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Sample records for demountable test cavity

  1. RF surface resistance of copper-on-beryllium at cryogenic temperatures measured by a 22-GHZ demountable cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jianfei; Krawczyk, F. L. (Frank L.); Kurennoy, S. (Sergey); Schrage, D. L. (Dale L.); Shapiro, A. H. (Alan H.); Tajima, T. (Tsuyoshi); Wood R. L. (Richard L.)

    2003-01-01

    A 22-GHz demountable cavity on the cold head of a compact refrigerator system was used to measure the RF performance of several coppt:r-plated Beryllium samples. The cavity inner surfce was treated by chemical polishing and heat treatment., as well as an OFE copper coupon to provide a baseline for comparison. The measured surhce resistance was reasonable and repeatable during either cooling or warming. Materials tested included four grades of Beryllium, OFE copper, alumina-dispersion strengthened copper (Glidcop), and Cu-plated versions of all of the above. Two coupons, Cuplated on Beryllium 0-30 and 1-70, offered comparable surface resistance to pure OFE copper or Cu-plated Glidcop. The RF surface resistance of Cu-on-Beryllium samples at cryogenic temperatures is reported together with that of other reference materials.

  2. Photovoltaic mounting/demounting unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic arrangement comprising a photovoltaic assembly comprising a support structure defining a mounting surface onto which a photovoltaic module is detachably mounted; and a mounting/demounting unit comprising at least one mounting/demounting apparatus...... which when the mounting/demounting unit is moved along the mounting surface, causes the photovoltaic module to be mounted or demounted to the support structure; wherein the photovoltaic module comprises a carrier foil and wherein a total thickness of the photo voltaic module is below 500 muiotaeta....... The present invention further relates to an associated method for mounting/demounting photovoltaic modules....

  3. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.

    2002-05-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons.

  4. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-05-30

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q{sub 0} of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons.

  5. RF Tests of an 805 MHz Pillbox Cavity at Lab G of Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Li; J. Corlett; R. MacGill; M. Zisman; J. Norem; A. Moretti; Z. Qian; J. Wallig; V. Wu; Y. Torun; R.A. Rimmer

    2003-05-01

    We report recent high power RF tests on an 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity with demountable windows over beam apertures at Lab G of Fermilab, a dedicated facility for testing of MUCOOL (muon cooling) components. The cavity is installed inside a superconducting solenoidal magnet. A 12 MW peak RF power klystron is used for the tests. The cavity has been processed both with and without magnetic field. Without magnetic field, a gradient of 34 MV/m was reached rather quickly with very low sparking rate. In a 2.5 T solenoidal field, a 16 MV/m gradient was achieved, following several weeks of conditioning. Strong multipacting effects associated with high radiation levels were measured during processing with the magnetic field. More recently Be windows with TiN-coated surface have been installed and tested with and without the external magnetic field. 16 MV/m gradient without magnetic field was reached quickly as planned. Less multipacting was observed during the conditioning, indicating that the TiN-coated surface on the windows had indeed helped to reduce the secondary electron emission significantly. A gradient of 16.5 MV/m was finally achieved with magnet on in solenoidal mode and the field up to 4 T. Preliminary inspection of the Be window surface found no visual damage, in comparison with Cu windows where substantial surface damage was found. Preliminary understanding of conditioning the cavity in a strong magnetic field has been developed. More thorough window and cavity surface inspection is under way.

  6. RF tests of an 805 MHz pillbox cavity at Lab G of Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian , Z.; Wu, V.; Rimmer, R.; Norem, J.; Torun, Y.

    2003-05-01

    We report recent high power RF tests on an 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity with demountable windows for beam apertures at Lab G of Fermilab, a dedicated facility for testing of MUCOOL (muon cooling) components. The cavity is installed inside a superconducting solenoidal magnet. A 12 MW peak RF power klystron is used for the tests. The cavity has been processed both with and without magnetic field. Without magnetic field, a gradient of 34 MV/m was reached rather quickly with very low sparking rate. In a 2.5 T solenoidal field, a 16 MV/m gradient was achieved, and it had to take many weeks of conditioning. Strong multipacting effects associated with high radiation levels were measured during the processing with the magnetic field. More recently Be windows with TiN-coated surface have been installed and tested at conditions of with and without the external magnetic field. A conservative 16 MV/m gradient without magnetic field was reached quickly as planned. Less multipacting was observed during the conditioning, it indicated that the TiN-coated surface on the windows had indeed helped to reduce the secondary electron emissions significantly. A modest gradient of 16.5 MV/m was finally achieved with magnet on in solenoidal mode and the field up to 4 T. Preliminary inspection on Be windows surface found no damage at all, in comparison with Cu windows where substantial surface damage was found. Preliminary understanding of conditioning cavity in a strong magnetic field has been developed. More through window and cavity surface inspection is under way.

  7. Performance evaluations of demountable electrical connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, R. C.; Cha, Y. S.; Hull, J. R.; Buckles, W. E.; Daugherty, M. A.

    Electrical conductors operating in cryogenic environments can require demountable connections along their lengths. The connections must have low resistance and high reliability and should allow ready assembly and disassembly. In this work, the performance of two types of connections has been evaluated. The first connection type is a clamped surface-to-surface joint. The second connection type is a screwed joint that incorporates male and female machine-thread components. The connections for copper conductors have been evaluated experimentally at 77 K. Experimental variables included thread surface treatment and assembly methods. The results of the evaluations are presented.

  8. LHC Crab Cavity Coupler Test Boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, James; Burt, Graeme; Calaga, Rama; Macpherson, Alick; Montesinos, Eric; Silva, Subashini; Tutte, Adam; Xiao, Binping

    2016-01-01

    The LHC double quarter wave (DQW) crab cavities have two different types of Higher Order Mode (HOM) couplers in addition to a fundamental power coupler (FPC). The FPC requires conditioning, so to achieve this we have designed a radio-frequency (RF) quarter wave resonator to provide high transmission between two opposing FPCs. For the HOM couplers we must ensure that the stop-band filter is positioned at the cavity frequency and that peak transmission occurs at the same frequencies as the strongest HOMs. We have designed two test boxes which preserve the cavity spectral response in order to test the couplers.

  9. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments.

  10. The crab cavities cryomodule for SPS test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, C.; Amorim Carvalho, A.; Artoos, K.; Atieh, S.; Brodzinski, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Dassa, L.; Dijoud, T.; Eiler, K.; Favre, G.; Freijedo Menendez, P.; Garlaschè, M.; Giordanino, L.; Jones, T.; E Langeslag, S. A.; Leuxe, R.; Mainaud-Durand, H.; Minginette, P.; Narduzzi, M.; Rude, V.; Sosin, M.; Swieszek, J. S.; Templeton, N.

    2017-07-01

    RF Crab Cavities are an essential part of the HL-LHC upgrade. Two concepts of such systems are being developed: the Double Quarter Wave (DQW) and the RF Dipole (RFD). A cryomodule with two DQW cavities is in advanced fabrication stage for the tests with protons in the SPS. The cavities must be operated at 2 K, without excessive heat loads, in a low magnetic environment and in compliance with CERN safety guidelines on pressure and vacuum systems. A large set of components, such as a thermal shield, a two layers magnetic shield, RF lines, helium tank and tuner are required for the successful and safe operation of the cavities. The sum of all these components with the cavities and their couplers forms the cryomodule. An overview of the design and fabrication strategy of this cryomodule is presented. The main components are described along with the present status of cavity fabrication and processing and cryomodule assembly. The lesson learned from the prototypes and first manufactured systems are also included.

  11. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  12. Injector Cavities Fabrication, Vertical Test Performance and Primary Cryomodule Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cheng, Guangfeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Davis, G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Macha, Kurt [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Overton, Roland [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Spell, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    After the electromagnetic design and the mechanical design of a β=0.6, 2-cell elliptical SRF cavity, the cavity has been fabricated. Then both 2-cell and 7-cell cavities have been bench tuned to the target values of frequency, coupling external Q and field flatness. After buffer chemistry polishing (BCP) and high pressure rinses (HPR), Vertical 2K cavity test results have been satisfied the specifications and ready for the string assembly. We will report the cavity performance including Lorenz Force Detuning (LFD) and Higher Order Modes (HOM) damping data. Its integration with cavity tuners to the cryomodule design will be reported.

  13. Cryogenic rf test of the first plasma etched SRF cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Im, D; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2016-01-01

    Plasma etching has a potential to be an alternative processing technology for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. An apparatus and a method are developed for plasma etching of the inner surfaces of SRF cavities. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity is used. The single cell cavity is mechanically polished, buffer chemically etched afterwards and rf tested at cryogenic temperatures for a baseline test. This cavity is then plasma processed. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish segmented plasma processing. The cavity is rf tested afterwards at cryogenic temperatures. The rf test and surface condition results are presented.

  14. High Gradient Tests of the Fermilab SSR1 Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Khabiboulline, T; Gonin, I; Madrak, R; Melnychuk, O; Ozelis, J; Pischalnikov, Y; Ristori, L; Rowe, A; Sergatskov, D A; Sukhanov, A; Terechkine, I; Wagner, R; Webber, R; Yakovlev, V

    2013-01-01

    In Fermilab we are build and tested several superconducting Single Spoke Resonators (SSR1, \\beta=0.22) which can be used for acceleration of low beta ions. Fist two cavities performed very well during cold test in Vertical Test Station at FNAL. One dressed cavity was also tested successfully in Horizontal Test Station. Currently we are building 8 cavity cryomodule for PIXIE project. Additional 10 cavities were manufactured in the industry and on-going cold test results will be presented in this poster.

  15. Fault Diagnosis of Demountable Disk-Drum Aero-Engine Rotor Using Customized Multiwavelet Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor is an important piece of equipment that greatly impacts the safe operation of aircraft. However, assembly looseness or crack fault has led to several unscheduled breakdowns and serious accidents. Thus, condition monitoring and fault diagnosis technique are required for identifying abnormal conditions. Customized ensemble multiwavelet method for aero-engine rotor condition identification, using measured vibration data, is developed in this paper. First, customized multiwavelet basis function with strong adaptivity is constructed via symmetric multiwavelet lifting scheme. Then vibration signal is processed by customized ensemble multiwavelet transform. Next, normalized information entropy of multiwavelet decomposition coefficients is computed to directly reflect and evaluate the condition. The proposed approach is first applied to fault detection of an experimental aero-engine rotor. Finally, the proposed approach is used in an engineering application, where it successfully identified the crack fault of a demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor. The results show that the proposed method possesses excellent performance in fault detection of aero-engine rotor. Moreover, the robustness of the multiwavelet method against noise is also tested and verified by simulation and field experiments.

  16. Recent Progress on High-Current SRF Cavities at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Rimmer, William Clemens, James Henry, Peter Kneisel, Kurt Macha, Frank Marhauser, Larry Turlington, Haipeng Wang, Daniel Forehand

    2010-05-01

    JLab has designed and fabricated several prototype SRF cavities with cell shapes optimized for high current beams and with strong damping of unwanted higher order modes. We report on the latest test results of these cavities and on developments of concepts for new variants optimized for particular applications such as light sources and high-power proton accelerators, including betas less than one. We also report on progress towards a first beam test of this design in the recirculation loop of the JLab ERL based FEL. With growing interest worldwide in applications of SRF for high-average power electron and hadron machines, a practical test of these concepts is highly desirable. We plan to package two prototype cavities in a de-mountable cryomodule for temporary installation into the JLab FEL for testing with RF and beam. This will allow verification of all critical design and operational parameters paving the way to a full-scale prototype cryomodule.

  17. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A. T.; Lu, X. Y.; Rimmer, R. A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I-V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson-Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  18. STANDARDIZATION OF CEBAF 12 GEV UPGRADE CAVITY TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffany Bass, G. Davis, Christiana Wilson, Mircea Stirbet

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF 12GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. Each cavity underwent RF qualification at 2.07K using a high power accelerating gradient test and an HOM survey in Jefferson Lab's Vertical Testing Area (VTA) before cavity string assembly. In order to ensure consistently high quality data, updated cavity testing procedures and analysis were implemented and used by a group of VTA operators. For high power tests, a cavity testing procedure was developed and used in conjunction with a LabVIEW program to collect the test data. Additionally while the cavity was at 2.07K, an HOM survey was performed using a network analyzer and a combination of Excel and Mathematica programs. Data analysis was standardized and an online logbook, Pansophy, was used for data storage and mining. The Pansophy system allowed test results to be easily summarized and searchable across all cavity tests. In this presentation, the CEBAF 12GeV upgrade cavity testing procedure, method for data analysis, and results reporting results will be discussed.

  19. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion University; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion University; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, β0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, β0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  20. Results of Q Disease Tests With 350-MHz Spoke Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Edwards, Randy L.; Krawczyk, Frank L.; Liu, Jian-Fei; Schrage, Dale L.; Shapiro, Alan H.

    2003-07-01

    Spoke cavities have been developed at LANL for an accelerator-driven nuclear waste transmutation system. One of the most important issues for this development is how we can build and operate the accelerator at minimum costs. It would save a significant amount of money if we do not need to heat treat the cavity at high temperatures to avoid Q disease. This motivated us to check to see if Q disease occurs with 350-MHz spoke cavities. We have tested 3 cavities, ANL, LANL/EZ02 and LANL/EZ01 so far. The ANL cavity was made of RRR˜150 and the LANL cavities were made of RRR˜250 niobium. The ANL cavity was chemically polished 98 microns at LANL with a standard buffered chemical polishing (BCP) solution, i.e., HF:HNO3:H3PO4=1:1:2 by volume, at 14 - 18 °C. We did not see any Q degradation after holding the cavity at 100 - 102 K for 13 hours or at 100 - 142 K for 86 hours. This cavity was unintentionally baked at >200 °C under poor vacuum, which may have caused thicker oxide layer that prevent the Q disease from occurring as well as due to lower RRR. The LANL/EZ02 and LANL/EZ01 cavities were polished 150 microns with standard BCP solution at <15 °C. The LANL/EZ02 cavity showed a ˜50 % Q degradation after holding the cavity at 100 - 132 K for 61 hours. More systematic tests with LANL/EZ01 to determine the dangerous temperature range precisely are under way by changing the holding temperature every 10 K. The detail of the results will be presented here.

  1. Fabrication and Testing of Deflecting Cavities for APS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammosser, John; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert; Jim, Henry; Katherine, Wilson; Dhakal, Pashupati; Ali, Nassiri; Jim, Kerby; Jeremiah, Holzbauer; Genfa, Wu; Joel, Fuerst; Yawei, Yang; Zenghai, Li

    2013-09-01

    Jefferson Lab (Newport News, Virginia) in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL) has fabricated and tested four first article, 2.8 GHz, deflecting SRF cavities, for Argonne's Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) project. These cavities are unique in many ways including the fabrication techniques in which the cavity cell and waveguides were fabricated. These cavity subcomponents were milled from bulk large grain niobium ingot material directly from 3D CAD files. No forming of sub components was used with the exception of the beam-pipes. The challenging cavity and helium vessel design and fabrication results from the stringent RF performance requirements required by the project and operation in the APS ring. Production challenges and fabrication techniques as well as testing results will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Fundamental tests in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of quantum physics, Einstein and Bohr had the dream to confine a photon in a box and to use this contraption in order to illustrate the strange laws of the quantum world. Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics has now made this dream real, allowing us to actually achieve in the laboratory variants of the thought experiments of the founding fathers of quantum theory. In our work at Ecole Normale Supérieure, we use a beam of Rydberg atoms to manipulate and probe non-destructively microwave photons trapped in a very high Q superconducting cavity. We realize ideal quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements of photon numbers, observe the radiation quantum jumps due to cavity relaxation and prepare non-classical fields such as Fock and Schrödinger cat states. Combining QND photon counting with a homodyne mixing method, we reconstruct the Wigner functions of these non-classical states and, by taking snapshots of these functions at increasing times, obtain movies of the decoherence process. These experiments ope...

  3. Demountable Toroidal Field Magnets for Use in a Compact Modular Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, F. J.; Goh, J.; Takayasu, M.; Bromberg, L.; Minervini, J. V.; Whyte, D.

    2014-05-01

    A concept of demountable toroidal field magnets for a compact fusion reactor is discussed. The magnets generate a magnetic field of 9.2 T on axis, in a 3.3 m major radius tokamak. Subcooled YBCO conductors have a critical current density adequate to provide this large magnetic field, while operating at 20 K reduces thermodynamic cooling cost of the resistive electrical joints. Demountable magnets allow for vertical replacement and maintenance of internal components, potentially reducing cost and time of maintenance when compared to traditional sector maintenance. Preliminary measurements of contact resistance of a demountable YBCO electrical joint between are presented.

  4. The Test of LLRF control system on superconducting cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhenglong; Wen, Lianghua; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Gao, Zheng; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The first generation Low-Level radio frequency(LLRF) control system independently developed by IMPCAS, the operating frequency is 162.5MHz for China ADS, which consists of superconducting cavity amplitude stability control, phase stability control and the cavity resonance frequency control. The LLRF control system is based on four samples IQ quadrature demodulation technique consisting an all-digital closed-loop feedback control. This paper completed the first generation of ADS LLRF control system in the low-temperature superconducting cavities LLRF stability and performance online tests. Through testing, to verify the performance of LLRF control system, to analysis on emerging issues, and in accordance with the experimental data, to summarize LLRF control system performance to accumulate experience for the future control of superconducting cavities.

  5. A high resolution cavity BPM for the CLIC Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chritin, N.; Schmickler, H.; Soby, L.; /CERN; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In frame of the development of a high resolution BPM system for the CLIC Main Linac we present the design of a cavity BPM prototype. It consists of a waveguide loaded dipole mode resonator and a monopole mode reference cavity, both operating at 15 GHz, to be compatible with the bunch frequencies at the CLIC Test Facility. Requirements, design concept, numerical analysis, and practical considerations are discussed.

  6. A high resolution cavity BPM for the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Chritin, N; Soby, L; Lunin, A; Solyak, N; Wendt, M; Yakovlev, V

    2012-01-01

    In frame of the development of a high resolution BPM system for the CLIC Main Linac we present the design of a cavity BPM prototype. It consists of a waveguide loaded dipole mode resonator and a monopole mode reference cavity, both operating at 15 GHz, to be compatible with the bunch frequencies at the CLIC Test Facility. Requirements, design concept, numerical analysis, and practical considerations are discussed.

  7. Single shot demountable self-contained He-3 refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, P.; Brooks, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the development of a self-contained demountable He-3 refrigerator which greatly increases the versatility of a cold-plate-style helium Dewar. The refrigerator is controlled by a single heater. The considered design makes it possible to achieve a temperature of 0.27 K without costly or time-consuming modifications to the Dewar. An example for an employment of a temperature of less than 1 K in space is related to the study of the critical behavior of He-3/He-4 mixtures in the absence of gravitational mixing. This requires a temperature of 0.87 K. Such low temperatures can also be utilized in the space operation of infrared telescopes. Attention is given to details of system design, the operating principles, and aspects of performance.

  8. Grid Window Tests on an 805-MHz Pillbox Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torun, Y. [IIT, Chicago; Moretti, A. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Muon ionization cooling channel designs use pillbox shaped RF cavities for improved power efficiency and fine control over phasing of individual cavities. For minimum scattering of the muon beam, the ends should be made out of a small thickness of high radiation length material. Good electrical and thermal conductivity are required to reduce power dissipation and remove the heat efficiently. Thin curved beryllium windows with TiN coating have been used successfully in the past. We have built an alternative win- dow set consisting of grids of tubes and tested these on a pillbox cavity previously used with both thin Be and thick Cu windows. The cavity was operated with a pair of grids as well as a single grid against a flat endplate.

  9. Recent Progress of RF Cavity Study at Mucool Test Area

    CERN Document Server

    Yonehara, Katsuya

    2012-01-01

    In order to develop an RF cavity that is applicable for a muon beam cooling channel, a new facility, called Mucool Test Area (MTA) has been built at Fermilab. MTA is a unique facility whose purpose is to test RF cavities in various conditions. There are 201 and 805 MHz high power sources, a 4-Tesla solenoid magnet, a cryogenic system including a Helium liquifier, an explosion proof apparatus to operate gaseous/liquid Hydrogen, and a beam transport line to send an intense H- beam from the Fermilab Linac accelerator to the MTA hall. Recent activities at MTA will be discussed in this document.

  10. Geant4 and Fano cavity test: where are we?

    CERN Document Server

    Elles, S; Maire, M; Urbàn, L

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport algorithm implemented in Geant4 has been recently revised. The modifications concern several physics aspects of the simulation model: the step limitation, the energy loss along a step and the multiple scattering. The Fano cavity setup was used to test these developments. The upgrades increase significantly the accuracy of the electron transport simulation. The ratio of simulated to theoretical dose deposition in the cavity is stable to ~1% while varying several parameters and within ~1.5% of the expected value for water and graphite. Work is underway to identify and resolve the remaining shift.

  11. A new fire performance test for cavity wall insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamison Kristin L.T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavity walls containing combustible insulation present an increased risk for fire propagation in a confined, concealed space. Damage to the building resulting from ignition of combustible insulation can be extensive; especially so, in the absence of horizontal and vertical fire-stops. Current codes and standards assess fire performance of exterior wall assemblies subjected to external ignition sources. However, test methods do not address the potential fire hazard resulting from ignition of combustible insulation within the wall cavity. A fire performance test has been developed that evaluates the fire propagation behavior of combustible insulation in a configuration that is representative of the actual installation. The test utilizes a full scale cavity wall assembly and offers fire performance evaluation of insulation of any thickness for either a 51 mm or 102 mm wide air space. A propane sand burner was selected as the ignition source; in addition to being reliable and repeatable, its heat output was carefully calibrated to be representative of potential ignition scenarios that may occur within a cavity wall. During the 15 minute fire performance test, the sample is continuously subjected to the propane sand burner exposure fire. An acceptable sample will produce a peak chemical heat release rate less than 100 kW and a maximum visible flame height less than 1.8 m. This fire performance test method is being incorporated into FM Approvals Standard for Cavity Walls and Rainscreens, Class Number 4411 [1] and is suitable for incorporation into other codes and standards.

  12. Uppsala High Power Test Stand for ESS Spoke Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Yogi, RA; Dancila, D; Gajewski, K; Hermansson, L; Noor, M; Wedberg, R; Santiago-Kern, R; Ekelöf, T; Lofnes, T; Ziemann, V; Goryashko, V; Ruber, R

    2013-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is one of the world’s most powerful neutron source. The ESS linac will accelerate 50mA pulse current of protons to 2.5GeV in 2.86 ms long pulses at a repetition rate of 14 Hz. It produces a beam with 5MW average power and 125MW peak power. ESS Spoke Linac consist of 28 superconducting spoke cavities, which will be developed by IPN Orsay, France. These Spoke Cavities will be tested at low power at IPN Orsay and high power testing will be performed in a high power test stand at Uppsala University. The test stand consists of tetrode based RF amplifier chain (352MHz, 350 kW) power and related RF distribution. Outputs of two tetrodes shall be combined with the hybrid coupler to produce 350 kW power. Preamplifier for a tetrode shall be solid state amplifier. As the spoke cavities are superconducting, the test stand also includes horizontal cryostat, Helium liquefier, test bunker etc. The paper describes features of the test stand in details.

