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Sample records for denatured human alpha-lactalbumin

  1. Comparative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance study at 67. 9 MHz on lysozyme (human and egg-white) and. cap alpha. -lactalbumin (human and bovine) in their native and denatured state

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    van Binst, G; Biesemans, M [Brussels Univ. (Belgium). Faculte des Sciences

    1975-01-01

    A first detailed comparison of the /sup 13/C spectra at high field of two lysozymes (human and egg-white) and two ..cap alpha..-lactalbumins (human and bovine milk) is presented. Assignments were made on most of the resonance peaks in the aliphatic and aromatic regions of the denatured proteins. The relative peak intensities clearly demonstrate the differences in the amino acid composition of the related proteins. The broadening and the complexity of the spectra of the native proteins reflect the non equivalence of the chemical groups in the folded conformation. The usefulness of /sup 13/C nmr spectroscopy in the study of the interaction between small molecules and proteins was tested on N-acteyl-glucosamine in the presence of lysozyme.

  2. Alpha-lactalbumin unfolding is not sufficient to cause apoptosis, but is required for the conversion to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

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    Svensson, Malin; Fast, Jonas; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Düringer, Caroline; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brooks, Charles L; Berliner, Lawrence; Linse, Sara; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-12-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a complex of human alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid (C18:1:9 cis) that kills tumor cells by an apoptosis-like mechanism. Previous studies have shown that a conformational change is required to form HAMLET from alpha-lactalbumin, and that a partially unfolded conformation is maintained in the HAMLET complex. This study examined if unfolding of alpha-lactalbumin is sufficient to induce cell death. We used the bovine alpha-lactalbumin Ca(2+) site mutant D87A, which is unable to bind Ca(2+), and thus remains partially unfolded regardless of solvent conditions. The D87A mutant protein was found to be inactive in the apoptosis assay, but could readily be converted to a HAMLET-like complex in the presence of oleic acid. BAMLET (bovine alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) and D87A-BAMLET complexes were both able to kill tumor cells. This activity was independent of the Ca(2+)site, as HAMLET maintained a high affinity for Ca(2+) but D87A-BAMLET was active with no Ca(2+) bound. We conclude that partial unfolding of alpha-lactalbumin is necessary but not sufficient to trigger cell death, and that the activity of HAMLET is defined both by the protein and the lipid cofactor. Furthermore, a functional Ca(2+)-binding site is not required for conversion of alpha-lactalbumin to the active complex or to cause cell death. This suggests that the lipid cofactor stabilizes the altered fold without interfering with the Ca(2+)site.

  3. Conformational analysis of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin associated with apoptosis.

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    Casbarra, Annarita; Birolo, Leila; Infusini, Giuseppe; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Svensson, Malin; Pucci, Piero; Svanborg, Catharina; Marino, Gennaro

    2004-05-01

    A combination of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange and limited proteolysis experiments coupled to mass spectrometry analysis was used to depict the conformation in solution of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin, complexed to oleic acid, that induces apoptosis in tumor and immature cells. Although near- and far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopy were not able to discriminate between HAMLET and apo-alpha-lactalbumin, H/D exchange experiments clearly showed that they correspond to two distinct conformational states, with HAMLET incorporating a greater number of deuterium atoms than the apo and holo forms. Complementary proteolysis experiments revealed that HAMLET and apo are both accessible to proteases in the beta-domain but showed substantial differences in accessibility to proteases at specific sites. The overall results indicated that the conformational changes associated with the release of Ca2+ are not sufficient to induce the HAMLET conformation. Metal depletion might represent the first event to produce a partial unfolding in the beta-domain of alpha-lactalbumin, but some more unfolding is needed to generate the active conformation HAMLET, very likely allowing the protein to bind the C18:1 fatty acid moiety. On the basis of these data, a putative binding site of the oleic acid, which stabilizes the HAMLET conformation, is proposed.

  4. Stability of HAMLET--a kinetically trapped alpha-lactalbumin oleic acid complex.

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    Fast, Jonas; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina; Linse, Sara

    2005-02-01

    The stability toward thermal and urea denaturation was measured for HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) and alpha-lactalbumin, using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as differential scanning calorimetry. Under all conditions examined, HAMLET appears to have the same or lower stability than alpha-lactalbumin. The largest difference is seen for thermal denaturation of the calcium free (apo) forms, where the temperature at the transition midpoint is 15 degrees C lower for apo HAMLET than for apo alpha-lactalbumin. The difference becomes progressively smaller as the calcium concentration increases. Denaturation of HAMLET was found to be irreversible. Samples of HAMLET that have been renatured after denaturation have lost the specific biological activity toward tumor cells. Three lines of evidence indicate that HAMLET is a kinetic trap: (1) It has lower stability than alpha-lactalbumin, although it is a complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid; (2) its denaturation is irreversible and HAMLET is lost after denaturation; (3) formation of HAMLET requires a specific conversion protocol.

  5. Weak and saturable protein-surfactant interactions in the denaturation of apo-alpha-lactalbumin by acidic and lactonic sophorolipid

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    Kell K Andersen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However knowledge of such interactions is limited. Here we present a study of the interactions between the model protein apo-alpha-lactalbumin and the biosurfactant sophorolipid (SL produced by the yeast Starmerella bombicola. SL occurs both as an acidic and a lactonic form; the lactonic form (lactSL is sparingly soluble and has a lower critical micelle concentration than the acidic form (acidSL. We show that acidSL affects apo-aLA in a similar way to the related glycolipid biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL, with the important difference that RL is also active below the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0-1 mM SL, it is only possible to observe interactions with monomeric acidSL at high apo-aLA concentrations. However, the denaturation kinetics of apo-aLA in the presence of acidSL are consistent with a collaboration between monomeric and micellar surfactant species, similar to RL and nonionic or zwitterionic surfactants. Inclusion of lactSL as mixed micelles with acidSL lowers the cmc and this effectively reduces the rate of unfolding, emphasizing that SL like other biosurfactants is a gentle anionic surfactant. Our data highlight the potential of these biosurfactants for future use in the detergent industry.

  6. Who is Mr. HAMLET? Interaction of human alpha-lactalbumin with monomeric oleic acid.

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    Knyazeva, Ekaterina L; Grishchenko, Valery M; Fadeev, Roman S; Akatov, Vladimir S; Permyakov, Sergei E; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2008-12-09

    A specific state of the human milk Ca(2+) binding protein alpha-lactalbumin (hLA) complexed with oleic acid (OA) prepared using an OA-pretreated ion-exchange column (HAMLET) triggers several cell death pathways in various tumor cells. The possibility of preparing a hLA-OA complex with structural and cytotoxic properties similar to those of the HAMLET but under solution conditions has been explored. The complex was formed by titration of hLA by OA at pH 8.3 up to OA critical micelle concentration. We have shown that complex formation strongly depends on calcium, ionic strength, and temperature; the optimal conditions were established. The spectrofluorimetrically estimated number of OA molecules irreversibly bound per hLA molecule (after dialysis of the OA-loaded preparation against water followed by lyophilization) depends upon temperature: 2.9 at 17 degrees C (native apo-hLA; resulting complex referred to as LA-OA-17 state) and 9 at 45 degrees C (thermally unfolded apo-hLA; LA-OA-45). Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence measurements revealed substantially decreased thermal stability of Ca(2+)-free forms of HAMLET, LA-OA-45, and OA-saturated protein. The irreversibly bound OA does not affect the Ca(2+) association constant of the protein. Phase plot analysis of fluorimetric and CD data indicates that the OA binding process involves several hLA intermediates. The effective pseudoequilibrium OA association constants for Ca(2+)-free hLA were estimated. The far-UV CD spectra of Ca(2+)-free hLA show that all OA-bound forms of the protein are characterized by elevated content of alpha-helical structure. The various hLA-OA complexes possess similar cytotoxic activities against human epidermoid larynx carcinoma cells. Overall, the LA-OA-45 complex possesses physicochemical, structural, and cytotoxic properties closely resembling those of HAMLET. The fact that the HAMLET-like complex can be formed in aqueous solution makes the process of its preparation more transparent and

  7. Bladder cancers respond to intravesical instillation of HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

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    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Gustafsson, Lotta; Månsson, Wiking; Ljunggren, Eva; Svanborg, Catharina

    2007-09-15

    We studied if bladder cancers respond to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) to establish if intravesical HAMLET application might be used to selectively remove cancer cells in vivo. Patients with nonmuscle invasive transitional cell carcinomas were included. Nine patients received 5 daily intravesical instillations of HAMLET (25 mg/ml) during the week before scheduled surgery. HAMLET stimulated a rapid increase in the shedding of tumor cells into the urine, daily, during the 5 days of instillation. The effect was specific for HAMLET, as intravesical instillation of NaCl, PBS or native alpha-lactalbumin did not increase cell shedding. Most of the shed cells were dead and an apoptotic response was detected in 6 of 9 patients, using the TUNEL assay. At surgery, morphological changes in the exophytic tumors were documented by endoscopic photography and a reduction in tumor size or change in tumor character was detected in 8 of 9 patients. TUNEL staining was positive in biopsies from the remaining tumor in 4 patients but adjacent healthy tissue showed no evidence of apoptosis and no toxic response. The results suggest that HAMLET exerts a direct and selective effect on bladder cancer tissue in vivo and that local HAMLET administration might be of value in the future treatment of bladder cancers. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

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    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  9. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

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    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  10. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

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    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  11. alpha-Lactalbumin species variation, HAMLET formation, and tumor cell death.

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    Pettersson, Jenny; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2006-06-23

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a tumoricidal complex of apo alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, formed in casein after low pH treatment of human milk. This study examined if HAMLET-like complexes are present in casein from different species and if isolated alpha-lactalbumin from those species can form such complexes with oleic acid. Casein from human, bovine, equine, and porcine milk was separated by ion exchange chromatography and active complexes were only found in human casein. This was not explained by alpha-lactalbumin sequence variation, as purified bovine, equine, porcine, and caprine alpha-lactalbumins formed complexes with oleic acid with biological activity similar to HAMLET. We conclude that structural variation of alpha-lactalbumins does not preclude the formation of HAMLET-like complexes and that natural HAMLET formation in casein was unique to human milk, which also showed the highest oleic acid content.

  12. Structural basis for the appearance of a molten globule state in chimeric molecules derived from lysozyme and alpha-lactalbumin.

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    Joniau, M; Haezebrouck, P; Noyelle, K; Van Dael, H

    2001-07-01

    The problem as to why alpha-lactalbumin, in the absence of Ca(2+), forms a molten globule intermediate, in contrast to its structural homologue lysozyme, has been addressed by the construction of chimeras of human lysozyme in which either the Ca(2+)-binding loop or a part of helix C of bovine alpha-lactalbumin were transplanted. Previously, we have shown that the introduction of both structural elements together in the lysozyme matrix causes the apo form of the resulting chimera to display molten globule behavior during the course of thermal denaturation. In this article, we demonstrate that this molten globule character is not correlated with the Ca(2+)-binding loop. Also, the Del 101 mutant in which Arg101 was deleted to simulate the alpha-lactalbumin conformation of the connecting loop between helix C and helix D, does not show a stable equilibrium intermediate. Rather, the molten globule character of the chimeras has to be related with a specific part of helix C. More particularly, attention is drawn to the four hydrophobic side-chains I93, V96, I99, and L100, the lysozyme counterparts of which are constituted of less bulky valines and alanine. Our observations are discussed in terms of decreased stability of the native form and increased stability of the intermediate molten globule. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Application of a monoclonal antibody to a comparative study of alpha-lactalbumins from various species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminogawa, S.; Shimoda, M.; Kurisaki, J.; Yamauchi, K.

    1989-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to bovine alpha-lactalbumin was prepared and purified. The binding ability of alpha-lactalbumin from different species (cow, goat, giraffe, horse, pig, human, monkey, and guinea pig) was examined by a competitive radioimmunoassay. The order in strength of the binding affinity was cow goat, giraffe, horse, cynomolgus monkey and human, pig, and guinea pig. The order of evolutional divergence calculated from the amino acid composition was cow, goat, giraffe, horse, pig, guinea pig and human, and monkey. The orders in both cases were similar. Hence, it is suggested that immunological divergence as deduced by a monoclonal antibody is likely to be close to the evolutional divergence of alpha-lactalbumin

  14. Identification and the primary structure of equine alpha-lactalbumin B and C (Equus caballus, Perissodactyla).

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    Godovac-Zimmermann, J; Shaw, D; Conti, A; McKenzie, H

    1987-04-01

    The presence of two new alpha-lactalbumins has been demonstrated in the colostrum of a single mare (Equus caballus, Persian Arab). They have been designated equine alpha-lactalbumin B and C, and that isolated previously from the milk of Australian horses (English Thoroughbred) as alpha-lactalbumin A. The primary structures of B/C have been determined by automatic Edman degradation of enzymatic cleavage of the oxidized protein. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of S-carbamoyl-methylated protein provided necessary overlapping peptides. Comparison of the sequences of B and C with that of A indicates 3 and 4 amino-acid exchanges, respectively. The phylogenetic difference of equine alpha-lactalbumin B/C from bovine alpha-lactalbumin B is indicated by 39 and 40 amino-acid exchanges, respectively. The structure-function relationship, calcium binding sites and variants of alpha-lactalbumin are discussed.

  15. Bovine alpha-lactalbumin stimulates mucus metabolism in gastric mucosa.

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    Ushida, Y; Shimokawa, Y; Toida, T; Matsui, H; Takase, M

    2007-02-01

    Bovine alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), a major milk protein, exerts strong gastroprotective activity against rat experimental gastric ulcers induced by ethanol or stress. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this activity, the influence of alpha-LA on gastric mucus metabolism was investigated in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro study, RGM1 cells (a rat gastric epithelial cell line) were selected for observation of the direct activity of alpha-LA on gastric mucosal cells and cultured in the presence of either alpha-LA or ovalbumin (OVA), a reference protein showing no gastroprotective activity. Amounts of synthesized and secreted mucin, a major component of mucus, were determined using [3H]glucosamine as a tracer, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in the culture medium were determined by RIA. For the in vivo study, the thickness of the mucus gel layer, a protective barrier for gastric mucosa, was evaluated histochemically in rat gastric mucosa. alpha-Lactalbumin (3 mg/mL) significantly stimulated mucin synthesis and secretion in RGM1 cells and also increased PGE2 levels in the culture medium. In contrast, OVA showed no enhancing effects under identical conditions. Neither indomethacin, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, nor AH23848, a prostaglandin EP4 receptor antagonist, affected alpha-LA-induced enhancement of mucin synthesis and secretion. In vivo, oral administration of alpha-LA (300 mg/kg x 3 times/d x 7 d) increased the thickness of the mucus gel layer in rats. These results indicate that alpha-LA fortifies the mucus gel layer by stimulating mucin production and secretion in gastric mucus-producing cells, and that this enhancing effect is independent of endogenous PGE2. Comparison of the efficacy of alpha-LA with OVA suggests that the activities observed in RGM1 cells are closely related to the gastroprotective effects in rat gastric ulcer models. In conclusion, alpha-LA stimulates mucus metabolism, and this action may be responsible for its gastroprotective

  16. Alpha-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide do not affect iron absorption from formula in healthy term infants

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    Iron absorption from infant formula is relatively low. Alpha-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide have been suggested to enhance mineral absorption. We therefore assessed the effect of alpha-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide on iron absorption from infant formula in healthy term infants. ...

  17. Kinetics of the homogeneous exchange of alpha-lactalbumin adsorbed on titanium oxide surface.

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    Bentaleb, A; Haïkel, Y; Voegel, J C; Schaaf, P

    1998-06-05

    The homogeneous exchange process whereby alpha-lactalbumine molecules adsorbed on hydrophilic titanium oxide particles are replaced by alpha-lactalbumine molecules in solution has been investigated by means of a 125I radio-labeling technique, alpha-lactalbumine is a compact and highly negatively charged protein, making this study complementary to previous work devoted to the general understanding of the exchange mechanisms of adsorbed proteins on solid surfaces. The isotherm of alpha-lactalbumine exhibits bimodal adsorption shape, and the exchange process whereby adsorbed proteins are replaced by new incoming ones from the bulk solution has been studied at both the upper and the lower plateau of the isotherm. In the upper plateau the exchange process was found to be of first order with respect to the bulk molecules, and the release rate constant was equal to 0.914 L. mol-1.s-1. This behavior is identical to what has been observed with other proteinic systems. In the lower plateau domain, in contrast, the protein release process is independent of the concentration of proteins in the bulk, but the release rates are higher than the pure desorption rates. This constitutes, to our knowledge, a behavior that never before has been observed and that remains to be explained.

  18. No need to be HAMLET or BAMLET to interact with histones: binding of monomeric alpha-lactalbumin to histones and basic poly-amino acids.

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    Permyakov, Serge E; Pershikova, Irina V; Khokhlova, Tatyana I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2004-05-18

    The ability of a specific complex of human alpha-lactalbumin with oleic acid (HAMLET) to induce cell death with selectivity for tumor and undifferentiated cells was shown recently to be mediated by interaction of HAMLET with histone proteins irreversibly disrupting chromatin structure [Duringer, C., et al. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 42131-42135]. Here we show that monomeric alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) in the absence of fatty acids is also able to bind efficiently to the primary target of HAMLET, histone HIII, regardless of Ca(2+) content. Thus, the modification of alpha-LA by oleic acid is not required for binding to histones. We suggest that interaction of negatively charged alpha-LA with the basic histone stabilizes apo-alpha-LA and destabilizes the Ca(2+)-bound protein due to compensation for excess negative charge of alpha-LA's Ca(2+)-binding loop by positively charged residues of the histone. Spectrofluorimetric curves of titration of alpha-LA by histone H3 were well approximated by a scheme of cooperative binding of four alpha-LA molecules per molecule of histone, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 1.0 microM. Such a stoichiometry of binding implies that the binding process is not site-specific with respect to histone and likely is driven by just electrostatic interactions. Co-incubation of positively charged poly-amino acids (poly-Lys and poly-Arg) with alpha-LA resulted in effects which were similar to those caused by histone HIII, confirming the electrostatic nature of the alpha-LA-histone interaction. In all cases that were studied, the binding was accompanied by aggregation. The data indicate that alpha-lactalbumin can be used as a basis for the design of antitumor agents, acting through disorganization of chromatin structure due to interaction between alpha-LA and histone proteins.

  19. Towards control of aggregational behaviour of alpha-lactalbumin at acidic pH.

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    Pedersen, Jane B; Fojan, Peter; Sorensen, John; Petersen, Steffen B

    2006-07-01

    alpha-Lactalbumin (alpha-La) undergoes considerable structural changes upon loss of bound Ca2+ at acidic pH, leaving alpha-La in a molten globule structure. Using fluorescence the present work provides more insight into the structural transition of alpha-La at acidic pH leading to protein aggregation, most likely caused by a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The rate of aggregation is determined by the protein concentration and temperature applied. Availability of Ca2+ stabilises the protein, and thus prevent aggregation at pH values as low as pH 2.9. In contrast, presence of Cu2+ induces a destabilisation of the protein, which can be explained by a binding to the Zn2+ binding site in alpha-La, possibly resulting in structural alterations of the protein. In general, presence of anions destabilize alpha-La at pH values below pI, with SO4(2-) exhibiting the strongest effect on the protein stability, thus correlating well with the Hofmeister series. At more acidic pH values far from pI, alpha-La becomes more stable towards ion induced aggregation, since higher ion activity is required to efficiently screen the charges on the protein surface. The results presented in this paper provide detailed knowledge on the external parameters leading to aggregation of alpha-La at acidic pH, thus permitting rational design of the aggregation process.

  20. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide to produce enriched alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin food ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A potentially economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (a-LA) and beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) from whey protein isolate. To prepare the fractions, so...

  1. Implications of the Maillard reaction on bovine alpha-lactalbumin and its proteolysis during in vitro infant digestion.

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    Joubran, Yousef; Moscovici, Alice; Portmann, Reto; Lesmes, Uri

    2017-06-21

    This study investigated the functionality and digestibility of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) of alpha-lactalbumin (α-la), a major whey protein and component of infant formulas. The impact of different carbohydrates (glucose, galactose or galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS)) and heating duration was studied. SDS-PAGE, UV and color measurements monitored reaction extent, which varied between carbohydrates whereby galactose reacted more readily than glucose. Surface hydrophobicity and antioxidant capacity were found to be significantly (p Maillard conjugation, with GOS-based MRPs elevating antioxidant capacity ∼50-fold compared to α-la. In addition, the digestive proteolysis of MRPs was evaluated using an infant in vitro gastro-duodenal model. SDS-PAGE analyses of digesta revealed Maillard conjugation generally increased α-la's susceptibility to proteolysis. Interestingly, GOS-based MRPs presented an optimization challenge, since heating for 12 h delayed proteolysis, while extended heating resulted in the highest susceptibility to proteolysis. Proteomic analyses further demonstrated the differences in enzymatic cleavage patterns and helped identify bioactive peptides rendered bioaccessible during the digestion of α-la or its MRPs. Bioinformatic mining of the proteomic data using PeptideRanker also gave rise to two potentially novel bioactive peptides, FQINNKIW and GINYWLAHKALCS. Finally, antioxidant capacity of luminal contents, measured by DPPH, revealed Maillard conjugation increased the antioxidant capacity of both gastric and duodenal digesta. Overall, this work draws a link between the Maillard reaction, digestive proteolysis and the bioaccessibility of bioactive peptides and antioxidant species in the infant alimentary canal. This could help rationally process infant formulas towards improved nutritional and extra-nutritional benefits.

  2. Characterization of casein and alpha lactalbumin of African elephant (Loxodonta africana) milk.

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    Madende, M; Osthoff, G; Patterton, H-G; Patterton, H E; Martin, P; Opperman, D J

    2015-12-01

    The current research reports partial characterization of the caseins and α-lactalbumin (α-LA) of the African elephant with proposed unique structure-function properties. Extensive research has been carried out to understand the structure of the casein micelles. Crystallographic structure elucidation of caseins and casein micelles is not possible. Consequently, several models have been developed in an effort to describe the casein micelle, specifically of cow milk. Here we report the characterization of African elephant milk caseins. The κ-caseins and β-caseins were investigated, and their relative ratio was found to be approximately 1:8.5, whereas α-caseins were not detected. The gene sequence of β-casein in the NCBI database was revisited, and a different sequence in the N-terminal region is proposed. Amino acid sequence alignment and hydropathy plots showed that the κ-casein of African elephant milk is similar to that of other mammals, whereas the β-casein is similar to the human protein, and displayed a section of unique AA composition and additional hydrophilic regions compared with bovine caseins. Elephant milk is destabilized by 62% alcohol, and it is speculated that the β-casein characteristics may allow maintenance of the colloidal nature of the casein micelle, a role that was previously only associated with κ-casein. The oligosaccharide content of milk was reported to be low in dairy animals but high in some other species such as humans and elephants. In the milk of the African elephant, lactose and oligosaccharides both occur at high levels. These levels are typically related to the content of α-LA in the mammary gland and thus point to a specialized carbohydrate synthesis, where the whey protein α-LA plays a role. We report the characterization of African elephant α-LA. Homology modeling of the α-LA showed that it is structurally similar to crystal structures of other mammalian species, which in turn may be an indication that its functional

  3. Expression of Recombinant Human Alpha-Lactalbumin in the Milk of Transgenic Goats Using a Hybrid Pomoter/Enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve nutrient content of goat milk, we describe the construction of a vector (pBLAC containing a hybrid goat β-lactoglobulin (BLG promoter/cytomegalovirus (CMV enhancer. We also describe the generation of transgenic goats expressing rhLA by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. Of 334 one-cell stage embryos derived from three transgenic cell lines and 99 embryos derived from non-transgenic (NT cells surgically transferred to the oviducts of 37 recipients, two recipients delivered two kids (2% from the non-transfected line and five recipients delivered six kids (1.8% from transgenic cell lines, three of which died within 2 days. Compared to the NT donor cells, transfection of donor cells does not negatively affect the development of nuclear transfer embryos into viable transgenic offspring. However, the clone efficiency in cell line number 1 was lower than that in numbers 2 and 3, and in the NT lines (0.9% versus 1.9% 2.4% and 2%; P<0.05. Two transgenic cloned goats expressed rhLA in the milk at 0.1–0.9 mg/mL. The mammary gland-specific expression vector pBLAC with hybrid BLG/CMV can drive the hLA gene to express in vitro and in vivo. These data establish the basis for use of a hybrid promoter/enhancer strategy to produce rhLA transgenic goats.

  4. Detection of human DNA polymorphisms with a simplified denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noll, W.W.; Collins, M.

    1987-01-01

    Single base pair differences between otherwise identical DNA molecules can result in altered melting behavior detectable by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The authors have developed a simplified procedure for using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect base pair changes in genomic DNA. Genomic DNA is digested with restriction enzymes and hybridized in solution to labeled single-stranded probe DNA. The excess probe is then hybridized to complementary phage M13 template DNA, and the reaction mixture is electrophoresed on a denaturing gradient gel. Only the genomic DNA probe hybrids migrate into the gel. Differences in hybrid mobility on the gel indicate base pair changes in the genomic DNA. They have used this technique to identify two polymorphic sites within a 1.2-kilobase region of human chromosome 20. This approach should greatly facilitate the identification of DNA polymorphisms useful for gene linkage studies and the diagnosis of genetic diseases

  5. Use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect Actinobacteria associated with the human faecal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyles, Lesley; Clear, Jessica A; McCartney, Anne L

    2013-08-01

    With the exceptions of the bifidobacteria, propionibacteria and coriobacteria, the Actinobacteria associated with the human gastrointestinal tract have received little attention. This has been due to the seeming absence of these bacteria from most clone libraries. In addition, many of these bacteria have fastidious growth and atmospheric requirements. A recent cultivation-based study has shown that the Actinobacteria of the human gut may be more diverse than previously thought. The aim of this study was to develop a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approach for characterizing Actinobacteria present in faecal samples. Amount of DNA added to the Actinobacteria-specific PCR used to generate strong PCR products of equal intensity from faecal samples of five infants, nine adults and eight elderly adults was anti-correlated with counts of bacteria obtained using fluorescence in situ hybridization probe HGC69A. A nested PCR using Actinobacteria-specific and universal PCR-DGGE primers was used to generate profiles for the Actinobacteria. Cloning of sequences from the DGGE bands confirmed the specificity of the Actinobacteria-specific primers. In addition to members of the genus Bifidobacterium, species belonging to the genera Propionibacterium, Microbacterium, Brevibacterium, Actinomyces and Corynebacterium were found to be part of the faecal microbiota of healthy humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of human DNA polymorphisms with a simplified denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Noll, W W; Collins, M

    1987-01-01

    Single base pair differences between otherwise identical DNA molecules can result in altered melting behavior detectable by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. We have developed a simplified procedure for using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect base pair changes in genomic DNA. Genomic DNA is digested with restriction enzymes and hybridized in solution to labeled single-stranded probe DNA. The excess probe is then hybridized to complementary phage M13 template DNA, and th...

  7. Potential use of gradient denaturing gel electrophoresis in obtaining mutational spectra from human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described to isolate mutations in DNA in human cells. When a double-stranded DNA migrates through an electric field on an electrophoretic gel, it is compact hydrodynamic structure relative to the same material in a melted form. Normally the solution in electrophoretic gels is uniform, but a way has been devised to set up a stable gradient of increasing solute concentration in the direction of DNA motion. Thus, as a double-stranded DNA molecule is drawn by the electric field into higher and higher concentrations of urea/formamide, it will eventually reach a point at which the concentration is high enough to melt the lower-melting-point region. The melting results in an essentially immobile structure within the gel so that the position at which the DNA molecule stops on the gradient gel is determined by its melting point, which is uniquely determined by its nucleotide sequence. A single base pair substitution within a low melting point sequence of some 100 base pairs changed the expected melting point by 0.4 0 C and resulted in about a 2-cm displacement under appropriate denaturing gel conditions. This expectation leads to the idea that if a mixture of DNA sequences derived from point mutations within the same restriction fragment were permitted to anneal with a complementary wild-type sequence, the melting point of each type of heteroduplex would differ depending on the kind and position of each mutation

  8. Sequential Events in the Irreversible Thermal Denaturation of Human Brain-Type Creatine Kinase by Spectroscopic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Song Gao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The non-cooperative or sequential events which occur during protein thermal denaturation are closely correlated with protein folding, stability, and physiological functions. In this research, the sequential events of human brain-type creatine kinase (hBBCK thermal denaturation were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, CD, and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. DSC experiments revealed that the thermal denaturation of hBBCK was calorimetrically irreversible. The existence of several endothermic peaks suggested that the denaturation involved stepwise conformational changes, which were further verified by the discrepancy in the transition curves obtained from various spectroscopic probes. During heating, the disruption of the active site structure occurred prior to the secondary and tertiary structural changes. The thermal unfolding and aggregation of hBBCK was found to occur through sequential events. This is quite different from that of muscle-type CK (MMCK. The results herein suggest that BBCK and MMCK undergo quite dissimilar thermal unfolding pathways, although they are highly conserved in the primary and tertiary structures. A minor difference in structure might endow the isoenzymes dissimilar local stabilities in structure, which further contribute to isoenzyme-specific thermal stabilities.

  9. Raman spectral markers of collagen denaturation and hydration in human cortical bone tissue are affected by radiation sterilization and high cycle fatigue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Christopher D; Unal, Mustafa; Akkus, Ozan; Rimnac, Clare M

    2017-11-01

    Thermal denaturation and monotonic mechanical damage alter the organic and water-related compartments of cortical bone. These changes can be detected using Raman spectroscopy. However, less is known regarding Raman sensitivity to detect the effects of cyclic fatigue damage and allograft sterilization doses of gamma radiation. To determine if Raman spectroscopic biomarkers of collagen denaturation and hydration are sensitive to the effects of (a) high cycle fatigue damage and (b) 25kGy irradiation. Unirradiated and gamma-radiation sterilized human cortical bone specimens previously tested in vitro under high-cycle (> 100,000 cycles) fatigue conditions at 15MPa, 25MPa, 35MPa, 45MPa, and 55MPa cyclic stress levels were studied. Cortical bone Raman spectral profiles from wavenumber ranges of 800-1750cm -1 and 2700-3800cm -1 were obtained and compared from: a) non-fatigue vs fatigue fracture sites and b) radiated vs. unirradiated states. Raman biomarker ratios 1670/1640 and 3220/2949, which reflect collagen denaturation and organic matrix (mainly collagen)-bound water, respectively, were assessed. One- and two-way ANOVA analyses were utilized to identify differences between groups along with interaction effects between cyclic fatigue and radiation-induced damage. Cyclic fatigue damage resulted in increases in collagen denaturation (1670/1640: 1.517 ± 0.043 vs 1.579 ± 0.021, p Raman spectroscopy can detect the effects of cyclic fatigue damage and 25kGy irradiation via increases in organic matrix (mainly collagen)-bound water. A Raman measure of collagen denaturation was sensitive to cyclic fatigue damage but not 25kGy irradiation. Collagen denaturation was correlated with organic matrix-bound water, suggesting that denaturation of collagen to gelatinous form may expose more binding sites to water by unwinding the triple alpha chains. This research may eventually be useful to help identify allograft quality and more appropriately match donors to recipients. Copyright

  10. Monomorphism in humans and sequence differences among higher primates for a sequence tagged site (STS) in homeo box cluster 2 as assayed by denaturing gradient electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano, G.; Ruddle, F.H.; Kidd, K.K. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)); Gray, M.R. (Tufts Univ., Boston, MA (United States)); Miki, Tetsuro (Osaka Univ. (Japan)); Ferguson-Smith, A.C. (Inst. of Animal Physiology and Genetics Research, Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1990-03-11

    The human homeo box cluster 2 (HOX2) contains genes coding for DNA binding proteins involved in developmental control and is highly conserved between mouse and man. The authors have applied in concert the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Denaturing Gradient Electrophoresis (DGE) to amplify defined primate HOX2 segments and to detect sequence differences among them. They have sequenced a PstI fragment 4 kb upstream from HOX 2.2 and synthesized primers delimiting both halves of 630 bp segment within it PCR on various unrelated humans and SC-PCR on chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan and gibbon yielded products of the same length for each primer pair.

  11. Guanidine hydrochloride denaturation of human serum albumin originates by local unfolding of some stable loops in domain III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Basir; Ahmed, Md Zulfazal; Haq, Soghra Khatun; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2005-06-15

    The effect of guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) on the global stability of human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements. The differential stability of native conformation of three HSA domains were explored by using domain-specific ligands, hemin (domain I), chloroform (domain II), bilirubin (at domain I/domain II interface) and diazepam (domain III). GnHCl induced unfolding transition curves as monitored by probes for secondary and tertiary structures were cooperative but noncoincidental. A strong ANS binding to the protein was observed around 1.8 M GnHCl, suggesting existence of intermediate states in the unfolding pathway of HSA. A gradual decrease (in the GnHCl concentration range 0.0-1.8 M) in the binding of diazepam indicates that domain III is the most labile to GnHCl denaturation. A significant increase in the binding of bilirubin up to 1.4 M GnHCl and decrease thereafter leading to complete abolishment of bilirubin binding at around 2.0 M GnHCl suggest favorable rearrangement and separation of domains I and II at 1.4 and 2.0 M GnHCl concentration, respectively. Above 1.6 M GnHCl, decrease of the binding of hemin, a ligand for domain I, chloroform, which binds in domain II and lone tryptophanyl fluorescence (Trp-214 located in domain II) indicate that at higher concentration of GnHCl domains I and II start unfolding simultaneously but the stability of domain I (7.4 Kcal/mol) is much more than domain II (4.3 Kcal/mol). A pictorial model for the unfolding of HSA domains, consistent with all these results, has been formulated, suggesting that domain III is the most labile followed by domain II while domain I is the most stable. A molten globule like state of domain III around 1.8 M GnHCl has also been identified and characterized.

  12. Denatured fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    This paper traces the history of the denatured fuel concept and discusses the characteristics of fuel cycles based on the concept. The proliferation resistance of denatured fuel cycles, the reactor types they involve, and the limitations they place on energy generation potential are discussed. The paper concludes with some remarks on the outlook for such cycles

  13. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherginskaya, S.A.; Cann, I.K.O.; Mackie, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    It is worthwhile considering that only some 30 species make up the bulk of the bacterial population in human faeces at any one time based on the classical cultivation-based approach. The situation in the rumen is similar. Thus, it is practical to focus on specific groups of interest within the complex community. These may be the predominant or the most active species, specific physiological groups or readily identifiable (genetic) clusters of phylogenetically related organisms. Several 16S rDNA fingerprinting techniques can be invaluable for selecting and monitoring sequences or phylogenetic groups of interest and are described below. Over the past few decades, considerable attention was focussed on the identification of pure cultures of microbes on the basis of genetic polymorphisms of DNA encoding rRNA such as ribotyping, amplified fragment length polymorphism and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. However, many of these methods require prior cultivation and are less suitable for use in analysis of complex mixed populations although important in describing cultivated microbial diversity in molecular terms. Much less attention was given to molecular characterization of complex communities. In particular, research into diversity and community structure over time has been revolutionized by the advent of molecular fingerprinting techniques for complex communities. Denaturing or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE/TGGE) methods have been successfully applied to the analysis of human, pig, cattle, dog and rodent intestinal populations

  14. 9 CFR 325.13 - Denaturing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the appropriate agent shall be used to give the material a distinctive color, odor, or taste so that... thoroughly mixing therein denaturing oil, No. 2 fuel oil, brucine dissolved in a mixture of alcohol and pine... distinctive a color, odor, or taste that it cannot be confused with an article of human food. [35 FR 15605...

  15. EXAFS analysis of a human Cu,Zn SOD isoform focused using non-denaturing gel electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevreux, Sylviane; Roudeau, Stephane; Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard [Laboratoire de Chimie Nucleaire Analytique et Bioenvironnementale, CNRS UMR5084, Universite Bordeaux 1, Chemin du Solarium, F-33175 Gradignan cedex (France); Solari, Pier Lorenzo [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex, Saint-Aubin (France); Alliot, Isabelle; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean Louis, E-mail: ortega@cenbg.in2p3.f [FAME, ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble cedex (France)

    2009-11-15

    Isoelectric point isoforms of a metalloprotein, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), separated on electrophoresis gels were analyzed using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Mutations of this protein are involved in familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The toxicity of mutants could be relied to defects in the metallation state. Our purpose is to establish analytical protocols to study metallation state of protein isoforms such as those from CuZnSOD. We previously highlighted differences in the copper oxidation state between CuZnSOD isoforms using XANES. Here, we present the first results for EXAFS analyses performed at Cu and Zn K-edge on the majoritary expressed isoform of human CuZnSOD separated on electrophoresis gels.

  16. EXAFS analysis of a human Cu,Zn SOD isoform focused using non-denaturing gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevreux, Sylviane; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Roudeau, Stéphane; Deves, Guillaume; Alliot, Isabelle; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean Louis; Ortega, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Isoelectric point isoforms of a metalloprotein, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), separated on electrophoresis gels were analyzed using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Mutations of this protein are involved in familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The toxicity of mutants could be relied to defects in the metallation state. Our purpose is to establish analytical protocols to study metallation state of protein isoforms such as those from CuZnSOD. We previously highlighted differences in the copper oxidation state between CuZnSOD isoforms using XANES. Here, we present the first results for EXAFS analyses performed at Cu and Zn K-edge on the majoritary expressed isoform of human CuZnSOD separated on electrophoresis gels.

  17. EXAFS analysis of a human Cu,Zn SOD isoform focused using non-denaturing gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevreux, Sylviane; Roudeau, Stephane; Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Alliot, Isabelle; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean Louis

    2009-01-01

    Isoelectric point isoforms of a metalloprotein, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), separated on electrophoresis gels were analyzed using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Mutations of this protein are involved in familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The toxicity of mutants could be relied to defects in the metallation state. Our purpose is to establish analytical protocols to study metallation state of protein isoforms such as those from CuZnSOD. We previously highlighted differences in the copper oxidation state between CuZnSOD isoforms using XANES. Here, we present the first results for EXAFS analyses performed at Cu and Zn K-edge on the majoritary expressed isoform of human CuZnSOD separated on electrophoresis gels.

  18. 27 CFR 19.456 - Adding denaturants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... proprietor shall submit a flow diagram of the intended process or method of adding denaturants. (Sec. 201... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Denaturing Operations and Manufacture of Articles...

  19. Detection in a Japanese population of a length polymorphism in the 5' flanking region of the human β-globin gene with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Noria; Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko

    1992-10-01

    An analysis of the ATTTT repeat polymorphism located approximately 1,400 base pairs upstream from the β-globin structural gene was carried out by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of RNA:DNA duplexes. Genomic or cloned DNAs were digested with restriction enzymes and hybridized with 32 P-labeled RNA probes, and resulting RNA:DNA duplexes were examined by DGGE. A difference in the number of repeat units was recognized by differences in duplex mobility on the DGGE gel. In this study of 81 unrelated Japanese from Hiroshima, a sequence heteromorphism was observed at this site. Alleles with 5 and 6 repeats of the ATTTT unit, which had already been reported, were found in polymorphic proportions. In addition, two unreported alleles, one having 7 repeats and the other having an A-to-G nucleotide substitution in the 5th repeat, were detected. Family study data showed that the segregation of these four types of variants is consistent with an autosomal codominant mode of inheritance. This study also demonstrated that DGGE of RNA:DNA duplexes is a sensitive tool for detecting variations in DNA. (author)

  20. Single DNA denaturation and bubble dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, Ralf; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Hanke, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    While the Watson-Crick double-strand is the thermodynamically stable state of DNA in a wide range of temperature and salt conditions, even at physiological conditions local denaturation bubbles may open up spontaneously due to thermal activation. By raising the ambient temperature, titration......, or by external forces in single molecule setups bubbles proliferate until full denaturation of the DNA occurs. Based on the Poland-Scheraga model we investigate both the equilibrium transition of DNA denaturation and the dynamics of the denaturation bubbles with respect to recent single DNA chain experiments...... for situations below, at, and above the denaturation transition. We also propose a new single molecule setup based on DNA constructs with two bubble zones to measure the bubble coalescence and extract the physical parameters relevant to DNA breathing. Finally we consider the interplay between denaturation...

  1. Single DNA denaturation and bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, Ralf; Ambjoernsson, Tobias; Hanke, Andreas; Fogedby, Hans C

    2009-01-01

    While the Watson-Crick double-strand is the thermodynamically stable state of DNA in a wide range of temperature and salt conditions, even at physiological conditions local denaturation bubbles may open up spontaneously due to thermal activation. By raising the ambient temperature, titration, or by external forces in single molecule setups bubbles proliferate until full denaturation of the DNA occurs. Based on the Poland-Scheraga model we investigate both the equilibrium transition of DNA denaturation and the dynamics of the denaturation bubbles with respect to recent single DNA chain experiments for situations below, at, and above the denaturation transition. We also propose a new single molecule setup based on DNA constructs with two bubble zones to measure the bubble coalescence and extract the physical parameters relevant to DNA breathing. Finally we consider the interplay between denaturation bubbles and selectively single-stranded DNA binding proteins.

  2. Preparation of denatured protein bone sterilized with gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna Z, D.

    2005-01-01

    The bone is one of the tissues more transplanted in the entire world by that the bone necessity for transplant every day becomes bigger. In the Bank of tissues Radio sterilized of the ININ the amnion and the pig skin are routinely processed. The tissue with which will be continued is with bone. Due to that in our country it doesn't have enough bone of human origin for the necessities required in the bone transplant, an option is the bone of bovine. Of this bone one can obtain denatured protein bone, with the same characteristics of the denatured protein human bone, the one which has been proven that it has good acceptance and incorporation in the human body when is transplanted. The method for the obtaining of the denatured protein bone of bovine, with the confirmation of the final product by means of X-ray diffraction is described. The radiosterilization of this bone with gamma rays and the determination of the lead content. (Author)

  3. Discrimination of three mutational events that result in a disruption of the R122 primary autolysis site of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Férec Claude

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background R122, the primary autolysis site of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1, constitutes an important "self-destruct" or "fail-safe" defensive mechanism against premature trypsin activation within the pancreas. Disruption of this site by a missense mutation, R122H, was found to cause hereditary pancreatitis. In addition to a c.365G>A (CGC>CAC single nucleotide substitution, a c.365~366GC>AT (CGC>CAT gene conversion event in exon 3 of PRSS1 was also found to result in a R122H mutation. This imposes a serious concern on the genotyping of pancreatitis by a widely used polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay, which could only detect the commonest c.365G>A variant. Materials and methods DNA samples containing either the known c.365G>A or c.365~366GC>AT variant in exon 3 of PRSS1 were used as positive controls to establish a denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC assay. Results DHPLC could readily discriminate the two known different mutational events resulting in the R122H mutation. More importantly, under the same experimental conditions, it identified a further mutational event that also occurs in the R122 primary autolysis site but results in a different amino acid substitution: c.364C>T (CGC>TGC; R122C. Conclusions A rapid, simple, and low-cost assay for detecting both the known and new mutations occuring in the R122 primary autolysis site of PRSS1 was established. In addition, the newly found R122C variant represents a likely pancreatitis-predisposing mutation.

  4. Reversibility of partial denaturation of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuna, M.I.; Mingot, F.; Davila, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The recovery of hypochromicity in a partially denatured DNA sample when salt concentration is suddenly increased at a intermediate stage of the thermal transition is studied. The results of CsCl gradient analysis, PEG/DEX partition analysis, behaviour in a new thermal transition hydrodynamic properties and transforming ability, support the view that the process is an intramolecular double chain denaturation. The degree of denaturation irreversibility is dependent on single chain molecular weight of DNA (discontinuities denisty) and upon the helicity value at which salt concentration jump is performed. Both dependences are formally interpreted according to Elton's model for base distribution in DNA. Kinetically the process behaves as being an hydrodynamically limited rewinding. (author)

  5. Effects of myo-inositol plus alpha-lactalbumin in myo-inositol-resistant PCOS women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanino Oliva, Mario; Buonomo, Giovanna; Calcagno, Marco; Unfer, Vittorio

    2018-05-10

    Myo-inositol (MI), successfully used in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), was administered with α-LA to exploit its action of favouring the passage of other molecules through biological barriers, and also considering its anti-inflammatory effect. PCOS patients, according to the Rotterdam ESHRE-ASRM criteria, with anovulation and infertility > 1 year, were included in this open and prospective study. The preliminary phase was aimed at determining a set of MI-resistant PCOS patients. This treatment involved 2 g MI, taken twice per day by oral route, for three months. The Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index and MI plasma levels were measured. In the main phase, previously selected MI-resistant patients received the same daily amount of MI plus 50 mg α-LA twice a day, for a further three months. Ovulation was assessed using ultrasound examination on days 12, 14 and 20 of the cycle. The HOMA index, lipid, hormone and MI plasma levels were detected at baseline and at the end of this phase. Thirty-seven anovulatory PCOS subjects were included in the study. Following MI treatment, 23 of the 37 women (62%) ovulated, while 14 (38%) were resistant and did not ovulate. In the latter group, MI plasma levels did not increase. These MI-resistant patients underwent treatment in the main phase of the study, receiving MI and α-LA. After this combined treatment, 12 (86%) of them ovulated. Their MI plasma levels were found to be significantly higher than at baseline; also, a hormone and lipid profile improvement was recorded. The combination of MI with α-LA allowed us to obtain significant progress in the treatment of PCOS MI-resistant patients. Therefore, this new formulation was able to re-establish ovulation, greatly increasing the chances of desired pregnancy. Clinical trial registration number: NCT03422289 ( ClinicalTrials.gov registry).

  6. The expression and proangiogenic effect of nucleolin during the recovery of heat-denatured HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pengfei; Jiang, Bimei; Lv, Chunliu; Huang, Xu; Sun, Li; Zhang, Pihong; Huang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to examine the expression patterns and roles of nucleolin during the recovery of heat-denatured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Deep partial thickness burn model in Sprague-Dawley rats and the heat denatured cell model (52°C, 35s) were used. The expression of nucleolin was measured using Western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Angiogenesis was assessed using in vitro parameters including endothelial cell proliferation, transwell migration assay, and scratched wound healing. Gene transfection and RNA interference approaches were employed to investigate the roles of nucleolin. Nucleolin mRNA and protein expression showed a time-dependent increase during the recovery of heat-denatured dermis and HUVECs. Heat-denaturation time-dependently promoted cell growth, adhesion, migration, scratched wound healing and formation of tube-like structures in HUVECs. These effects of heat denaturation on endothelial wound healing and formation of tube-like structures were prevented by knockdown of nucleolin, whereas over-expression of nucleolin increased cell growth, migration, and formation of tube-like structures in cultured HUVEC endothelial cells. In addition, we found that the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) increased during the recovery of heat-denatured dermis and HUVECs, and nucleolin up-regulated VEGF in HUVECs. The present study reveals that the expression of nucleolin is up-regulated, and plays a pro-angiogenic role during the recovery of heat-denatured dermis and its mechanism is probably dependent on production of VEGF. We find a novel and important pro-angiogenic role of nucleolin during the recovery of heat-denatured dermis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analyzing Protein Denaturation using Fast Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Splinter, R.; Van Herwaarden, A.W.; Iervolino, E.; Vanden Poel, G.; Istrate, D.; Sarro, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibility to measure protein denaturation with Fast Differential Scanning Calorimetry (FDSC). Cancer can be diagnosed by measuring protein denaturation in blood plasma using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). FDSC can reduce diagnosis time from hours to minutes,

  8. Guanidinium-induced denaturation by breaking of salt bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuzelaar, H.; Panman, M.R.; Woutersen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite its wide use as a denaturant, the mechanism by which guanidinium (Gdm+) induces protein unfolding remains largely unclear. Herein, we show evidence that Gdm+ can induce denaturation by disrupting salt bridges that stabilize the folded conformation. We study the Gdm+-​induced denaturation of

  9. Hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hernández-Lemus

    Full Text Available In the past, a great deal of attention has been drawn to thermal driven denaturation processes. In recent years, however, the discovery of stress-induced denaturation, observed at the one-molecule level, has revealed new insights into the complex phenomena involved in the thermo-mechanics of DNA function. Understanding the effect of local pressure variations in DNA stability is thus an appealing topic. Such processes as cellular stress, dehydration, and changes in the ionic strength of the medium could explain local pressure changes that will affect the molecular mechanics of DNA and hence its stability. In this work, a theory that accounts for hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation is proposed. We here combine an irreversible thermodynamic approach with an equation of state based on the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. The latter one provides a good description of the osmotic pressure over a wide range of DNA concentrations. The resulting theoretical framework predicts, in general, the process of denaturation and, in particular, hysteresis curves for a DNA sequence in terms of system parameters such as salt concentration, density of DNA molecules and temperature in addition to structural and configurational states of DNA. Furthermore, this formalism can be naturally extended to more complex situations, for example, in cases where the host medium is made up of asymmetric salts or in the description of the (helical-like charge distribution along the DNA molecule. Moreover, since this study incorporates the effect of pressure through a thermodynamic analysis, much of what is known from temperature-driven experiments will shed light on the pressure-induced melting issue.

  10. A correlated Walks' theory for DNA denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejdani, R.

    1994-08-01

    We have shown that by using a correlated Walks' theory for the lattice gas model on a one-dimensional lattice, we can study, beside the saturation curves obtained before for the enzyme kinetics, also the DNA denaturation process. In the limit of no interactions between sites the equation for melting curves of DNA reduces to the random model equation. Thus our leads naturally to this classical equation in the limiting case. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs

  11. Denatured plutonium: a study of deterrent action. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, B.A.

    1975-07-01

    The safeguarding of nuclear reactor fuel includes physical security methods as well as technological process options. The purpose of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of a technological option; the introduction of denaturing as a deterrent to illicit plutonium diversion. Denaturing is accomplished by coextracting some highly-radioactive fission products with the plutonium during reprocessing of spent fuel. The radioactive denaturant is always in companion with the plutonium through all subsequent fuel cycle steps - and serves as a deterrent to diversion or illicit usage of this fissile source. In concept the denaturing approach is simple and straightforward. This report provides a preliminary analysis of denaturing which can be achieved within the framework of present reprocessing technology. The impact of denaturing is indicated by comparison to a conventional (i.e., non-denatured) light water reacter cycle approach

  12. Cow's milk proteins in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Rovelli, I; Peila, C; Martano, C; Chiale, F; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics techniques cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, not previously detected, in order to understand if such allergens could be cause of sensitization during lactation. Term colostrum samples from 62 healthy mothers and preterm colostrum samples from 11 healthy mothers were collected for this purpose. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using this method, which allows direct proteins identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of colostrum samples. According to our results bovine alpha 1 casein that is considered a major cow's milk allergen is readily secreted in human milk: further investigations are needed in order to clarify if alpha-1-casein has a major role in sensitization or tolerance to cow's milk of exclusively breastfed predisposed infants.

  13. Preparation of denatured sup(99m)Tc labeled HSA aerosols of different median diameters for various imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunath, B.; Kotrappa, P.; Soni, P.S.; Ganatra, R.D. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India))

    1982-02-01

    The preparation of denatured sup(99m)Tc-labelled human serum albumin (HSA) aerosols of different median diameters is described using the BARC (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre) dry aerosol generation and delivery system. The applications of these radioactive aerosols are demonstrated in aerosol scintigraphy of lungs, mucociliary movement studies and lymphoscintigraphy in rabbits. It is concluded that the BARC system gives a simplified, rapid and versatile procedure for generation of denatured volume tagged HSA aerosols for a variety of clinical applications.

  14. Hemichrome formation during hemoglobin Zurich denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zago, M.A.; Costa, F.F.; Botura, C.; Baffa, O.

    1988-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)spectrum of hemoglobin Zurich, after oxidation, storage and heating, showed several absorption derives in the high field region (g ≅ 2) which are indicative of hemichrome formation. Characteristic visible spectra of hemichromes were observed for oxidized Hb Zurich and for its spontaneous precipitate. The proportional increase of EPR signals at g ≅ 2 and decrease at g = 6.37, the constant ratio of absorbance at 540 nm to 280 nm during heating, and the similarity of this ratio for spontaneously precipitated HbA and for Hb Zurich indicate that heme is not lost during the first steps of Hb Zurich denaturation. (author) [pt

  15. Partially folded intermediates during trypsinogen denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium unfolding of bovine trypsinogen was studied by circular dichroism, differential spectra and size exclusion HPLC. The change in free energy of denaturation was = 6.99 ± 1.40 kcal/mol for guanidine hydrochloride and = 6.37 ± 0.57 kcal/mol for urea. Satisfactory fits of equilibrium unfolding transitions required a three-state model involving an intermediate in addition to the native and unfolded forms. Size exclusion HPLC allowed the detection of an intermediate population of trypsinogen whose Stokes radii varied from 24.1 ± 0.4 Å to 26.0 ± 0.3 Å for 1.5 M and 2.5 M guanidine hydrochloride, respectively. During urea denaturation, the range of Stokes radii varied from 23.9 ± 0.3 Å to 25.7 ± 0.6 Å for 4.0 M and 6.0 M urea, respectively. Maximal intrinsic fluorescence was observed at about 3.8 M urea with 8-aniline-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS binding. These experimental data indicate that the unfolding of bovine trypsinogen is not a simple transition and suggest that the equilibrium intermediate population comprises one intermediate that may be characterized as a molten globule. To obtain further insight by studying intermediates representing different stages of unfolding, we hope to gain a better understanding of the complex interrelations between protein conformation and energetics.

  16. Simulated pressure denaturation thermodynamics of ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A; Smith, Paul E

    2017-12-01

    Simulations of protein thermodynamics are generally difficult to perform and provide limited information. It is desirable to increase the degree of detail provided by simulation and thereby the potential insight into the thermodynamic properties of proteins. In this study, we outline how to analyze simulation trajectories to decompose conformation-specific, parameter free, thermodynamically defined protein volumes into residue-based contributions. The total volumes are obtained using established methods from Fluctuation Solution Theory, while the volume decomposition is new and is performed using a simple proximity method. Native and fully extended ubiquitin are used as the test conformations. Changes in the protein volumes are then followed as a function of pressure, allowing for conformation-specific protein compressibility values to also be obtained. Residue volume and compressibility values indicate significant contributions to protein denaturation thermodynamics from nonpolar and coil residues, together with a general negative compressibility exhibited by acidic residues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reversible thermal denaturation of immobilized rhodanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, P.; Bowman, S.

    1987-01-01

    For the first time, the enzyme rhodanese had been refolded after thermal denaturation. This was previously not possible because of the strong tendency for the soluble enzyme to aggregate at temperatures above 37 degrees C. The present work used rhodanese that was covalently coupled to a solid support under conditions that were found to preserve enzyme activity. Rhodanese was immobilized using an N-hydroxymalonimidyl derivative of Sepharose containing a 6-carbon spacer. The number of immobilized competent active sites was measured by using [ 35 S]SO 3 (2-) to form an active site persulfide that is the obligatory catalytic intermediate. Soluble enzyme was irreversibly inactivated in 10 min at 52 degrees C. The immobilized enzyme regained at least 30% of its original activity even after boiling for 20 min. The immobilized enzyme had a Km and Vmax that were each approximately 3 times higher than the corresponding values for the native enzyme. After preincubation at high temperatures, progress curves for the immobilized enzyme showed induction periods of up to 5 min before attaining apparently linear steady states. The pH dependence of the activity was the same for both the soluble and the immobilized enzyme. These results indicate significant stabilization of rhodanese after immobilization, and instabilities caused by adventitious solution components are not the sole reasons for irreversibility of thermal denaturation seen with the soluble enzyme. The results are consistent with models for rhodanese that invoke protein association as a major cause of inactivation of the enzyme. Furthermore, the induction period in the progress curves is consistent with studies which show that rhodanese refolding proceeds through intermediate states

  18. 27 CFR 19.464 - Denatured spirits inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of Articles Inventories § 19.464 Denatured spirits inventories. Each proprietor shall take a physical inventory of all denatured spirits in the processing account at the close of each calendar quarter and at... inventories. 19.464 Section 19.464 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE...

  19. 27 CFR 20.144 - Packages of completely denatured alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packages of completely denatured alcohol. 20.144 Section 20.144 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Sale...

  20. 27 CFR 20.261 - Records of completely denatured alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records of completely denatured alcohol. 20.261 Section 20.261 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM...

  1. Guanidinium-Induced Denaturation by Breaking of Salt Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Panman, Matthijs R; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-12-07

    Despite its wide use as a denaturant, the mechanism by which guanidinium (Gdm(+) ) induces protein unfolding remains largely unclear. Herein, we show evidence that Gdm(+) can induce denaturation by disrupting salt bridges that stabilize the folded conformation. We study the Gdm(+) -induced denaturation of a series of peptides containing Arg/Glu and Lys/Glu salt bridges that either stabilize or destabilize the folded conformation. The peptides containing stabilizing salt bridges are found to be denatured much more efficiently by Gdm(+) than the peptides containing destabilizing salt bridges. Complementary 2D-infrared measurements suggest a denaturation mechanism in which Gdm(+) binds to side-chain carboxylate groups involved in salt bridges. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. [Inactivating Effect of Heat-Denatured Lysozyme on Murine Norovirus in Bread Fillings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Michiko; Yasuda, Yuka; Takahashi, Hajime; Takeuchi, Akira; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the viability of murine norovirus strain 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human norovirus, in bread fillings used for making stuffed buns and pastries. The inactivating effect of heat-denatured lysozyme, which was recently reported to have an antiviral effect, on MNV-1 contaminating the bread fillings was also examined. MNV-1 was inoculated into two types of fillings (chocolate cream, marmalade jam) at 4.5 log PFU/g, and the bread fillings were stored at 4℃ for 5 days. MNV-1 remained viable in the bread fillings during storage. However, addition of 1% heat-denatured lysozyme to the fillings resulted in a decrease of MNV-1 infectivity immediately after inoculation, in both fillings. On the fifth day of storage, MNV-1 infectivity was decreased by 1.2 log PFU/g in chocolate cream and by 0.9 log PFU/g in marmalade jam. Although the mechanism underlying the anti-norovirus effect of heat-denatured lysozyme has not been clarified, our results suggest that heat-denatured lysozyme can be used as an inactivating agent against norovirus in bread fillings.

  3. Thermal denaturation of A-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle-Orero, J; Wildes, A R; Theodorakopoulos, N; Cuesta-López, S; Peyrard, M; Garden, J-L; Danilkin, S

    2014-01-01

    The DNA molecule can take various conformational forms. Investigations focus mainly on the so-called ‘B-form’, schematically drawn in the famous paper by Watson and Crick [1]. This is the usual form of DNA in a biological environment and is the only form that is stable in an aqueous environment. Other forms, however, can teach us much about DNA. They have the same nucleotide base pairs for ‘building blocks’ as B-DNA, but with different relative positions, and studying these forms gives insight into the interactions between elements under conditions far from equilibrium in the B-form. Studying the thermal denaturation is particularly interesting because it provides a direct probe of those interactions which control the growth of the fluctuations when the ‘melting’ temperature is approached. Here we report such a study on the ‘A-form’ using calorimetry and neutron scattering. We show that it can be carried further than a similar study on B-DNA, requiring the improvement of thermodynamic models for DNA. (paper)

  4. Single-molecule denaturation mapping of DNA in nanofluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, Walter; Larsen, Niels Bent; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2010-01-01

    Here we explore the potential power of denaturation mapping as a single-molecule technique. By partially denaturing YOYO (R)-1-labeled DNA in nanofluidic channels with a combination of formamide and local heating, we obtain a sequence-dependent "barcode" corresponding to a series of local dips...... and peaks in the intensity trace along the extended molecule. We demonstrate that this structure arises from the physics of local denaturation: statistical mechanical calculations of sequence-dependent melting probability can predict the barcode to be observed experimentally for a given sequence...

  5. Microwave-enhanced folding and denaturation of globular proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Bohr, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that microwave irradiation can affect the kinetics of the folding process of some globular proteins, especially beta-lactoglobulin. At low temperature the folding from the cold denatured phase of the protein is enhanced, while at a higher temperature the denaturation of the protein from...... its folded state is enhanced. In the latter case, a negative temperature gradient is needed for the denaturation process, suggesting that the effects of the microwaves are nonthermal. This supports the notion that coherent topological excitations can exist in proteins. The application of microwaves...