  13. Cryostat for Testing HIE-Isolde Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Cuccuru, G; Pasini, M; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M; Vullierme, B

    2011-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities at CERN [1], with the objective of increasing the energy and intensity of the delivered radioactive ion beams (RIB). This project aims to fill the request for a more energetic post-accelerated beam by means of a new superconducting (SC) linac based on Quarter Wave Resonators (QWR). A research and development (R&D) programme looking at all the different aspects of the SC linac started in 2008 and continued throughout 2010. The R&D effort has particularly focused on the development of the high β cavities (β = 10.3%) for which the Nb sputtered on Cu substrate technology has been adopted. Two prototype cavities were manufactured and are undergoing RF cold tests. The pre-series cavity manufacturing is under way using 3D forged Cu billets. A single vacuum cryostat was designed and built to test these cavities at liquid helium temperatures. This paper details the main design concep...

  14. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may pass these bacteria to a child through kissing, sampling the child's food, or sharing eating utensils. ... pass decay-causing bacteria to their children through kissing or sharing eating utensils. Symptoms of Cavities Whether ...

  15. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S-I-S hetero-structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  16. Cold test results for the test cavities w/out the deposited lead photo cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present tests of a 1.5-cell superconducting photo-injector cavity, which was built in the frame of Task 4. The cavity was tested twice: without the cathode (baseline test) and with the lead photo-cathode. The result of tests was very encouraging and the decision was made to continue the experiment, beyond scope of the task, at HZB in Berlin to learn more about quality of the cathode.

  17. A vertical test system for China-ADS project injector II superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; He, Yuan; Wen, Liang-Hua; Li, Chun-Long; Xue, Zong-Heng; Song, Yu-Kun; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Zheng-Long; Gao, Zheng; Zhang, Cong; Sun, Lie-Peng; Yue, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; You, Zhi-Ming; Thomas, Joseph Powers(Tom Powers

    2014-05-01

    To test superconducting cavities, a vertical test system has been designed and set up at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The system design is based on VCO-PLL hardware and the NI Labview software. The test of the HWR010#2 superconducting cavity shows that the function of this test system is satisfactory for testing the low frequency cavity.

  18. Cavity tests of parity-odd Lorentz violations in electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, Matthew; Petroff, Alexander

    2007-03-01

    Electromagnetic resonant cavities form the basis for a number modern tests of Lorentz invariance. The geometry of most of these experiments implies unsuppressed sensitivities to parity-even Lorentz violations only. Parity-odd violations typically enter through suppressed boost effects, causing a reduction in sensitivity by roughly 4 orders of magnitude. Here we discuss possible techniques for achieving unsuppressed sensitivities to parity-odd violations using asymmetric resonators.

  19. Radionuclide Partitioning in an Underground Nuclear Test Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, T P; Hu, Q; Zhao, P; Conrado, C L; Dickerson, R; Eaton, G F; Kersting, A B; Moran, J E; Nimz, G; Powell, B A; Ramon, E C; Ryerson, F J; Williams, R W; Wooddy, P T; Zavarin, M

    2009-01-09

    In 2004, a borehole was drilled into the 1983 Chancellor underground nuclear test cavity to investigate the distribution of radionuclides within the cavity. Sidewall core samples were collected from a range of depths within the re-entry hole and two sidetrack holes. Upon completion of drilling, casing was installed and a submersible pump was used to collect groundwater samples. Test debris and groundwater samples were analyzed for a variety of radionuclides including the fission products {sup 99}Tc, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 155}Eu, the activation products {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu, and the actinides U, Pu, and Am. In addition, the physical and bulk chemical properties of the test debris were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Microprobe measurements. Analytical results were used to evaluate the partitioning of radionuclides between the melt glass, rubble, and groundwater phases in the Chancellor test cavity. Three comparative approaches were used to calculate partitioning values, though each method could not be applied to every nuclide. These approaches are based on: (1) the average Area 19 inventory from Bowen et al. (2001); (2) melt glass, rubble, and groundwater mass estimates from Zhao et al. (2008); and (3) fission product mass yield data from England and Rider (1994). The U and Pu analyses of the test debris are classified and partitioning estimates for these elements were calculated directly from the classified Miller et al. (2002) inventory for the Chancellor test. The partitioning results from this study were compared to partitioning data that were previously published by the IAEA (1998). Predictions of radionuclide distributions from the two studies are in agreement for a majority of the nuclides under consideration. Substantial differences were noted in the partitioning values for {sup 99}Tc, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 129}I, and uranium. These differences are attributable to two factors

  20. Measurements of SCRF cavity dynamic heat load in horizontal test system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGraff, B.D.; Bossert, R.J.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    The Horizontal Test System (HTS) at Fermilab is currently testing fully assembled, dressed superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. These cavities are cooled in a bath of superfluid helium at 1.8K. Dissipated RF power from the cavities is a dynamic heat load on the cryogenic system. The magnitude of heat flux from these cavities into the helium is also an important variable for understanding cavity performance. Methods and hardware used to measure this dynamic heat load are presented. Results are presented from several cavity tests and testing accuracy is discussed.

  1. BERLinPro Booster Cavity Design, Fabrication and Test Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill, Andrew [HZB; Anders, W [HZB; Frahm, A. [HZB; Knobloch, Jens [HZB; Neumann, Axel [HZB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Turlington, Larry D. [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    The bERLinPro project, a 100 mA, 50 MeV superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under construction at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for the purpose of studying the technical challenges and physics of operating a high current, c.w., 1.3 GHz ERL. This machine will utilize three unique SRF cryomodules for the injector, booster and linac module respectively. The booster cryomodule will contain three 2-cell SRF cavities, based on the original design by Cornell University, and will be equipped with twin 115 kW RF power couplers in order to provide the appropriate acceleration to the high current electron beam. This paper will review the status of the fabrication of the 4 booster cavities that have been built for this project by Jefferson Laboratory and look at the challenges presented by the incorporation of fundamental power couplers capable of delivering 115 kW. The test plan for the cavities and couplers will be given along with a brief overview of the cryomodule design.

  2. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  3. Soldered joints—an essential component of demountable high temperature superconducting fusion magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Yeekin; Surrey, Elizabeth; Hampshire, Damian

    2016-07-01

    Demountable superconducting magnet coils would offer significant benefits to commercial nuclear fusion power plants. Whether large pressed joints or large soldered joints provide the solution for demountable fusion magnets, a critical component or building block for both will be the many, smaller-scale joints that enable the supercurrent to leave the superconducting layer, cross the superconducting tape and pass into the solder that lies between the tape and the conductor that eventually provides one of the demountable surfaces. This paper considers the electrical and thermal properties of this essential component part of demountable high temperature superconducting (HTS) joints by considering the fabrication and properties of jointed HTSs consisting of a thin layer of solder (In52Sn48 or Pb38Sn62) sandwiched between two rare-earth-Ba2Cu3O7 (REBCO) second generation HTS coated conductors (CCs). The HTS joints are analysed using numerical modelling, critical current and resistivity measurements on the joints from 300 to 4.2 K in applied magnetic fields up to 12 T, as well as scanning electron microscopy studies. Our results show that the copper/silver layers significantly reduce the heating in the joints to less than a few hundred mK. When the REBCO alone is superconducting, the joint resistivity (R J) predominantly has two sources, the solder layer and an interfacial resistivity at the REBCO/silver interface (∼25 nΩ cm2) in the as-supplied CCs which together have a very weak magnetoresistance in fields up to 12 T. We achieved excellent reproducibility in the R J of the In52Sn48 soldered joints of better than 10% at temperatures below T c of the REBCO layer which can be compared to variations of more than two orders of magnitude in the literature. We also show that demountable joints in fusion energy magnets are viable and need only add a few percent to the total cryogenic cost for a fusion tokamak.

  4. Cavity BPM System Tests for the ILC Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, M.

    2007-12-21

    The main physics program of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a measurement of the beam energy at the interaction point with an accuracy of 10{sup -4} or better. To achieve this goal a magnetic spectrometer using high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs) has been proposed. This paper reports on the cavity BPM system that was deployed to test this proposal. We demonstrate sub-micron resolution and micron level stability over 20 hours for a 1 m long BPM triplet. We find micron-level stability over 1 hour for 3 BPM stations distributed over a 30 m long baseline. The understanding of the behavior and response of the BPMs gained from this work has allowed full spectrometer tests to be carried out.

  5. Test Results of the 3.9 GHz Cavity at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Solyak, N

    2004-01-01

    Fermilab is developing two types of 3.9 GHz superconducting cavities to improve performances of A0 and TTF photoinjectors. In frame of this project we have built and tested two nine-cell copper models and one 3-cell niobium accelertating cavity and series of deflecting cavities. Properties of the high order modes were carefully studied in a chain of two copper cavities at room temperature. High gradient performance were tested at helium temperature. Achieved gradients and surface resistances are exceed goal parameters. In paper we discuss results of cold tests of the 3-cell accelerating and deflecting cavities.

  6. Design of horizontal test cryostat for testing two 650 MHz cavities: cryogenic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, P.; Gilankar, S.; Kush, P. K.; Lakshminarayanan, A.; Choubey, R.; Ghosh, R.; Jain, A.; Patel, H.; Gupta, P. D.; Hocker, A.; Ozelis, J. P.; Geynisman, M.; Reid, C.; Poloubotko, V.; Mitchell, D.; Peterson, T. J.; Nicol, T. H.

    2017-02-01

    Horizontal Test Cryostat has been designed for testing two 650 MHz "dressed" Superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities in a single testing cycle at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, India (RRCAT) in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, USA (FNAL). This cryostat will facilitate testing of two 5-cell 650 MHz SCRF cavities, in CW or pulsed regime, for upcoming High Intensity Superconducting Proton Accelerator projects at both countries. Two such HTS facilities are planned, one at RRCAT for Indian Spallation Neutron Source project (ISNS), which is on the horizon, and the other at FNAL, USA. A test cryostat, a part of horizontal test stand-2 (HTS-2) will be set up at RRCAT for Indian project. In order to maximize the utility of this facility, it can also be used to test two dressed 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities and other similarly-sized devices. The facility assumes, as an input, the availability of liquid nitrogen at 80 K and liquid helium at 4.5 K and 2 K, with a refrigeration capacity of approximately 50 W at 2 K. Design work of cryostat has been completed and now procurement process is in progress. This paper discusses salient features of the cryostat. It also describes different design calculations and ANSYS analysis for cool down of few subsystems like cavity support system and liquid nitrogen cooled thermal radiation shield of horizontal test cryostat..

  7. PAL-XFEL cavity beam position monitor pick-up design and beam test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sojeong, E-mail: sojung8681@postech.ac.kr; Park, Young Jung; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Seung Hwan; Shin, Dong Cheol; Han, Jang-Hui; Ko, In Soo

    2016-08-11

    As an X-ray Free Electron Laser, PAL-XFEL is about to start beam commissioning. X-band cavity beam position monitor (BPM) is used in the PAL-XFEL undulator beam line. Prototypes of cavity BPM pick-up were designed and fabricated to test the RF characteristics. Also, the beam test of a cavity BPM pick-up was done in the Injector Test Facility (ITF). In the beam test, the raw signal properties of the cavity BPM pick-up were measured at a 200 pC bunch charge. According to the RF test and beam test results, the prototype cavity BPM pick-up design was confirmed to meet the requirements of the PAL-XFEL cavity BPM system.

  8. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-04-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. (author). 3 refs.

  9. Fault Diagnosis of Demountable Disk-Drum Aero-Engine Rotor Using Customized Multiwavelet Method

    OpenAIRE

    Jinglong Chen; Yu Wang; Zhengjia He; Xiaodong Wang

    2015-01-01

    The demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor is an important piece of equipment that greatly impacts the safe operation of aircraft. However, assembly looseness or crack fault has led to several unscheduled breakdowns and serious accidents. Thus, condition monitoring and fault diagnosis technique are required for identifying abnormal conditions. Customized ensemble multiwavelet method for aero-engine rotor condition identification, using measured vibration data, is developed in this paper. Fir...

  10. Result of MHI 2-Cell Seamless Dumb-Bell Cavity Vertical Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okihira, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Hara, H. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Ikeda, N. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Inoue, F. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Sennyu, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd, Mihara, Hiroshima, 729-0393, Japan; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Kako, E. [KEK

    2014-12-01

    MHI have supplied several 9-cell cavities for STF (R&D of ILC project at KEK) and have been considering production method for stable quality and cost reduction, seamless dumb-bell cavity was one of them. We had fabricated a 2 cell seamless dumb-bell cavity for cost reduction and measured RF performance in collaboration with JLab, KEK and MHI. Surface treatment recipe for ILC was applied for MHI 2-cell cavity and vertical test was performed at JLab. The cavity reached Eacc=32.4MV/m after BCP and EP. Details of the result are reported.

  11. RF and Data Acquisition Systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF Cavity Vertical Test Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph P. Ozelis; Roger Nehring; Christiana Grenoble; Thomas J. Powers

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of a program to improve cavity performance reproducibility for the ILC. The RF system for this facility, using the classic combination of oscillator, phase detector/mixer, and loop amplifier to detect the resonant cavity frequency and lock onto the cavity, is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment. This software provides for amplitude and phase adjustment of incident RF power, and measures all relevant cavity power levels, cavity thermal environment parameters, as well as field emission-produced radiation. It also calculates the various cavity performance parameters and their associated errors. Performance during system commissioning and initial cavity tests will be presented.

  12. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Alberty, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Artoos, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Capelli, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Carra, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Leuxe, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Kuder, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zanoni, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ratti, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  13. Design and Prototyping of HL-LHC Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavities for SPS Test

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, S; Wu, Q; Xiao, B P; Belomestnykh, S; Ben-Zv, I; Alberty, L; Artoos, Kurt; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Capelli, Teddy; Carra, Federico; Leuxe, Raphael; Kuder, Norbert; Zanoni, Carlo; Li, Z; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  14. Cryogenic Test of Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, B; Belomestnykh, S; Ben-Zvi, I; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, C; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, L; Li, Z; Marques, C; Skaritka, J; Verdú-Andres, S; Wu, Q

    2015-01-01

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109 . We report the test results of this design.

  15. Design, prototyping and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Binping; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdú-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    A novel design of superconducting Crab Cavity was proposed and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new cavity shape is a Double Quarter Wave or DQWCC. After fabrication and surface treatments, the niobium proof-of-principle cavity was cryogenically tested in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also well matched for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the requirement for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC of 3.34 MV. In this paper we present the design, prototyping and test results of the DQWCC.

  16. RF tests of the beta - 0.5 five cell TRASCO cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Bosotti; Carlo Pagani; P. Pierini; J.P. Charrier; B. Visentin; Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2004-07-01

    Two complete 5 cell superconducting cavities at {beta} = 0.5 have been fabricated in the TRASCO INFN program. The cavities have been designed to minimize peak electric and magnetic fields, with a goal of 8.5 MV/m of accelerating gradient, at a Q > 5 10{sup 9}. The cavities have been tested in vertical cryostats at TJNAF and Saclay and the results are summarized here.

  17. Preparation and Testing of the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, A. V.; Bass, T.; Burrill, A.; Davis, G. K.; Marhauser, F.; Reece, C. E.; Stirbet, M.

    2011-07-01

    Eighty new 7-cell, low-loss cell-shaped cavities are required for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade project. In addition to ten pre-production units fabricated at JLab, the full set of commercially-produced cavities have been delivered. An efficient processing routine, which includes a controlled 30 micron electropolish, has been established to transform these cavities into qualified 8-cavity strings. This work began in 2010 and will run through the end of 2011. The realized cavity performance consistently exceeds project requirements and also the maximum useful gradient in CEBAF: 25 MV/m. We will describe the cavity processing and preparation protocols and summarize test results obtained to date.

  18. Cryogenic Test of a Proof-of-Principle Superconducting RF-Dipole Deflecting and Crabbing Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2013-01-01

    Recent applications in need of compact low-frequency deflecting and crabbing cavities have initiated the design and development of new superconducting structures operating at high gradients with low losses. Previously, TM$_{110}$ -type deflecting and crabbing cavities were developed and have also been operated successfully. However, these geometries are not favorable designs for low operating frequencies. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is the first compact deflecting and crabbing geometry that has demonstrated high gradients and high shunt impedance. Since the fundamental operating mode is the lowest mode and is widely separated from the nearest higher order mode, the rf-dipole design is an attractive geometry for effective damping of the higher order modes in high current applications. A 400 MHz rf-dipole cavity was designed, fabricated, and tested as a proof-of-principle cavity. The cavity achieved high operating gradients, and the multipacting levels were easily processed and did not reoccur.

  19. Design and cold test of S-BAND cavity BPM for HLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An S-band cavity BPM is designed for a new injector in National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. A re-entrant position cavity is tuned to the TM110 mode as position cavity. Cut-through waveguides are used as pickups to suppress the monopole signal. Theoretical resolution of this design is 31 nm. A prototype cavity BPM system is manufactured for off-line cold tests. The wire scanning method is used to calibrate the BPM and estimate the performance of the on-line BPM system. A cross-talk problem has been detected during the cold test. Racetrack cavity BPM design can be used to suppress the cross-talk. With the nonlinear effect being ignored, transform matrix can be used to correct cross-talk. Analysis of cold test results shows that the position resolution of prototype BPM is better than 3 μm.

  20. Large-Grain Superconducting Gun Cavity Testing Program Phase One Closing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cullen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dai, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Degen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hahn, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Masi, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schultheiss, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seda, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kellerman, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tallerico, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Todd, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-10-31

    This report details the experimental configuration and RF testing results for the first phase of a large-grained niobium electron gun cavity testing program being conducted in the Small Vertical Testing Facility in the Collider-Accelerator Department. This testing is meant to explore multi-pacting in the cavity and shed light on the behavior of a counterpart cavity of identical geometry installed in the Energy Recovery LINAC being constructed in the Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This test found that the Q of the large-grained cavity at 4 K reached ~6.5 × 108 and at 2 K reached a value of ~6 × 109. Both of these values are about a factor of 10 lower than would be expected for this type of cavity given the calculated surface resistance and the estimated geometry factor for this half-cell cavity. In addition, the cavity reached a peak voltage of 0.6 MV before there was sig-nificant decline in the Q value and a substantial increase in field emission. This relatively low volt-age, coupled with the low Q and considerable field emission suggest contamination of the cavity interior, possibly during experimental assembly. The results may also suggest that additional chemical etching of the interior surface of the cavity may be beneficial. Throughout the course of testing, various challenges arose including slow helium transfer to the cryostat and cable difficulties. These difficulties and others were eventually resolved, and the re-port discusses the operating experience of the experiment thus far and the plans for future work aimed at exploring the nature of multipacting with a copper cathode inserted into the cavity.

  1. Buffer Chemical Polishing and RF Testing of the 56 MHz SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill,A.

    2009-01-01

    The 56 MHz cavity presents a unique challenge in preparing it for RF testing prior to construction of the cryomodule. This challenge arises due to the physical dimensions and subsequent weight of the cavity, and is further complicated by the coaxial geometry, and the need to properly chemically etch and high pressure rinse the entire inner surface prior to RF testing. To the best of my knowledge, this is the largest all niobium SRF cavity to be chemically etched and subsequently tested in a vertical dewar at 4K, and these processes will be the topic of this technical note.

  2. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. Additional measurements of mechanical stability under RF operation (frequency variation with He pressure, Lorentz detuning) and cryogenic and electric measurements of power dissipation are presented. (author). 3 refs.

  3. RF and data acquisition systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF cavity vertical test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Nehring, Roger; /Fermilab; Grenoble, Christiana; Powers, Thomas J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of its ILC program. The RF system for this facility is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Comprehensive data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment.

  4. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  5. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Alberty, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cullen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marques, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  6. Results of SC proton cavity tests (B = 1 and B = 0.65)

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F et al

    2013-01-01

    The two superconducting cavities were carefully designed for challenging performance. They were fabricated in industry with intermediate tests and specialized processing in CEA and CNRS. The results are promising, except for a degradation of the field flatness of the low velocity cavity, after electron-beam welding. This might reduce the accelerating gradient. Due to delays in manufacturing, the final performance tests will be carried out in the coming months.

  7. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-01

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  8. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan)

    2014-01-29

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  9. Thermal Testing for Resin Structure Including Artificial Cavity Made by Three-Dimensional Printer

    OpenAIRE

    倉橋, 貴彦; 丸岡, 宏太郎; 井山, 徹郎; Kurahashi, Takahiko; Maruoka, Kotaro; Iyama, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the thermal testing is carried out by using the resin structure with artificial cavity made by three-dimensional printer. There are some non-destructive testing method such as the ultrasonic testing method, the thermal testing method and so on. It is known that the size of defect can be found at the target point by using the ultrasonic testing method. On the other hand, the thermal testing method has a characteristic that the location of the defect, the cavity, the corrosion an...

  10. First Test Results of the bERLinPro 2-cell Booster Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill, Andrew [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), (Germany); Anders, W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), (Germany); Frahm, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), (Germany); Knobloch, Jens [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), (Germany); Neumann, Axel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), (Germany); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kneisel, Peter [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Turlington, Larry [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The bERLinPro Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently being built at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin in order to study the physics of operating a high-current, a 100 mA, 50 MeV ERL utilizing all SRF cavity technology. This machine will utilize three unique SRF cryomodules for the photoinjector, booster and linac cryomodules respectively. The focus of this paper will be on the cavities contained within the booster cryomodule. Here there will be three 2-cell SRF cavities, based on the original design by Cornell University, but optimized to meet the needs of the project. All of the cavity fabrication, processing and testing was carried out at Jefferson Laboratory, where 4 cavities were produced, and the 3 cavities with the best RF performance were fitted with helium vessels for installation in the cryomodule. This paper will report on the test results of the cavities as measured in the vertical testing dewar at JLab after fabrication and again after outfitting with the helium vessels.

  11. Nitrogen-Doped 9-Cell Cavity Performance in a Test Cryomodule for LCLS-II

    CERN Document Server

    Gonnella, Dan; Furuta, Fumio; Ge, Mingqi; Hall, Daniel; Ho, Vivian; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Liepe, Matthias; O'Connell, Tim; Posen, Sam; Quigley, Peter; Sears, James; Veshcherevich, Vadim; Grassellino, Anna; Romanenko, Alexander; Sergatskov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    The superconducting RF linac for LCLS-II calls for 1.3 GHz 9-cell cavities with an average intrinsic quality factor Q0 of 2.7x10^10 at 2 K and 16 MV/m accelerating gradient. Two niobium 9-cell cavities, prepared with nitrogen-doping at Fermilab, were assembled into the Cornell Horizontal Test Cryomodule (HTC) to test cavity performance in a cryomodule that is very similar to a full LCLS-II cryomodule. The cavities met LCLS-II specifications with an average quench field of 17 MV/m and an average Q0 of 3x10^10. The sensitivity of the cavities' residual resistance to ambient magnetic field was determined to be 0.5 nOhm/mG during fast cool down. In two cool downs, a heater attached to one of the cavity beam tubes was used to induce large horizontal temperature gradients. Here we report on the results of these first tests of nitrogen-doped cavities in cryomodule, which provide critical information for the LCLS-II project.