  6. The expression of miR-125b regulates angiogenesis during the recovery of heat-denatured HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Situo; Zhang, Pihong; Liang, Pengfei; Huang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-06-01

    In previous studies we found that miR-125b was down-regulated in denatured dermis of deep partial thickness burn patients. Moreover, miR-125b inhibited tumor-angiogenesis associated with the decrease of ERBB2 and VEGF expression in ovarian cancer cells and breast cancer cells, etc. In this study, we investigated the expression patterns and roles of miR-125b during the recovery of denatured dermis and heat-denatured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Deep partial thickness burns in Sprague-Dawley rats and the heat-denatured cells (52°C, 35 s) were used for analysis. Western blot analysis and real-time PCR were applied to evaluate the expression of miR-125b and ERBB2 and VEGF. The ability of angiogenesis in heat-denatured HUVECs was analyzed by scratch wound healing and tube formation assay after pri-miR-125b or anti-miR-125b transfection. miR-125b expression was time-dependent during the recovery of heat-denatured dermis and HUVECs. Moreover, miR-125b regulated ERBB2 mRNA and Protein Expression and regulated angiogenesis association with regulating the expression of VEGF in heat-denatured HUVECs. Taken together our results show that the expression of miR-125b is time-dependent and miR-125b plays a regulatory role of angiogenesis during wound healing after burns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Light water reactors with a denatured thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Discussed in this paper is the performance of denatured thorium fuel cycles in PWR plants of conventional design, such as those currently in operation or under construction. Although some improvement in U 3 O 8 utilization is anticipated in PWRs optimized explicitly for the denatured thorium fuel cycle, this paper is limited to a discussion of the performance of denatured thorium fuels in conventional PWRs and consequently the data presented is representative of the use of thorium fuel in existing PWRs or those presently under construction. In subsequent sections of this paper, the design of the PWR, its performance on the denatured thorium fuel cycle, safety, accident and environmental considerations, and technological status and R and D requirements are discussed

  8. Thermal denaturation of type I collagen vitrified gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Zhiyong; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer; Guo, Qiongyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We analyzed the denaturation of vitrigels synthesized under different conditions. ► Overall denaturation kinetics consisted of both reversible and irreversible steps. ► More stable vitrigels were formed under high level of vitrification. - Abstract: The denaturation kinetics of type I collagen vitrigels synthesized under different vitrification time and temperature were analyzed by the classical Kissinger approach and the advanced model free kinetics (AMFK) using the Vyazovkin algorithm. The AMFK successfully elucidated the overall denaturation into reversible and irreversible processes. Depending on vitrification conditions, the activation energy for the irreversible process ranged from 100 to 200 kJ/mol, and the reversible enthalpy ranged from 250 to 300 kJ/mol. All of these values increased with the vitrification time and temperature, indicating that a more stable and complex structure formed with increased vitrification. The classical Kissinger method predicted the presence of a critical temperate of approximately 60 °C for the transition between reversible and irreversible processes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of fibril structures in vitrigels both before and after full denaturation; however the fibrils had became thicker and rougher after denaturation.

  9. Preparation of denatured sup(99m)Tc labeled HSA aerosols of different median diameters for various imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, B.; Kotrappa, P.; Soni, P.S.; Ganatra, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation of denatured sup(99m)Tc-labelled human serum albumin (HSA) aerosols of different median diameters is described using the BARC (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre) dry aerosol generation and delivery system. The applications of these radioactive aerosols are demonstrated in aerosol scintigraphy of lungs, mucociliary movement studies and lymphoscintigraphy in rabbits. It is concluded that the BARC system gives a simplified, rapid and versatile procedure for generation of denatured volume tagged HSA aerosols for a variety of clinical applications. (U.K.)

  10. Effects of heat treatment on conformation and cell growth activity of alpha- lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin from market milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Mizuho; Kawai, Shuji; Ijier, X; Fukuoka, Mayuko; Yabe, Tomio; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Kanamaru, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Heat processes, low temperature for long time (LTLT) pasteurization and ultra-heat treatment (UHT) sterilization, are essential for commercial market milk to improve the shelf life of raw milk and ensure microbial safety. We evaluated the effects of heat experience on the molecular properties of α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) isolated from four types of market milk such as LTLT-A (66°C for 30 min), LTLT-B (65°C for 30 min), UHT-I (130°C for 2 s, indirect heating) and UHT-D (135°C for 2 s, direct heating) samples. We examined molecular conformations using circular dichroism spectrum measurement and cell growth activity using the WST-1 method for the proteins. α-LA isolated from each of these four types of market milk displayed no significant structural difference as compared to raw milk α-LA, while α-LA of UHT-I only inhibited cell growth of an intestinal epithelial cell line more potently than raw milk α-LA. In the case of β-LG, only the UHT-I sample demonstrated a drastic change in structure, while it did not exhibit any cytotoxicity. We found that cell viability effects of α-LA and β-LG are attributable to the type of UHT; indirect and direct. These findings indicate that the effect of heat treatment on whey proteins should carefully be investigated further.

  11. Denaturation of proteins by surfactants studied by the Taylor dispersion analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldona Jelińska

    Full Text Available We showed that the Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA is a fast and easy to use method for the study of denaturation proteins. We applied TDA to study denaturation of β-lactoglobulin, transferrin, and human insulin by anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. A series of measurements at constant protein concentration (for transferrin was 1.9 x 10-5 M, for β- lactoglobulin was 7.6 x 10-5 M, and for insulin was 1.2 x 10-4 M and varying SDS concentrations were carried out in the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. The structural changes were analyzed based on the diffusion coefficients of the complexes formed at various surfactant concentrations. The concentration of surfactant was varied in the range from 1.2 x 10-4 M to 8.7 x 10-2 M. We determined the minimum concentration of the surfactant necessary to change the native conformation of the proteins. The minimal concentration of SDS for β-lactoglobulin and transferrin was 4.3 x 10-4 M and for insulin 2.3 x 10-4 M. To evaluate the TDA as a novel method for studying denaturation of proteins we also applied other methods i.e. electronic circular dichroism (ECD and dynamic light scattering (DLS to study the same phenomenon. The results obtained using these methods were in agreement with the results from TDA.

  12. "Cooperative collapse" of the denatured state revealed through Clausius-Clapeyron analysis of protein denaturation phase diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Machha, Venkata R; Rösgen, Jörg; Auton, Matthew

    2018-02-19

    Protein phase diagrams have a unique potential to identify the presence of additional thermodynamic states even when non-2-state character is not readily apparent from the experimental observables used to follow protein unfolding transitions. Two-state analysis of the von Willebrand factor A3 domain has previously revealed a discrepancy in the calorimetric enthalpy obtained from thermal unfolding transitions as compared with Gibbs-Helmholtz analysis of free energies obtained from the Linear Extrapolation Method (Tischer and Auton, Prot Sci 2013; 22(9):1147-60). We resolve this thermodynamic conundrum using a Clausius-Clapeyron analysis of the urea-temperature phase diagram that defines how ΔH and the urea m-value interconvert through the slope of c m versus T, (∂cm/∂T)=ΔH/(mT). This relationship permits the calculation of ΔH at low temperature from m-values obtained through iso-thermal urea denaturation and high temperature m-values from ΔH obtained through iso-urea thermal denaturation. Application of this equation uncovers sigmoid transitions in both cooperativity parameters as temperature is increased. Such residual thermal cooperativity of ΔH and the m-value confirms the presence of an additional state which is verified to result from a cooperative phase transition between urea-expanded and thermally-compact denatured states. Comparison of the equilibria between expanded and compact denatured ensembles of disulfide-intact and carboxyamidated A3 domains reveals that introducing a single disulfide crosslink does not affect the presence of the additional denatured state. It does, however, make a small thermodynamically favorable free energy (∼-13 ± 1 kJ/mol) contribution to the cooperative denatured state collapse transition as temperature is raised and urea concentration is lowered. The thermodynamics of this "cooperative collapse" of the denatured state retain significant compensations between the enthalpy and entropy contributions to the overall

  13. Heavy water reactors on the denatured thorium cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This paper presents preliminary technical and economic data to INFCE on the denatured U-233/Thorium fuel cycle for use in early comparisons of alternate nuclear systems. The once-through uranium fuel cycle is discussed in a companion paper. In presenting this preliminary information at this time, it is recognized that there are several other denatured thorium fuel cycles of potential interest, such as the U-235/thorium cycle which could be implemented at an earlier date. Information on these alternate cycles is currently being developed, and will be provided to INFCE when available

  14. On the radioimmunological determination of native and heat denaturated protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, E.J.; Glatz, F.; Technische Univ., Vienna

    1981-01-01

    Precipitation radioimmunoassay, solid phase radioimmunoassay and passive hemagglutination were examined for their efficiency in the determination of native or denaturated soy proteins. Native as well as autoclaved soy protein could be determined quantitatively in the precipitation radioimmunoassay, using antisera directed against the native product. In the solid phase technique only the autoclaved soy protein could be detected with high sensitivity. In the passive hemagglutination reaction, no agglutination could be observed with erythrocytes coated with autoclaved soy protein. Only antisera against the denaturated (autoclaved) soy protein agglutinated these erythrocytes. (orig.) [de

  15. Denaturation of membrane proteins and hyperthermic cell killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgman, Paulus Wilhelmus Johannes Jozef

    1993-01-01

    Summarizing: heat induced denaturation of membrane proteins is probably related to hyperthermic cell killing. Induced resistance of heat sensitive proteins seems to be involved in the development of thermotolerance. Although many questions remain still to be answered, it appears that HSP72, when

  16. Role of cyclobutane dimers in UV-denaturation of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavil'gel'skij, G.B.; Zuev, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    UV irradiation of double-stranded DNA produces local denatured regions. The evidence presented indicates that these single-stranded regions arise from photoproducts other than pyrimidine dimers. The irradiation of T2 DNA at 8x10 4 erg/mm 2 (254 nm) produces 6-8% thymine dimers, amd Tsub(mel) drops by 12-14 deg C, accompanied by a significant broadening of the transition profile. The kinetics of denatured region formation and lowering Tsub(mel) corresponds to that of formation of crosslinkages and differs markedly from the kinetics of formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Treatment of UV-irradiated DNA with light in the presence of yeast photoreactivating enzyme monomerizes almost all thymine dimers but does not change the Tsub(mel). Local denatured regions are detected in UV-irradiated DNA and are absent from AcPhM-sensibilized DNA, which contains 20-25% thymine dimers, as determined by the accridine orange fluorescence technique. S1 nuclease from Aspergillis oryzae produces single-strand breaks in UV-irradiated DNA of phage PM2 but is not active on AcPhM-treated PM2 DNA, which contains about 50 thymine dimers. It is supposed that the formation of a cyclobutane dimer only weakens the hydrogen bonds in the AT base pair rather than breaks them. Local denatured regions are thought to arise from the accumulation in UV-irradiated DNA (254 nm) of the sufficient number of photoproducts with impaired ability to base pairing

  17. Cold denaturation of the HIV-1 protease monomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösner, Heike Ilona; Caldarini, Martina; Prestel, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1-protease is a complex protein which in its active form adopts a homodimer dominated by -sheet structures. We have discovered a cold-denatured state of the monomeric subunit of HIV-1-protease which is populated above 0ºC and therefore directly accessible to various spectroscopic approac...

  18. Evaluation of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) is a powerful method used to study structure of bacterial communities, without cultivation, based on the diversity of the genes coding for ribosomal RNA. However, the results are strongly dependent on the respective target region of the used primer systems. Therefore, three ...

  19. Nanometer-Scale Dissection of Chromosomes by Atomic Force Microscopy Combined with Heat-Denaturing Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Kazumi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shichiri, Motoharu; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Toshio; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a method for dissecting chromosome fragments with a size of a few hundred nanometers by atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using this method, we demonstrated reproducible dissections of silkworm chromosomes in the pachytene phase. The dissected fragments were successfully recovered on the cantilever tips, as confirmed by fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent stained chromosomes. To recover dissected chromosome fragments from a larger chromosome, such as the human metaphase chromosome of a somatic cell, heat denaturation was found to be effective. Further improvements in this method may lead to a novel tool for isolating valuable genes and/or investigating local genome structures in the near future.

  20. [Denaturation of egg antigens by cooking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroko; Akaboshi, Chie; Sekido, Haruko; Tanaka, Kouki; Tanaka, Kazuko; Shimojo, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Changes in egg protein contents by cooking were measured with an ELISA kit using Tris-HCl buffer in model foods including cake, meatballs, pasta and pudding made with whole egg, egg-white and egg-yolk. The egg protein contents were lowest in the deep-fried model foods of cakes and meatballs. Ovalbumin (OVA) was undetectable (meatballs, suggesting that processing temperature and uniform heat-treatment affect the detection of egg protein. Furthermore, egg protein contents were below 6 µg/g in the pouched meatballs and pasta made with egg-yolk, and OVA and OVM were not detected by Western blotting analysis with human IgE from patients' serum. On the other hand, processed egg proteins were detected with an ELISA kit using a surfactant and reductant in the extract buffer.

  1. Spectral shift controlled reactors, denatured U-233/thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This paper presents technical and economic data on the SSCR which may be of use in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation Program to intercompare alternative nuclear systems. Included in this paper are data on the denatured U-233/thorium cycle. This cycle shows a proliferation advantage over more classical thorium fuel cycle (e.g., highly-enriched U-235/thorium or plutonium/thorium) due to the elimination of chemically-separable, concentrated fissile material from unirradiated nuclear fuel. The U-233 is denatured by mixing with depleted uranium to a concentration no greater than 12 w/o. An exogenous source of U-233 is assumed in this paper, since U-233 does not occur in nature and only a limited supply has been produced to date for research and development work

  2. Vibrational energy relaxation: proposed pathway of fast local chromatin denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, D.; Greinert, R.

    2002-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for the a component of exchange-type chromosome aberrations, of chromosome fragmentation and of reproductive cell death is one of the unsolved issues of radiation biology. Under review is whether vibrational energy relaxation in the constitutive biopolymers of chromatin, induced by inelastic energy deposition events and mediated via highly excited vibrational states, may provide a pathway of fast local chromatin denaturation, thereby producing the severe DNA lesion able to interact chemically with other, non-damaged chromatin. (author)

  3. A study of the thermal denaturation of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus salivarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lighezan, Liliana; Georgieva, Ralitsa; Neagu, Adrian

    2012-09-01

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins display an intrinsic self-assembly property, forming monomolecular crystalline arrays, identified in outermost structures of the cell envelope in many organisms, such as bacteria and archaea. Isolated S-layer proteins also possess the ability to recrystallize into regular lattices, being used in biotechnological applications, such as controlling the architecture of biomimetic surfaces. To this end, the stability of the S-layer proteins under high-temperature conditions is very important. In this study, the S-layer protein has been isolated from Lactobacillus salivarius 16 strain of human origin, and purified by cation-exchange chromatography. Using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, we have investigated the thermal denaturation of the S-layer protein. The far- and near-UV CD spectra have been collected, and the temperature dependence of the CD signal in these spectral domains has been analyzed. The variable temperature results show that the secondary and tertiary structures of the S-layer protein change irreversibly due to the heating of the sample. After the cooling of the heated protein, the secondary and tertiary structures are partially recovered. The denaturation curves show that the protein unfolding depends on the sample concentration and on the heating rate. The secondary and tertiary structures of the protein suffer changes in the same temperature range. We have also detected an intermediate state in the protein denaturation pathway. Our results on the thermal behavior of the S-layer protein may be important for the use of S-layer proteins in biotechnological applications, as well as for a better understanding of the structure and function of S-layer proteins.

  4. Deciphering allogeneic antibody response against native and denatured HLA epitopes in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Jonathan; Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Moreau, Jean-François; Lee, Jar-How; Taupin, Jean-Luc

    2015-07-01

    Anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies are deleterious for organ transplant survival. Class I HLA donor-specific antibodies are identified by using the Luminex single antigen beads (LSAB) assay, which also detects anti-denatured HLA antibodies (anti-dHLAs). Anti-dHLAs are thought to be unable to recognize native HLA (nHLA) on the cell surface and therefore to be clinically irrelevant. Acid denaturation of nHLA on LSAB allows anti-dHLAs to be discriminated from anti-nHLAs. We previously defined a threshold for the ratio between mean fluorescence intensity against acid-treated (D for denaturation) and nontreated (N) LSAB, D ≥ 1.2 N identifying the anti-dHLAs. However, some anti-dHLAs remained able to bind nHLA on lymphocytes in flow cytometry crossmatches, and some anti-nHLAs conserved significant reactivity toward acid-treated LSAB. After depleting serum anti-nHLA reactivity with HLA-typed cells, we analyzed the residual LSAB reactivity toward nontreated and acid-treated LSABs, and then evaluated the ability of antibodies to recognize nHLA alleles individually. We observed that sera can contain mixtures of anti-nHLAs and anti-dHLAs, or anti-nHLAs recognizing acid-resistant epitopes, all possibly targeting the same allele(s). Therefore, the anti-HLA antibody response can be highly complex and subtle, as is the accurate identification of pathogenic anti-HLA antibodies in human serum. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Preparation of denatured protein bone sterilized with gamma radiation; Preparacion de hueso desproteinizado esterilizado con radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna Z, D [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The bone is one of the tissues more transplanted in the entire world by that the bone necessity for transplant every day becomes bigger. In the Bank of tissues Radio sterilized of the ININ the amnion and the pig skin are routinely processed. The tissue with which will be continued is with bone. Due to that in our country it doesn't have enough bone of human origin for the necessities required in the bone transplant, an option is the bone of bovine. Of this bone one can obtain denatured protein bone, with the same characteristics of the denatured protein human bone, the one which has been proven that it has good acceptance and incorporation in the human body when is transplanted. The method for the obtaining of the denatured protein bone of bovine, with the confirmation of the final product by means of X-ray diffraction is described. The radiosterilization of this bone with gamma rays and the determination of the lead content. (Author)

  6. Preparation of denatured protein bone sterilized with gamma radiation; Preparacion de hueso desproteinizado esterilizado con radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna Z, D. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: dlz@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The bone is one of the tissues more transplanted in the entire world by that the bone necessity for transplant every day becomes bigger. In the Bank of tissues Radio sterilized of the ININ the amnion and the pig skin are routinely processed. The tissue with which will be continued is with bone. Due to that in our country it doesn't have enough bone of human origin for the necessities required in the bone transplant, an option is the bone of bovine. Of this bone one can obtain denatured protein bone, with the same characteristics of the denatured protein human bone, the one which has been proven that it has good acceptance and incorporation in the human body when is transplanted. The method for the obtaining of the denatured protein bone of bovine, with the confirmation of the final product by means of X-ray diffraction is described. The radiosterilization of this bone with gamma rays and the determination of the lead content. (Author)

  7. Membrane bridging and hemifusion by denaturated Munc18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xu

    Full Text Available Neuronal Munc18-1 and members of the Sec1/Munc18 (SM protein family play a critical function(s in intracellular membrane fusion together with SNARE proteins, but the mechanism of action of SM proteins remains highly enigmatic. During experiments designed to address this question employing a 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD fluorescence de-quenching assay that is widely used to study lipid mixing between reconstituted proteoliposomes, we observed that Munc18-1 from squid (sMunc18-1 was able to increase the apparent NBD fluorescence emission intensity even in the absence of SNARE proteins. Fluorescence emission scans and dynamic light scattering experiments show that this phenomenon arises at least in part from increased light scattering due to sMunc18-1-induced liposome clustering. Nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism data suggest that, although native sMunc18-1 does not bind significantly to lipids, sMunc18-1 denaturation at 37 °C leads to insertion into membranes. The liposome clustering activity of sMunc18-1 can thus be attributed to its ability to bridge two membranes upon (perhaps partial denaturation; correspondingly, this activity is hindered by addition of glycerol. Cryo-electron microscopy shows that liposome clusters induced by sMunc18-1 include extended interfaces where the bilayers of two liposomes come into very close proximity, and clear hemifusion diaphragms. Although the physiological relevance of our results is uncertain, they emphasize the necessity of complementing fluorescence de-quenching assays with alternative experiments in studies of membrane fusion, as well as the importance of considering the potential effects of protein denaturation. In addition, our data suggest a novel mechanism of membrane hemifusion induced by amphipathic macromolecules that does not involve formation of a stalk intermediate.

  8. Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

    1992-10-01

    In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons

  9. U.S. leans toward denatured thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smock, R.

    1977-01-01

    Denatured thorium appears to be the most promising among the nonproliferating alternatives to the plutonium cycle, which the Carter Administration is trying to cancel. Criteria for a better system include uranium utilization comparable to current light water reactors and minimal separation of fissile material into the waste stream. Comparisons with other systems conclude that thorium is preferable because it can lead to an acceptable fast breeder. The thorium cycle can be placed in energy centers for sensitive facilities and can also be introduced into ongoing light water systems. Reprocessing can be handled in the centers, where thorium can be mixed with plutonium for use in reactors within the center, while light water reactors operate on the outside. Any fuel leaving the center would be unsuitable for weapons. Later adaptation to in-center fast breeders will extend energy supplies, although a thorium breeder will be less efficient than a plutonium fast breeder. Denatured thorium is a technical answer to a complex political problem, but those in the nuclear industry see the U.S. goal of a nonproliferating fuel as futile in the light of world politics and breeder efforts in other countries

  10. Cooperative unfolding of apolipoprotein A-1 induced by chemical denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, D; Li-Blatter, X; Schönfeld, H-J; Heerklotz, H; Seelig, J

    2018-05-25

    Apolipoprotein A-1 (Apo A-1) plays an important role in lipid transfer and obesity. Chemical unfolding of α-helical Apo A-1 is induced with guanidineHCl and monitored with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD spectroscopy. The unfolding enthalpy and the midpoint temperature of unfolding decrease linearly with increasing guanidineHCl concentration, caused by the weak binding of denaturant. At room temperature, binding of 50-60 molecules guanidineHCl leads to a complete Apo A-1 unfolding. The entropy of unfolding decreases to a lesser extent than the unfolding enthalpy. Apo A-1 chemical unfolding is a dynamic multi-state equilibrium that is analysed with the Zimm-Bragg theory modified for chemical unfolding. The chemical Zimm-Bragg theory predicts the denaturant binding constant K D and the protein cooperativity σ. Chemical unfolding of Apo A-1 is two orders of magnitude less cooperative than thermal unfolding. The free energy of thermal unfolding is ~0.2 kcal/mol per amino acid residue and ~1.0 kcal/mol for chemical unfolding at room temperature. The Zimm-Bragg theory calculates conformational probabilities and the chemical Zimm-Bragg theory predicts stretches of α-helical segments in dynamic equilibrium, unfolding and refolding independently and fast. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermal denaturation of sunflower globulins in low moisture conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouilly, A.; Orliac, O.; Silvestre, F.; Rigal, L.

    2003-01-01

    DSC analysis in pressure resisting pans of sunflower oil cake makes appear the endothermic peak of sunflower globulins denaturation. Its temperature decreases from 189.5 to 119.9 deg. C while the corresponding enthalpy increases from 2.6 to 3.3 J/g of sample, or from 6.7 to 12.2 J/g of dry protein, when the samples moisture content varies from 0 to 30.0% of the total weight. The plot of the denaturation temperature versus the moisture content is not linear but has a rounded global shape and seems to follow the hydration behavior of the proteins, modeled with the sorption isotherm. As it can be seen on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, protein corpuscles 'melt' after such a thermal treatment and large aggregates form by coagulation. Moisture dependence of the 'fusion' temperature of native proteic organization, in low moisture conditions, offers so a new characterization method for the use of vegetable proteins in agro-materials

  12. Thermal denaturation of sunflower globulins in low moisture conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouilly, A.; Orliac, O.; Silvestre, F.; Rigal, L

    2003-03-05

    DSC analysis in pressure resisting pans of sunflower oil cake makes appear the endothermic peak of sunflower globulins denaturation. Its temperature decreases from 189.5 to 119.9 deg. C while the corresponding enthalpy increases from 2.6 to 3.3 J/g of sample, or from 6.7 to 12.2 J/g of dry protein, when the samples moisture content varies from 0 to 30.0% of the total weight. The plot of the denaturation temperature versus the moisture content is not linear but has a rounded global shape and seems to follow the hydration behavior of the proteins, modeled with the sorption isotherm. As it can be seen on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, protein corpuscles 'melt' after such a thermal treatment and large aggregates form by coagulation. Moisture dependence of the 'fusion' temperature of native proteic organization, in low moisture conditions, offers so a new characterization method for the use of vegetable proteins in agro-materials.

  13. Acetic acid denaturing pulsed field capillary electrophoresis for RNA separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenqing; Dou, Xiaoming; Ni, Yi; Sumitomo, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori

    2010-10-01

    Based on our previous work of in-capillary denaturing polymer electrophoresis, we present a study of RNA molecular separation up to 6.0 kilo nucleotide by pulsed field CE. This is the first systematic investigation of electrophoresis of a larger molecular mass RNA in linear hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) under pulsed field conditions. The parameters that may influence the separation performance, e.g. gel polymer concentration, modulation depth and pulse frequency, are analyzed in terms of resolution and mobility. For denaturing and separating RNA in the capillary simultaneously, 2 M acetic acid was added into the HEC polymer to serve as separation buffer. Result shows that (i) in pulsed field conditions, RNA separation can be achieved in a wide range of concentration of HEC polymer, and RNA fragments between 0.3 and 0.6 kilo nucleotide are sensitive to the polymer concentration; (ii) under certain pulsed field conditions, RNA fragments move linearly as the modulation depth increases; (iii) 12.5 Hz is the resonance frequency for RNA reorientation time and applied frequency.

  14. Denaturation/Renaturation of Organophosphorus Acid Anhydrolase (OPAA) Using Guanidinium Hydrochloride and Urea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ong, K. K; Sun, Z; Cheng, T. C; Wei, Y; Yuan, J. M; Yin, R

    2004-01-01

    .... Using organophosphorus acid anhydrolase (OPAA) as the model protein, a guanidinium hydrochloride and urea denaturation/renaturation study was conducted and measured both optically and enzymatically...

  15. Denaturation/Renaturation of Organophosphorus Acid Anhydrolase (OPAA) Using Guanidinium Hydrochloride and Urea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ong, K. K; Sun, Z; Cheng, T. C; Wei, Y; Yuan, J. M; Yin, R

    2004-01-01

    ...; thereby indicating conformational changes. Similar results were obtained with circular dichroism as the peak representing the alpha-helix conformation decreased as denaturant concentration was increased...

  16. Visualization of early events in acetic acid denaturation of HIV-1 protease: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Narendra Borkar

    Full Text Available Protein denaturation plays a crucial role in cellular processes. In this study, denaturation of HIV-1 Protease (PR was investigated by all-atom MD simulations in explicit solvent. The PR dimer and monomer were simulated separately in 9 M acetic acid (9 M AcOH solution and water to study the denaturation process of PR in acetic acid environment. Direct visualization of the denaturation dynamics that is readily available from such simulations has been presented. Our simulations in 9 M AcOH reveal that the PR denaturation begins by separation of dimer into intact monomers and it is only after this separation that the monomer units start denaturing. The denaturation of the monomers is flagged off by the loss of crucial interactions between the α-helix at C-terminal and surrounding β-strands. This causes the structure to transit from the equilibrium dynamics to random non-equilibrating dynamics. Residence time calculations indicate that denaturation occurs via direct interaction of the acetic acid molecules with certain regions of the protein in 9 M AcOH. All these observations have helped to decipher a picture of the early events in acetic acid denaturation of PR and have illustrated that the α-helix and the β-sheet at the C-terminus of a native and functional PR dimer should maintain both the stability and the function of the enzyme and thus present newer targets for blocking PR function.

  17. Aqueous Solutions of the Ionic Liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium Chloride Denature Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Gary A.; Heller, William T.

    2009-01-01

    As we advance our understanding, ionic liquids (ILs) are finding ever broader scope within the chemical sciences including, most recently, pharmaceutical, enzymatic, and bioanalytical applications. With examples of enzymatic activity reported in both neat ILs and in IL/water mixtures, enzymes are frequently assumed to adopt a quasi-native conformation, even if little work has been carried out to date toward characterizing the conformation, dynamics, active-site perturbation, cooperativity of unfolding transitions, free energy of stabilization, or aggregation/oligomerization state of enzymes in the presence of an IL solvent component. In this study, human serum albumin and equine heart cytochrome c were characterized in aqueous solutions of the fully water-miscible IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, (bmim)Cl, by small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering. At (bmim)Cl concentrations up to 25 vol.%, these two proteins were found to largely retain their higher-order structures whereas both proteins become highly denatured at the highest IL concentration studied here (i.e., 50 vol.% (bmim)Cl). The response of these proteins to (bmim)Cl is analogous to their behavior in the widely studied denaturants guanidine hydrochloride and urea which similarly lead to random coil conformations at excessive molar concentrations. Interestingly, human serum albumin dimerizes in response to (bmim)Cl, whereas cytochrome c remains predominantly in monomeric form. These results have important implications for enzymatic studies in aqueous IL media, as they suggest a facile pathway through which biocatalytic activity can be altered in these nascent and potentially green electrolyte systems

  18. Human Breast Cancer Cells Are Redirected to Mammary Epithelial Cells upon Interaction with the Regenerating Mammary Gland Microenvironment In-Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, Karen M.; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display ‘normal’ behavior when placed into ‘normal’ ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for ‘normal’ gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts) confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini) were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic) respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo. PMID:23155468

  19. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Bussard

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  20. Irreversible denaturation of maltodextrin glucosidase studied by differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, and turbidity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Megha; Chaudhuri, Tapan K; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    Thermal denaturation of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism (230 nm), and UV-absorption measurements (340 nm), which were respectively used to monitor heat absorption, conformational unfolding, and the production of solution turbidity. The denaturation was irreversible, and the thermal transition recorded at scan rates of 0.5-1.5 K/min was significantly scan-rate dependent, indicating that the thermal denaturation was kinetically controlled. The absence of a protein-concentration effect on the thermal transition indicated that the denaturation was rate-limited by a mono-molecular process. From the analysis of the calorimetric thermograms, a one-step irreversible model well represented the thermal denaturation of the protein. The calorimetrically observed thermal transitions showed excellent coincidence with the turbidity transitions monitored by UV-absorption as well as with the unfolding transitions monitored by circular dichroism. The thermal denaturation of the protein was thus rate-limited by conformational unfolding, which was followed by a rapid irreversible formation of aggregates that produced the solution turbidity. It is thus important to note that the absence of the protein-concentration effect on the irreversible thermal denaturation does not necessarily means the absence of protein aggregation itself. The turbidity measurements together with differential scanning calorimetry in the irreversible thermal denaturation of the protein provided a very effective approach for understanding the mechanisms of the irreversible denaturation. The Arrhenius-equation parameters obtained from analysis of the thermal denaturation were compared with those of other proteins that have been reported to show the one-step irreversible thermal denaturation. Maltodextrin glucosidase had sufficiently high kinetic stability with a half-life of 68 days at a physiological temperature (37°C).

  1. Uranium production in thorium/denatured uranium fueled PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium-232 buildup in a thorium/denatured uranium fueled pressurized water reactor, PWR(Th), was studied using a modified version of the spectrum-dependent zero dimensional depletion code, LEOPARD. The generic Combustion Engineering System 80 reactor design was selected as the reactor model for the calculations. Reactors fueled with either enriched natural uranium and self-generated recycled uranium or uranium from a thorium breeder and self-generated recycled uranium were considered. For enriched natural uranium, concentrations of 232 U varied from about 135 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) in the zeroth generation to about 260 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) at the end of the fifth generation. For the case in which thorium breeder fuel (with its relatively high 232 U concentration) was used as reactor makeup fuel, concentrations of 232 U varied from 441 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) at discharge from the first generation to about 512 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) at the end of the fifth generation. Concentrations in freshly fabricated fuel for this later case were 20 to 35% higher than the discharge concentration. These concentrations are low when compared to those of other thorium fueled reactor types (HTGR and MSBR) because of the relatively high 238 U concentration added to the fuel as a denaturant. Excellent agreement was found between calculated and existing experimental values. Nevertheless, caution is urged in the use of these values because experimental results are very limited, and the relevant nuclear data, especially for 231 Pa and 232 U, are not of high quality

  2. The generation of denatured reactor plutonium by different options of the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, C.H.M.; Kessler, G. [Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Research Center Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Denatured (proliferation resistant) reactor plutonium can be generated in a number of different fuel cycle options. First denatured reactor plutonium can be obtained if, instead of low enriched U-235 PWR fuel, re-enriched U-235/U-236 from reprocessed uranium is used (fuel type A). Also the envisaged existing 2,500 t of reactor plutonium (being generated world wide up to the year 2010), mostly stored in intermediate fuel storage facilities at present, could be converted during a transition phase into denatured reactor plutonium by the options fuel type B and D. Denatured reactor plutonium could have the same safeguards standard as present low enriched (<20% U-235) LWR fuel. It could be incinerated by recycling once or twice in PWRs and subsequently by multi-recycling in FRs (CAPRA type or IFRs). Once denatured, such reactor plutonium could remain denatured during multiple recycling. In a PWR, e.g., denatured reactor plutonium could be destroyed at a rate of about 250 kg/GWey. While denatured reactor plutonium could be recycled and incinerated under relieved IAEA safeguards, neptunium would still have to be monitored by the IAEA in future for all cases in which considerable amounts of neptunium are produced. (orig.)

  3. Heat denaturation of soy glycinin : Influence of pH and ionic strength on molecular structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakemond, C.M.M.; Jongh, de H.H.J.; Hessing, M.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2000-01-01

    The 7S/11S glycinin equilibrium as found in Lakemond et al. (J. Agric. Food Chem. 2000, 48, xxxx-xxxx) at ambient temperatures influences heat denaturation. It is found that the 7S form of glycinin denatures at a lower temperature than the 11S form, as demonstrated by a combination of calorimetric

  4. 27 CFR 20.148 - Manufacture of articles with completely denatured alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacture of articles with completely denatured alcohol. 20.148 Section 20.148 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL... ALCOHOL AND RUM Sale and Use of Completely Denatured Alcohol § 20.148 Manufacture of articles with...

  5. Apoptosis-like death in bacteria induced by HAMLET, a human milk lipid-protein complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders P Hakansson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is the primary means for eliminating unwanted cells in multicellular organisms in order to preserve tissue homeostasis and function. It is characterized by distinct changes in the morphology of the dying cell that are orchestrated by a series of discrete biochemical events. Although there is evidence of primitive forms of programmed cell death also in prokaryotes, no information is available to suggest that prokaryotic death displays mechanistic similarities to the highly regulated programmed death of eukaryotic cells. In this study we compared the characteristics of tumor and bacterial cell death induced by HAMLET, a human milk complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that HAMLET-treated bacteria undergo cell death with mechanistic and morphologic similarities to apoptotic death of tumor cells. In Jurkat cells and Streptococcus pneumoniae death was accompanied by apoptosis-like morphology such as cell shrinkage, DNA condensation, and DNA degradation into high molecular weight fragments of similar sizes, detected by field inverse gel electrophoresis. HAMLET was internalized into tumor cells and associated with mitochondria, causing a rapid depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and bound to and induced depolarization of the pneumococcal membrane with similar kinetic and magnitude as in mitochondria. Membrane depolarization in both systems required calcium transport, and both tumor cells and bacteria were found to require serine protease activity (but not caspase activity to execute cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that many of the morphological changes and biochemical responses associated with apoptosis are present in prokaryotes. Identifying the mechanisms of bacterial cell death has the potential to reveal novel targets for future antimicrobial therapy and to further our understanding of core activation mechanisms of cell death in eukaryote cells.

  6. Apoptosis-like death in bacteria induced by HAMLET, a human milk lipid-protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakansson, Anders P; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-10

    Apoptosis is the primary means for eliminating unwanted cells in multicellular organisms in order to preserve tissue homeostasis and function. It is characterized by distinct changes in the morphology of the dying cell that are orchestrated by a series of discrete biochemical events. Although there is evidence of primitive forms of programmed cell death also in prokaryotes, no information is available to suggest that prokaryotic death displays mechanistic similarities to the highly regulated programmed death of eukaryotic cells. In this study we compared the characteristics of tumor and bacterial cell death induced by HAMLET, a human milk complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid. We show that HAMLET-treated bacteria undergo cell death with mechanistic and morphologic similarities to apoptotic death of tumor cells. In Jurkat cells and Streptococcus pneumoniae death was accompanied by apoptosis-like morphology such as cell shrinkage, DNA condensation, and DNA degradation into high molecular weight fragments of similar sizes, detected by field inverse gel electrophoresis. HAMLET was internalized into tumor cells and associated with mitochondria, causing a rapid depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and bound to and induced depolarization of the pneumococcal membrane with similar kinetic and magnitude as in mitochondria. Membrane depolarization in both systems required calcium transport, and both tumor cells and bacteria were found to require serine protease activity (but not caspase activity) to execute cell death. Our results suggest that many of the morphological changes and biochemical responses associated with apoptosis are present in prokaryotes. Identifying the mechanisms of bacterial cell death has the potential to reveal novel targets for future antimicrobial therapy and to further our understanding of core activation mechanisms of cell death in eukaryote cells.

  7. Cation-Induced Stabilization and Denaturation of DNA Origami Nanostructures in Urea and Guanidinium Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Krainer, Georg; Grundmeier, Guido; Schlierf, Michael; Keller, Adrian

    2017-11-01

    The stability of DNA origami nanostructures under various environmental conditions constitutes an important issue in numerous applications, including drug delivery, molecular sensing, and single-molecule biophysics. Here, the effect of Na + and Mg 2+ concentrations on DNA origami stability is investigated in the presence of urea and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl), two strong denaturants commonly employed in protein folding studies. While increasing concentrations of both cations stabilize the DNA origami nanostructures against urea denaturation, they are found to promote DNA origami denaturation by GdmCl. These inverse behaviors are rationalized by a salting-out of Gdm + to the hydrophobic DNA base stack. The effect of cation-induced DNA origami denaturation by GdmCl deserves consideration in the design of single-molecule studies and may potentially be exploited in future applications such as selective denaturation for purification purposes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Interim assessment of the denatured 233U fuel cycle: feasibility and nonproliferation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, L.S.; Bartine, D.E.; Burns, T.J.

    1979-12-01

    A fuel cycle that employs 233 U denatured with 238 U and mixed with thorium fertile material is examined with respect to its proliferation-resistance characteristics and its technical and economic feasibility. The rationale for considering the denatured 233 U fuel cycle is presented, and the impact of the denatured fuel on the performance of Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Controlled Reactors, Gas-Cooled Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors, and Fast Breeder Reactors is discussed. The scope of the R, D and D programs to commercialize these reactors and their associated fuel cycles is also summarized and the resource requirements and economics of denatured 233 U cycles are compared to those of the conventional Pu/U cycle. In addition, several nuclear power systems that employ denatured 233 U fuel and are based on the energy center concept are evaluated

  9. Use of anionic denaturing detergents to purify insoluble proteins after overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlager Benjamin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Many proteins form insoluble protein aggregates, called “inclusion bodies”, when overexpressed in E. coli. This is the biggest obstacle in biotechnology. Ever since the reversible denaturation of proteins by chaotropic agents such as urea or guanidinium hydrochloride had been shown, these compounds were predominantly used to dissolve inclusion bodies. Other denaturants exist but have received much less attention in protein purification. While the anionic, denaturing detergent sodiumdodecylsulphate (SDS is used extensively in analytical SDS-PAGE, it has rarely been used in preparative purification. Results Here we present a simple and versatile method to purify insoluble, hexahistidine-tagged proteins under denaturing conditions. It is based on dissolution of overexpressing bacterial cells in a buffer containing sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS and whole-lysate denaturation of proteins. The excess of detergent is removed by cooling and centrifugation prior to affinity purification. Host- and overexpressed proteins do not co-precipitate with SDS and the residual concentration of detergent is compatible with affinity purification on Ni/NTA resin. We show that SDS can be replaced with another ionic detergent, Sarkosyl, during purification. Key advantages over denaturing purification in urea or guanidinium are speed, ease of use, low cost of denaturant and the compatibility of buffers with automated FPLC. Conclusion Ionic, denaturing detergents are useful in breaking the solubility barrier, a major obstacle in biotechnology. The method we present yields detergent-denatured protein. Methods to refold proteins from a detergent denatured state are known and therefore we propose that the procedure presented herein will be of general application in biotechnology.

  10. Calorimetric studies of the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresheck, G.C.; Erman, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Two endotherms are observed by differential scanning calorimetry during the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase at pH 7.0. The transition midpoint temperatures (t/sub m/) were 43.9 +- 1.4 and 63.3 +- 1.6 0 C, independent of concentration. The two endotherms were observed at all pH values between 4 and 8, with the transition temperatures varying with pH. Precipitation was observed between pH 4 and 6, and only qualitative data are presented for this region. The thermal unfolding of cytochrome c peroxidase was sensitive to the presence and ligation state of the heme. Only a single endotherm was observed for the unfolding of the apoprotein, and this transition was similar to the high-temperature transition in the holoenzyme. Addition of KCN to the holoenzyme increases the midpoint of the high-temperature transition whereas the low-temperature transition was increased upon addition of KF. Binding of the natural substrate ferricytochrome c to the enzyme increases the low-temperature transition by 4.8 +- 1.3 0 C but has no effect on the high-temperature transition at pH 7. The presence of cytochrome c peroxidase decreases the stability of cytochrome c, and both proteins appear to unfold simultaneously. The results are discussed in terms of the two domains evident in the X-ray crystallographic structure of cytochrome c peroxidase

  11. Renaturation of the androgen receptor after denaturation in SDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.P.; Young, C.Y.F.; Rowley, D.R.; Tindall, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Renaturation of the steroid binding activity of receptor proteins is a potentially useful tool for their purification and analysis. Cytosol was prepared from rat Dunning prostate tumor in buffer containing molybdate and then denatured by addition of SDS buffer and heating. Aliquots were precipitated in cold acetone and the resulting pellets were washed and solubilized with a small volume of solution containing a chaotropic agent such as 6M guanidine, 8M urea, or 5M sodium iodide. After a 20-minute incubation, samples were diluted 20-fold with buffer containing 4nM [ 3 H]dihydrotestosterone with or without excess unlabeled dihydrotestosterone. Diluted samples were incubated at 0 0 C for varying periods of time prior to assay of bound radioactivity using hydroxylapatite. A time-course of renaturation after exposure to guanidine showed a steady increase of specific binding activity during the first 7 hrs post-dilution that remained stable up to 22 hrs. Experiments with guanidine consistently demonstrated that 25-50% of binding activity was recoverable. Preliminary results using urea or sodium iodide were similar. Efforts to optimize recovery and to characterize the renatured androgen receptor are in progress

  12. Thermally responsive silicon nanowire arrays for native/denatured-protein separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongwei; Wang Yanwei; Yuan Lin; Wang Lei; Yang Weikang; Wu Zhaoqiang; Li Dan; Chen Hong

    2013-01-01

    We present our findings of the selective adsorption of native and denatured proteins onto thermally responsive, native-protein resistant poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) decorated silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWAs). The PNIPAAm–SiNWAs surface, which shows very low levels of native-protein adsorption, favors the adsorption of denatured proteins. The amount of denatured-protein adsorption is higher at temperatures above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAAm. Temperature cycling surrounding the LCST, which ensures against thermal denaturation of native proteins, further increases the amount of denatured-protein adsorption. Moreover, the PNIPAAm–SiNWAs surface is able to selectively adsorb denatured protein even from mixtures of different protein species; meanwhile, the amount of native proteins in solution is kept nearly at its original level. It is believed that these results will not only enrich current understanding of protein interactions with PNIPAAm-modified SiNWAs surfaces, but may also stimulate applications of PNIPAAm–SiNWAs surfaces for native/denatured protein separation. (paper)

  13. 27 CFR 19.41 - Claims on spirits, denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost or destroyed in bond. 19.41 Section 19.41 Alcohol, Tobacco... DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Taxes Claims § 19.41 Claims on spirits, denatured spirits, articles, or wines lost..., relating to the destruction or loss of spirits, denatured spirits, articles, or wines in bond, shall be...

  14. Urea-temperature phase diagrams capture the thermodynamics of denatured state expansion that accompany protein unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the thermodynamic properties of the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A3 domain using urea-induced unfolding at variable temperature and thermal unfolding at variable urea concentrations to generate a phase diagram that quantitatively describes the equilibrium between native and denatured states. From this analysis, we were able to determine consistent thermodynamic parameters with various spectroscopic and calorimetric methods that define the urea–temperature parameter plane from cold denaturation to heat denaturation. Urea and thermal denaturation are experimentally reversible and independent of the thermal scan rate indicating that all transitions are at equilibrium and the van't Hoff and calorimetric enthalpies obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions are equivalent demonstrating two-state character. Global analysis of the urea–temperature phase diagram results in a significantly higher enthalpy of unfolding than obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions and significant cross correlations describing the urea dependence of and that define a complex temperature dependence of the m-value. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy illustrates a large increase in secondary structure content of the urea-denatured state as temperature increases and a loss of secondary structure in the thermally denatured state upon addition of urea. These structural changes in the denatured ensemble make up ∼40% of the total ellipticity change indicating a highly compact thermally denatured state. The difference between the thermodynamic parameters obtained from phase diagram analysis and those obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions illustrates that phase diagrams capture both contributions to unfolding and denatured state expansion and by comparison are able to decipher these contributions. PMID:23813497

  15. Protein denaturation and functional properties of Lenient Steam Injection heat treated whey protein concentrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickow, Jonatan Ahrens; Kaufmann, Niels; Wiking, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) was heat treated by use of the novel heat treatment method of Lenient Steam Injection (LSI) to elucidate new functional properties in relation to heat-induced gelation of heat treated WPC. Denaturation was measured by both DSC and FPLC, and the results of the two...... methods were highly correlated. Temperatures of up to 90 °C were applicable using LSI, whereas only 68 °C could be reached by plate heat exchange before coagulation/fouling. Denaturation of whey proteins increased with increasing heat treatment temperature up to a degree of 30–35% denaturation at 90 °C...

  16. Studying pressure denaturation of a protein by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarupria, Sapna; Ghosh, Tuhin; García, Angel E; Garde, Shekhar

    2010-05-15

    Many globular proteins unfold when subjected to several kilobars of hydrostatic pressure. This "unfolding-up-on-squeezing" is counter-intuitive in that one expects mechanical compression of proteins with increasing pressure. Molecular simulations have the potential to provide fundamental understanding of pressure effects on proteins. However, the slow kinetics of unfolding, especially at high pressures, eliminates the possibility of its direct observation by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Motivated by experimental results-that pressure denatured states are water-swollen, and theoretical results-that water transfer into hydrophobic contacts becomes favorable with increasing pressure, we employ a water insertion method to generate unfolded states of the protein Staphylococcal Nuclease (Snase). Structural characteristics of these unfolded states-their water-swollen nature, retention of secondary structure, and overall compactness-mimic those observed in experiments. Using conformations of folded and unfolded states, we calculate their partial molar volumes in MD simulations and estimate the pressure-dependent free energy of unfolding. The volume of unfolding of Snase is negative (approximately -60 mL/mol at 1 bar) and is relatively insensitive to pressure, leading to its unfolding in the pressure range of 1500-2000 bars. Interestingly, once the protein is sufficiently water swollen, the partial molar volume of the protein appears to be insensitive to further conformational expansion or unfolding. Specifically, water-swollen structures with relatively low radii of gyration have partial molar volume that are similar to that of significantly more unfolded states. We find that the compressibility change on unfolding is negligible, consistent with experiments. We also analyze hydration shell fluctuations to comment on the hydration contributions to protein compressibility. Our study demonstrates the utility of molecular simulations in estimating volumetric properties

  17. How Chain Length and Charge Affect Surfactant Denaturation of Acyl Coenzyme A Binding Protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kell Kleiner; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    maltoside (DDM). The aim has been to determine how surfactant chain length and micellar charge affect the denaturation mechanism. ACBP denatures in two steps irrespective of surfactant chain length, but with increasing chain length, the potency of the denaturant rises more rapidly than the critical micelle......Using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, equilibria and kinetics of unfolding of acyl coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) have been investigated in sodium alkyl sulfate surfactants of different chain length (8-16 carbon atoms) and with different proportions of the nonionic surfactant dodecyl...... constants increases linearly with denaturant concentration below the cmc but declines at higher concentrations. Both shortening chain length and decreasing micellar charge reduce the overall kinetics of unfolding and makes the dependence of unfolding rate constants on surfactant concentration more complex...

  18. On the Use of Potential Denaturing Agents for Ethanol in Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domnik Bayer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acidic or alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs can be a sustainable alternative for power generation if they are fuelled with bio-ethanol. However, in order to keep the fuel cheap, ethanol has to be exempted from tax on spirits by denaturing. In this investigation the potential denaturing agents fusel oil, tert-butyl ethyl ether, and Bitrex were tested with regard to their compatibility with fuel cells. Experiments were carried out both in sulphuric acid and potassium hydroxide solution. Beside, basic electrochemical tests, differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS and fuel cell tests were conducted. It was found that fusel oil is not suitable as denaturing agent for DEFC. However, tert-butyl ethyl ether does not seem to hinder the ethanol conversion as much. Finally, a mixture of tert-butyl ethyl ether and Bitrex can be proposed as promising candidate as denaturing agent for use in acidic and alkaline DEFC.

  19. On the Use of Potential Denaturing Agents for Ethanol in Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Domnik Bayer; Florina Jung; Birgit Kintzel; Martin Joos; Carsten Cremers; Dierk Martin; Jörg Bernard; Jens Tübke

    2011-01-01

    Acidic or alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) can be a sustainable alternative for power generation if they are fuelled with bio-ethanol. However, in order to keep the fuel cheap, ethanol has to be exempted from tax on spirits by denaturing. In this investigation the potential denaturing agents fusel oil, tert-butyl ethyl ether, and Bitrex were tested with regard to their compatibility with fuel cells. Experiments were carried out both in sulphuric acid and potassium hydroxide solution...

  20. Interim assessment of the denatured 233U fuel cycle: feasibility and nonproliferation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, L.S.; Bartine, D.E.; Burns, T.J.

    1978-12-01

    A fuel cycle that employs 233 U denatured with 238 U and mixed with thorium fertile material is examined with respect to its proliferation-resistance characteristics and its technical and economic feasibility. The rationale for considering the denatured 233 U fuel cycle is presented, and the impact of the denatured fuel on the performance of Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Controlled Reactors, Gas-Cooled Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors, and Fast Breeder Reactors is discussed. The scope of the R, D and D programs to commercialize these reactors and their associated fuel cycles is also summarized and the resource requirements and economics of denatured 233 U cycles are compared to those of the conventional Pu/U cycle. In addition, several nuclear power systems that employ denatured 233 U fuel and are based on the energy center concept are evaluated. Under this concept, dispersed power reactors fueled with denatured or low-enriched uranium fuel are supported by secure energy centers in which sensitive activities of the nuclear cycle are performed. These activities include 233 U production by Pu-fueled transmuters (thermal or fast reactors) and reprocessing. A summary chapter presents the most significant conclusions from the study and recommends areas for future work

  1. Interim assessment of the denatured /sup 233/U fuel cycle: feasibility and nonproliferation characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L.S.; Bartine, D.E.; Burns, T.J. (eds.)

    1978-12-01

    A fuel cycle that employs /sup 233/U denatured with /sup 238/U and mixed with thorium fertile material is examined with respect to its proliferation-resistance characteristics and its technical and economic feasibility. The rationale for considering the denatured /sup 233/U fuel cycle is presented, and the impact of the denatured fuel on the performance of Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Controlled Reactors, Gas-Cooled Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors, and Fast Breeder Reactors is discussed. The scope of the R, D and D programs to commercialize these reactors and their associated fuel cycles is also summarized and the resource requirements and economics of denatured /sup 233/U cycles are compared to those of the conventional Pu/U cycle. In addition, several nuclear power systems that employ denatured /sup 233/U fuel and are based on the energy center concept are evaluated. Under this concept, dispersed power reactors fueled with denatured or low-enriched uranium fuel are supported by secure energy centers in which sensitive activities of the nuclear cycle are performed. These activities include /sup 233/U production by Pu-fueled transmuters (thermal or fast reactors) and reprocessing. A summary chapter presents the most significant conclusions from the study and recommends areas for future work.

  2. Mutation of charged residues to neutral ones accelerates urea denaturation of HP-35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haiyan; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2010-09-16

    Following the studies of urea denaturation of β-hairpins using molecular dynamics, in this paper, molecular dynamics simulations of two peptides, a 35 residue three helix bundle villin headpiece protein HP-35 and its doubly norleucine-substituent mutant (Lys24Nle/Lys29Nle) HP-35 NleNle, were undertaken in urea solutions to understand the molecular mechanism of urea denaturation of α-helices. The mutant HP-35 NleNle was found to denature more easily than the wild type. During the expansion of the small hydrophobic core, water penetration occurs first, followed by that of urea molecules. It was also found that the initial hydration of the peptide backbone is achieved through water hydrogen bonding with the backbone CO groups during the denaturation of both polypeptides. The mutation of the two charged lysine residues to apolar norleucine enhances the accumulation of urea near the hydrophobic core and facilitates the denaturation process. Urea also interacts directly with the peptide backbone as well as side chains, thereby stabilizing nonnative conformations. The mechanism revealed here is consistent with the previous study on secondary structure of β-hairpin polypeptide, GB1, PEPTIDE 1, and TRPZIP4, suggesting that there is a general mechanism in the denaturation of protein backbone hydrogen bonds by urea.

  3. Beta-1,4-Galactosyltransferase-catalyzed glycosylation of sugar derivatives: Modulation of the enzyme activity by alpha-lactalbumin, immobilization and solvent tolerance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Charvátová, Andrea; Rossi, C.; Petrásková, Lucie; Křen, Vladimír; Riva, S.; Monti, D.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 39, - (2006), s. 98-104 ISSN 1381-1177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D25.001; GA ČR GA203/05/0172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : enzymatic galactosylation * immobilization * organic solvent Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.149, year: 2006

  4. Dose-dependent effect of alpha-lactalbumin in combination with two different doses of glucose on the plasma Trp/LNAA ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markus, C.R.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, W.I.; Pasman, W.; Klarenbeek, B.; Berg, H. van den

    2000-01-01

    A deficient brain serotonin function has been demonstrated in psychiatric disorders and increases in brain serotonin ameliorate emotional and behavioural abnormalities found in depression. The uptake of the serotonin precursor tryptophan into the brain is dependent on nutrients that influence the

  5. Purification of inclusion bodies using PEG precipitation under denaturing conditions to produce recombinant therapeutic proteins from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Li, Ninghuan; Xie, Yueqing; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Xiaoyi; Cagliero, Cedric; Shi, Siwei; Zhu, Chencen; Luo, Han; Chen, Junsheng; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Menglin; Feng, Lei; Lu, Huili; Zhu, Jianwei

    2017-07-01

    It has been documented that the purification of inclusion bodies from Escherichia coli by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) may benefit subsequent refolding and recovery of recombinant proteins. However, loading volume and the high cost of the column limits its application in large-scale manufacturing of biopharmaceutical proteins. We report a novel process using polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation under denaturing conditions to replace SEC for rapid purification of inclusion bodies containing recombinant therapeutic proteins. Using recombinant human interleukin 15 (rhIL-15) as an example, inclusion bodies of rhIL-15 were solubilized in 7 M guanidine hydrochloride, and rhIL-15 was precipitated by the addition of PEG 6000. A final concentration of 5% (w/v) PEG 6000 was found to be optimal to precipitate target proteins and enhance recovery and purity. Compared to the previously reported S-200 size exclusion purification method, PEG precipitation was easier to scale up and achieved the same protein yields and quality of the product. PEG precipitation also reduced manufacturing time by about 50 and 95% of material costs. After refolding and further purification, the rhIL-15 product was highly pure and demonstrated a comparable bioactivity with a rhIL-15 reference standard. Our studies demonstrated that PEG precipitation of inclusion bodies under denaturing conditions holds significant potential as a manufacturing process for biopharmaceuticals from E. coli protein expression systems.

  6. 27 CFR 19.32 - Assessment of tax on spirits, denatured spirits, or wines in bond which are lost, destroyed or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... spirits, denatured spirits, or wines in bond which are lost, destroyed or removed without authorization... spirits, denatured spirits, or wines in bond which are lost, destroyed or removed without authorization. When spirits, denatured spirits, or wines in bond are lost or destroyed (except spirits, denatured...

  7. An improved method for detecting genetic variation in DNA using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Norio; Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko.

    1990-05-01

    We have examined the feasibility of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of RNA:DNA duplexes to detect variations in genomic and cloned DNAs. The result has demonstrated that use of RNA:DNA duplexes makes DGGE much more practical for screening a large number of samples than use of DNA:DNA heteroduplexes, because preparation of RNA probes is easier than that of DNA probes. Three different 32 P-labeled RNA probes were produced. Genomic or cloned DNAs were digested with restriction enzymes and hybridized to labeled RNA probes, and resulting RNA:DNA duplexes were examined by DGGE. The presence of a mismatch(es) was detected as a difference in the mobility of bands on the gel. The experimental conditions were determined using DNA segments from cloned normal and three thalassemic human β-globin genes. The results from experiments on the cloned DNAs suggest that DGGE of RNA:DNA duplexes will detect nucleotide substitutions and deletions in DNA. In the course of these studies, a polymorphism due to a single-base substitution at position 666 of IVS2 (IVS2-666) of the human β-globin gene was directly identified using genomic DNA samples. A study of 59 unrelated Japanese from Hiroshima was undertaken in which the frequency of the allele with C at IVS2-666 was 0.48 and that of the allele with T was 0.52. This approach was found to be very effective for detecting heritable variation and should be a powerful tool for detecting fresh mutations in DNA, which occur outside the known restriction sites. (author)

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551 denaturation by five systematic urea derivatives that differ in the alkyl chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Fujii, Sotaro; Koga, Aya; Wakai, Satoshi; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2017-07-01

    Reversible denaturation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c 551 (PAc 551 ) could be followed using five systematic urea derivatives that differ in the alkyl chain length, i.e. urea, N-methylurea (MU), N-ethylurea (EU), N-propylurea (PU), and N-butylurea (BU). The BU concentration was the lowest required for the PAc 551 denaturation, those of PU, EU, MU, and urea being gradually higher. Furthermore, the accessible surface area difference upon PAc 551 denaturation caused by BU was found to be the highest, those by PU, EU, MU, and urea being gradually lower. These findings indicate that urea derivatives with longer alkyl chains are stronger denaturants. In this study, as many as five systematic urea derivatives could be applied for the reversible denaturation of a single protein, PAc 551 , for the first time, and the effects of the alkyl chain length on protein denaturation were systematically verified by means of thermodynamic parameters.

  9. Phagocytosis by macrophages mediated by receptors for denatured proteins - dependence on tyrosine protein kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Hespanhol

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that some components of the leukocyte cell membrane, CR3 (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18 and p150/95, are able to bind to denatured proteins. Thus, it is of interest to know which effector functions of these cells can be triggered by these receptors when they interact with particles or surfaces covered with denatured proteins. In the present study we analyzed their possible role as mediators of phagocytosis of red cells covered with denatured bovine serum albumin (BSA by mouse peritoneal macrophages. We observed that a macrophages are able to recognize (bind to these red cells, b this interaction can be inhibited by denatured BSA in the fluid phase, c there is no phagocytosis of these particles by normal macrophages, d phagocytosis mediated by denatured BSA can be, however, effectively triggered in inflammatory macrophages induced by glycogen or in macrophages activated in vivo with LPS, and e this phagocytic capacity is strongly dependent on the activity of tyrosine protein kinases in its signal transduction pathway, as demonstrated by using three kinds of enzyme inhibitors (genistein, quercetin and herbimycin A.

  10. Alcohol-induced structural transitions in the acid-denatured Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyani Azizah Abd Halim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol-induced structural changes in the acid-denatured Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase (BLA at pH 2.0 were studied by far-ultra violet circular dichroism, intrinsic, three-dimensional and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS fluorescence, acrylamide quenching and thermal denaturation. All the alcohols used in this study produced partial refolding in the acid-denatured BLA as evident from the increased mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm, increased intrinsic fluorescence and decreased ANS fluorescence. The order of effectiveness of these alcohols to induce a partially folded state of BLA was found to be: 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol/tert-butanol > 1-propanol/2-propanol > 2-chloroethanol > ethanol > methanol. Three-dimensional fluorescence and acrylamide quenching results obtained in the presence of 5.5 M tert-butanol also suggested formation of a partially folded state in the acid-denatured BLA. However, 5.5 M tert-butanol-induced state of BLA showed a non-cooperative thermal transition. All these results suggested formation of a partially folded state of the acid-denatured BLA in the presence of these alcohols. Furthermore, their effectiveness was found to be guided by their chain length, position of methyl groups and presence of the substituents.

  11. Drying and denaturation characteristics of whey protein isolate in the presence of lactose and trehalose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M Amdadul; Chen, Jie; Aldred, Peter; Adhikari, Benu

    2015-06-15

    The denaturation kinetics of whey protein isolate (WPI), in the presence and absence of lactose and trehalose, was quantified in a convective air-drying environment. Single droplets of WPI, WPI-lactose and WPI-trehalose were dried in conditioned air (2.5% RH, 0.5m/s air velocity) at two temperatures (65°C and 80°C) for 500s. The initial solid concentration of these solutions was 10% (w/v) in all the samples. Approximately 68% of WPI was denatured when it was dried in the absence of sugars. Addition of 20% trehalose prevented the irreversible denaturation of WPI at both temperatures. Thirty percent lactose was required to prevent denaturation of WPI at 65°C and the same amount of lactose protected only 70% of WPI from denaturation at 80°C. The secondary structures of WPI were found to be altered by the drying-induced stresses, even in the presence of 20% trehalose and 30% lactose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neutronics calculations for denatured molten salt reactors: Assessing resource requirements and proliferation-risk attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Ali; McClamrock, Edward B.; Glaser, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the proliferation-risk and resource attributes of denatured MSRs. • MSRs offer significantly better resource efficiency compared to light-water reactors. • Denatured single-fluid MSRs reactors offer promising non-proliferation attributes. - Abstract: Molten salt reactors (MSRs) are often advocated as a radical but worthwhile alternative to traditional reactor concepts based on solid fuels. This article builds upon the existing research into MSRs to model and simulate the operation of thorium-fueled single-fluid and two-fluid reactors. The analysis is based on neutronics calculations and focuses on denatured MSR systems. Resource utilization and basic proliferation-risk attributes are compared to those of standard light-water reactors. Depending on specific design choices, even fully denatured reactors could reduce uranium and enrichment requirements by a factor of 3–4. Overall, denatured single-fluid designs appear as the most promising candidate technology minimizing both design complexity and overall proliferation risks despite being somewhat less attractive from the perspective of resource utilization

  13. Nonsurgical Transurethral Radiofrequency Collagen Denaturation: Results at Three Years after Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise M. Elser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess treatment efficacy and quality of life in women with stress urinary incontinence 3 years after treatment with nonsurgical transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation. Methods. This prospective study included 139 women with stress urinary incontinence due to bladder outlet hypermobility. Radiofrequency collagen denaturation was performed using local anesthesia in an office setting. Assessments included incontinence quality of life (I-QOL and urogenital distress inventory (UDI-6 instruments. Results. In total, 139 women were enrolled and 136 women were treated (mean age, 47 years. At 36 months, intent-to-treat analysis (n=139 revealed significant improvements in quality of life. Mean I-QOL score improved 17 points from baseline (P=.0004, while mean UDI-6 score improved (decreased 19 points (P=.0005. Conclusions. Transurethral collagen denaturation is a low-risk, office-based procedure that results in durable quality-of-life improvements in a significant proportion of women for as long as 3 years.

  14. Intrinsic alterations in the partial molar volume on the protein denaturation: surficial Kirkwood-Buff approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Isseki; Takayanagi, Masayoshi; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2009-03-19

    The partial molar volume (PMV) of the protein chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) was calculated by all-atom MD simulation. Denatured CI2 showed almost the same average PMV value as that of native CI2. This is consistent with the phenomenological question of the protein volume paradox. Furthermore, using the surficial Kirkwood-Buff approach, spatial distributions of PMV were analyzed as a function of the distance from the CI2 surface. The profiles of the new R-dependent PMV indicate that, in denatured CI2, the reduction in the solvent electrostatic interaction volume is canceled out mainly by an increment in thermal volume in the vicinity of its surface. In addition, the PMV of the denatured CI2 was found to increase in the region in which the number density of water atoms is minimum. These results provide a direct and detailed picture of the mechanism of the protein volume paradox suggested by Chalikian et al.

  15. Denaturing of plutonium by transmutation of minor-actinides for enhancement of proliferation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, Hiroshi; Saito, Masaki; Peryoga, Yoga; Ezoubtchenko, Alexey; Takivayev, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Feasibility study for the plutonium denaturing by utilizing minor-actinide transmutation in light water reactors has been performed. And the intrinsic feature of proliferation resistance of plutonium has been discussed based on IAEA's publication and Kessler's proposal. The analytical results show that not only 238 Pu but also other plutonium isotopes with even-mass-number have very important role for denaturing of plutonium due to their relatively large critical mass and noticeably high spontaneous fission neutron generation. With the change of the minor-actinide doping ratio in U-Pu mix oxide fuel and moderator to fuel ratio, it is found that the reactor-grade plutonium from conventional light water reactors can be denatured to satisfy the proliferation resistance criterion based on the Kessler's proposal but not to be sufficient for the criterion based on IAEA's publication. It has been also confirmed that all the safety coefficients take negative value throughout the irradiation. (author)

  16. Distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations in the denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liujiao; Ji, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Extensive and intensive studies on the unfolding of proteins require appropriate theoretical model and parameter to clearly illustrate the feature and characteristic of the unfolding system. Over the past several decades, four approaches have been proposed to describe the interaction between proteins and denaturants, but some ambiguity and deviations usually occur in the explanation of the experimental data. In this work, a theoretical model was presented to show the dependency of the residual activity ratio of the proteins on the molar denaturant concentration. Through the characteristic unfolding parameters ki and Δmi in this model, the distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations during the unfolding process can be quantitatively described. This model was tested with the two-state unfolding of bovine heart cytochrome c and the three-state unfolding of hen egg white lysozyme induced by both guanidine hydrochloride and urea, the four-state unfolding of bovine carbonic anhydrase b induced by guanidine hydrochloride and the unfolding of some other proteins induced by denaturants. The results illustrated that this model could be used accurately to reveal the distribution and transition of protein conformations in the presence of different concentrations of denaturants and to evaluate the unfolding tendency and thermodynamic stability of different conformations. In most denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins, the unfolding became increasingly hard in next transition step and the proteins became more unstable as they attained next successive stable conformation. This work presents a useful method for people to study the unfolding of proteins and may be used to describe the unfolding and refolding of other biopolymers induced by denaturants, inducers, etc.

  17. The efficacy of denaturing actinide elements as a means of decreasing materials attractiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, K.R.; Bathke, C.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory: P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Sleaford, B.W.; Robel, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Collins, B.A.; Prichard, A.W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This study considers the concept of denaturing as applied to the actinide elements present in spent fuel as a means to reduce materials attractiveness. Highly attractive materials generally have low values of bare critical mass, heat content, and dose. To denature an attractive element, its spent-fuel isotopic composition (isotopic vector) is intentionally modified by introducing sufficient quantities of a significantly less attractive isotope to dilute the concentration of a highly attractive isotope so that the overall attractiveness of the element is reduced. The authors used FOM (Figure of Merit) formula as the material attractiveness metric for their parametric determination of the attractiveness of the Pu and U. Materials attractiveness needs to be considered in three distinct phases in the process to construct a nuclear explosive device (NED): the acquisition phase, processing phase, and utilization phase. The results show that denaturing uranium with {sup 238}U is actually an effective means of reducing the attractiveness. For uranium with a large minority of {sup 235}U, a mixture of 80% {sup 238}U to 20% {sup 235}U is required to reduce the attractiveness to low. For uranium with a large concentration of {sup 233}U, a mixture of 88% {sup 238}U to 12% {sup 233}U is required to reduce the attractiveness to low. The results also show that denaturing plutonium with {sup 238}Pu is less effective than denaturing uranium with {sup 238}U. Using {sup 238}Pu as the denaturing agent would require 80% or more by mass in order to reduce the attractiveness to low. No amount of {sup 240}Pu is enough to reduce the plutonium attractiveness below medium. The combination of {sup 238}Pu and {sup 240}Pu would require approximately 70% {sup 238}Pu and 25% {sup 240}Pu by mass to reduce the plutonium attractiveness to low.

  18. The efficacy of denaturing actinide elements as a means of decreasing materials attractiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hase, K.R.; Bathke, C.G.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Sleaford, B.W.; Robel, M.; Collins, B.A.; Prichard, A.W.

    2013-01-01

    This study considers the concept of denaturing as applied to the actinide elements present in spent fuel as a means to reduce materials attractiveness. Highly attractive materials generally have low values of bare critical mass, heat content, and dose. To denature an attractive element, its spent-fuel isotopic composition (isotopic vector) is intentionally modified by introducing sufficient quantities of a significantly less attractive isotope to dilute the concentration of a highly attractive isotope so that the overall attractiveness of the element is reduced. The authors used FOM (Figure of Merit) formula as the material attractiveness metric for their parametric determination of the attractiveness of the Pu and U. Materials attractiveness needs to be considered in three distinct phases in the process to construct a nuclear explosive device (NED): the acquisition phase, processing phase, and utilization phase. The results show that denaturing uranium with 238 U is actually an effective means of reducing the attractiveness. For uranium with a large minority of 235 U, a mixture of 80% 238 U to 20% 235 U is required to reduce the attractiveness to low. For uranium with a large concentration of 233 U, a mixture of 88% 238 U to 12% 233 U is required to reduce the attractiveness to low. The results also show that denaturing plutonium with 238 Pu is less effective than denaturing uranium with 238 U. Using 238 Pu as the denaturing agent would require 80% or more by mass in order to reduce the attractiveness to low. No amount of 240 Pu is enough to reduce the plutonium attractiveness below medium. The combination of 238 Pu and 240 Pu would require approximately 70% 238 Pu and 25% 240 Pu by mass to reduce the plutonium attractiveness to low

  19. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study conformational changes in denatured proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Eilon; Itkin, Anna; Kuttner, Yosef Yehuda; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Amir, Dan; Haas, Elisha; Haran, Gilad

    2008-06-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a sensitive analytical tool that allows dynamics and hydrodynamics of biomolecules to be studied under a broad range of experimental conditions. One application of FCS of current interest is the determination of the size of protein molecules in the various states they sample along their folding reaction coordinate, which can be accessed through the measurement of diffusion coefficients. It has been pointed out that the analysis of FCS curves is prone to artifacts that may lead to erroneous size determination. To set the stage for FCS studies of unfolded proteins, we first show that the diffusion coefficients of small molecules as well as proteins can be determined accurately even in the presence of high concentrations of co-solutes that change the solution refractive index significantly. Indeed, it is found that the Stokes-Einstein relation between the measured diffusion coefficient and solution viscosity holds even in highly concentrated glycerol or guanidinium hydrochloride (GuHCl) solutions. These measurements form the basis for an investigation of the structure of the denatured state of two proteins, the small protein L and the larger, three-domain protein adenylate kinase (AK). FCS is found useful for probing expansion in the denatured state beyond the unfolding transition. It is shown that the denatured state of protein L expands as the denaturant concentration increases, in a process akin to the transition from a globule to a coil in polymers. This process continues at least up to 5 M GuHCl. On the other hand, the denatured state of AK does not seem to expand much beyond 2 M GuHCl, a result that is in qualitative accord with single-molecule fluorescence histograms. Because both the unfolding transition and the coil-globule transition of AK occur at a much lower denaturant concentration than those of protein L, a possible correlation between the two phenomena is suggested.

  20. Complement-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA and MICA antigens are associated with antibody mediated rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Junchao; Terasaki, Paul I; Zhu, Dong; Lachmann, Nils; Schönemann, Constanze; Everly, Matthew J; Qing, Xin

    2016-02-01

    We have found antibodies against denatured HLA class I antigens in the serum of allograft recipients which were not significantly associated with graft failure. It is unknown whether transplant recipients also have denatured HLA class II and MICA antibodies. The effects of denatured HLA class I, class II, and MICA antibodies on long-term graft outcome were further investigated based on their ability to fix complement c1q. In this 4-year retrospective cohort study, post-transplant sera from 975 kidney transplant recipients were tested for antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens and these antibodies were further classified based on their ability to fix c1q. Thirty percent of patients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, or MICA antigens. Among them, 8.5% and 21.5% of all patients had c1q-fixing and non c1q-fixing antibodies respectively. There was no significant difference on graft survival between patients with or without antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA. However, when these antibodies were further classified according to their ability to fix c1q, patients with c1q-fixing antibodies had a significantly lower graft survival rate than patients without antibodies or patients with non c1q-fixing antibodies (p=0.008). In 169 patients who lost renal grafts, 44% of them had c1q-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens, which was significantly higher than that in patients with functioning renal transplants (25%, pantibodies were more significantly associated with graft failure caused by AMR (72.73%) or mixed AMR/CMR (61.9%) as compared to failure due to CMR (35.3%) or other causes (39.2%) (p=0.026). Transplant recipients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, and MICA antigens. However, only c1q-fixing antibodies were associated with graft failure which was related to antibody mediated rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Unravelling the hydrophobicity of urea in water using thermodiffusion: implications for protein denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niether, Doreen; Di Lecce, Silvia; Bresme, Fernando; Wiegand, Simone

    2018-01-03

    Urea is widely used as a protein denaturant in aqueous solutions. Experimental and computer simulation studies have shown that it dissolves in water almost ideally at high concentrations, introducing little disruption in the water hydrogen bonded structure. However, at concentrations of the order of 5 M or higher, urea induces denaturation in a wide range of proteins. The origin of this behaviour is not completely understood, but it is believed to stem from a balance between urea-protein and urea-water interactions, with urea becoming possibly hydrophobic at a specific concentration range. The small changes observed in the water structure make it difficult to connect the denaturation effects to the solvation properties. Here we show that the exquisite sensitivity of thermodiffusion to solute-water interactions allows the identification of the onset of hydrophobicity of urea-water mixtures. The hydrophobic behaviour is reflected in a sign reversal of the temperature dependent slope of the Soret coefficient, which is observed, both in experiments and non-equilibrium computer simulations at ∼5 M concentration of urea in water. This concentration regime corresponds to the one where abrupt changes in the denaturation of proteins are commonly observed. We show that the onset of hydrophobicity is intrinsically connected to the urea-water interactions. Our results allow us to identify correlations between the Soret coefficient and the partition coefficient, log P, hence establishing the thermodiffusion technique as a powerful approach to study hydrophobicity.

  2. Thermal denaturation of protein studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiuhua; Li, Xiangjun; Liu, Jianjun; Du, Yong; Hong, Zhi

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the absorption spectra of native or thermal protein were measured in 0.2-1.4THz using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system at room temperature, their absorption spectra and the refractive spectra were obtained. Experimental results indicate that protein both has strong absorption but their characteristics were not distinct in the THz region, and the absorption decreased during thermal denatured state. In order to prove protein had been denatured, we used Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measured their denatured temperature, from their DSC heating traces, collagen Td=101℃, Bovine serum albumin Td=97℃. While we also combined the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) to investigate their secondary and tertiary structure before and after denatuation, but the results did not have the distinct changes. We turned the absorption spectra and the refractive spectra to the dielectric spectra, and used the one-stage Debye model simulated the terahertz dielectric spectra of protein before and after denaturation. This research proved that the terahertz spectrum technology is feasible in testing protein that were affected by temperature or other factors which can provide theoretical foundation in the further study about the THz spectrum of protein and peptide temperature stability.

  3. Mesoscopic modeling of DNA denaturation rates: Sequence dependence and experimental comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlen, Oda, E-mail: oda.dahlen@ntnu.no; Erp, Titus S. van, E-mail: titus.van.erp@ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Høgskoleringen 5, Realfagbygget D3-117 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-06-21

    Using rare event simulation techniques, we calculated DNA denaturation rate constants for a range of sequences and temperatures for the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model with two different parameter sets. We studied a larger variety of sequences compared to previous studies that only consider DNA homopolymers and DNA sequences containing an equal amount of weak AT- and strong GC-base pairs. Our results show that, contrary to previous findings, an even distribution of the strong GC-base pairs does not always result in the fastest possible denaturation. In addition, we applied an adaptation of the PBD model to study hairpin denaturation for which experimental data are available. This is the first quantitative study in which dynamical results from the mesoscopic PBD model have been compared with experiments. Our results show that present parameterized models, although giving good results regarding thermodynamic properties, overestimate denaturation rates by orders of magnitude. We believe that our dynamical approach is, therefore, an important tool for verifying DNA models and for developing next generation models that have higher predictive power than present ones.

  4. Resistance to DNA denaturation in irradiated Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts is linked to cell shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, P.L.; Vanderbyl, S.; MacPhail, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Exponentially growing Chinese hamster V79-171b lung fibroblasts seeded at high density on plastic (approximately 7 x 10(3) cells/cm2) flatten, elongate, and produce significant amounts of extracellular fibronectin. When lysed in weak alkali/high salt, the rate of DNA denaturation following exposure to ionizing radiation is exponential. Conversely, cells plated at low density (approximately 7 x 10(2) cells/cm2) on plastic are more rounded 24 h later, produce little extracellular fibronectin, and display unusual DNA denaturation kinetics after X-irradiation. DNA in these cells resists denaturation, as though constraints to DNA unwinding have developed. Cell doubling time and distribution of cells in the growth cycle are identical for both high and low density cultures as is cell survival in response to radiation damage. The connection between DNA conformation and cell shape was examined further in low density cultures grown in conditioned medium. Under these conditions, cells at low density were able to elongate, and DNA denaturation of low density cultures was identical to that of high density cultures. Conversely, cytochalasin D, which interferes with actin polymerization causing cells to round up and release fibronectin, allowed development of constraints in high density cultures. These results suggest that DNA conformation is sensitive to changes in cell shape which result when cells are grown in different environments. However, these changes in DNA conformation detected by the DNA unwinding assay do not appear to play a direct role in radiation-induced cell killing

  5. 27 CFR 20.178 - Marks and brands on containers of specially denatured spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marks and brands on... Dealers § 20.178 Marks and brands on containers of specially denatured spirits. (a) Required marks. Each... officer, or (2) Consist of a brand name, or consist of caution notices, or consist of other material...

  6. Isoenergic modification of whey protein structure by denaturation and crosslinking using transglutaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Emil G. P.; Koutina, Glykeria; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2018-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) catalyzes formation of covalent bonds between lysine and glutamine side chains and has applications in manipulation of food structure. Physical properties of a whey protein mixture (SPC) denatured either at elevated pH or by heat-treatment and followed by TG catalyzed...

  7. Improvement of fragment and primer selection for mutation detection by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Hayes, VM; Osinga, J; Mulder, IM; Looman, MWG; Buys, CHCM; Hofstra, RMW

    1998-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) is one of the most powerful methods for mutation detection currently available. For successful application the appropriate selection of PCR fragments and PCR primers is crucial. The sequence of interest should always be within the domain with the lowest

  8. Comparative analyses of amplicon migration behavior in differing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, D. J.; Kemp, D. W.; Sampayo, E. M.; Schmidt, G. W.

    2010-03-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) is commonly utilized to identify and quantify microbial diversity, but the conditions required for different electrophoretic systems to yield equivalent results and optimal resolution have not been assessed. Herein, the influence of different DGGE system configuration parameters on microbial diversity estimates was tested using Symbiodinium, a group of marine eukaryotic microbes that are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems. To accomplish this, bacterial clone libraries were constructed and sequenced from cultured isolates of Symbiodinium for the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region. From these, 15 clones were subjected to PCR with a GC clamped primer set for DGGE analyses. Migration behaviors of the resulting amplicons were analyzed using a range of conditions, including variation in the composition of the denaturing gradient, electrophoresis time, and applied voltage. All tests were conducted in parallel on two commercial DGGE systems, a C.B.S. Scientific DGGE-2001, and the Bio-Rad DCode system. In this context, identical nucleotide fragments exhibited differing migration behaviors depending on the model of apparatus utilized, with fragments denaturing at a lower gradient concentration and applied voltage on the Bio-Rad DCode system than on the C.B.S. Scientific DGGE-2001 system. Although equivalent PCR-DGGE profiles could be achieved with both brands of DGGE system, the composition of the denaturing gradient and application of electrophoresis time × voltage must be appropriately optimized to achieve congruent results across platforms.

  9. Urea and Guanidinium Induced Denaturation of a Trp-Cage Miniprotein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyda, Jan; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Thompson, G.; Konvalinka, Jan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 28 (2011), s. 8910-8924 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/08/0114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : trp-cage denaturation * urea * guanidinium * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  10. A Role For Ca 2+ in the Thermal and Urea Denaturation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant African snail (Achatina achatina) becomes dormant (aestivate) under harsh environmental conditions like dry seasons. During this period the animal accumulates urea and is faced with thermal death. The stability towards thermal and urea denaturation of haemocyanin from aestivating and nonaestivating A. achatina ...

  11. Kinetic evidence for a two-stage mechanism of protein denaturation by guanidinium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Santosh Kumar; Marqusee, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Dry molten globular (DMG) intermediates, an expanded form of the native protein with a dry core, have been observed during denaturant-induced unfolding of many proteins. These observations are counterintuitive because traditional models of chemical denaturation rely on changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and there is no notable change in solvent-accessible surface area during the formation of the DMG. Here we show, using multisite fluorescence resonance energy transfer, far-UV CD, and kinetic thiol-labeling experiments, that the guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced unfolding of RNase H also begins with the formation of the DMG. Population of the DMG occurs within the 5-ms dead time of our measurements. We observe that the size and/or population of the DMG is linearly dependent on [GdmCl], although not as strongly as the second and major step of unfolding, which is accompanied by core solvation and global unfolding. This rapid GdmCl-dependent population of the DMG indicates that GdmCl can interact with the protein before disrupting the hydrophobic core. These results imply that the effect of chemical denaturants cannot be interpreted solely as a disruption of the hydrophobic effect and strongly support recent computational studies, which hypothesize that chemical denaturants first interact directly with the protein surface before completely unfolding the protein in the second step (direct interaction mechanism).

  12. Interaction of ATP with acid-denatured cytochrome c via coupled folding-binding mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, Unnati; Deep, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Interaction between ATP and cyt c takes place via coupled binding–folding mechanism. ► Binding of ATP to cyt c is endothermic. ► GTP and CTP induce similar level of helicity in acid-denatured cyt c as with ATP. ► Compactness induced by ATP is far greater than ADP or AMP. - Abstract: The non-native conformations of the cytochrome c (cyt c) are believed to play key roles in a number of physiological processes. Nucleotides are supposed to act as allosteric effectors in these processes by regulating structural transitions among different conformations of cyt c. To understand the interaction between acid denatured cytochrome c and nucleotides, spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques were utilized to observe the structural features of the induced conformation and the energetics of interaction of acid denatured cyt c with different nucleotides. Structure induction in the acid denatured cyt c was observed on the addition of the ∼1 mM nucleotide tri-phosphates (ATP/GTP/CTP) at 25 °C, however, not in the presence of 1 mM nucleotide mono and diphosphates. ATP-bound cyt c at pH 2.0 is likely to have a conformation that has intact α-helical domain. However, Met80-Fe(III) axial bond is still ruptured. Observed thermodynamics reflect interaction between nucleotide and cyt c via coupled binding–folding mechanism. DSC data suggest the preferential binding of the ATP to the folded conformation with respect to the acid denatured cyt c. ITC data indicate that the exothermic folding of cyt c was accompanied by endothermic binding of ATP to cyt c.

  13. Quantitative assessments of the distinct contributions of polypeptide backbone amides versus sidechain groups to chain expansion via chemical denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holehouse, Alex S.; Garai, Kanchan; Lyle, Nicholas; Vitalis, Andreas; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-01-01

    In aqueous solutions with high concentrations of chemical denaturants such as urea and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) proteins expand to populate heterogeneous conformational ensembles. These denaturing environments are thought to be good solvents for generic protein sequences because properties of conformational distributions align with those of canonical random coils. Previous studies showed that water is a poor solvent for polypeptide backbones and therefore backbones form collapsed globular structures in aqueous solvents. Here, we ask if polypeptide backbones can intrinsically undergo the requisite chain expansion in aqueous solutions with high concentrations of urea and GdmCl. We answer this question using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We find that the degree of backbone expansion is minimal in aqueous solutions with high concentrations denaturants. Instead, polypeptide backbones sample conformations that are denaturant-specific mixtures of coils and globules, with a persistent preference for globules. Therefore, typical denaturing environments cannot be classified as good solvents for polypeptide backbones. How then do generic protein sequences expand in denaturing environments? To answer this question, we investigated the effects of sidechains using simulations of two archetypal sequences with amino acid compositions that are mixtures of charged, hydrophobic, and polar groups. We find that sidechains lower the effective concentration of backbone amides in water leading to an intrinsic expansion of polypeptide backbones in the absence of denaturants. Additional dilution of the effective concentration of backbone amides is achieved through preferential interactions with denaturants. These effects lead to conformational statistics in denaturing environments that are congruent with those of canonical random coils. Our results highlight the role of sidechain-mediated interactions as determinants of the

  14. Transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation for the treatment of women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Diana; Han, Julia; Neuberger, Molly M; Moy, M Louis; Wallace, Sheila A; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Dahm, Philipp

    2015-03-18

    Transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation is a relatively novel, minimally invasive device-based intervention used to treat individuals with urinary incontinence (UI). No systematic review of the evidence supporting its use has been published to date. To evaluate the efficacy of transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation, compared with other interventions, in the treatment of women with UI.Review authors sought to compare the following.• Transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation versus no treatment/sham treatment.• Transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation versus conservative physical treatment.• Transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation versus mechanical devices (pessaries for UI).• Transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation versus drug treatment.• Transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation versus injectable treatment for UI.• Transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation versus other surgery for UI. We conducted a systematic search of the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 19 December 2014), EMBASE and EMBASE Classic (January 1947 to 2014 Week 50), Google Scholar and three trials registries in December 2014, along with reference checking. We sought to identify unpublished studies by handsearching abstracts of major gynaecology and urology meetings, and by contacting experts in the field and the device manufacturer. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation versus no treatment/sham treatment, conservative physical treatment, mechanical devices, drug treatment, injectable treatment for UI or other surgery for UI in women were eligible. We screened search results and selected eligible studies for inclusion. We assessed risk of bias and analysed dichotomous variables as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and continuous variables as mean differences (MDs) with 95% CIs. We rated the quality of

  15. Denaturing of single electrospun fibrinogen fibers studied by deep ultraviolet fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongyong; Song, Hugeun; Park, Inho; Carlisle, Christine R; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) microscopy is a fluorescence microscopy technique to image unlabeled proteins via the native fluorescence of some of their amino acids. We constructed a DUV fluorescence microscope, capable of 280 nm wavelength excitation by modifying an inverted optical microscope. Moreover, we integrated a nanomanipulator-controlled micropipette into this instrument for precise delivery of picoliter amounts of fluid to selected regions of the sample. In proof-of-principle experiments, we used this instrument to study, in situ, the effect of a denaturing agent on the autofluorescence intensity of single, unlabeled, electrospun fibrinogen nanofibers. Autofluorescence emission from the nanofibers was excited at 280 nm and detected at ∼350 nm. A denaturant solution was discretely applied to small, select sections of the nanofibers and a clear local reduction in autofluorescence intensity was observed. This reduction is attributed to the dissolution of the fibers and the unfolding of proteins in the fibers. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Theoretical aspects of pressure and solute denaturation of proteins: A Kirkwood-buff-theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2012-12-01

    A new approach to the problem of pressure-denaturation (PD) and solute-denaturation (SD) of proteins is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of Le Chatelier principle, and a solution is sought in terms of the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions. It is found that both problems have one factor in common; the excluded volumes of the folded and the unfolded forms with respect to the solvent molecules. It is shown that solvent-induced effects operating on hydrophilic groups along the protein are probably the main reason for PD. On the other hand, the SD depends on the preferential solvation of the folded and the unfolded forms with respect to solvent and co-solvent molecules.

  17. Teaching what one does not know: strangeness and denaturation in (autobiographical narrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luiz da Cunha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The thematic focus in this text are the estrangement/denaturation processes in (autobiographical narrations. The aim of this study was to reflect on the possibility to promote estrangement/denatura - tion in (autobiographical writings made by teenagers in the space/ time of the classroom environment. The methodological proposal consisted on developing (autobiographical writings by students from sociology classes in High School. A total of 138 teenagers from a public school, attending the first school trimester in the year 2013, have participated in the study. The concepts of estrangement/de - naturation are located in the anthropology field and, the work with (autobiographical narrations is located in the socio-clinic perspec - tives and of biographization processes. The results indicate that (autobiographical narrations provide estrangements/denaturation and go towards teaching what one does not know. We can, then, conclude that this possibility, as an educational act, may generate knowledge suspension to self-inventiveness.

  18. Two-dimensional salt and temperature DNA denaturation analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2017-01-01

    We present a microfluidic system and its use to measure DNA denaturation curves by varying the temperature or salt (Na+) concentration. The readout is based on real-time measurements of DNA hybridization using magnetoresistive sensors and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as labels. We report the first...... melting curves of DNA hybrids measured as a function of continuously decreasing salt concentration at fixed temperature and compare them to the corresponding curves obtained vs. temperature at fixed salt concentration. The magnetoresistive sensor platform provided reliable results under varying....... The results demonstrate that concentration melting provides an attractive alternative to temperature melting in on-chip DNA denaturation experiments and further show that the magnetoresistive platform is attractive due to its low cross-sensitivity to temperature and liquid composition....

  19. Native and denatured bovine serum albumin. D.c. polarography, stripping voltammetry and constant current chronopotentiometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostatná, Veronika; Uslu, B.; Dogan, B.; Ozkan, S.; Paleček, Emil

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 593, č. 1-2 (2006), s. 172-178 ISSN 0022-0728 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040513; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : protein electrochemistry * bovine serum albumin * native and denatured proteins Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.339, year: 2006

  20. Micro-CT Imaging of Denatured Chitin by Silver to Explore Honey Bee and Insect Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzloff, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chitin and cuticle coatings are important to the environmental and immune defense of honey bees and insect pollinators. Pesticides or environmental effects may target the biochemistry of insect chitin and cuticle coating. Denaturing of chitin involves a combination of deacetylation, intercalation, oxidation, Schweiger-peeling, and the formation of amine hydrochloride salt. The term “denatured chitin” calls attention to structural and property changes to the internal membranes and external carapace of organisms so that some properties affecting biological activities are diminished. Methodology/Principal Findings A case study was performed on honey bees using silver staining and microscopic computer-tomographic x-ray radiography (micro-CT). Silver nitrate formed counter-ion complexes with labile ammonium cations and reacted with amine hydrochloride. Silver was concentrated in the peritrophic membrane, on the abdomen, in the glossa, at intersegmental joints (tarsi), at wing attachments, and in tracheal air sacs. Imaged mono-esters and fatty acids from cuticle coating on external surfaces were apparently reduced by an alcohol pretreatment. Conclusions/Significance The technique provides 3-dimensional and sectional images of individual honey bees consistent with the chemistries of silver reaction and complex formation with denatured chitin. Environmental exposures and influences such as gaseous nitric oxide intercalant, trace oxidants such as ozone gas, oligosachharide salt conversion, exposure to acid rain, and chemical or biochemical denaturing by pesticides may be studied using this technique. Peritrophic membranes, which protect against food abrasion, microorganisms, and permit efficient digestion, were imaged. Apparent surface damage to the corneal lenses of compound eyes by dilute acid exposure consistent with chitin amine hydrochloride formation was imaged. The technique can contribute to existing insect pathology research, and may provide an

  1. Micro-CT imaging of denatured chitin by silver to explore honey bee and insect pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Butzloff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin and cuticle coatings are important to the environmental and immune defense of honey bees and insect pollinators. Pesticides or environmental effects may target the biochemistry of insect chitin and cuticle coating. Denaturing of chitin involves a combination of deacetylation, intercalation, oxidation, Schweiger-peeling, and the formation of amine hydrochloride salt. The term "denatured chitin" calls attention to structural and property changes to the internal membranes and external carapace of organisms so that some properties affecting biological activities are diminished. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case study was performed on honey bees using silver staining and microscopic computer-tomographic x-ray radiography (micro-CT. Silver nitrate formed counter-ion complexes with labile ammonium cations and reacted with amine hydrochloride. Silver was concentrated in the peritrophic membrane, on the abdomen, in the glossa, at intersegmental joints (tarsi, at wing attachments, and in tracheal air sacs. Imaged mono-esters and fatty acids from cuticle coating on external surfaces were apparently reduced by an alcohol pretreatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The technique provides 3-dimensional and sectional images of individual honey bees consistent with the chemistries of silver reaction and complex formation with denatured chitin. Environmental exposures and influences such as gaseous nitric oxide intercalant, trace oxidants such as ozone gas, oligosachharide salt conversion, exposure to acid rain, and chemical or biochemical denaturing by pesticides may be studied using this technique. Peritrophic membranes, which protect against food abrasion, microorganisms, and permit efficient digestion, were imaged. Apparent surface damage to the corneal lenses of compound eyes by dilute acid exposure consistent with chitin amine hydrochloride formation was imaged. The technique can contribute to existing insect pathology research, and may

  2. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling of bacterial communities composition in Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, S.K.; Ramaiah, N.

    of Environmental Biology circleshadowdwnMay 2011circleshadowdwn Introduction The bacteria play a major role in carbon dynamics of marine ecosystems and, the importance of heterotrophic bacteria in marine ecosystem functioning is very well recognized (Azam et al..., 2008). Denaturing gradient gel-electrophoressis (DGGE) based fingerprinting helps estimate the numbers of dominant phylotype in a given sample (Muyzer et al., 1993). Very diverse bacterial assemblages such as those in the soils present many bands...

  3. Native and denatured forms of proteins can be discriminated at edge plane carbon electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostatná, Veronika; Černocká, Hana; Kurzatkowska, K.; Paleček, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 735, JUL (2012), s. 31-36 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB100040901; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA MŠk(CZ) ME09038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : protein denaturation * carbon electrodes * edge plane pyrolytic graphite Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.387, year: 2012

  4. Multifocal peritoneal splenosis in Tc-99m-labeled heat-denatured red blood cell scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Min Ki; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Choe, Won Sick [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    A 44-year-old man with a past medical history of splenectomy came to hospital because of epigastric pain abdominopelvic computed tomography(CT) showed a soft tissue mass and multifocal variable-sized nodules as well as finding suggestive of cholecystitis. Subsequently, he underwent Tc-99m-labeled heat- denatured red blood cell(RBC) scintigraphy to evaluate the mass and nodules. The scintigraphy confirmed multifocal peritoneal splenosis in the abdominopelvic cavity.

  5. Equilibrium unfolding of A. niger RNase: pH dependence of chemical and thermal denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gundampati Ravi; Sharma, Anurag; Kumari, Moni; Jagannadham, Medicherla V; Debnath, Mira

    2011-08-01

    Equilibrium unfolding of A. niger RNase with chemical denaturants, for example GuHCl and urea, and thermal unfolding have been studied as a function of pH using fluorescence, far-UV, near-UV, and absorbance spectroscopy. Because of their ability to affect electrostatic interactions, pH and chemical denaturants have a marked effect on the stability, structure, and function of many globular proteins. ANS binding studies have been conducted to enable understanding of the folding mechanism of the protein in the presence of the denaturants. Spectroscopic studies by absorbance, fluorescence, and circular dichroism and use of K2D software revealed that the enzyme has α + β type secondary structure with approximately 29% α-helix, 24% β-sheet, and 47% random coil. Under neutral conditions the enzyme is stable in urea whereas GuHCl-induced equilibrium unfolding was cooperative. A. niger RNase has little ANS binding even under neutral conditions. Multiple intermediates were populated during the pH-induced unfolding of A. niger RNase. Urea and temperature-induced unfolding of A. niger RNase into the molten globule-like state is non-cooperative, in contrast to the cooperativity seen with the native protein, suggesting the presence of two parts/domains, in the molecular structure of A. niger RNase, with different stability that unfolds in steps. Interestingly, the GuHCl-induced unfolding of the A state (molten globule state) of A. niger RNase is unique, because a low concentration of denaturant not only induces structural change but also facilitates transition from one molten globule like state (A(MG1)) into another (I(MG2)).

  6. Thermal stability of chemically denatured green fluorescent protein (GFP) A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Attila; Malnasi-Csizmadia, Andras; Somogyi, Bela; Lorinczy, Denes

    2004-02-09

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a light emitter in the bioluminescence reaction of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The protein consist of 238 amino acids and produces green fluorescent light ({lambda}{sub max}=508 nm), when irradiated with near ultraviolet light. The fluorescence is due to the presence of chromophore consisting of an imidazolone ring, formed by a post-translational modification of the tripeptide -Ser{sup 65}-Tyr{sup 66}-Gly{sup 67}-, which buried into {beta}-barrel. GFP is extremely compact and heat stable molecule. In this work, we present data for the effect of chemical denaturing agent on the thermal stability of GFP. When denaturing agent is applied, global thermal stability and the melting point of the molecule is decreases, that can be monitored with differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicate, that in 1-6 M range of GuHCl the melting temperature is decreasing continuously from 83 to 38 deg. C. Interesting finding, that the calculated calorimetric enthalpy decreases with GuHCl concentration up to 3 M (5.6-0.2 kJ mol{sup -1}), but at 4 M it jumps to 8.4 and at greater concentration it is falling down to 1.1 kJ mol{sup -1}. First phenomena, i.e. the decrease of melting point with increasing GuHCl concentration can be easily explained by the effect of the extended chemical denaturation, when less and less amount of heat required to diminish the remaining hydrogen bonds in {beta}-barrel. The surprising increase of calorimetric enthalpy at 4 M concentration of GuHCl could be the consequence of a dimerization or a formation of stable complex between GFP and denaturing agent as well as a precipitation at an extreme GuHCl concentration. We are planning further experiments to elucidate fluorescent consequence of these processes.

  7. Chemical Denaturants Smoothen Ruggedness on the Free Energy Landscape of Protein Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Pooja; Jethva, Prashant N; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2017-08-08

    To characterize experimentally the ruggedness of the free energy landscape of protein folding is challenging, because the distributed small free energy barriers are usually dominated by one, or a few, large activation free energy barriers. This study delineates changes in the roughness of the free energy landscape by making use of the observation that a decrease in ruggedness is accompanied invariably by an increase in folding cooperativity. Hydrogen exchange (HX) coupled to mass spectrometry was used to detect transient sampling of local energy minima and the global unfolded state on the free energy landscape of the small protein single-chain monellin. Under native conditions, local noncooperative openings result in interconversions between Boltzmann-distributed intermediate states, populated on an extremely rugged "uphill" energy landscape. The cooperativity of these interconversions was increased by selectively destabilizing the native state via mutations, and further by the addition of a chemical denaturant. The perturbation of stability alone resulted in seven backbone amide sites exchanging cooperatively. The size of the cooperatively exchanging and/or unfolding unit did not depend on the extent of protein destabilization. Only upon the addition of a denaturant to a destabilized mutant variant did seven additional backbone amide sites exchange cooperatively. Segmentwise analysis of the HX kinetics of the mutant variants further confirmed that the observed increase in cooperativity was due to the smoothing of the ruggedness of the free energy landscape of folding of the protein by the chemical denaturant.

  8. Modified denatured lysozyme effectively solubilizes fullerene c60 nanoparticles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepi, Marialuisa; Politi, Jane; Dardano, Principia; Amoresano, Angela; De Stefano, Luca; Monti, Daria Maria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2017-08-01

    Fullerenes, allotropic forms of carbon, have very interesting pharmacological effects and engineering applications. However, a very low solubility both in organic solvents and water hinders their use. Fullerene C60, the most studied among fullerenes, can be dissolved in water only in the form of nanoparticles of variable dimensions and limited stability. Here the effect on the production of C60 nanoparticles by a native and denatured hen egg white lysozyme, a highly basic protein, has been systematically studied. In order to obtain a denatured, yet soluble, lysozyme derivative, the four disulfides of the native protein were reduced and exposed cysteines were alkylated by 3-bromopropylamine, thus introducing eight additional positive charges. The C60 solubilizing properties of the modified denatured lysozyme proved to be superior to those of the native protein, allowing the preparation of biocompatible highly homogeneous and stable C60 nanoparticles using lower amounts of protein, as demonstrated by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies. This lysozyme derivative could represent an effective tool for the solubilization of other carbon allotropes.

  9. Evaluation of gasoline-denatured ethanol as a carbon source for denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazasi, Anna; Boardman, Gregory D; Bott, Charles B

    2013-06-01

    In this study concerning denitrification, the performance of three carbon sources, methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and gasoline-denatured ethanol (dEtOH), was compared and evaluated on the basis of treatment efficiency, inhibition potential and cost. The gasoline denaturant considered here contained mostly aliphatic compounds and little of the components that typically boost the octane rating, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes. Results were obtained using three lab-scale SBRs operated at SRT of 12.0 +/- 0.9 days. After biomass was acclimated, denitrification rates with dEtOH were similar to those of EtOH (201 +/- 50 and 197 +/- 28 NO3-N/g MLVSS x d, respectively), and higher than those of MeOH (165 +/- 49 mg NO3-N/g MLVSS x d). The denaturant did not affect biomass production, nitrification or denitrification. Effluent soluble COD concentrations were always less than the analytical detection limit. Although the cost of dEtOH ($2.00/kg nitrate removed) was somewhat higher than that of methanol ($1.63/kg nitrate removed), the use of dEtOH is very promising and utilities will have to decide if it is worth paying a little extra to take advantage of its benefits.

  10. Comparison of membrane electroporation and protein denature in response to pulsed electric field with different durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feiran; Fang, Zhihui; Mast, Jason; Chen, Wei

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we compared the minimum potential differences in the electroporation of membrane lipid bilayers and the denaturation of membrane proteins in response to an intensive pulsed electric field with various pulse durations. Single skeletal muscle fibers were exposed to a pulsed external electric field. The field-induced changes in the membrane integrity (leakage current) and the Na channel currents were monitored to identify the minimum electric field needed to damage the membrane lipid bilayer and the membrane proteins, respectively. We found that in response to a relatively long pulsed electric shock (longer than the membrane intrinsic time constant), a lower membrane potential was needed to electroporate the cell membrane than for denaturing the membrane proteins, while for a short pulse a higher membrane potential was needed. In other words, phospholipid bilayers are more sensitive to the electric field than the membrane proteins for a long pulsed shock, while for a short pulse the proteins become more vulnerable. We can predict that for a short or ultrashort pulsed electric shock, the minimum membrane potential required to start to denature the protein functions in the cell plasma membrane is lower than that which starts to reduce the membrane integrity. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Radioimmunoassay and heat denaturation enzyme assay for the detection of Tay-Sachs heterozygotes during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gold, R.J.M.; Mahuran, D.; Lowden, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Tay-Sachs disease results from a loss of activity of hexosaminidase A (HEX A) in body tissues and fluids. Heterozygotes for the disease are usually identified by their relatively low ratio of heat-labile HEX A to total hexosaminidase. During pregnancy an intermediate isoenzyme (HEX I) increases in activity in serum and obscures the heterozygote status. HEX I does not increase in leucocytes, tears and other body tissues but because of technical difficulties in these assays the authors examined the feasibility of using a radioimmunoassay for HEX A. By univariate analysis, the heat denaturation assay gave a lower cost of misclassification for non-pregnant normals while RIA did so for pregnant normals. A combination of both tests led to reduced cost of misclassification compared to either alone. Bayesian analysis of bivariate gaussian density functions for heat denaturation and for radioimmunoassays of HEX isoenzymes was employed to calculate misclassification frequencies. Among the parameters examined, HEX A measured by RIA and % HEX A by heat-denaturation assay were the two having the best discriminatory power. (Auth.)

  12. Isothermal chemical denaturation of large proteins: Path-dependence and irreversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafer, Lucas; Kloczewiak, Marek; Polleck, Sharon M; Luo, Yin

    2017-12-15

    State functions (e.g., ΔG) are path independent and quantitatively describe the equilibrium states of a thermodynamic system. Isothermal chemical denaturation (ICD) is often used to extrapolate state function parameters for protein unfolding in native buffer conditions. The approach is prudent when the unfolding/refolding processes are path independent and reversible, but may lead to erroneous results if the processes are not reversible. The reversibility was demonstrated in several early studies for smaller proteins, but was assumed in some reports for large proteins with complex structures. In this work, the unfolding/refolding of several proteins were systematically studied using an automated ICD instrument. It is shown that: (i) the apparent unfolding mechanism and conformational stability of large proteins can be denaturant-dependent, (ii) equilibration times for large proteins are non-trivial and may introduce significant error into calculations of ΔG, (iii) fluorescence emission spectroscopy may not correspond to other methods, such as circular dichroism, when used to measure protein unfolding, and (iv) irreversible unfolding and hysteresis can occur in the absence of aggregation. These results suggest that thorough confirmation of the state functions by, for example, performing refolding experiments or using additional denaturants, is needed when quantitatively studying the thermodynamics of protein unfolding using ICD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of high pressure freezing (HPF) on denaturation of natural actomyosin extracted from prawn (Metapenaeus ensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lina; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zhihang

    2017-08-15

    Effects of protein denaturation caused by high pressure freezing, involving Pressure-Factors (pressure, time) and Freezing-Factors (temperature, phase transition, recrystallization, ice crystal types), are complicated. In the current study, the conformation and functional changes of natural actomyosin (NAM) under pressure assisted freezing (PAF, 100,150,300,400,500MPa P -20°C/25min ), pressure shift freezing (PSF, 200MPa P -20°C/25min ), and immersion freezing ( 0.1MPa P -20°C/5min ) after pressure was released to 0.1MPa, as compared to normal immersion freezing process (IF, 0.1MPa P -20°C/30min ). Results indicated that PSF ( 200MPa P -20°C/30min ) could reduce the denaturation of frozen NAM and a pressure of 300MPa was the critical point to induce such a denaturation. During the periods of B→D in PSF or B→C→D in PAF, the generation and growth of ice crystals played an important role on changing the secondary and tertiary structure of the treated NAM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exact method for numerically analyzing a model of local denaturation in superhelically stressed DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fye, R.M.; Benham, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Local denaturation, the separation at specific sites of the two strands comprising the DNA double helix, is one of the most fundamental processes in biology, required to allow the base sequence to be read both in DNA transcription and in replication. In living organisms this process can be mediated by enzymes which regulate the amount of superhelical stress imposed on the DNA. We present a numerically exact technique for analyzing a model of denaturation in superhelically stressed DNA. This approach is capable of predicting the locations and extents of transition in circular superhelical DNA molecules of kilobase lengths and specified base pair sequences. It can also be used for closed loops of DNA which are typically found in vivo to be kilobases long. The analytic method consists of an integration over the DNA twist degrees of freedom followed by the introduction of auxiliary variables to decouple the remaining degrees of freedom, which allows the use of the transfer matrix method. The algorithm implementing our technique requires O(N 2 ) operations and O(N) memory to analyze a DNA domain containing N base pairs. However, to analyze kilobase length DNA molecules it must be implemented in high precision floating point arithmetic. An accelerated algorithm is constructed by imposing an upper bound M on the number of base pairs that can simultaneously denature in a state. This accelerated algorithm requires O(MN) operations, and has an analytically bounded error. Sample calculations show that it achieves high accuracy (greater than 15 decimal digits) with relatively small values of M (M<0.05N) for kilobase length molecules under physiologically relevant conditions. Calculations are performed on the superhelical pBR322 DNA sequence to test the accuracy of the method. With no free parameters in the model, the locations and extents of local denaturation predicted by this analysis are in quantitatively precise agreement with in vitro experimental measurements

  15. Fluctuating partially native-like topologies in the acid denatured ensemble of autolysis resistant HIV-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Manoj Kumar; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2009-02-01

    Folding, in-vivo, starts from a denatured state and thus the nature of the denatured state would play an important role in directing the folding of a protein. We report here NMR characterization of the acid-denatured state of a mutant of HIV-1 protease, designed to prevent autolysis (Q7K, L33I, L63I) and to prevent cysteine oxidation (C67A and C95A). Secondary chemical shifts, TALOS analysis of chemical shifts and (15)N relaxation data (R(1), R(2), NOE) coupled with AABUF and hydrophobicity calculations, suggest formation of hydrophobic clusters and possibility of some partially native-like topologies in the acid denatured state of the protease. The structural and dynamics characteristics of the acid denatured PR seem to be considerably different from those of the guanidine or urea denatured states of some variants of PR. These would have implications for the folding and auto-processing of the enzyme in-vivo.

  16. Variations among Japanese of the factor IX gene (F9) detected by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Chiyoko; Takahashi, Norio; Asakawa, Junichi; Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Meiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    In the course of feasibility studies to examine the efficiencies and practicalities of various techniques for screening for genetic variations, the human coagulation factor IX (F9) genes of 63 Japanese families were examined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Four target sequences with lengths of 983-2,891 bp from the F9 genes of 126 unrelated individuals from Hiroshima and their 100 children were amplified by PCR, digested with restriction enzymes to approximately 500-bp fragments, and examined by DGGE - a total of 6,724 bp being examined per individual. GC-rich sequences (GC-clamps) of 40 bp were attached to both ends of the target sequences, as far as was feasible. Eleven types of new nucleotide substitutions were detected in the population, none of which produced RFLPs or caused hemophilia B. By examining two target sequences in a single lane, approximately 8,000 bp in a diploid individual could be examined. This approach is very effective for the detection of variations in DNA and is applicable to large-scale population studies. 46 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Helical Propensity Affects the Conformational Properties of the Denatured State of Cytochrome c'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Travis A; Bowler, Bruce E

    2018-01-23

    Changing the helical propensity of a polypeptide sequence might be expected to affect the conformational properties of the denatured state of a protein. To test this hypothesis, alanines at positions 83 and 87 near the center of helix 3 of cytochrome c' from Rhodopseudomonas palustris were mutated to serine to decrease the stability of this helix. A set of 13 single histidine variants in the A83S/A87S background were prepared to permit assessment of the conformational properties of the denatured state using histidine-loop formation in 3 M guanidine hydrochloride. The data are compared with previous histidine-heme loop formation data for wild-type cytochrome c'. As expected, destabilization of helix 3 decreases the global stabilities of the histidine variants in the A83S/A87S background relative to the wild-type background. Loop stability versus loop size data yields a scaling exponent of 2.1 ± 0.2, similar to the value of 2.3 ± 0.2 obtained for wild-type cytochrome c'. However, the stabilities of all histidine-heme loops, which contain the helix 3 sequence segment, are increased in the A83S/A87S background compared to the wild-type background. Rate constants for histidine-heme loop breakage are similar for the wild-type and A83S/A87S variants. However, for histidine-heme loops that contain the helix 3 sequence segment, the rate constants for loop formation increase in the A83S/A87S background compared to the wild-type background. Thus, residual helical structure appears to stiffen the polypeptide chain slowing loop formation in the denatured state. The implications of these results for protein folding mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Single Molecular Level Probing of Structure and Dynamics of Papain Under Denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bhaswati; Chaudhury, Apala; Das, Nilimesh; Sen, Pratik

    2017-01-01

    Papain is a cysteine protease enzyme present in papaya and known to help in digesting peptide. Thus the structure and function of the active site of papain is of interest. The objective of present study is to unveil the overall structural transformation and the local structural change around the active site of papain as a function of chemical denaturant. Papain has been tagged at Cys-25 with a thiol specific fluorescence probe N-(7- dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarin-3-yl) iodoacetamide (DACIA). Guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) has been used as the chemical denaturant. Steady state, time-resolved, and single molecular level fluorescence techniques was applied to map the change in the local environment. It is found that papain undergoes a two-step denaturation in the presence of GnHCl. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopic (FCS) data indicate that the size (hydrodynamic diameter) of native papain is ~36.8 Å, which steadily increases to ~53 Å in the presence of 6M GnHCl. FCS study also reveals that the conformational fluctuation time of papain is 6.3 µs in its native state, which decreased to 2.7 µs in the presence of 0.75 M GnHCl. Upon further increase in GnHCl concentration the conformational fluctuation time increase monotonically till 6 M GnHCl, where the time constant is measured as 14 µs. On the other hand, the measurement of ellipticity, hence the helical structure, by circular dichroism spectroscopy is found to be incapable to capture such structural transformation. It is concluded that in the presence of small amount of GnHCl the active site of papain takes up a more compact structure (although the overall size increases) than in the native state, which has been designated as the intermediate state. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Stabilizing effect of biochar on soil extracellular enzymes after a denaturing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzobair, Khalid A; Stromberger, Mary E; Ippolito, James A

    2016-01-01

    Stabilizing extracellular enzymes may maintain enzymatic activity while protecting enzymes from proteolysis and denaturation. A study determined whether a fast pyrolysis hardwood biochar (CQuest™) would reduce evaporative losses, subsequently stabilizing soil extracellular enzymes and prohibiting potential enzymatic activity loss following a denaturing stress (microwaving). Soil was incubated in the presence of biochar (0%, 1%, 2%, 5%, or 10% by wt.) for 36 days and then exposed to microwave energies (0, 400, 800, 1600, or 3200 J g(-1) soil). Soil enzymes (β-glucosidase, β-d-cellobiosidase, N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase, β-xylosidase) were analyzed by fluorescence-based assays. Biochar amendment reduced leucine aminopeptidase and β-xylosidase potential activity after the incubation period and prior to stress exposure. The 10% biochar rate reduced soil water loss at the lowest stress level (400 J microwave energy g(-1) soil). Enzyme stabilization was demonstrated for β-xylosidase; intermediate biochar application rates prevented a complete loss of this enzyme's potential activity after soil was exposed to 400 (1% biochar treatment) or 1600 (5% biochar treatment) J microwave energy g(-1) soil. Remaining enzyme potential activities were not affected by biochar, and activities decreased with increasing stress levels. We concluded that biochar has the potential to reduce evaporative soil water losses and stabilize certain extracellular enzymes where activity is maintained after a denaturing stress; this effect was biochar rate and enzyme dependent. While biochar may reduce the potential activity of certain soil extracellular enzymes, this phenomenon was not universal as the majority of enzymes assayed in this study were unaffected by exposure to biochar. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On the mobility of partially denatured DNA in gel electrophoresis: a theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sean, David

    There are technologies which exploit a rapid reduction of the gel electrophoretic mobility of DNA arising from partial denaturation. The underlying phenomenon behind these experiments---the mechanisms which reduce the mobility---are not very well understood. Such is the purpose of my thesis. The first chapter provides a brief introduction to the field of polymer physics. The subjects covered are carefully chosen to directly relate to the forthcoming research. There is a published semi-empirical formula used to model the rapid decrease of mobility which is largely considered to be consistent with experimental data. The second chapter of this thesis demonstrates that there is a fundamental confusion in the literature regarding the fitting parameter Lr, in the said formula. By going back to the original derivation, a physical interpretation can be given to L r. This interpretation yields theoretical values which are consistent with what has been published. However, we find that an underlying assumption---that the effect of the denaturation does not depend on its position along the DNA fragment---may systematically overestimate experimental observations of Lr. To measure the impact of this assumption, a simulation model of DNA is presented. The article presented in the third chapter reveals that indeed, the position of the denatured region affects the migration of the DNA fragment. A refined version of the formula which takes these factors into account is proposed. The simulations also reveal that, for certain fields, an unexpected conformation completely dominates during migration of the fragment. This surprising result: a squid-like conformation, is explored in chapter four.

  1. Brownian dynamics simulations of sequence-dependent duplex denaturation in dynamically superhelical DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Steven P.; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Krishnan, V. V.; Fink, William H.; Benham, Craig J.

    2005-09-01

    The topological state of DNA in vivo is dynamically regulated by a number of processes that involve interactions with bound proteins. In one such process, the tracking of RNA polymerase along the double helix during transcription, restriction of rotational motion of the polymerase and associated structures, generates waves of overtwist downstream and undertwist upstream from the site of transcription. The resulting superhelical stress is often sufficient to drive double-stranded DNA into a denatured state at locations such as promoters and origins of replication, where sequence-specific duplex opening is a prerequisite for biological function. In this way, transcription and other events that actively supercoil the DNA provide a mechanism for dynamically coupling genetic activity with regulatory and other cellular processes. Although computer modeling has provided insight into the equilibrium dynamics of DNA supercoiling, to date no model has appeared for simulating sequence-dependent DNA strand separation under the nonequilibrium conditions imposed by the dynamic introduction of torsional stress. Here, we introduce such a model and present results from an initial set of computer simulations in which the sequences of dynamically superhelical, 147 base pair DNA circles were systematically altered in order to probe the accuracy with which the model can predict location, extent, and time of stress-induced duplex denaturation. The results agree both with well-tested statistical mechanical calculations and with available experimental information. Additionally, we find that sites susceptible to denaturation show a propensity for localizing to supercoil apices, suggesting that base sequence determines locations of strand separation not only through the energetics of interstrand interactions, but also by influencing the geometry of supercoiling.

  2. Denaturation of collagen structures and their transformation under the physical and chemical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankin, A.; Boldirev, V.; Fadeev, G.; Baburina, M.; Kulikovskii, A.; Vostrikova, N.

    2017-11-01

    The process of denaturation of collagen structures under the influence of physical and chemical factors play an important role in the manufacture of food technology and the production of drugs for medicine and cosmetology. The paper discussed the problem of the combined effects of heat treatment, mechanical dispersion and ultrasonic action on the structural changes of the animal collagen in the presence of weak protonated organic acids. Algorithm combined effects of physical and chemical factors as a result of the formation of the technological properties of products containing collagen has been shown.

  3. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography mutation analysis in patients with reduced Protein S levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bathum, Lise; Münster, Anna-Marie; Nybo, Mads

    2008-01-01

    diagnosis and risk estimation. The aim was to design a high-throughput genetic analysis based on denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography to identify sequence variations in the gene coding for Protein S. PATIENTS: In total, 55 patients referred to the Section of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Odense......BACKGROUND: Patients with congenital Protein S deficiency have increased risk of venous thromboembolism. However, Protein S levels show large intra-individual variation and the biochemical assays have low accuracy and a high interlaboratory variability. Genetic analysis might aid in a more precise......, giving a precise diagnosis and subsequently a better risk estimation....

  4. DNA denaturation through a model of the partition points on a one-dimensional lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejdani, R.; Huseini, H.

    1994-08-01

    We have shown that by using a model of the partition points gas on a one-dimensional lattice, we can study, besides the saturation curves obtained before for the enzyme kinetics, also the denaturation process, i.e. the breaking of the hydrogen bonds connecting the two strands, under treatment by heat of DNA. We think that this model, as a very simple model and mathematically transparent, can be advantageous for pedagogic goals or other theoretical investigations in chemistry or modern biology. (author). 29 refs, 4 figs

  5. Screening for mutations in the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase gene using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, L; Ged, C; Hombrados, I

    1999-01-01

    to exon skipping, and a 2-bp deletion (415-416delTA) resulting in a frameshift and the introduction of a premature stop codon. Heterologous expression and enzymatic studies of the mutant proteins demonstrate that the three mutations leading to shortening or truncation of the UROD protein have no residual......, confirming the heterogeneity of the underlying genetic defects of these diseases. We have established a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) assay for mutation detection in the UROD gene, enabling the simultaneous screening for known and unknown mutations. The established assay has proved able...