  12. Nitrogen-doped 9-cell cavity performance in a test cryomodule for LCLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonnella, D., E-mail: dg433@cornell.edu; Eichhorn, R.; Furuta, F.; Ge, M.; Hall, D.; Ho, V.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Liepe, M., E-mail: mul2@cornell.edu; O' Connell, T.; Posen, S.; Quigley, P.; Sears, J.; Veshcherevich, V. [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Sergatskov, D. A. [FNAL, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    The superconducting RF linac for Linac Coherent Light Source-II calls for 1.3 GHz 9-cell cavities with an average intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0} of 2.7 × 10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and 16 MV/m accelerating gradient. Two niobium 9 cell cavities, prepared with nitrogen-doping at Fermilab, were assembled into the Cornell Horizontal Test Cryomodule (HTC) to test cavity performance in a cryomodule that is very similar to a full LCLS-II cryomodule. The cavities met LCLS-II specifications with an average quench field of 17 MV/m and an average Q{sub 0} of 3 × 10{sup 10}. The sensitivity of the cavities' residual resistance to ambient magnetic field was determined to be 0.5 nΩ/mG during fast cool down. In two cool downs, a heater attached to one of the cavity beam tubes was used to induce large horizontal temperature gradients. Here, we report on the results of these first tests of nitrogen-doped cavities in a cryomodule, which provide critical information for the LCLS-II project.

  13. Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Cavity Detection at the WES Cavity Test Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    reduction, and interpretive procedures for the crosshole method are described by Ballard (1976) and Butler, Skogland , and Landers (1978). The...K., Skogland , G. R., and Landers, G. B. 1970. "CROSSHOLE: An Interpretive Computer Code for Crosshole Seismic Test Results, Documentation ani Examples

  14. A study on surface roughness and microleakage test in cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser irradiation and etched bur cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M; Yamada, Y; Nakamura, Y; Murakami, Y; Tamaki, Y; Matsumoto, K

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the surface morphology, suface roughness of cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser irradiation, and compared the microleakage degree after composite resin restoration with etched bur cavities, in vitro. In each of the 30 human extracted teeth, two shallow cavities were prepared; one prepared with the Er:YAG laser system on the buccal surface, and one produced on the lingual (palatal) surface with a high-speed turbine. Five cavities from each group were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and five were subjected to surface roughness analysis by a colour laser three-dimensional (3D) microscope. The remaining cavities were filled with a composite resin and subjected to a microleakage test under thermocycling. Only bur cavities were acid-etched before filling. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test; a value of p roughness was significantly increased with the laser system. Microleakage test revealed no significant differences between the laser and bur cavities. Crosscut sections of the cavities with no microleakage showed no gap at the interface. Laser cavity may facilitate good adaptation of composite resin with enamel and dentine, because an increase of surface roughness and the openings of dentinal tubules may facilitate the formation of a hybrid zone, since a primer and an adhesive can penetrate the surface better when the smear layer is removed. It can be concluded that shallow cavity prepared by Er:YAG laser is capable of decreasing microleakage of composite resin restorations, and its efficiency is similar to etched bur cavities.

  15. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1  μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  16. High Powered Tests of Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavities for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. Alumina of purities ranging from 96 to 99.8% was tested in a high pressure RF test cell at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of breakdown studies with pure nitrogen gas, and oxygen-doped nitrogen gas indicate the peak surface electric field on the alumina ranges between 10 and 15 MV/m. How these results affect the design of a prototype cooling channel cavity will be discussed.

  17. Measuring the Wigner Functions of Two-Mode Cavity Fields and Testing the Bell's Inequalities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张智明

    2004-01-01

    We propose a scheme for measuring the Wigner function of a two-mode cavity field. The scheme bases on the interaction between the two-mode cavity field and three-level atoms. We find a simple relation between the Wigner function and the atomic population. One can obtain the Wigner function by measuring the atomic population with a micromaser-like experiment and doing a numerical integral. By using the two-mode Wigner function one can obtain the Clauser-Horne combination and test the Bell's inequalities. We test our equations with a two-mode entanglement state and the results are rather good.

  18. High pressure gas filled RF cavity beam test at the Fermilab Mucool test area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemire, Ben

    With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built. As part of the accelerator, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated within a short amount of time. Muons are generated with a huge phase space, so radio frequency cavities placed in strong magnetic fields are required to bunch, focus, and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary. To successfully operate RF cavities in strong magnetic fields, the cavity can be filled with a high pressure gas in order to mitigate breakdown. The gas has the added benefit of providing cooling for the beam. The electron-ion plasma created in the cavity by the beam absorbs energy and degrades the accelerating electric field of the cavity. As electrons account for the majority of the energy loss in the cavity, their removal in a short time is highly desirable. The addition of an electronegative dopant gas can greatly decrease the lifetime of an electron in the cavity. Measurements in pure hydrogen of the energy consumption of electrons in the cavity range in 10-18 and 10-16 joules per RF cycle per electron. When hydrogen doped with dry air is used, measurements of the power consumption indicate an energy loss range of 10-20 to 10-18 joules per RF cycle per ion, two orders of magnitude improvement over non-doped measurements. The lifetime of electrons in a mixture of hydrogen gas and dry air has been measured from cooling-channel for either machine.

  19. Realization of GHZ States and the GHZ Test via Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss the realization of atomic GHZ states involving three-level atoms and we show explicitly how to use this state to perform the GHZ test in which it is possible to decide between local realism theories and quantum mechanics. The experimental realizations proposed makes use of the interaction of Rydberg atoms with a cavity prepared in a coherent state.

  20. Preliminary Beam Tests at REX for an Automatic Cavity Phasing Routine at HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Broere, J; Lanaia, D; Valuch, D

    2013-01-01

    The HIE upgrade at ISOLDE will use 32 independently phased superconducting quarterwave cavities, which will impose new demands on the operation and set-up of the linac. The large range of different radioactive species and the broad experimental programme means that the same beam species and energy are rarely studied twice, and the accelerator must be re-tuned for each experimental run. In order to expedite machine set-up it is foreseen to calculate and set automatically the cavity phases when the operator inputs the desired beam energy and A/q of the beam species. In this note we explore our understanding of the REX rf system and test our beam dynamics calculations with two independently phased 7-gap split-ring cavities.

  1. Cryogenic Test of a 750 MHz Superconducting RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [ODU; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-07-01

    A superconducting rf dipole cavity has been designed to address the challenges of a high repetition rate (750 MHz), high current for both electron/ion species (0.5/3 A per bunch), and large crossing angle (50 mrad) at the interaction points (IPs) crabbing system for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The cavity prototype built at Niowave, Inc. has been tested at the Jefferson Lab facilities. In this work we present a detailed analysis of the prototype cavity performance at 4 K and 2 K, corroborating the absence of hard multipacting barriers that could limit the desired transverse fields, along with the surface resistance (Rs) temperature dependency.

  2. Non-Destructive Testing for Black Heart Cavities in Potatoes with Microwave Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, Imran; Gregory, Andrew; Mouthaan, Ralf; Tian, Zhengrong; Andrews, Paul; Mellonie, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    A first investigation into the use of microwaves for the non-destructive testing for the presence of black heart cavities is presented. Additionally a potato's complex permittivity data between 0.5 GHz to 20 GHz measured using a coaxial sensor and the recipe for a potato phantom are also presented. Electromagnetic finite-difference time-domain simulations of potatoes show that changes to how microwaves propagate through a potato caused by a cavity can produce measurable changes in S21 at the potato's surface of up to 26 dB. Lab-based readings of the change in S21 caused by a phantom cavity submerged in a potato phantom liquid confirms the results of the simulation, albeit at a much reduced magnitude in the order of 0.1 dB.

  3. Cold Testing Of A Radial Extraction Output Cavity For A Frequency-doubling Gyroklystron

    CERN Document Server

    Bharathan, K

    2004-01-01

    Research in the University of Maryland Gyroklystron program has centered around the development of a 17.136 GHz gyroklystron, that combines the gyrotron mechanism with the ballistic bunching of klystrons to produce a high power, high gain amplifier. The current tube is a 4- cavity (input, buncher, penultimate and output) coaxial, frequency doubling system that will be used as a driver for the Haimson Research Corporation (HRC) accelerator structure. This thesis presents the design, simulation, optimization, cold test methodology and performance data of a proposed radial extraction output cavity in which the microwave energy is extracted through an inner coaxial conductor in the TE01 circular mode. The positioning of dielectrics in the drift spaces and the effect of axial and radial misalignments between the inner and outer walls of the cavity were studied at depth and quantified. One advantage of this topology is that it reduces the size and complexity of the output waveguide chain otherwise needed to convert...

  4. Rapid demountable platform (RDP)--a device for preventing fall from height accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Esther; Chan, Albert P C

    2012-09-01

    The prevention of fall from height accidents has long been a popular topic in the field of construction safety. Previous research has indicated one of the potential hazards was induced by the use of steel bracket as scaffold support. While researchers are focusing to improve the existing scaffolding system, this research introduces a newly developed device to minimize fall accidents. The working platform, namely Rapid Demountable Platform (RDP) can be applied across window frames without fixing anchor bolts. Emphasizing on the rapid installation/dismantling, the RDP provides another safer option for working at height. The development of the RDP has incorporated modular concept and aesthetic factor into the design, achieving a more user-friendly platform. Although the RDP is not intended to totally replace the traditional bamboo truss-out scaffold, it is designed to act as an alternative or a supplement to the existing bamboo truss-out scaffold. The RDP is the first of this kind to minimize fall from height accidents especially in cities similar to Hong Kong where external working at height is frequently encountered.

  5. Demountable, High field High-Temperature Superconductor TF coils for flexible steady-state fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Phillip; Bromberg, Leslie; Vieira, Rui; Minervini, Joseph; Galea, Christopher; Hensley, Sarah; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The excellent properties of HTS materials (e.g., YBCO) at high fields and elevated temperatures (>20 K), offer operational advantages for fusion machines, but results in challenges. For fusion devices, the ability to disassemble the TF coil is very attractive as it provides direct access to maintain the vacuum vessel, first wall and other components in a timely manner. High current conductors, made from multiple thin tapes, are not available but are being developed. Quench protection is a serious issue with HTS magnets, and novel means are needed to detect normal zones and to quickly discharge the magnet. Potential cables designs, demountable magnets and solutions to quench and protection issues for an HTS TF magnet for the Vulcan device (long term PMI studies) will be described. We also describe means for making continuous, persistent loops with HTS tapes. These loops offer an alternative to expensive monoliths for field control for complex geometries, such as stellarator-like fields. Partially supported by US DOE DE-FC02-93ER54186.

  6. TERA high gradient test program of RF cavities for medical linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degiovanni, A., E-mail: alberto.degiovanni@cern.ch [TERA Foundation-via G. Puccini 11, 28100 Novara (Italy); Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne EPFL-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Amaldi, U. [TERA Foundation-via G. Puccini 11, 28100 Novara (Italy); Universita Milano Bicocca-Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milan (Italy); Bonomi, R. [TERA Foundation-via G. Puccini 11, 28100 Novara (Italy); Politecnico di Torino-Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Garlasche, M. [TERA Foundation-via G. Puccini 11, 28100 Novara (Italy); Garonna, A. [TERA Foundation-via G. Puccini 11, 28100 Novara (Italy); Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne EPFL-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Verdu-Andres, S. [TERA Foundation-via G. Puccini 11, 28100 Novara (Italy); Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular IFIC (CSIC-UVEG)-Paterna, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Wegner, R. [CERN- 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-11-21

    The scientific community and the medical industries are putting a considerable effort into the design of compact, reliable and cheap accelerators for hadrontherapy. Up to now only circular accelerators are used to deliver beams with energies suitable for the treatment of deep seated tumors. The TERA Foundation has proposed and designed a hadrontherapy facility based on the cyclinac concept: a high gradient linear accelerator placed downstream of a cyclotron used as an injector. The overall length of the linac, and therefore its final cost, is almost inversely proportional to the average accelerating gradient achieved in the linac. TERA, in collaboration with the CLIC RF group, has started a high gradient test program. The main goal is to study the high gradient behavior of prototype cavities and to determine the appropriate linac operating frequency considering important issues such as machine reliability and availability of distributed power sources. A preliminary test of a 3 GHz cavity has been carried out at the beginning of 2010, giving encouraging results. Further investigations are planned before the end of 2011. A set of 5.7 GHz cavities is under production and will be tested in a near future. The construction and test of a multi-cell structure is also foreseen.

  7. TERA high gradient test program of RF cavities for medical linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiovanni, A.; Amaldi, U.; Bonomi, R.; Garlasché, M.; Garonna, A.; Verdú-Andrés, S.; Wegner, R.

    2011-11-01

    The scientific community and the medical industries are putting a considerable effort into the design of compact, reliable and cheap accelerators for hadrontherapy. Up to now only circular accelerators are used to deliver beams with energies suitable for the treatment of deep seated tumors. The TERA Foundation has proposed and designed a hadrontherapy facility based on the cyclinac concept: a high gradient linear accelerator placed downstream of a cyclotron used as an injector. The overall length of the linac, and therefore its final cost, is almost inversely proportional to the average accelerating gradient achieved in the linac. TERA, in collaboration with the CLIC RF group, has started a high gradient test program. The main goal is to study the high gradient behavior of prototype cavities and to determine the appropriate linac operating frequency considering important issues such as machine reliability and availability of distributed power sources. A preliminary test of a 3 GHz cavity has been carried out at the beginning of 2010, giving encouraging results. Further investigations are planned before the end of 2011. A set of 5.7 GHz cavities is under production and will be tested in a near future. The construction and test of a multi-cell structure is also foreseen.

  8. Thermal Shock test of Helium tank for HL-LHC crab cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Thermal shock test of the prototype of the helium tank for the HL-LHC crab cavities. We put the tank in a bath of liquid nitrogen so that it goes from 300 K to 77 K in ~1 hr. We had some sensors inside to make sure the loads and the deformations are not too big. The tank is then put back in the air and heated up. We do this cycle 5 times ato validate the design made for this device. Before this test we run a pressure test (we put a higher pressure inside).

  9. Processing and Testing of the SRF Photoinjector Cavity for BERLinPro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill, Andrew; Anders, W; Frahm, A; Knobloch, Jens; Neumann, Axel; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Kneisel, Peter; Turlington, Larry; Zaplatin, Evgeny

    2014-07-01

    The BERLinPro project is a compact, c.w. SRF energy recovery linac (ERL) that is being built to develop the accelerator physics and technology required to operate the next generation of high current ERLs. The machine is designed to produce a 50 MeV 100 mA beam, with better than 1 mm-mrad emittance. The electron source for the ERL will be a SRF photoinjector equipped with a multi-alkali photocathode. In order to produce a SRF photoinjector to operate reliably at this beam current HZB has undertaken a 3 stage photoinjector development program to study the operation of SRF photoinjectors in detail. The 1.4 cell cavity being reported on here is the second stage of this development, and represents the first cavity designed by HZB for use with a high quantum efficiency multi-alkali photocathode. This paper will describe the work done to prepare the cavity for RF testing in the vertical testing dewar at Jefferson Laboratory as well as the results of these RF tests.

  10. Nucleate pool boiling investigation on a silicon test section with micro-fabricated cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanna, A.; Kenning, D.B.R.; Karayiannis, T.G. [Brunel University, Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Hutter, C.; Sefiane, K. [University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Nelson, R.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The basic mechanisms of nucleate boiling are still not completely understood, in spite of the many numerical and experimental studies dedicated to the topic. The use of a hybrid code allows reasonable computational times for simulations of a solid plate with a large population of artificial micro-cavities with fixed distribution. This paper analyses the guidelines for the design, through numerical simulations, of the location and sizes of micro-fabricated cavities on a new silicon test section immersed in FC-72 at the saturation temperature for different pressures with an imposed heat flux applied at the back of the plate. Particular focus is on variations of wall temperature around nucleation sites. (author)

  11. Preliminary laboratory testing on the sound absorption of coupled cavity sonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiani, R.; Yahya, I.; Harjana; Suparmi

    2016-11-01

    This paper focuses on the sound absorption performance of coupled cavity sonic crystal. It constructed by a pair of a cylindrical tube with different values in diameters. A laboratory test procedure after ASTM E1050 has been conducted to measure the sound absorption of the sonic crystal elements. The test procedures were implemented to a single coupled scatterer and also to a pair of similar structure. The results showed that using the paired structure bring a better possibility for increase the sound absorption to a wider absorption range. It also bring a practical advantage for setting the local Helmholtz resonant frequency to certain intended frequency.

  12. Combining Cavity for RF Power Sources Higher Power Testing and Further Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wooldridge, Emma; Rogers, James H P

    2005-01-01

    A combining cavity for RF power sources has been investigated previously reported in EPAC'04 using computer simulations in CSTs' Microwave Studio© and by building a low power model out of aluminium. The model has now been tested at higher power in a number different configurations and compared with earlier results. This paper discusses the results of the higher power test and options for a combiner that can be used at the high power required for particle accelerators. It discusses further design and future modelling.

  13. Electromagnetic cavity tests of Lorentz invariance on Earth and in space

    CERN Document Server

    Nagel, M; Döringshoff, K; Kovalchuk, E V; Peters, A

    2011-01-01

    We present a Michelson-Morley type experiment for testing the isotropy of the speed of light in vacuum and matter. The experiment compares the resonance frequency of an actively rotated monolithic optical cryogenic sapphire resonator against the resonance frequency of a stationary evacuated optical cavity made of ultra-low-expansion glass. The results yield an upper limit for the anisotropy of the speed of light in matter (sapphire) of Delta(c)/c < 1 x 10^-16, limited by the frequency stability of the sapphire resonator.

  14. Electromagnetic cavity tests of Lorentz invariance on Earth and in space

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, M.; Möhle, K.; Döringshoff, K.; Kovalchuk, E. V.; Peters, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a Michelson-Morley type experiment for testing the isotropy of the speed of light in vacuum and matter. The experiment compares the resonance frequency of an actively rotated monolithic optical cryogenic sapphire resonator against the resonance frequency of a stationary evacuated optical cavity made of ultra-low-expansion glass. The results yield an upper limit for the anisotropy of the speed of light in matter (sapphire) of Delta(c)/c < 1 x 10^-16, limited by the frequency stabili...

  15. Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Duane P; Czerwinski, Ken; Russell, Charles E; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2010-07-13

    This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program's Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  16. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Duane P.; Bruckner, Jim; Fisher, Jen; Czerwinski, Ken; Russell, Charles E.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2010-09-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program’s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  17. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  18. Realization of GHZ States and the GHZ Test via Cavity QED for a Cavity Prepared in a Superposition of Zero and One Fock States

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss the realization of atomic GHZ states involving three-level atoms in a cascade and in a lambda configuration and we show explicitly how to use this state to perform the GHZ test in which it is possible to decide between local realism theories and quantum mechanics. The experimental realizations proposed makes use the interaction of Rydberg atoms with a cavity prepared in a state which is a superposition of zero and one Fock states.

  19. A case study testing the cavity mode model of the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on a case study we test the cavity mode model of the magnetosphere, looking for eigenfrequencies via multi-satellite and multi-instrument measurements. Geotail and ACE provide information on the interplanetary medium that dictates the input parameters of the system; the four Cluster satellites monitor the magnetopause surface waves; the POLAR (L=9.4 and LANL 97A (L=6.6 satellites reveal two in-situ monochromatic field line resonances (FLRs with T=6 and 2.5 min, respectively; and the IMAGE ground magnetometers demonstrate latitude dependent delays in signature arrival times, as inferred by Sarafopoulos (2004b. Similar dispersive structures showing systematic delays are also extensively scrutinized by Sarafopoulos (2005 and interpreted as tightly associated with the so-called pseudo-FLRs, which show almost the same observational characteristics with an authentic FLR. In particular for this episode, successive solar wind pressure pulses produce recurring ionosphere twin vortex Hall currents which are identified on the ground as pseudo-FLRs. The BJN ground magnetometer records the pseudo-FLR (alike with the other IMAGE station responses associated with an intense power spectral density ranging from 8 to 12 min and, in addition, two discrete resonant lines with T=3.5 and 7 min. In this case study, even though the magnetosphere is evidently affected by a broad-band compressional wave originated upstream of the bow shock, nevertheless, we do not identify any cavity mode oscillation within the magnetosphere. We fail, also, to identify any of the cavity mode frequencies proposed by Samson (1992.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetosphereionosphere interactions; Solar wind-magnetosphere interactions; MHD waves and instabilities

  20. Microwave power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity for accelerator application and its testing procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianjian [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Superconducting cavity resonators offer the advantage of high field intensity for a given input power, making them an attractive contender for particle accelerator applications. Power coupling into a superconducting cavity employed in a particle accelerator requires unique provisions to maintain high vacuum and cryogenic temperature on the cavity side, while operating with ambient conditions on the source side. Components introduced to fulfill mechanical requirements must show negligible obstruction of the propagation of the microwave with absence of critical locations that may give rise to electron multipaction, leading to a multiple section design, instead of an aperture, a probe, or a loop structure as found in conventional cavities. A coaxial power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity at 3.9 GHz has been developed. The cavity is intended to be employed as an accelerator to provide enhanced electron beam quality in a free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) user facility. The design of the coupler called for two windows to sustain high vacuum in the cavity and two bellows to accommodate mechanical dimensional changes resulting from cryogenics. Suppression of multipacting was accomplished by the choice of conductor dimensions and materials with low second yield coefficients. Prior to integration with the cavity, the coupler was tested for intrinsic properties in a back-to-back configuration and conditioned for high-power operation with increasing power input. Maximum incident power was measured to be 61 kW. When integrated with the superconducting cavity, a loaded quality factor of 9 x 10 5 was measured by transient method. Coupler return loss and insertion loss were estimated to be around -21 dB and -0.2 dB, respectively.

  1. Analysis of the cool down related cavity performance of the European XFEL vertical acceptance tests

    CERN Document Server

    Wenskat, Marc

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that the cool down dynamics across $T_c$ has a significant influence on the observed quality factors $Q_0$ of a cavity, which is most likely due to trapped flux. In this document we show the results of the investigation if such a correlation can be observed during the European XFEL cavity production.

  2. High Power Test Of A 3.9 GHz 5-cell Deflecting-mode Cavity In A Cryogenic Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    A 3.9 GHz deflecting mode (pi, TM110) cavity has been long used for six-dimensional phase-space beam manipulation tests at the A0 Photo-Injector Lab (16 MeV) in Fermilab and their extended applications with vacuum cryomodules are currently planned at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) user facility (> 50 MeV). Despite the successful test results, the cavity, however, demonstrated limited RF performance during liquid nitrogen (LN2) ambient operation that was inferior to theoretical prediction. We have been performing full analysis of the designed cavity by analytic calculation and comprehensive system simulation analysis to solve complex thermodynamics and mechanical stresses. The re-assembled cryomodule is currently under the test with a 50 kW klystron at the Fermilab A0 beamline, which will benchmark the modeling analysis. The test result will be used to design vacuum cryomodules for the 3.9 GHz deflecting mode cavity that will be employed at the ASTA facility for beam diagnostics and phase...