  6. Effect of heating strategies on whey protein denaturation--Revisited by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, M; Rauh, V M; Christensen, M; Johansen, L B; Hammershøj, M; Larsen, L B

    2016-01-01

    Previous standards in the area of effect of heat treatment processes on milk protein denaturation were based primarily on laboratory-scale analysis and determination of denaturation degrees by, for example, electrophoresis. In this study, whey protein denaturation was revisited by pilot-scale heating strategies and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC/MC Q-TOF) analysis. Skim milk was heat treated by the use of 3 heating strategies, namely plate heat exchanger (PHE), tubular heat exchanger (THE), and direct steam injection (DSI), under various heating temperatures (T) and holding times. The effect of heating strategy on the degree of denaturation of β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin was determined using LC/MC Q-TOF of pH 4.5-soluble whey proteins. Furthermore, effect of heating strategy on the rennet-induced coagulation properties was studied by oscillatory rheometry. In addition, rennet-induced coagulation of heat-treated micellar casein concentrate subjected to PHE was studied. For skim milk, the whey protein denaturation increased significantly as T and holding time increased, regardless of heating method. High denaturation degrees were obtained for T >100°C using PHE and THE, whereas DSI resulted in significantly lower denaturation degrees, compared with PHE and THE. Rennet coagulation properties were impaired by increased T and holding time regardless of heating method, although DSI resulted in less impairment compared with PHE and THE. No significant difference was found between THE and PHE for effect on rennet coagulation time, whereas the curd firming rate was significantly larger for THE compared with PHE. Micellar casein concentrate possessed improved rennet coagulation properties compared with skim milk receiving equal heat treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of AGEs as markers for carbohydrate metabolism and protein denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Ryoji; Shirakawa, Jun-Ichi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ohno, Rei-Ichi; Moroishi, Narumi; Sakata, Noriyuki; Nagai, Mime

    2014-07-01

    Approximately 100 years have passed since the Maillard reaction was first reported in the field of food chemistry as a condensation reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids. This reaction is thought to progress slowly primarily from glucose with proteins in vivo. An early-stage product, called the "Amadori product", is converted into advanced glycation end products. Those accumulate in the body in accordance with age, with such accumulation being enhanced by lifestyle-related diseases that result in the denaturation of proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated that intermediate carbonyls are generated by several pathways, and rapidly generate many glycation products. However, accurate quantification of glycation products in vivo is difficult due to instability and differences in physicochemical properties. In this connection, little is known about the relationship between the structure of glycation products and pathology. Furthermore, the interaction between proteins modified by glycation and receptors for advanced glycation end products is also known to induce the production of several inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, those inhibitors have been developed over the world to prevent lifestyle-related diseases. In this review, we describe the process of protein denaturation induced by glycation and discuss the possibility of using the process as a marker of age-related diseases.

  8. Heat capacity changes in RNA folding: application of perturbation theory to hammerhead ribozyme cold denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulecky, Peter J; Feig, Andrew L

    2004-01-01

    In proteins, empirical correlations have shown that changes in heat capacity (DeltaC(P)) scale linearly with the hydrophobic surface area buried upon folding. The influence of DeltaC(P) on RNA folding has been widely overlooked and is poorly understood. In addition to considerations of solvent reorganization, electrostatic effects might contribute to DeltaC(P)s of folding in polyanionic species such as RNAs. Here, we employ a perturbation method based on electrostatic theory to probe the hot and cold denaturation behavior of the hammerhead ribozyme. This treatment avoids much of the error associated with imposing two-state folding models on non-two-state systems. Ribozyme stability is perturbed across a matrix of solvent conditions by varying the concentration of NaCl and methanol co-solvent. Temperature-dependent unfolding is then monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The resulting array of unfolding transitions can be used to calculate a DeltaC(P) of folding that accurately predicts the observed cold denaturation temperature. We confirm the accuracy of the calculated DeltaC(P) by using isothermal titration calorimetry, and also demonstrate a methanol-dependence of the DeltaC(P). We weigh the strengths and limitations of this method for determining DeltaC(P) values. Finally, we discuss the data in light of the physical origins of the DeltaC(P)s for RNA folding and consider their impact on biological function.

  9. Thermal and chemical denaturation of Bacillus circulans xylanase: A biophysical chemistry laboratory module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Richard; Gentile, Lisa

    2008-11-01

    A number of institutions have been, or are in the process of, modifying their biochemistry major to include some emphasis on the quantitative physical chemistry of biomolecules. Sometimes this is done as a replacement for part for the entire physical chemistry requirement, while at other institutions this is incorporated as a component into the traditional two-semester biochemistry series. The latter is the model used for biochemistry and molecular biology majors at the University of Richmond, whose second semester of biochemistry is a course entitled Proteins: Structure, Function, and Biophysics. What is described herein is a protein thermodynamics laboratory module, using the protein Bacillus circulans xylanase, which reinforces many lecture concepts, including: (i) the denatured (D) state ensemble of a protein can be different, depending on how it was populated; (ii) intermediate states may be detected by some spectroscopic techniques but not by others; (iii) the use and assumptions of the van't Hoff approach to calculate ΔH(o) , ΔS(o) , and ΔG(o) (T) for thermal protein unfolding transitions; and (iv) the use and assumptions of an approach that allows determination of the Gibb's free energy of a protein unfolding transition based on the linear dependence of ΔG(o) on the concentration of denaturant used. This module also requires students to design their own experimental protocols and spend time in the primary literature, both important parts of an upper division lab. Copyright © 2008 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Approach to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms by automated constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerheim, Jens; Abrahamsen, Torveig Weum; Kristensen, Annette Torgunrud; Gaudernack, Gustav; Ekstroem, Per O.

    2003-01-01

    Melting gel techniques have proven to be amenable and powerful tools in point mutation and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. With the introduction of commercially available capillary electrophoresis instruments, a partly automated platform for denaturant capillary electrophoresis with potential for routine screening of selected target sequences has been established. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the use of automated constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (ACDCE) in single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of various target sequences. Optimal analysis conditions for different single nucleotide polymorphisms on ACDCE are evaluated with the Poland algorithm. Laboratory procedures include only PCR and electrophoresis. For direct genotyping of individual SNPs, the samples are analyzed with an internal standard and the alleles are identified by co-migration of sample and standard peaks. In conclusion, SNPs suitable for melting gel analysis based on theoretical thermodynamics were separated by ACDCE under appropriate conditions. With this instrumentation (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer), 48 samples could be analyzed without any intervention. Several institutions have capillary instrumentation in-house, thus making this SNP analysis method accessible to large groups of researchers without any need for instrument modification

  11. Denatured protein-coated docetaxel nanoparticles: Alterable drug state and cytosolic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Xiao, Qingqing; Wang, Yiran; Zhang, Chenshuang; He, Wei; Yin, Lifang

    2017-05-15

    Many lead compounds have a low solubility in water, which substantially hinders their clinical application. Nanosuspensions have been considered a promising strategy for the delivery of water-insoluble drugs. Here, denatured soy protein isolate (SPI)-coated docetaxel nanosuspensions (DTX-NS) were developed using an anti-solvent precipitation-ultrasonication method to improve the water-solubility of DTX, thus improving its intracellular delivery. DTX-NS, with a diameter of 150-250nm and drug-loading up to 18.18%, were successfully prepared by coating drug particles with SPI. Interestingly, the drug state of DTX-NS was alterable. Amorphous drug nanoparticles were obtained at low drug-loading, whereas at a high drug-loading, the DTX-NS drug was mainly present in the crystalline state. Moreover, DTX-NS could be internalized at high levels by cancer cells and enter the cytosol by lysosomal escape, enhancing cell cytotoxicity and apoptosis compared with free DTX. Taken together, denatured SPI has a strong stabilization effect on nanosuspensions, and the drug state in SPI-coated nanosuspensions is alterable by changing the drug-loading. Moreover, DTX-NS could achieve cytosolic delivery, generating enhanced cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of thermally induced denaturation on technological-functional properties of whey protein isolate-based films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Krimmel, B; Grupa, U; Noller, K

    2014-09-01

    This study examined how and to what extent the degree of denaturation affected the technological-functional properties of whey protein isolate (WPI)-based coatings. It was observed that denaturation affected the material properties of WPI-coated films significantly. Surface energy decreased by approximately 20% compared with native coatings. Because the surface energy of a coating should be lower than that of the substrate, this might result in enhanced wettability characteristics between WPI-based solution and substrate surface. Water vapor barrier properties increased by about 35% and oxygen barrier properties increased by approximately 33%. However, significant differences were mainly observed between coatings made of fully native WPI and ones with a degree of denaturation of 25%. Higher degrees of denaturation did not lead to further improvement of material properties. This observation offers cost-saving potential: a major share of denatured whey proteins may be replaced by fully native ones that are not exposed to energy-intensive heat treatment. Furthermore, native WPI solutions can be produced with higher dry matter content without gelatinizing. Hence, less moisture has to be removed through drying, resulting in reduced energy consumption. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ion-ion interactions in the denatured state contribute to the stabilization of CutA1 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutani, Katsuhide; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Naitow, Hisashi; Joti, Yasumasa

    2018-05-16

    In order to elucidate features of the denatured state ensembles that exist in equilibrium with the native state under physiological conditions, we performed 1.4-μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 400 K and 450 K using the monomer subunits of three CutA1 mutants from Escherichia coli: an SH-free mutant (Ec0SH) with denaturation temperature (T d ) = 85.6 °C, a hydrophobic mutant (Ec0VV) with T d  = 113.3 °C, and an ionic mutant (Ec0VV_6) with T d  = 136.8 °C. The occupancy of salt bridges by the six substituted charged residues in Ec0VV_6 was 140.1% at 300 K and 89.5% at 450 K, indicating that even in the denatured state, salt bridge occupancy was high, approximately 60% of that at 300 K. From these results, we can infer that proteins from hyperthermophiles with a high ratio of charged residues are stabilized by a decrease in conformational entropy due to ion-ion interactions in the denatured state. The mechanism must be comparable to the stabilization conferred by disulfide bonds within a protein. This suggests that introduction of charged residues, to promote formation of salt bridges in the denatured state, would be a simple way to rationally design stability-enhanced mutants.

  14. In vitro study of prebiotic properties of levan-type exopolysaccharides from Lactobacilli and non-digestible carbohydrates using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, F D; Walter, J; Hertel, C; Hammes, W P

    2001-07-01

    Batch cultures inoculated with human faeces were used to study the prebiotic properties of levan-type exopolysaccharides (EPS) from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis as well as levan, inulin, and fructooligosaccharide (FOS). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA fragments generated by PCR with universal primers was used to analyse the cultures. Characteristic changes were revealed in the composition of the gut bacteria during fermentation of the carbohydrates. An enrichment of Bifidobacterium spp. was found for the EPS and inulin but not for levan and FOS. The bifidogenic effect of the EPS was confirmed by culturing on selective medium. In addition, the use of EPS and FOS resulted in enhanced growth of Eubacterium biforme and Clostridium perfringens, respectively.

  15. Signal Peptide and Denaturing Temperature are Critical Factors for Efficient Mammalian Expression and Immunoblotting of Cannabinoid Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, Chenyun; WANG, Yingying; WANG, Miao; CHEN, Jiankui; YU, Nong; SONG, Shiping; KAMINSKI, Norbert E.; ZHANG, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many researchers employed mammalian expression system to artificially express cannabinoid receptors, but immunoblot data that directly prove efficient protein expression can hardly be seen in related research reports. In present study, we demonstrated cannabinoid receptor protein was not able to be properly expressed with routine mammalian expression system. This inefficient expression was rescued by endowing an exogenous signal peptide ahead of cannabinoid receptor peptide. In addition, the artificially synthesized cannabinoid receptor was found to aggregate under routine sample denaturing temperatures (i.e., ≥95°C), forming a large molecular weight band when analyzed by immunoblotting. Only denaturing temperatures ≤75°C yielded a clear band at the predicted molecular weight. Collectively, we showed that efficient mammalian expression of cannabinoid receptors need a signal peptide sequence, and described the requirement for a low sample denaturing temperature in immunoblot analysis. These findings provide very useful information for efficient mammalian expression and immunoblotting of membrane receptors. PMID:22528237

  16. Effective non-denaturing purification method for improving the solubility of recombinant actin-binding proteins produced by bacterial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jeong Min; Lee, Sangmin; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial expression is commonly used to produce recombinant and truncated mutant eukaryotic proteins. However, heterologous protein expression may render synthesized proteins insoluble. The conventional method used to express a poorly soluble protein, which involves denaturation and refolding, is time-consuming and inefficient. There are several non-denaturing approaches that can increase the solubility of recombinant proteins that include using different bacterial cell strains, altering the time of induction, lowering the incubation temperature, and employing different detergents for purification. In this study, we compared several non-denaturing protocols to express and purify two insoluble 34 kDa actin-bundling protein mutants. The solubility of the mutant proteins was not affected by any of the approaches except for treatment with the detergent sarkosyl. These results indicate that sarkosyl can effectively improve the solubility of insoluble proteins during bacterial expression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. A calorimetric study of the interactions in the aqueous solutions of lysozyme in the presence of denaturing cosolvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castronuovo, Giuseppina; Niccoli, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A thermodynamic method is reported to monitor the chemical denaturation of lysozyme. ► The enthalpic interaction coefficients are very useful parameters to gain information about the mechanism through which two hydrated molecules interact in solution. ► Hypotheses are proposed about the mechanism underlying the denaturation of lysozyme induced by high concentrations of urea or ethanol. - Abstract: A thermodynamic method is reported to monitor the chemical denaturation of lysozyme. Heats of dilution of the protein in concentrated aqueous solutions of urea or ethanol have been determined at 298.15 K by flow microcalorimetry. The pairwise enthalpic interaction coefficients of the protein in the different solvent media are derived. These parameters allow to gain information about the influence of the cosolvents on the interactions acting between two interacting hydrated molecules of lysozyme, hence on the denaturation process. At increasing urea concentration, up to about 6 mol kg −1 , the values of the interaction coefficients are large and negative and remain almost unaltered. The invariance of the coefficients underlines that, even in highly concentrated urea, the hydration shell of the protein is such to maintain essentially unaltered the native conformation. At higher urea concentrations, a sudden change in the sign of the coefficients monitors the variation in the interactions between two hydrated denatured protein molecules. The same trend is found when ethanol is the cosolvent. At increasing concentration of the cosolvent, coefficients are, at first, almost invariant. After that, denaturation occurs, detected as a jump toward much more negative values. The results obtained are rationalized on the basis of those previously found for small model molecules in concentrated solutions of urea or ethanol. The thermodynamic framework allows useful comments to be made on the possible mode of action of the two cosolvents on the stability of proteins

  18. A calorimetric study of the interactions in the aqueous solutions of lysozyme in the presence of denaturing cosolvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castronuovo, Giuseppina, E-mail: giuseppina.castronuovo@unina.it [Department of Chemistry, University Federico II of Naples, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Niccoli, Marcella [Department of Chemistry, University Federico II of Naples, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thermodynamic method is reported to monitor the chemical denaturation of lysozyme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enthalpic interaction coefficients are very useful parameters to gain information about the mechanism through which two hydrated molecules interact in solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypotheses are proposed about the mechanism underlying the denaturation of lysozyme induced by high concentrations of urea or ethanol. - Abstract: A thermodynamic method is reported to monitor the chemical denaturation of lysozyme. Heats of dilution of the protein in concentrated aqueous solutions of urea or ethanol have been determined at 298.15 K by flow microcalorimetry. The pairwise enthalpic interaction coefficients of the protein in the different solvent media are derived. These parameters allow to gain information about the influence of the cosolvents on the interactions acting between two interacting hydrated molecules of lysozyme, hence on the denaturation process. At increasing urea concentration, up to about 6 mol kg{sup -1}, the values of the interaction coefficients are large and negative and remain almost unaltered. The invariance of the coefficients underlines that, even in highly concentrated urea, the hydration shell of the protein is such to maintain essentially unaltered the native conformation. At higher urea concentrations, a sudden change in the sign of the coefficients monitors the variation in the interactions between two hydrated denatured protein molecules. The same trend is found when ethanol is the cosolvent. At increasing concentration of the cosolvent, coefficients are, at first, almost invariant. After that, denaturation occurs, detected as a jump toward much more negative values. The results obtained are rationalized on the basis of those previously found for small model molecules in concentrated solutions of urea or ethanol. The thermodynamic framework allows useful comments to be made on

  19. Chemical denaturation of globular proteins at the air/water interface: an x-ray and neutron reflectometry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriman, A.W.; Henderson, M.J.; White, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: X-ray and neutron reflectometry has been used to probe the equilibrium surface structure of hen egg white lysozyme (lysozyme) and bovine β -lactoglobulin (β -lactoglobulin) under denaturing conditions at the air-water interface. This was achieved by performing experiments on 10 mg mL -1 protein solutions containing increasing concentrations of the chemical denaturant guanidinium hydrochloride (G.HCl). For solutions containing no G.HCl, the surface structure of the proteins was represented by a two-layer model with total thicknesses of 48 Angstroms and 38 Angstroms for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. The total volume of a single protein molecule and the associated water molecules was evaluated to be approximately 45 (0.3) nm 3 for lysozyme, and 60 (0.3) nm 3 for β-lactoglobulin. The thickness dimensions and the total volumes compared favourably with the crystal dimensions of 45 x 30 x 30 Angstroms (40.5 nm 3 ),1 and 36 x 36 x 36 Angstroms (47 nm 3 ) 2 for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. This comparison suggests that when no denaturant was present, the structures of lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin were near to their native conformations at the air-water interface. The response to the presence of the chemical denaturant was different for each protein. The surface layer of β-lactoglobulin expanded at very low concentrations (0.2 mol dm -3 ) of G.HCl. In contrast, the lysozyme layer contracted. At higher concentrations, unfolding of both the proteins led to the formation of a third diffuse layer. In general, lysozyme appeared to be less responsive to the chemical denaturant, which is most likely a result of the higher disulfide content of lysozyme. A protocol allowing quantitative thermodynamic analysis of the contribution from the air-water interface to the chemical denaturation of a protein was developed

  20. Biological function evaluation and effects of laser micro-pore burn-denatured acellular dermal matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youlai; Zeng, Yuanlin; Xin, Guohua; Zou, Lijin; Ding, Yuewei; Duyin, Jiang

    2018-03-01

    In the field of burns repairs, many problems exist in the shortage of donor skin, the expense of allograft or xenograft skin, temporary substitution and unsatisfactory extremity function after wound healing. Previous studies showed that burn-denatured skin could return to normal dermis formation and function. This study investigates the application of laser micro-pore burn-denatured acellular dermis matrix (DADM) from an escharotomy in the repair of burn wounds and evaluates the biological properties and wound repair effects of DADM in implantation experiments in Kunming mice. Specific-pathogen-free (SPF) Kunming mice were used in this study. A deep II° burn wound was created on the dorsum of the mice by an electric heated water bath. The full-thickness wound tissue was harvested. The necrotic tissue and subcutaneous tissue were removed. The denatured dermis was preserved and treated with 0.25% trypsin, 0.5% Triton X-100. The DADM was drilled by laser micro-pore. The biological properties and grafting effects of laser micro-pore burn-DADM were evaluated by morphology, cytokine expression levels and subcutaneous implantation experiments in Kunming mice. We found statistical significance (Ppore burn-DADM (experimental group) compared to the control group (no laser micro-pore burn-DADM). Cytokine expression level was different in the dermal matrixes harvested at various time points after burn (24h, 48h, 72h and infected wound group). Comparing the dermal matrix from 24h burn tissue to infected wound tissue, the expression level of IL-6, MMP-24, VE-cadherin and VEGF were decreased. We found no inflammatory cells infiltration in the dermal matrix were observed in both experimental and control groups (24h burn group), while the obviously vascular infiltration and fiber fusion were observed in the experimental group after subcutaneous implantation experiments. There was better bio-performance, low immunogenicity and better dermal incorporation after treated by laser

  1. Glutamate Induced Thermal Equilibrium Intermediate and Counteracting Effect on Chemical Denaturation of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumalla, Bramhini; Prabhu, N Prakash

    2018-01-25

    When organisms are subjected to stress conditions, one of their adaptive responses is accumulation of small organic molecules called osmolytes. These osmolytes affect the structure and stability of the biological macromolecules including proteins. The present study examines the effect of a negatively charged amino acid osmolyte, glutamate (Glu), on two model proteins, ribonuclease A (RNase A) and α-lactalbumin (α-LA), which have positive and negative surface charges at pH 7, respectively. These proteins follow two-state unfolding transitions during both heat and chemical induced denaturation processes. The addition of Glu stabilizes the proteins against temperature and induces an early equilibrium intermediate during unfolding. The stability is found to be enthalpy-driven, and the free energy of stabilization is more for α-LA compared to RNase A. The decrease in the partial molar volume and compressibility of both of the proteins in the presence of Glu suggests that the proteins attain a more compact state through surface hydration which could provide a more stable conformation. This is also supported by molecule dynamic simulation studies which demonstrate that the water density around the proteins is increased upon the addition of Glu. Further, the intermediates could be completely destabilized by lower concentrations (∼0.5 M) of guanidinium chloride and salt. However, urea subverts the Glu-induced intermediate formed by α-LA, whereas it only slightly destabilizes in the case of RNase A which has a positive surface charge and could possess charge-charge interactions with Glu. This suggests that, apart from hydration, columbic interactions might also contribute to the stability of the intermediate. Gdm-induced denaturation of RNase A and α-LA in the absence and the presence of Glu at different temperatures was carried out. These results also show the Glu-induced stabilization of both of the proteins; however, all of the unfolding transitions followed two

  2. Dynamics of Ionic Liquid-Assisted Refolding of Denatured Cytochrome c: A Study of Preferential Interactions toward Renaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra Kumar; Patel, Rajan

    2018-05-25

    In vitro refolding of denatured protein and the influence of the alkyl chain on the refolding of a protein were tested using long chain imidazolium chloride salts, 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium chloride [C 8 mim][Cl], and 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [C 10 mim][Cl]. The horse heart cytochrome c (h-cyt c) was denatured by urea and guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl), as well as by base-induced denaturation at pH 13, to provide a broad overview of the overall refolding behavior. The variation in the alkyl chain of the ionic liquids (ILs) showed a profound effect on the refolding of denatured h-cyt c. The ligand-induced refolding was correlated to understand the mechanism of the conformational stability of proteins in aqueous solutions of ILs. The results showed that the long chain ILs having the [C 8 mim] + and [C 10 mim] + cations promote the refolding of alkali-denatured h-cyt c. The IL having the [C 10 mim] + cation efficiently refolded the alkali-denatured h-cyt c with the formation of the MG state, whereas the IL having the [C 8 mim] + cation, which is known to be compatible for protein stability, shows slight refolding and forms a different transition state. The lifetime results show successful refolding of alkaline-denatured h-cyt c by both of the ILs, however, more refolding was observed in the case of [C 10 mim][Cl], and this was correlated with the fast and medium lifetimes (τ 1 and τ 2 ) obtained, which show an increase accompanied by an increase in secondary structure. The hydrophobic interactions plays an important role in the refolding of chemically and alkali-denatured h-cyt c by long chain imidazolium ILs. The formation of the MG state by [C 10 mim][Cl] was also confirmed, as some regular structure exists far below the CMC of IL. The overall results suggested that the [C 10 mim] + cation bound to the unfolded h-cyt c triggers its refolding by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions that stabilize the MG state.

  3. HAMLET kills tumor cells by apoptosis: structure, cellular mechanisms, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Pettersson, Jenny; Fischer, Walter; Aronsson, Annika; Svanborg, Catharina

    2005-05-01

    New cancer treatments should aim to destroy tumor cells without disturbing normal tissue. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) offers a new molecular approach to solving this problem, because it induces apoptosis in tumor cells but leaves normal differentiated cells unaffected. After partial unfolding and binding to oleic acid, alpha-lactalbumin forms the HAMLET complex, which enters tumor cells and freezes their metabolic machinery. The cells proceed to fragment their DNA, and they disintegrate with apoptosis-like characteristics. HAMLET kills a wide range of malignant cells in vitro and maintains this activity in vivo in patients with skin papillomas. In addition, HAMLET has striking effects on human glioblastomas in a rat xenograft model. After convection-enhanced delivery, HAMLET diffuses throughout the brain, selectively killing tumor cells and controlling tumor progression without apparent tissue toxicity. HAMLET thus shows great promise as a new therapeutic with the advantage of selectivity for tumor cells and lack of toxicity.

  4. Fuel utilization improvement in PWRs using the denatured 233U-Th cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, H.M.; Schwenk, G.A.; Toops, E.C.; Yotinen, V.O.

    1980-06-01

    A number of changes in PWR core design and/or operating strategy were evaluated to assess the fuel utilization improvement achievable by their implementation in a PWR using thorium-based fuel and operating in a recycle mode. The reference PWR for this study was identical to the B and W Standard Plant except that the fuel pellets were of denatured ( 233 U/ 238 U-Th)O 2 . An initial scoping study identified the three most promising improvement concepts as (1) a very tight lattice, (2) thorium blankets, and (3) ThO 2 rods placed in available guide tubes. A conceptual core design incorporating these changes was then developed, and the fuel utilization of this modified design was compared with that of the reference case

  5. Investigating the fermentation of cocoa by correlating denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles and near infrared spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Snitkjær, Pia; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J

    2008-01-01

    demonstrating the microbial succession taking place during the fermentation. Subsequently the DGGE spectra were correlated to the NIR spectra using Partial Least Squares regression models (PLS2). Correlations of 0.87 (bacterial derived DGGE spectra) and 0.81 (yeast derived DGGE spectra) were obtained indicating......Raw cocoa has an astringent, unpleasant taste and flavour, and has to be fermented, dried and roasted in order to obtain the characteristic cocoa flavour and taste. During the fermentation microbial activity outside the cocoa beans induces biochemical and physical changes inside the beans...... of the beans and the chemical processes inside the beans have been carried out previously. Recently it has been shown that Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) offers an efficient tool for monitoring the microbiological changes taking place during the fermentation of cocoa. Near Infrared (NIR...

  6. Protective role of salt in catalysis and maintaining structure of halophilic proteins against denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, Sunil K.

    2014-01-01

    Search for new industrial enzymes having novel properties continues to be a desirable pursuit in enzyme research. The halophilic organisms inhabiting under saline/ hypersaline conditions are considered as promising source of useful enzymes. Their enzymes are structurally adapted to perform efficient catalysis under saline environment wherein n0n-halophilic enzymes often lose their structure and activity. Haloenzymes have been documented to be polyextremophilic and withstand high temperature, pH, organic solvents, and chaotropic agents. However, this stability is modulated by salt. Although vast amount of information have been generated on salt mediated protection and structure function relationship in halophilic proteins, their clear understanding and correct perspective still remain incoherent. Furthermore, understanding their protein architecture may give better clue for engineering stable enzymes which can withstand harsh industrial conditions. The article encompasses the current level of understanding about haloadaptations and analyzes structural basis of their enzyme stability against classical denaturants. PMID:24782853

  7. Fluorescence lifetime components reveal kinetic intermediate states upon equilibrium denaturation of carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtseva, Elena V; Lashchuk, Olesya O; Gerasimova, Marina A; Melnik, Tatiana N; Nagibina, Galina S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-12-21

    In most cases, intermediate states of multistage folding proteins are not 'visible' under equilibrium conditions but are revealed in kinetic experiments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used in equilibrium denaturation studies. The technique allows for detecting changes in the conformation and environment of tryptophan residues in different structural elements of carbonic anhydrase II which in its turn has made it possible to study the intermediate states of carbonic anhydrase II under equilibrium conditions. The results of equilibrium and kinetic experiments using wild-type bovine carbonic anhydrase II and its mutant form with the substitution of leucine for alanine at position 139 (L139A) were compared. The obtained lifetime components of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence allowed for revealing that, the same as in kinetic experiments, under equilibrium conditions the unfolding of carbonic anhydrase II ensues through formation of intermediate states.

  8. Functionality screen of streptavidin mutants by non-denaturing SDS-PAGE using biotin-4-fluorescein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Nicolas; Ward, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis or directed evolution of proteins often leads to the production of inactive mutants. For streptavidin and related proteins, mutations may lead to the loss of their biotin-binding properties. With high-throughput screening methodologies in mind, it is imperative to detect, prior to the high-density protein production, the bacteria that produce non-functional streptavidin isoforms. Based on the incorporation of biotin-4-fluorescein in streptavidin mutants present in Escherichia coli bacterial extracts, we detail a functional screen that allows the identification of biotin-binding streptavidin variants. Bacteria are cultivated in a small volume, followed by a rapid treatment of the cells; biotin-4-fluorescein is added to the bacterial extract and loaded on an Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Poly-Acrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under non-denaturing conditions. Revealing is performed using a UV transilluminator. This screen is thus easy to implement, cheap and requires only readily available equipment.

  9. 125I-labeled cortisol radioimmunoassay in which serum binding protein are enzymatically denatured

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasler, M.J.; Painter, K.; Niswender, G.D.

    1976-01-01

    We report an iodine-125 radioimmunoassay for cortisol in biological fluids, in which interfering binding proteins are enzymatically denatured. An antiserum to cortisol-3-carboxymethyloxime-bovine serum albumin, extremely low cross-reacting with other corticosteroids, was raised in rabbits. A cortisol-3-carboxymethyloxime tyrosine methyl ester derivative was synthesized and labeled with iodine-125 by standard radioiodination techniques. To eliminate the need for extraction and recovery procedures, we digested interfering binding with a proteolytic enzyme, which then was heat-inactivated before adding the labeled derivative and the premixed, preincubated antiserum complex. There was quantitative analytical recovery of esogenous cortisol added to sera from a normal man, a normal woman, and a pregnant woman. Values for the same samples agreed after extraction and chromatographic purification and agreed well with values obtained by other techniques by independent reference laboratories. The five-step assay can be done in 6 h or less

  10. Thermal, chemical and pH induced unfolding of turmeric root lectin: modes of denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Biswas

    Full Text Available Curcuma longa rhizome lectin, of non-seed origin having antifungal, antibacterial and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities, forms a homodimer with high thermal stability as well as acid tolerance. Size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering show it to be a dimer at pH 7, but it converts to a monomer near pH 2. Circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence emission maxima are virtually indistinguishable from pH 7 to 2, indicating secondary and tertiary structures remain the same in dimer and monomer within experimental error. The tryptophan environment as probed by acrylamide quenching data yielded very similar data at pH 2 and pH 7, implying very similar folding for monomer and dimer. Differential scanning calorimetry shows a transition at 350.3 K for dimer and at 327.0 K for monomer. Thermal unfolding and chemical unfolding induced by guanidinium chloride for dimer are both reversible and can be described by two-state models. The temperatures and the denaturant concentrations at which one-half of the protein molecules are unfolded, are protein concentration-dependent for dimer but protein concentration-independent for monomer. The free energy of unfolding at 298 K was found to be 5.23 Kcal mol-1 and 14.90 Kcal mol-1 for the monomer and dimer respectively. The value of change in excess heat capacity upon protein denaturation (ΔCp is 3.42 Kcal mol-1 K-1 for dimer. The small ΔCp for unfolding of CLA reflects a buried hydrophobic core in the folded dimeric protein. These unfolding experiments, temperature dependent circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering for the dimer at pH 7 indicate its higher stability than for the monomer at pH 2. This difference in stability of dimeric and monomeric forms highlights the contribution of inter-subunit interactions in the former.

  11. T1ρ is superior to T2 mapping for the evaluation of articular cartilage denaturalization with osteoarthritis: radiological-pathological correlation after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yukihisa; Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Tsushima, Hidetoshi; Okazaki, Ken; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yonezawa, Masato; Nishikawa, Kei; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    We compared the diagnostic performance of T1ρ and T2 mappings in the evaluation of denatured articular cartilage with osteoarthritis of the knee. 2D-Sagittal T1ρ and T2 mappings of the knee were obtained from 16 patients before total knee arthroplasty. After surgery, specimens of the femur and tibia were regionally segmented according to a 5-point scale of the severity of denaturalization. The T1ρ and T2 values in the full thickness of the articular cartilage in each region were measured by two observers. The two mappings were compared for their ability to differentiate between normal and denatured articular cartilage and also for their usefulness in grading the severity of the denaturalization using the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (Az). A pT2 mapping for the differentiation between normal and denatured articular cartilage (pT2 mapping could not. However, there were no significant differences between the two mappings in the discrimination of mild versus moderate denaturalization or of moderate versus severe denaturalization. The two observers showed good agreement in the results (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.81 for T1ρ and 0.92 for T2). T1ρ mapping is superior to T2 mapping for the evaluation of denatured articular cartilage with osteoarthritis of the knee. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Laboratory Exercise for Studying the Morphology of Heat-Denatured and Amyloid Aggregates of Lysozyme by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Sumeyra; Horton, William; Jónsdóttir-Lewis, Elfa B.; Foster, Michelle; Török, Marianna

    2018-01-01

    To facilitate learning advanced instrumental techniques, essential tools for visualizing biomaterials, a simple and versatile laboratory exercise demonstrating the use of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in biomedical applications was developed. In this experiment, the morphology of heat-denatured and amyloid-type aggregates formed from a low-cost…

  13. Evaluation of several techniques to modify denatured muscle tissue to obtain a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; den Dunnen, WFA; Schakenraad, JM; Robinson, PH

    The aim of this study was to (1) evaluate the effect of several preparation techniques of denatured muscle tissue to obtain an open three-dimensional structure, and (2) test if this scaffold is suitable for peripheral nerve regeneration. Four samples (A-D) of muscle tissue specimens were evaluated

  14. New comprehensive denaturing-gradient-gel-electrophoresis assay for KRAS mutation detection applied to paraffin-embedded tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayes, VM; Westra, JL; Verlind, E; Bleeker, W; Plukker, JT; Hofstra, RMW; Buys, CHCM

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive mutation detection assay is presented for the entire coding region and all splice site junctions of the KRAS oncogene. The assay is based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and applicable to archival paraffin-embedded tumour material. All KRAS amplicons are analysed within

  15. Denaturation and in Vitro Gastric Digestion of Heat-Treated Quinoa Protein Isolates Obtained at Various Extraction pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz, Geraldine Avila; Opazo-Navarrete, Mauricio; Meurs, Marlon; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; Boekel, van Tiny; Stieger, Markus; Janssen, Anja E.M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of heat processing on denaturation and digestibility properties of protein isolates obtained from sweet quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) at various extraction pH values (8, 9, 10 and 11). Pretreatment of suspensions of protein isolates at 60,

  16. The effect of Na+ and K+ on the thermal denaturation of Na+ and + K+-dependent ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T H

    1983-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the physical nature of the Na+ and K+ forms of the Na+ + K+-dependent ATPase, thermal-denaturation studies were conducted in different types of ionic media. Thermal-denaturation measurements were performed by measuring the regeneration of ATPase activity after slow pulse exposure to elevated temperatures. Two types of experiments were performed. First, the dependence of the thermal-denaturation rate on Na+ and K+ concentrations was examined. It was found that both cations stabilized the pump protein. Also, K+ was a more effective stabilizer of the native state than was Na+. Secondly, a set of thermodynamic parameters was obtained by measuring the temperature-dependence of the thermal-denaturation rate under three ionic conditions: 60 mM-K+, 150 mM-Na+ and no Na+ or K+. It was found that ion-mediated stabilization of the pump protein was accompanied by substantial increases in activation enthalpy and entropy, the net effect being a less-pronounced increase in activation free energy. PMID:6309139

  17. Compact oleic acid in HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Jonas; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Nilsson, Hanna; Svanborg, Catharina; Akke, Mikael; Linse, Sara

    2005-11-07

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a complex between alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid that induces apoptosis in tumor cells, but not in healthy cells. Heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of 13C-oleic acid in HAMLET, and to study the 15N-labeled protein. Nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy shows that the two ends of the fatty acid are in close proximity and close to the double bond, indicating that the oleic acid is bound to HAMLET in a compact conformation. The data further show that HAMLET is a partly unfolded/molten globule-like complex under physiological conditions.

  18. Structural and dynamical study about denatured states of yeast phosphoglycerate kinase by neutrons scattering and X-rays; Etude structurale et dynamique des etats denatures de la phosphoglycerate kinase de levure par diffusion des neutrons et des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Receveur, V

    1997-04-28

    During a long time, the neutron scattering and X-rays techniques have not been used for the studies bearing on the folding of proteins. The compactness and the globularness of a protein are two structural characteristics describing the denatured states and the intermediate states of folding, and the neutrons and x-rays scattering are probably the two techniques the most appropriate to give this kind of information; they are sensible to the spatial extent and to the molecules compactness, and to their general shape. For these three or four last years, the works using these techniques are increasing, giving precious knowledge on the different steps of folding and on the interactions stabilizing the denatured or intermediate states. This thesis falls into this category. (N.C.).

  19. Pu Denaturing by Transmutation of MA in FBR Multi-cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiliza, Yoshitalia; Saito, Masaki; Sagara, Hiroshi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 1528550 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Pu accumulation and its recycling is important in the term of energy resources, however one of the most sensitive issues is non-proliferation in the future fuel cycle based on fast breeder reactor (FBR). The present paper utilizes Protected Pu Production (P{sup 3}) concept for the production of {sup 238}Pu and {sup 242}Pu by Minor Actinides (MA) transmutation to enhance the proliferation resistance of Pu in the fuel. Increase in the {sup 238}Pu and {sup 242}Pu isotopic fraction creates a high rate of internal heat generation by alpha decay (DH) and/or a high neutron source of spontaneous fission (SFN) in Pu that would be encountered during manufacturing and maintaining of nuclear explosive device. The feasibility of denaturing of Pu by MA transmutation in medium size FBR has been studied from the viewpoint of even-mass number Pu accumulation during multi-cycle of Pu and MA. The proliferation resistance property of Pu is also evaluated based on the specific decay heat and spontaneous fission neutron, compared with the reference criteria. In present paper, the P{sup 3} technology based on multi-recycled Pu and MA is compared with the conventional technology based on multi-recycled Pu only. The detail of mass balance behavior is, however, beyond the scope of the present paper. (authors)

  20. Insight into the effect mechanism of urea-induced protein denaturation by dielectric spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cancan; Yang, Man; Zhao, Kongshuang

    2017-12-06

    Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy was applied to study how urea affects the phase transition of a thermosensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), which has been widely used as a protein model. It was found that there is a pronounced relaxation near 10 GHz for the ternary system of PNIPAM in urea aqueous solution. The temperature dependence of dielectric parameters indicates that urea can reduce the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM, i.e., stabilize the globule state of PNIPAM and collapse the PNIPAM chains. Based on our results, the interaction mechanism of urea on the conformational transition of PNIPAM was presented: urea replaces water molecules directly bonding with PNIPAM and acts as the bridging agent for the adjacent side chains of PNIPAM. Accordingly, the mechanism with which urea denatures protein was deduced. In addition, it is worth mentioning that, from the temperature dependence of the dielectric parameters obtained in the presence of urea, an interesting phenomenon was found in which the effect of urea on PNIPAM seems to take 2 M as a unit. This result may be the reason why urea and TMAO exit marine fishes at a specific ratio of 2 : 1.

  1. Precise determination of protein extinction coefficients under native and denaturing conditions using SV-AUC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Andreas; Grassl, Kerstin; Gommert, Janine; Schlesak, Christian; Bepperling, Alexander

    2018-04-17

    The accurate determination of protein concentration is an important though non-trivial task during the development of a biopharmaceutical. The fundamental prerequisite for this is the availability of an accurate extinction coefficient. Common approaches for the determination of an extinction coefficient for a given protein are either based on the theoretical prediction utilizing the amino acid sequence or the photometric determination combined with a measurement of absolute protein concentration. Here, we report on an improved SV-AUC based method utilizing an analytical ultracentrifuge equipped with absorbance and Rayleigh interference optics. Global fitting of datasets helped to overcome some of the obstacles encountered with the traditional method employing synthetic boundary cells. Careful calculation of dn/dc values taking glycosylation and solvent composition into account allowed the determination of the extinction coefficients of monoclonal antibodies and an Fc-fusion protein under native as well as under denaturing conditions. An intra-assay precision of 0.9% and an accuracy of 1.8% compared to the theoretical value was achieved for monoclonal antibodies. Due to the large number of data points of a single dataset, no meaningful difference between the ProteomeLab XL-I and the new Optima AUC platform could be observed. Thus, the AUC-based approach offers a precise, convenient and versatile alternative to conventional methods like total amino acid analysis (AAA).

  2. Detection of urea-induced internal denaturation of dsDNA using solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Alon; Kuhn, Heiko; Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim; Meller, Amit

    2010-11-17

    The ability to detect and measure dsDNA thermal fluctuations is of immense importance in understanding the underlying mechanisms responsible for transcription and replication regulation. We describe here the ability of solid-state nanopores to detect sub-nanometer changes in DNA structure as a result of chemically enhanced thermal fluctuations. In this study, we investigate the subtle changes in the mean effective diameter of a dsDNA molecule with 3-5 nm solid-state nanopores as a function of urea concentration and the DNA's AT content. Our studies reveal an increase in the mean effective diameter of a DNA molecule of approximately 0.6 nm at 8.7 M urea. In agreement with the mechanism of DNA local denaturation, we observe a sigmoid dependence of these effects on urea concentration. We find that the translocation times in urea are markedly slower than would be expected if the dynamics were governed primarily by viscous effects. Furthermore, we find that the sensitivity of the nanopore is sufficient to statistically differentiate between DNA molecules of nearly identical lengths differing only in sequence and AT content when placed in 3.5 M urea. Our results demonstrate that nanopores can detect subtle structural changes and are thus a valuable tool for detecting differences in biomolecules' environment.

  3. Detection of urea-induced internal denaturation of dsDNA using solid-state nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, Alon; Kuhn, Heiko; Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim; Meller, Amit

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and measure dsDNA thermal fluctuations is of immense importance in understanding the underlying mechanisms responsible for transcription and replication regulation. We describe here the ability of solid-state nanopores to detect sub-nanometer changes in DNA structure as a result of chemically enhanced thermal fluctuations. In this study, we investigate the subtle changes in the mean effective diameter of a dsDNA molecule with 3-5 nm solid-state nanopores as a function of urea concentration and the DNA's AT content. Our studies reveal an increase in the mean effective diameter of a DNA molecule of approximately 0.6 nm at 8.7 M urea. In agreement with the mechanism of DNA local denaturation, we observe a sigmoid dependence of these effects on urea concentration. We find that the translocation times in urea are markedly slower than would be expected if the dynamics were governed primarily by viscous effects. Furthermore, we find that the sensitivity of the nanopore is sufficient to statistically differentiate between DNA molecules of nearly identical lengths differing only in sequence and AT content when placed in 3.5 M urea. Our results demonstrate that nanopores can detect subtle structural changes and are thus a valuable tool for detecting differences in biomolecules' environment.

  4. CalFitter: a web server for analysis of protein thermal denaturation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenko, Stanislav; Stourac, Jan; Kunka, Antonin; Nedeljkovic, Sava; Bednar, David; Prokop, Zbynek; Damborsky, Jiri

    2018-05-14

    Despite significant advances in the understanding of protein structure-function relationships, revealing protein folding pathways still poses a challenge due to a limited number of relevant experimental tools. Widely-used experimental techniques, such as calorimetry or spectroscopy, critically depend on a proper data analysis. Currently, there are only separate data analysis tools available for each type of experiment with a limited model selection. To address this problem, we have developed the CalFitter web server to be a unified platform for comprehensive data fitting and analysis of protein thermal denaturation data. The server allows simultaneous global data fitting using any combination of input data types and offers 12 protein unfolding pathway models for selection, including irreversible transitions often missing from other tools. The data fitting produces optimal parameter values, their confidence intervals, and statistical information to define unfolding pathways. The server provides an interactive and easy-to-use interface that allows users to directly analyse input datasets and simulate modelled output based on the model parameters. CalFitter web server is available free at https://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/calfitter/.

  5. Formation of Polyphenol-Denatured Protein Flocs in Alcohol Beverages Sweetened with Refined Cane Sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Gillian; Triplett, Alexa

    2017-11-08

    The sporadic appearance of floc from refined, white cane sugars in alcohol beverages remains a technical problem for both beverage manufacturers and sugar refiners. Cane invert sugars mixed with 60% pure alcohol and water increased light scattering by up to ∼1000-fold. Insoluble and soluble starch, fat, inorganic ash, oligosaccharides, Brix, and pH were not involved in the prevailing floc-formation mechanism. Strong polynomial correlations existed between the haze floc and indicator values (IVs) (color at 420 nm pH 9.0/color at pH 4.0-an indirect measure of polyphenolic and flavonoid colorants) (R 2 = 0.815) and protein (R 2 = 0.819) content of the invert sugars. Ethanol-induced denaturation of the protein exposed hydrophobic polyphenol-binding sites that were further exposed when heated to 80 °C. A tentative mechanism for floc formation was advanced by molecular probing with a haze (floc) active protein and polyphenol as well as polar, nonpolar, and ionic solvents.

  6. Modulation of the Extent of Cooperative Structural Change During Protein Folding by Chemical Denaturant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Prashant N; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2017-09-07

    Protein folding and unfolding reactions invariably appear to be highly cooperative reactions, but the structural and sequence determinants of cooperativity are poorly understood. Importantly, it is not known whether cooperative structural change occurs throughout the protein, or whether some parts change cooperatively and other parts change noncooperatively. In the current study, hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry has been used to show that the mechanism of unfolding of the PI3K SH3 domain is similar in the absence and presence of 5 M urea. The data are well described by a four state N ↔ I N ↔ I 2 ↔ U model, in which structural changes occur noncooperatively during the N ↔ I N and I N ↔ I 2 transitions, and occur cooperatively during the I 2 ↔ U transition. The nSrc-loop and RT-loop, as well as β strands 4 and 5 undergo noncooperative unfolding, while β strands 1, 2, and 3 unfold cooperatively in the absence of urea. However, in the presence of 5 M urea, the unfolding of β strand 4 switches to become cooperative, leading to an increase in the extent of cooperative structural change. The current study highlights the relationship between protein stability and cooperativity, by showing how the extent of cooperativity can be varied, using chemical denaturant to alter protein stability.

  7. Effect of free cysteine on the denaturation and aggregation of holo α-lactalbumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line R.; Lund, Marianne N.; Davies, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    α-Lactalbumin (α-LA) is a key commercial whey protein for nutritional purposes. The holo protein (calcium saturated) is considered the most heat stable whey protein, capable of refolding from unfolded states under many conditions. This is due to the absence of free thiols (cysteine residues......) that are typically involved in thermal aggregation and thiol–disulphide exchange reactions of other whey proteins. Heating (0–120 min at 90 °C, pH 7.0) holo α-LA generates free thiols through thermal cleavage of disulphide bonds, resulting in aggregates comprising unfolded α-LA species. The addition of free cysteine...... promotes the formation of soluble aggregates, effectively decreasing the holding time required to reach a particular aggregate size in a dose-dependent manner (0.35–1.4 mM cysteine). Excess cysteine (≥14 mM) causes a destabilisation of α-LA, shown by decreased denaturation temperature and gel formation...

  8. Size distribution of DNA molecules recovered from non-denaturing filter elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloecher, D.; Iliakis, G.

    1991-01-01

    DNA fragments removed from the filter during non-denaturing filter elution were collected and loaded on top of neutral sucrose gradients. Their size distribution was determined by low-speed centrifugation in neutral sucrose gradients. The average size of eluted DNA was found to be approximately 110 S; the average size of DNA collected after short elution times was found to be slightly larger than after long elution times. It is concluded that the size of eluted DNA fragments is not correlated with elution rate, and it is proposed that shear forces generated at the filter pores cause degradation of the DNA. Comparison of sedimentation profiles of carefully prepared cellular DNA before and after elution revealed that generated shear forces during elution break down DNA to an extent equivalent to around 20 000 DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) per G 1 cell. The size of DNA fragments decreased with increasing radiation dose; five times more dsb were found than expected after exposure to radiation alone. It is proposed that excess of dsb may derive from the transformation of other radiation-induced lesions to dsb under the action of shear forces generated during elution. (author)

  9. Programmable self-assembly of carbon nanotubes assisted by reversible denaturation of a protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nithiyasri, P; Parthasarathy, M; Balaji, K; Brindha, P

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly of pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous dispersion using a protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), has been demonstrated. Step-wise conformational changes in BSA as a function of temperature have been deployed to direct the assembly of nanotubes. More specifically, CNTs distributed randomly in native BSA at 35 °C as well as completely denatured BSA solution at 80 °C self-assemble in the intermediate temperature range of 45–65 °C, as evident from scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and fluorescence studies indicate significant changes in the α-helical content of the protein with respect to the amide I and II bands and tryptophan emission intensity, respectively. The stability of CNT dispersion in BSA solution has been attributed to the hydrophobic interaction between nanotubes and the protein molecule by adding sodium cholate to the dispersion. Moreover, a mechanism based on electrostatic repulsion between BSA-bound CNTs has been proposed for the thermally reversible assembly of CNTs in BSA solution based on evidence from zeta potential measurements and FTIR spectroscopy. Thus the present report demonstrates bio-mimetic self-assembly of as-synthesized CNTs using changes in surface charge and conformation of an unfolding protein for biomedical applications and nanobiotechnology. (paper)

  10. Protein Denaturation on p-T Axes--Thermodynamics and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeller, László

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are essential players in the vast majority of molecular level life processes. Since their structure is in most cases substantial for their correct function, study of their structural changes attracted great interest in the past decades. The three dimensional structure of proteins is influenced by several factors including temperature, pH, presence of chaotropic and cosmotropic agents, or presence of denaturants. Although pressure is an equally important thermodynamic parameter as temperature, pressure studies are considerably less frequent in the literature, probably due to the technical difficulties associated to the pressure studies. Although the first steps in the high-pressure protein study have been done 100 years ago with Bridgman's ground breaking work, the field was silent until the modern spectroscopic techniques allowed the characterization of the protein structural changes, while the protein was under pressure. Recently a number of proteins were studied under pressure, and complete pressure-temperature phase diagrams were determined for several of them. This review summarizes the thermodynamic background of the typical elliptic p-T phase diagram, its limitations and the possible reasons for deviations of the experimental diagrams from the theoretical one. Finally we show some examples of experimentally determined pressure-temperature phase diagrams.

  11. The quaternary structure of the recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein is modulated by chemical denaturants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Stepanenko

    Full Text Available A large group of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs has attracted great scientific interest as promising building blocks in constructing optical biosensors for dangerous substances, such as toxic and explosive molecules. Native tissue-extracted bovine OBP (bOBP has a unique dimer folding pattern that involves crossing the α-helical domain in each monomer over the other monomer's β-barrel. In contrast, recombinant bOBP maintaining the high level of stability inherent to native tissue bOBP is produced in a stable native-like state with a decreased tendency for dimerization and is a mixture of monomers and dimers in a buffered solution. This work is focused on the study of the quaternary structure and the folding-unfolding processes of the recombinant bOBP in the absence and in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl. Our results show that the recombinant bOBP native dimer is only formed at elevated GdnHCl concentrations (1.5 M. This process requires re-organizing the protein structure by progressing through the formation of an intermediate state. The bOBP dimerization process appears to be irreversible and it occurs before the protein unfolds. Though the observed structural changes for recombinant bOBP at pre-denaturing GdnHCl concentrations show a local character and the overall protein structure is maintained, such changes should be considered where the protein is used as a sensitive element in a biosensor system.

  12. A Comparison Between Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Detecting Mutations in Genes Associated with Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and the Identification of 9 New Mutations Previously Unidentified by DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldrum Cliff J

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is a relatively new method by which heteroduplex structures formed during the PCR amplification of heterozygote samples can be rapidly identified. The use of this technology for mutation detection in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC has the potential to appreciably shorten the time it takes to analyze genes associated with this disorder. Prior to acceptance of this method for screening genes associated with HNPCC, assessment of the reliability of this method should be performed. In this report we have compared mutation and polymorphism detection by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC in a set of 130 families. All mutations/polymorphisms representing base substitutions, deletions, insertions and a 23 base pair inversion were detected by DHPLC whereas DGGE failed to identify four single base substitutions and a single base pair deletion. In addition, we show that DHPLC has been used for the identification of 5 different mutations in exon 7 of hMSH2 that could not be detected by DGGE. From this study we conclude that DHPLC is a more effective and rapid alternative to the detection of mutations in hMSH2 and hMLH1 with the same or better accuracy than DGGE. Furthermore, this technique offers opportunities for automation, which have not been realised for the majority of other methods of gene analysis.

  13. Structural and dynamical study about denatured states of yeast phosphoglycerate kinase by neutrons scattering and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Receveur, V.

    1997-01-01

    During a long time, the neutron scattering and X-rays techniques have not been used for the studies bearing on the folding of proteins. The compactness and the globularness of a protein are two structural characteristics describing the denatured states and the intermediate states of folding, and the neutrons and x-rays scattering are probably the two techniques the most appropriate to give this kind of information; they are sensible to the spatial extent and to the molecules compactness, and to their general shape. For these three or four last years, the works using these techniques are increasing, giving precious knowledge on the different steps of folding and on the interactions stabilizing the denatured or intermediate states. This thesis falls into this category. (N.C.)

  14. Protective role of microRNA-29a in denatured dermis and skin fibroblast cells after thermal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study has suggested that downregulated microRNA (miR-29a in denatured dermis might be involved in burn wound healing. However, the exact role of miR-29a in healing of burn injury still remains unclear. Here, we found that expression of miR-29a was notably upregulated in denatured dermis tissues and skin fibroblast cells after thermal injury, and thereafter gradually downregulated compared with control group. By contrast, the expression of collagen, type I, alpha 2 (COL1A2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A were first reduced and subsequently upregulated in denatured dermis tissues and skin fibroblast cells after thermal injury. We further identified COL1A2 as a novel target of miR-29a, which is involved in type I collagen synthesis, and showed that miR-29a negatively regulated the expression level of COL1A2 in skin fibroblast cells. In addition, VEGF-A, another target gene of miR-29a, was also negatively mediated by miR-29a in skin fibroblast cells. Inhibition of miR-29a expression significantly promoted the proliferation and migration of skin fibroblast cells after thermal injury, and knockdown of COL1A2 and VEGF-A reversed the effects of miR-29a on the proliferation and migration of skin fibroblast cells. Furthermore, we found that Notch2/Jagged2 signaling was involved in miR-29a response to burn wound healing. Our findings suggest that downregulated miR-29a in denatured dermis may help burn wound healing in the later phase, probably via upregulation of COL1A2 and VEGF-A expression, which can further enhance type I collagen synthesis and angiogenesis.

  15. Counteraction of urea-induced protein denaturation by trimethylamine N-oxide: A chemical chaperone at atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bennion, Brian J.; Daggett, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Proteins are very sensitive to their solvent environments. Urea is a common chemical denaturant of proteins, yet some animals contain high concentrations of urea. These animals have evolved an interesting mechanism to counteract the effects of urea by using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The molecular basis for the ability of TMAO to act as a chemical chaperone remains unknown. Here, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of a small globular protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, in 8 M urea ...

  16. The effect of a non-denaturing detergent and a guanidinium-based inactivation agent on the viability of Ebola virus in mock clinical serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J E; Easterbrook, L; Pitman, J; Anderson, D; Roddy, S; Bailey, D; Vipond, R; Bruce, C B; Roberts, A D

    2017-12-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa required the rapid testing of clinical material for the presence of potentially high titre Ebola virus (EBOV). Safe, fast and effective methods for the inactivation of such clinical samples are required so that rapid diagnostic tests including downstream analysis by RT-qPCR or nucleotide sequencing can be carried out. One of the most commonly used guanidinium - based denaturing agents, AVL (Qiagen) has been shown to fully inactivate EBOV once ethanol is added, however this is not compatible with the use of automated nucleic acid extraction systems. Additional inactivation agents need to be identified that can be used in automated systems. A candidate inactivation agent is Triton X-100, a non-denaturing detergent that is frequently used in clinical nucleic acid extraction procedures and has previously been used for inactivation of EBOV. In this study the effect of 0.1% and 1.0% Triton X-100 (final concentration 0.08% and 0.8% respectively) alone and in combination with AVL on the viability of EBOV (10 6 TCID 50 /ml) spiked into commercially available pooled negative human serum was tested. The presence of viable EBOV in the treated samples was assessed by carrying out three serial passages of the samples in Vero E6 cells (37°C, 5% CO 2 , 1 week for each passage). At the end of each passage the cells were observed for evidence of cytopathic effect and samples were taken for rRT-PCR analysis for the presence of EBOV RNA. Before cell culture cytotoxic components of AVL and Triton X-100 were removed from the samples using size exclusion spin column technology or a hydrophobic adsorbent resin. The results of this study showed that EBOV spiked into human serum was not fully inactivated when treated with either 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100 for 10 mins or 1.0% (v/v) Triton X-100 for 20 mins (final concentrations 0.08% and 0.8% Triton X-100 respectively). AVL alone also did not consistently provide complete inactivation. Samples treated

  17. Interchange reaction of disulfides and denaturation of oxytocin by copper(II)/ascorbic acid/O2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, H; Hirobe, M

    1987-05-29

    The interchange reaction of disulfides was caused by the copper(II)/ascorbic acid/O2 system. The incubation of two symmetric disulfides, L-cystinyl-bis-L-phenylalanine (PP) and L-cystinyl-bis-L-tyrosine (TT), with L-ascorbic acid and CuSO4 in potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2, 50 mM) resulted in the formation of an asymmetric disulfide, L-cystinyl-L-phenylalanine-L-tyrosine (PT), and the final ratio of PP:PT:TT was 1:2:1. As the reaction was inhibited by catalase and DMSO only at the initial time, hydroxyl radical generated by the copper(II)/ascorbic acid/O2 system seemed to be responsible for the initiation of the reaction. Oxytocin and insulin were denatured by this system, and catalase and DMSO similarly inhibited these denaturations. As the composition of amino acids was unchanged after the reaction, hydroxyl radical was thought to cause the cleavage and/or interchange reaction of disulfides to denature the peptides.

  18. A Proposed Mechanism for the Thermal Denaturation of a Recombinant Bacillus Halmapalus Alpha-amylase - the Effect of Calcium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anders D.; Pusey, Marc L.; Fuglsang, Claus C.; Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The thermal stability of a recombinant alpha-amylase from Bacillus halmapalus alpha-amylase (BHA) has been investigated using circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This alpha-amylase is homologous to other Bacillus alpha-amylases where previous crystallographic studies have identified the existence of 3 calcium binding sites in the structure. Denaturation of BHA is irreversible with a Tm of approximately 89 C, and DSC thermograms can be described using a one-step irreversible model. A 5 C increase in T(sub m) in the presence of 10 fold excess CaCl2 was observed. However, a concomitant increase in the tendency to aggregate was also observed. The presence of 30-40 fold excess calcium chelator (EDTA or EGTA) results in a large destabilization of BHA corresponding to about 40 C lower T(sub m), as determined by both CD and DSC. Ten fold excess EGTA reveals complex DSC thermograms corresponding to both reversible and irreversible transitions, which possibly originate from different populations of BHA:calcium complexes. The observations in the present study have, in combination with structural information of homologous alpha-amylases, provided the basis for the proposal of a simple denaturation mechanism of BHA. The proposed mechanism describes the irreversible thermal denaturation of different BHA:calcium complexes and the calcium binding equilibrium involved. Furthermore, the model accounts for a temperature induced reversible structural change associated with calcium binding.

  19. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Luisa Romero-Romero

    Full Text Available The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm's, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm's are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV's but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm's for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms.

  20. NF2 tumor suppressor gene: a comprehensive and efficient detection of somatic mutations by denaturing HPLC and microarray-CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szijan, Irene; Rochefort, Daniel; Bruder, Carl; Surace, Ezequiel; Machiavelli, Gloria; Dalamon, Viviana; Cotignola, Javier; Ferreiro, Veronica; Campero, Alvaro; Basso, Armando; Dumanski, Jan P; Rouleau, Guy A

    2003-01-01

    The NF2 tumor suppressor gene, located in chromosome 22q12, is involved in the development of multiple tumors of the nervous system, either associated with neurofibromatosis 2 or sporadic ones, mainly schwannomas and meningiomas. In order to evaluate the role of the NF2 gene in sporadic central nervous system (CNS) tumors, we analyzed NF2 mutations in 26 specimens: 14 meningiomas, 4 schwannomas, 4 metastases, and 4 other histopathological types of neoplasms. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (denaturing HPLC) and comparative genomic hybridization on a DNA microarray (microarray- CGH) were used as scanning methods for small mutations and gross rearrangements respectively. Small mutations were identified in six out of seventeen meningiomas and schwannomas, one mutation was novel. Large deletions were detected in six meningiomas. All mutations were predicted to result in truncated protein or in the absence of a large protein domain. No NF2 mutations were found in other histopathological types of CNS tumors. These results provide additional evidence that mutations in the NF2 gene play an important role in the development of sporadic meningiomas and schwannomas. Denaturing HPLC analysis of small mutations and microarray-CGH of large deletions are complementary, fast, and efficient methods for the detection of mutations in tumor tissues.