  3. HIGH POWER TEST OF A 3.9 GHZ 5-CELL DEFLECTING-MODE CAVITY IN A CRYOGENIC OPERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young-Min; Church, Michael

    2013-11-24

    A 3.9 GHz deflecting mode (S, TM110) cavity has been long used for six-dimensional phase-space beam manipulation tests [1-5] at the A0 Photo-Injector Lab (16 MeV) in Fermilab and their extended applications with vacuum cryomodules are currently planned at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) user facility (> 50 MeV). Despite the successful test results, the cavity, however, demonstrated limited RF performance during liquid nitrogen (LN2) ambient operation that was inferior to theoretical prediction. We have been performing full analysis of the designed cavity by analytic calculation and comprehensive system simulation analysis to solve complex thermodynamics and mechanical stresses. The re-assembled cryomodule is currently under the test with a 50 kW klystron at the Fermilab A0 beamline, which will benchmark the modeling analysis. The test result will be used to design vacuum cryomodules for the 3.9 GHz deflecting mode cavity that will be employed at the ASTA facility for beam diagnostics and phase-space control.

  4. Film Deposition, Cryogenic RF Testing and Materials Analysis of a Nb/Cu Single Cell SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Palczerski, Ari [JLAB; Li, Yongming [Peking

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we present preliminary results on using a cathodic-arc-discharge Nb plasma ion source to establish a Nb film-coated single-cell Cu cavity for SRF research. The polycrystalline Cu cavity was fabricated and mirror-surface-finished by a centrifugal barrel polishing (CBP) process at Jefferson Lab. Special pre-coating processes were conducted, in order to create a template-layer for follow-on Nb grain thickening. A sequence of cryogenic RF testing demonstrated that the Nb film does show superconductivity. But the quality factor of this Nb/Cu cavity is low as a result of high residual surface resistance. We are conducting a thorough materials characterization to explore if some microstructural defects or hydrogen impurities, led to such a low quality factor.

  5. Design and High Power Testing of 52.809 MHz RF Cavities for Slip Stacking in the Fermilab Recycler

    CERN Document Server

    Madrak, R

    2014-01-01

    For NOvA and future experiments requiring high intensity proton beams, Fermilab is in the process of upgrading the existing accelerator complex for increased proton production. One such improvement is to reduce the Main Injector cycle time, by performing slip stacking, previously done in the Main Injector, in the now repurposed Recycler Ring. Recycler slip stacking requires two new RF cavities operating at slightly different frequencies (df = 1260Hz). These are copper, coaxial, quarter wave cavities with R/Q =13 ohms. They operate at a peak gap voltage of 150 kV with 150 kW peak drive power (60% duty factor), and are resonant at 52.809 MHz with a 10 kHz tuning range. Two have been completed and installed. The design, high power test results, and status of the cavities are presented.

  6. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injektor Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Eremeev, G V; Kneisel, P; Stirbet, M; Turlington, L

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac [1]. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning; the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing [2] was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test were carried out at TJNAF’s production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (Ø10 mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects a...

  7. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injector Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A. [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Murcek, P. [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Teichert, J. [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Xiang, R. [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kneisel, P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Stirbet, M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Turlington, L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning, the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test was carried out at TJNAF's production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (O-slash10mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects appeared in the least accessible cathode cell. This contribution reports about our experiences, initial results and the on-going diagnostic work to understand and fix the problems.

  8. Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Program - Elliptical Twin Cavity for Accelerator Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, Andrew [TJNAF; Areti, Hari [TJNAF

    2015-08-01

    Funding is being requested pursuant to the proposals entitled Elliptical Twin Cavity for Accelerator Applications that was submitted and reviewed through the Portfolio Analysis and Management System (PAMS). The PAMS proposal identifier number is 0000219731. The proposed new type of superconducting cavity, the Elliptical Twin Cavity, is capable of accelerating or decelerating beams in two separate beam pipes. This configuration is particularly effective for high-current, low energy electron beams that will be used for bunched beam cooling of high-energy protons or ions. Having the accelerated beam physically separated from the decelerated beam, but interacting with the same RF mode, means that the low energy beam from the gun can be injected into to the superconducting cavity without bends enabling a small beam emittance to be maintained. A staff engineer who has been working with non-standard complicated cavity structures replaces the senior engineer (in the original budget) who is moving on to be a project leader. This is reflected in a slightly increased engineer time and in reduced costs. The Indirect costs for FY16 are lower than the previous projection. As a result, there is no scope reduction.

  9. Breakdown study based on direct in situ observation of inner surfaces of an rf accelerating cavity during a high-gradient test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tetsuo; Kageyama, Tatsuya; Sakai, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Yasunao; Yoshino, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    We have developed normal-conducting accelerating single-cell cavities with a complete higher-order-mode (HOM) heavily damped structure, into which we feed a 508.9-MHz continuous wave. During a high-gradient test of the second production version of the cavity, we performed a breakdown study based on direct in situ observation of the inner surfaces of the cavity. This paper presents our experimental findings obtained from this observation.

  10. Velocity Measurements in Nasal Cavities by Means of Stereoscopic Piv - Preliminary Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Fabio; Felisati, Giovanni; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2017-08-01

    The prediction of detailed flow patterns in human nasal cavities using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can provide essential information on the potential relationship between patient-specific geometrical characteristics of the nasal anatomy and health problems, and ultimately led to improved surgery. The complex flow structure and the intricate geometry of the nasal cavities make achieving such goals a challenge for CFD specialists. The need for experimental data to validate and improve the numerical simulations is particularly crucial. To this aim an experimental set-up based on Stereo PIV and a silicon phantom of nasal cavities have been designed and realized at Politecnico di Milano. This work describes the main features and challenges of the set-up along with some preliminary results.

  11. Demountable& Reconfigurable Support Structure%可拆卸和重构的支撑体结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roger-Bruno Richard; 杜翛然

    2013-01-01

    工业化建筑系统提供可由工厂控制的质量保证,以及快速简单的现场装配方式,同时基于干挂法的应用,拆卸也变得快速简单;且基于可持续性要求,整个过程没有任何拆毁行为.可拆卸和重构的支撑体结构可在3个工业化建筑系统的范畴内应用:现浇组装,工厂预制三维模块及混合式.%Industrialized building systems are by definition offering factory-controlled quality as well as fast and easy assembly at the site, which means fast and easy disassembly when dry joints are used; without any demolition as per the sustainability agenda. Demountable and reconfigurable Support Structures are offered within the three categories of industrialized building systems: Site-Assembled Kit-of-Parts, Factory-Made 3D Module and Hybrid.

  12. Measurement Report for the Four-Rod LHC Crab Cavity. Cold Tests held in July 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro Tapia, Maria; Calaga, Rama; Hernandez Chahin, Karim Gibran; Junginger, Tobias; Macpherson, Alick; Torres-Sanchez, Roberto; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the four-rod cavity prototype considered for the HL-LHC upgrade has already been assessed at CERN at cryogenic temperatures three times in the last two years [1, 2, 3]. In this report, the results of the latest measurements, carried out in July 2014, are shown. These measurements were to check the improvement of the cavity performance due to the change of the input and pick-up antennas. An estimation of the residual resistance of the Niobium was also performed.

  13. Beam Test of a High Pressure Cavity for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Kurup, A.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2010-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a high pressure RF cavity for use in the cooling channel of a muon collider, an experimental setup that utilizes 400-MeV Fermilab linac proton beam has been developed. In this paper, we describe the beam diagnostics and the collimator system for the experiment, and report the initial results of the beam commissioning. The transient response of the cavity to the beam is measured by the electric and magnetic pickup probes, and the beam-gas interaction is monitored by the optical diagnostic system composed of a spectrometer and two PMTs.

  14. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Duane; Russell, Chuck; Marshall, Matthew; Czerwinski, Ken; Daly, Michael J; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2008-02-08

    This exploratory research project is designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the possible existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations in Nevada Test Site (NTS) subsurface nuclear blast cavities. Although subsurface microbiological studies have been performed at the NTS in the past, radioactive zones have yet to be addressed. Nuclear blast zone microbiology is a completely new field and our team is well-positioned to collect and analyze samples that have never before been available to microbiologists. Relevant samples are now being obtained by incorporating microbiological collections into an ongoing annual hot well sampling program being conducted by other agencies. A combination of cultivation-based and molecular microbial detection protocols is being utilized at multiple locations to survey for uncultivable microorganisms and to develop a culture collection which will be characterized for radionuclide- and metal-reduction capabilities. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, a positive outcome from this work would have significant implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites. A primary objective of the project has been the establishment of the regulatory and technical framework necessary to enable our acquisition of samples. Thus, much of our activity in the first phase of this work has involved the development an approved Field Area Work Plan (FAWP), Radiological Work Permit (RWP), and other documentation required for radiological work at the NTS. We have also invested significant time into ensuring that all personnel possess the required training (e.g. Radworker II and 40 hr. HAZWOPER) for access to the hot well sampling sites. Laboratory facilities, required for field processing of radioactive samples as well as DNA extraction and other manipulations, have been secured both the NTS (Mercury, NV) and UNLV. Although our year-1 field work was delayed due

  15. Analysis of New High-Q0 SRF Cavity Tests by Nitrogen Gas Doping at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari D. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    In order to refine systematic understanding and establish confident process control, Jefferson Lab has joined with partners to investigate and thoroughly characterize the dramatically higher Q0 of 1.3 GHz niobium cavities first reported by FNAL in 2013[1]. With partial support from the LCLS-II project, JLab has undertaken a parametric study of nitrogen doping in vacuum furnace at 800 °C followed by variable depth surface removal in the 5 - 20 μm range. Q0 above 3×1010 are typical at 2.0 K and 16 MV/m accelerating field. We report observations from the single cell study and current interpretations. In addition to the parametric single cell study, we also report on the ongoing serial testing of six nitrogen-doped 9-cell cavities as baseline prototypes for LCLS-II.

  16. Measurement of groove features and dimensions of the vertical test cathode and the choke joint of the superconducting electron gun cavity of the Energy Recovery LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, L.; Ke, M.

    2011-10-13

    A testing program for the superconducting electron gun cavity that has been designed for the Energy Recovery LINAC is being planned. The goal of the testing program is to characterize the RF properties of the gun cavity at superconducting temperatures and, in particular, to study multipacting that is suspected to be occurring in the choke joint of the cavity where the vertical test cathode is inserted. The testing program will seek to understand the nature and cause of this multipacting and attempt to eliminate it, if possible, by supplying sufficient voltage to the cavity. These efforts are motivated by the multipacting issues that have been observed in the processing of the fine-grain niobium gun cavity. This cavity, which is being processed at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory for Brookhaven, has encountered multipacting at a gradient of approximately 3 MV/m and, to date, has resisted efforts at elimination. Because of this problem, a testing program is being established here in C-AD that will use the large-grain niobium gun cavity that currently resides at Brookhaven and has been used for room-temperature measurements. The large-grain and fine-cavities are identical in every aspect of construction and only differ in niobium grain size. Thus, it is believed that testing and conditioning of the large-grain cavity should yield important insights about the fine-grain cavity. One element of this testing program involves characterizing the physical features of the choke joint of the cavity where the multipacting is believed to be occurring and, in particular the grooves of the joint. The configuration of the cavity and the vertical test cathode is shown in Figure 1. In addition, it is important to characterize the groove of the vertical test cathode. The grooved nature of these two components was specifically designed to prevent multipacting. However, it is suspected that, because of the chemical processing that the fine-grain gun cavity underwent along with the

  17. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, S K; Pawloski, G A; Raschke, K

    2007-04-26

    This report describes evaluation of collapse evolution for selected LLNL underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The work is being done at the request of NSTec and supports the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Association Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program and the Chemical Sciences Division who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. The following unclassified summary

  18. A Laboratory Test Setup for in Situ Measurements of the Dielectric Properties of Catalyst Powder Samples under Reaction Conditions by Microwave Cavity Perturbation: Set up and Initial Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Dietrich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR of nitrogen oxides (NOX depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia.

  19. A laboratory test setup for in situ measurements of the dielectric properties of catalyst powder samples under reaction conditions by microwave cavity perturbation: set up and initial tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Markus; Rauch, Dieter; Porch, Adrian; Moos, Ralf

    2014-09-10

    The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOX) depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia.

  20. Higher order test of Lorentz invariance with an optical ring cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Michimura, Yuta; Mewes, Matthew; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Ohmae, Noriaki; Kokuyama, Wataru; Aso, Yoichi; Ando, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an apparatus to search for the higher-order Lorentz violation in photons by measuring the resonant frequency difference between two counterpropagating directions of an asymmetric optical ring cavity. From the year-long data taken between 2012 and 2013, we found no evidence for the light speed anisotropy at the level of $\\delta c/c \\lesssim 10^{-15}$. Limits on the dipole components of the anisotropy are improved by more than an order of magnitude, and limits on the hexapole components are obtained for the first time. An overview of our apparatus and the data analysis in the framework of the spherical harmonics decomposition of anisotropy are presented. We also present the status of the recent upgrade of the apparatus.

  1. A high gradient test of a single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a feedback waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, Roman; Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Kazakov, Sergey; Wu, Genfa; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Rowe, Allan; Rathke, John

    2015-09-01

    The most severe problem of the international linear collider (ILC-type) is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the collider. In current technology, the maximum acceleration gradient in superconducting (SC) structures is determined mainly by the value of the surface RF magnetic field. In order to increase the gradient, a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure is suggested. Utilization of STWA structure with small phase advance per cell for future high energy linear colliders such as ILCs may provide an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 times larger [1] than a standing wave structure. However, STWA structure requires a feedback waveguide for power redirecting from the end of the structure back to the front end of accelerating structure. Recent tests of a 1.3 GHz model of a single-cell cavity with waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient of a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer [2]. In the present paper, high gradient test results are presented.

  2. Testing of super conducting low-beta 704 Mhz cavities at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate in view of SPL- first results

    CERN Document Server

    Höfle, W; Lollierou, J; Valuch, D; Chel, S; Devanz, G; Desmons, M; Piquet, O; Paparella, R; Pierini, P

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the preparatory phase for the luminosity upgrade of the LHC (SLHC-PP ) it is foreseen to characterize two superconducting RF cavities and demonstrate compliance of the required SPL field stability in amplitude and phase using a prototype LLRF system. We report on the preparation for testing of two superconducting low-beta cavities at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate including the setting-up of the low level RF control system to evaluate the performance of the piezo-tuning system and cavity field stability in amplitude and phase. Results from tests with 50 Hz pulse repetition rate are presented. Simulations of the RF system will be used to predict the necessary specifications for power and bandwidth to control the cavity field and derive specifications for the RF system and its control. Exemplary results of the simulation are presented.

  3. A final report on the Phase 1 testing of a molten-salt cavity receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, J M [ed.; Smith, D C [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Barberton, OH (United States). Nuclear Equipment Div.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and testing of a solar central receiver using molten nitrate salt as a heat exchange fluid. Design studies for large commercial plants (30--100 MWe) have shown molten salt to be an excellent fluid for solar thermal plants as it allows for efficient thermal storage. Plant design studies concluded that an advanced receiver test was required to address uncertainties not covered in prior receiver tests. This recommendation led to the current test program managed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy. The 4.5 MWt receiver is installed at Sandia National Laboratories' Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The receiver incorporates features of large commercial receiver designs. This report describes the receiver's configuration, heat absorption surface (design and sizing), the structure and supporting systems, and the methods for control. The receiver was solar tested during a six-month period at the Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. The purpose of the testing was to characterize the operational capabilities of the receiver under a number of solar operating and stand-by conditions. This testing consisted of initial check-out of the systems, followed by steady-state performance, transient receiver operation, receiver operation in clouds, receiver thermal loss testing, receiver start-up operation, and overnight thermal conditioning tests. This report describes the design, fabrication, and results of testing of the receiver.

  4. Model to Test Electric Field Comparisons in a Composite Fairing Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Burford, Janessa

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This study shows cumulative distribution function (CDF) comparisons of composite a fairing electromagnetic field data obtained by computational electromagnetic 3D full wave modeling and laboratory testing. This work is an extension of the bare aluminum fairing perfect electric conductor (PEC) model. Test and model data correlation is shown.

  5. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  6. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.2 GHz, 4.0 kW-CW coupled-cavity traveling wave tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, W. R.; Harman, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program to study design techniques and to utilize these techniques to optimize the performance of an X-band 4 kW, CW traveling wave tube ultimately intended for satellite-borne television broadcast transmitters is described. The design is based on the coupled-cavity slow-wave circuit with velocity resynchronization to maximize the conversion efficiency. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube. This was done to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments employing a NASA designed axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes after shipment of the tubes to NASA.

  7. Freedrop Testing and CFD Simulation of Ice Models from a Cavity into Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    flow in the test section. 9. Vacuum-side valve . Pilot actuated butterfly -type valve isolates vacuum condi- tions required to attain sub-atmospheric...dryers - DonaldsonrRegenerative Air Dryersrremove moisture from the compressed air prior to tunnel entry. 3. Pressure-side valve - El-O-Maticrpilot...actuator controls the high pressure sup- ply via a ball-type valve . 4. Regulating valve - Pressure controlled Leslierdiaphragm-type valve provides the

  8. Design, construction, and testing of a large-cavity, 1-10 GHz Flygare-Balle spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolich, Stephen G.; Sarkozy, Laszlo C.

    2011-09-01

    A large pulsed-beam, Fourier transform microwave spectrometer employing 48 in. diameter mirrors and 35″ (NHS-35) diffusion pump has been constructed at the University of Arizona. The Fabry-Perot-type cavity, using the large mirrors provides Q-values in the 15 000 to 40 000 range. Test spectra were obtained using transverse and coaxial injection of the pulsed-nozzle molecular beams. The measured molecular resonance linewidths were 8 kHz for the transverse injection and 2 kHz for coaxial molecular beam injection. Good signal to noise ratios were obtained for the test signals. Strong lines for butadiene iron tricarbonyl were seen with a single beam pulse (S/N = 5/1). Transitions were measured as low as 900 MHz and some previously unresolved hyperfine structure is now resolved for the butadiene iron tricarbonyl spectra. The spectrometer is operated using a personal computer with LABVIEW programs, with provisions for automatic frequency scanning. The extended, low-frequency range of this spectrometer should make it very useful for making measurements on significantly larger molecules and complexes than have been previously studied. The improved resolution, in the coaxial beam mode, will allow better resolution of hyperfine structure. The large diffusion pump allows a higher beam pulse frequency to compensate for the generally lower sensitivity at lower frequencies.

  9. Cryogenic testing of the 2.1 GHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A., E-mail: arsenyev@mit.edu; Temkin, Richard J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terrence L.; Rogacki, Adam R. [Niowave, Inc., 1012 North Walnut Street, Lansing, Michigan 48906 (United States)

    2016-05-30

    We present results from cryogenic tests of the multi-cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving high average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery-linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam break-up instability, caused by parasitic higher order modes (HOMs) interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The multi-cell cavity was designed and fabricated of niobium. Two cryogenic (vertical) tests were conducted. The high unloaded Q-factor was demonstrated at a temperature of 4.2 K at accelerating gradients up to 3 MV/m. The measured value of the unloaded Q-factor was 1.55 × 10{sup 8}, in agreement with prediction.

  10. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  11. Design, Construction, and Initial Test of High Spatial Resolution Thermometry Arrays for Detection of Surface Temperature Profiles on SRF Cavities in Super Fluid Helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Grigory Eremeev

    2011-07-01

    We designed and built two high resolution (0.6-0.55mm special resolution [1.1-1.2mm separation]) thermometry arrays prototypes out of the Allen Bradley 90-120 ohm 1/8 watt resistor to measure surface temperature profiles on SRF cavities. One array was designed to be physically flexible and conform to any location on a SRF cavity; the other was modeled after the common G-10/stycast 2850 thermometer and designed to fit on the equator of an ILC (Tesla 1.3GHz) SRF cavity. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each array and their construction. In addition we will present a case study of the arrays performance on a real SRF cavity TB9NR001. TB9NR001 presented a unique opportunity to test the performance of each array as it contained a dual (4mm separation) cat eye defect which conventional methods such as OST (Oscillating Superleak second-sound Transducers) and full coverage thermometry mapping were unable to distinguish between. We will discuss the new arrays ability to distinguish between the two defects and their preheating performance.

  12. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  13. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  14. Discharge light and carbonization distribution characteristics at XLPE-silicon rubber interface with micro-cavity in tracking failure test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, L.; Li, S.; Wang, S. B.; Lei, S. L.; Liu, S. X.

    2011-12-01

    Installation of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable joint possibly introduces defects into the XLPE-silicon rubber interface, such as micro-cavity and micro-wire. Those defects greatly decrease the interfacial breakdown strength and endanger the stability of power system. However, the traditional method only measures the breakdown strength, which alone is limited and can not provide detailed information to more clearly understand the dielectric performance and tracking failure mechanism. This paper investigated the effect of micro-cavity on tracking failure by analyzing the distribution characteristics of discharge light and carbonization. Interfaces with those defects were setup by pressing together a slice of XLPE and a slice of transparent silicon rubber. A 50 Hz AC voltage was applied on a pair of flat-round electrodes sandwiched at the interface with their insulation distance of 5 mm until tracking failure occurred. The evolution of both discharge light and carbonization at the interface from discharge to the failure was recorded with a video recorder and then their channel width was analyzed with image processing method. Obtained results show that micro-cavity at an XLPE-silicon rubber interface strengthens the transportation of charge and easily leads to interfacial discharge and tracking failure. The distribution of discharge light and carbonization at the interface with micro-wire proves this.

  15. Topical report: Natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) evaluation for generating additional reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Pointer, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2005-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept. One of the key passive safety features of the VHTR is the potential for decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-cooled RCCS concept is notably similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that was developed for the General Electric PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor. As part of the DOE R&D program that supported the development of this fast reactor concept, the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) was developed at ANL to provide proof-of-concept data for the RVACS under prototypic natural convection flow, temperature, and heat flux conditions. Due to the similarity between RVACS and the RCCS, current VHTR R&D plans call for the utilization of the NSTF to provide RCCS model development and validation data, in addition to supporting design validation and optimization activities. Both air-cooled and water-cooled RCCS designs are to be included. In support of this effort, ANL has been tasked with the development of an engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF to ensure that sufficiently detailed temperature, heat flux, velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained to adequately qualify the codes under the expected range of air-cooled RCCS flow conditions. Next year, similar work will be carried out for the alternative option of a water-cooled RCCS design. Analysis activities carried out in support of this experiment planning task have shown that: (a) in the RCCS, strong

  16. Performance of powder-filled evacuated panel insulation in a manufactured home roof cavity: Tests in the Large Scale Climate Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, T.W.; Kosny, J.; Childs, P.W.

    1996-03-01

    A full-scale section of half the top of a single-wide manufactured home has been studied in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A small roof cavity with little room for insulation at the eaves is often the case with single-wide units and limits practical ways to improve thermal performance. The purpose of the current tests was to obtain steady-state performance data for the roof cavity of the manufactured home test section when the roof cavity was insulated with fiberglass batts, blown-in rock wool insulation or combinations of these insulations and powder-filled evacuated panel (PEP) insulation. Four insulation configurations were tested: (A) a configuration with two layers of nominal R{sub US}-7 h {center_dot} ft{sup 2} {center_dot} F/BTU (R{sub SI}-1.2 m{sup 2} {center_dot} K/W) fiberglass batts; (B) a layer of PEPs and one layer of the fiberglass batts; (C) four layers of the fiberglass batts; and (D) an average 4.1 in. (10.4 cm) thick layer of blown-in rock wool at an average density of 2.4 lb/ft{sup 3} (38 kg/m{sup 3}). Effects of additional sheathing were determined for Configurations B and C. With Configuration D over the ceiling, two layers of expanded polystyrene (EPS) boards, each about the same thickness as the PEPs, were installed over the trusses instead of the roof. Aluminum foils facing the attic and over the top layer of EPS were added. The top layer of EPS was then replaced by PEPs.

  17. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  18. Cavity water hammer characteristic test on two places%两处断流弥合水击特性试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵莉; 杨玉思; 卢玉东; 胡晓; 樊凌珲

    2016-01-01

    为研究有压管道系统停泵过程产生的多处水柱分离现象,并分析断流弥合水击升压和断流长度的影响因素,设计出可以实现同时发生两处断流弥合水击的试验模型。试验观察到停泵产生的水柱分离现象有完全雾状汽化状态、完全断流空腔状态、既有断流空腔又有雾状汽化区的断流状态以及不完全断流状态等4种。试验结果表明,初始流速、关阀速度是两处断流弥合升压和断流长度的重要影响因素,初始流速越大,弥合升压越大,断流长度越长;关阀速度越快,弥合升压越大,断流长度越长;流速较高时,管路布置形式对具有两处断流管路的弥合升压影响很大。%In order to study the water column separation phenomenon and analyze the factors of pressure boosts and breaking length during the process of stopping a pump for a system, a test model was designed to cause cavity water hammer to occur in two places at the same time. Through the test model, we observed the water column separation phenomena. These phenomena included a completely vaporized state, a completely blocked cavity state, a blocked cavity and vaporized state, and not-completely block cavity state. The test results show that the initial flow rate and valve closing speed are the two most important factors that influence the water hammer pressure and breaking length. When the flow rate is higher, the water hammer pressure is greater and the breaking length is longer. When the valve closing speed is faster, the water hammer pressure is greater and the breaking length is longer. When there is a higher flow rate, the pipeline layout form has a large influence on water hammer pressure when the pipeline system has devascularization in two places.

  19. Performance of a Downconverter Test-electronics with MTCA-based Digitizers for Beam Position Monitoring in 3.9 GHz Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Wamsat, T; Lorbeer, B; Zhang, P

    2012-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in 3.9GHz accelerating cavities are planned to be used for beam position monitoring at the European XFEL. The selected HOMs are located around 5440MHz, with a bandwidth of 100MHz and 9060MHz, with a bandwidth of 50MHz. A downconverter electronics, built for tests at FLASH, converts the HOMs to an intermediate frequency of 70MHz. The MTCA (Micro Telecommunications Computing Architecture) standard will be used for the XFEL. Thus it is important to have a performance study of the downconverter test-electronics using the MTCA digitizer card SIS8300. In the digitizer the IF frequency of 70MHz is undersampled with a clock frequency of 108MS/s. The paper presents the performance of the digitizer together with the test-electronics. A comparison with a 216MS/s VME (Versa Module Eurocard) digitizer is made.

  20. [Role of beta-carotene in the prevention of genotoxic damage in patients undergoing radiotherapy. Monitoring by the micronucleus test in exfoliative cells of the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldini, C; Malusardi, G; Grossi, L; Chiarelli, G

    1992-01-01

    Radiotherapic treatment of patients with carcinoma usually causes genotoxis damage. This has been studied recently using the test of micronuclei in esfoliated cells. This test presents methodologic advantages in compared with the classic citogenetic analysis and as it is carried out on esfolieted cells from the oral cavity it faithfully reflects the genotoxic damage undergone by the cells of the basal layer of the epitelium. The preliminary result obtained so far have confirmed the anticlastogenic activity of beta-carotene in fact, the frequence of micronuclei in esfolieted cells from the oral cavity in patients undergoing radiotherapy or undergoing treatment with beta-carotene is inferior to that of patients undergoing treatment with beta-carotene is inferior to that of patients undergoing radiotherapy without the subministration of carotenoids. Treatment with carotenoids does not influence the therapeutic efficiency of radiotherapy treatment. Therefore, the results seem to confirm that indirect ossidaction processes are involved in the mechanism of the clastogenic action of radiotherapia. The carotenoids seem to be able to contrast validly this undesirable effect without interfering with the desirable therapeutic effect.

  1. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Wastine, B.; Rella, C. W.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Delmotte, M.; Kazan, V.; Darding, M.; Lebègue, B.; Kaiser, C.; Xueref-Rémy, I.; Ramonet, M.

    2015-09-01

    To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about 10 years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments) and in the field (15 instruments). The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  2. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Matalevich, Joseph R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  4. 贯入法与回弹法检测空斗墙砌体的适用性检验%Applicability verification of penetration method and rebound method testing row-lock cavity wall masonry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卓琳

    2012-01-01

    In light of many row-lock cavity wall structures in villages and small towns of domestic Jiangnan region, the paper testifies the applica- bility of penetration method and rebound method for testifying the mortar of row-lock cavity wall and the masonry strength. Results show that pene- tration method is suitable to testify the mortar strength of row-lock cavity wall, and the testing position is good for avoiding cavity brick and lime joints. Rebound method is suitable to testify the clay strength of row-lock cavity wall masonry, and the testing position is good for avoiding cavity brick.%针对我国江南地区村镇较多的空斗墙结构,对贯入法和回弹法对空斗墙中砂浆和砌块强度检测的适用性进行了检验,结果表明,贯入法适用于空斗墙砌体砂浆强度的检测,检测位置宜避开斗砖和丁砖位置的灰缝,回弹法适用于空斗墙砌体粘土砖强度的检测,检测位置宜避开斗砖。

  5. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sorbom, B N; Palmer, T R; Mangiarotti, F J; Sierchio, J M; Bonoli, P; Kasten, C; Sutherland, D A; Barnard, H S; Haakonsen, C B; Goh, J; Sung, C; Whyte, D G

    2014-01-01

    The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design study aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q_p~13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ~63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ~23 T peak field on coil with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External cu...

  6. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorbom, B.N., E-mail: bsorbom@mit.edu; Ball, J.; Palmer, T.R.; Mangiarotti, F.J.; Sierchio, J.M.; Bonoli, P.; Kasten, C.; Sutherland, D.A.; Barnard, H.S.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Goh, J.; Sung, C.; Whyte, D.G.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • ARC reactor designed to have 500 MW fusion power at 3.3 m major radius. • Compact, simplified design allowed by high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • ARC has innovative plasma physics solutions such as inboardside RF launch. • High temperature superconductors allow high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • Liquid immersion blanket and jointed magnets greatly simplify tokamak reactor design. - Abstract: The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor is the product of a conceptual design study aimed at reducing the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a ∼200–250 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q{sub p} ≈ 13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ∼63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ∼23 T peak field on coil achievable with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External current drive is provided by two innovative inboard RF launchers using 25 MW of lower hybrid and 13.6 MW of ion cyclotron fast wave power. The resulting efficient current drive provides a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing fluorine lithium beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket is low-risk technology and provides effective neutron moderation and shielding, excellent

  7. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); TESLA Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.).

  8. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavities/tooth decay Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cavities are permanently damaged areas in the hard surface of your teeth ... into tiny openings or holes. Cavities, also called tooth decay or caries, are caused by a combination of ...

  9. Tests of a niobium split-ring superconducting heavy ion accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Jaffey, A.H.; Khoe, T.K.; Olesen, M.C.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wesolowski, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A niobium split-ring accelerating structure designed for use in the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion energy booster was successfully tested. The superconducting resonator has a resonant frequency of 97 MHz and an optimum particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.11. Ultimate performance is expected to be limited by peak surface fields, which in this structure are 4.7 E/sub a/ electric and 170 E/sub a/ (Gauss) magnetic, where E/sub a/ is the effective accelerating gradient in MV/m. The rf losses in two demountable superconducting joints severely limited performance in initial tests. Following independent measurements of the rf loss properties of several types of demountable joints, one demountable joint was eliminated and the other modified. Subsequently, the resonator could be operated continuously at E/sub a/ = 3.6 MV/m (corresponding to an energy gain of 1.3 MeV per charge) with 10W rf input power. Maximum field level was limited by electron loading. The mechanical stability of the resonator under operating conditions is excellent: vibration induced eigenfrequency noise is less than 120 Hz peak to peak, and the radiation pressure induced frequency shift is ..delta..f/f = 1.6 x 10/sup -6/ E/sub a//sup 2/.

  10. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  11. Data Acquisition System of Superconducting Cavity Test Based on Labview%基于 Labview 的超导腔测试数据采集系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娟; 戴建枰; 黄泓; 徐波; 林海英; 孙毅; 潘卫民

    2013-01-01

    设计了基于Labview的超导腔测试数据采集系统,该系统应用于超导腔垂直和水平测试的数据采集,实现了测量仪器、本地机及远程机的数据通讯,于国内首次实现了Q0~Eacc曲线及辐射剂量曲线的实时显示,并使得Labview采集的数据与EPICS之间互相连通。该数据采集系统根据被测数据带宽及精度的不同,灵活选择不同的传输接口,采集功率计、频率计、温度计、辐射剂量探测器等仪器的信号,实时地传输、处理并存储所有数据。 Spoke012超导腔垂直测试实验结果表明,该系统运行稳定可靠,易于维护,界面友好,同时具有很好的可移植性,可在其他类型的超导腔测试中获得广泛应用。%The data acquisition system based on Labview is designed .The system is applied to the vertical and horizontal test experiment .It is in charge of communications of the measuring instruments , the local machine and the remote machine .It realizes the real-time display of Q0 ~Eacc and radiation dose curve for the first time in China.The data connection between Labview and EPICS is also implemented .The DAQ system chooses dif-ferent transmission interfaces according to the different bandwidths and precisions of the measured data .It col-lects data of instruments such as power meter , frequency counter , thermometer and radiation dosimeter .All of these data should be acquired , transmitted, processed and stored synchronously and in real time .The result for Spoke012 cavity vertical test has shown that the DAQ system in operation performs stably and reliably as expec -ted.It also has a friendly interface and can be transplanted to other superconducting cavity tests easily and con -veniently .

  12. Cold RF test and associated mechanical features correlation of a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity built in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAIJing; JIN Song; WANG Fang; LIU Ke-Xin; R. L.Geng; ZHAO Kui; LU Xiang-Yang; QUAN Sheng-Wen; ZHANG Bao-Cheng; LIN Lin; HAO Jian-Kui; ZHU Feng; XU Wen-Can; HE Fei-Si

    2012-01-01

    The RF performance of a 1.3 G Hz 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity was evaluated at cryogenic temperatures following surface processing by using the standard ILC-style recipe.The cavity is a TESLA-style 9-ccll superconducting niobium cavity,with complete end group components including a higher order mode coupler,built in China for practical applications.An accelerating gradient of 28.6 MV/m was achieved at an unloaded quality factor of 4 × 109.The morphological property of mechanical features on the RF surface of this cavity was characterized through optical inspection.Correlation between the observed mechanical features and the RF performance of the cavity is attempted.

  13. European infrastructures for R&D and test of superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryo-modules

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    The volume is copyright CERN and can be distributed under CC-BY license. The need for a European facility to build and test superconducting RF accelerating structures and cryo‐modules (SRF test facility) was extensively discussed during the preparation of EuCARD [1,2]. It comprised a distributed network of equipment across Europe to be assessed and, if needed, completed by hardware. It also addressed the quest for a deeper basic understanding, a better control and optimisation of the manufacture of superconducting RF structures with the aim of a substantial improvement of the accelerating gradient, a reduction of its spread and a cost minimisation. However, consequent to EU budget restrictions, the proposal was not maintained. Instead, a more detailed analysis was requested by a sub‐task inside the EuCARD Network [3] AccNet ‐ RFTech [4]. The main objective of this “SRF sub‐task” consists of intensifying a collaborative effort between European accelerator labs. The aim focused on planning and later...

  14. Evaluation of Etest and macrodilution broth method for antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida sp strains isolated from oral cavities of AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVA Maria do Rosário R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of the Etest and the reference broth macrodilution susceptibility test for fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B was performed with 59 of Candida species isolated from the oral cavities of AIDS patients. The Etest method was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the reference method was performed according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards document M27-A guidelines. Our data showed that there was a good correlation between the MICs obtained by the Etest and broth dilution methods. When only the MIC results at ± 2 dilutions for both methods were considered, the agreement rates were 90.4% for itraconazole, ketoconazole and amphotericin B and 84.6% for fluconazole of the C. albicans tested. In contrast, to the reference method, the Etest method classified as susceptible three fluconazole-resistant isolates and one itraconazole-resistant isolate, representing four very major errors. These results indicate that Etest could be considered useful for antifungal sensitivity evaluation of yeasts in clinical laboratories.

  15. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  16. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  17. A study of beam position diagnostics with beam-excited dipole higher order modes using a downconverter test electronics in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, N.; Lorbeer, B.; Wamsat, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Jones, R.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to de ne a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 m accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth dipole band, and a global resolution of 20 m over the complete module. Based on these results we decided to build a HOM electronics for the second dipole band and the fifth dipole band, so that we will have both high resolution measurements for the whole module, and localized measurements for individual cavity. The prototype electronics is being built by Fermilab and planned to be tested in FLASH by the end of 2012.

  18. Superconducting accelerating four-cell cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A close view of the four-cell cavity. This was a prototype designed for LEP2 (LEP1 had warm copper cavities as accelerating elements). The first successful tests were made in December 1980 - reaching a Q = 10^6. (see photo 8012650X)

  19. Dawn of Cavity Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Can-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Merging the progress of spintronics with the advancement in cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity polaritons, a new field of Cavity Spintronics is forming, which connects some of the most exciting modern physics, such as quantum information and quantum optics, with one of the oldest science on the earth, the magnetism.

  20. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Olivier, Gilles; Renard, Bertrand; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  1. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousson, Sebastien; Darve, Christine; Duthil, Patxi; Elias, Nuno; Molloy, Steve; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  2. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-01

    "Cavity-optomechanics" aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  3. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Michael [Booz Allen Hamilton, 3811 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  4. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  5. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  6. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  7. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  8. Superconducting RF cavity R&D for future accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, C M

    2009-01-01

    High-beta superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) elliptical cavities are being developed for several accelerator projects including Project X, the European XFEL, and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Fermilab has recently established an extensive infrastructure for SRF cavity R&D for future accelerators, including cavity surface processing and testing and cavity assembly into cryomodules. Some highlights of the global effort in SRF R&D toward improving cavity performance, and Fermilab SRF cavity R&D in the context of global projects are reviewed.

  9. Extreme diffusion limited electropolishing of niobium radiofrequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Anthony C.

    2017-03-01

    A deeply modulated, regular, continuous, oscillating current waveform is reliably and repeatably achieved during electropolishing of niobium single-cell elliptical radiofrequency cavities. Details of the technique and cavity test results are reported here. The method is applicable for cavity frequencies in the range 500 MHz to 3.9 GHz and can be extended to multicell structures.

  10. Extreme diffusion limited electropolishing of niobium radiofrequency cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    Deeply modulated, continuous, diffusion-limited current waveforms for electropolishing niobium single-cell elliptical radiofrequency cavities are reliably and repeatedly achieved at Fermilab. Details of the technique and cavity test results are reported here. The method is applicable for cavity frequencies in the range 500MHz to 3.9 GHz and can be extended to multicell structures.

  11. The First Nine-Cell TESLA Cavity Made in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiang-Yang; JIN Song; XIN Tian-Mu; YAO Zhong-Yuan; CHEN Jia-Er; ZHAO Kui; QUAN Sheng-Wen; ZHANG Bao-Cheng; HAO Jian-Kui; ZHU Feng; LIN Lin; XU Wen-Can; WANG Er-Dong; WANG Fang

    2008-01-01

    A totally home-made 9-cell TESLA type superconducting cavity is made at Peking University. The cavity fabrication is according to DESY specification. The cavity is made of high purity niobium from OTIC, Ningxia.The electron beam welding is carried out at Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin. By the cooperation, the cavity is tested at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, USA. The preliminary result shows the acceleration gradient Eacc is 23 MV/m without quench and has potential for improvement.

  12. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  13. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  14. Performance of 3-cell Seamless Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLBA; Jelezov, I. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, W. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, X. [DESY, Hamburg

    2009-11-01

    In the last several months we have surface treated and cryogenically tested three TESLA-type 3-cell cavities, which had been manufactured at DESY as seamless assemblies by hydroforming. The cavities were completed at JLab with beam tube/flange assemblies. All three cavities performed very well after they had been post-purified with titanium at 1250C for 3 hrs. The cavities, two of which consisted of an end cell and 2 center cells and one was a center cell assembly, achieved gradients of Eacc = 32 MV/m, 34 MV/m and 35 MV/m without quenches. The performance was limited by the appearance of the “Q-drop” in the absence of field emission. This contribution reports about the various measurements undertaken with these cavities.

  15. The ADMX Microwave Cavity: Present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollett, Nathan; ADMX Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX), a direct-detection axion search, uses a tunable resonant cavity to enhance axion to photon conversion rates to a detectable level when the cavity resonance matches the mass of the axion. It has successfully taken data in the 460 - 890 MHz frequency range and is now probing a similar range with much higher sensitivity. However the axion mass is unknown and may be at higher frequencies than the currently operating system. In anticipation of future runs with an increased mass range, ADMX is conducting extensive research and development of microwave cavities. These developments include photonic band-gap cavities, multi-vane cavities, partitioned cavities, in-phase coupled cavities, and superconducting hybrid cavities. Many of these projects are in different stages between simulations and testing of physical prototypes. The status and current objectives of these projects will be presented. Supported by DOE Grants DE-SC0010280, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, the Heising-Simons Foundation and the LLNL, FNAL and PNNL LDRD program.

  16. Cavity spin optodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, N

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a large quantum spin coupled parametrically to an optical resonator is treated in analogy with the motion of a cantilever in cavity optomechanics. New spin optodynamic phenonmena are predicted, such as cavity-spin bistability, optodynamic spin-precession frequency shifts, coherent amplification and damping of spin, and the spin optodynamic squeezing of light.

  17. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  18. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  19. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  20. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  1. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  2. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  3. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  4. SPS RF cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. A power of up to 790 kW can be supplied to each giving a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities.

  5. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; Molendijk, John; Timko, Helga; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently configured for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would exceed the peak klystron power and lead to saturation. A new scheme has therefore been proposed: for beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam will not be corrected (transient beam loading), but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point will be adapted for each bunch. The goal of this MD was to test a new algorithm that would adjust the voltage set point to achieve the cavity phase modulation that would minimize klystron forward power.

  6. Tests of Four PT-415 Coolers Installed in the Drop-in Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, S.T.

    2008-07-08

    The superconducting magnets and absorbers for MICE will be cooled using PT415 pulse tube coolers. The cooler 2nd stage will be connected to magnets and the absorbers through a helium or hydrogen re-condensing system. It was proposed that the coolers be connected to the magnets in such a way that the cooler can be easily installed and removed, which permits the magnets to be shipped without the coolers. The drop-in mode requires that the cooler 1st stage be well connected to the magnet shields and leads through a low temperature drop demountable connection. The results of the PT415 drop-in cooler tests are presented.

  7. Characterizing the geometrical tolerances of optimized vertical-cavity thermal emitter stack configurations for the mid-infrared via Monte Carlo testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pühringer, Gerald; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2017-05-01

    We evaluate a recently devised design of vertical-cavity enhanced resonant thermal emitter (VERTE) regarding stability to fabrication tolerances of PVD layer deposition techniques. Such an emitter achieves narrowband and coherent thermal emission and is composed of an multilayer stack of dielectric layers (silicon and silica) on top of a reflective metal (silver) structure. The silica layer above the metal acts as a vertical cavity enhancing the electromagnetic field between the reflective metal and the dielectric stack forming a Bragg mirror (1-D photonic crystal). In our previous work, we identified several suitable five-layer-stack configurations, which considered several features and limitations of a real-world device, such as temperature dependence of the materials, fabrication constraints or unwanted emission modes. However, the emission characteristics are very sensitive to the geometrical and optical properties of the material. In order to examine this behaviour, a Monte-Carlo algorithm was used to apply a Gauss-distributed error in depth (relative the unperturbed layer thickness) for every individual layer. The robustness of the emission properties against fabrication errors were evaluated and analyzed by significant statistical quantities. As expected, the main issue compromising the emission properties is a deviation of the resonance wavelength in relation to the initial target resonance wavelength of the unperturbed configuration. Interestingly, configurations with larger average layer thicknesses and therefore with larger absolute thickness deviations did not exhibit a larger variance of the emission wavelength. Instead, the variance slightly decreased or remained constant. A similar result was obtained for increasing the number of dielectric layers. In contrast, the peak emissivity (at normal incidence) was significantly influenced by the average layer depth of a configuration. Also, the effect of broadening of the spectral emittance curve due to

  8. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  9. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  10. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  11. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  12. Surface explosion cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Clanet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video on cavities created by explosions of firecrackers at the water free surface. We use three types of firecrackers containing 1, 1.3 and 5 g of flash powder. The firecrackers are held with their center at the surface of water in a cubic meter pool. The movies are recorded from the side with a high-speed video camera. Without confinement the explosion produces an hemispherical cavity. Right after the explosion this cavity grows isotropically, the bottom then stops while the sides continue to expand. In the next phase the bottom of the cavity accelerates backwards to the surface. During this phase the convergence of the flow creates a central jet that rises above the free surface. In the last part of the video the explosion is confined in a vertical open tube made of glass and of centimetric diameter. The explosion creates a cylindrical cavity that develops towards the free end of the tube. Depending on the charge, the cavity can either stop inside the tube or at its exit, but nev...

  13. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  14. Coupled resonator vertical cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    The monolithic integration of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. The authors report the first electrically injected coupled resonator vertical-cavity laser diode and demonstrate novel characteristics arising from the cavity coupling, including methods for external modulation of the laser. A coupled mode theory is used model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser.

  15. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradin, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Muci, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Hassan, Yassin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Dominguez, A. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tokuhiro, Akira [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Hamman, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2014-10-15

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  16. 805 MHz and 201 MHz RF cavity development for MUCOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derun [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Corlett, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ladran, A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); MacGill, R [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wallig, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zisman, M [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Moretti, A [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Rowe, A [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Qian, Z B [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Wu, V [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Rimmer, R A [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Norem, J [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Summers, D [University of Mississippi at Oxford, MS 38677 (United States); Torun, Y [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2003-08-01

    A muon cooling channel calls for very high accelerating gradient RF structures to restore the energy lost by muons in the absorbers. The RF structures have to be operated in a strong magnetic field and thus the use of superconducting RF cavities is excluded. To achieve a high shunt impedance while maintaining a large enough aperture to accommodate a large transverse emittance muon beam, the cavity design adopted is a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be foils to terminate the electromagnetic field at the cavity iris. The possibility of using grids of thin-walled metallic tubes for the termination is also being explored. Many of the RF-related issues for muon cooling channels are being studied both theoretically and experimentally using an 805 MHz cavity that has a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be windows to terminate the cavity aperture. The design and performance of this cavity are reported here. High-power RF tests of the 805 MHz cavity are in progress at Lab G in Fermilab. The cavity has exceeded its design gradient of 30 MV m{sup -1}, reaching 34 MV m{sup -1} without external magnetic field. No surface damage was observed at this gradient. The cavity is currently under conditioning at Lab G with an external magnetic field of 2.5 T. We also present here a 201 MHz cavity design for muon cooling channels. The proposed cavity design is also suitable for use in a proof-of-principle muon ionization cooling experiment.