  1. Transition from uranium to denatured uranium/thorium fuel in an existing PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether it is possible to make a gradual transition from uranium to denatured uranium/thorium (DUTH) fuel in an existing PWR by adding DUTH assemblies during each scheduled refueling and, if the transition is possible, to develop a general procedure for making it. The feasibility of the transition was established by identifying acceptable refueling schemes for a series of transition cores, and in the process, a method for identifying acceptable schemes evolved. The utility of the method was then demonstrated by applying it to a standard reactor operating under normal conditions. The vehicle used to examine proposed fuel mixtures and to select acceptable ones was a set of one-dimensional computer codes. The core was modeled as a set of five concentric fuel zones with a reflector. Fuel mixtures were proposed and the computer codes were used to determine whether a mixture was acceptable, i.e., whether it had the desired k-effective and flux and power distributions. The parameters allowed to vary in selection of proposed fuel mixtures were enrichment of fresh fuel assemblies, number of uranium and DUTH assemblies added during each refueling, and distribution of fuel in the core. Results of the research showed that a gradual transition is possible. Furthermore, there is a method that allows the identification of fuel mixtures that are likely to be acceptable. It requires the calculation of K-infinity for the entire proposed core and for some of its regions. These values of K-infinity and relationships developed in this research can be used to predict the flux distribution and the final k-effective for the proposed fuel mixture

  2. Polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in the evaluation of oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Saxena, D; Barnes, V M; Trivedi, H M; Ge, Y; Xu, T

    2006-10-01

    Clinical evaluation of oral microbial reduction after a standard prophylactic treatment has traditionally been based on bacterial cultivation methods. However, not all microbes in saliva or dental plaque can be cultivated. Polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) is a cultivation-independent molecular fingerprinting technique that allows the assessment of the predominant bacterial species present in the oral cavity. This study sought to evaluate the oral microbial changes that occurred after a standard prophylactic treatment with a conventional oral care product using PCR-DGGE. Twelve healthy adults participated in the study. Pooled plaque samples were collected at baseline, 24 h after prophylaxis (T1), and 4 days after toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste (T4). The total microbial genomic DNA of the plaque was isolated. PCR was performed with a set of universal bacterial 16S rDNA primers. The PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments were separated by DGGE. The effects of the treatment and of dental brushing were assessed by comparing the PCR-DGGE fingerprinting profiles. The mean numbers of detected PCR amplicons were 22.3 +/- 6.1 for the baseline group, 13.0 +/- 3.1 for the T1 group, and 13.5 +/- 4.3 for the T4 group; the differences among the three groups were statistically significant (P < 0.01). The study also found a significant difference in the mean similarities of microbial profiles between the baseline and the treatment groups (P < 0.001). PCR-based DGGE has been shown to be an excellent means of rapidly and accurately assessing oral microbial changes in this clinical study.

  3. Nonlinear acoustic properties of ex vivo bovine liver and the effects of temperature and denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, E J; Coussios, C-C; Cleveland, R O

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has a great potential for the non-invasive treatment of solid tumours. Due to the high pressure amplitudes involved, nonlinear acoustic effects must be understood and the relevant medium property is the parameter of nonlinearity B/A. Here, B/A was measured in ex vivo bovine liver, over a heating/cooling cycle replicating temperatures reached during HIFU ablation, adapting a finite amplitude insertion technique, which also allowed for measurement of sound-speed and attenuation. The method measures the nonlinear progression of a plane wave through liver and B/A was chosen so that numerical simulations matched the measured waveforms. To create plane-wave conditions, sinusoidal bursts were transmitted by a 100 mm diameter 1.125 MHz unfocused transducer and measured using a 15 mm diameter 2.25 MHz broadband transducer in the near field. Attenuation and sound-speed were calculated using a reflected pulse from the smaller transducer using the larger transducer as the reflecting interface. Results showed that attenuation initially decreased with heating then increased after denaturation, the sound-speed initially increased with temperature and then decreased, and B/A showed an increase with temperature but no significant post-heating change. The B/A data disagree with other reports that show a significant change and we suggest that any nonlinear enhancement in the received ultrasound signal post-treatment is likely due to acoustic cavitation rather than changes in tissue nonlinearity. (paper)

  4. A differential scanning calorimetric study of the effects of metal ions, substrate/product, substrate analogues and chaotropic anions on the thermal denaturation of yeast enolase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, J M; Wampler, J E

    2001-03-14

    The thermal denaturation of yeast enolase 1 was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under conditions of subunit association/dissociation, enzymatic activity or substrate binding without turnover and substrate analogue binding. Subunit association stabilizes the enzyme, that is, the enzyme dissociates before denaturing. The conformational change produced by conformational metal ion binding increases thermal stability by reducing subunit dissociation. 'Substrate' or analogue binding additionally stabilizes the enzyme, irrespective of whether turnover is occurring, perhaps in part by the same mechanism. More strongly bound metal ions also stabilize the enzyme more, which we interpret as consistent with metal ion loss before denaturation, though possibly the denaturation pathway is different in the absence of metal ion. We suggest that some of the stabilization by 'substrate' and analogue binding is owing to the closure of moveable polypeptide loops about the active site, producing a more 'closed' and hence thermostable conformation.

  5. Abundance and Diversity of Hydrogenotrophic Microorganisms in the Infant Gut before the Weaning Period Assessed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Sagheddu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Delivery mode (natural vs. cesarean and feeding type (breast vs. formula feeding are relevant factors for neonatal gut colonization. Biomolecular methods have shown that the ecological structure of infant microbiota is more complex than previously proposed, suggesting a relevant presence of unculturable bacteria. It has also been postulated that among unculturable bacteria, hydrogenotrophic populations might play a key role in infant health. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, acetogens, and methanogenic archaea use hydrogenotrophic pathways within the human colon. However, to date, few studies have reported detection of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms in newborns, possibly because of limitations on available group-specific, culture-independent quantification procedures. In the present work, we analyzed 16 fecal samples of healthy babies aged 1–6 months by means of quantitative PCR (qPCR targeting the 16S rRNA or metabolic functional genes and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. qPCR data showed quantifiable levels of methanogens, SRB, and acetogens in all samples, indicating that the relative abundances of these microbial groups were not affected by delivery mode (natural vs. caesarian. DGGE revealed a high prevalence of the Blautia genus within the acetogenic bacteria despite strong interindividual variability. Our preliminary results suggest that hydrogenotrophic microorganisms, which have been a neglected group to date, should be included in future ecological and metabolic studies evaluating the infant intestinal microbiota.

  6. Final report of the safety assessment of Alcohol Denat., including SD Alcohol 3-A, SD Alcohol 30, SD Alcohol 39, SD Alcohol 39-B, SD Alcohol 39-C, SD Alcohol 40, SD Alcohol 40-B, and SD Alcohol 40-C, and the denaturants, Quassin, Brucine Sulfate/Brucine, and Denatonium Benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    animals that died, respiratory arrest was the cause. The acute i.p. LD(50) for 15 ml/kg of Brucine base was 62.0 mg/kg, with central nervous system depression prior to the onset of convulsions, just as with oral Brucine. The acute intravenous (i.v.) LD(50) was 12.0 mg/kg. Brucine was nonmutagenic in an Ames assay at levels up to 6666 mu g/plate, with and without metabolic activation. In a repeat-insult patch test, for a hair care product containing 47% SD Alcohol 40 (95%), it was reported that Brucine Sulfate may be considered a nonprimary irritant and a nonprimary sensitizer. Three different sunscreen products (35% SD Alcohol 40-B, 72.4% SD Alcohol 40, and 74.5% SD Alcohol 40) did not show any signs of photoallergy in human subjects. Also, these three formulas did not exhibit any evidence of phototoxicity in humans. Denatonium Benzoate is a bitter substance detectable at a concentration of 10 ppb, discernibly bitter at 50 ppb, and unpleasantly bitter at 10 ppm. The distribution of topically applied lidocaine, a topical anesthetic chemically related to Denatonium Benzoate demonstrated that virtually no lidocaine appears in the plasma, suggesting that the larger Denatonium Benzoate molecule also would have little or no systemic exposure. Denatonium Benzoate (0.1%) did not show adverse effects in 10 rats in an acute inhalation toxicity test and 0.005% to 0.05% was nonirritating to ocular mucosa in 6 albino rabbits. The acute oral LD(50) for the male rats was 640 mg/kg and for females, 584 mg/kg. The LD(50) for the male rabbits was 508 mg/kg and for the female rabbits, 640 mg/kg. In two chronic toxicity studies, Denatonium Benzoate was administered (by gavage) at 1.6, 8, and 16 mg/kg/day, one using cynomologus monkeys and the other rats, resulted in no compound-related toxicity. The toxicity of SD Alcohols has also been tested, with implications for the particular denaturant used. An irritation test of 55.65% SD Alcohol 40-B denatured with Denatonium Benzoate using rabbits

  7. INTERACTION OF IRON(II MIXED-LIGAND COMPLEXES WITH DNA: BASE-PAIR SPECIFICITY AND THERMAL DENATURATION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasir Mudasir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A research about base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of [Fe(phen3]2+, [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ and [Fe(phen(dip2]2+ complexes and the effect of calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA binding of these metal complexes on thermal denaturation of ct-DNA has been carried out. This research is intended to evaluate the preferential binding of the complexes to the sequence of DNA (A-T or G-C sequence and to investigate the binding strength and mode upon their interaction with DNA. Base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of the complexes was determined by comparing the equilibrium binding constant (Kb of each complex to polysynthetic DNA that contain only A-T or G-C sequence. The Kb value of the interaction was determined by spectrophotometric titration and thermal denaturation temperature (Tm was determined by monitoring the absorbance of the mixture solution of each complex and ct-DNA at λ =260 nm as temperature was elevated in the range of 25 - 100 oC. Results of the study show that in general all iron(II complexes studied exhibit a base-pair specificity in their DNA binding to prefer the relatively facile A-T sequence as compared to the G-C one. The thermal denaturation experiments have demonstrated that Fe(phen3]2+ and [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ interact weakly with double helical DNA via electrostatic interaction as indicated by insignificant changes in melting temperature, whereas [Fe(phen2(dip]2+  most probably binds to DNA in mixed modes of interaction, i.e.: intercalation and electrostatic interaction. This conclusion is based on the fact that the binding of [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ to ct-DNA moderately increase the Tm value of ct- DNA   Keywords: DNA Binding, mixed-ligand complexes

  8. Denatured states of yeast cytochrome c induced by heat and guanidinium chloride are structurally and thermodynamically different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sobia; Haque, Md Anzarul; Ubaid-Ullah, Shah; Prakash, Amresh; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Batra, Janendra K; Ahmad, Faizan

    2017-05-01

    A sequence alignment of mammalian cytochromes c with yeast iso-1-cytochrome c (y-cyt-c) shows that the yeast protein contains five extra N-terminal residues. We have been interested in understanding the question: What is the role of these five extra N-terminal residues in folding and stability of the protein? To answer this question we have prepared five deletants of y-cyt-c by sequentially removing these extra residues. During our studies on the wild type (WT) protein and its deletants, we observed that the amount of secondary structure in the guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced denatured (D) state of each protein is different from that of the heat-induced denatured (H) state. This finding is confirmed by the observation of an additional cooperative transition curve of optical properties between H and D states on the addition of different concentrations of GdmCl to the already heat denatured WT y-cyt-c and its deletants at pH 6.0 and 68°C. For each protein, analysis of transition curves representing processes, native (N) state ↔ D state, N state ↔ H state, and H state ↔ D state, was done to obtain Gibbs free energy changes associated with all the three processes. This analysis showed that, for each protein, thermodynamic cycle accommodates Gibbs free energies associated with transitions between N and D states, N and H states, and H and D states, the characteristics required for a thermodynamic function. All these experimental observations have been supported by our molecular dynamics simulation studies.

  9. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the secondary structure and thermal denaturation of CaATPase from rabbit skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworsky, Mark; Brauner, Joseph W.; Mendelsohn, Richard

    Fourier transform i.r. spectroscopy has been used to monitor structural alterations induced by thermal denaturation of the intrinsic membrane protein CaATPase in aqueous media. The protein has been isolated, purified and studied in five forms: (i) In its native lipid environment after isolation from rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum, both in H 2O and D 2O suspensions. (ii) After both mild and extensive tryptic digestion has cleaved those residues external to the membrane bilayer. (iii) Reconstituted in vesicle form with bovine brain sphingomyelin. Fourier deconvolution techniques have been used to enhance the resolution of the intrinsically overlapped Amide I and Amide II spectral regions. Large spectral alterations apparent in the deconvoluted spectra occur in these regions upon thermal denaturation of the protein which are consistent with the formation of a large proportion of β-antiparallel sheet form. The alteration parallels the loss in ATPase activity. A mild tryptic digestion increases slightly the proportion of α-helix and/or random coil secondary structure. A thermal transition to a form containing a high proportion of β structure is still evident. Extensive tryptic digestion nearly abolishes the alpha helical plus random coil secondary structure, while producing a high proportion of β form which is resistant to further thermally induced structural alterations. Studies of CaATPase reconstituted into vesicles with bovine brain sphingomyelin reveal a higher proportion of β structure than the native enzyme, with further introduction of β structure on thermal denaturation. Both the utility of deconvolution techniques and the necessity for caution in their application are apparent from the current experiments.

  10. Heterogeneity of equilibrium molten globule state of cytochrome c induced by weak salt denaturants under physiological condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidur Rahaman

    Full Text Available While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s, the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD, ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N, denatured (D and intermediate state (X of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4 at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400 and CD ([θ]409, is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1 that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2 that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3 that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1, classical (X2 and disordered (X3, i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N.

  11. Pressure-assisted cold denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme: the influence of co-solvents probed by hydrogen exchange nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtt, K; Winter, R

    2005-08-01

    COSY proton nuclear magnetic resonance was used to measure the exchange rates of amide protons of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in the pressure-assisted cold-denatured state and in the heat-denatured state. After dissolving lysozyme in deuterium oxide buffer, labile protons exchange for deuterons in such a way that exposed protons are substituted rapidly, whereas "protected" protons within structured parts of the protein are substituted slowly. The exchange rates k obs were determined for HEWL under heat treatment (80 degrees C) and under high pressure conditions at low temperature (3.75 kbar, -13 degrees C). Moreover, the influence of co-solvents (sorbitol, urea) on the exchange rate was examined under pressure-assisted cold denaturation conditions, and the corresponding protection factors, P, were determined. The exchange kinetics upon heat treatment was found to be a two-step process with initial slow exchange followed by a fast one, showing residual protection in the slow-exchange state and P-factors in the random-coil-like range for the final temperature-denatured state. Addition of sorbitol (500 mM) led to an increase of P-factors for the pressure-assisted cold denatured state, but not for the heat-denatured state. The presence of 2 M urea resulted in a drastic decrease of the P-factors of the pressure-assisted cold denatured state. For both types of co-solvents, the effect they exert appears to be cooperative, i.e., no particular regions within the protein can be identified with significantly diverse changes of P-factors.

  12. Pressure-assisted cold denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme: the influence of co-solvents probed by hydrogen exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vogtt

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available COSY proton nuclear magnetic resonance was used to measure the exchange rates of amide protons of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL in the pressure-assisted cold-denatured state and in the heat-denatured state. After dissolving lysozyme in deuterium oxide buffer, labile protons exchange for deuterons in such a way that exposed protons are substituted rapidly, whereas "protected" protons within structured parts of the protein are substituted slowly. The exchange rates k obs were determined for HEWL under heat treatment (80ºC and under high pressure conditions at low temperature (3.75 kbar, -13ºC. Moreover, the influence of co-solvents (sorbitol, urea on the exchange rate was examined under pressure-assisted cold denaturation conditions, and the corresponding protection factors, P, were determined. The exchange kinetics upon heat treatment was found to be a two-step process with initial slow exchange followed by a fast one, showing residual protection in the slow-exchange state and P-factors in the random-coil-like range for the final temperature-denatured state. Addition of sorbitol (500 mM led to an increase of P-factors for the pressure-assisted cold denatured state, but not for the heat-denatured state. The presence of 2 M urea resulted in a drastic decrease of the P-factors of the pressure-assisted cold denatured state. For both types of co-solvents, the effect they exert appears to be cooperative, i.e., no particular regions within the protein can be identified with significantly diverse changes of P-factors.

  13. Detection by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in microcosms of crude oil-contaminated mangrove sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, A C F; Marques, E L S; Gross, E; Souza, S S; Dias, J C T; Brendel, M; Rezende, R P

    2012-01-27

    Currently, the effect of crude oil on ammonia-oxidizing bacterium communities from mangrove sediments is little understood. We studied the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in mangrove microcosm experiments using mangrove sediments contaminated with 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5% crude oil as well as non-contaminated control and landfarm soil from near an oil refinery in Camamu Bay in Bahia, Brazil. The evolution of CO(2) production in all crude oil-contaminated microcosms showed potential for mineralization. Cluster analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis-derived samples generated with primers for gene amoA, which encodes the functional enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, showed differences in the sample contaminated with 5% compared to the other samples. Principal component analysis showed divergence of the non-contaminated samples from the 5% crude oil-contaminated sediment. A Venn diagram generated from the banding pattern of PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to look for operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in common. Eight OTUs were found in non-contaminated sediments and in samples contaminated with 0.5, 1, or 2% crude oil. A Jaccard similarity index of 50% was found for samples contaminated with 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2% crude oil. This is the first study that focuses on the impact of crude oil on the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium community in mangrove sediments from Camamu Bay.

  14. Evidence of β-sheet structure induced kinetic stability of papain upon thermal and sodium dodecyl sulphate denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašković Brankica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Papain is a protease that consists of α-helical and β-sheet domains which unfold almost independently. Both, papain considerable thermal stability and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS resistance have been shown. However, the ability of each domain to unfold upon thermal and SDS denaturation has never been studied. This work shows that fruit papain has slightly higher thermal inactivation resistance when it is compared to stem papain with rather high activation energy (Ea of 223 ± 16 kJmol-1 and Tm50 value of 79 ± 2 °C. SDS resistance of fruit papain was estimated by SDS-PAGE analysis and activity staining. It has been noted that, in the presence of SDS, unless heat energy was applied in order to unfold papain, the protein remained active. Furthermore, it has been proven via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR that α-helical domain of fruit papain is more prone to unfolding at elevated temperatures and in the presence of SDS then β-sheet rich domain. Thermal denaturation of papain without detergent present led to accelerated formation of aggregation specific intermolecular β-sheets as compared to native protein. Presented results are both, of fundamental and application importance. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172049

  15. Effect of quencher, denaturants, temperature and pH on the fluorescent properties of BSA protected gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chib, Rahul, E-mail: Rahul.chib@live.unthsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Butler, Susan [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Raut, Sangram [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Shah, Sunil; Borejdo, Julian [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Gryczynski, Zygmunt [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Gryczynski, Ignacy, E-mail: ignacy.gryczynski@unthsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, Center for Fluorescence Technologies and Nanomedicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we have synthesized BSA protected gold nanoclusters (BSA Au nanocluster) and studied the effect of quencher, protein denaturant, pH and temperature on the fluorescence properties of the tryptophan molecule of the BSA Au nanocluster and native BSA. We have also studied their effect on the peak emission of BSA Au nanoclusters (650 nm). The photophysical characterization of a newly developed fluorophore in different environments is absolutely necessary to futher develop their biomedical and analytical applications. It was observed from our experiments that the tryptophan in BSA Au nanoclusters is better shielded from the polar environment. Tryptophan in native BSA showed a red shift in its peak emission wavelength position. Tryptophan is a highly polarity sensitive dye and a minimal change in its microenvironment can be easily observed in its photophysical properties. - Highlights: • Tryptophan is easily accessible in native BSA compared to BSA Au nanoclusters. • Guanidine HCL denatures native BSA more compared to BSA Au nanoclusters. • High temperature decreases the quantum yield of tryptophan and BSA Au nanocluster. • Emission wavelength of BSA Au nanoclusters remains constant with increasing pH. • BSA Au nanoclusters are robust to the changes in their environments.

  16. Effect of quencher, denaturants, temperature and pH on the fluorescent properties of BSA protected gold nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chib, Rahul; Butler, Susan; Raut, Sangram; Shah, Sunil; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have synthesized BSA protected gold nanoclusters (BSA Au nanocluster) and studied the effect of quencher, protein denaturant, pH and temperature on the fluorescence properties of the tryptophan molecule of the BSA Au nanocluster and native BSA. We have also studied their effect on the peak emission of BSA Au nanoclusters (650 nm). The photophysical characterization of a newly developed fluorophore in different environments is absolutely necessary to futher develop their biomedical and analytical applications. It was observed from our experiments that the tryptophan in BSA Au nanoclusters is better shielded from the polar environment. Tryptophan in native BSA showed a red shift in its peak emission wavelength position. Tryptophan is a highly polarity sensitive dye and a minimal change in its microenvironment can be easily observed in its photophysical properties. - Highlights: • Tryptophan is easily accessible in native BSA compared to BSA Au nanoclusters. • Guanidine HCL denatures native BSA more compared to BSA Au nanoclusters. • High temperature decreases the quantum yield of tryptophan and BSA Au nanocluster. • Emission wavelength of BSA Au nanoclusters remains constant with increasing pH. • BSA Au nanoclusters are robust to the changes in their environments.

  17. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis-Polymerase Chain Reaction Comparison of Chitosan Effects on Anaerobic Cultures of Broiler Cecal Bacteria and Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Michael; Sohail, Muhammad Umar

    2018-04-01

    Enteropathogen colonization and product contamination are major poultry industry problems. The emergence of antibiotic resistance, and associated risks to human health, is limiting the use of antibiotics as first-line defense against enteropathogens in poultry. The chitin derivative, chitosan, has drawn substantial attention for its bactericidal properties. Different molecular weight (MW) chitosans can have varied effects against different bacteria in monoculture. In the current study, cecal contents from each of three market-age broilers and Salmonella Typhimurium, as indicator enteropathogen, were exposed to in vitro anaerobic culture to three chitosan preparations (0.08%, wt/vol), low (LMW), medium (MMW), and coarse (CMW). Effects of chitosan and the carrier solvent acetic acid, on cecal bacteria and Salmonella, were examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Salmonella enumeration. Bacterial profiles for the three cecal contents were shown by DGGE to be very different. Each of the three cecal contents grown in the presence of 0.08% acetic acid was very different from the same contents grown without the chitosan solvent. Culturing cecal contents in the presence of chitosan altered the bacterial DGGE profiles from the control and acetic acid-only cultures. The DGGE chitosan-treated profiles for all three cecal sources were identical to each other regardless of the MW chitosan in the culture medium. Compared with Salmonella in monoculture, Salmonella decreased (p < 0.05) by about 1.5 log CFU/mL when grown in mixed culture with cecal contents. Salmonella monocultures in the presence of 0.08% of the chitosan solvent acetic acid decreased (p < 0.05) counts by almost 3.5 log CFU/mL. Combining acetic acid and cecal contents reduced (p < 0.05) Salmonella by 7 log CFU/mL. Adding the chitosan preparations to the mixtures reduced (p < 0.05) Salmonella by 8 log CFU/mL.

  18. Use of pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to examine the effects of probiotics and essential oil blends on digestive microflora in broilers under mixed Eimeria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Michael E; Barbosa, Nei A; Dowd, Scot E; Sakomura, Nilva K; Nalian, Armen G; Martynova-Van Kley, Alexandra; Oviedo-Rondón, Edgar O

    2011-11-01

    A protective digestive microflora helps prevent and reduce broiler infection and colonization by enteropathogens. In the current experiment, broilers fed diets supplemented with probiotics and essential oil (EO) blends were infected with a standard mixed Eimeria spp. to determine effects of performance enhancers on ileal and cecal microbial communities (MCs). Eight treatment groups included four controls (uninfected-unmedicated [UU], unmedicated-infected, the antibiotic BMD plus the ionophore Coban as positive control, and the ionophore as negative control), and four treatments (probiotics BC-30 and Calsporin; and EO, Crina Poultry Plus, and Crina PoultryAF). Day-old broilers were raised to 14 days in floor pens on used litter and then were moved to Petersime batteries and inoculated at 15 days with mixed Eimeria spp. Ileal and cecal samples were collected at 14 days and 7 days postinfection. Digesta DNA was subjected to pyrosequencing for sequencing of individual cecal bacteria and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for determination of changes in ileal and cecal MC according to percentage similarity coefficient (%SC). Pyrosequencing is very sensitive detecting shifts in individual bacterial sequences, whereas DGGE is able to detect gross shifts in entire MC. These combined techniques offer versatility toward identifying feed additive and mild Eimeria infection modulation of broiler MC. Pyrosequencing detected 147 bacterial species sequences. Additionally, pyrosequencing revealed the presence of relatively low levels of the potential human enteropathogens Campylobacter sp. and four Shigella spp. as well as the potential poultry pathogen Clostridiun perfringens. Pre- and postinfection changes in ileal (56%SC) and cecal (78.5%SC) DGGE profiles resulted from the coccidia infection and with increased broiler age. Probiotics and EO changed MC from those seen in UU ilea and ceca. Results potentially reflect the performance enhancement above expectations in

  19. Splenic scintigraphy using Tc-99m-labeled heat-denatured red blood cells in pediatric patients: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, C.P.; Papanicolaou, N.; Treves, S.; Hurwitz, R.A.; Richards, P.

    1982-01-01

    Ten children underwent splenic imaging with heat-denatured red blood cells labeled with technetium-99m (Tc-99m DRBC). The presenting problems included the heterotaxia syndrome, recurrent idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura following splenectomy, mass in the left posterior hemithorax, and blunt abdominal trauma. In nine patients, the presence or absence of splenic tissue was established. A splenic hematoma was identified in the tenth patient. All patients were initially scanned with Tc-99m sulfur colloid (Tc-99m SC), and were selected for Tc-99m DRBC scintigraphy only after the results of the SC scans failed to establish the clinical problem beyond doubt. The availability of kits containing stannous ions, essential for efficient and stable labeling of red blood cells with Tc-99m and requiring only a small volume of blood, make splenic scintigraphy in children a relatively simple and definitive diagnostic procedure, when identification of splenic tissue is of clinical importance

  20. Splenic scintigraphy using Tc-99m-labeled heat-denatured red blood cells in pediatric patients: concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlich, C.P.; Papanicolaou, N.; Treves, S.; Hurwitz, R.A.; Richards, P.

    1982-03-01

    Ten children underwent splenic imaging with heat-denatured red blood cells labeled with technetium-99m (Tc-99m DRBC). The presenting problems included the heterotaxia syndrome, recurrent idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura following splenectomy, mass in the left posterior hemithorax, and blunt abdominal trauma. In nine patients, the presence or absence of splenic tissue was established. A splenic hematoma was identified in the tenth patient. All patients were initially scanned with Tc-99m sulfur colloid (Tc-99m SC), and were selected for Tc-99m DRBC scintigraphy only after the results of the SC scans failed to establish the clinical problem beyond doubt. The availability of kits containing stannous ions, essential for efficient and stable labeling of red blood cells with Tc-99m and requiring only a small volume of blood, make splenic scintigraphy in children a relatively simple and definitive diagnostic procedure, when identification of splenic tissue is of clinical importance.

  1. Antibodies to uv light denatured DNA in systemic lupus erythematosus: detection by filter radioimmunoassay and clinical correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P; Russell, A S; Percy, J S

    1976-12-01

    Antibodies to ultraviolet light denatured DNA (UV DNA) have been measured in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and normal subjects, using a millipore filter radioimmunoassay. High levels of UV DNA binding were only found in patients with SLE. The presence of UV DNA antibodies correlated well with the presence of native DNA antibodies, although immunodiffusion studies and inhibition techniques showed these antibodies to be immunologically distinct in many cases. Forty-one percent of the SLE patients had had photosensitivity at some stage of their disease, but there was a poor correlation between this symptom and the presence of UV DNA antibodies. Although UV DNA is known to be a potent immunogen, none of the results from this study suggests that antibodies to UV DNA are more than another example of the broad spectrum of antinuclear antibodies seen in SLE.

  2. The detection of Mycoplasma (formerly Eperythrozoon) wenyonii by 16S rDNA PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Laura; Lawes, Joanna; Bell, Suzanna; Barlow, Alex; Ayling, Roger; Nicholas, Robin

    2006-10-31

    Although the role of Mycoplasma wenyonii in disease is still subject to some debate, infections have been reported to result in parasitaemia, anaemia, scrotal and hind limb oedema, tachycardia, pyrexia, infertility, swollen teats, prefemoral lymphadenopathy and decreased milk production. Previously, diagnosis of M. wenyonii has been based on blood smears but is not specific for M. wenyonii and can be difficult to interpret. We have previously described the use of PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for the detection and differentiation of Mycoplasma species. DGGE enables the rapid and specific identification of Mycoplasma species and is ideally suited to detecting both mixed infections and new and unusual species. In this study, we have used DGGE with universal primers to detect M. wenyonii DNA from blood samples. DGGE can be used on blood samples as a rapid and specific test for M. wenyonii and can also be used as a screening test for other blood borne pathogens.

  3. 9 CFR 325.11 - Inedible articles: denaturing and other means of identification; exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... other means of identification; exceptions. 325.11 Section 325.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY... for use solely by the consignee for manufacturing articles not for human food. Such products may not... the carcasses of livestock, or other meat food product, that has not been inspected and passed at an...

  4. The effects of urea and n-propanol on collagen denaturation: using DSC, circular dicroism and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usha, R.; Ramasami, T.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of urea and n-propanol on circular dichroism (CD) and viscosity of purified type1 collagen solution at various temperatures and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of rat-tail tendon (RTT) collagen fibre have been studied. CD reveals a spectrum with a positive peak at around 220 nm and a negative peak at 200 nm characteristics of collagen triple helix. The molar ellipticity decreases as the concentration of urea increases up to particular concentration (collagen solution treated with 265 μM of urea) and after that it increases (collagen solution treated with 500 μM of urea). There is a linear decrease in molar ellipticity as the concentration of n-propanol increases. Denaturation temperature of urea and n-propanol treated with purified collagen solution has been studied using viscosity method. Additives such as urea and n-propanol decrease the thermal stability of collagen triple helix in solution and in RTT collagen fibre. Thermal helix to coil transition of urea and n-propanol treated collagen depends on the degree of hydration and the concentration of these additives. Thermodynamic parameters such as the peak temperature, enthalpy of activation, and energy of activation for collagen-gelatin transition for native, urea and n-propanol treated RTT collagen fibre has been calculated using DSC. The change in the thermodynamic parameters has been observed for native, urea and n-propanol treated RTT collagen fibres. The experimental results show that the change in the water structure, dehydration and desolvation induced by different additives such as urea and n-propanol on RTT may vary with the type of denaturation

  5. Effects of sterilization, packaging, and storage on vitamin C degradation, protein denaturation, and glycation in fortified milks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliguem, H; Birlouez-Aragon, I

    2005-03-01

    Monitoring the nutritional quality of dietetic milk throughout its shelf life is particularly important due to the high susceptibility of some vitamins to oxidation, and the continuous development of the Maillard reaction during storage. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the vitamin C content and protein modification by denaturation and glycation on fortified milk samples (growth milks) destined for 1- to 3-yr-old children. The influences of the sterilization process, formulation, packaging, and storage duration at ambient temperature in the dark were studied. Vitamin C degradation was particularly influenced by type of packaging. The use of a 3-layered opaque bottle was associated with complete oxidation of vitamin C after 1 mo of storage, whereas in the 6-layered opaque bottle, which has an oxygen barrier, the vitamin C content slowly decreased to reach 25% of the initial concentration after 4 mo of storage. However, no significant effect of vitamin C degradation during storage could be observed in terms of Maillard reaction, despite the fact that a probable impact occurred during sterilization. Furosine content and the FAST (fluorescence of advanced Maillard products and soluble tryptophan) index-indicators of the early and advanced Maillard reaction, respectively-were significantly higher in the in-bottle sterilized milk samples compared with UHT samples, and in fortified milk samples compared with cow milk. However, after 1 mo, the impact of storage was predominant, increasing the furosine level and the FAST index at similar levels for the differently processed samples. The early Maillard reaction developed continuously throughout the storage period.In conclusion, only packaging comprising an oxygen and light barrier is compatible with vitamin C fortification of milk. Furthermore, short storage time or low storage temperature is needed to retard vitamin C degradation, protein denaturation, and development of the Maillard reaction.

  6. Application of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priha, Outi; Nyyssönen, Mari; Bomberg, Malin; Laitila, Arja; Simell, Jaakko; Kapanen, Anu; Juvonen, Riikka

    2013-09-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) participate in microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of equipment and H2S-driven reservoir souring in oil field sites. Successful management of industrial processes requires methods that allow robust monitoring of microbial communities. This study investigated the applicability of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) targeting the dissimilatory sulfite reductase ß-subunit (dsrB) gene for monitoring SRB communities in oil field samples from the North Sea, the United States, and Brazil. Fifteen of the 28 screened samples gave a positive result in real-time PCR assays, containing 9 × 10(1) to 6 × 10(5) dsrB gene copies ml(-1). DHPLC and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) community profiles of the PCR-positive samples shared an overall similarity; both methods revealed the same samples to have the lowest and highest diversity. The SRB communities were diverse, and different dsrB compositions were detected at different geographical locations. The identified dsrB gene sequences belonged to several phylogenetic groups, such as Desulfovibrio, Desulfococcus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfobulbus, Desulfotignum, Desulfonatronovibrio, and Desulfonauticus. DHPLC showed an advantage over DGGE in that the community profiles were very reproducible from run to run, and the resolved gene fragments could be collected using an automated fraction collector and sequenced without a further purification step. DGGE, on the other hand, included casting of gradient gels, and several rounds of rerunning, excising, and reamplification of bands were needed for successful sequencing. In summary, DHPLC proved to be a suitable tool for routine monitoring of the diversity of SRB communities in oil field samples.

  7. Changes in the diversity of pig ileal lactobacilli around weaning determined by means of 16S rRNA gene amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janzcyk, P.; Pieper, R.; Smidt, H.; Souffrant, W.B.

    2007-01-01

    Our study aimed to provide a comprehensive characterization of changes in porcine intestinal Lactobacillus populations around the time of weaning based on 16S rRNA gene amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). DNA was extracted from the ileal contents of piglets at weaning

  8. Evaluation of functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a poly (DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide, filled with modified denatured muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Den Dunnen, WFA; Schakenraad, JM; Robinson, PH

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed of functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon -CL) nerve guide, as filled with either modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). To evaluate both motor and sensory nerve recovery,

  9. Development and application of a selective pcr-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis approach to detect a recently cultivated Bacillus group predominant in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzeneva, V.A.; Li, Y.; Felske, A.; Vos, de W.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Vaughan, E.E.; Smidt, H.

    2004-01-01

    The worldwide presence of a hitherto-nondescribed group of predominant soil microorganisms related to Bacillus benzoevorans was analyzed after development of two sets of selective primers targeting 16S rRNA genes in combination with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The high abundance

  10. Lysis solution composition and non-linear dose-response to ionizing radiation in the non-denaturing DNA filter elution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.

    1990-01-01

    The suggestion by Okayasu and Iliakis (1989) that the non-linear dose-response curve, obtained with the non-denaturing filter elution technique for mammalian cells exposed to low-LET radiation, is the result of a technical artefact, was not confirmed. (author)

  11. The recognition of adsorbed and denatured proteins of different topographies by β2 integrins and effects on leukocyte adhesion and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brevig, T.; Holst, B.; Ademovic, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte beta(2) integrins Mac-1 and p150,95 are promiscuous cell-surface receptors that recognise and mediate cell adhesion to a variety of adsorbed and denatured proteins. We used albumin as a model protein to study whether leukocyte adhesion and activation depended on the nm-scale topography...

  12. Electronmicroscopical evaluation of short-term nerve regeneration through a thin-walled biodegradable poly(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Robinson, PH; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, EH; Kors, G; den Dunnen, WFA

    The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm gap in the sciatic nerve of the rat, using a thin-walled biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon -caprolactone) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT). The evaluation was performed

  13. NMR backbone resonance assignments of the prodomain variants of BDNF in the urea denatured state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Bains, Henrietta; Anastasia, Agustin; Bracken, Clay

    2018-04-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of proteins which plays a central role in neuronal survival, growth, plasticity and memory. A single Val66Met variant has been identified in the prodomain of human BDNF that is associated with anxiety, depression and memory disorders. The structural differences within the full-length prodomain Val66 and Met66 isoforms could shed light on the mechanism of action of the Met66 and its impact on the development of neuropsychiatric-associated disorders. In the present study, we report the backbone 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N NMR assignments of both full-length Val66 and Met66 prodomains in the presence of 2 M urea. These conditions were utilized to suppress residual structure and aid subsequent native state structural investigations aimed at mapping and identifying variant-dependent conformational differences under native-state conditions.

  14. Unrecorded alcohol consumption in Russia: toxic denaturants and disinfectants pose additional risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodun, Yuriy V; Monakhova, Yulia B; Kuballa, Thomas; Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2011-12-01

    In 2005, 30% of all alcohol consumption in Russia was unrecorded. This paper describes the chemical composition of unrecorded and low cost alcohol, including a toxicological evaluation. Alcohol products (n=22) from both recorded and unrecorded sources were obtained from three Russian cities (Saratov, Lipetsk and Irkutsk) and were chemically analyzed. Unrecorded alcohols included homemade samogons, medicinal alcohols and surrogate alcohols. Analysis included alcoholic strength, levels of volatile compounds (methanol, acetaldehyde, higher alcohols), ethyl carbamate, diethyl phthalate (DEP) and polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride (PHMG). Single samples showed contamination with DEP (275-1269 mg/l) and PHMG (515 mg/l) above levels of toxicological concern. Our detailed chemical analysis of Russian alcohols showed that the composition of vodka, samogon and medicinal alcohols generally did not raise major public health concerns other than for ethanol. It was shown, however, that concentration levels of DEP and PHMG in some surrogate alcohols make these samples unfit for human consumption as even moderate drinking would exceed acceptable daily intakes.

  15. Dynamic and structural study of neocarzinostatin native and denatured states, by differential microcalorimetry, optical spectroscopies and X-ray and neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Daniela

    2000-01-01

    A structural and dynamic characterization of proteins denatured states is essential to the understanding of mechanisms which control proteins folding. It is in this framework that this study has been undertaken in taking as model the neocarzinostatin globular protein. It is formed with seven cell-layers which form a barrel pattern maintained by two bi-sulfur bonds. A full characterization of native and denatured states, both from structural and dynamic point of view, has been implemented with several techniques able to bring data at different levels. During the experiments, ncs has been stabilized by temperature and by the use of a chaotropic agent: the guanidinium chloride (gdmcl). Small angle x-ray and neutron scattering have allowed us to obtain data on the variation of the protein compactness in terms of gdmcl temperature and concentration. The diffusion spectra show that ncs loses completely its globular structure above 80 C or in presence of about 5 m of gdmcl. Temperature and concentration of half denaturation are tm= 70 C and cm=3.5 m (in heavy water), respectively. Spectra analysis of strongly denatured protein has allowed us to obtain values of its chain length and of its persistence length which are in agreement with those theoretically estimated. Experiments have been carried out too to measure the radius of gyration to zero concentration and the second virial coefficient of the solution in order to estimate the interactions between the molecules. A full characterization has been performed in terms of gdmcl temperature and concentration by fluorescence and circular dichroism. These two techniques reveal the variations of the local three-dimensional structure and secondary structure of the protein respectively. Microcalorimetry measurements have shown that thermal denaturation of ncs is completely reversible and has been used to measure the enthalpy variation during the transition. At last, it has been possible to study ncs intramolecular dynamics in

  16. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and barcoded pyrosequencing reveal unprecedented archaeal diversity in mangrove sediment and rhizosphere samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ana C C; Cleary, Daniel F R; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Angela; Dealtry, Simone; Mendonça-Hagler, Leda C S; Smalla, Kornelia; Gomes, Newton C M

    2012-08-01

    Mangroves are complex ecosystems that regulate nutrient and sediment fluxes to the open sea. The importance of bacteria and fungi in regulating nutrient cycles has led to an interest in their diversity and composition in mangroves. However, very few studies have assessed Archaea in mangroves, and virtually nothing is known about whether mangrove rhizospheres affect archaeal diversity and composition. Here, we studied the diversity and composition of Archaea in mangrove bulk sediment and the rhizospheres of two mangrove trees, Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing of archaeal 16S rRNA genes with a nested-amplification approach. DGGE profiles revealed significant structural differences between bulk sediment and rhizosphere samples, suggesting that roots of both mangrove species influence the sediment archaeal community. Nearly all of the detected sequences obtained with pyrosequencing were identified as Archaea, but most were unclassified at the level of phylum or below. Archaeal richness was, furthermore, the highest in the L. racemosa rhizosphere, intermediate in bulk sediment, and the lowest in the R. mangle rhizosphere. This study shows that rhizosphere microhabitats of R. mangle and L. racemosa, common plants in subtropical mangroves located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, hosted distinct archaeal assemblages.

  17. Robust Denaturation of Villin Headpiece by MoS2 Nanosheet: Potential Molecular Origin of the Nanotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Kang, Seung-Gu; Yang, Jerry R.; Luo, Judong; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    MoS2 nanosheet, a new two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides nanomaterial, has attracted significant attentions lately due to many potential promising biomedical applications. Meanwhile, there is also a growing concern on its biocompatibility, with little known on its interactions with various biomolecules such as proteins. In this study, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of a MoS2 nanosheet with Villin Headpiece (HP35), a model protein widely used in protein folding studies. We find that MoS2 exhibits robust denaturing capability to HP35, with its secondary structures severely destroyed within hundreds of nanosecond simulations. Both aromatic and basic residues are critical for the protein anchoring onto MoS2 surface, which then triggers the successive protein unfolding process. The main driving force behind the adsorption process is the dispersion interaction between protein and MoS2 monolayer. Moreover, water molecules at the interface between some key hydrophobic residues (e.g. Trp-64) and MoS2 surface also help to accelerate the process driven by nanoscale drying, which provides a strong hydrophobic force. These findings might have shed new light on the potential nanotoxicity of MoS2 to proteins with atomic details, which should be helpful in guiding future biomedical applications of MoS2 with its nanotoxicity mitigated.

  18. Bacteria community study of combined periodontal-endodontic lesions using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Guan, Rui; Sun, Jinghua; Hou, Benxiang

    2014-10-01

    The entire microbial population and predominant microflora of root canals (RCs) and adjacent periodontal pockets (PPs) from teeth with combined periodontal-endodontic lesions were determined and compared. Pooled RC and PP samples were collected from the molars of 20 patients diagnosed with combined periodontal-endodontic lesions. DNA was extracted for polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), cloning, and sequence analysis. A coefficient of similarity (Cs) was used to determine the similarity of the bacterial profiles from RCs and PPs. Significantly fewer bands were produced by PCR-DGGE from RCs (5.9 ± 1.7) than from PPs (8.0 ± 1.8) (P bacteria in both the RC and PP samples were (in descending order) Filifactor alocis, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia. The high similarity in the sets of organisms present in both RC and PP samples in this study suggests that the pocket could be a source of RC infection. The data also demonstrate that combined periodontal-endodontic lesions consist of a diverse and complex microbial community.

  19. Bacterial analysis of combined periodontal-endodontic lesions by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Minghui; Qi, Qingguo

    2013-01-01

    We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to compare bacterial profiles in periodontium and root canals of teeth with combined periodontal-endodontic lesions. Samples of dental plaque and necrotic pulp were collected from thirteen extracted teeth with advanced periodontitis. Genomic DNA was extracted for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using universal bacterial primers. The PCR products were then loaded onto DGGE gels to obtain fractionated bands. Characteristic DGGE bands were excised and DNA was cloned and sequenced. The number of bands, which indicates the number of bacterial species, was compared between dental plaques and necrotic pulp tissues from the same tooth. Although the difference was statistically significant (P bacteria species were present in both the periodontal pockets and root canals of the same tooth; however, periodontal bacteria did not always invade the root canals, and some bacteria in root canals were not present in periodontal pockets of the same tooth. In some teeth, unique bacteria in root canals had not passed from periodontal pockets. A basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) sequence search in Genbank indicated that new bacteria species were present in periodontal pockets and root canals. Their characteristics must thus be further analyzed.

  20. 16S rRNA PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of Oral Lactobacillus casei Group and Their Phenotypic Appearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwat, S; Teanpaisan, R

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a 16S rRNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to identify the species level of Lactobacillus casei group and to investigate their characteristics of acid production and inhibitory effect. PCR-DGGE has been developed based on the 16S rRNA gene, and a set of HDA-1-GC and HDA-2, designed at V2-V3 region, and another set of CARP-1-GC and CARP-2, designed at V1 region, have been used. The bacterial strains included L. casei ATCC 393, L. paracasei CCUG 32212, L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469, L. zeae CCUG 35515, and 46 clinical strains of L. casei/paracasei/rhamnosus. Inhibitory effect against Streptococcus mutans and acid production were examined. Results revealed that each type species strain and identified clinical isolate showed its own unique DGGE pattern using CARP1-GC and CARP2 primers. HDA1-GC and HDA2 primers could distinguish the strains of L. paracasei from L. casei. It was found that inhibitory effect of L. paracasei was stronger than L. casei and L. rhamnosus. The acid production of L. paracasei was lower than L. casei and L. rhamnosus. In conclusion, the technique has been proven to be able to differentiate between closely related species in L. casei group and thus provide reliable information of their phenotypic appearances.

  1. Monitoring of the microbial communities involved in the soy sauce manufacturing process by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu

    2012-08-01

    Soy sauce is a traditional seasoning produced through the fermentation of soybeans and wheat using microbes. In this study, the microbial communities involved in the soy sauce manufacturing process were analyzed by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The bacterial DGGE profile indicated that the bacterial microbes in the koji were Weissella cibaria (Weissella confusa, Weissella kimchii, Weissella salipiscis, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus iners, or Streptococcus thermophilus), Staphylococcus gallinarum (or Staphylococcus xylosus), and Staphylococcus kloosii. In addition to these bacteria, Tetragenococcus halophilus was also detected in the mash during lactic acid fermentation. The fungal DGGE profile indicated that the fungal microbes in the koji were not only Aspergillus oryzae but also several yeasts. In the mash, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii appeared in the early fermentation stage, Candida etchellsii (or Candida nodaensis) and Candida versatilis were detected at the middle fermentation stage, and Candida etchellsii was detected at the mature fermentation stage. These results suggest that the microbial communities present during the soy sauce manufacturing process change drastically throughout its production. This is the first report to reveal the microbial communities involved in the soy sauce manufacturing process using a culture-independent method. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of microbial diversity on deli slicers using polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, O K; Mertz, A W; Akins, E L; Sirsat, S A; Neal, J A; Morawicki, R; Crandall, P G; Ricke, S C

    2013-02-01

    Cross-contamination of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria from food-contact surfaces to food products is a serious public health issue. Bacteria may survive and attach to food-contact surfaces by residual food components and/or background bacteria which may subsequently transfer to other food products. Deli slicers, generally used for slicing ready-to-eat products, can serve as potential sources for considerable bacterial transfer. The objective of this study was to assess the extent and distribution of microbial diversity of deli slicers by identification of pathogenic and background bacteria. Slicer-swab samples were collected from restaurants in Arkansas and Texas in the United States. Ten surface areas for each slicer were swabbed using sterile sponges. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was applied to investigate the fingerprint of samples, and each band was further identified by sequence analysis. Pseudomonads were identified as the dominant bacteria followed by Enterobacteriaceae family, and lactic acid bacteria such as Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus were also found. Bacterial distribution was similar for all surface areas, while the blade guard exhibited the greatest diversity. This study provides a profile of the microbial ecology of slicers using DGGE to develop more specific sanitation practices and to reduce cross-contamination during slicing. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE as a powerful novel alternative for differentiation of epizootic ISA virus variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela Carmona

    Full Text Available Infectious Salmon Anemia is a devastating disease critically affecting world-wide salmon production. Chile has been particularly stricken by this disease which in all cases has been directly related with its causative agent, a novel orthomyxovirus which presents specific and distinctive infective features. Among these, two molecular markers have been directly associated with pathogenicity in two of the eight RNA sub genomic coding units of the virus: an insertion hot spot region present in viral segment 5 and a Highly Polymorphic Region (HPR located in viral segment 6. Here we report the successful adaptation of a PCR-dependent denaturing gel electrophoresis technique (DGGE, which enables differentiation of selected reported HPR epizootic variants detected in Chile. At the same time, the technique allows us to distinguish one nucleotide differences in sequences associated with the intriguing, and still not well-understood, insertion events which tend to occur on RNA Segment 5. Thus, the versatility of the technique opens new opportunities for improved understanding of the complex biology of all ISA variants as well as possible applications to other highly variable pathogens.

  4. Heat-denaturation and aggregation of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) globulins as affected by the pH value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Koehler, Peter; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-04-01

    The influence of heating (100 °C; 0-15 min) on the relative molecular mass, protein unfolding and secondary structure of quinoa globulins was studied at pH 6.5 (low solubility), 8.5 and 10.5 (high solubility). The patterns of denaturation and aggregation varied with pH. Heating triggered the disruption of the disulfide bonds connecting the acidic and basic chains of the chenopodin subunits at pH 8.5 and 10.5, but not at pH 6.5. Large aggregates unable to enter a 4% SDS-PAGE gel were formed at pH 6.5 and 8.5, which became soluble under reducing conditions. Heating at pH 10.5 lead to a rapid dissociation of the native chenopodin and to the disruption of the subunits, but no SDS-insoluble aggregates were formed. No major changes in secondary structure occurred during a 15 min heating, but an increase in hydrophobicity indicated unfolding of the tertiary structure in all samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Counteraction of urea-induced protein denaturation by trimethylamine N-oxide: a chemical chaperone at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Brian J; Daggett, Valerie

    2004-04-27

    Proteins are very sensitive to their solvent environments. Urea is a common chemical denaturant of proteins, yet some animals contain high concentrations of urea. These animals have evolved an interesting mechanism to counteract the effects of urea by using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The molecular basis for the ability of TMAO to act as a chemical chaperone remains unknown. Here, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of a small globular protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, in 8 M urea and 4 M TMAO/8 M urea solutions, in addition to other control simulations, to investigate this effect at the atomic level. In 8 M urea, the protein unfolds, and urea acts in both a direct and indirect manner to achieve this effect. In contrast, introduction of 4 M TMAO counteracts the effect of urea and the protein remains well structured. TMAO makes few direct interactions with the protein. Instead, it prevents unfolding of the protein by structuring the solvent. In particular, TMAO orders the solvent and discourages it from competing with intraprotein H bonds and breaking up the hydrophobic core of the protein.

  6. Application of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique as an efficient diagnostic tool for ciliate communities in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Alexandre; Lara, Enrique; Nikolausz, Marcell; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2010-02-01

    Ciliates (or Ciliophora) are ubiquitous organisms which can be widely used as bioindicators in ecosystems exposed to anthropogenic and industrial influences. The evaluation of the environmental impact on soil ciliate communities with methods relying on morphology-based identification may be hampered by the large number of samples usually required for a statistically supported, reliable conclusion. Cultivation-independent molecular-biological diagnostic tools are a promising alternative to greatly simplify and accelerate such studies. In this present work a ciliate-specific fingerprint method based on the amplification of a phylogenetic marker gene (i.e. the 18S ribosomal RNA gene) with subsequent analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was developed and used to monitor community shifts in a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) polluted soil. The semi-nested approach generated ciliate-specific amplification products from all soil samples and allowed to distinguish community profiles from a PAH-polluted and a non-polluted control soil. Subsequent sequence analysis of excised bands provided evidence that polluted soil samples are dominated by organisms belonging to the class Colpodea. The general DGGE approach presented in this study might thus in principle serve as a fast and reproducible diagnostic tool, complementing and facilitating future ecological and ecotoxicological monitoring of ciliates in polluted habitats. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A Fast Silver Staining Protocol Enabling Simple and Efficient Detection of SSR Markers using a Non-denaturing Polyacrylamide Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Deng, Xiaohui; Li, Ronghua; Xia, Yanshi; Bai, Guihua; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Guo, Peiguo

    2018-04-20

    Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) is one of the most effective markers used in plant and animal genetic research and molecular breeding programs. Silver staining is a widely used method for the detection of SSR markers in a polyacrylamide gel. However, conventional protocols for silver staining are technically demanding and time-consuming. Like many other biological laboratory techniques, silver staining protocols have been steadily optimized to improve detection efficiency. Here, we report a simplified silver staining method that significantly reduces reagent costs and enhances the detection resolution and picture clarity. The new method requires two major steps (impregnation and development) and three reagents (silver nitrate, sodium hydroxide, and formaldehyde), and only 7 min of processing for a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Compared to previously reported protocols, this new method is easier, quicker and uses fewer chemical reagents for SSR detection. Therefore, this simple, low-cost, and effective silver staining protocol will benefit genetic mapping and marker-assisted breeding by a quick generation of SSR marker data.

  8. Behavior of variable V3 region from 16S rDNA of lactic acid bacteria in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolini, D; Moschetti, G; Blaiotta, G; Coppola, S

    2001-03-01

    Separation of amplified V3 region from 16S rDNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was tested as a tool for differentiation of lactic acid bacteria commonly isolated from food. Variable V3 regions of 21 reference strains and 34 wild strains referred to species belonging to the genera Pediococcus, Enterococcus, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Weissella, and Streptococcus were analyzed. DGGE profiles obtained were species-specific for most of the cultures tested. Moreover, it was possible to group the remaining LAB reference strains according to the migration of their 16S V3 region in the denaturing gel. The results are discussed with reference to their potential in the analysis of LAB communities in food, besides shedding light on taxonomic aspects.

  9. Purification of correctly oxidized MHC class I heavy-chain molecules under denaturing conditions: a novel strategy exploiting disulfide assisted protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferré, Henrik; Ruffet, Emmanuel; Blicher, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to develop a strategy for purifying correctly oxidized denatured major histocompability complex class I (MHC-I) heavy-chain molecules, which on dilution, fold efficiently and become functional. Expression of heavy-chain molecules in bacteria results in the formation...... of insoluble cellular inclusion bodies, which must be solubilized under denaturing conditions. Their subsequent purification and refolding is complicated by the fact that (1). correct folding can only take place in combined presence of beta(2)-microglobulin and a binding peptide; and (2). optimal in vitro...... conditions for disulfide bond formation ( approximately pH 8) and peptide binding ( approximately pH 6.6) are far from complementary. Here we present a two-step strategy, which relies on uncoupling the events of disulfide bond formation and peptide binding. In the first phase, heavy-chain molecules...

  10. Purification of correctly oxidized MHC class I heavy-chain molecules under denaturing conditions: A novel strategy exploiting disulfide assisted protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferré, Henrik; Ruffet, E.; Blicher, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to develop a strategy for purifying correctly oxidized denatured major histocompability complex class I (MHC-I) heavy-chain molecules, which on dilution, fold efficiently and become functional. Expression of heavy-chain molecules in bacteria results in the formation...... of insoluble cellular inclusion bodies, which must be solubilized under denaturing conditions. Their subsequent purification and refolding is complicated by the fact that (1) correct folding can only take place in combined presence of beta(2)-microglobulin and a binding peptide; and (2) optimal in vitro...... conditions for disulfide bond formation (similar topH 8) and peptide binding (similar topH 6.6) are far from complementary. Here we present a two-step strategy, which relies on uncoupling the events of disulfide bond formation and peptide binding. In the first phase, heavy-chain molecules with correct...

  11. 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of domain 5 of Dictyostelium discoideum gelation factor (ABP-120) in its native and 8M urea-denatured states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John; Dobson, Christopher M

    2009-06-01

    The gelation factor from Dictyostelium discoideum (ABP-120) is an actin binding protein consisting of six immunoglobulin (Ig) domains in the C-terminal rod domain. We have recently used the pair of domains 5 and 6 of ABP-120 as a model system for studying multi-domain nascent chain folding on the ribosome. Here we present the NMR assignments of domain 5 in its native and 8M urea-denatured states.

  12. Sampling the Denatured State of Polypeptides in Water, Urea, and Guanidine Chloride to Strict Equilibrium Conditions with the Help of Massively Parallel Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Roberto; Camilloni, Carlo; Tiana, Guido

    2014-02-11

    The denatured state of polypeptides and proteins, stabilized by chemical denaturants like urea and guanidine chloride, displays residual secondary structure when studied by nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy. However, these experimental techniques are weakly sensitive, and thus molecular-dynamics simulations can be useful to complement the experimental findings. To sample the denatured state, we made use of massively-parallel computers and of a variant of the replica exchange algorithm, in which the different branches, connected with unbiased replicas, favor the formation and disruption of local secondary structure. The algorithm is applied to the second hairpin of GB1 in water, in urea, and in guanidine chloride. We show with the help of different criteria that the simulations converge to equilibrium. It results that urea and guanidine chloride, besides inducing some polyproline-II structure, have different effect on the hairpin. Urea disrupts completely the native region and stabilizes a state which resembles a random coil, while guanidine chloride has a milder effect.

  13. Mapping Proteoforms and Protein Complexes From King Cobra Venom Using Both Denaturing and Native Top-down Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Rafael D; Skinner, Owen S; Fornelli, Luca; Domont, Gilberto B; Compton, Philip D; Kelleher, Neil L

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing whole proteins by top-down proteomics avoids a step of inference encountered in the dominant bottom-up methodology when peptides are assembled computationally into proteins for identification. The direct interrogation of whole proteins and protein complexes from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) provides a sharply clarified view of toxin sequence variation, transit peptide cleavage sites and post-translational modifications (PTMs) likely critical for venom lethality. A tube-gel format for electrophoresis (called GELFrEE) and solution isoelectric focusing were used for protein fractionation prior to LC-MS/MS analysis resulting in 131 protein identifications (18 more than bottom-up) and a total of 184 proteoforms characterized from 14 protein toxin families. Operating both GELFrEE and mass spectrometry to preserve non-covalent interactions generated detailed information about two of the largest venom glycoprotein complexes: the homodimeric l-amino acid oxidase (∼130 kDa) and the multichain toxin cobra venom factor (∼147 kDa). The l-amino acid oxidase complex exhibited two clusters of multiproteoform complexes corresponding to the presence of 5 or 6 N-glycans moieties, each consistent with a distribution of N-acetyl hexosamines. Employing top-down proteomics in both native and denaturing modes provides unprecedented characterization of venom proteoforms and their complexes. A precise molecular inventory of venom proteins will propel the study of snake toxin variation and the targeted development of new antivenoms or other biotherapeutics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Mechanism of Protein Denaturation: Partial Unfolding of the P22 Coat Protein I-Domain by Urea Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Rebecca L.; Fraser, LaTasha C.R.; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2015-01-01

    The I-domain is an insertion domain of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein that drives rapid folding and accounts for over half of the stability of the full-length protein. We sought to determine the role of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the unfolding of the I-domain by examining 3JNC’ couplings transmitted through H-bonds, the temperature and urea-concentration dependence of 1HN and 15N chemical shifts, and native-state hydrogen exchange at urea concentrations where the domain is predominantly folded. The native-state hydrogen-exchange data suggest that the six-stranded β-barrel core of the I-domain is more stable against unfolding than a smaller subdomain comprised of a short α-helix and three-stranded β-sheet. H-bonds, separately determined from solvent protection and 3JNC’ H-bond couplings, are identified with an accuracy of 90% by 1HN temperature coefficients. The accuracy is improved to 95% when 15N temperature coefficients are also included. In contrast, the urea dependence of 1HN and 15N chemical shifts is unrelated to H-bonding. The protein segments with the largest chemical-shift changes in the presence of urea show curved or sigmoidal titration curves suggestive of direct urea binding. Nuclear Overhauser effects to urea for these segments are also consistent with specific urea-binding sites in the I-domain. Taken together, the results support a mechanism of urea unfolding in which denaturant binds to distinct sites in the I-domain. Disordered segments bind urea more readily than regions in stable secondary structure. The locations of the putative urea-binding sites correlate with the lower stability of the structure against solvent exchange, suggesting that partial unfolding of the structure is related to urea accessibility. PMID:26682823

  15. Effects of Metal Ions, Temperature, and a Denaturant on the Oxidative Folding Pathways of Bovine α-Lactalbumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Shinozaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine α-lactalbumin (αLA has four disulfide (SS bonds in the native form (N. On the oxidative folding pathways of this protein, two specific SS folding intermediates, i.e., (61–77, 73–91 and des[6–120], which have two and three native SS bonds, respectively, accumulate predominantly in the presence of Ca2+. In this study, we reinvestigated the pathways using a water-soluble cyclic selenoxide reagent, trans-3,4-dihydroxyselenolane oxide (DHSox, as a strong and quantitative oxidant to oxidize the fully reduced form (R. In the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA (under a metal-free condition, SS formation randomly proceeded, and N did not regenerate. On the other hand, two specific SS intermediates transiently generated in the presence of Ca2+. These intermediates could be assigned to (61–77, 73–91 and des[6–120] having two common SS bonds, i.e., Cys61-Cys77 and Cys73-Cys91, near the calcium binding pocket of the β-sheet domain. Much faster folding to N was observed in the presence of Mn2+, whereas Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Zn2+ did not affect the pathways. The two key intermediates were susceptible to temperature and a denaturant. The oxidative folding pathways revealed were significantly different from those of hen egg white lysozyme, which has the same SS-bonding pattern as αLA, suggesting that the folding pathways of SS-containing proteins can alter depending on the amino acid sequence and other factors, even when the SS-bond topologies are similar to each other.