  17. "Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Barber

    2012-07-08

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

  18. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  19. Single-atom coherent field electron emitters for practical application to electron microscopy: Buildup controllability, self-repairing function and demountable characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokuta, E. [Institute for Material Science and Technologies, Waseda University, 2-8-26 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan)]. E-mail: rokuta@waseda.jp; Itagaki, T. [Institute for Material Science and Technologies, Waseda University, 2-8-26 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Ishikawa, T. [Institute for Material Science and Technologies, Waseda University, 2-8-26 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Cho, B.-L. [Institute for Material Science and Technologies, Waseda University, 2-8-26 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Kuo, H.-S. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsong, T.T. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Oshima, C. [Institute for Material Science and Technologies, Waseda University, 2-8-26 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan)

    2006-03-15

    We have fabricated single-atom field emission (FE) tips by annealing Rh-deposited W tips at 900 K, and the FE characteristics were investigated. Due to the formation of the nanotips, the electron beams were confined in a semi-cone angle of 3 deg., an indication quite different from the conventional FE beams. In repairing-function test where the FE nanotips were intentionally destroyed beforehand, they recovered the peculiar FE characteristics by means of feasible low temperature annealing. Finally, we found that the present nanotips equipped the capability of recovering the unique FE properties even after an exposure to the air. These characteristics are significantly relevant to the practical applications to electron-optics instruments.

  20. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-10

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests.

  2. HOM Coupler Notch Filter Tuning for the European XFEL Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Sulimov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    The notch filter (NF) tuning prevents the extraction of fundamental mode (1.3 GHz) RF power through Higher Order Modes (HOM) couplers. The procedure of NF tuning was optimized at the beginning of serial European XFEL cavities production. It allows keeping the filter more stable against temperature and pressure changes during cavity cool down. Some statistics of NF condition during cavities and modules cold tests is presented.

  3. Statistical electromagnetics: Complex cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2008-01-01

    A selection of the literature on the statistical description of electromagnetic fields and complex cavities is concisely reviewed. Some essential concepts, for example, the application of the central limit theorem and the maximum entropy principle, are scrutinized. Implicit assumptions, biased choic

  4. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  5. Finemet cavity impedance studies

    CERN Document Server

    Persichelli, S; Migliorati, M; Salvant, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the impedance of the Finemet kicker cavity to be installed in the PS straight section 02 during LS1, under realistic assumptions of bunch length. Time domain simulations with CST Particle Studio have been performed in order to get the impedance of the cavity and make a comparison with the longitudinal impedance measured for a single cell prototype. The study has been performed on simplified 3D geometries imported from a mechanical CATIA drawing, assuming that the simplications have small impact on the nal results. Simulations confirmed that the longitudinal impedance observed with measurements can be excited by bunches circulating in the PS. In the six-cells Finemet cavity, PS bunches circulating in the center can excite a longitudinal impedance, the real part of which has a maximum of 2 kOhm at 4 MHz. This mode does not seem to have any transverse component. All the eigenmodes of the cavity are strongly damped by the Finemet rings: we predict to have no issues regarding tr...

  6. Melatonin and oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  7. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat İnanç Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  8. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  9. Vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides a vertical cavity laser comprising a grating layer comprising an in-plane grating, the grating layer having a first side and having a second side opposite the first side and comprising a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index...

  10. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  11. Teleportation of Cavity Field States via Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss two schemes of teleportation of cavity field states. In the first scheme we consider cavities prepared in a coherent state and in the second scheme we consider cavities prepared in a superposition of zero and one Fock states.

  12. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  13. The first operation of 56 MHz SRF cavity in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); DeSanto, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Goldberg, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harvey, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Orfin, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The cavity operates at 4.4 K with a “quiet helium source” to isolate the cavity from environmental acoustic noise. The cavity is a beam driven quarter wave resonator. It is detuned and damped during injection and acceleration cycles and is brought to operation only at store energy. For a first test operation, the cavity voltage was stabilized at 300 kV with full beam current. Within both Au + Au and asymmetrical Au + He3 collisions, luminosity improvement was detected from direct measurement, and the hourglass effect was reduced. One higher order mode (HOM) coupler was installed on the cavity. We report in this paper on our measurement of a broadband HOM spectrum excited by the Au beam.

  14. Research on Field Emission and Dark Current in ILC Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kexin; Li, Yongming; Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli

    2013-09-01

    Field emission and dark current are issues of concern for SRF cavity performance and SRF linac operation. Complete understanding and reliable control of the issue are still needed, especially in full-scale multi-cell cavities. Our work aims at developing a generic procedure for finding an active field emitter in a multi-cell cavity and benchmarking the procedure through cavity vertical test. Our ultimate goal is to provide feedback to cavity preparation and cavity string assembly in order to reduce or eliminate filed emission in SRF cavities. Systematic analysis of behaviors of field emitted electrons is obtained by ACE3P developed by SLAC. Experimental benchmark of the procedure was carried out in a 9-cell cavity vertical test at JLab. The energy spectrum of Bremsstrahlung X-rays is measured using a NaI(Tl) detector. The end-point energy in the X-ray energy spectrum is taken as the highest kinetic electron energy to predict longitudinal position of the active field emitter. Angular location of the field emitter is determined by an array of silicon diodes around irises of the cavity. High-resolution optical inspection was conducted at the predicted field emitter location.

  15. Optimization of photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present optimization of photonic crystal cavities. The optimization problem is formulated to maximize the Purcell factor of a photonic crystal cavity. Both topology optimization and air-hole-based shape optimization are utilized for the design process. Numerical results demonstrate...... that the Purcell factor of the photonic crystal cavity can be significantly improved through optimization....

  16. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  17. Sustainable design by embodied energy and demountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is written for the TIDO-course AR0532 Smart & Bioclimatic Design Theory. The construction industry uses vast quantities of materials, resulting in the consumption of energy resources and the release of pollutant emissions to the biosphere. Resource management becomes a key issue in the

  18. Sustainable design by embodied energy and demountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is written for the TIDO-course AR0532 Smart & Bioclimatic Design Theory. The construction industry uses vast quantities of materials, resulting in the consumption of energy resources and the release of pollutant emissions to the biosphere. Resource management becomes a key issue in the d

  19. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  20. Access cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, N; Tomson, P L

    2014-03-01

    Each stage of root canal treatment should be carried out to the highest possible standard. The access cavity is arguably the most important technical stage, as subsequent preparation of the root canal(s) can be severely comprised if this is not well executed. Inadequate access can lead to canals being left untreated, poorly disinfected, difficult to shape and obturate, and may ultimately lead to the failure of the treatment. This paper highlights common features in root canal anatomy and outlines basic principles for locating root canals and producing a good access cavity. It also explores each phase of the preparation in detail and offers suggestions of instruments that have been specifically designed to overcome potential difficulties in the process. Good access design and preparation will result in an operative environment which will facilitate cleaning, shaping and obturation of the root canal system in order to maximise success.

  1. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  2. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  3. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Crepaz; Li Yuan Ley; Rainer Dumke

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage...

  4. Plasmonic band gap cavities on biharmonic gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Seckin Senlik, S.; Aydinli, Atilla

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we have experimentally demonstrated the formation of plasmonic band gap cavities in infrared and visible wavelength range. The cavity structure is based on a biharmonic metallic grating with selective high dielectric loading. A uniform metallic grating structure enables strong surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation and a superimposed second harmonic component forms a band gap for the propagating SPPs. We show that a high dielectric superstructure can dramatically perturb the optical properties of SPPs and enables the control of the plasmonic band gap structure. Selective patterning of the high index superstructure results in an index contrast in and outside the patterned region that forms a cavity. This allows us to excite the SPPs that localize inside the cavity at specific wavelengths, satisfying the cavity resonance condition. Experimentally, we observe the formation of a localized state in the band gap and measure the dispersion diagram. Quality factors as high as 37 have been observed in the infrared wavelength. The simplicity of the fabrication and the method of testing make this approach attractive for applications requiring localization of propagating SPPs.

  5. Resonant cavity monitors for charged beam measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Gary A.

    2003-04-01

    The G_zero experiment at Jefferson Lab, will measure the strange quark content of the proton as it contributes to the proton's charge and magnetic properties. Parity violating elastic electron scattering is being used to measure the physics asymmetry to better than 1 part in 10^7. Helicity correlated properties of the electron beam used in this experiment must be measured to better than 1 in 10^7 over the course of the experiment. G_zero employs two types of beam monitors for this purpose. Standard, 4-wire, ``strip-line'' monitors measure beam positions with a resolution of 20microns. Another type of monitor, Beam Resonant Cavities are being tested. Two sets of three cavities are used to measure beam position in X and Y, as well as beam current. Presented will be the performance and evaluation of these cavities including their theoretical versus actual operation, their noise characteristics, and signal resolution. These cavities can be paired with either linear or logarithmic amplifier electronics. Overall performance of these cavity systems including amplifiers will be compared with standard 'strip-line' monitors.

  6. CERN Developments for 704 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Aviles Santillana, I; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Bonomi, R; Calatroni, S; Chambrillon, J; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Guinchard, M; Junginger, T; Malabaila, M; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Mikulas, S; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Renaglia, T; Schirm, K; Tardy, T; Therasse, M; Vacca, A; Valverde Alonso, N; Vande Craen, A

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort coordinated by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories. It is aiming at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art RF superconducting technology, which would serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB). Amongst the main objectives of this R&D effort, is the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities, operating at 2 K with a maximum accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m, and the testing of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryomodule. The cavity together with its helium tank had to be carefully designed in coherence with the innovative design of the cryomodule. New fabrication methods have also been explored. Five such niobium cavities and two copper cavities are in fabrication. The key design aspects are discussed, the results of the alternative fabrication methods presented and the stat...

  7. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  8. Spoke cavity developments for the EURISOL driver

    CERN Document Server

    Bousson, S; Biarrotte, J.L; Dufour, J.M; Gandolfo, N; Junquera, T; Lesrel, J; Lukovac, L; Lutton, F; Martinet, G; Olry, G; Ponton, A; Rampnoux, E; Saugnac, H

    EURISOL is the next generation of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility which aims at the provision of high intensity beams of radioactive nuclei with variable energy, from a few keV to greater than 100 MeV per nucleon, at an intensity several orders of magnitude higher than those currently available. The driver of EURISOL has to accelerate protons at a final energy of 1 GeV and 5 mA current, but also deuterons at 200 MeV (total energy). For the intermediate energy part of the driver, a solution based on superconducting (SC) spoke cavities is under study at the IPN Orsay laboratory. In this paper are presented the experimental results on the beta 0.15 spoke cavity, as well as achievements on the power coupler and cold tuning system. A new horizontal cryostat for performing a test of a fully equipped spoke cavity is also presented.

  9. Cavity QED by the Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, H. J.; Boca, A.; Boozer, A. D.; Bowen, W. P.; Buck, J. R.; Chou, C. W.; Duan, L.-M.; Kuzmich, A.; McKeever, J.

    2004-12-01

    Observations of cooling and trapping of N = 1,2,3,... atoms inside a small optical cavity are described. The atom-cavity system operates in a regime of strong coupling for which single photons are sufficient to saturate the atomic response. New theoretical protocols for the efficient engineering of multi-atom entanglement within the setting of cavity QED are described. By trapping a single atom within the cavity mode, a one-atom laser is experimentally realized in a regime of strong coupling. Beyond the setting of cavity QED, quantum correlations have been observed for photon pairs emitted from an atomic ensemble and with a programmable time offset.

  10. Development of the superconducting 3.9-GHz accelerating cavity at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkan, T.; Bauer, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Boffo, C.; Borissov, E.; Carter, H.; Edwards, H.; Foley, M.; Gonin, I.; Khabibouline, T.; Mishra, S.; Mitchell, D.; Polubotko, V.; Rowe, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    A superconducting third harmonic 3.9 GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam quality in the TTF-like photoinjector [1]. Fermilab has developed, built and tested several prototypes, including two copper 9-cell cavities, one niobium 3-cell cavity, and one 9-cell cavity. The helium vessel and frequency tuner for the 9-cell cavity was built and tested as well. In cold tests, we achieved a peak surface magnetic field of {approx}100mT, well above the 70mT specification. The accelerating gradient was likely limited by thermal breakdown. Studies of the higher order modes in the cavity revealed that the existing cavity design with two HOM couplers will provide sufficient damping of these modes. In this paper we discuss the cavity design, results of the studies and plans for further development.

  11. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  12. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  13. Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2009-05-04

    Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

  14. R&D of BEPCII 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) adopts two 500 MHz superconducting cavities (SCCs) in each ring for higher accelerated gradient, higher Q and lower impedance (Wang et al. The proceedings of SRF’07). There’s no spare cavity due to the limited time and funding during BEPCII construction. If any serious trouble happened on either one of the two cavities and could not be recovered in a short time, the operation of BEPCII facility will be affected. Therefore, since 2009 three spare cavities have been fabricated in China to ensure reliable operation, and two of them have been successfully vertically tested in January and July 2011. This paper will briefly present the manufacture, post-process and vertical test performance of the 500 MHz spare cavities.

  15. Multilayer structures for X-ray laser cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceglio, N. M.; Stearns, D. G.; Hawryluk, A. M.

    1985-08-01

    Recent demonstrations of the generation of amplified spontaneous emission at soft X-ray wavelenths have spurred interest in normal incidence multilayer structures for use as X-ray laser (XRL) cavity mirrors. Calculations indicate that cavity mirrors can provide significant enhancement of RXL output, and drive the oscillations to the saturation limit. Novel ideas for cavity output coupling may expand the versatility of XRL devices, while encouraging the marriage of lithographic and multilayer technologies to the general benefit of X-ray optics. Preliminary tests of a double pass cavity have already been conducted. These tests point out the importance of detailed cavity design issues such as precision mirror alignment, mirror damage dynamics, and detailed mirror calibration, to the future success of this field.

  16. Physical simulations of cavity closure in a creeping material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, H.J.; Preece, D.S.

    1985-09-01

    The finite element method has been used extensively to predict the creep closure of underground petroleum storage cavities in rock salt. Even though the numerical modeling requires many simplifying assumptions, the predictions have generally correlated with field data from instrumented wellheads, however, the field data are rather limited. To gain an insight into the behavior of three-dimensional arrays of cavities and to obtain a larger data base for the verification of analytical simulations of creep closure, a series of six centrifuge simulation experiments were performed using a cylindrical block of modeling clay, a creeping material. Three of the simulations were conducted with single, centerline cavities, and three were conducted with a symmetric array of three cavities surrounding a central cavity. The models were subjected to body force loading using a centrifuge. For the single cavity experiments, the models were tested at accelerations of 100, 125 and 150 g's for 2 hours. For the multi-cavity experiments, the simulations were conducted at 100 g's for 3.25 hours. The results are analyzed using dimensional analyses. The analyses illustrate that the centrifuge simulations yield self-consistent simulations of the creep closure of fluid-filled cavities and that the interaction of three-dimensional cavity layouts can be investigated using this technique.

  17. Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on the Performance of a Superconducting Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer

    2005-05-01

    A special two-cell cavity was designed to obtain surface field distributions suitable for investigation of electric and magnetic field effects on cavity performance. The cavity design and preliminary results were presented in a previous contribution. The bulk niobium cavity was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace at 1250 C to improve thermal conductivity. Three seamless hydroformed Nb/Cu cavities of the same design were fabricated to investigate the role of the electron beam welds located in high field areas. This paper will present RF test results at 2 K for the bulk niobium and one of the seamless cavities.

  18. Validation of sensitivity and reliability of GPR and microgravity detection of underground cavities in complex urban settings: Test case of a cellar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromčák, Jakub; Grinč, Michal; Pánisová, Jaroslava; Vajda, Peter; Kubová, Anna

    2016-03-01

    We test here the feasibility of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and microgravity methods in identifying underground voids, such as cellars, tunnels, abandoned mine-workings, etc., in complex urban conditions. For this purpose, we selected a cellar located under a private lot in a residential quarter of the town of Senec in Western Slovakia, which was discovered by chance when a small sinkhole developed on the yard just two meters away from the house. The size of our survey area was limited 1) by the presence of a technical room built at the back of the yard with a staircase leading to the garden, and 2) by the small width of the lot. Therefore the geophysical survey was carried out only in the backyard of the lot as we were not permitted to measure on neighbouring estates. The results from the GPR measurements obtained by the GSSI SIR-3000 system with 400 MHz antenna were visualized in the form of 2D radargrams with the corresponding transformed velocity model of studied cross-sections. Only the profiles running over the pavement next to the house yielded interpretable data because the local geological situation and the regular watering of the lawn covering prevailingly the backyard caused significant attenuation of the emitted GPR signal. The Bouguer gravity map is dominated by a distinctive negative anomaly indicating the presence of a shallow underground void. The quantitative interpretation by means of Euler deconvolution was utilized to validate the depth of the center and location of the cellar. Comparison with the gravitational effect of the cellar model calculated in the in-house program Polygrav shows a quite good correlation between the modelled and observed fields. Only a part of the aerial extent of the anomaly could be traced by the used geophysical methods due to accessibility issues. Nevertheless, the test cellar was successfully detected and interpreted by both methods, thus confirming their applicability in similar environmental and geotechnical

  19. Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

    CERN Document Server

    Le Duff, J; Thomas, C

    2000-01-01

    Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

  20. CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

  1. Seismic wave interaction with underground cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Felix M.; Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    Realization of the future Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) will require ensuring its compliance, making the CTBT a prime example of forensic seismology. Following indications of a nuclear explosion obtained on the basis of the (IMS) monitoring network further evidence needs to be sought at the location of the suspicious event. For such an On-Site Inspection (OSI) at a possible nuclear test site the treaty lists several techniques that can be carried out by the inspection team, including aftershock monitoring and the conduction of active seismic surveys. While those techniques are already well established, a third group of methods labeled as "resonance seismometry" is less well defined and needs further elaboration. A prime structural target that is expected to be present as a remnant of an underground nuclear explosion is a cavity at the location and depth the bomb was fired. Originally "resonance seismometry" referred to resonant seismic emission of the cavity within the medium that could be stimulated by an incident seismic wave of the right frequency and observed as peaks in the spectrum of seismic stations in the vicinity of the cavity. However, it is not yet clear which are the conditions for which resonant emissions of the cavity could be observed. In order to define distance-, frequency- and amplitude ranges at which resonant emissions could be observed we study the interaction of seismic waves with underground cavities. As a generic model for possible resonances we use a spherical acoustic cavity in an elastic full-space. To solve the forward problem for the full elastic wave field around acoustic spherical inclusions, we implemented an analytical solution (Korneev, 1993). This yields the possibility of generating scattering cross-sections, amplitude spectrums and synthetic seismograms for plane incident waves. Here, we focus on the questions whether or not we can expect resonant responses in the wave field scattered from the cavity. We show

  2. The importance of accounting for the area of the medullary cavity in cross-sectional geometry: A test based on the femoral midshaft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparacello, V S; Pearson, O M

    2010-12-01

    In cross-sectional geometric (CSG) studies, both the subperiosteal and endosteal contours are considered important factors in determining bone bending rigidity. Recently, regression equations predicting CSG properties from a section's external dimensions were developed in a world-wide sample of human long bones. The results showed high correlations between some subperiosteally derived and actual CSG parameters. We present a theoretical model that further explores the influence of endosteal dimensions on CSG properties. We compare two hypothetical femoral midshaft samples with the same total subperiosteal area but with percentages of cortical bone at the opposite ends of published human variation for population sample means. Even in this relatively uncommon scenario, the difference between the samples in the resultant means for predicted femoral polar second moment of area (J) appears to be modest: power analysis indicates that a minimum sample size of 61 is needed to detect the difference 90% of the time via a t-test. Moreover, endosteal area can be predicted--although with substantial error--from periosteal area. Despite this error, including this relationship in subperiosteally derived estimates of J produces sample mean estimates close to true mean values. Power analyses reveal that when similar samples are used to develop prediction equations, a minimum sample of hundreds or more may be needed to distinguish a predicted mean J from the true mean J. These results further justify the use of regression equations estimating J from periosteal contours when analyzing behaviorally induced changes in bone rigidity in ancient populations, when it is not possible to measure endosteal dimensions. However, in other situations involving comparisons of individual values, growth trends, and senescence, where relative cortical thickness may vary greatly, inclusion of endosteal dimensions is still important. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  4. Cavity Optomechanical Magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Forstner, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2011-01-01

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated where the magnetic field induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator. The resulting motion is read out optically with ultra-high sensitivity. Detecting the magnetostrictive deformation of Terfenol-D with a toroidal whispering gallery mode (TWGM) resonator a peak sensitivity of 400 nT/Hz^.5 was achieved with theoretical modelling predicting that sensitivities of up to 500 fT/Hz^.5 may be possible. This chip-based magnetometer combines high-sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  5. Cavity optomechanical magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, S; Prams, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2012-03-23

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated. The magnetic-field-induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is resonantly transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator and read out optically with ultrahigh sensitivity. A peak magnetic field sensitivity of 400  nT  Hz(-1/2) is achieved, with theoretical modeling predicting the possibility of sensitivities below 1  pT  Hz(-1/2). This chip-based magnetometer combines high sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  6. Oral cavity eumycetoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Stuani, Maria Luiza de Toledo; Stuani, Luís Antonio Sasso

    2011-01-01

    Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal) or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  7. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  8. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2015-02-01

    standing electromagnetic wave oscillating in the cavity resonator as compared to the frequency of atomic clocks. Continuous comparison of the frequency of the optical cavity resonator against that of atomic clock yields a powerful null test of the local isotropy of the Hubble expansion and the Einstein equivalence principle in cosmology.

  9. Apparatus and method for plasma processing of SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Peshl, J; Bašović, M; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vuškovića, L

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are described for plasma etching of the inner surface of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Accelerator SRF cavities are formed into a variable-diameter cylindrical structure made of bulk niobium, for resonant generation of the particle accelerating field. The etch rate non-uniformity due to depletion of the radicals has been overcome by the simultaneous movement of the gas flow inlet and the inner electrode. An effective shape of the inner electrode to reduce the plasma asymmetry for the coaxial cylindrical rf plasma reactor is determined and implemented in the cavity processing method. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise way to establish segmented plasma columns. The test structure was a pillbox cavity made of steel of similar dimension to the standard SRF cavity. This was adopted to experimentally verify the plasma surface reaction on cylindrical structures with variable diameter using the segment...

  10. Optomechanical damping of a nanomembrane inside an optical ring cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Yilmaz, Arzu; Wolf, Philip; Schmidt, Dag; Eisele, Max; Zimmermann, Claus; Slama, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigate mechanical nanooscillators coupled to the light in an optical ring resonator made of dielectric mirrors. We identify an optomechanical damping mechanism that is fundamentally different to the well known cooling in standing wave cavities. While, in a standing wave cavity the mechanical oscillation shifts the resonance frequency of the cavity in a ring resonator the frequency does not change. Instead the position of the nodes is shifted with the mechanical excursion. We derive the damping rates and test the results experimentally with a silicon-nitride nanomembrane. It turns out that scattering from small imperfections of the dielectric mirror coatings has to be taken into account to explain the value of the measured damping rate. We extend our theoretical model and regard a second reflector in the cavity that captures the effects of mirror back scattering. This model can be used to also describe the situation of two membranes that both interact with the cavity fi...

  11. Magnetic Flux Expulsion Studies in Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Martinello, Martina [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab; Trenikhina, Yulia [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of nitrogen doping treatment for SRF cavities, ultra-high quality factors at medium accelerating fields are regularly achieved in vertical RF tests. To preserve these quality factors into the cryomodule, it is important to consider background magnetic fields, which can become trapped in the surface of the cavity during cooldown and cause Q₀ degradation. Building on the recent discovery that spatial thermal gradients during cooldown can significantly improve expulsion of magnetic flux, a detailed study was performed of flux expulsion on two cavities with different furnace treatments that are cooled in magnetic fields amplitudes representative of what is expected in a realistic cryomodule. In this contribution, we summarize these cavity results, in order to improve understanding of the impact of flux expulsion on cavity performance.

  12. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  13. JLEIC SRF cavity RF Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The initial design of a low higher order modes (HOM) impedance superconducting RF (SRF) cavity is presented in this paper. The design of this SRF cavity is for the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC). The electron ring of JLEIC will operate with electrons of 3 to 10 GeV energy. The ion ring of JLEIC will operate with protons of up to 100 GeV energy. The bunch lengths in both rings are ~12 mm (RMS). In order to maintain the short bunch length in the ion ring, SRF cavities are adopted to provide large enough gradient. In the first phase of JLEIC, the PEP II RF cavities will be reused in the electron ring to lower the initial cost. The frequency of the SRF cavities is chosen to be the second harmonic of PEP II cavities, 952.6 MHz. In the second phase of JLEIC, the same frequency SRF cavities may replace the normal conducting PEP II cavities to achieve higher luminosity at high energy. At low energies, the synchro-tron radiation damping effect is quite weak, to avoid the coupled bunch instability caused by the intense closely-spaced electron bunches, low HOM impedance of the SRF cavities combined with longitudinal feedback sys-tem will be necessary.

  14. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  15. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemire, B.; Tollestrup, A. V.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Torun, Y.; Johnson, R. P.; Flanagan, G.; Hanlet, P. M.; Collura, M. G.; Jana, M. R.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Schwarz, T.

    2016-06-01

    A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf) test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF6 and O2 were measured.

  16. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Freemire

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF_{6} and O_{2} were measured.

  17. Uterine cavity assessment prior to IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, Jyotsna; El Toukhy, Tarek

    2010-11-01

    Approximately 15% of couples are affected with subfertility, of which up to 20% remain unexplained. Uterine cavity abnormalities can be a contributing cause of subfertility and recurrent implantation failure. Uterine cavity assessment has been suggested as a routine investigation in the evaluation of subfertile women. Traditionally, hysterosalpingography has been the most commonly used technique in the evaluation of infertility. Transvaginal ultrasound scan allows visualization of the endometrial lining and cavity, and has been used as a screening test for the assessment of uterine cavity. Abnormal uterine findings on a baseline scan can be further evaluated with saline hysterosonography, which is highly sensitive and specific in identifying intrauterine abnormalities. Hysteroscopy is considered as the definitive diagnostic tool to evaluate any abnormality suspected on hysterosalpingography, transvaginal ultrasound scan or saline hysterosonography during routine investigation of infertile patients. Minimally invasive hysteroscopes have minimized the pain experienced by patients during the procedure and made it feasible to use hysteroscopy as a routine outpatient examination. Following recurrent IVF failure there is some evidence of benefit from hysteroscopy in increasing the chance of pregnancy in the subsequent IVF cycle, both in those with abnormal and normal hysteroscopic findings. Various possible mechanisms have been proposed for this beneficial effect, but more randomized controlled trials are needed before its routine use in the general subfertile population can be recommended.

  18. Shock induced cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  19. A Scanning Cavity Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Mader, Matthias; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1700-fold signal enhancement compared to diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity below 1 nm2, we show a method to improve spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for opt...

  20. Frequency Tuning for a DQW Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Leuxe, Raphael; Skaritka, John; Wu, Qiong; Xiao, Binping; Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The nominal operating frequency for the HL-LHC crab cavities is 400.79 MHz within a bandwidth of ±60kHz. Attaining the required cavity tune implies a good understanding of all the processes that influence the cavity frequency from the moment when the cavity parts are being fabricated until the cavity is installed and under operation. Different tuning options will be available for the DQW crab cavity of LHC. This paper details the different steps in the cavity fabrication and preparation that may introduce a shift in the cavity frequency and introduces the different tuning methods foreseen to bring the cavity frequency to meet the specifications.

  1. Performance of production SRF cavities for CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Kneisel, P.; Kushnick, P.; Mammosser, J.; Powers, T.

    1993-06-01

    Construction of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date. Over 250 of the eventual 338 SRF 1497 MHz cavities have been assembled into hermetic pairs and completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of Q[sub 0] = 2.4[times]10[sup 9] at 5 MV/m, the usual limiting phenomena are encountered field emission, quenching, Q-switching, will occasional multipacting. An analysis of the occurrence conditions and severity of these phenomena during production cavity testing is presented. The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m. The distributions of frequency and Q for a higher-order mode are also presented.

  2. Heat loss from an open cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

  3. Performance of production SRF cavities for CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Kneisel, P.; Kushnick, P.; Mammosser, J.; Powers, T.

    1993-06-01

    Construction of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date. Over 250 of the eventual 338 SRF 1497 MHz cavities have been assembled into hermetic pairs and completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of Q[sub 0] = 2.4[times]10[sup 9] at 5 MV/m, the usual limiting phenomena are encountered field emission, quenching, Q-switching, will occasional multipacting. An analysis of the occurrence conditions and severity of these phenomena during production cavity testing is presented. The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m. The distributions of frequency and Q for a higher-order mode are also presented.

  4. Defect Detection in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity Surface Using C + + and OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Samantha; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) uses superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities to accelerate an electron beam. If theses cavities have a small particle or defect, it can degrade the performance of the cavity. The problem at hand is inspecting the cavity for defects, little bubbles of niobium on the surface of the cavity. Thousands of pictures have to be taken of a single cavity and then looked through to see how many defects were found. A C + + program with Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) was constructed to reduce the number of hours searching through the images and finds all the defects. Using this code, the SRF group is now able to use the code to identify defects in on-going tests of SRF cavities. Real time detection is the next step so that instead of taking pictures when looking at the cavity, the camera will detect all the defects.

  5. Quantum entanglement purification in cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, J L; Saavedra, C; Retamal, J C

    2002-01-01

    A physical implementation of an entanglement purification protocol is studied using a cavity quantum electrodynamic based proposal, where, the quantum information is stored in quantum field sates inside cavities. Also a procedure is given for quantifying the degree of entanglement between quantum fields. (Author)

  6. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  7. LEP radio-frequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    One of the copper radio-frequency accelerating cavities installed for the first phase of LEP (1989-1995). Bunches of electrons and positrons circulated in LEP in opposite directions and were accelerated in eight different sets of 16 cavities (situated on either side of the four experiments), gaining 400 million volts of accelerating power per turn.

  8. Single and Coupled Nanobeam Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Shyroki, Dzmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    for analysis and design of photonic crystal devices, such as 2D ring resonators for filters, single and coupled nanobeam cavities, birefringence in photonic crystal cavities, threshold analysis in photonic crystal lasers, gap solitons in photonic crystals, novel photonic atolls, dynamic characteristics...

  9. Characterization of transducer cavities to oscillatory inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.; Hollingshead, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The design and use of measurement systems must ensure that the data are not computed by the measurement system. A wide variety of sources can be responsible for compromising the integrity of test data. Among the sources of error are transducer calibration errors, signal conditioning problems, recording problems, and characteristics of the mechanical system which introduce errors. In this paper, the characteristics of an acoustic cavity are discussed as they apply to a pressure measurement problem.

  10. Mechanical properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, G., E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Dhakal, P.; Matalevich, J.; Myneni, G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Schmidt, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Singer, W. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-08-26

    Radio-frequency cavities made of bulk niobium are one of the components used in modern particle accelerators. The mechanical stability is an important aspect of cavity design, which typically relies on finite-element analysis simulations using material properties from tensile tests on sample. This contribution presents the results of strain and resonant frequency measurements as a function of a uniform pressure up to 620 kPa, applied to single-cell niobium cavities with different crystallographic structure, purity and treatments. In addition, burst tests of high-purity multi-cell cavities with different crystallographic structures have been conducted up to the tensile strength of the material. Finite-element analysis of the single-cell cavity geometry is in good agreement with the observed behavior in the elastic regime assuming a Young’s modulus value of 88.5 GPa and a Poisson’s ratio of 0.4, regardless of crystallographic structure, purity or treatment. However, the measured yield strength and tensile strength depend on crystallographic structure, material purity and treatment. In particular, the results from this study show that the mechanical properties of niobium cavities made from ingot material with large crystals are comparable to those of cavities made of fine-grain niobium.

  11. Early prototype of a superconducting RF cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    As early as 1979, before LEP became an approved project, studies were located in the ISR Division. Although Cu-cavities were foreseen, certainly for the 1st energy-stage, superconducting cavities were explored as a possible alternative for the 2nd energy-stage. This began with very basic studies of manufacture and properties of Nb-cavities. This one, held by Mr.Girel, was made from bulk Nb-sheet, 2.5 mm thick. It was dimensioned for tests at 500 MHz (LEP accelerating RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 8004204, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  12. Properties of quarter-wavelength coaxial cavity for triode-type thermionic RF gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgasin, Konstantin; Mishima, Kenta; Zen, Heishun; Yoshida, Kohei; Negm, Hani; Omer, Muhamed; Kii, Toshiteru; Nagasaki, Kazunobu; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2017-09-01

    A quarter-wavelength coaxial cavity with a longitudinal radio-frequency power supply was fabricated and tested. The cavity was designed as a pre-buncher for a thermionic triode-type radio-frequency gun of a mid-infrared free electron laser facility. The triode structure was formed to ensure the reduction of the back-bombarding effect, which usually appears in thermionic radio-frequency guns. The coaxial cavity was tested using a tungsten dispenser cathode. From the results of the cold test, a cavity voltage of about 25 kV can be attained, which corresponds to designed characteristics. In contrast, the hot test showed a sudden drop in voltage, resulting in an unstable operation. The small dimensions of the cavity caused some low-field effects, which led to multipactoring. In this paper, we report the tested characteristics of the pre-bunching cavity.

  13. The Rise of Ingot Niobium as a Material for Superconducting Radiofrequency Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kneisel, P; Dhakal, P; Saito, K; Singer, W; Singer, X; Myneni, G R

    2013-01-01

    As a result of a collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer CBMM, ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This pioneering work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large grain niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this material. Most of the original expectations for this material of being less costly and allowing less expensive fabrication and treatment procedures at the same performance levels in cavities have been met. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown the performances comparable to the best cavities made from...

  14. Heat transfer in window frames with internal cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsen, Arild

    2001-07-01

    Heat transfer in window frames with internal air cavities is studied in this thesis. Investigations focus on two- and three-dimensional natural convection effects inside air cavities, the dependence of the emissivity on the thermal transmittance, and the emissivity of anodized and untreated aluminium profiles. The investigations are mostly conducted on window frames which are the same size as real frames found in residential buildings. Numerical and experimental investigations were performed to study the effectiveness of one commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program for simulating combined natural convection and heat transfer in simple three-dimensional window frames with internal air cavities. The accuracy of the conjugate CFD simulations was evaluated by comparing results for surface temperature on the warm side of the specimens to results from experiments that use infrared (IR) thermography to map surface temperatures during steady-state thermal tests. In general, there was good agreement between the simulations and experiments. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic and conduction simulations are performed to study the difference between treating air cavities as a fluid and as a solid when calculating the thermal transmittance of window frames. The simulations show that traditional software codes, simulating only conduction and using equivalent conductivities for the air cavities, give Uvalues that compare well with results from fluid flow simulations. The difference between the two models are mostly limited to the temperature distribution inside air cavities. It is also found that cavities with an interconnection less than about 7 mm can be treated as separate cavities. Three-dimensional natural convection effects in simple and custom-made PVC and thermally broken aluminum window frames with one open internal cavity were studied, with the use of CFD simulations and thermography experiments. Focus was put on corner effects and heat transfer

  15. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  16. High Gradient Accelerator Cavities Using Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Parsons, Gregory [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, Philip [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Oldham, Christopher [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Mundy, Zach [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Dolgashev, Valery [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-12-09

    In the Phase I program, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR), in collaboration with North Carolina State University (NCSU), fabricated copper accelerator cavities and used Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to apply thin metal coatings of tungsten and platinum. It was hypothesized that a tungsten coating would provide a robust surface more resistant to arcing and arc damage. The platinum coating was predicted to reduce processing time by inhibiting oxides that form on copper surfaces soon after machining. Two sets of cavity parts were fabricated. One was coated with 35 nm of tungsten, and the other with approximately 10 nm of platinum. Only the platinum cavity parts could be high power tested during the Phase I program due to schedule and funding constraints. The platinum coated cavity exhibit poor performance when compared with pure copper cavities. Not only did arcing occur at lower power levels, but the processing time was actually longer. There were several issues that contributed to the poor performance. First, machining of the base copper cavity parts failed to achieve the quality and cleanliness standards specified to SLAC National Accelerator Center. Secondly, the ALD facilities were not configured to provide the high levels of cleanliness required. Finally, the nanometer coating applied was likely far too thin to provide the performance required. The coating was ablated or peeled from the surface in regions of high fields. It was concluded that the current ALD process could not provide improved performance over cavities produced at national laboratories using dedicated facilities.

  17. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowring, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stratakis, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kochemirovskiy, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Leonova, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Moretti, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Palmer, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Peterson, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Freemire, B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lane, P. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Torun, Y. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Haase, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  18. 805 MHz and 201 MHz RF cavity development for MUCOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; Ladran, Tony; MacGill, R.; Wallig, J.; S. Zisman, Michael; Moretti, Alfred; Rowe, A; Qian, Zubao; Wu, Vincent; Rimmer, Robert; Norem, J.; Norem, Jim; Summers, Donald; Torun, Yagmur

    2003-08-01

    A muon cooling channel calls for very high accelerating gradient RF structures to restore the energy lost by muons in the absorbers. The RF structures have to be operated in a strong magnetic field and thus the use of superconducting RF cavities is excluded. To achieve a high shunt impedance while maintaining a large enough aperture to accommodate a large transverse emittance muon beam, the cavity design adopted is a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be foils to terminate the electromagnetic field at the cavity iris. The possibility of using grids of thin-walled metallic tubes for the termination is also being explored. Many of the RF-related issues for muon cooling channels are being studied both theoretically and experimentally using an 805 MHz cavity that has a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be windows to terminate the cavity aperture. The design and performance of this cavity are reported here. High-power RF tests of the 805 MHz cavity are in progress at Lab G in Fermilab. The cavit

  19. On sky testing of the SOFIA telescope in preparation for the first science observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Franziska; Wolf, Jürgen; Waddell, Patrick; Dunham, Edward; Reinacher, Andreas; Lampater, Ulrich; Jakob, Holger; Bjarke, Lisa; Adams, Sybil; Grashuis, Randy; Meyer, Allan; Bower, Kenneth; Schweikhard, Keith; Keilig, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is an airborne observatory that will study the universe in the infrared spectrum. A Boeing 747-SP aircraft will carry a 2.5 m telescope designed to make sensitive infrared measurements of a wide range of astronomical objects. In 2008, SOFIA's primary mirror was demounted and coated for the first time. After reintegration into the telescope assembly in the aircraft, the alignment of the telescope optics was repeated and successive functional and performance testing of the fully integrated telescope assembly was completed on the ground. The High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO) was used as a test instrument for aligning the optics and calibrating and tuning the telescope's pointing and control system in preparation for the first science observations in flight. In this paper, we describe the mirror coating process, the subsequent telescope testing campaigns and present the results.

  20. First attempt of at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detection in a CEBAF cryomodule for field emission monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Drury, Michael [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, Ari [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the first result of at-cavity X-ray detection in a CEBAF cryomodule for field emission monitoring. In the 8-cavity cryomodule F100, two silicon diodes were installed near the end flange of each cavity. Each cavity was individually tested during the cryomodule test in JLab’s cryomodule test facility. The behaviors of these at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detectors were compared with those of the standard ‘in air’ Geiger-Muller (G-M) tubes. Our initial experiments establish correlation between X-ray response of near diodes and the field emission source cavity in the 8-cavity string. For two out of these eight cavities, we also carried out at-cavity X-ray detection experiment during their vertical testing. The aim is to track field emission behavior uniquely from vertical cavity testing to horizontal cavity testing in the cryomodule. These preliminary results confirmed our expectation and warrant further effort toward the establishment of permanent at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detection for SRF development and operation.

  1. Vibration insensitive optical ring cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Jin; Jiang Yan-Yi; Fang Su; Bi Zhi-Yi; Ma Long-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The mounting configuration of an optical ring cavity is optimized for vibration insensitivity by finite element analysis. A minimum response to vertical accelerations is found by simulations made for different supporting positions.

  2. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  3. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  4. Sterility of the uterine cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Birger R.; Kristiansen, Frank V.; Thorsen, Poul

    1995-01-01

    from the same sites. Nearly a quarter of all the patients harbored one or more microorganisms in the uterus, mostly Gardnerella vaginalis, Enterobacter and Streptococcus agalactiae. We found that in a significant number of cases, the uterine cavity is colonized with potentially pathogenic organisms...... which may play a causative role in endometritis. The results indicate that inflammation of the uterine cavity should be evaluated by hysteroscopic examination before hysterectomy is undertaken in patients with persistent irregular vaginal bleeding. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Mar...

  5. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  6. Imaging of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesa, Indu Rekha; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is a challenging area in head and neck imaging because of its complex anatomy and the numerous pathophysiologies that involve its contents. This challenge is further compounded by the ubiquitous artifacts that arise from the dental amalgam, which compromise image quality. In this article, the anatomy of the oral cavity is discussed in brief, followed by a description of the imaging technique and some common pathologic abnormalities.

  7. Active Control of Open Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    UKeiley, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Open loop edge blowing was demonstrated as an effective method for reducing the broad band and tonal components of the fluctuating surface pressure in open cavities. Closed loop has been successfully applied to low Mach number open cavities. Need to push actuators that are viable for closed loop control in bandwidth and output. Need a better understanding of the effects of control on the flow through detailed measurements so better actuation strategies can be developed.

  8. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2002-12-31

    SRD tested a number of different length cavities during this past quarter. Continuous transmission was observed with cavity lengths from 65 to 12 cm. The 65 cm cavity was replaced with a 39 cm cavity for work performed during this quarter. Flue gas components were tested for background absorptions and any interference with the determination of accurate mercury concentrations. Sulfur dioxide was found to absorb fairly strongly in the region of the mercury transition, but the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) instrument was still able to detect mercury at subparts-per-billion by volume (ppb) levels. Additional flue gases tested included H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}. None of these flue gas constituents showed any observable absorption in the ultraviolet region near the atomic mercury transition. Work was also initiated in speciation studies. In particular mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was tested. A mercury signal was detected from a gas stream containing HgCl{sub 2}. SRD was not able to determine definitively if there exists a spectral shift great enough to separate HgCl{sub 2} from elemental mercury in these initial tests.

  9. An Automated 476 MHz RF Cavity Processing Facility at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, P; Schwarz, H

    2003-01-01

    The 476 MHz accelerating cavities currently used at SLAC are those installed on the PEP-II B-Factory collider accelerator. They are designed to operate at a maximum accelerating voltage of 1 MV and are routinely utilized on PEP-II at voltages up to 750 kV. During the summer of 2003, SPEAR3 will undergo a substantial upgrade, part of which will be to replace the existing 358.54 MHz RF system with essentially a PEP-II high energy ring (HER) RF station operating at 476.3 MHz and 3.2 MV (or 800 kV/cavity). Prior to installation, cavity RF processing is required to prepare them for use. A dedicated high power test facility is employed at SLAC to provide the capability of conditioning each cavity up to the required accelerating voltage. An automated LabVIEW based interface controls and monitors various cavity and test stand parameters, increasing the RF fields accordingly such that stable operation is finally achieved. This paper describes the high power RF cavity processing facility, highlighting the features of t...

  10. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed.

  11. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Robert

    2008-03-11

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  12. Cavity filling water control below aerator devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱尚拓; 吴建华; 马飞; 徐建荣; 彭育; 汪振

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of high dam projects within China, the dragon-drop-tail spillway tunnel is introduced and widely used. In view of the high water head and the large flow velocity on the dragon-drop-tail section, aerator devices are usually placed for the cavitation damage control. For the device placed in its initial position, it is a serious concern to design a suitable flow regime of the cavity and to control the cavity filling water due to the large flow depth and the low Froude number through this aera-tor. In this study, the relationships between the geometries of the aerator device and the jet impact angle of the lower trajectory of the flow are theoretically analyzed with/without a local slope. Nine test cases with different geometries are designed, the effectiveness of the filling water control is experimentally investigated under different operation conditions, and two criteria of the local slope design are proposed. It is concluded that the cavity flow regime and the filling water can be improved if a small impact angle and some sui-table geometries of the local slope are designed.

  13. Polishing Difficult-To-Reach Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1990-01-01

    Springy abrasive tool used to finish surfaces of narrow cavities made by electrical-discharge machining. Robot arm moves vibrator around perimeters of cavities, polishing walls of cavities as it does so. Tool needed because such cavities inaccessible or at least difficult to reach with most surface-finishing tools.

  14. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, P., E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Saito, K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Singer, W.; Singer, X. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Myneni, G.R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of E{sub acc}=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  15. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  16. Study of creep cavity growth for power plant lifetime assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Rui; Sandstroem, Rolf

    2001-01-01

    This report aims to the sub project lifetime assessment by creep (livslaengdspredikteringar vid kryp), which is involved in the project package strength in high temperature power plant, KME 708. The physical creep damage includes mainly cavities and their development. Wu and Sandstroem have observed that cavity size increases linearly with increasing creep strain in a 12%Cr steel. Sandstroem has showed that, based on the relations between the nucleation and growth of creep cavities with creep strain, the physical creep damage can be modelled as a function of creep strain. In the present paper the growth of creep cavity radius R in relation to time t and strain {epsilon} in low alloy and 12%Cr steels as well as a Type 347 steel has been studied. The results exhibit that the power law cavity radius with creep time (R-t) and with creep strain (R-{epsilon}) relations are found for these materials at various testing conditions. The power law R-t and R-{epsilon} relations are in most cases dependent and independent on testing conditions, respectively. The empirical power law R-{epsilon} relations give a description of cavity evolution, which can be used for lifetime assessment. Experimental data have also been compared to the estimations by the classical models for cavity growth, including the power law growth due to Hancock, the diffusion growth due to Speight and Harris, the constrained diffusion growths due to Dyson and due to Rice and the enhanced diffusion growth due to Beere. It appears that the constraint diffusion growth models give a reasonable estimation of R-{epsilon} relation in many cases. The diffusion growth model is only applicable for limited cases where the power over t in R-t relation takes about 1/3. The power law and the enhanced diffusion models are found in most cases to overestimate the cavity growth.