  16. Origins of protein denatured state compactness and hydrophobic clustering in aqueous urea: inferences from nonpolar potentials of mean force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Seishi; Chan, Hue Sun

    2002-12-01

    Free energies of pairwise hydrophobic association are simulated in aqueous solutions of urea at concentrations ranging from 0-8 M. Consistent with the expectation that hydrophobic interactions are weakened by urea, the association of relatively large nonpolar solutes is destabilized by urea. However, the association of two small methane-sized nonpolar solutes in water has the opposite tendency of being slightly strengthened by the addition of urea. Such size effects and the dependence of urea-induced stability changes on the configuration of nonpolar solutes are not predicted by solvent accessible surface area approaches based on energetic parameters derived from bulk-phase solubilities of model compounds. Thus, to understand hydrophobic interactions in proteins, it is not sufficient to rely solely on transfer experiment data that effectively characterize a single nonpolar solute in an aqueous environment but not the solvent-mediated interactions among two or more nonpolar solutes. We find that the m-values for the rate of change of two-methane association free energy with respect to urea concentration is a dramatically nonmonotonic function of the spatial separation between the two methanes, with a distance-dependent profile similar to the corresponding two-methane heat capacity of association in pure water. Our results rationalize the persistence of residual hydrophobic contacts in some proteins at high urea concentrations and explain why the heat capacity signature (DeltaC(P)) of a compact denatured state can be similar to DeltaC(P) values calculated by assuming an open random-coil-like unfolded state. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jiri

    2002-03-25

    The combination of advanced high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques with high-pressure capability represents a powerful experimental tool in studies of protein folding. This review is organized as follows: after a general introduction of high-pressure, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of proteins, the experimental part deals with instrumentation. The main section of the review is devoted to NMR studies of reversible pressure unfolding of proteins with special emphasis on pressure-assisted cold denaturation and the detection of folding intermediates. Recent studies investigating local perturbations in proteins and the experiments following the effects of point mutations on pressure stability of proteins are also discussed. Ribonuclease A, lysozyme, ubiquitin, apomyoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin and troponin C were the model proteins investigated.

  18. Synthesis of the human VEGF165 gene based on overlap PCR and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165) protein in CHO cells. ... The PCR program consisted of a denaturation step at 95°C for 3 min, then 25 cycles at ... PCR product for template and two oligos introduced at one end for.

  19. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient

  20. 99 mTc-sulphur-colloid and heat-denatured 99mTc-labelled red cell scans demonstrating a giant intrapelvic spleen in a girl after splenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, P.F.; Tzen, K.Y.; Tsai, M.F.; Lin, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    A 17 x 12 x 5-cm giant intrapelvic mass in a 14-year-old girl is reported. This mass developed 6 years after a splenectomy for splenic torsion. The heat-denatured 99 m Tc-labelled red cell scan and 99 m Tc- sulphur-colloid scan confirmed the specific red cell sequestration function and reticuloendothelial activity in the giant intrapelvic spleen. The size and development of the giant intrapelvic spleen are unusual. The usefulness of functional images to diagnosis the nature of the intrapelvic mass is well demonstrated. (orig.)

  1. The H1 histone-specific proteinase is associated with nuclear matrix and stimulated by DNA containing breaks of denatured sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaziev, A.I.; Kutsyj, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    Discovery of proteinase in nuclear matrix specific of H1 histone and dependent presence of breaks or denatured sites in DNA permits to assume that the given enzyme, obviously, participates in replication and DNA repair, in regulation of genes expression. Removal of H1 histone by proteinase is, probably, necessary for procedure of these processes, and, obviously, this proteinase suffers conformational changes in the composition of the DNA-histone complex. H1 histone disintegration in nucleohistone containing damaged sites of DNA by specific proteinase, probably, represents one of the mechanisms for providing DNA repair in cells of higher organisms

  2. A Comprehensive Quality Evaluation System for Complex Herbal Medicine Using PacBio Sequencing, PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, and Several Chemical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiasheng; Zhang, Peng; Liao, Baosheng; Li, Jing; Liu, Xingyun; Shi, Yuhua; Cheng, Jinle; Lai, Zhitian; Xu, Jiang; Chen, Shilin

    2017-01-01

    Herbal medicine is a major component of complementary and alternative medicine, contributing significantly to the health of many people and communities. Quality control of herbal medicine is crucial to ensure that it is safe and sound for use. Here, we investigated a comprehensive quality evaluation system for a classic herbal medicine, Danggui Buxue Formula, by applying genetic-based and analytical chemistry approaches to authenticate and evaluate the quality of its samples. For authenticity, we successfully applied two novel technologies, third-generation sequencing and PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis), to analyze the ingredient composition of the tested samples. For quality evaluation, we used high performance liquid chromatography assays to determine the content of chemical markers to help estimate the dosage relationship between its two raw materials, plant roots of Huangqi and Danggui. A series of surveys were then conducted against several exogenous contaminations, aiming to further access the efficacy and safety of the samples. In conclusion, the quality evaluation system demonstrated here can potentially address the authenticity, quality, and safety of herbal medicines, thus providing novel insight for enhancing their overall quality control. Highlight: We established a comprehensive quality evaluation system for herbal medicine, by combining two genetic-based approaches third-generation sequencing and DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) with analytical chemistry approaches to achieve the authentication and quality connotation of the samples. PMID:28955365

  3. A Comprehensive Quality Evaluation System for Complex Herbal Medicine Using PacBio Sequencing, PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, and Several Chemical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiasheng Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is a major component of complementary and alternative medicine, contributing significantly to the health of many people and communities. Quality control of herbal medicine is crucial to ensure that it is safe and sound for use. Here, we investigated a comprehensive quality evaluation system for a classic herbal medicine, Danggui Buxue Formula, by applying genetic-based and analytical chemistry approaches to authenticate and evaluate the quality of its samples. For authenticity, we successfully applied two novel technologies, third-generation sequencing and PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, to analyze the ingredient composition of the tested samples. For quality evaluation, we used high performance liquid chromatography assays to determine the content of chemical markers to help estimate the dosage relationship between its two raw materials, plant roots of Huangqi and Danggui. A series of surveys were then conducted against several exogenous contaminations, aiming to further access the efficacy and safety of the samples. In conclusion, the quality evaluation system demonstrated here can potentially address the authenticity, quality, and safety of herbal medicines, thus providing novel insight for enhancing their overall quality control.Highlight: We established a comprehensive quality evaluation system for herbal medicine, by combining two genetic-based approaches third-generation sequencing and DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with analytical chemistry approaches to achieve the authentication and quality connotation of the samples.

  4. A Comprehensive Quality Evaluation System for Complex Herbal Medicine Using PacBio Sequencing, PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, and Several Chemical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiasheng; Zhang, Peng; Liao, Baosheng; Li, Jing; Liu, Xingyun; Shi, Yuhua; Cheng, Jinle; Lai, Zhitian; Xu, Jiang; Chen, Shilin

    2017-01-01

    Herbal medicine is a major component of complementary and alternative medicine, contributing significantly to the health of many people and communities. Quality control of herbal medicine is crucial to ensure that it is safe and sound for use. Here, we investigated a comprehensive quality evaluation system for a classic herbal medicine, Danggui Buxue Formula, by applying genetic-based and analytical chemistry approaches to authenticate and evaluate the quality of its samples. For authenticity, we successfully applied two novel technologies, third-generation sequencing and PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis), to analyze the ingredient composition of the tested samples. For quality evaluation, we used high performance liquid chromatography assays to determine the content of chemical markers to help estimate the dosage relationship between its two raw materials, plant roots of Huangqi and Danggui. A series of surveys were then conducted against several exogenous contaminations, aiming to further access the efficacy and safety of the samples. In conclusion, the quality evaluation system demonstrated here can potentially address the authenticity, quality, and safety of herbal medicines, thus providing novel insight for enhancing their overall quality control. Highlight : We established a comprehensive quality evaluation system for herbal medicine, by combining two genetic-based approaches third-generation sequencing and DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) with analytical chemistry approaches to achieve the authentication and quality connotation of the samples.

  5. Resonance assignment of disordered protein with repetitive and overlapping sequence using combinatorial approach reveals initial structural propensities and local restrictions in the denatured state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Nikita; Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: askutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering (India)

    2016-09-15

    NMR resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins poses a challenge because of the limited dispersion of amide proton chemical shifts. This becomes even more complex with the increase in the size of the system. Residue specific selective labeling/unlabeling experiments have been used to resolve the overlap, but require multiple sample preparations. Here, we demonstrate an assignment strategy requiring only a single sample of uniformly labeled {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-protein. We have used a combinatorial approach, involving 3D-HNN, CC(CO)NH and 2D-MUSIC, which allowed us to assign a denatured centromeric protein Cse4 of 229 residues. Further, we show that even the less sensitive experiments, when used in an efficient manner can lead to the complete assignment of a complex system without the use of specialized probes in a relatively short time frame. The assignment of the amino acids discloses the presence of local structural propensities even in the denatured state accompanied by restricted motion in certain regions that provides insights into the early folding events of the protein.

  6. Resonance assignment of disordered protein with repetitive and overlapping sequence using combinatorial approach reveals initial structural propensities and local restrictions in the denatured state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Nikita; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    NMR resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins poses a challenge because of the limited dispersion of amide proton chemical shifts. This becomes even more complex with the increase in the size of the system. Residue specific selective labeling/unlabeling experiments have been used to resolve the overlap, but require multiple sample preparations. Here, we demonstrate an assignment strategy requiring only a single sample of uniformly labeled "1"3C,"1"5N-protein. We have used a combinatorial approach, involving 3D-HNN, CC(CO)NH and 2D-MUSIC, which allowed us to assign a denatured centromeric protein Cse4 of 229 residues. Further, we show that even the less sensitive experiments, when used in an efficient manner can lead to the complete assignment of a complex system without the use of specialized probes in a relatively short time frame. The assignment of the amino acids discloses the presence of local structural propensities even in the denatured state accompanied by restricted motion in certain regions that provides insights into the early folding events of the protein.

  7. Can misfolded proteins be beneficial? The HAMLET case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson-Kastberg, Jenny; Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Anki; Storm, Petter; Trulsson, Maria; Persson, Filip; Mok, K Hun; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-01-01

    By changing the three-dimensional structure, a protein can attain new functions, distinct from those of the native protein. Amyloid-forming proteins are one example, in which conformational change may lead to fibril formation and, in many cases, neurodegenerative disease. We have proposed that partial unfolding provides a mechanism to generate new and useful functional variants from a given polypeptide chain. Here we present HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) as an example where partial unfolding and the incorporation of cofactor create a complex with new, beneficial properties. Native alpha-lactalbumin functions as a substrate specifier in lactose synthesis, but when partially unfolded the protein binds oleic acid and forms the tumoricidal HAMLET complex. When the properties of HAMLET were first described they were surprising, as protein folding intermediates and especially amyloid-forming protein intermediates had been regarded as toxic conformations, but since then structural studies have supported functional diversity arising from a change in fold. The properties of HAMLET suggest a mechanism of structure-function variation, which might help the limited number of human protein genes to generate sufficient structural diversity to meet the diverse functional demands of complex organisms.

  8. pH dependence of cyanide binding to the ferric heme domain of the direct oxygen sensor from Escherichia coli and the effect of alkaline denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwai, Anil K; Ok, Esther Y; Erman, James E

    2008-09-30

    The spectrum of the ferric heme domain of the direct oxygen sensor protein from Escherichia coli ( EcDosH) has been measured between pH 3.0 and 12.6. EcDosH undergoes acid denaturation with an apparent p K a of 4.24 +/- 0.05 and a Hill coefficient of 3.1 +/- 0.6 and reversible alkaline denaturation with a p K a of 9.86 +/- 0.04 and a Hill coefficient of 1.1 +/- 0.1. Cyanide binding to EcDosH has been investigated between pH 4 and 11. The EcDosH-cyanide complex is most stable at pH 9 with a K D of 0.29 +/- 0.06 microM. The kinetics of cyanide binding are monophasic between pH 4 and 8. At pH >or=8.5, the reaction is biphasic with the fast phase dependent upon the cyanide concentration and the slow phase independent of cyanide. The slow phase is attributed to conversion of denatured EcDosH to the native state, with a pH-independent rate of 0.052 +/- 0.006 s (-1). The apparent association rate constant for cyanide binding to EcDosH increases from 3.6 +/- 0.1 M (-1) s (-1) at pH 4 to 520 +/- 20 M (-1) s (-1) at pH 11. The dissociation rate constant averages (8.6 +/- 1.3) x 10 (-5) s (-1) between pH 5 and 9, increasing to (1.4 +/- 0.1) x 10 (-3) s (-1) at pH 4 and (2.5 +/- 0.1) x 10 (-3) s (-1) at pH 12.2. The mechanism of cyanide binding is consistent with preferential binding of the cyanide anion to native EcDosH. The reactions of imidazole and H 2O 2 with ferric EcDosH were also investigated and show little reactivity.

  9. [Macrophages in human semen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Beatriz Reina; Brufman, Adriana Silvia; Paparella, Cecilia Vicenta; Feldman, Rodolfo Nestor; Gatti, Vanda Nora; Solis, Edita Amalia

    2003-11-01

    To investigate the presence of macrophages in human semen samples and the function they carry out in the seminal fluid. Their presence was studied in relation to spermatic morphology, percentage of spermatozoids with native DNA, and presence of antispermatic antibodies. The work was performed with semen samples from 31 unfertile males from 63 couples in which the "female factor" was ruled out as the cause of infertility. Sperm study according to WHO (1992) was carried out in all samples, in addition to: DNA study with acridine orange as fluorocrom, macrophage concentration by neutral red in a Neubauer camera, and detection of antispermatic antibodies with a mixed agglutination test (TAC II) (validated with Mar Screen-Fertility technologies). Sperm morphology was evaluated by Papanicolaou test. 19/31 selected sperm samples (61.3%) showed increased concentration of macrophages, 13 of them (41.9%) with denaturalized DNA, and 8 (25.8%) abnormal morphology. Six samples showed increased macrophage concentration and predominance of native DNA, whereas 11 samples showed increased macrophages and abnormal morphology. Among 18 (58.1%) samples showing antispermatic antibodies 14 (77.7%) had an increased concentration of macrophages. Statistical analysis resulted in a high correlation between macrophage concentration and increased percentage of spermatozoids with denaturalized DNA (p < 0.05). An increased concentration of macrophages is associated with the presence of antispermatic antibodies (p < 0.05). There was not evidence of significant association between concentration of macrophages and percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoids (p < 0.05). We can conclude that macrophages are present in human semen and participate in immunovigilance contributing to improve the seminal quality.

  10. HAMLET treatment delays bladder cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Hou, Yuchuan; Svensson, Majlis; Holmqvist, Bo; Svanborg, Catharina

    2010-04-01

    HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that kills different types of cancer cells. Recently we observed a rapid reduction in human bladder cancer size after intravesical HAMLET treatment. In this study we evaluated the therapeutic effect of HAMLET in the mouse MB49 bladder carcinoma model. Bladder tumors were established by intravesical injection of MB49 cells into poly L-lysine treated bladders of C57BL/6 mice. Treatment groups received repeat intravesical HAMLET instillations and controls received alpha-lactalbumin or phosphate buffer. Effects of HAMLET on tumor size and putative apoptotic effects were analyzed in bladder tissue sections. Whole body imaging was used to study HAMLET distribution in tumor bearing mice compared to healthy bladder tissue. HAMLET caused a dose dependent decrease in MB49 cell viability in vitro. Five intravesical HAMLET instillations significantly decreased tumor size and delayed development in vivo compared to controls. TUNEL staining revealed selective apoptotic effects in tumor areas but not in adjacent healthy bladder tissue. On in vivo imaging Alexa-HAMLET was retained for more than 24 hours in the bladder of tumor bearing mice but not in tumor-free bladders or in tumor bearing mice that received Alexa-alpha-lactalbumin. Results show that HAMLET is active as a tumoricidal agent and suggest that topical HAMLET administration may delay bladder cancer development. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High pressure inactivation of relevant target microorganisms in poultry meat products and the evaluation of pressure-induced protein denaturation of marinated poultry under different high pressure treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidgall, Johanna; Hertel, Christian; Bindrich, Ute; Heinz, Volker; Toepfl, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the possibility of extending shelf life of marinated poultry meat products by high pressure processing was evaluated. Relevant spoilage and pathogenic strains were selected and used as target microorganisms (MOs) for challenge experiments. Meat and brine were inoculated with MOs and treated at 450 MPa, 4 °C for 3 min. The results of inactivation show a decreasing pressure tolerance in the series Lactobacillus > Arcobacter > Carnobacterium > Bacillus cereus > Brochothrix thermosphacta > Listeria monocytogenes. Leuconostoc gelidum exhibited the highest pressure tolerance in meat. A protective effect of poultry meat was found for L. sakei and L. gelidum. In parallel, the influence of different marinade formulations (pH, carbonates, citrates) on protein structure changes during a pressure treatment was investigated. Addition of sodium carbonate shows a protection against denaturation of myofibrillar proteins and provides a maximum water-holding capacity. Caustic marinades allowed a higher retention of product characteristics than low-pH marinades.

  12. Application of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) for the identification of fish: a new way to determine the composition of processed food containing multiple species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Fresne, Sophie; Popova, Milena; Le Vacon, Françoise; Carton, Thomas

    2011-12-14

    The identification of fish species in transformed food products is difficult because the existing methods are not adapted to heat-processed products containing more than one species. Using a common to all vertebrates region of the cytochrome b gene, we have developed a denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) fingerprinting method, which allowed us to identify most of the species in commercial crab sticks. Whole fish and fillets were used for the creation of a library of referent DHPLC profiles. Crab sticks generated complex DHPLC profiles in which the number of contained fish species can be estimated by the number of major fluorescence peaks. The identity of some of the species was predicted by comparison of the peaks with the referent profiles, and others were identified after collection of the peak fractions, reamplification, and sequencing. DHPLC appears to be a quick and efficient method to analyze the species composition of complex heat-processed fish products.

  13. Culture-based and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of the bacterial community from Chungkookjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Wook; Choi, Jae Young; Chung, Kun Sub

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial community of Chungkookjang and raw rice-straw collected from various areas in South Korea was investigated using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Pure cultures were isolated from Chungkookjang and raw rice-straw on tryptic soy agar plates with 72 to 121 colonies and identified by 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis, respectively. The traditional culture-based method and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA confirmed that Pantoea agglomerans and B. subtilis were identified as predominant in the raw rice-straw and Chungkookjang, respectively, from Iljuk district of Gyeonggi province, P. ananatis and B. licheniformis were identified as predominant in the raw rice-straw and Chungkookjang from Wonju district of Gangwon province, and Microbacterium sp. and B. licheniformis were identified as predominant in the raw rice-straw and Chungkookjang from Sunchang district of Jeolla province. Other strains, such as Bacillus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and uncultured bacteria were also present in raw rice-straw and Chungkookjang. A comprehensive analysis of these microorganisms would provide a more detailed understanding of the biologically active components of Chungkookjang and help improve its quality. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis can be successfully applied to a fermented food to detect unculturable or more species than the culture-dependent method. This technique is an effective and convenient culture-independent method for studying the bacterial community in Chungkookjang. In this study, the bacterial community of Chungkookjang collected from various areas in South Korea was investigated using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Measurement of tyrosine kinase activity in non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels and its induction during differentiation of human leukemia HL-60 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazer, R.I.; Chapekar, M.S.; Knode, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a PAGE assay to measure tyrosine kinase (PK-T) activity in cell extracts. HL-60 cells were extracted sequentially with 0.1% and 1.0% Triton X-100 buffer to obtain soluble and membrane-bound proteins, respectively. Extracts were separated by PAGE at 4 0 and gels were incubated in the presence of the substrate Glu:Tyr (4:1) and an assay mixture containing Mn ++ , Mg ++ and [γ 32 P]ATP. Gels were washed in TCA:PPi, dried and autoradiographed. 0.1% Triton extracts of untreated cells in log phase displayed several PK-T activities of which the major species was ∼75 kD; 1% Triton extracts exhibited only residual 75 kD PK-T. In contrast, induction of differentiation in HL-60 cells with optimal concentrations of DMSO, retinoic acid, 1.25(OH) 2 vitamin D 3 , phorbol ester, immune interferon (IFN-γ) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) induced the appearance of a ∼170 kD PK-T in the 1% Triton extracts and a reduction of the 75 kD PK-T in the 0.1% Triton extracts. The 170 kD PK-T could also utilize Glu:Tyr (6:3:1), histone H 1 , pp60/sup src/ substrate Lys-14-Gly and vinculin as substrates but not Glu:Tyr (1:1). The 170 kD PK-T appeared within 2 days after treatment with 2500 μ/ml of IFN-γ or 100 μ/ml of TNF and its appearance coincided with the induction of the monocyte phenotype. These results suggest that the appearance of the 170 kD PK-T is related to the mature granulocyte or monocyte phenotype. Studies are in progress with radiolabeled IFN-γ to determine if the 170 kD PK-T is related to the IFN-γ receptor

  15. Induction of Heat Shock Protein Expression in Cervical Epithelial Cells by Human Semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Jeremias

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The 70kD heat shock protein (Hsp70, induced when cells are subjected to environmental stress, prevents the denaturation and incorrect folding of polypeptides and may expedite replication and transmission of DNA and RNA viruses. We analyzed whether messenger RNA (mRNA for Hsp70 was expressed following exposure of a cultured human cervical cell line (HeLa cells to human semen or in cervical cells from sexually active women.

  16. Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    Our goal is to develop the tools of mutational spectrometry in order to discover the cause(s) of genetic change in somatic and germinal cells in humans. Our study of the spectrum of point mutations in human mitochrondrial DNA sequences has revealed that there are multiple point mutation hotspots in each of four separate sequences in the mitochrondrial genome. These spectra were revealed by a combination of high fidelity PCR (modified T 7 polymerase) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis which has a limit of detection of about 10 -3 . There appear to be identical hotspot mutations in both cultured B cell and fresh human blood T cell samples

  17. Fate and effect of ingested Bacillus cereus spores and vegetative cells in the intestinal tract of human-flora-associated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse

    2006-01-01

    The fate and effect of Bacillus cereus F4433/73R in the intestine of human-flora-associated rats was studied using bacteriological culturing techniques and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in combination with cell assays and immunoassays for detection of enterotoxins. In faecal samples...

  18. Insights into signal transduction by a hybrid FixL: Denaturation study of on and off states of a multi-domain oxygen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Wellinson G; Gondim, Ana C S; Costa, Pedro Mikael da Silva; Gilles-Gonzalez, Marie-Alda; Lopes, Luiz G F; Carepo, Marta S P; Sousa, Eduardo H S

    2017-07-01

    FixL from Rhizobium etli (ReFixL) is a hybrid oxygen sensor protein. Signal transduction in ReFixL is effected by a switch off of the kinase activity on binding of an oxygen molecule to ferrous heme iron in another domain. Cyanide can also inhibit the kinase activity upon binding to the heme iron in the ferric state. The unfolding by urea of the purified full-length ReFixL in both active pentacoordinate form, met-FixL(Fe III ) and inactive cyanomet-FixL (Fe III -CN - ) form was monitored by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. The CD and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy revealed two states during unfolding, whereas fluorescence spectroscopy identified a three-state unfolding mechanism. The unfolding mechanism was not altered for the active compared to the inactive state; however, differences in the ΔG H2O were observed. According to the CD results, compared to cyanomet-FixL, met-FixL was more stable towards chemical denaturation by urea (7.2 vs 4.8kJmol -1 ). By contrast, electronic spectroscopy monitoring of the Soret band showed cyanomet-FixL to be more stable than met-FixL (18.5 versus 36.2kJmol -1 ). For the three-state mechanism exhibited by fluorescence, the ΔG H2O for both denaturation steps were higher for the active-state met-FixL than for cyanomet-FixL. The overall stability of met-FixL is higher in comparison to cyanomet-FixL suggesting a more compact protein in the active form. Nonetheless, hydrogen bonding by bound cyanide in the inactive state promotes the stability of the heme domain. This work supports a model of signal transduction by FixL that is likely shared by other heme-based sensors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The interaction of equine lysozyme:oleic acid complexes with lipid membranes suggests a cargo off-loading mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bang; Wilhelm, Kristina; Vad, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The normal function of equine lysozyme (EL) is the hydrolysis of peptidoglycan residues of bacterial cell walls. EL is closely related to alpha-lactalbumins with respect to sequence and structure and further possesses the calcium binding site of alpha-lactalbumins. Recently, EL multimeric complexes...

  20. Deciphering the fluorescence resonance energy transfer from denatured transport protein to anthracene 1,5 disulphonate in reverse micellar environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singharoy, Dipti; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra

    2017-12-01

    Constrained environmental effect inside AOT reverse micellar media has been employed in this work to collect the information about energy transfer efficacy between sodium salt of anthracene 1,5 disulphonate (1,5-AS) with model transport proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and human serum albumin (HSA). Steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques have been used for this purpose and corresponding Fӧrster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) from tryptophan residues to 1,5-AS indicates that 1,5-AS binds in the vicinity of the tryptophan residue (BSA and HSA) with equal strength. Indication of protein damage from fluorescence data and its confirmation has been measured from CD measurement. Molecular modeling study hereby plays a crucial role to predict the minimum energy docked conformation of the probe inside the protein environment. From the docked conformation the distance between 1,5-AS and tryptophan moiety of BSA/HSA has successfully explained the FRET possibility between them. A comparative modeling study between BSA and HSA with 1,5-AS assigning their binding site within specific amino acids plays a crucial role in support of the FRET study.

  1. Evaluation of the antibody-detection ELISA using plates precoated with denatured T. congolense and T. vivax antigens for monitoring tsetse and trypanosomosis control in Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machila, N.; Sinyangwe, L.; Eisler, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    An evaluation of the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of anti-trypanosomal antibodies in bovine serum was conducted using ELISA plates pre-coated with denatured T. congolense and T. vivax antigen. The study was conducted on 280 samples from a parasitologically positive cattle population and 200 samples from a negative cattle population. The overwhelming majority of trypanosome infections in the parasitologically positive cattle were T. congolense. The Ab-ELISA was able to discriminate between the negative and positive cattle populations, at an optimum cut-off point of 40% positivity (T. congolense antigen), with 89% sensitivity and 86% specificity; and for the T. vivax antigen, the optimum cut-off point was at 30%, with 81% sensitivity and 70% specificity. However, the optical densities (OD) and percentage positivity (PP) values for sera from both the reference positive and negative cattle populations were unacceptably high particularly in the ELISA using T. congolense antigen. Furthermore the quality control sera used in the assay appear to have inappropriately low OD and PP values by comparison to typical sera from the reference positive and negative cattle populations. It is suggested that these ELISA's be re-titrated using more appropriate quality assurance sera. This should result in OD and PP values for sera from the reference populations failing within acceptable ranges. (author)

  2. Behavior of Heat-Denatured Whey: Buttermilk Protein Aggregates during the Yogurt-Making Process and Their Influence on Set-Type Yogurt Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Saffon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the impact of using heat-denatured whey:buttermilk protein aggregate in acid-set type yogurt production. Whey and buttermilk (25:75 protein concentrate was adjusted to pH 4.6, heated at 90 °C for 5 min, homogenized and freeze-dried. Set-type yogurts were prepared from skim milk standardized to 15% (w/v total solids and 4.2% (w/v protein using different levels of powdered skim milk or freeze-dried protein aggregate. The use of the protein aggregate significantly modified yogurt texture, but did not affect the water-holding capacity of the gel. Confocal laser-scanning microscope images showed the presence of large particles in milk enriched with protein aggregate, which directly affected the homogeneity of the clusters within the protein matrix. Thiol groups were freed during heating of the protein aggregate suspended in water, suggesting that the aggregates could interact with milk proteins during heating.

  3. Hand-held optical sensor using denatured antibody coated electro-active polymer for ultra-trace detection of copper in blood serum and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sutapa; Dhawangale, Arvind; Mukherji, Soumyo

    2018-07-01

    An optimum copper concentration in environment is highly desired for all forms of life. We have developed an ultrasensitive copper sensor which functions from femto to micro molar concentration accurately (R 2 = 0.98). The sensor is based on denatured antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG), immobilized on polyaniline (PAni) which in turn is the coating on the core of an optical fiber. The sensing relies on changes in evanescent wave absorbance in the presence of the analyte. The sensor showed excellent selectivity towards Cu (II) ions over all other metal ions. The sensor was tested with lake and marine water samples to determine unknown concentrations of copper ions and the recovery results were within 90-115%, indicating reasonable accuracy. We further integrated the fiber-optic sensor with a miniaturized hand-held instrumentation platform to develop an accurate and field deployable device which can broadly be applicable to determine Cu (II) concentration in a wide range of systems - natural water bodies, soil as well as blood serum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Succession of bacterial and fungal communities during a traditional pot fermentation of rice vinegar assessed by PCR-mediated denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Shin; Ueno, Shintaro; Egawa, Isao; Hashiguchi, Kazunori; Fujii, Akira; Nagano, Masanobu; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2006-05-25

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) based on small subunit rRNA gene was applied to a traditional rice vinegar fermentation process in which the conversion of rice starch into acetic acid proceeded in a pot. The fungal DGGE profile indicated that the transition from Aspergillus oryzae to Saccharomyces sp. took place at the initial stage at which alcohol production was observed. The early stage was characterized by the coexistence of Saccharomyces sp. and lactic acid bacteria. Almost all of the bacterial DGGE bands related to lactic acid bacteria were replaced by bands derived from Lactobacillus acetotolerance and Acetobacter pasteurianus at the stage at which acetic acid started to accumulate. The microbial succession, tested in three different pots, was found to be essentially identical. Among the bacteria isolated at the early stage, some species differed from those detected by DGGE. This is the first report to reveal the microbial community succession that occurs during a unique vinegar fermentation process, as determined by a culture-independent method.

  5. Dynamics of Vaginal Bacterial Communities in Women Developing Bacterial Vaginosis, Candidiasis, or No Infection, Analyzed by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Beatrice; Pugliese, Ciro; Biagi, Elena; Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Bellen, Gert; Donders, Gilbert G. G.; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2007-01-01

    The microbial flora of the vagina plays a major role in preventing genital infections, including bacterial vaginosis (BV) and candidiasis (CA). An integrated approach based on PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and real-time PCR was used to study the structure and dynamics of bacterial communities in vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients developing BV and CA. Universal eubacterial primers and Lactobacillus genus-specific primers, both targeted at 16S rRNA genes, were used in DGGE and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. The DGGE profiles revealed that the vaginal flora was dominated by Lactobacillus species under healthy conditions, whereas several potentially pathogenic bacteria were present in the flora of women with BV. Lactobacilli were the predominant bacterial population in the vagina for patients affected by CA, but changes in the composition of Lactobacillus species were observed. Real-time PCR analysis allowed the quantitative estimation of variations in lactobacilli associated with BV and CA diseases. A statistically significant decrease in the relative abundance of lactobacilli was found in vaginal fluids of patients with BV compared to the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients with CA. PMID:17644631

  6. Dynamics of vaginal bacterial communities in women developing bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, or no infection, analyzed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Beatrice; Pugliese, Ciro; Biagi, Elena; Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Bellen, Gert; Donders, Gilbert G G; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2007-09-01

    The microbial flora of the vagina plays a major role in preventing genital infections, including bacterial vaginosis (BV) and candidiasis (CA). An integrated approach based on PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and real-time PCR was used to study the structure and dynamics of bacterial communities in vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients developing BV and CA. Universal eubacterial primers and Lactobacillus genus-specific primers, both targeted at 16S rRNA genes, were used in DGGE and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. The DGGE profiles revealed that the vaginal flora was dominated by Lactobacillus species under healthy conditions, whereas several potentially pathogenic bacteria were present in the flora of women with BV. Lactobacilli were the predominant bacterial population in the vagina for patients affected by CA, but changes in the composition of Lactobacillus species were observed. Real-time PCR analysis allowed the quantitative estimation of variations in lactobacilli associated with BV and CA diseases. A statistically significant decrease in the relative abundance of lactobacilli was found in vaginal fluids of patients with BV compared to the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients with CA.

  7. Bacterial Diversity in the Digestive Tracts of Four Indian Air-Breathing Fish Species Investigated by PCR Based Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suxu He

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT An investigation was conducted to identify the allochthonous microbiota (entire intestine and the autochthonous microbiota in proximal intestine (PI and distal intestine (DI of four species of Indian air-breathing fish (climbing perch; Anabas testudineus, murrel; Channa punctatus, walking catfish; Clarias batrachus and stinging catfish; Heteropneustes fossilis by PCR based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. High similarities of the allochthonous microbiota were observed between climbing perch and murrel, walking catfish and stinging catfish, indicating similar food behavior. The autochthonous microbiota of PI and DI from climbing perch and murrel revealed more similarity, than the result obtained from walking catfish and stinging catfish. The autochthonous microbiota of climbing perch and murrel were similar with regard to the allochthonous microbiota, but no such similarity was observed in case of walking catfish and stinging catfish. The fish genotype and intestinal bacteria are well matched and show co-evolutionary relationship. Three fish species has its unique bacteria; autochthonous Enterobacter cloacae, Edwardsiella tarda and Sphingobium sp. in DI of climbing perch, Pseudomonas sp.; allochthonous and autochthonous in PI of walking catfish and uncultured bacterium (EU697160.1, uncultured bacterium (JF018065.1 and uncultured bacterium (EU697160.1 for stinging catfish. In murrel, no unique bacteria were detected.

  8. Efficient detection of factor IX mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography in Taiwanese hemophilia B patients, and the identification of two novel mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chin Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia B (HB is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by mutations in the clotting factor IX (FIX gene that result in FIX deficiency. Previous studies have shown a wide variation of FIX gene mutations in HB. Although the quality of life in HB has greatly improved mainly because of prophylactic replacement therapy with FIX concentrates, there exists a significant burden on affected families and the medical care system. Accurate detection of FIX gene mutations is critical for genetic counseling and disease prevention in HB. In this study, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC, which has proved to be a highly informative and practical means of detecting mutations, for the molecular diagnosis of our patients with HB. Ten Taiwanese families affected by HB were enrolled. We used the DHPLC technique followed by direct sequencing of suspected segments to detect FIX gene mutations. In all, 11 FIX gene mutations (8 point mutations, 2 small deletions/insertions, and 1 large deletion, including two novel mutations (exon6 c.687–695, del 9 mer and c.460–461, ins T were found. According to the HB pedigrees, 25% and 75% of our patients were defined as familial and sporadic HB cases, respectively. We show that DHPLC is a highly sensitive and cost-effective method for FIX gene analysis and can be used as a convenient system for disease prevention.

  9. Chromatin structure influence of DNA damage measurements by four assays: pulsed- and constant-field gel electrophoresis, DNA precipitation and non-denaturing filter elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlodek, D.; Olive, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The of elution of DNA during non-denaturing filter elution (NFE) often correlates with cell sensitivity to radiation. The elution rate is influenced by two cellular factors: chromatin structure and the number of DNA-strand breaks (DSBs) produced in an intact cell by ionizing radiation. To determine which of the above factors is relevant to cell radiosensitivity, four assays were used to measure induction of DNA damage in three cell lines varying in radiosensitivity (V79, CHO, and L5178Y-R). Each of the assays, neutral filter elution (NFE), DNA precipitation, constant (CFGE) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have different physical basis for DNA damage measurement and might be differently affected by chromatin structure. Three of the methods used to measure DNA double-strand breaks gave different results: NFE was dependent on cell type and location of DNA relative to the replication fork, gel electrophoresis was independent of cell type but was affected by proximity to the replication fork, and the precipitation assay was independent of both cell type and replication status. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis produced the same results and constant field gel electrophoresis for 3 cell lines examined. Only NFE showed differences in sensitivity which correlated with cell survival following irradiation. The results suggest that three is the same initial amount of DSBs in cells from all three lines and that the sensitivity to radiation is determined by some additional factors, probably chromatin structure. (author). 18 refs, 5 figs

  10. Bacterial community structure in Apis florea larvae analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraithong, Prakaimuk; Li, Yihong; Saenphet, Kanokporn; Chen, Zhou; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2015-10-01

    This study characterizes the colonization and composition of bacterial flora in dwarf Asian honeybee (Apis florea) larvae and compares bacterial diversity and distribution among different sampling locations. A. florea larvae were collected from 3 locations in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Bacterial DNA was extracted from each larva using the phenol-chloroform method. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was performed, and the dominant bands were excised from the gels, cloned, and sequenced for bacterial species identification. The result revealed similarities of bacterial community profiles in each individual colony, but differences between colonies from the same and different locations. A. florea larvae harbor bacteria belonging to 2 phyla (Firmicutes and Proteobacteria), 5 classes (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli, and Clostridia), 6 genera (Clostridium, Gilliamella, Melissococcus, Lactobacillus, Saccharibacter, and Snodgrassella), and an unknown genus from uncultured bacterial species. The classes with the highest abundance of bacteria were Alphaproteobacteria (34%), Bacilli (25%), Betaproteobacteria (11%), Gammaproteobacteria (10%), and Clostridia (8%), respectively. Similarly, uncultured bacterial species were identified (12%). Environmental bacterial species, such as Saccharibacter floricola, were also found. This is the first study in which sequences closely related to Melissococcus plutonius, the causal pathogen responsible for European foulbrood, have been identified in Thai A. florea larvae. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. Parallel characterization of anaerobic toluene- and ethylbenzene-degrading microbial consortia by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, RNA-DNA membrane hybridization, and DNA microarray technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kelly, John J.; Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El-Fantroussi, Said; Al-Muzaini, Saleh; Fukui, Manabu; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A mesophilic toluene-degrading consortium (TDC) and an ethylbenzene-degrading consortium (EDC) were established under sulfate-reducing conditions. These consortia were first characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, followed by sequencing. The sequences of the major bands (T-1 and E-2) belonging to TDC and EDC, respectively, were affiliated with the family Desulfobacteriaceae. Another major band from EDC (E-1) was related to an uncultured non-sulfate-reducing soil bacterium. Oligonucleotide probes specific for the 16S rRNAs of target organisms corresponding to T-1, E-1, and E-2 were designed, and hybridization conditions were optimized for two analytical formats, membrane and DNA microarray hybridization. Both formats were used to characterize the TDC and EDC, and the results of both were consistent with DGGE analysis. In order to assess the utility of the microarray format for analysis of environmental samples, oil-contaminated sediments from the coast of Kuwait were analyzed. The DNA microarray successfully detected bacterial nucleic acids from these samples, but probes targeting specific groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria did not give positive signals. The results of this study demonstrate the limitations and the potential utility of DNA microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  12. Endogenous pyrogen activity in human plasma after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, J G; Kluger, M J

    1983-05-06

    Plasma obtained from human subjects after exercise and injected intraperitoneally into rats elevated rat rectal temperature and depressed plasma iron and zinc concentrations. The pyrogenic component was heat-denaturable and had an apparent molecular weight of 14,000 daltons. Human mononuclear leukocytes obtained after exercise and incubated in vitro released a factor into the medium that also elevated body temperature in rats and reduced trace metal concentrations. These results suggest that endogenous pyrogen, a protein mediator of fever and trace metal metabolism during infection, is released during exercise.

  13. Density and radioactivity distribution of respirable range human serum albumin aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, B.; Somasundaram, S.; Soni, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    Dry human serum albumin (HSA) aerosol in the respirable size range was generated using the BARC nebulizer. The aerosol was sampled using Lovelace Aerosol Particle Separator (LAPS) and the density of HSA was determined. Labelling of HSA with 99m TcO 4 - was done, both in HSA solution and with dry denatured HSA particles, to study the distribution of radioactivity in both cases. The results are discussed. (author)

  14. 15NH/D-SOLEXSY experiment for accurate measurement of amide solvent exchange rates: application to denatured drkN SH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Xue, Yi; Krishna Rao, D.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R.

    2010-01-01

    Amide solvent exchange rates are regarded as a valuable source of information on structure/dynamics of unfolded (disordered) proteins. Proton-based saturation transfer experiments, normally used to measure solvent exchange, are known to meet some serious difficulties. The problems mainly arise from the need to (1) manipulate water magnetization and (2) discriminate between multiple magnetization transfer pathways that occur within the proton pool. Some of these issues are specific to unfolded proteins. For example, the compensation scheme used to cancel the Overhauser effect in the popular CLEANEX experiment is not designed for use with unfolded proteins. In this report we describe an alternative experimental strategy, where amide 15 N is used as a probe of solvent exchange. The experiment is performed in 50% H 2 O-50% D 2 O solvent and is based on the (HACACO)NH pulse sequence. The resulting spectral map is fully equivalent to the conventional HSQC. To fulfill its purpose, the experiment monitors the conversion of deuterated species, 15 N D , into protonated species, 15 N H , as effected by the solvent exchange. Conceptually, this experiment is similar to EXSY which prompted the name of 15 N H/D -SOLEXSY (SOLvent EXchange SpectroscopY). Of note, our experimental scheme, which relies on nitrogen rather than proton to monitor solvent exchange, is free of the complications described above. The developed pulse sequence was used to measure solvent exchange rates in the chemically denatured state of the drkN SH3 domain. The results were found to correlate well with the CLEANEX-PM data, r = 0.97, thus providing a measure of validation for both techniques. When the experimentally measured exchange rates are converted into protection factors, most of the values fall in the range 0.5-2, consistent with random-coil behavior. However, elevated values, ca. 5, are obtained for residues R38 and A39, as well as the side-chain indole of W36. This is surprising, given that high

  15. Improving the reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase through stabilizing a long loop in domain B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Li

    Full Text Available The reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase were improved through site-directed mutagenesis. By using multiple sequence alignment and PoPMuSiC algorithm, Ser187 and Asn188, which located within a long loop in Domain B of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase, were selected for mutation. In addition, Ala269, which is adjacent to Ser187 and Asn188, was also investigated. Seven mutants carrying the mutations S187D, N188T, N188S, A269K, A269K/S187D, S187D/N188T, and A269K/S187D/N188T were generated and characterized. The most thermostable mutant, A269K/S187D/N188T, exhibited a 9-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C and pH 5.5, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. Mutant A269K/S187D/N188T also exhibited improved catalytic efficiency. The catalytic efficiency of mutant A269K/S187D/N188T reached 5.87×103±0.17 g·L-1·s-1 at pH 5.5, which is 1.84-fold larger than the corresponding value determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the structure analysis showed that immobilization of the loop containing Ser187 and Asn188 plays a significant role in developing the properties of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase.

  16. Improving the reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase through stabilizing a long loop in domain B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhu; Duan, Xuguo; Chen, Sheng; Wu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase were improved through site-directed mutagenesis. By using multiple sequence alignment and PoPMuSiC algorithm, Ser187 and Asn188, which located within a long loop in Domain B of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase, were selected for mutation. In addition, Ala269, which is adjacent to Ser187 and Asn188, was also investigated. Seven mutants carrying the mutations S187D, N188T, N188S, A269K, A269K/S187D, S187D/N188T, and A269K/S187D/N188T were generated and characterized. The most thermostable mutant, A269K/S187D/N188T, exhibited a 9-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C and pH 5.5, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. Mutant A269K/S187D/N188T also exhibited improved catalytic efficiency. The catalytic efficiency of mutant A269K/S187D/N188T reached 5.87×103±0.17 g·L-1·s-1 at pH 5.5, which is 1.84-fold larger than the corresponding value determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the structure analysis showed that immobilization of the loop containing Ser187 and Asn188 plays a significant role in developing the properties of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase.

  17. Application of PCR-denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method to examine microbial community structure in asparagus fields with growth inhibition due to continuous cropping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urashima, Yasufumi; Sonoda, Takahiro; Fujita, Yuko; Uragami, Atsuko

    2012-01-01

    Growth inhibition due to continuous cropping of asparagus is a major problem; the yield of asparagus in replanted fields is low compared to that in new fields, and missing plants occur among young seedlings. Although soil-borne disease and allelochemicals are considered to be involved in this effect, this is still controversial. We aimed to develop a technique for the biological field diagnosis of growth inhibition due to continuous cropping. Therefore, in this study, fungal community structure and Fusarium community structure in continuously cropped fields of asparagus were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction/denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Soil samples were collected from the Aizu region of Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Soil samples were taken from both continuously cropped fields of asparagus with growth inhibition and healthy neighboring fields of asparagus. The soil samples were collected from the fields of 5 sets in 2008 and 4 sets in 2009. We were able to distinguish between pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium by using Alfie1 and Alfie2GC as the second PCR primers and PCR-DGGE. Fungal community structure was not greatly involved in the growth inhibition of asparagus due to continuous cropping. By contrast, the band ratios of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi in growth-inhibited fields were higher than those in neighboring healthy fields. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the band ratios of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. asparagi and the ratios of missing asparagus plants. We showed the potential of biological field diagnosis of growth inhibition due to continuous cropping of asparagus using PCR-DGGE.

  18. Identification and characterization of single nucleotide polymorphisms in 6 growth-correlated genes in porcine by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dewu; Zhang, Yushan; Du, Yinjun; Yang, Guanfu; Zhang, Xiquan

    2007-06-01

    The growth-correlated genes that are part of the neuroendocrine growth axis play crucial roles in the regulation of growth and development of pig. The identification of genetic polymorphisms in these genes will enable the scientist to evaluate the biological relevance of such polymorphisms and to gain a better understanding of quantitative traits like growth. In the present study, seven pairs of primers were designed to obtain unknown sequences of growth-correlated genes, and other 25 pairs of primers were designed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) using the denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) technology in four pig breeds (Duroc, Landrace, Lantang and Wuzhishan), significantly differing in growth and development characteristics. A total of 101 polymorphisms were discovered in 10,707 base pairs (bp) from six genes of the ghrelin (GHRL), leptin (LEP), insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP-2), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and somatostatin (SS). The observed average distances between the SNP in the 5'UTR, coding regions, introns and 3'UTR were 134, 521, 81 and 92 bp, respectively. Four SNPs were found in the coding regions of IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and LEP, respectively. Two synonymous mutations were obtained in IGF-II and LEP genes respectively, and two non-synonymous were found in IGFBP-2 and LEP genes, respectively. Seven other mutations were also observed. Thirty-two PCR-RFLP markers were found among 101 polymorphisms of the six genes. The SNP discovered in this study would provide suitable markers for association studies of candidate genes with growth related traits in pig.

  19. [Effects of redox state of disulfide bonds on the intrinsic fluorescence and denaturation of Trx-fused gibberellin-induced cysteine-rich protein from Gymnadnia conopsea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Feng, Juan; Li, Yang; Chen, Rui; Tang, Li-Xia; Pang, Xiao-Feng; Ren, Zheng-Long

    2010-02-01

    In the present paper, thioredoxin-fused gibberellin-induced cysteine-rich protein from Gymnadnia conopsea, desigated as Trx-GcGASA and expressed prokaryotically, was purified and identified by using Ni(2+) -NTA affinity chromatography column and SDS-PAGE, and then its intrinsic fluorescence was investigated in the absence and presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), peroxide and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) by means of steady-state fluorescence spectroscopic methods. It was found that (1) at the neutral pH Trx-GcGASA had maximum fluorescence emission at 305 nm following excitation at different wavelengths varying from 250 to 280 nm, which was ascribed to the fluorescence emission from tyrosine residues. (2) The reduction of disulphide bonds lead to the changes in the relative fluorescence intensity between tyrosine and tryptophan residues from 0.7 to 1.8. (3) Both Tyr and Trp residues underwent 12%-21% decrease in fluorescence intensity with the addition of 0.5 mmol x L(-1) GSSG or 5 mmol x L(-1) peroxide. The latter was roughly consistent with the antioxidative activity reported in vivo. (4) No matter whether 1 mmol x L(-1) DTT was absent or present, the fusion protein could not be fully unfolded with lambda(max) Trx-GcGASA experienced GdnHCl-induced denaturation process, and the unfolding equilibrium curve could be well fitted by using two-state model, giving the Gibbs free energy change (deltaG) of 3.7 kJ x mol(-1). However, it was not the case for reduced Trx-GcGASA protein. The aforementioned experimental results will not only provide some guides to investigate the effects of fusion partner Trx on the unfolding thermodynamics, kinetics and refolding process of Trx-GcGASA, but also will be useful for further studies on the strucuture of GA-induced cysteine-rich protein with the help of spectroscopic methods.

  20. Comparison of automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques for analysing the influence of diet on ruminal bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saro, Cristina; Molina-Alcaide, Eduarda; Abecia, Leticia; Ranilla, María José; Carro, María Dolores

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques for analysing the effects of diet on diversity in bacterial pellets isolated from the liquid (liquid-associated bacteria (LAB)) and solid (solid-associated bacteria (SAB)) phase of the rumen. The four experimental diets contained forage to concentrate ratios of 70:30 or 30:70 and had either alfalfa hay or grass hay as forage. Four rumen-fistulated animals (two sheep and two goats) received the diets in a Latin square design. Bacterial pellets (LAB and SAB) were isolated at 2 h post-feeding for DNA extraction and analysed by ARISA and DGGE. The number of peaks in individual samples ranged from 48 to 99 for LAB and from 41 to 95 for SAB with ARISA, and values of DGGE-bands ranged from 27 to 50 for LAB and from 18 to 45 for SAB. The LAB samples from high concentrate-fed animals tended (p forage-fed animals with ARISA, but no differences were identified with DGGE. The SAB samples from high concentrate-fed animals had lower (p forage diets with ARISA, but only a trend was noticed for these parameters with DGGE (p forage type on LAB diversity was detected by any technique. In this study, ARISA detected some changes in ruminal bacterial communities that were not detected by DGGE, and therefore ARISA was considered more appropriate for assessing bacterial diversity of ruminal bacterial pellets. The results highlight the impact of the fingerprinting technique used to draw conclusions on dietary factors affecting bacterial diversity in ruminal bacterial pellets.

  1. Residue-specific description of non-native transient structures in the ensemble of acid-denatured structures of the all-beta protein c-src SH3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösner, Heike I; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2010-01-01

    -src loop to the third beta-strand, exhibited an apparent helicity of nearly 45%. Furthermore, the RT loop and the diverging turn appeared to adopt non-native-like helical conformations. Interestingly, none of the residues found in transient helical conformations exhibited significant varphi-values [Riddle......Secondary chemical shift analysis has been used to characterize the unfolded state of acid-denatured c-src SH3. Even though native c-src SH3 adopts an all-beta fold, we found evidence of transient helicity in regions corresponding to native loops. In particular, residues 40-46, connecting the n...

  2. {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-sulphur-colloid and heat-denatured {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-labelled red cell scans demonstrating a giant intrapelvic spleen in a girl after splenectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, P.F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Tauyuan, Taiwan (Taiwan); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Tzen, K.Y.; Tsai, M.F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Tauyuan, Taiwan (Taiwan); Lin, J.N. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Chang Gung Childrens Hospital and Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Tauyuan, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2001-04-01

    A 17 x 12 x 5-cm giant intrapelvic mass in a 14-year-old girl is reported. This mass developed 6 years after a splenectomy for splenic torsion. The heat-denatured {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-labelled red cell scan and {sup 99} {sup m}Tc- sulphur-colloid scan confirmed the specific red cell sequestration function and reticuloendothelial activity in the giant intrapelvic spleen. The size and development of the giant intrapelvic spleen are unusual. The usefulness of functional images to diagnosis the nature of the intrapelvic mass is well demonstrated. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of different PCR primers for denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of fungal community structure in traditional fermentation starters used for Hong Qu glutinous rice wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xu-Cong; Jiang, Ya-Jun; Liu, Jie; Guo, Wei-Ling; Liu, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Wen; Rao, Ping-Fan; Ni, Li

    2017-08-16

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) has become a widely used tool to examine microbial community structure. However, when DGGE is applied to evaluate the fungal community of traditional fermentation starters, the choice of hypervariable ribosomal RNA gene regions is still controversial. In the current study, several previously published fungal PCR primer sets were compared and evaluated using PCR-DGGE, with the purpose of screening a suitable primer set to study the fungal community of traditional fermentation starters for Hong Qu glutinous rice wine. Firstly, different primer sets were used to amplify different hypervariable regions from pure fungal cultures. Except NS1/FR1+ and ITS1fGC/ITS4, other primer sets (NL1+/LS2R, NL3A/NL4GC, FF390/FR1+, NS1/GCFung, NS3+/YM951r and ITS1fGC/ITS2r) amplified the target DNA sequences successfully. Secondly, the selected primer sets were further evaluated based on their resolution to distinguish different fungal cultures through DGGE fingerprints. Three primer sets (NL1+/LS2R, NS1/GCFung and ITS1fGC/ITS2r) were finally selected for investigating the fungal community structure of different traditional fermentation starters for Hong Qu glutinous rice wine. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region amplified by ITS1fGC/ITS2r, which is more hypervariable than the 18S rRNA gene and 26S rRNA gene, provides an excellent tool to separate amplification products of different fungal species. Results indicated that PCR-DGGE profile using ITS1fGC/ITS2r showed more abundant fungal species than that using NL1+/LS2R and NS1/GCFung. Therefore, ITS1fGC/ITS2r is the most suitable primer set for PCR-DGGE analysis of fungal community structure in traditional fermentation starters for Hong Qu glutinous rice wine. DGGE profiles based on ITS1fGC/ITS2r revealed the presence of twenty-four fungal species in traditional fermentation starter. A significant difference of fungal community can be observed directly from DGGE fingerprints and

  4. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  5. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This "protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains...... in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range...... of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a "receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET...

  6. HAMLET kills tumor cells by an apoptosis-like mechanism--cellular, molecular, and therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanborg, Catharina; Agerstam, Helena; Aronson, Annika; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Düringer, Caroline; Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Leijonhuvud, Irene; Linse, Sara; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Nilsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Jenny; Svensson, Malin

    2003-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex that induces apoptosis-like death in tumor cells, but leaves fully differentiated cells unaffected. This review summarizes the information on the in vivo effects of HAMLET in patients and tumor models on the tumor cell biology, and on the molecular characteristics of the complex. HAMLET limits the progression of human glioblastomas in a xenograft model and removes skin papillomas in patients. This broad anti-tumor activity includes >40 different lymphomas and carcinomas and apoptosis is independent of p53 or bcl-2. In tumor cells HAMLET enters the cytoplasm, translocates to the perinuclear area, and enters the nuclei where it accumulates. HAMLET binds strongly to histones and disrupts the chromatin organization. In the cytoplasm, HAMLET targets ribosomes and activates caspases. The formation of HAMLET relies on the propensity of alpha-lactalbumin to alter its conformation when the strongly bound Ca2+ ion is released and the protein adopts the apo-conformation that exposes a new fatty acid binding site. Oleic acid (C18:1,9 cis) fits this site with high specificity, and stabilizes the altered protein conformation. The results illustrate how protein folding variants may be beneficial, and how their formation in peripheral tissues may depend on the folding change and the availability of the lipid cofactor. One example is the acid pH in the stomach of the breast-fed child that promotes the formation of HAMLET. This mechanism may contribute to the protective effect of breastfeeding against childhood tumors. We propose that HAMLET should be explored as a novel approach to tumor therapy.

  7. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis-polymerase chain reaction comparison of chitosan effects on anaerobic cultures of broiler cecal bacteria and Salmonella Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella colonization and product contamination are major poultry industry problems. Alternatives to traditional antibiotics against Salmonella offer the potential to lessen the development of resistance to antibiotics of importance to human health. The chitin derivative chitosan has drawn substa...

  8. New approach for in vivo detection of insulitis in type I diabetes: activated lymphocyte targeting with [sup 123]I-labelled interleukin 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signore, S.; Chianelli, M.; Ferretti, E.; Toscano, A.; Britton, K.E.; Andreani, D.; Gale, E.A.M.; Pozzilli, P. (Clinical Medica II, Univ. of Rome (Italy))

    1994-10-01

    Insulitis is considered the histopathological hallmark of type I diabetes. In the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, diabetes has never been observed in the absence of insulitis. The in vivo detection of insulitis could be of relevance for early prediction of diabetes. As approximately 15% of islet-infiltrating lymphocytes express interleukin 2 receptors, the authors have labelled recombinant inter-leukin 2 with [sup 123]I and used this radiopharmaceutical to detect insulitis by gamma camera imaging. The authors studied 71 prediabetic NOD and 27 normal Balb/c mice. Labelled [alpha]-lactalbumin was used as the control protein. In the first set of experiments the tissue distribution of radiolabelled interleukin 2 in isolated organs from animals sacrificed at different time points was studied. Higher radioactivity was detected in the pancreas of NOD mice injected with labelled interleukin 2, as compared to NOD mice receiving labelled [alpha]-lactalbumin. In another set of experiments, gamma camera images have been acquired after injection of [sup 123]I-labelled interleukin 2. Radioactivity in the pancreatic region of prediabetic NOD and Balb/c mice showed similar kinetics to those observed by single organ counting, with higher accumulation in the pancreatic region of NOD mice. Finally, a positive correlation was found between the radioactivity in the pancreas and the extent of lymphocytic infiltration. This study demonstrates that [sup 123]I-labelled interleukin 2 administered intravenously accumulates specifically in the inflamed pancreas of diabetes-prone NOD mice, suggesting its potential application in human insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. HAMLET interacts with lipid membranes and perturbs their structure and integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Puchades, Maja; Halskau, Øyvind; Baumann, Anne; Lanekoff, Ingela; Chao, Yinxia; Martinez, Aurora; Svanborg, Catharina; Karlsson, Roger

    2010-02-23

    Cell membrane interactions rely on lipid bilayer constituents and molecules inserted within the membrane, including specific receptors. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a tumoricidal complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin (HLA) and oleic acid that is internalized by tumor cells, suggesting that interactions with the phospholipid bilayer and/or specific receptors may be essential for the tumoricidal effect. This study examined whether HAMLET interacts with artificial membranes and alters membrane structure. We show by surface plasmon resonance that HAMLET binds with high affinity to surface adherent, unilamellar vesicles of lipids with varying acyl chain composition and net charge. Fluorescence imaging revealed that HAMLET accumulates in membranes of vesicles and perturbs their structure, resulting in increased membrane fluidity. Furthermore, HAMLET disrupted membrane integrity at neutral pH and physiological conditions, as shown by fluorophore leakage experiments. These effects did not occur with either native HLA or a constitutively unfolded Cys-Ala HLA mutant (rHLA(all-Ala)). HAMLET also bound to plasma membrane vesicles formed from intact tumor cells, with accumulation in certain membrane areas, but the complex was not internalized by these vesicles or by the synthetic membrane vesicles. The results illustrate the difference in membrane affinity between the fatty acid bound and fatty acid free forms of partially unfolded HLA and suggest that HAMLET engages membranes by a mechanism requiring both the protein and the fatty acid. Furthermore, HAMLET binding alters the morphology of the membrane and compromises its integrity, suggesting that membrane perturbation could be an initial step in inducing cell death.

  10. Enrichment of methylated molecules using enhanced-ice-co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR (E-ice-COLD-PCR) for the sensitive detection of disease-related hypermethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, Florence; Kernaleguen, Magali; Lallemand, Céline; Kristensen, Vessela N; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tost, Jörg

    2018-05-01

    The detection of specific DNA methylation patterns bears great promise as biomarker for personalized management of cancer patients. Co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR (COLD-PCR) assays are sensitive methods, but have previously only been able to analyze loss of DNA methylation. Enhanced (E)-ice-COLD-PCR reactions starting from 2 ng of bisulfite-converted DNA were developed to analyze methylation patterns in two promoters with locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes blocking amplification of unmethylated CpGs. The enrichment of methylated molecules was compared to quantitative (q)PCR and quantified using serial dilutions. E-ice-COLD-PCR allowed the multiplexed enrichment and quantification of methylated DNA. Assays were validated in primary breast cancer specimens and circulating cell-free DNA from cancer patients. E-ice-COLD-PCR could prove a useful tool in the context of DNA methylation analysis for personalized medicine.

  11. A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for the identification of Micrococcaceae strains involved in meat fermentations. Its application to naturally fermented Italian sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocolin, L; Manzano, M; Aggio, D; Cantoni, C; Comi, G

    2001-05-01

    A new molecular method consisting of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of a small fragment from the 16S rRNA gene identified the Micrococcaceae strains isolated from natural fermented Italian sausages. Lactic acid bacteria, total aerobic mesophilic flora, Enterobacteriaceae and faecal enterococci were also monitored. Micrococcaceaea control strains from international collections were used to optimise the method and 90 strains, isolated from fermented sausages, were identified by biochemical tests and PCR-DGGE. No differences were observed between the methods used. The results reported in this paper prove that Staphylococcus xylosus is the main bacterium involved in fermented sausage production, representing, from the tenth day of ripening, the only Micrococcaceaea species isolated.

  12. Heat shock protein 70 negatively regulates the heat-shock-induced suppression of the IκB/NF-κB cascade by facilitating IκB kinase renaturation and blocking its further denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Choon-Taek; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young-Soo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2005-01-01

    Heat shock (HS) treatment has been previously shown to suppress the IκB/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) cascade by denaturing, and thus inactivating IκB kinase (IKK). HS is characterized by the induction of a group of heat shock proteins (HSPs). However, their role in the HS-induced suppression of the IκB/NF-κB cascade is unclear. Adenovirus-mediated HSP70 overexpression was found not to suppress the TNF-α-induced activation of the IκB/NF-κB pathway, thus suggesting that HSP70 is unlikely to suppress this pathway. When TNF-α-induced activation of the IκB/NF-κB pathway was regained 24 h after HS, HSP70 was found to be highly up-regulated. Moreover, blocking HSP70 induction delayed TNF-α-induced IκBα degradation and the resolubilization of IKK. In addition, HSP70 associated physically with IKK, suggesting that HSP70 is involved in the recovery process via molecular chaperone effect. Adenovirus-mediated HSP70 overexpression prior to HS blocked the IκBα stabilizing effect of HS by suppressing IKK insolubilization. Moreover, the up-regulation of endogenous HSP70 by preheating, suppressed this subsequent HS-induced IKK insolubilization, and this effect was abrogated by blocking HSP70 induction. These findings indicate that HSP70 accumulates during HS and negatively regulates the HS-induced suppression of the IκB/NF-κB cascade by facilitating the renaturation of IKK and blocking its further denaturation

  13. Acute differential effects of milk-derived dietary proteins on postprandial lipaemia in obese non-diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmer-Jensen, Jens; Hartvigsen, Merete; Mortensen, L.S.

    2012-01-01

    Postprandial lipaemia is an established risk factor for atherosclerosis. To investigate the acute effect of four milk-derived dietary proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, whey isolate, caseinoglycomacropeptide and whey hydrolysate) on postprandial lipaemia, we have conducted a randomized, acute, single...

  14. Expression, purification, and refolding of active recombinant human E-selectin lectin and EGF domains in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Susumu; Iyaguchi, Daisuke; Okada, Chiaki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Toyota, Eiko

    2013-06-01

    Attempts to obtain active E-selectin from Escherichia coli (E. coli) have not yet been successful. In this study, we succeeded in expressing the recombinant lectin and epidermal growth factor domain fragments of human E-selectin (rh-ESLE) in E. coli on a large-scale. The rh-ESLE protein was expressed as an inactive form in the inclusion bodies. The inactive form of rh-ESLE was denatured and solubilized by 6 M guanidine hydrochloride and then purified by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. Denatured rh-ESLE was then refolded by a rapid-dilution method using a large amount of refolding buffer, which contained arginine and cysteine/cystine. The refolded rh-ESLE showed binding affinity for sLe(X) (K(d) = 321 nM, B(max) = 1.9 pmol/μg protein). This result suggests that the refolded rh-ESLE recovered its native and functional structure.

  15. Post-human body and beauty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Maria Teresa; Di Stefano, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The article calls into question the very possibility of a post-human aesthetics, starting from the following premise: rather than post-human, it is more correct to speak of post-natural, indicating by this expression a reality produced through a new type of evolution, which does not simply change human nature, but de-natures it, radically transforming it into an artefact. This post-nature which aspires to be perfect, immortal, invulnerable, is entirely devoid of beauty. In fact, while there may be an aesthetic of the artificial and of the artefact if it is in relation to objects, there is, however, no aesthetic of the post-human body. This is because is configured as a non-body and does not have the characteristics for what is commonly intended as beauty (harmony between matter and form, a reflection of inner life, uniqueness). Also in this case, it is more correct to speak of post-beauty, which in its properties appears to be the mirror image of beauty and ultimately, represents its complete dissolution.

  16. Drosophila UNC-45 prevents heat-induced aggregation of skeletal muscle myosin and facilitates refolding of citrate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melkani, Girish C.; Lee, Chi F.; Cammarato, Anthony [Department of Biology and the Molecular Biology Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614 (United States); Bernstein, Sanford I., E-mail: sbernst@sciences.sdsu.edu [Department of Biology and the Molecular Biology Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614 (United States)

    2010-05-28

    UNC-45 belongs to the UCS (UNC-45, CRO1, She4p) domain protein family, whose members interact with various classes of myosin. Here we provide structural and biochemical evidence that Escherichia coli-expressed Drosophila UNC-45 (DUNC-45) maintains the integrity of several substrates during heat-induced stress in vitro. DUNC-45 displays chaperone function in suppressing aggregation of the muscle myosin heavy meromyosin fragment, the myosin S-1 motor domain, {alpha}-lactalbumin and citrate synthase. Biochemical evidence is supported by electron microscopy, which reveals the first structural evidence that DUNC-45 prevents inter- or intra-molecular aggregates of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin caused by elevated temperatures. We also demonstrate for the first time that UNC-45 is able to refold a denatured substrate, urea-unfolded citrate synthase. Overall, this in vitro study provides insight into the fate of muscle myosin under stress conditions and suggests that UNC-45 protects and maintains the contractile machinery during in vivo stress.

  17. Comparative mutagenesis in human cells in vitro and in vivo: First progress report for the period 15 July 1986-30 June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1987-06-01

    We used the technique of denaturing gradient electrophoresis to produce a pure mutant sequence so that we were able to directly sequence the mutant without bacterial cloning. As part of our continuing studies of the hprt locus in human cells, we have isolated a series of chemically induced mutant DNA sequences in HPRT exon 3 which had been selected by 6-thioguanine resistance. Using denaturing gradient gels to study the amount and kinds of mutations induced in vitro by certain DNA polymerases, we modified polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA amplification to our studies of mutation in the human hprt gene. We studied the nature of T 4 DNA polymerase errors and discovered a means to overcome the principle source of noise in amplifying sequences from the human genome. We initiated studies of multi-copy sequences in the human genome so that mutational spectra may be obtained from small numbers of human cells. We worked out novel statistical modes of analysis for planning and evaluating long term low dose human cell mutation studies, and mutational spectra from cell-based or DNA sequence-based studies. We have characterized the positions of large deletion mutations, confirming 6TG resistance in human cells and have found an intron of hprt which has an apparently high density of deletion endpoints within it. We used exon specific probes to discover which exons are present in each of the four pseudogenes of hprt which are scattered over three human autosomes. 41 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs

  18. A novel technique using DNA denaturation to detect multiply induced single-strand breaks in a hydrated plasmid DNA molecule by X-ray and 4He2+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Noguchi, M.; Urushibara, A.

    2011-01-01

    To detect multiple single-strand breaks (SSBs) produced in plasmid DNA molecules by direct energy deposition from radiation tracks, we have developed a novel technique using DNA denaturation by which irradiated DNA is analysed as single-strand DNA (SS-DNA). The multiple SSBs that arise in both strands of DNA, but do not induce a double-strand break, are quantified as loss of SS-DNA using agarose gel electrophoresis. We have applied this method to X-ray and 4 He 2+ ion-irradiated samples of fully hydrated pUC18 plasmid DNA. The fractions of both SS-DNA and closed circular DNA (CC-DNA) exponentially decrease with the increasing dose of X rays and 4 He 2+ ions. The efficiency of the loss of SS-DNA was half that of CC-DNA for both types of irradiation, indicating that one of two strands in DNA is not broken when one SSB is produced in CC-DNA by irradiation. Contrary to our initial expectation, these results indicate that SSBs are not multiply induced even by high linear energy transfer radiation distributed in both strands. (authors)

  19. An X-band Co2+ EPR study of Zn1-xCoxO (x=0.005-0.1) nanoparticles prepared by chemical hydrolysis methods using diethylene glycol and denaturated alcohol at 5 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sushil K.; Andronenko, S. I.; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Chess, Jordan; Punnoose, A.

    2015-11-01

    EPR investigations on two types of dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) ZnO nanoparticles doped with 0.5-10% Co2+ ions, prepared by two chemical hydrolysis methods, using: (i) diethylene glycol ((CH2CH2OH)2O) (NC-rod-like samples), and (ii) denatured ethanol (CH3CH2OH) solutions (QC-spherical samples), were carried out at X-band (9.5 GHz) at 5 K. The analysis of EPR data for NC samples revealed the presence of several types of EPR lines: (i) two types, intense and weak, of high-spin Co2+ ions in the samples with Co concentration >0.5%; (ii) surface oxygen vacancies, and (iii) a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line. QC samples exhibit an intense FMR line and an EPR line due to high-spin Co2+ ions. FMR line is more intense, than the corresponding line exhibited by NC samples. These EPR spectra varied for sample with different doping concentrations. The magnetic states of these samples as revealed by EPR spectra, as well as the origin of ferromagnetism DMS samples are discussed.

  20. More Human than Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  1. NH exchange in point mutants of human ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahr, Nicole; Fiedler, Erik; Günther, Robert; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg; Berger, Stefan

    2011-08-01

    Several point mutants of human ubiquitin (Ub(T9V), Ub(F45W), Ub(F45G), and Ub(A46S)) were prepared by recombinant techniques. The NH exchange rate constants were measured by the NMR diffusion and the MEXICO methods and compared with those in the wild type to examine the influence of structural changes and to improve the understanding of this important reaction in studies of protein folding and denaturation. The observed changes follow qualitatively the polarity and steric alterations caused by the introduced amino acids. Attempts to reproduce quantitatively the observed changes by modeling studies and molecular dynamics simulations were not satisfactory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro assessment of Tc-99m labeled bovine thrombin and streptokinase-activated human plasmin: concise communication. [Iodine 125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, D.W.; Tanaka, T.; Mishkin, F.; Lee, T.

    1979-09-01

    Bovine thrombin and streptokinase-activated human plasmin have been labeled with Tc-99m using stannous reduction of pertechnetate under physiological conditions (pH 7.4). The binding efficiency of radiotechnetium to these enzymes is greater than 94%, with less than 5% of reduced but unbound Tc-99m (Sn) complex as assayed by ascending paper radiochromatography using ITLC silica gel plate. Free or unbound pertechnetate is less than 1%. In vitro enzymatic analyses of the Tc-99m-labeled enzymes demonstrate no evidence of protein denaturation or significant loss of enzymatic activity after labeling. Both labeled enzymes are biochemically active in vitro with their respective substrates.

  3. In vitro assessment of Tc-99m labeled bovine thrombin and streptokinase-activated human plasmin: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.W.; Tanaka, T.; Mishkin, F.; Lee, T.

    1979-01-01

    Bovine thrombin and streptokinase-activated human plasmin have been labeled with Tc-99m using stannous reduction of pertechnetate under physiological conditions (pH 7.4). The binding efficiency of radiotechnetium to these enzymes is greater than 94%, with less than 5% of reduced but unbound Tc-99m (Sn) complex as assayed by ascending paper radiochromatography using ITLC silica gel plate. Free or unbound pertechnetate is less than 1%. In vitro enzymatic analyses of the Tc-99m-labeled enzymes demonstrate no evidence of protein denaturation or significant loss of enzymatic activity after labeling. Both labeled enzymes are biochemically active in vitro with their respective substrates

  4. Screening for mutations in human alpha-globin genes by nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge S.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations and small insertions or deletions in the human alpha-globin genes may produce alpha-chain structural variants and alpha-thalassemia. Mutations can be detected either by direct DNA sequencing or by screening methods, which select the mutated exon for sequencing. Although small (about 1 kb, 3 exons and 2 introns, the alpha-globin genes are duplicate (alpha2 and alpha1 and highy G-C rich, which makes them difficult to denature, reducing sequencing efficiency and causing frequent artifacts. We modified some conditions for PCR and electrophoresis in order to detect mutations in these genes employing nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP. Primers previously described by other authors for radioactive SSCP and phast-SSCP plus denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were here combined and the resultant fragments (6 new besides 6 original per alpha-gene submitted to silver staining SSCP. Nine structural and one thalassemic mutations were tested, under different conditions including two electrophoretic apparatus (PhastSystem(TM and GenePhor(TM, Amersham Biosciences, different polyacrylamide gel concentrations, run temperatures and denaturing agents, and entire and restriction enzyme cut fragments. One hundred percent of sensitivity was achieved with four of the new fragments formed, using the PhastSystem(TM and 20% gels at 15ºC, without the need of restriction enzymes. This nonradioactive PCR-SSCP approach showed to be simple, rapid and sensitive, reducing the costs involved in frequent sequencing repetitions and increasing the reliability of the results. It can be especially useful for laboratories which do not have an automated sequencer.

  5. Insight into temperature dependence of GTPase activity in human guanylate binding protein-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Rani

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1 belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1.

  6. Raman spectroscopy of DNA-metal complexes. II. The thermal denaturation of DNA in the presence of Sr2+, Ba2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguid, J G; Bloomfield, V A; Benevides, J M; Thomas, G J

    1995-12-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry, laser Raman spectroscopy, optical densitometry, and pH potentiometry have been used to investigate DNA melting profiles in the presence of the chloride salts of Ba2+, Sr2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+. Metal-DNA interactions have been observed for the molar ratio [M2+]/[PO2-] = 0.6 in aqueous solutions containing 5% by weight of 160 bp mononucleosomal calf thymus DNA. All of the alkaline earth metals, plus Mn2+, elevate the melting temperature of DNA (Tm > 75.5 degrees C), whereas the transition metals Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+ lower Tm. Calorimetric (delta Hcal) and van't Hoff (delta HVH) enthalpies of melting range from 6.2-8.7 kcal/mol bp and 75.6-188.6 kcal/mol cooperative unit, respectively, and entropies from 17.5 to 24.7 cal/K mol bp. The average number of base pairs in a cooperative melting unit () varied from 11.3 to 28.1. No dichotomy was observed between alkaline earth and transition DNA-metal complexes for any of the thermodynamic parameters other than their effects on Tm. These results complement Raman difference spectra, which reveal decreases in backbone order, base unstacking, distortion of glycosyl torsion angles, and rupture of hydrogen bonds, which occur after thermal denaturation. Raman difference spectroscopy shows that transition metals interact with the N7 atom of guanine in duplex DNA. A broader range of interaction sites with single-stranded DNA includes ionic phosphates, the N1 and N7 atoms of purines, and the N3 atom of pyrimidines. For alkaline earth metals, very little interaction was observed with duplex DNA, whereas spectra of single-stranded complexes are very similar to those of melted DNA without metal. However, difference spectra reveal some metal-specific perturbations at 1092 cm-1 (nPO2-), 1258 cm-1 (dC, dA), and 1668 cm-1 (nC==O, dNH2 dT, dG, dC). Increased spectral intensity could also be observed near 1335 cm-1 (dA, dG) for CaDNA. Optical densitometry, employed to detect DNA

  7. Metal retention in human transferrin: consequences of solvent composition in analytical sample preparation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C Derrick; Randunu, K Manoj; Brumaghim, Julia L; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    The analysis of metal-binding proteins requires careful sample manipulation to ensure that the metal-protein complex remains in its native state and the metal retention is preserved during sample preparation or analysis. Chemical analysis for the metal content in proteins typically involves some type of liquid chromatography/electrophoresis separation step coupled with an atomic (i.e., inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy or -mass spectrometry) or molecular (i.e., electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry) analysis step that requires altered-solvent introduction techniques. UV-VIS absorbance is employed here to monitor the iron content in human holo-transferrin (Tf) under various solvent conditions, changing polarity, pH, ionic strength, and the ionic and hydrophobic environment of the protein. Iron loading percentages (i.e. 100% loading equates to 2 Fe(3+):1 Tf) were quantitatively determined to evaluate the effect of solvent composition on the retention of Fe(3+) in Tf. Maximum retention of Fe(3+) was found in buffered (20 mM Tris) solutions (96 ± 1%). Exposure to organic solvents and deionized H(2)O caused release of ~23-36% of the Fe(3+) from the binding pocket(s) at physiological pH (7.4). Salt concentrations similar to separation conditions used for ion exchange had little to no effect on Fe(3+) retention in holo-Tf. Unsurprisingly, changes in ionic strength caused by additions of guanidine HCl (0-10 M) to holo-Tf resulted in unfolding of the protein and loss of Fe(3+) from Tf; however, denaturing and metal loss was found not to be an instantaneous process for additions of 1-5 M guanidinium to Tf. In contrast, complete denaturing and loss of Fe(3+) was instantaneous with ≥6 M additions of guanidinium, and denaturing and loss of iron from Tf occurred in parallel proportions. Changes to the hydrophobicity of Tf (via addition of 0-14 M urea) had less effect on denaturing and release of Fe(3+) from the Tf binding pocket compared to changes

  8. Human engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seong Hwan; Park, Bum; Gang, Yeong Sik; Gal, Won Mo; Baek, Seung Ryeol; Choe, Jeong Hwa; Kim, Dae Sung

    2006-07-01

    This book mentions human engineering, which deals with introduction of human engineering, Man-Machine system like system design, and analysis and evaluation of Man-Machine system, data processing and data input, display, system control of man, human mistake and reliability, human measurement and design of working place, human working, hand tool and manual material handling, condition of working circumstance, working management, working analysis, motion analysis working measurement, and working improvement and design in human engineering.

  9. Human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2006-01-01

    Human rights reflect a determined effort to protect the dignity of each and every human being against abuse of power. This endeavour is as old as human history. What is relatively new is the international venture for the protection of human dignity through internationally accepted legal standards

  10. Recombinant human serum albumin hydrogel as a novel drug delivery vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Masaaki; Tachibana, Akira; Tanabe, Toshizumi

    2010-01-01

    Serum albumin acts as a physiological carrier for various compounds including drugs. A hydrogel consisting of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) was prepared to take advantage of drug binding ability of albumin for a sustained drug release carrier. The hydrogel was prepared by mixing rHSA and dithiothreitol and casted to a polystyrene mold. Hydrogel formation was thought to occur through the intermolecular interaction of the hydrophobic groups by protein denaturation. The release of sodium benzoate and salicylic acid from the hydrogel completed in 2 h, while warfarin release continued for 24 h. The total amounts of the drugs released from 100 mg of 15 and 5% rHSA hydrogel were 2.3 and 1.4 μmol for warfarin, 1.4 and 1.1 μmol for salicylic acid and 0.9 and 0.9 μmol for sodium benzoate. These results reflected the order of the binding ability of drugs for intact albumin indicating that the drug binding ability of HSA still remained after the hydrogel formation. However, fibroblast cells attached and proliferated well on the hydrogel, indicating that denaturation of rHSA proceeded to the extent to allow the cell attachment. The present rHSA hydrogel might be suitable for a sustained release carrier of drugs having affinity for albumin.

  11. Recombinant human serum albumin hydrogel as a novel drug delivery vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Masaaki, E-mail: Hirose.Masaaki@mh.mt-pharma.co.jp [Advanced Medical Research Laboratory, Research Division, Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, 3-16-89 Kashima, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-8505 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira; Tanabe, Toshizumi [Department of Applied Chemistry and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Serum albumin acts as a physiological carrier for various compounds including drugs. A hydrogel consisting of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) was prepared to take advantage of drug binding ability of albumin for a sustained drug release carrier. The hydrogel was prepared by mixing rHSA and dithiothreitol and casted to a polystyrene mold. Hydrogel formation was thought to occur through the intermolecular interaction of the hydrophobic groups by protein denaturation. The release of sodium benzoate and salicylic acid from the hydrogel completed in 2 h, while warfarin release continued for 24 h. The total amounts of the drugs released from 100 mg of 15 and 5% rHSA hydrogel were 2.3 and 1.4 {mu}mol for warfarin, 1.4 and 1.1 {mu}mol for salicylic acid and 0.9 and 0.9 {mu}mol for sodium benzoate. These results reflected the order of the binding ability of drugs for intact albumin indicating that the drug binding ability of HSA still remained after the hydrogel formation. However, fibroblast cells attached and proliferated well on the hydrogel, indicating that denaturation of rHSA proceeded to the extent to allow the cell attachment. The present rHSA hydrogel might be suitable for a sustained release carrier of drugs having affinity for albumin.

  12. Human reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrey, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Concepts and techniques of human reliability have been developed and are used mostly in probabilistic risk assessment. For this, the major application of human reliability assessment has been to identify the human errors which have a significant effect on the overall safety of the system and to quantify the probability of their occurrence. Some of the major issues within human reliability studies are reviewed and it is shown how these are applied to the assessment of human failures in systems. This is done under the following headings; models of human performance used in human reliability assessment, the nature of human error, classification of errors in man-machine systems, practical aspects, human reliability modelling in complex situations, quantification and examination of human reliability, judgement based approaches, holistic techniques and decision analytic approaches. (UK)

  13. Physical Properties of Human Whole Salivary Mucin:A Dynamic Light Scattering Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Manish; Kumar, Vijay; Saraswat, Mayank; Yadav, Savita; Shukla, N. K.; Singh, T. P.

    2008-04-01

    Human salivary mucin, a primary mucous membrane coating glycoprotein forms the first line of defense against adverse environments, attributed to the complex formation between mucin subunits and non mucin species. Aim of the study was to emphasize the effect of pH, denaturants (guanidinum hydrochloride, urea) and detergents (CHAPS, TRITON X -100, SDS on human whole salivary mucin. Hydrodynamic size distribution was measured using DLS. It was observed that aggregation was due to increase in hydrophobic interactions, believed to be accomplished by unfolding of the protein core. Whereas, the detergents which solubilize the proteins by decreasing hydrophobicity lead to disaggregation of mucin into smaller fragments. Mucin subjected to tobacco extract and upon subsequent addition of nicotine was found to have a disaggregating effect on it, suggesting nicotine may be one of the factors responsible for the disaggregating effect of tobacco on mucin, an important carcinogenetic mechanism.

  14. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security

    OpenAIRE

    Gasper, Des

    2009-01-01

    Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each has emerged within the United Nations world; each relies implicitly on a conceptualisation of human need; each has specific strengths. Yet mutual communication, understanding and co-operation are deficient, espec...

  15. Human niche, human behaviour, human nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Agustin

    2017-10-06

    The concept of a 'human nature' or 'human natures' retains a central role in theorizing about the human experience. In Homo sapiens it is clear that we have a suite of capacities generated via our evolutionary past, and present, and a flexible capacity to create and sustain particular kinds of cultures and to be shaped by them. Regardless of whether we label these capacities 'human natures' or not, humans occupy a distinctive niche and an evolutionary approach to examining it is critical. At present we are faced with a few different narratives as to exactly what such an evolutionary approach entails. There is a need for a robust and dynamic theoretical toolkit in order to develop a richer, and more nuanced, understanding of the cognitively sophisticated genus Homo and the diverse sorts of niches humans constructed and occupied across the Pleistocene, Holocene, and into the Anthropocene. Here I review current evolutionary approaches to 'human nature', arguing that we benefit from re-framing our investigations via the concept of the human niche and in the context of the extended evolutionary synthesis (EES). While not a replacement of standard evolutionary approaches, this is an expansion and enhancement of our toolkit. I offer brief examples from human evolution in support of these assertions.

  16. Human Smuggling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel - Rozenblit, Dina; Zaitch, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Human smuggling is based on a consensus between smuggler, smuggled, and his/her family (which usually guarantees or effectuates payment). However, unauthorized immigrants are violating immigration laws and human smugglers are profiting from enabling illegal immigration. Both human smuggling and its

  17. Human intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hora, S.; Neill, R.; Williams, R.; Bauser, M.; Channell, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper focused on the possible approaches to evaluating the impacts of human intrusion on nuclear waste disposal. Several major issues were reviewed. First, it was noted that human intrusion could be addressed either quantitatively through performance assessments or qualitatively through design requirements. Second, it was decided that it was impossible to construct a complete set of possible future human intrusion scenarios. Third, the question of when the effect of possible human intrusion should be considered, before or after site selection was reviewed. Finally, the time frame over which human intrusion should be considered was discussed

  18. Human Technology and Human Affects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Human Technology and Human Affects  This year Samsung introduced a mobile phone with "Soul". It was made with a human touch and included itself a magical touch. Which function does technology and affects get in everyday aesthetics like this, its images and interactions included this presentation...... will ask and try to answer. The mobile phone and its devices are depicted as being able to make a unique human presence, interaction, and affect. The medium, the technology is a necessary helper to get towards this very special and lost humanity. Without the technology, no special humanity - soul....... The paper will investigate how technology, humanity, affects, and synaesthesia are presented and combined with examples from everyday aesthetics, e.g. early computer tv-commercial, net-commercial for mobile phones. Technology and affects point, is the conclusion, towards a forgotten pre-human and not he...

  19. An FCS study of unfolding and refolding of CPM-labeled human serum albumin: role of ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, Dibyendu Kumar; Mondal, Tridib; Sen Mojumdar, Supratik; Choudhury, Aparajita; Banerjee, Rajat; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2011-11-10

    The effect of a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) on the conformational dynamics of a protein, human serum albumin (HSA), is studied by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). For this, the protein was covalently labeled by a fluorophore, 7-dimethylamino-3-(4-maleimidophenyl)-4-methylcoumarin (CPM). On addition of a RTIL ([pmim][Br]) to the native protein, the diffusion coefficient (D(t)) decreases and the hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) increases. This suggests that the RTIL ([pmim][Br]) acts as a denaturant when the protein is in the native state. However, addition of [pmim][Br] to a protein denatured by GdnHCl causes an increases in D(t) and decrease in R(h). This suggests that in the presence of GdnHCl addition of RTIL helps the protein to refold. In the native state, the conformational dynamics of protein is described by three distinct time constants: ~3.6 ± 0.7, ~29 ± 4.5, and 133 ± 23 μs. The faster components (~3.6 ± 0.7 and ~29 ± 4.5 μs) are ascribed to chain dynamics of the protein, while the slowest component (133 μs) is responsible for interchain interaction or concerted motion. On addition of [pmim][Br], the conformational dynamics of HSA becomes slower (~5.1 ± 1, ~43.5 ± 2.8, and ~311 ± 2.3 μs in the presence of 1.5 M [pmim][Br]). The time constants for the protein denatured by 6 M GdnHCl are 3.2 ± 0.4, 34 ± 6, and 207 ± 38 μs. When 1.5 M [pmim][Br] is added to the denatured protein (in 6 M GdnHCl), the time constants become ~5 ± 1, ~41 ± 10, and ~230 ± 45 μs. The lifetime histogram shows that, on addition of GdnHCl to HSA, the contribution of the shorter lifetime component decreases and vanishes at 6 M GdnHCl. The shorter lifetime component immediately reappears after addition of RTIL to unfolded HSA. This suggests recoiling of the unfolded protein by RTIL.

  20. Human Parvoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Young, Neal S.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Parvovirus B19 (B19V) and human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), members of the large Parvoviridae family, are human pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases. For B19V in particular, host features determine disease manifestations. These viruses are prevalent worldwide and are culturable in vitro, and serological and molecular assays are available but require careful interpretation of results. Additional human parvoviruses, including HBoV2 to -4, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), and human bufavirus (BuV) are also reviewed. The full spectrum of parvovirus disease in humans has yet to be established. Candidate recombinant B19V vaccines have been developed but may not be commercially feasible. We review relevant features of the molecular and cellular biology of these viruses, and the human immune response that they elicit, which have allowed a deep understanding of pathophysiology. PMID:27806994

  1. Production, secretion, and stability of human secreted alkaline phosphatase in tobacco NT1 cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Arteaga, Alejandro; Mason, Hugh S; Shuler, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    Tobacco NT1 cell suspension cultures secreting active human secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) were generated for the first time as a model system to study recombinant protein production, secretion, and stability in plant cell cultures. The SEAP gene encodes a secreted form of the human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP). During batch culture, the highest level of active SEAP in the culture medium (0.4 U/mL, corresponding to approximately 27 mg/L) was observed at the end of the exponential growth phase. Although the level of active SEAP decreased during the stationary phase, the activity loss did not appear to be due to SEAP degradation (based on Western blots) but due to SEAP denaturation. The protein-stabilizing agents polyvinylpirrolidone (PVP) and bacitracin were added extracellularly to test for their ability to reduce the loss of SEAP activity during the stationary phase. Bacitracin (100 mg/L) was the most effective treatment at sustaining activity levels for up to 17 days post-subculture. Commercially available human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) was used to probe the mechanism of SEAP deactivation. Experiments with PLAP in sterile and conditioned medium corroborated the denaturation of SEAP by factors generated by cell growth and not due to simple proteolysis. We also show for the first time that the factors promoting activity loss are heat labile at 95 degrees C but not at 70 degrees C, and they are not inactivated after a 5 day incubation period under normal culture conditions (27 degrees C). In addition, there were no significant changes in pH or redox potential when comparing sterile and cell-free conditioned medium during PLAP incubation, indicating that these factors were unimportant.

  2. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  3. An alternative method for cDNA cloning from surrogate eukaryotic cells transfected with the corresponding genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin-Yong; Cui, Chen-Chen; Song, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xiang-Guo; Jin, Ya-Ping; Wang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2012-07-01

    cDNA is widely used in gene function elucidation and/or transgenics research but often suitable tissues or cells from which to isolate mRNA for reverse transcription are unavailable. Here, an alternative method for cDNA cloning is described and tested by cloning the cDNA of human LALBA (human alpha-lactalbumin) from genomic DNA. First, genomic DNA containing all of the coding exons was cloned from human peripheral blood and inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector. Next, by delivering the plasmids into either 293T or fibroblast cells, surrogate cells were constructed. Finally, the total RNA was extracted from the surrogate cells and cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR. The human LALBA cDNA that was obtained was compared with the corresponding mRNA published in GenBank. The comparison showed that the two sequences were identical. The novel method for cDNA cloning from surrogate eukaryotic cells described here uses well-established techniques that are feasible and simple to use. We anticipate that this alternative method will have widespread applications.

  4. 27 CFR 21.151 - List of denaturants authorized for denatured spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., liquid S.D.A. 36. Cedar leaf oil, U.S.P.XIII S.D.A. 38-B. Chloroform S.D.A. 20. Chlorothymol, N.F.XII S.D... (Glycerol), U.S.P S.D.A. 31-A. Green soap, U.S.P S.D.A. 27-B. Guaiacol, N.F.X S.D.A. 38-B. Heptane C.D.A. 18...) S.D.A. 45. Soap, hard, N.F.XI S.D.A. 31-A. Sodium iodide, U.S.P S.D.A. 25, 25-A. Sodium, metallic S...

  5. 78 FR 38628 - Reclassification of Specially Denatured Spirits and Completely Denatured Alcohol Formulas and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... this proposed rulemaking: Rum is any spirit produced from sugar cane products and distilled at less...--with ethanol in the resulting formulations. Thus, it would be more difficult to separate the ethanol...

  6. Understanding the structural differences between spherical and rod-shaped human insulin nanoparticles produced by supercritical fluids precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonju; Seo, Yongil; Chae, Boknam; Pyo, Dongjin; Chung, Hoeil; Hwang, Hyonseok; Jung, Young Mee

    2015-02-02

    In this study, the thermal denaturation mechanism and secondary structures of two types of human insulin nanoparticles produced by a process of solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol (EtOH) solutions of insulin are investigated using spectroscopic approaches and molecular dynamics calculations. First, the temperature-dependent IR spectra of spherical and rod-shaped insulin nanoparticles prepared from DMSO and EtOH solution, respectively, are analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and 2D correlation spectroscopy to obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular structures and thermal behavior of the two insulin particle shapes. All-atom molecular dynamics (AAMD) calculations are performed to investigate the influence of the solvent molecules on the production of the insulin nanoparticles and to elucidate the geometric differences between the two types of nanoparticles. The results of the PCA, the 2D correlation spectroscopic analysis, and the AAMD calculations clearly reveal that the thermal denaturation mechanisms and the degrees of hydrogen bonding in the spherical and rod-shaped insulin nanoparticles are different. The polarity of the solvent might not alter the structure or function of the insulin produced, but the solvent polarity does influence the synthesis of different shapes of insulin nanoparticles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The production and repair of double strand breaks in cells from normal humans and patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, A.R.; Stevens, S.

    1977-01-01

    The production and repair of double strand breaks induced by γ-rays in the DNA of human fibroblasts have been measured by sedimentation in sucrose gradients under non-denaturing conditions. Unirradiated DNA formed a rapidly sedimenting gel. Low doses of radiation released freely sedimenting DNA molecules from this gel. Higher doses reduced the rate of sedimentation of the free DNA due to the introduction of double strand breaks. The breakage efficiency was 1 break/1.3x10 10 daltons of DNA/krad. Postirradiation incubation after a high dose of radiation resulted in an increase in molecular weight of the free DNA molecules, and after a low dose the rapidly-sedimenting gel was reformed. These data suggest that double strand breaks are repaired in human fibroblasts. No significant differences were found between fibroblasts from two normal donors and four patients with the radiosensitive disorder, ataxia telangiectasia, in either the production or repair of double strand breaks

  8. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security - Relationships between four international human discourses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract: Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and

  9. The Influence of Different Apple Based Supplements on the Intestinal Microbiota of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Wilcks, Andrea; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective: The present project is part of the large ISAFRUIT project, where one of the objectives is to identify effects of apple and apple product on parameters related to gut health. In a previous rat study we observed changes in the intestinal microbiota of rats fed whole apples......, pomace or apple pectin ([1], and we were interested in finding out if the same effect can be observed in humans. Method: The study was conducted as a randomized, controlled 5 x 28 days cross-over study with 24 healthy persons of both genders. The persons were following a pectin- and polyphenol free......-free), 3) cloudy juice (apple juice with pulp), and 4) pomace (press cake from the cloudy juice production process). Fecal samples were taken before and after each diet period. After DNA extraction, Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) with universal primers and specific primers...

  10. High-level secretion of native recombinant human calreticulin in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Čiplys, Evaldas; Žitkus, Eimantas; Gold, Leslie I.

    2015-01-01

    , Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. RESULTS: Expression of a full-length human CRT precursor including its native signal sequence resulted in high-level secretion of mature recombinant protein into the culture medium by both S. cerevisiae and P. pastoris. To ensure the structural and functional...... by non-denaturing PAGE. Moreover, limited trypsin digestion yielded identical fragment patterns of calcium-binding recombinant and native CRT suggesting that the yeast-derived CRT was correctly folded. Furthermore, both native and recombinant CRT induced cellular proliferation (MTS assay) and migration...... recombinant CRT protein with yields reaching 75 % of total secreted protein and with production levels of 60 and 200 mg/l from S. cerevisiae and P. pastoris, respectively. Finally, cultivation of P. pastoris in a bioreactor yielded CRT secretion titer to exceed 1.5 g/l of culture medium. CONCLUSIONS: Yeasts...

  11. Improving solubility and refolding efficiency of human V(H)s by a novel mutational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanha, Jamshid; Nguyen, Thanh-Dung; Ng, Andy; Ryan, Shannon; Ni, Feng; Mackenzie, Roger

    2006-11-01

    The antibody V(H) domains of camelids tend to be soluble and to resist aggregation, in contrast to human V(H) domains. For immunotherapy, attempts have therefore been made to improve the properties of human V(H)s by camelization of a small set of framework residues. Here, we have identified through sequence comparison of well-folded llama V(H) domains an alternative set of residues (not typically camelid) for mutation. Thus, the solubility and thermal refolding efficiency of a typical human V(H), derived from the human antibody BT32/A6, were improved by introduction of two mutations in framework region (FR) 1 and 4 to generate BT32/A6.L1. Three more mutations in FR3 of BT32/A6.L1 further improved the thermal refolding efficiency while retaining solubility and cooperative melting profiles. To demonstrate practical utility, BT32/A6.L1 was used to construct a phage display library from which were isolated human V(H)s with good antigen binding activity and solubility. The engineered human V(H) domains described here may be useful for immunotherapy, due to their expected low immunogenicity, and in applications involving transient high temperatures, due to their efficient refolding after thermal denaturation.

  12. Human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The field of human ancient DNA (aDNA) has moved from mitochondrial sequencing that suffered from contamination and provided limited biological insights, to become a fully genomic discipline that is changing our conception of human history. Recent successes include the sequencing of extinct homini...

  13. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  14. Human kapital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Anders; Nielsen, Peder Harbjerg

    2007-01-01

    finansiel og human kapital. Den traditionelle rådgivnings snævre synsvinkel kan føre til forkerte investeringsråd. Der skal derfor opfordres til, at de finansielle virksomheder i tilrettelæggelsen af deres rådgivning af private kunder systematisk inddrager den humane kapitals størrelse og karakteristika i...

  15. Human trichuriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human trichuriasis is a neglected tropical disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is particularly prevalent among children living in areas where sanitation is poor. This review examines the current knowledge on the taxonomy, genetics and phylogeography of human Trichuris...

  16. A PCR-DGGE method for detection and identification of Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter and related Epsilobacteria and its application to saliva samples from humans and domestic pets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Randi Føns; Harrington, C. S.; Kortegaard, H. E.

    2007-01-01

    Results: A semi-nested PCR was developed to allow sensitive detection of all Epsilobacteria, with species separation undertaken by DGGE. A database was constructed in BioNumerics using 145 strains covering 51 Campylobacter, Arcobacter and Helicobacter taxa; Nineteen distinct DGGE profile-groups were......Aims: To develop a PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method for the detection and identification of Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Arcobacter species (Epsilobacteria) in clinical samples and evaluate its efficacy on saliva samples from humans and domestic pets. Methods ans...... distinguished. This approach detected Epsilobacteria in all saliva samples collected from humans, cats and dogs, and identified Campylobacter concisus and/or Campylobacter gracilis in the human samples. The pet animal samples were taken from individuals with oral/dental diseases; PCR-DGGE identified up to four...

  17. Human serum albumin as protecting agent of silver nanoparticles: role of the protein conformation and amine groups in the nanoparticle stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Emilio I.; Bueno-Alejo, Carlos J.; Noel, Christopher W.; Stamplecoskie, Kevin G. [Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, University of Ottawa, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Pacioni, Natalia L. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, INFIQC, Departamento de Quimica Organica (Argentina); Poblete, Horacio [Center for Bioinformatics and Molecular Simulations, Universidad de Talca (Chile); Scaiano, J. C., E-mail: tito@photo.chem.uottawa.ca [Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, University of Ottawa, Department of Chemistry (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Thermally denatured human serum albumin interacts with {approx}3.0 nm spherical AgNP enhancing the fluorescence of Trp-214 at large protein/nanoparticle ratios. However, using native HSA, no changes in the emission were observed. The observation is likely due to differences between native and denatured protein packing resulting from protein corona formation. We have also found that NH{sub 2} blocking of the protein strongly affects the ability of the protein to protect AgNP from different salts/ions such as NaCl, PBS, Hank's buffer, Tris-HCl, MES, and DMEM. Additionally, AgNP can be readily prepared in aqueous solutions by a photochemical approach employing HSA as an in situ protecting agent. The role of the protein in this case is beyond that of protecting agent; thus, Ag{sup +} ions and I-2959 complexation within the protein structure also affects the efficiency of AgNP formation. Blocking NH{sub 2} in HSA modified the AgNP growth profile, surface plasmon band shape, and long-term stability suggesting that amine groups are directly involved in the formation and post-stabilization of AgNP. In particular, AgNP size and shape are extensively influenced by NH{sub 2} blocking, leading primarily to cubes and plates with sizes around 5-15 nm; in contrast, spherical monodisperse 4.0 nm AgNP are observed for native HSA. The nanoparticles prepared by this protocol are non-toxic in primary cells and have remarkable antibacterial properties. Finally, surface plasmon excitation of native HSA-AgNP promoted loss of protein conformation in just 5 min, suggesting that plasmon heating causes protein denaturation using continuous light sources such as commercial LED.

  18. Human serum albumin as protecting agent of silver nanoparticles: role of the protein conformation and amine groups in the nanoparticle stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarcon, Emilio I.; Bueno-Alejo, Carlos J.; Noel, Christopher W.; Stamplecoskie, Kevin G.; Pacioni, Natalia L.; Poblete, Horacio; Scaiano, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thermally denatured human serum albumin interacts with ∼3.0 nm spherical AgNP enhancing the fluorescence of Trp-214 at large protein/nanoparticle ratios. However, using native HSA, no changes in the emission were observed. The observation is likely due to differences between native and denatured protein packing resulting from protein corona formation. We have also found that NH 2 blocking of the protein strongly affects the ability of the protein to protect AgNP from different salts/ions such as NaCl, PBS, Hank’s buffer, Tris–HCl, MES, and DMEM. Additionally, AgNP can be readily prepared in aqueous solutions by a photochemical approach employing HSA as an in situ protecting agent. The role of the protein in this case is beyond that of protecting agent; thus, Ag + ions and I-2959 complexation within the protein structure also affects the efficiency of AgNP formation. Blocking NH 2 in HSA modified the AgNP growth profile, surface plasmon band shape, and long-term stability suggesting that amine groups are directly involved in the formation and post-stabilization of AgNP. In particular, AgNP size and shape are extensively influenced by NH 2 blocking, leading primarily to cubes and plates with sizes around 5–15 nm; in contrast, spherical monodisperse 4.0 nm AgNP are observed for native HSA. The nanoparticles prepared by this protocol are non-toxic in primary cells and have remarkable antibacterial properties. Finally, surface plasmon excitation of native HSA-AgNP promoted loss of protein conformation in just 5 min, suggesting that plasmon heating causes protein denaturation using continuous light sources such as commercial LED.

  19. Canine degenerative myelopathy: a model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra C; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-02-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (CDM) represents a unique naturally occurring animal model for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because of similar clinical signs, neuropathologic findings, and involvement of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. A definitive diagnosis can only be made postmortem through microscopic detection of axonal degeneration, demyelination and astroglial proliferation, which is more severe in the dorsal columns of the thoracic spinal cord and in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus. Interestingly, the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes are intact in CDM prior to functional impairment, thus suggesting that muscle atrophy in CDM does not result from physical denervation. Moreover, since sensory involvement seems to play an important role in CDM progression, a more careful investigation of the sensory pathology in ALS is also warranted. The importance of SOD1 expression remains unclear, while oxidative stress and denatured ubiquinated proteins appear to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CDM. In this updated narrative review we performed a systematic search of the published studies on CDM that may shed light on the pathophysiological mechanisms of human ALS. A better understanding of the factors that determine the disease progression in CDM may be beneficial for the development of effective treatments for ALS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of low abundance cyclophilins in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Michael; Ihling, Christian H; Prell, Erik; Schierhorn, Angelika; Sinz, Andrea; Fischer, Gunter; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia; Malešević, Miroslav

    2016-11-01

    Cylophilins (Cyps) belong to the ubiquitously distributed enzyme class of peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerases (EC5.2.1.8), which are foldases capable of accelerating slow steps in the refolding of denatured proteins. At least 20 different Cyp isoenzymes are broadly distributed among all organs and cellular compartments in humans. Extracellularly localized Cyps came into the scientific focus recently because of their involvement in the control of inflammatory diseases, as well as viral and bacterial infections. However, detailed insights into Cyp functions are often hampered by the lack of sensitive detection methods. We present an improved method for affinity purification and detection of Cyp in biotic samples in this manuscript. The procedure takes advantage of two novel cyclosporine A derivatives. Derivative 1 was used to capture Cyps from the sample while derivative 2 was applied for selective release from the affinity matrix. Using this approach, eight different Cyp (CypA, CypB, CypC, Cyp40 (PPID), CypE, CypD (PPIF), CypH, and CypL1) were unambiguously detected in healthy human blood plasma. Moreover, extracellular CypA was found to be partially modified by N ε acetylation on residues Lys44, Lys133, Lys155, as well as N α  acetylation at the N-terminal Val residue. N α  acetylation of Ser2 residue was also found for Cyp40. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of flexible polyanions complexing with whey proteins at their isoelectric point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R

    2004-02-15

    Electrostatic complexation of flexible polyanions with the whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin is studied using Monte Carlo simulations. The proteins are considered at their respective isoelectric points. Discrete charges on the model polyelectrolytes and proteins interact through Debye-Huckel potentials. Protein excluded volume is taken into account through a coarse-grained model of the protein shape. Consistent with experimental results, it is found that alpha-lactalbumin complexes much more strongly than beta-lactoglobulin. For alpha-lactalbumin, strong complexation is due to localized binding to a single large positive "charge patch," whereas for beta-lactoglobulin, weak complexation is due to diffuse binding to multiple smaller charge patches. Copyright 2004 American Institute of Physics

  2. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    , and preserving material to study, as an object of study in its own right, as an analytical tool, or for collaborating, and for disseminating results. The term "digital humanities" was coined around 2001, and gained currency within academia in the following years. However, computers had been used within......Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting...

  3. Human Computation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  4. Human expunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Thomas Nagel in `The Absurd' (Nagel 1971) mentions the future expunction of the human species as a `metaphor' for our ability to see our lives from the outside, which he claims is one source of our sense of life's absurdity. I argue that the future expunction (not to be confused with extinction) of everything human - indeed of everything biological in a terran sense - is not a mere metaphor but a physical certainty under the laws of nature. The causal processes by which human expunction will take place are presented in some empirical detail, so that philosophers cannot dismiss it as merely speculative. I also argue that appeals to anthropic principles or to forms of mystical cosmology are of no plausible avail in the face of human expunction under the laws of physics.

  5. Human Cloning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Judith A; Williams, Erin D

    2006-01-01

    .... Scientists in other labs, including Harvard University and the University of California at San Francisco, intend to produce cloned human embryos in order to derive stem cells for medical research...

  6. Human brucellosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, María Pía; Mulder, Maximilian; Gilman, Robert H.; Smits, Henk L.

    2007-01-01

    Human brucellosis still presents scientists and clinicians with several challenges, such as the understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of Brucella spp, the identification of markers for disease severity, progression, and treatment response, and the development of improved treatment regimens.

  7. Human settlements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Niekerk, Cornelia W

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available risk of deaths and injuries by drowning in floods and migration- related health effects. • Increased migration, which can result in human suffering, human rights violations, conflicts and political instability. • Loss of property and livelihoods.... The vulnerability of settlements in southern Africa is impacted by various and complex socio-economic processes related to the cultural, political and institutional contexts and demographic pressure, as well as specific high-risk zones susceptible to flash floods...

  8. Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-20

    Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA). A team of scientists headed by Alison Murdoch at the University of Newcastle received permission...not yet reported success in isolating stem cells from a cloned human embryo. A research team headed by Ian Wilmut at the University of Edinburgh...research group, headed by Douglas Melton and Kevin Eggan, submitted their proposal to a Harvard committee composed of ethicists, scientists and public

  9. Sensitization of Staphylococcus aureus to methicillin and other antibiotics in vitro and in vivo in the presence of HAMLET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R Marks

    Full Text Available HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells is a protein-lipid complex from human milk with both tumoricidal and bactericidal activities. HAMLET exerts a rather specific bactericidal activity against some respiratory pathogens, with highest activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, but lacks activity against most other bacterial pathogens, including Staphylococci. Still, ion transport associated with death in S. pneumoniae is also detected to a lower degree in insensitive organisms. In this study we demonstrate that HAMLET acts as an antimicrobial adjuvant that can increase the activity of a broad spectrum of antibiotics (methicillin, vancomycin, gentamicin and erythromycin against multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus, to a degree where they become sensitive to those same antibiotics, both in antimicrobial assays against planktonic and biofilm bacteria and in an in vivo model of nasopharyngeal colonization. We show that HAMLET exerts these effects specifically by dissipating the proton gradient and inducing a sodium-dependent calcium influx that partially depolarizes the plasma membrane, the same mechanism induced during pneumococcal death. These effects results in an increased cell associated binding and/or uptake of penicillin, gentamicin and vancomycin, especially in resistant stains. Finally, HAMLET inhibits the increased resistance of methicillin seen under antibiotic pressure and the bacteria do not become resistant to the adjuvant, which is a major advantageous feature of the molecule. These results highlight HAMLET as a novel antimicrobial adjuvant with the potential to increase the clinical usefulness of antibiotics against drug resistant strains of S. aureus.

  10. Sensitization of Staphylococcus aureus to methicillin and other antibiotics in vitro and in vivo in the presence of HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R; Clementi, Emily A; Hakansson, Anders P

    2013-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex from human milk with both tumoricidal and bactericidal activities. HAMLET exerts a rather specific bactericidal activity against some respiratory pathogens, with highest activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, but lacks activity against most other bacterial pathogens, including Staphylococci. Still, ion transport associated with death in S. pneumoniae is also detected to a lower degree in insensitive organisms. In this study we demonstrate that HAMLET acts as an antimicrobial adjuvant that can increase the activity of a broad spectrum of antibiotics (methicillin, vancomycin, gentamicin and erythromycin) against multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus, to a degree where they become sensitive to those same antibiotics, both in antimicrobial assays against planktonic and biofilm bacteria and in an in vivo model of nasopharyngeal colonization. We show that HAMLET exerts these effects specifically by dissipating the proton gradient and inducing a sodium-dependent calcium influx that partially depolarizes the plasma membrane, the same mechanism induced during pneumococcal death. These effects results in an increased cell associated binding and/or uptake of penicillin, gentamicin and vancomycin, especially in resistant stains. Finally, HAMLET inhibits the increased resistance of methicillin seen under antibiotic pressure and the bacteria do not become resistant to the adjuvant, which is a major advantageous feature of the molecule. These results highlight HAMLET as a novel antimicrobial adjuvant with the potential to increase the clinical usefulness of antibiotics against drug resistant strains of S. aureus.

  11. Human cognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The study of human cognition encompasses the study of all mental phenomena, from the receipt and interpretation of sensory information to the final control of the motor system in the performance of action. The cognitive scientist examines all intermediary processes, including thought, decision making, and memory and including the effects of motivation, states of arousal and stress, the study of language, and the effects of social factors. The field therefore ranges over an enormous territory, covering all that is known or that should be known about human behavior. It is not possible to summarize the current state of knowledge about cognition with any great confidence that we know the correct answer about any aspect of the work. Nontheless, models provide good characterizations of certain aspects of the data and situations. Even if these models should prove to be incorrect, they do provide good approximate descriptions of people's behavior in some situations, and these approximations will still apply even when the underlying theories have changed. A quick description is provided of models within a number of areas of human cognition and skill and some general theoretical frameworks with which to view human cognition. The frameworks are qualitative descriptions that provide a way to view the development of more detailed, quantitative models and, most important, a way of thinking about human performance and skill

  12. Beyond Humanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Capurro, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    In the first part of this paper a short history of Western humanisms (Socrates, Pico della Mirandola, Descartes, Kant) is presented. As far as these humanisms rest on a fixation of the ‘humanum’ they are metaphysical, although they might radically differ from each other. The second part deals with the present debate on trans- and posthumanism in the context of some breath-taking developments in science and technology.Angeletics, a theory of messengers and messages, intends to give an answer t...

  13. HAMLET - A protein-lipid complex with broad tumoricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, James C S; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina

    2017-01-15

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex with broad effects against cancer cells of different origin. The therapeutic potential is emphasized by a high degree of specificity for tumor tissue. Here we review early studies of HAMLET, in collaboration with the Orrenius laboratory, and some key features of the subsequent development of the HAMLET project. The early studies focused on the apoptotic response that accompanies death in HAMLET treated tumor cells and the role of mitochondria in this process. In subsequent studies, we have identified a sequence of interactions that starts with the membrane integration of HAMLET and the activation of ion fluxes followed by HAMLET internalization, progressive inhibition of MAPK kinases and GTPases and sorting of HAMLET to different cellular compartments, including the nuclei. Therapeutic efficacy of HAMLET has been demonstrated in animal models of glioblastoma, bladder cancer and intestinal cancer. In clinical studies, HAMLET has been shown to target skin papillomas and bladder cancers. The findings identify HAMLET as a new drug candidate with promising selectivity for cancer cells and a strong therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote the tumoricidal effect of HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gustafsson, Lotta; Duringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Svanborg, Catharina

    2007-12-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) and HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interact with histones, modify the structure of chromatin, and trigger tumor cell death. This study investigated how the combination of HDIs and HAMLET influences cell viability, histone acetylation, and DNA integrity. The pretreatment of tumor cells with HDIs was shown to enhance the lethal effect of HAMLET and the histone hyperacetylation response to HDIs increased even further after HAMLET treatment. HDIs and HAMLET were shown to target different histone domains as HAMLET bound tailless core histones, whereas HDIs modify the acetylation of the histone tail. DNA damage in response to HAMLET was increased by HDIs. The DNA repair response (p21WAFI expression) was induced by both agonists but abolished when the two agonists were combined. The results suggest that the synergy of HDIs and HAMLET is based on different but converging death pathways, both involving chromatin alterations. We speculate that HAMLET and HDIs might be combined to promote tumor cell death in vivo.

  15. HAMLET triggers apoptosis but tumor cell death is independent of caspases, Bcl-2 and p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, O; Gustafsson, L; Irjala, H; Selivanova, G; Orrenius, S; Svanborg, C

    2006-02-01

    HAMLET (Human alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumor cells) triggers selective tumor cell death in vitro and limits tumor progression in vivo. Dying cells show features of apoptosis but it is not clear if the apoptotic response explains tumor cell death. This study examined the contribution of apoptosis to cell death in response to HAMLET. Apoptotic changes like caspase activation, phosphatidyl serine externalization, chromatin condensation were detected in HAMLET-treated tumor cells, but caspase inhibition or Bcl-2 over-expression did not prolong cell survival and the caspase response was Bcl-2 independent. HAMLET translocates to the nuclei and binds directly to chromatin, but the death response was unrelated to the p53 status of the tumor cells. p53 deletions or gain of function mutations did not influence the HAMLET sensitivity of tumor cells. Chromatin condensation was partly caspase dependent, but apoptosis-like marginalization of chromatin was also observed. The results show that tumor cell death in response to HAMLET is independent of caspases, p53 and Bcl-2 even though HAMLET activates an apoptotic response. The use of other cell death pathways allows HAMLET to successfully circumvent fundamental anti-apoptotic strategies that are present in many tumor cells.

  16. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L; James, Ho C S; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N; Klausen, Thomas Kjær; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-11-12

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ''protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a ''receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. Finally, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death.

  17. Human Parechoviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Harvala, Heli; Midgley, Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Infections with human parechoviruses (HPeV) are highly prevalent, particularly in neonates, where they may cause substantial morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of HPeV infection is often indistinguishable from that of enterovirus (EV) infection and may vary from mild disease...

  18. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    and self-reflective democracy. Contemporary humanities have adopted a new orientation towards practices, and it is not clear how this fits with the ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’. A possible theoretical framework for this orientation towards practices could be found in John Dewey’s pragmatic...

  19. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  20. Human Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  1. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...

  2. Nothing Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  3. In Vitro Culture Conditions for Maintaining a Complex Population of Human Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Soo Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable intestinal microbiota is important in maintaining human physiology and health. Although there have been a number of studies using in vitro and in vivo approaches to determine the impact of diet and xenobiotics on intestinal microbiota, there is no consensus for the best in vitro culture conditions for growth of the human gastrointestinal microbiota. To investigate the dynamics and activities of intestinal microbiota, it is important for the culture conditions to support the growth of a wide range of intestinal bacteria and maintain a complex microbial community representative of the human gastrointestinal tract. Here, we compared the bacterial community in three culture media: brain heart infusion broth and high- and low-carbohydrate medium with different growth supplements. The bacterial community was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, pyrosequencing and real-time PCR. Based on the molecular analysis, this study indicated that the 3% fecal inoculum in low-concentration carbohydrate medium with 1% autoclaved fecal supernatant provided enhanced growth conditions to conduct in vitro studies representative of the human intestinal microbiota.

  4. Fraction from human and rat liver which is inhibitory for proliferation of liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T S; Ottenweller, J; Luke, A; Santos, S; Keeting, P; Cuy, R; Lea, M A

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study was undertaken with human and rat liver of a fraction reported to have growth inhibitory activity when prepared from rat liver. Fractions which were soluble in 70% ethanol and insoluble in 87% ethanol were prepared from liver cytosols. Electrophoretic analysis under denaturing conditions indicated that there were several quantitative or qualitative differences in the fractions from the two species. Fractions from both human and rat liver were found to be inhibitory for the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into DNA of foetal chick hepatocytes. Under conditions in which the rat fraction inhibited precursor incorporation into DNA of rat liver epithelial cells there was not a significant inhibitory effect with the fraction from human liver. DNA synthesis in a rat hepatoma cell line was not significantly inhibited by preparations from either species. The data suggested that corresponding fractions from both rat and human liver could have inhibitory effects on precursor incorporation into DNA but the magnitude of the effects and target cell specificity may differ.

  5. Human Rights and Human Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Javadi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper firstly explores some theories of Human Rights justification and then assents to the theory that Human Rights is based on justified moral values. In order to justify moral values, Aristotle’s approach called “Function Argument” is reviewed. Propounding this argument, the writer attempts to show that all analysis of human identity will directly contribute to the man’s view of his rights. Not only Human rights is really determined by human function or human distinguishing characteristic i.e. human identity, but in the world of knowledge the proper method to know human rights is to know human being himself. n cloning violates man’s rights due to two reasons: damage of human identity and violation of the right to be unique. Attempting to clarify the nature of human cloning, this article examines the aspects to be claimed to violate human rights and evaluates the strength of the reasons for this claim. این مقاله پس از بررسی اجمالی برخی از نظریه‌های توجیه حقوق بشر، نظریة ابتنای آن بر ارزش‌های اخلاقی موجّه را می‌پذیرد. دربارة چگونگی توجیه ارزش اخلاقی، رویکرد ارسطو که به «برهان ارگن» موسوم است، مورد بحث و بررسی قرار می‌گیرد. مؤلف با طرح این برهان می‌کوشد نشان دهد ارائه هرگونه تحلیل از هویت انسان در نگرش آدمی به حقوق خود تأثیر مستقیم خواهد گذاشت. حقوق آدمی نه فقط از ناحیة کارویژه یا فصل ممیز وی (هویت انسان تعیّن واقعی می‌گیرد، بلکه در عالم معرفت هم راه درست شناخت حقوق بشر، شناخت خود انسان است.

  6. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security : Relationships between four international 'human' discourses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHuman rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each

  7. Delipidation of Plasma Has Minimal Effects on Human Butyrylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Onder

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE is purified in large quantities from Cohn fraction IV-4 to use for protection against the toxicity of chemical warfare agents. Small scale preliminary experiments use outdated plasma from the American Red Cross as the starting material for purifying BChE (P06276. Many of the volunteer donor plasma samples are turbid with fat, the donor having eaten fatty food before the blood draw. The turbid fat interferes with enzyme assays performed in the spectrophotometer and with column chromatography. Our goal was to find a method to remove fat from plasma without loss of BChE activity. Satisfactory delipidation was achieved by adding a solution of 10% dextran sulfate and calcium chloride to fatty plasma, followed by centrifugation, and filtration through a 0.8 μm filter. Treatment with Aerosil also delipidated fatty plasma, but was accompanied by loss of 50% of the plasma volume. BChE activity and the BChE isozyme pattern on nondenaturing gel electrophoresis were unaffected by delipidation. BChE in delipidated plasma was efficiently captured by immobilized monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2. The immunopurified BChE was released from antibody binding with acid and visualized as a highly enriched, denatured BChE preparation by SDS gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, delipidation with dextran sulfate/CaCl2 preserves BChE activity and the tetramer structure of BChE.

  8. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of As2O3 toxicological effects on human insulin in generation diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsennia, Mohsen; Motaharinejad, Atieh; Rafiee-Pour, Hossain-Ali; Torabbeigi, Marzieh

    2017-12-01

    The interaction of arsenic trioxide with human insulin was investigated by circular dichroism (CD), cyclic voltammetry and electrophoresis techniques. The interfacial behavior of insulin in presence of As2O3 onto the Ag electrode surface was studied at 310 K in phosphate buffer solution (PBS). According to Far-UV CD spectroscopy results, As2O3 caused to decrease in structural compactness and variety of alpha helix into beta structures. Near-UV CD indicated that As2O3 dissociates disulfide linkage in insulin structure. The kinetic parameters, including charge-transfer coefficient and apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant were also determined. The thermodynamic parameters of insulin denaturation in presence of arsenic trioxide were calculated and reported. The obtained results indicated strong adsorption of insulin in presence of arsenic trioxide onto the Ag surface via chemisorptions.

  9. Effect of hydrophilicity of carbon nanotube arrays on the release rate and activity of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Zhaojun; Ostrikov, Kostya [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); Tan, Cher Ming; Tay, Beng Kang [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Peel, Sean A F, E-mail: zhaojun.han@csiro.au [Department of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5G 1G6 (Canada)

    2011-07-22

    Novel nanostructures such as vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have received increasing interest as drug delivery carriers. In the present study, two CNT arrays with extreme surface wettabilities are fabricated and their effects on the release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) are investigated. It is found that the superhydrophilic arrays retained a larger amount of rhBMP-2 than the superhydrophobic ones. Further use of a poloxamer diffusion layer delayed the initial burst and resulted in a greater total amount of rhBMP-2 released from both surfaces. In addition, rhBMP-2 bound to the superhydrophilic CNT arrays remained bioactive while they denatured on the superhydrophobic surfaces. These results are related to the combined effects of rhBMP-2 molecules interacting with poloxamer and the surface, which could be essential in the development of advanced carriers with tailored surface functionalities.

  10. Human Face as human single identity

    OpenAIRE

    Warnars, Spits

    2014-01-01

    Human face as a physical human recognition can be used as a unique identity for computer to recognize human by transforming human face with face algorithm as simple text number which can be primary key for human. Human face as single identity for human will be done by making a huge and large world centre human face database, where the human face around the world will be recorded from time to time and from generation to generation. Architecture database will be divided become human face image ...

  11. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  12. [Comparison of Physico-chemical Aspects between E. coli and Human Dihydrofolate Reductase: an Equilibrium Unfolding Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Charu; Jain, Neha; Chaudhuri, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    A protein, differing in origin, may exhibit variable physicochemical behaviour, difference in sequence homology, fold and function. Thus studying structure-function relationship of proteins from altered sources is meaningful in the sense that it may give rise to comparative aspects of their sequence-structure-function relationship. Dihydrofolate reductase is an enzyme involved in cell cycle regulation. It is a significant enzyme as.a target for developing anticancer drugs. Hence, detailed understanding of structure-function relationships of wide variants of the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase would be important for developing an inhibitor or an antagonist against the enzyme involved in the cellular developmental processes. In this communication, we have reported the comparative structure-function relationship between E. coli and human dihydrofolate reductase. The differences in the unfolding behaviour of these two proteins have been investigated to understand various properties of these two proteins like relative' stability differences and variation in conformational changes under identical denaturing conditions. The equilibrium unfolding mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase proteins using guanidine hydrochloride as a denaturant in the presence of various types of osmolytes has been monitored using loss in enzymatic activity, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and an extrinsic fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid as probes. It has been observed that osmolytes, such as 1M sucrose, and 30% glycerol, provided enhanced stability to both variants of dihydrofolate reductase. Their level of stabilisation has been observed to be dependent on intrinsic protein stability. It was observed that 100 mM proline does not show any 'significant stabilisation to either of dihydrofolate reductases. In the present study, it has been observed that the human protein is relatively less stable than the E.coli counterpart.

  13. Human reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubb, H.

    1992-01-01

    This book resulted from the activity of Task Force 4.2 - 'Human Reliability'. This group was established on February 27th, 1986, at the plenary meeting of the Technical Reliability Committee of VDI, within the framework of the joint committee of VDI on industrial systems technology - GIS. It is composed of representatives of industry, representatives of research institutes, of technical control boards and universities, whose job it is to study how man fits into the technical side of the world of work and to optimize this interaction. In a total of 17 sessions, information from the part of ergonomy dealing with human reliability in using technical systems at work was exchanged, and different methods for its evaluation were examined and analyzed. The outcome of this work was systematized and compiled in this book. (orig.) [de

  14. Human paleoneurology

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book presents an integrative review of paleoneurology, the study of endocranial morphology in fossil species. The main focus is on showing how computed methods can be used to support advances in evolutionary neuroanatomy, paleoanthropology and archaeology and how they have contributed to creating a completely new perspective in cognitive neuroscience. Moreover, thanks to its multidisciplinary approach, the book addresses students and researchers approaching human paleoneurology from different angles and for different purposes, such as biologists, physicians, anthropologists, archaeologists

  15. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  16. Introduction: Digital Humanities, Public Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Christie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available NANO: New American Notes Online: An Interdisciplinary Academic Journal for Big Ideas in a Small World. This special issue shows how both public and digital humanities research can be rendered more persuasive through engagement with cultures beyond the academy. More specifically, the aim of this special issue is to demonstrate how investments in technologies and computation are not necessarily antithetical to investments in critical theory and social justice.

  17. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  18. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  19. Human neural stem cells over-expressing choline acetyltransferase restore cognition in rat model of cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dongsun; Lee, Hong Jun; Joo, Seong Soo; Bae, Dae-Kwon; Yang, Goeun; Yang, Yun-Hui; Lim, Inja; Matsuo, Akinori; Tooyama, Ikuo; Kim, Yun-Bae; Kim, Seung U

    2012-04-01

    A human neural stem cell (NSC) line over-expressing human choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene was generated and these F3.ChAT NSCs were transplanted into the brain of rat Alzheimer disease (AD) model which was induced by application of ethylcholine mustard aziridinium ion (AF64A) that specifically denatures cholinergic nerves and thereby leads to memory deficit as a salient feature of AD. Transplantation of F3.ChAT human NSCs fully recovered the learning and memory function of AF64A animals, and induced elevated levels of acetylcholine (ACh) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Transplanted F3.ChAT human NSCs were found to migrate to various brain regions including cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and septum, and differentiated into neurons and astrocytes. The present study demonstrates that brain transplantation of human NSCs over-expressing ChAT ameliorates complex learning and memory deficits in AF64A-cholinotoxin-induced AD rat model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro fermentation behaviors of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from Pearsonothuria graeffei by human gut microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao-Yang; Liao, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Yu; Ye, Xing-Qian; Li, Shan; Hu, Ya-Qin; Liu, Dong-Hong; Linhardt, Robert J; Wang, Xin; Chen, Shi-Guo

    2017-09-01

    A fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS-pg) with highly repeated structure from Pearsonothuria graeffei was subjected to a in vitro fermentation model to investigate its fermentability and effects on human gut microflora. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurement found FCS-pg can be fermented to short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) by gut microflora from partial human fecal samples. 16S rRNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) profiling and real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that FCS-pg mainly increased the proportions of Clostridium cluster XI, Bacteriodes prevotella group, Bifidobacterium genus, Clostridium cluster I and Clostridium cluster XIVab, whereas the numbers of the Enterobacteriaceae and Lactobacillus decreased. These results indicated that FCS-pg was mainly fermented by Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium and Clostridium. It increased the content of probiotics bacteria in achieving health-enhancing effect, was slightly different than most sulfated polysaccharides from marine animals. The current study provides useful new information on the mechanism of absorption and functional activity on FCS-pg within the gastrointestinal tract of the human body. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. The biological effects of quadripolar radiofrequency sequential application: a human experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Giovanni; Cornaglia, Antonia Icaro; Faga, Angela; Scevola, Silvia

    2014-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of an innovative quadripolar variable electrode configuration radiofrequency device with objective measurements in an ex vivo and in vivo human experimental model. Nonablative radiofrequency applications are well-established anti-ageing procedures for cosmetic skin tightening. The study was performed in two steps: ex vivo and in vivo assessments. In the ex vivo assessments the radiofrequency applications were performed on human full-thickness skin and subcutaneous tissue specimens harvested during surgery for body contouring. In the in vivo assessments the applications were performed on two volunteer patients scheduled for body contouring surgery at the end of the study. The assessment methods were: clinical examination and medical photography, temperature measurement with thermal imaging scan, and light microscopy histological examination. The ex vivo assessments allowed for identification of the effective safety range for human application. The in vivo assessments allowed for demonstration of the biological effects of sequential radiofrequency applications. After a course of radiofrequency applications, the collagen fibers underwent an immediate heat-induced rearrangement and were partially denaturated and progressively metabolized by the macrophages. An overall thickening and spatial rearrangement was appreciated both in the collagen and elastic fibers, the latter displaying a juvenile reticular pattern. A late onset in the macrophage activation after sequential radiofrequency applications was appreciated. Our data confirm the effectiveness of sequential radiofrequency applications in obtaining attenuation of the skin wrinkles by an overall skin tightening.

  2. Characterization of Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium clusters in the human axillary region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Callewaert

    Full Text Available The skin microbial community is regarded as essential for human health and well-being, but likewise plays an important role in the formation of body odor in, for instance, the axillae. Few molecular-based research was done on the axillary microbiome. This study typified the axillary microbiome of a group of 53 healthy subjects. A profound view was obtained of the interpersonal, intrapersonal and temporal diversity of the human axillary microbiota. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and next generation sequencing on 16S rRNA gene region were combined and used as extent to each other. Two important clusters were characterized, where Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium species were the abundant species. Females predominantly clustered within the Staphylococcus cluster (87%, n = 17, whereas males clustered more in the Corynebacterium cluster (39%, n = 36. The axillary microbiota was unique to each individual. Left-right asymmetry occurred in about half of the human population. For the first time, an elaborate study was performed on the dynamics of the axillary microbiome. A relatively stable axillary microbiome was noticed, although a few subjects evolved towards another stable community. The deodorant usage had a proportional linear influence on the species diversity of the axillary microbiome.

  3. Humanized mouse models: Application to human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryoji; Takahashi, Takeshi; Ito, Mamoru

    2018-05-01

    Humanized mice are superior to rodents for preclinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of drug candidates using human cells or tissues. During the past decade, humanized mouse technology has been greatly advanced by the establishment of novel platforms of genetically modified immunodeficient mice. Several human diseases can be recapitulated using humanized mice due to the improved engraftment and differentiation capacity of human cells or tissues. In this review, we discuss current advanced humanized mouse models that recapitulate human diseases including cancer, allergy, and graft-versus-host disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Human steroidogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Y; Ezcurra, Diego

    2014-01-01

    In the menstrual cycle, the mid-cycle surge of gonadotropins (both luteinising hormone [LH] and follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH]) signals the initiation of the periovulatory interval, during which the follicle augments progesterone production and begins to luteinise, ultimately leading to the r......In the menstrual cycle, the mid-cycle surge of gonadotropins (both luteinising hormone [LH] and follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH]) signals the initiation of the periovulatory interval, during which the follicle augments progesterone production and begins to luteinise, ultimately leading...... reviews current knowledge of the regulation of progesterone in the human ovary during the follicular phase and highlights areas where knowledge remains limited. In this review, we provide in-depth information outlining the regulation and function of gonadotropins in the complicated area of steroidogenesis...

  5. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  6. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  7. Managing the Human in Human Brands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fournier Susan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The physical and social realities, mental biases and limitations of being human differentiate human brands from others. It is their very humanness that introduces risk while generating the ability for enhanced returns. Four particular human characteristics can create imbalance or inconsistency between the person and the brand: mortality, hubris, unpredictability and social embeddedness. None of these qualities manifest in traditional non-human brands, and all of them present risks requiring active managerial attention. Rather than treating humans as brands and making humans into brands for sale in the commercial marketplace, our framework forces a focus on keeping a balance between the person and the personified object.

  8. Human cloning and human dignity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Eslami

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Catholic Church and most of Muslims believe that human cloning is in contrast with human rights. They argue that applying Somatic Nuclear Transfer Technique or so-called cloning to humans is against human dignity. Their main reason is that the cloned person would be a copy or shadow of another person and lack his or her identity and uniqueness. They also argue that in the process of cloning human beings would be treated as laboratory mice. This article tries to evaluate this kind of argumentation and shows that the "human dignity" expression in the relevant writings is vague and has been used inappropriately. مسیحیان و برخی از مسلمانان استدلال می‌کنند که کاربست تکنیک شبیه‌سازی ناقض کرامت انسانی است. این دلیل خود به صورت‌های مختلفی بیان می‌شود، مانند آنکه انسان موضوع آزمایش‌های علمی قرار می‌گیرد و با او مانند حیوانات رفتار می‌شود. گاه نیز تغییر نحوة تولید مثل، مایة نقض کرامت انسانی قلمداد می‌گردد و گاه به مسئلة از بین رفتن هویت فردی اشاره می‌شود. نگارنده در دو قسمت، دیدگاه مسیحیان و مسلمانان را در این باره نقل و تحلیل کرده است و کوشیده است نشان دهد که استناد به مفهوم کرامت انسانی در این جا مبهم و ناگویاست و مخالفان کوشش دقیقی در جهت تبیین دلیل خود به عمل نیاورده‌اند.

  9. Radiosequence analysis of the human progestin receptor charged with [3H]promegestone. A comparison with the glucocorticoid receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemstedt, P.E.B.; Berkenstam, A.; Joernvall, H.G.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Carlstedt-Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    Partially purified preparations of the human progestin receptor and the human and rat glucocorticoid receptor proteins were covalently charged with the synthetic progestin, [ 3 H]promegestone, by photoaffinity labeling. After labeling, the denaturated protein was cleaved and the mixture of peptides subjected to radiosequence analysis as previously described for the rat glucocorticoid receptor protein. The radioactivity labels identified, corresponded to Met-759 and Met-909 after photoaffinity labeling of the human progestin receptor, and Met-622 and Cys-754 after labeling of the rat glucocorticoid receptor. The residues labeled in the glucocorticoid receptor are the same as those previously reported to bind triamcinolone actonide. The corresponding residues were also labeled in the human glucocorticoid receptor. Met-759 of the progestin receptor and Met-622 of the rat glucocorticoid receptor are positioned within a segment with an overall high degree of sequence similarity and are equivalent. However, Met-909 (progestin receptor) and Cys-754 (glucocorticoid receptor) do not occur within equivalent segments of the two proteins. Thus, although the two classes of steroid hormone share a common structure within the A-ring, there are subtle differences in their interaction with the two separate receptor proteins

  10. Impact of human milk pasteurization on the kinetics of peptide release during in vitro dynamic term newborn digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglaire, Amélie; De Oliveira, Samira C; Jardin, Julien; Briard-Bion, Valérie; Emily, Mathieu; Ménard, Olivia; Bourlieu, Claire; Dupont, Didier

    2016-07-01

    Holder pasteurization (62.5°C, 30 min) ensures sanitary quality of donor's human milk but also denatures beneficial proteins. Understanding whether this further impacts the kinetics of peptide release during gastrointestinal digestion of human milk was the aim of the present paper. Mature raw (RHM) or pasteurized (PHM) human milk were digested (RHM, n = 2; PHM, n = 3) by an in vitro dynamic system (term stage). Label-free quantitative peptidomics was performed on milk and digesta (ten time points). Ascending hierarchical clustering was conducted on "Pasteurization × Digestion time" interaction coefficients. Preproteolysis occurred in human milk (159 unique peptides; RHM: 91, PHM: 151), mostly on β-casein (88% of the endogenous peptides). The predicted cleavage number increased with pasteurization, potentially through plasmin activation (plasmin cleavages: RHM, 53; PHM, 76). During digestion, eight clusters resumed 1054 peptides from RHM and PHM, originating for 49% of them from β-casein. For seven clusters (57% of peptides), the kinetics of peptide release differed between RHM and PHM. The parent protein was significantly linked to the clustering (p-value = 1.4 E-09), with β-casein and lactoferrin associated to clusters in an opposite manner. Pasteurization impacted selectively gastric and intestinal kinetics of peptide release in term newborns, which may have further nutritional consequences. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Coupled cell-free synthesis, segregation, and core glycosylation of a secretory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingappa, V R; Lingappa, J R; Prasad, R; Ebner, K E; Blobel, G

    1978-05-01

    mRNA from rat mammary glands 13-15 days post partum was translated in a wheat germ cell-free system either in the absence or in the presence of ribosome-denuded membranes prepared from isolated rough microsomes of dog pancreas. Newly synthesized alpha-lactalbumin was identified by immunoprecipitation with a monospecific rabbit antiserum against rat alpha-lactalbumin and was characterized by partial amino-terminal sequence determination and by lectin affinity chromatography. In the absence of membranes a presumably unglycosylated form of alpha-lactalbumin was synthesized that bound neither to concanavalin A-Sepharose nor to Ricinus communis lectin-agarose and that contained an amino-terminal signal peptide region comprising 19 amino acid residues. In the presence of membranes a processed form was synthesized that lacked the signal peptide portion and that had an amino-terminal sequence identical to that of mature alpha-lactalbumin. Furthermore, this processed form was found to be segregated, presumably within the microsomal vesicles, because it was resistant to post-translational proteolysis. It was also found to be glycosylated, and because it bound to concanavalin A-Sepharose, from which it could be eluted specifically by alpha-methyl mannoside, but not to R. communis lectin-agarose, it was presumably core-glycosylated. Processing, segregation, and core glycosylation were observed to proceed only when membranes were present during translation and not when they were added after translation.

  12. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide – process modeling and cost estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 55% ...

  13. Higher Plasma Concentration of Food-Specific Antibodies in Persons with Autistic Disorder in Comparison to Their Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, Vladimir; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Trajkov, Dejan; Arsov, Todor; Strezova, Ana; Ajdinski, Ljubomir; Spiroski, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    Specific IgA, IgG, and IgE antibodies to food antigens in 35 participants with autistic disorder and 21 of their siblings in the Republic of Macedonia were examined. Statistically significant higher plasma concentration of IgA antibodies against alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, casein, and gliadin were found in the children with autistic…

  14. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørn

    2015-01-01

    overgangen fra trykkekultur til digital kultur. For det første problemstillingen omkring digitalisering af litterær kulturarv med fokus på kodning og tagging af teksten samt organisering i hypertekststrukturer. For det andet reorganiseringen af det digitale dokument i dataelementer og database. For det......Artiklen præsenterer først nogle generelle problemstillinger omkring Digital Humanities (DH) med det formål at undersøge dem nærmere i relation til konkrete eksempler på forskellige digitaliseringsmåder og ændringer i dokumentproduktion. I en nærmere afgrænsning vælger artiklen den tendens i DH......, der betragter DH som forbundet med "making" og "building" af digitale objekter og former. Dette kan også karakteriseres som DH som praktisk-produktiv vending. Artiklen har valgt tre typer af digitalisering. De er valgt ud fra, at de skal repræsentere forskellige måder at håndtere digitaliseringen på...

  15. Rapid method for detecting base damage in DNA of mammalian cells: assay of U. V. -induced pyrimidine dimers in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, P E [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit; Jansson, G; Ahnstroem, G

    1978-11-01

    Simple and rapid techniques are described for the detection of pyrimidine dimers in DNA. Human cells derived from embryonic lung tissue were UV-irradiated and subjected to either an osmotic shock procedure or detergent lysis, then treated with UV-endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus and the DNA partially denatured by treatment with weak alkali. Brief sonication reduced the molecular weight of the DNA, and the single- and double-stranded DNA could then be separated by hydroxylapatite chromatography. Approximately 40% of the expected number of pyrimidine dimers were detected by the enzyme treatment technique. The mean value of numbers of strand breaks per 10/sup 9/ dalton per J/m/sup 2/ was approximately 50% of the expected value. The method has advantages of speed and reproducibility and a large reduction in the quantities of materials used, particularly at the scintillation-counting stage.

  16. HIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity in rabbits vaccinated with recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-like gag-env particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffar, O.K.; Smithgall, M.D.; Moran, P.A.; Travis, B.M.; Zarling, J.M.; Hu, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-like gag-env particles produced in mammalian cells were inoculated into two New Zealand white rabbits. In parallel, two control rabbits were inoculated with the homologous HIV-1 virions inactivated by ultraviolet light (uv) and psoralen treatments. The humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV-1 were evaluated for both groups of animals. Recombinant particles elicited humoral immunity that was specific for all the viral structural proteins. The antibodies recognized both denatured and nondenatured proteins. Moreover, the sera neutralized the in vitro infectivity of the homologous virus in CEM cells. Importantly, the recombinant particles also generated a T helper response by priming with the HIV proteins. Similar results were observed with inactivated virus immunization. Therefore, the authors results suggest that the recombinant HIV-like particles elicit functional humoral immunity as well as cellular immunity and represent a novel vaccine candidate for AIDS

  17. Immunocytochemistry of formalin-fixed human brain tissues: microwave irradiation of free-floating sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiurba, R A; Spooner, E T; Ishiguro, K; Takahashi, M; Yoshida, R; Wheelock, T R; Imahori, K; Cataldo, A M; Nixon, R A

    1998-01-01

    antigens. Theory and practice of microwave antigen retrieval are covered extensively in the handbook Microwave Cookbook for Microscopists. A concise overview of microwave methods in the neurosciences has been published, and clinical applications have been reviewed. In this context, it should be noted that fresh tissues may be stabilized for immunocytochemistry by reversible, non-chemical binding processes such as cryosectioning after microwave treatment and freeze-drying. Thus, it may be possible to enhance immunostaining for some antigens by microwave irradiation of unfixed as well as fixed specimens. Parameters to be optimized for microwave retrieval of specific antigens include temperature, irradiation time, tissue buffer composition, salt concentration, and pH. Temperature, irradiation time, and pH are key variables. With this in mind, an optimal method was developed for retrieval of a wide variety of antigens in human brain tissues. Typical microwave protocols employ elevated temperatures that may reach 100 degrees C, where denaturation causes irreversible uncoiling and disruption of protein secondary and tertiary structures. Under these conditions, stable covalent bonds securing methylene crosslinks between polypeptides remain intact, but more reactive links formed by Schiff bases may be hydrolyzed. Resultant conformational changes presumably expose buried loops of continuous amino acids and protruding regions, increasing accessibility of their epitopes. Protein denaturation seems to be a reasonable explanation for the effects of microwaves on antigen retrieval. This idea is supported by the observation that denaturing solutions such as 6 M urea increase immunoreactivity of some antigens. Still, the molecular basis of these effects remains unresolved, in part due to the complex chemistry of formaldehyde reactions with tissue constituents. Indeed, some methylene bridges between similar groups such as NH2 and NH may be hydrolyzed by washing fixed tissues in distilled

  18. Simultaneous assay for plasmin and DNase using radiolabeled human fibroblasts on microcarriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boswell, G.S.; Dimitrijevich, S.D.; Gracy, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    A critical step in tissue and wound repair is the removal of eschar--accumulation of denatured cellular and extracellular macromolecules. Enzymatic debridement using a combination of plasmin (fibrinolysin) and DNase has been successfully utilized on a variety of types of wounds. Monitoring the activity of these enzymes by measuring the rate of fibrinolysis, or by viscometric changes due to DNA hydrolysis, is exceedingly cumbersome, time consuming, and, at best, only semiquantitative. Although spectrophotometric assays using synthetic substrates offer several advantages, they do not allow extrapolation of the data to the more complex natural substrates encountered in vivo. We have, therefore, developed an in vitro radioisotopic assay for the simultaneous and quantitative measurement of the hydrolytic activity of both plasmin and DNase. Double labeled ([3H]thymidine, [14C]leucine) human dermal fibroblasts grown on microcarrier beads are utilized as sources of nucleic acid and protein substrates. The assay meets all the criteria of analytical validity, is sensitive and rapid, and is amenable to adaptation for analysis of other hydrolytic enzymes. The method offers a direct evaluation of the enzymatic debridement of wounds using actual human cellular substrates. Moreover, the microcarriers provide a greatly increased surface area for cell attachment and growth, are amenable to rapid separation from the cells by simple mechanical methods, and are ideally suited to analytical manipulations

  19. Optimization of expression and purification of human mortalin (Hsp70): Folding/unfolding analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Ahmed, Anwar; Tabrez, Shams; Islam, Badar ul; Rabbani, Nayyar; Malik, Ajamaluddin; Ismael, Mohamad A.; Alsenaidy, Mohammad A.; Alsenaidy, Abdulrahman M.

    2017-12-01

    Human mortalin is a Hsp70 mitochondrial protein that plays an essential role in the biogenesis of mitochondria. The deregulation of mortalin expression and its functions could lead to several age-associated disorders and some types of cancers. In the present study, we optimized the expression and purification of recombinant human mortalin by the use of two-step chromatography. Low temperature (18 °C) and 0.5 mM (IPTG) was required for optimum mortalin expression. Chaperone activity of mortalin was assessed by the citrate synthase and insulin protection assay, which suggested their protective role in mitochondria. Folding and unfolding assessments of mortalin were carried out in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) by intrinsic fluorescence measurement, ANS (8-analino 1-nephthlene sulfonic acid) binding and CD (circular dichroism) analysis. Under denaturing conditions, mortalin showed decrease in tryptophan fluorescence intensity along with a red shift of 11 nm. Moreover, ANS binding studies illustrated decrease in hydrophobicity. CD measurement of mortalin showed a predominant helical structure. However, the secondary structure was lost at low concentration of GdnHCl (1 M). We present a simple and robust method to produce soluble mortalin and warranted that chaperones are also susceptible to unfolding and futile to maintain protein homeostasis.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the V domain of human nectin-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xiaomin; Qi, Jianxun; Chu, Fuliang; Liu, Jun; Li, Qing; Yan, Jinghua

    2009-01-01

    Crystals of the V domain of human nectin-2 diffracted to 1.85 Å resolution and were monoclinic, belonging to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 52.3, b = 43.9, c = 56.1 Å, β = 118.2°. Nectin-2 belongs to a family of immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules that are characterized by the presence of three immunoglobulin-like domains (V, C2 and C2) in the extracellular region. The V domain plays important roles in cell adhesion, NK cell activation and the entry of some herpesvirus. In this study, the V domain of human nectin-2 was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies, which were subsequently denatured and refolded. The soluble protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 1.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 52.3, b = 43.9, c = 56.1 Å, β = 118.2°

  1. Modern Human Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Byeong Yong; Lee Dong Kyeong

    2005-08-01

    These are the titles of each chapter. They are as in the following; design of human-centerdness, human machine system, information processing process, sense of human, user interface, elements of human body, vital dynamics, measurement of reaction of human body, estimation and management of working environment, mental characteristic of human, human error, group, organization and leadership, safety supervision, process analysis, time studying, work sampling, work factor and methods time measurement, introduction of muscular skeletal disease and program of preventive management.

  2. Modern Human Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Byeong Yong; Lee Dong Kyeong

    2005-08-15

    These are the titles of each chapter. They are as in the following; design of human-centerdness, human machine system, information processing process, sense of human, user interface, elements of human body, vital dynamics, measurement of reaction of human body, estimation and management of working environment, mental characteristic of human, human error, group, organization and leadership, safety supervision, process analysis, time studying, work sampling, work factor and methods time measurement, introduction of muscular skeletal disease and program of preventive management.

  3. Impact of human milk pasteurization on gastric digestion in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Samira C; Bellanger, Amandine; Ménard, Olivia; Pladys, Patrick; Le Gouar, Yann; Dirson, Emelyne; Kroell, Florian; Dupont, Didier; Deglaire, Amélie; Bourlieu, Claire

    2017-02-01

    Holder pasteurization has been reported to modify human milk composition and structure by inactivating bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) and partially denaturing some of its proteins, potentially affecting its subsequent digestion. We sought to determine the impact of human milk pasteurization on gastric digestion (particularly for proteins and lipids) in preterm infants who were fed their mothers' own milk either raw or pasteurized. In a randomized controlled trial, 12 hospitalized tube-fed preterm infants were their own control group in comparing the gastric digestion of raw human milk (RHM) with pasteurized human milk (PHM). Over a 6-d sequence, gastric aspirates were collected 2 times/d before and after RHM or PHM ingestion. The impact of milk pasteurization digestive kinetics and disintegration was tested with the use of a general linear mixed model. Despite inactivating BSSL, instantaneous lipolysis was not affected by pasteurization (mean ± SD at 90 min: 12.6% ± 4.7%; P > 0.05). Lipolysis occurred in milk before digestion and was higher for PHM than for RHM (mean ± SD: 3.2% ± 0.6% and 2.2% ± 0.8%, respectively; P Pasteurization enhanced the proteolysis of lactoferrin (P Pasteurization did not affect gastric emptying (∼30-min half time) or pH (mean ± SD: 4.4 ± 0.8) at 90 min. Overall, pasteurization had no impact on the gastric digestion of lipids and some proteins from human milk but did affect lactoferrin and α-lactalbumin proteolysis and emulsion disintegration. Freeze-thawing and pasteurization increased the milk lipolysis before digestion but did not affect gastric lipolysis. Possible consequences on intestinal digestion and associated nutritional outcomes were not considered in this study. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02112331. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. An X-band Co{sup 2+} EPR study of Zn{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O (x=0.005–0.1) nanoparticles prepared by chemical hydrolysis methods using diethylene glycol and denaturated alcohol at 5 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Sushil K., E-mail: skmisra@alcor.concordia.ca [Physics Department, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1M8 (Canada); Andronenko, S.I. [Physics Institute, Kazan Federal University, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Srinivasa Rao, S.; Chess, Jordan; Punnoose, A. [Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725-1570 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    EPR investigations on two types of dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) ZnO nanoparticles doped with 0.5–10% Co{sup 2+} ions, prepared by two chemical hydrolysis methods, using: (i) diethylene glycol ((CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}O) (NC-rod-like samples), and (ii) denatured ethanol (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH) solutions (QC-spherical samples), were carried out at X-band (9.5 GHz) at 5 K. The analysis of EPR data for NC samples revealed the presence of several types of EPR lines: (i) two types, intense and weak, of high-spin Co{sup 2+} ions in the samples with Co concentration >0.5%; (ii) surface oxygen vacancies, and (iii) a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line. QC samples exhibit an intense FMR line and an EPR line due to high-spin Co{sup 2+} ions. FMR line is more intense, than the corresponding line exhibited by NC samples. These EPR spectra varied for sample with different doping concentrations. The magnetic states of these samples as revealed by EPR spectra, as well as the origin of ferromagnetism DMS samples are discussed. - Highlights: • 5 K X band Co{sup 2+} EPR investigations on QC and NC ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductor nanoparticles. • NC and QC samples exhibited high-spin Co{sup 2+} EPR lines and ferromagnetic resonance line. • NC sample also exhibit line due surface oxygen vacancies. • FMR line is more intense in QC than that in NC samples. • Magnetic states and the origin of ferromagnetism are discussed.

  5. HUMANISM OF ANTROPOCENTRISM AND ANTROPOCENTRISM WITHOUT HUMANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Shilovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to the distinction of humanism and anthropocentrism which is based on the parity of the person and being. Genetic communication of humanism and anthropocentrism and their historical break comes to light.

  6. Superintelligence, Humans, and War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-13

    Recent studies of the human mind debunk the myth that humans only use 10-20 percent of the human mind. A healthy human mind uses up to 90 percent...way. They will eat what is in front of them to satiate their appetite not knowing if there is anymore food for the future. Humans can predict

  7. S-acylation of SOD1, CCS, and a stable SOD1-CCS heterodimer in human spinal cords from ALS and non-ALS subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinone, Sarah E; Ghadge, Ghanashyam D; Ostrow, Lyle W; Roos, Raymond P; Green, William N

    2017-01-25

    Previously, we found that human Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is S-acylated (palmitoylated) in vitro and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse models, and that S-acylation increased for ALS-causing SOD1 mutants relative to wild type. Here, we use the acyl resin-assisted capture (acyl-RAC) assay to demonstrate S-acylation of SOD1 in human post-mortem spinal cord homogenates from ALS and non-ALS subjects. Acyl-RAC further revealed that endogenous copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS) is S-acylated in both human and mouse spinal cords, and in vitro in HEK293 cells. SOD1 and CCS formed a highly stable heterodimer in human spinal cord homogenates that was resistant to dissociation by boiling, denaturants, or reducing agents and was not observed in vitro unless both SOD1 and CCS were overexpressed. Cysteine mutations that attenuate SOD1 maturation prevented the SOD1-CCS heterodimer formation. The degree of S-acylation was highest for SOD1-CCS heterodimers, intermediate for CCS monomers, and lowest for SOD1 monomers. Given that S-acylation facilitates anchoring of soluble proteins to cell membranes, our findings suggest that S-acylation and membrane localization may play an important role in CCS-mediated SOD1 maturation. Furthermore, the highly stable S-acylated SOD1-CCS heterodimer may serve as a long-lived maturation intermediate in human spinal cord.

  8. Capillary electrophoresis with indirect UV detection for the determination of stabilizers and citrates present in human albumin solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska, Małgorzata; Cygan, Paulina; Wilk, Małgorzata; Anuszewska, Elzbieta

    2009-08-15

    Sodium caprylate and N-acetyltryptophan are the most frequently used stabilizers that protect the albumin from aggregation or heat induced denaturation. In turn citrates - excipients remaining after fractionation process - can be treated as by-product favoring leaching aluminum out of glass containers whilst albumin solution is stored. With ionic nature these substances have all the markings of a subject for capillary electrophoresis analysis. Thus CE methods were proposed as new approach for quality control of human albumin solution in terms of determination of stabilizers and citrates residue. Human albumin solutions both 5% and 20% from various manufacturers were tested. Indirect detection mode was set to provide sufficient detectability of analytes lacking of chromophores. As being anions analytes were separated with reversed electroosmotic flow. As a result of method optimization two background electrolytes based on p-hydroxybenzoic acid and 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid were selected for stabilizers and citrates separation, respectively. The optimized methods were successfully validated. For citrates that require quantification below 100microM the method demonstrated the precision less than 4% and the limit of detection at 4microM. In order to check the new methods accuracy and applicability the samples were additionally tested with selected reference methods. The proposed methods allow reliable quantification of stabilizers and citrates in human albumin solution that was confirmed by method validation as well as result comparison with reference methods. The CE methods are considered to be suitable for quality control yet simplifying and reducing cost of analysis.

  9. Expression analysis and specific blockade of the receptor for human thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) by novel antibodies to the human TSLPRα receptor chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Andreas; Vetter, Tina; Kuepper, Michael; Wohlmann, Andreas; Krause, Sebastian; Lorenzen, Thomas; Virchow, Johann Christian; Luttmann, Werner; Friedrich, Karlheinz

    2013-02-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an interleukin-7 (IL-7)-like cytokine with a pivotal role in development and maintenance of atopic diseases such as allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. Moreover, recent studies show an involvement of TSLP in the progression of various cancers. TSLP signaling is mediated by the TSLP receptor (TSLPR), a heterodimeric type I cytokine receptor. It consists of the IL-7 receptor alpha chain (IL-7Rα), which is shared with the IL-7 receptor, and the TSLPRα chain as a specific subunit. Blocking signal release by TSLP without affecting IL-7 function is a potentially interesting option for the treatment of atopic diseases or certain tumors. By employing the extracellular domain of human TSLPRα chain (hTSLPRα(ex)) as an antigen, we generated a set of monoclonal antibodies. Several binders to native and/or denatured receptor protein were identified and characterized by cytometry and Western blot analysis. A screen based on a STAT3-driven reporter gene assay in murine pro-B cells expressing a functional hTSLPR yielded two hybridoma clones with specific antagonistic properties towards hTSLP, but not IL-7. Kinetic studies measuring blockade of hTSLP-dependent STAT phosphorylation in a TSLP-responsive cell line revealed an inhibitory constant in the nanomolar range. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The golden triangle of human dignity: human security, human development and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2004-01-01

    The success or failure of processes of democratization cannot be detached from processes of development related to the aspirations of people at the grassroots. Human rights, in a more theoretical terminology, require human development in order to enhance human security.

  11. Human factors in training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, J.W.; Brown, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Human Factors concept is a focused effort directed at those activities which require human involvement. Training is, by its nature, an activity totally dependent on the Human Factor. This paper identifies several concerns significant to training situations and discusses how Human Factor awareness can increase the quality of learning. Psychology in the training arena is applied Human Factors. Training is a method of communication represented by sender, medium, and receiver. Two-thirds of this communications model involves the human element directly

  12. Human-machine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, J Chris [Sandia Park, NM; Xavier, Patrick G [Albuquerque, NM; Abbott, Robert G [Albuquerque, NM; Brannon, Nathan G [Albuquerque, NM; Bernard, Michael L [Tijeras, NM; Speed, Ann E [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  13. Native and denatured enzyme enterokinase determined by electrochemical methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janovjáková, A.; Gál, M.; Krahulec, J.; Sokolová, Romana; Naumowicz, M.; Híveš, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 3 (2017), s. 549-553 ISSN 0026-9247 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : enterokinase * proteins conformation * chronopotentiometry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  14. The Denaturation of Environmental Education: Exploring the Role of Ecotechnologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Annette; Gough, Noel

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the changing ways "environment" has been represented in the discourses of environmental education and education for sustainable development (ESD) in United Nations (and related) publications since the 1970s. It draws on the writings of Jean-Luc Nancy and discusses the increasingly dominant view of the environment as…

  15. The application of polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-05-23

    May 23, 2011 ... dominance in microbial ecology if the corresponding environment samples had been provided. This ... yeast peptone dextrose; PCR, polymerase chain reaction. method, DGGE method ..... Two nuclear mutations that block.

  16. Evaluation of denatured thorium fuel cycles in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Rec, J.R.; Terney, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    A developing national energy policy that is based in part on a substantial expansion of the LWR-based electrical generating capacity with deferment of the LMFBR has prompted a re-evaluation of our nuclear fuel resources and their utilization. The ancillary policy of minimizing nuclear weapons proliferation through diversion of bred fissile material has left in doubt the viability of fuel recycling as a means of extending these fuel resources. A substantial, government-sponsored effort is in progress to examine alternate fuel cycles and advanced reactor concepts which can lead to improved resource utilization while minimizing proliferation potential. This paper evaluates several improved fuel cycles for use in current design PWRs and develops selected scenarios for their use within the framework of the safeguarded Nuclear Energy Center (NEC) concept

  17. ESR studies of heat denaturation in Cu myoglobin complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louro, S.R.W.; Ribeiro, S.C.; Bemski, G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made on the behaviour of Cu2 + and Fe3 + in copper doped myoglobin, subjected to heat treatment. ESR is observed at X-band. The amplitude of the g = 5.9 line of the high spin F 3 + in met-myoglobin is studied as a function of the temperature of the heat treatment, the pH and the length of time of exposure to the heat treatment. These experiments are performed for both the pure protein and for the copper-myoglobin complex, at pH between 5 and 8.5. Results concerning the decrease of the amplitude of Fe 3+ high spin signal are discussed in comparison with Hollocher's results in hemoglobin. The Cu spectra obtained are interpreted, with the aid of a computer program, Kivelson and Neiman's results being used to analyse the authors data

  18. Denaturalizing the technique: feminists contributions to think the cinematography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Cavalcanti Tedesco

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cinematography is generally understood as a technological area, which means neutral for many people. This may account for not deserving the due attention into the cinema and the audiovisual studies. However, as any technique, it was developed starting from some hypotheses to reach specific objectives. In this study, we aim to analyze it with a feministic perspective to identify the gender views that contributed to its expression, which were influenced by it. We ́ll do that by the sudy of some cinematographic manuals edited since the years 1930, comparing their guidelines with some important classic/industrial Mexican films.

  19. The anionic biosurfactant rhamnolipid does not denature industrial enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Kvist Madsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants (BS are surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms. Their combination of useful properties and sustainable production make them promising industrial alternatives to petrochemical and oleochemical surfactants. Here we compare the impact of the anionic BS rhamnolipid (RL and the conventional/synthetic anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS on the structure and stability of three different commercially used enzymes, namely the cellulase Carezyme® (CZ, the phospholipase Lecitase Ultra® (LT and the α-amylase Stainzyme® (SZ. Our data reveal a fundamental difference in their mode of interaction. SDS shows great diversity of interaction towards the different enzymes. It efficiently unfolds both LT and CZ, but LT is unfolded by SDS through formation of SDS clusters on the protein well below the cmc, while CZ is only unfolded by bulk micelles and on average binds significantly less SDS than LT. SDS binds with even lower stoichiometry to SZ and leads to an increase in thermal stability. In contrast, RL does not affect the tertiary or secondary structure of any enzyme at room temperature, has little impact on thermal stability and only binds detectably (but at low stoichiometries to SZ. Furthermore all enzymes maintain activity at both monomeric and micellar concentrations of RL. We conclude that RL, despite its anionic charge, is a surfactant that does not compromise the structural integrity of industrially relevant proteins. This makes RL a promising alternative to current synthetic anionic surfactants in a wide range of commercial applications.

  20. sY116, a human Y-linked polymorphic STS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Laboratoire d'ImmunogeÂneÂtique, Faculte de Sciences de Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia ... studying genomic instabilities in some types of cancer is discussed. Materials ..... polymorphisms by denaturing high-performance liquid chroma- tography.

  1. Fidelity and mutational spectrum of Pfu DNA polymerase on a human mitochondrial DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, P; Kim, A; Khrapko, K; Thilly, W G

    1997-08-01

    The study of rare genetic changes in human tissues requires specialized techniques. Point mutations at fractions at or below 10(-6) must be observed to discover even the most prominent features of the point mutational spectrum. PCR permits the increase in number of mutant copies but does so at the expense of creating many additional mutations or "PCR noise". Thus, each DNA sequence studied must be characterized with regard to the DNA polymerase and conditions used to avoid interpreting a PCR-generated mutation as one arising in human tissue. The thermostable DNA polymerase derived from Pyrococcus furiosus designated Pfu has the highest fidelity of any DNA thermostable polymerase studied to date, and this property recommends it for analyses of tissue mutational spectra. Here, we apply constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE) to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification. This new strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by Pfu DNA polymerase in a 96-bp low melting domain of a human mitochondrial sequence despite the very low mutant fractions generated in the PCR process. This sequence, containing part of the tRNA glycine and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 genes, is the target of our studies of mitochondrial mutagenesis in human cells and tissues. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes by sequential enrichment on CDCE. An artificially constructed mutant was used as an internal standard to permit calculation of the mutant fraction. Our study found that the average error rate (mutations per base pair duplication) of Pfu was 6.5 x 10(-7), and five of its more frequent mutations (hot spots) consisted of three transversions (GC-->TA, AT-->TA, and AT-->CG), one transition (AT-->GC), and one 1-bp deletion (in an AAAAAA sequence). To achieve an even higher sensitivity, the amount of Pfu-induced mutants must be reduced.

  2. Ultraviolet light-denatured DNA/anti-ultraviolet light-denatured DNA immune-complex nephritis in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweny, P.

    1980-01-01

    Two groups of preimmunized rabbits were studied during a 3-month course of daily intravenous injections of uv DNA in amounts sufficient to neuralize circulating antibody. One group was given high-molecular-weight uv DNA, and the other group, US uv DNA. Rabbits receiving US uv DNA formed potentially more damaging immune complexes, since this group of animals developed greater rises in blood urea and greater falls in C3. Both groups of animals developed evidence of immune complex-mediated glomerular nephritis as evidenced by heavy granular deposits of IgG and C3 in the glomeruli. The results suggest that immune complexes formed with US uv DNA may be more nephrotoxic

  3. The Human/Machine Humanities: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollivier Dyens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to be human in the 21st century? The pull of engineering on every aspect of our lives, the impact of machines on how we represent ourselves, the influence of computers on our understanding of free-will, individuality and species, and the effect of microorganisms on our behaviour are so great that one cannot discourse on humanity and humanities without considering their entanglement with technology and with the multiple new dimensions of reality that it opens up. The future of humanities should take into account AI, bacteria, software, viruses (both organic and inorganic, hardware, machine language, parasites, big data, monitors, pixels, swarms systems and the Internet. One cannot think of humanity and humanities as distinct from technology anymore.

  4. Special Section: Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  5. Advanced drug delivery of N-acetylcarnosine (N-acetyl-beta-alanyl-L-histidine), carcinine (beta-alanylhistamine) and L-carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) in targeting peptide compounds as pharmacological chaperones for use in tissue engineering, human disease management and therapy: from in vitro to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2010-11-01

    A pharmacological chaperone is a relatively new concept in the treatment of certain chronic disabling diseases. Cells maintain a complete set of functionally competent proteins normally and in the face of injury or environmental stress with the use of various mechanisms, including systems of proteins called molecular chaperones. Proteins that are denatured by any form of proteotoxic stress are cooperatively recognized by heat shock proteins (HSP) and directed for refolding or degradation. Under non-denaturing conditions HSP have important functions in cell physiology such as in transmembrane protein transport and in enabling assembly and folding of newly synthesized polypeptides. Besides cellular molecular chaperones, which are stress-induced proteins, there have been recently reported chemical, or so-called pharmacological chaperones with demonstrated ability to be effective in preventing misfolding of different disease causing proteins, specifically in the therapeutic management of sight-threatening eye diseases, essentially reducing the severity of several neurodegenerative disorders (such as age-related macular degeneration), cataract and many other protein-misfolding diseases. This work reviews the biological and therapeutic activities protected with the patents of the family of imidazole-containing peptidomimetics Carcinine (β-alanylhistamine), N-acetylcarnosine (N-acetyl-β-alanylhistidine) and Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) which are essential constituents possessing diverse biological and pharmacological chaperone properties in human tissues.

  6. Human factor reliability program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoblochova, L.

    2017-01-01

    The human factor's reliability program was at Slovenske elektrarne, a.s. (SE) nuclear power plants. introduced as one of the components Initiatives of Excellent Performance in 2011. The initiative's goal was to increase the reliability of both people and facilities, in response to 3 major areas of improvement - Need for improvement of the results, Troubleshooting support, Supporting the achievement of the company's goals. The human agent's reliability program is in practice included: - Tools to prevent human error; - Managerial observation and coaching; - Human factor analysis; -Quick information about the event with a human agent; -Human reliability timeline and performance indicators; - Basic, periodic and extraordinary training in human factor reliability(authors)

  7. Quantitative glycan profiling of normal human plasma derived immunoglobulin and its fragments Fab and Fc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumula, Kalyan Rao

    2012-08-31

    Typical clinical grade human IgG (intravenous immunoglobulin, IVIG), used for carbohydrate analysis, is derived from thousands of healthy donors. Quantitative high-resolution glycan profiles of IgG and its Fc-Fab fragments are presented here. Glycan profiles were established following digestions with Fc specific endoglycosidase S and generic PNGase F under denaturing and non-denaturing (native) conditions. The native PNGase F glycan profile of IgG was similar (but not identical) to that of Endo S. Endo S profiles did not contain the glycans with bisecting GlcNAc. PNGase F glycan profiles were the same for Fc fragments that were isolated from pepsin and Ide S protease digests. Both isolated Fab fragments and the previously deglycosylated IVIG (native conditions) yielded the same glycan profile. Glycan profiles were established using high resolution HPLC with 2-aminobenzoic acid (2AA) labeling. An accurate determination of sialylation levels can be made by this method. Carbohydrate content in Fc and Fab was determined using an internal standard and corrected for both protein and glycan recoveries. Fab portion contained about 14% of the total carbohydrate which translates to 2.3 sugar chains per mol in IVIG where 2 chains are located in the CH2 domain of the Fc. Fc glycans consisted of neutral (N) 84.5%; mono-sialylated (S1) 15% and di-sialylated (S2) 0.5%. In contrast, Fab contained N, 21%; S1, 43% and S2, 36%. The distribution of bisecting N-acetylglucosamine and fucose was found to be very different in various glycans (N, S1 and S2) found in Fab and Fc. Total IgG glycan profile (Fab plus Fc) contained N, 78.5%; S1, 17% and S2, 4.5%. Percent distribution of glycans G0, G1 and G2 (with 0, 1 and 2 two galactoses) was 26, 49 and 25 respectively within the 78% of the neutral glycans. Glycan profiles were nearly the same for various clinical grade IVIG preparations from various manufacturers. A fast HPLC profiling method was developed for the separation and quantitation

  8. O estatuto da diversidade sexual nas políticas de educação no Brasil e na França: a comparação como ferramenta de desnaturalização do cotidiano de pesquisa Sexual diversity status in Brazil's and France's educational policies: comparison as a denaturalizing tool for the quotidian of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Caetano Nardi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é descrever problematizando o cotidiano da construção de uma pesquisa que, ela mesma, busca entender como se produz, a partir da implantação de políticas públicas, ações sobre um cotidiano naturalizado de discriminações de caráter homofóbico e sexista nas escolas do Brasil e da França. Além de apresentar informações e hipóteses que emergem do trabalho de campo, a intenção do texto é apresentar os desafios de uma pesquisa que mergulha no cotidiano de culturas e contextos socio-econômicos distintos. A análise da utilização da ferramenta da comparação, pensada como efeito de distorção da imagem no espelho e colocação em suspenso de formas pré-construídas de compreensão do vivido, indica que uma intervenção analítica desta ordem permite, de forma distinta da pretensão de generalização pópria a um exercício de comparação de base positivista, a desnaturalização de formas de pesquisar e de compreender as problemáticas sobre as quais nos debruçamos.The goal of this article is to describe and problematize the quotidian of producing a research, which, in itself, seeks to understand how naturalized homophobic and sexist discriminatory actions are produced in the quotidian of schools in Brazil and France, based on the implementation of public policies. Besides presenting information and hypotheses derived from fieldwork, the intention of this text is to present the challenges of a research that immerses into the quotidian of different socioeconomic and cultural contexts. The analysis of using the comparative tool, considered as having a distortion effect of an image in the mirror and suspension effect of pre-constructed forms of comprehension of what is experienced, indicates that this order of analytic intervention allows to denaturalize research practices and the understanding of problems, distinctively from positivist comparison exercises that intend to generalize.

  9. Evidence of the protein content of bovine and human dental pulps by the action of endodontic irrigation solutions through electrophoretic patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E López

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis let to show the protein content of different tissues. Dental pulp contains connective tissue which is removed during the endodontic treatment. Many studies consider bovine rather than human pulp tissue because of its size. Aim: To evidence the protein content of bovine and human dental pulps and the action of endodontic irrigation solutions through electrophoretic patterns. Materials and Methods: Extracts of human and bovine dental pulps were prepared. Sodium hypochlorite, calcium hydroxide, chlorhexidine and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid were used as irrigating solutions. Results: Bovine and human pulps have a small difference in two bands of proteins present between 74 kDa and 80 kDa. The denaturizing capacity of sodium hypochlorite and the washing action of calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine were evidenced. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid solution was shown to contain proteins continuously during the endodontic root canal washing. Conclusions: Differences in pulp tissues and the action of irrigating solutions on their protein content would help on the understanding of the biological process of the endodontic treatment.

  10. Economics of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  11. The Disney princesses and the construction of “silenced” Digital Humanities in animation cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cantillo Valero

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the main ways of controlling power is to prohibit access to speech. Indoctrination through silence places women in a lower stratum in the digital narrative of animation film and, therefore, in society. This article reflects —from a qualitative perspective— on various aspects of Disney princesses' children's cinematography: the images of their characters, their representations, their speeches and their silences are analyzed with the intention of denaturing this type of fictions, since education, participation, transgression, perverse reading and the alternative view are the basis for recovering the freedom to create stories and identities. We start from making visible the mechanisms of audiovisual creation and the ways of suggesting to the public that they are essential elements to avoid manipulation and we conclude with the need to provide literacy in the media from schools so that the Digital Humanities can be built with such solid pillars as equality, critical thinking and humanist values, with which to give coherence to our existence.

  12. Thermal Response of In Vivo Human Skin to Fractional Radiofrequency Microneedle Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woraphong Manuskiatti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fractional radiofrequency microneedle system (FRMS is a novel fractional skin resurfacing system. Data on thermal response to this fractional resurfacing technique is limited. Objectives. To investigate histologic response of in vivo human skin to varying energy settings and pulse stacking of a FRMS in dark-skinned subjects. Methods. Two female volunteers who were scheduled for abdominoplasty received treatment with a FRMS with varying energy settings at 6 time periods including 3 months, 1 month, 1 week, 3 days, 1 day, and the time immediately before abdominoplasty. Biopsy specimens were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E, Verhoeff-Van Gieson (VVG, colloidal iron, and Fontana-Masson stain. Immunohistochemical study was performed by using Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70 antibody and collagen III monoclonal antibody. Results. The average depth of radiofrequency thermal zone (RFTZ ranged from 100 to 300 μm, correlating with energy levels. Columns of cell necrosis and collagen denaturation followed by inflammatory response were initially demonstrated, with subsequent increasing of mucin at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Immunohistochemical study showed positive stain with HSP70. Conclusion. A single treatment with a FRMS using appropriate energy setting induces neocollagenesis. This wound healing response may serve as a mean to improve the appearance of photodamaged skin and atrophic scars.

  13. Human cytosolic thymidine kinase: purification and physical characterization of the enzyme from HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherley, J.L.; Kelly, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mammalian cytosolic thymidine kinase is one of a number of enzymes involved in DNA replication whose activities increase dramatically during S phase of the cell cycle. As a first step in defining the mechanisms that control the S phase induction of thymidine kinase activity, the authors have purified the human enzyme from HeLa cells and raised a specific immune serum against the purified protein. The enzyme was isolated from cells arrested in S phase by treatment with methotrexate and purified to near homogeneity by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. Stabilization of the purified enzyme was achieved by the addition of digitonin. An electrophoretic R/sub m/ of 0.2 in nondenaturing gels characterizes the purified enzyme activity as cytosolic thymidine kinase. The enzyme has a Stoke's radius of 40 A determined by gel filtration and a sedimentation coefficient of 5.5 S determined by glycerol gradient sedimentation. Based on these hydrodynamic values, a native molecular weight of 96,000 was calculated for the purified enzyme. When electrophoresed in denaturing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels under reducing conditions, the most purified enzyme fraction was found to contain one predominant polypeptide of M/sub r/ = 24,000. Several lines of evidence indicate that this polypeptide is responsible for thymidine kinase enzymatic activity

  14. NDUFA4 Mutations Underlie Dysfunction of a Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit Linked to Human Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D.S. Pitceathly

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of cytochrome c oxidase (COX, complex IV deficiency remains genetically undetermined in many cases. Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were performed in a consanguineous pedigree with isolated COX deficiency linked to a Leigh syndrome neurological phenotype. Unexpectedly, affected individuals harbored homozygous splice donor site mutations in NDUFA4, a gene previously assigned to encode a mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit. Western blot analysis of denaturing gels and immunocytochemistry revealed undetectable steady-state NDUFA4 protein levels, indicating that the mutation causes a loss-of-function effect in the homozygous state. Analysis of one- and two-dimensional blue-native polyacrylamide gels confirmed an interaction between NDUFA4 and the COX enzyme complex in control muscle, whereas the COX enzyme complex without NDUFA4 was detectable with no abnormal subassemblies in patient muscle. These observations support recent work in cell lines suggesting that NDUFA4 is an additional COX subunit and demonstrate that NDUFA4 mutations cause human disease. Our findings support reassignment of the NDUFA4 protein to complex IV and suggest that patients with unexplained COX deficiency should be screened for NDUFA4 mutations.

  15. Secondary structure determination of human. beta. -endorphin by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtarge, O.; Jardetzky, O.; Li, C.H.

    1987-09-08

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectra of human ..beta..-endorphin indicate that the peptide exists in random-coil form in aqueous solution but becomes helical in mixed solvent. Thermal denaturation NMR experiments show that in water there is no transition between 24 and 75/sup 0/C, while a slow noncooperative thermal unfolding is observed in a 60% methanol-40% water mixed solvent in the same temperature range. These findings are consistent with circular dichroism studies by other workers concluding that ..beta..-endorphin is a random coil in water but that it forms 50% ..cap alpha..-helix or more in mixed solvents. The peptide in the mixed water-methanol solvent was further studied by correlated spectroscopy (COSY) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. These allow a complete set of assignments to be made and establish two distinct stretches over which the solvent induces formation of ..cap alpha..-helices: the first occurs between Tyr-1 and Thr-12 and the second between Leu-14 and extending to Lys-28. There is evidence that the latter is capped by a turn occurring between Lys-28 and Glu-31. These helices form at the enkephalin receptor binding site, which is at the amino terminus, and at the morphine receptor binding site, located at the carboxyl terminus. The findings suggest that these two receptors may specifically recognize ..cap alpha..-helices.

  16. Inclusion bodies in loggerhead erythrocytes are associated with unstable hemoglobin and resemble human Heinz bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Filomena; Di Santi, Annalisa; Caldora, Mercedes; Ferretti, Luigi; Bentivegna, Flegra; Pica, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of the erythrocyte inclusions found during the hematological screening of loggerhead population of the Mediterranean Sea. We studied the erythrocyte inclusions in blood specimens collected from six juvenile and nine adult specimens of the loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta, from the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian Seas. Our study indicates that the percentage of mature erythrocytes containing inclusions ranged from 3 to 82%. Each erythrocyte contained only one round inclusion body. Inclusion bodies stained with May Grünwald-Giemsa show that their cytochemical and ultrastructure characteristics are identical to those of human Heinz bodies. Because Heinz bodies originate from the precipitation of unstable hemoglobin (Hb) and cause globular osmotic resistance to increase, we analyzed loggerhead Hb using electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography to detect and quantitate Hb fractions. We also tested the resistance of Hb to alkaline pH, heat, isopropanol denaturation, and globular osmosis. Our hemogram results excluded the occurrence of any infection, which could be associated with an inclusion body, in all the specimens. Negative Feulgen staining indicated that the inclusion bodies are not derived from DNA fragmentation. We hypothesize that amino acid substitutions could explain why loggerhead Hb precipitates under normal physiologic conditions, forming Heinz bodies. The identification of inclusion bodies in loggerhead erythrocytes allow us to better understand the haematological characteristics and the physiology of these ancient reptiles, thus aiding efforts to conserve such an endangered species. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  17. Low resolution solution structure of HAMLET and the importance of its alpha-domains in tumoricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C S James; Rydstrom, Anna; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is the first member in a new family of protein-lipid complexes with broad tumoricidal activity. Elucidating the molecular structure and the domains crucial for HAMLET formation is fundamental for understanding its tumoricidal function. Here we present the low-resolution solution structure of the complex of oleic acid bound HAMLET, derived from small angle X-ray scattering data. HAMLET shows a two-domain conformation with a large globular domain and an extended part of about 2.22 nm in length and 1.29 nm width. The structure has been superimposed into the related crystallographic structure of human α-lactalbumin, revealing that the major part of α-lactalbumin accommodates well in the shape of HAMLET. However, the C-terminal residues from L105 to L123 of the crystal structure of the human α-lactalbumin do not fit well into the HAMLET structure, resulting in an extended conformation in HAMLET, proposed to be required to form the tumoricidal active HAMLET complex with oleic acid. Consistent with this low resolution structure, we identified biologically active peptide epitopes in the globular as well as the extended domains of HAMLET. Peptides covering the alpha1 and alpha2 domains of the protein triggered rapid ion fluxes in the presence of sodium oleate and were internalized by tumor cells, causing rapid and sustained changes in cell morphology. The alpha peptide-oleate bound forms also triggered tumor cell death with comparable efficiency as HAMLET. In addition, shorter peptides corresponding to those domains are biologically active. These findings provide novel insights into the structural prerequisites for the dramatic effects of HAMLET on tumor cells.

  18. Molecular monitoring of succession of bacterial communities in human neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favier, C.; Vaughan, E.E.; Vos, de W.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.

    2002-01-01

    The establishment of bacterial communities in two healthy babies was examined for more than the first 10 months of life by monitoring 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) diversity in fecal samples by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and by analyzing the sequences of the major ribotypes.

  19. Boundaries of Humanities: Writing Medical Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Gillie

    2008-01-01

    Literature and medicine is a discipline within medical humanities, which challenges medicine to reconfigure its scientific model to become interdisciplinary, and be disciplined by arts and humanities as well as science. The psychological, emotional, spiritual and physical are inextricably linked in people, inevitably entailing provisionality,…

  20. Human algorithmic stability and human Rademacher complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vahdat, Mehrnoosh; Oneto, L.; Ghio, A; Anguita, D.; Funk, M.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    In Machine Learning (ML), the learning process of an algo- rithm given a set of evidences is studied via complexity measures. The way towards using ML complexity measures in the Human Learning (HL) domain has been paved by a previous study, which introduced Human Rademacher Complexity (HRC): in this