  17. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  18. 3D cavity detection technique and its application based on cavity auto scanning laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ling; LI Xi-bing; LI Fa-ben; ZHAO Guo-yan; QIN Yu-hui

    2008-01-01

    Ground constructions and mines are severely threatened by underground cavities especially those unsafe or inaccessible ones. Safe and precise cavity detection is vital for reasonable cavity evaluation and disposal. The conventional cavity detection methods and their limitation were analyzed. Those methods cannot form 3D model of underground cavity which is used for instructing the cavity disposal; and their precisions in detection are always greatly affected by the geological circumstance. The importance of 3D cavity detection in metal mine for safe exploitation was pointed out; and the 3D cavity laser detection method and its principle were introduced. A cavity auto scanning laser system was recommended to actualize the cavity 3D detection after comparing with the other laser detection systems. Four boreholes were chosen to verify the validity of the cavity auto scanning laser system. The results show that the cavity auto scanning laser system is very suitable for underground 3D cavity detection, especially for those inaccessible ones.

  19. An improved equivalent circuit model of a four rod deflecting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R.; Burt, G.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we present an improved equivalent circuit model for a four rod deflecting cavity which calculates the frequencies of the first four modes of the cavity as well as the RT/Q for the deflecting mode. Equivalent circuit models of RF cavities give intuition and understanding about how the cavity operates and what changes can be made to modify the frequency, without the need for RF simulations, which can be time-consuming. We parameterise a generic four rod deflecting cavity into a geometry consisting of simple shapes. Equations are derived for the line impedance of the rods and the capacitance between the rods and these are used to calculate the resonant frequency of the deflecting dipole mode as well as the lower order mode and the model is bench-marked against two test cases; the CEBAF separator and the HL-LHC 4-rod LHC crab cavity. CST and the equivalent circuit model agree within 4% for both cavities with the LOM frequency and within 1% for the deflecting frequency. RT/Q differs between the model and CST by 37% for the CEBAF separator and 25% for the HL-LHC 4-rod crab cavity; however this is sufficient for understanding how to optimise the cavity design. The model has then been utilised to suggest a method of separating the modal frequencies in the HL-LHC crab cavity and to suggest design methodologies to optimise the cavity geometries.

  20. Sound transmission performance on cavity ferrocement panels with ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kandaswamy S; Ramachandraiah A

    2003-01-01

    Ferrocement panels have been used in low cost housing construction in developingcountries. This study focuses on the sound transmission performance of cavity ferrocement pan-els with ties. In this study, panels have been cast and tested in transmission loss suite speciallydesigned and constructed for testing their sound transmission performance experimentally. Themeasured results agree well with the theoretical model.

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, Jean [ODU, JLAB; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini [ODU, JLAB

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  2. Assessment of a Cavity to Optimize Ultrasonic Efficiency to Remove Intraradicular Posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Izabela Araujo Aguiar; Sponchiado Júnior, Emílio Carlos; Marques, André Augusto Franco; de Moura Martins, Leandro; Garrido, Ângela Delfina Bittencourt

    2017-08-01

    The study assessed an in vitro protocol for the removal of cast metal posts using ultrasonic vibration in multirooted teeth by drilling a cavity in the coronal portion of the post followed by ultrasound application in the cavity. Forty endodontically treated molars received intraradicular cast posts and were divided into 4 groups according to the removal protocol: the control group, no cavity and no ultrasonic vibration; the ultrasonic group, no cavity and ultrasonic vibration in the coronal portion of the core; the cavity group, a cavity in the core and no ultrasonic vibration; and the cavity ultrasonic group, a cavity in the core and ultrasonic vibration inside the cavity. The traction test was performed on all samples using a universal testing machine (EMIC DL-2000; EMIC Equipamentos e Sistemas de Ensaio LTDA, São José dos Pinhais, PR, Brazil) at a speed of 1 mm/min, obtaining values in Newtons. The data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance and the Tukey-Kramer test (P control group = 322.74 N, ultrasonic group = 283.09 N, cavity group = 244.00 N, and cavity ultrasonic group = 237.69 N). The lowest mean strength was found in the group that received ultrasonic vibration inside the cavity. Preparing a cavity in the coronal core followed by ultrasonic vibration reduces the traction force required for removal. The removal protocol was effective for removing posts in multirooted teeth cemented with zinc phosphate. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inter-assemblage facilitation: the functional diversity of cavity-producing beetles drives the size diversity of cavity-nesting bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydenham, Markus A K; Häusler, Lise D; Moe, Stein R; Eldegard, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Inter-specific interactions are important drivers and maintainers of biodiversity. Compared to trophic and competitive interactions, the role of non-trophic facilitation among species has received less attention. Cavity-nesting bees nest in old beetle borings in dead wood, with restricted diameters corresponding to the body size of the bee species. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the functional diversity of cavity-producing wood boring beetles - in terms of cavity diameters - drives the size diversity of cavity-nesting bees. The invertebrate communities were sampled in 30 sites, located in forested landscapes along an elevational gradient. We regressed the species richness and abundance of cavity nesting bees against the species richness and abundance of wood boring beetles, non-wood boring beetles and elevation. The proportion of cavity nesting bees in bee species assemblage was regressed against the species richness and abundance of wood boring beetles. We also tested the relationships between the size diversity of cavity nesting bees and wood boring beetles. The species richness and abundance of cavity nesting bees increased with the species richness and abundance of wood boring beetles. No such relationship was found for non-wood boring beetles. The abundance of wood boring beetles was also related to an increased proportion of cavity nesting bee individuals. Moreover, the size diversity of cavity-nesting bees increased with the functional diversity of wood boring beetles. Specifically, the mean and dispersion of bee body sizes increased with the functional dispersion of large wood boring beetles. The positive relationships between cavity producing bees and cavity nesting bees suggest that non-trophic facilitative interactions between species assemblages play important roles in organizing bee species assemblages. Considering a community-wide approach may therefore be required if we are to successfully understand and conserve wild bee

  4. Development of Infrastructure Facilities for Superconducting RF Cavity Fabrication, Processing and 2 K Characterization at RRCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S. C.; Raghavendra, S.; Jain, V. K.; Puntambekar, A.; Khare, P.; Dwivedi, J.; Mundra, G.; Kush, P. K.; Shrivastava, P.; Lad, M.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-02-01

    An extensive infrastructure facility is being established at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) for a proposed 1 GeV, high intensity superconducting proton linac for Indian Spallation Neutron Source. The proton linac will comprise of a large number of superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities ranging from low beta spoke resonators to medium and high beta multi-cell elliptical cavities at different RF frequencies. Infrastructure facilities for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and performance characterization at 2 K are setup to take-up manufacturing of large number of cavities required for future projects of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). RRCAT is also participating in a DAE’s approved mega project on “Physics and Advanced technology for High intensity Proton Accelerators” under Indian Institutions-Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC). In the R&D phase of IIFC program, a number of high beta, fully dressed multi-cell elliptical SCRF cavities will be developed in collaboration with Fermilab. A dedicated facility for SCRF cavity fabrication, tuning and processing is set up. SCRF cavities developed will be characterized at 2K using a vertical test stand facility, which is already commissioned. A Horizontal Test Stand facility has also been designed and under development for testing a dressed multi-cell SCRF cavity at 2K. The paper presents the infrastructure facilities setup at RRCAT for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and testing at 2K.

  5. Multi-purpose 805 MHz Pillbox RF Cavity for Muon Acceleration Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    An 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity has been designed and constructed to investigate potential muon beam acceleration and cooling techniques. The cavity can operate at vacuum or under pressure to 100 atmospheres, at room temperature or in a liquid nitrogen bath at 77 K. The cavity is designed for easy assembly and disassembly with bolted construction using aluminum seals. The surfaces of the end walls of the cavity can be replaced with different materials such as copper, aluminum, beryllium, or molybdenum, and with different geometries such as shaped windows or grid structures. Different surface treatments such as electro polished, high-pressure water cleaned, and atomic layer deposition are being considered for testing. The cavity has been designed to fit inside the 5-Tesla solenoid in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. Current status of the cavity prepared for initial conditioning and operation in the external magnetic field is discussed.

  6. Investigation Of Breakdown Induced Surface Damage On 805 Mhz Pillbox Cavity Interior Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jana, M R; Leonova, M; Moretti, A; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, K; Freemire, B; Torun, Y; Bowring, D; Flanagan, G

    2014-01-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, we have tested two 805 MHz vacuum RF cavities in a multi-Tesla magnetic field to study the effects of the static magnetic field on the cavity operation. This study gives useful information on field emitters in the cavity, dark current, surface conditioning, breakdown mechanisms and material properties of the cavity. All these factors determine the maximum accelerating gradient in the cavity. This paper discusses the image processing technique for quantitative estimation of spark damage spot distribution on cavity interior surfaces. The distribution is compared with the electric field distribution predicted by a computer code calculation. The local spark density is proportional to probability of surface breakdown and shows a power law dependence on the maximum electric field (E). This E dependence is consistent with ...

  7. Wave Dynamical Chaos in Superconducting Microwave Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Rehfeld, H; Dembowski, C; Gräf, H D; Hofferbert, R; Richter, A; Lengeler, Herbert

    1997-01-01

    During the last few years we have studied the chaotic behavior of special Euclidian geometries, so-called billiards, from the quantum or in more general sense "wave dynamical" point of view. Due to the equivalence between the stationary Schroedinger equation and the classical Helmholtz equation in the two-dimensional case (plain billiards), it is possible to simulate "quantum chaos" with the help of macroscopic, superconducting microwave cavities. Using this technique we investigated spectra of three billiards from the family of Pascal's Snails (Robnik-Billiards) with a different chaoticity in each case in order to test predictions of standard stochastical models for classical chaotic systems.

  8. Orion EFT-1 Cavity Heating Tile Experiments and Environment Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Oliver, Brandon; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Developing aerothermodynamic environments for deep cavities, such as those produced by micrometeoroids and orbital debris impacts, poses a great challenge for engineers. In order to assess existing cavity heating models, two one-inch diameter cavities were flown on the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). These cavities were manufactured with depths of 1.0 in and 1.4 in, and they were both instrumented. Instrumentation included surface thermocouples upstream, downstream and within the cavities, and additional thermocouples at the TPS-structure interface. This paper will present the data obtained, and comparisons with computational predictions will be shown. Additionally, the development of a 3D material thermal model will be described, which will be used to account for the three-dimensionality of the problem when interpreting the data. Furthermore, using a multi-dimensional inverse heat conduction approach, a reconstruction of a time- and space-dependent flight heating distribution during EFT1 will be presented. Additional discussions will focus on instrumentation challenges and calibration techniques specific to these experiments. The analysis shown will highlight the accuracies and/or deficiencies of current computational techniques to model cavity flows during hypersonic re-entry.

  9. Centrifugal barrel polishing of 1.3 GHz Nb cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamashevich, Yegor; Foster, Brian [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany); Navitski, Aliaksandr; Steder, Lea; Elsen, Eckhard [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are the key components of particle accelerators such as the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL, under construction) and the planned future International Linear Collider (ILC). Steady progress in surface treatment techniques of SRF cavities in both the achievable quality factor Q and the accelerating electric field Eacc makes new accelerators and ambitious projects feasible. One of the alternative surface preparation techniques which is actually being explored is centrifugal barrel polishing (CBP) pioneered at KEK in Japan in mid-nineties by T. Hiuchi et al. CBP is a mechanical polishing of cavities and results in around 10 x smaller surface roughness and mirror-like surface as compared to chemistry alone. Q and E{sub acc} are expected to be at least as high as for chemically treated cavities. CBP eliminates the bulk chemistry and has the potential to completely replace the chemistry. The University of Hamburg is installing a CBP machine to study it as a cavity preparation and repair technique for 9-cell 1.3 GHz SRF cavities at the Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY). The setup and first commissioning tests will be presented and discussed.

  10. RRR Characteristics for SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Yoochul; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-01-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes were fabricated such as a quarter wave resonator (QWR), a half wave resonator (HWR) and a single spoke resonator (SSR). One of the critical factors determining performances of the superconducting cavities is a residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how much niobium is pure and how fast niobium can transmit heat as well. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to the impurity incorporation. Thus it is important to maintain RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level will be discussed.

  11. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  12. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, A G; Ducloux, O; Chartier, C; Traon, O Le; Briant, T; Cohadon, P -F; Heidmann, A; Michel, C; Pinard, L; Flaminio, R

    2011-01-01

    We present a new micromechanical resonator designed for cavity optomechanics. We have used a micropillar geometry to obtain a high-frequency mechanical resonance with a low effective mass and a very high quality factor. We have coated a 60-$\\mu$m diameter low-loss dielectric mirror on top of the pillar and are planning to use this micromirror as part of a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, to laser cool the resonator down to its quantum ground state and to monitor its quantum position fluctuations by quantum-limited optical interferometry.

  13. Entanglement swapping between atom and cavity and generation of entangled state of cavity fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ai-Xi; Deng Li

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme where entanglement swapping between atom and cavity can be realized. A-type three-level atoms interacting resonantly with cavity field are considered. By detecting atom and cavity field, it realizes entanglement swapping between atom and cavity. It uses the technique of entanglement swapping to generate an entangled state of two cavity fields by measuring on atoms. It discusses the experimental feasibility of the proposed scheme and application of entangled state of cavity fields.

  14. On cavity modification of stimulated Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Matsko, A B; Letargat, R J; Ilchenko, V S; Maleki, L

    2003-01-01

    We study theoretically stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a nonlinear dielectric microcavity and compare SRS thresholds for the cavity and the bulk material it is made of. We show that cavity SRS enhancement results solely from the intensity build up in the cavity and from the differences of the SRS dynamics in free and confined space. There is no significant modification of the Raman gain due to cavity QED effects. We show that the SRS threshold depends significantly on the nature of the dominating cavity decay as well as on the coupling technique with the cavity used for SRS measurements.

  15. RF Processing of the Couplers for the SNS Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.Kang; I.E. Campisi; D. Stout; A. Vassioutchenko; M. Stirbet; M. Drury; T. Powers

    2005-07-10

    All eighty-one fundamental power couplers for the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the SNS linac have been RF conditioned and installed in the cryomodules successfully. The couplers were RF processed at JLAB or at the SNS in ORNL: more than forty couplers have been RF conditioned in the SNS RF Test Facility (RFTF) after the first forty couplers were conditioned at JLAB. The couplers were conditioned up to 650 kW forward power at 8% duty cycle in traveling and standing waves. They were installed on the cavities in the cryomodules and then assembled with the airside waveguide transitions. The couplers have been high power RF tested with satisfactory accelerating field gradients in the cooled cavities.

  16. S0 Tight Loop Studies on ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Fumio [KEK; Konomi, T. [KEK; Saito, Kenji [KEK; Bice, Damon [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony C. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    We have continued high gradient R&D of ICHIRO 9-cell cavities at KEK. ICHIRO 9-cell cavity #5 (I9#5) that has no end groups on beam tube to focus on high gradient sent to Jlab as S0 tight loop study. Surface treatments and vertical test were repeated 3 times at Jlab, and then I9#5 sent back to KEK. We also repeated surface treatments and test at KEK. Maximum gradients were 36.5MV/m at Jlab, and 33.7MV/m at KEK so far. Now we are struggling with the puzzle why the results of singles do not work well on 9-cell cavities.

  17. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  18. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also d...

  19. A 200 MHz prebunching cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This cavity was installed in the PS ring and proved very efficient in providing a modulation on the PS beam before it is injected into the SPS machine. Moreover it allowed longitudinal instabilities studies at high intensities. Roberto Cappi stands on the left.

  20. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  1. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide...

  2. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavi-tation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator,which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emer-gence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects,of both model and prototype,on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length be-low aerators was suggested,which considers overall effects of the above men-tioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  3. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JianHua; RUAN ShiPing

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavitation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator, which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emergence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects, of both model and prototype, on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length below aerators was suggested, which considers overall effects of the above mentioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  4. Optimization of the Low Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekutowicz, J.S.; /DESY; Kneisel, P.; /Jefferson Lab; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Saito, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ge, L.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC main linacs. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and TJNAF (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping factors for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reducing the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced multipacting barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, multipacting activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss designs for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting.

  5. Displacement-noise-free gravitational-wave detection with two Fabry-Perot cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Rakhubovsky, Andrey A

    2008-01-01

    We propose two detuned Fabry-Perot cavities, each pumped through both the mirrors, positioned in line as a toy model of the gravitational-wave (GW) detector free from displacement noise of the test masses. It is demonstrated that the noise of cavity mirrors can be completely excluded in a proper linear combination of the cavities output signals. This model is illustrated by a simplified round trip model (without Fabry-Perot cavities). We show that in low-frequency region the obtained displacement-noise-free response signal is stronger than the one of the interferometer recently proposed by S.Kawamura and Y.Chen.

  6. Impact of Trapped Flux and Thermal Gradients on the SRF Cavity Quality Factor

    CERN Document Server

    Kugeler, O; Knobloch, J; Aull, S

    2012-01-01

    The obtained Q0 value of a superconducting niobium cavity is known to depend on various factors like the RRR of the Niobium material, crystallinity, chemical treatment history, the high-pressure rinsing process, or effectiveness of the magnetic shielding. We have observed that spatial thermal gradients over the cavity length during cool-down appear to contribute to a degradation of Q0. Measurements were performed in the Horizontal Bi-Cavity Test Facility (HoBiCaT) at HZB on TESLA type cavities as well as on disc- and rod-shaped niobium samples equipped with thermal, electrical and magnetic diagnostics. Possible explanations for the effect are discussed.

  7. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as...

  8. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  9. Study of low work function materials for hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Schwellnus, F; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Mattolat, Ch; Menna, M; Österdahl, F K; Raeder, S; Stora, T; Wendta, K

    2009-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization of the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high temperature, low work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE/CERN, Geneva and RISIKO/University of Mainz.

  10. Study of Low Work Function Materials for Hot Cavity Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Catherall, R; Fedosseev, V; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Menna, Mariano; Österdahl, F; Raeder, S; Schwellnus, F; Stora, T; Wendt, K; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization on the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high-temperature, low-work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE / CERN, Geneva and RISIKO / University of Mainz.

  11. Magnesium Diboride thin Films, multilayers, and coatings for SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoxing [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities currently use low-temperature superconductor niobium, and the Nb SRF cavities have approached the performance levels predicted theoretically. Compared to Nb, MgB2 becomes superconducting at a much higher temperature and promises a better RF performance in terms of higher quality factor Q and higher acceleration capability. An MgB2 SRF technology can significantly reduce the operating costs of particle accelerators when these potentials are realized. This project aimed to advance the development of an MgB2 SRF technology. It had two main objectives: (1) materials issues of MgB2 thin films and multilayers related to their applications in SRF cavities; and (2) coating single-cell cavities for testing at RF frequencies. The key technical thrust of the project is the deposition of high quality clean MgB2 films and coatings by the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) technique, which was developed in my group. We have achieved technical progress in each of the two areas. For the first objective, we have confirmed that MgB2 thin film coatings can be used to effectively enhance the vortex penetration field of an SRF cavity. A vortex is a normal region in the shape of spaghetti that threads through a superconductor. Its existence is due to an applied magnetic field that is greater than a so-called lower critical field, Hc1. Once a vortex enters the superconductor, its movement leads to loss. This has been shown to be the reason for an SRF cavity to break down. Thus, enhancing the magnetic field for a vortex to enter the superconductor that forms the SRF cavity has be a goal of intense research. To this end, Gurevich proposed that a coating of thin superconductor layer can impede the vortex entrance. In this project, we have done two important experiment to test this concept. One, we showed that the enhancement of Hc1 can be

  12. Quantum states preparation in cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wenchao

    Quantum entanglement and quantum superposition are fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, which underline quantum information and quantum computation. Preparing quantum states in the macroscopic level is both conceptually interesting for extending quantum physics to a broader sense and fundamentally important for testing the validity of quantum mechanics. In this dissertation, schemes of preparing macroscopic entanglement and macroscopic superposition states in cavity optomechanics are studied using the unitary evolution method in the nonlinear regime or Lyapunov equation in the linearized regime. Quantum entanglement and quantum superposition states can be realized using experimentally feasible parameters with the proposals in this dissertation. Firstly, a scheme of entangling two movable end mirrors in a Fabry-Perot cavity that are coupled to a common single photon superposition state is studied. It is shown that strong entanglement can be obtained either in the single-photon strong coupling regime deterministically or in the single-photon weak coupling regime conditionally. Secondly, a scheme of entangling two movable end mirrors, that are coupled to two-mode entangled fields generated from a correlated-emission laser is investigated. By tuning the input driving laser frequencies at the Stokes sidebands of the cavity, the radiation-pressure coupling can be linearized as an effective beam-splitter-like interaction. Hence entanglement can be transferred from the two-mode fields to the two mechanical mirrors. Macroscopic entanglement between macroscopic mirrors persists at temperature ~ 1K. Thirdly, a scheme of creating macroscopic quantum superpositions of a mechanical mirror via periodically flipping a photonic qubit is proposed. Quantum superposition states of a mechanical mirror can be obtained via the nonlinear radiation coupling with a single-photon superposition state. However, the difference between two superposed mechanical states is very small due

  13. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained.......Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  14. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. Ian Wilso seems to hold it in his hands. The storage cavities had 4 portholes, 1 each for: RF feed; tuning; connection to the accelerating cavity; vacuum pump. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the lower LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. See also 8002294, 8006510X, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  15. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  16. Design of N-type feedthrough for HOM coupler for cERL injector cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Noguchi, S.; Kako, E.; Shishido, T.

    2014-01-01

    The injector cryomodule for the compact energy recovery linac (cERL) is under development at KEK. The cryomodule with 3L-band 2-cell cavities was built in June 2012. A prototype 2-cell cavity and three other 2-cell cavities with five higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers for actual operation were fabricated in May 2011. The vertical tests of these cavities were carried out after standard surface preparation at the KEK Superconducting accelerator Test Facility (KEK-STF) from October 2010 to March 2012. Radio-frequency feedthroughs with high thermal conductivity for the HOM coupler were also developed to achieve 12.5 MV/m CW operation in the cryomodule. A Kyocera NR-type connector was modified to connect to this target. The results of vertical tests of the 2-cell cavities to measure their feedthrough performance will be reported in this paper.

  17. One Innovation of Mechanical Polishing Apparatus for Surface Treatment of 6 GHz TESLA Superconducting Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Guo-long; A.A.Rossi; R.K.Thakur; V.Palmieri

    2013-01-01

    6 GHz spinning seamless superconducting radio frequency(SRF)cavities are a very useful tool for testing alternative surface treatments in the fabrication of TESLA cavity.However,the surface is damaged in internal part for the using of the collapsible mandrel during spinning.The first important step of the

  18. Intra-cavity metamorphosis of a Gaussian beam to flat-top distribution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We explore an intra-cavity beam shaping approach to generate a Gaussian distribution by the metamorphosis of a Gaussian beam into a flat-top distribution on opposing mirrors. The concept is tested external to the cavity through the use of two...

  19. Digital Cavities and Their Potential Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Karki, Khadga; Widom, Julia R; Marcus, Andrew H; Pullerits, Tonu

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a digital cavity is presented. The functionality of a tunable radio-frequency/microwave cavity with unrestricted Q-factor is implemented. The theoretical aspects of the cavity and its potential applications in high resolution spectroscopy and synchronization of clocks together with examples in signal processing and data acquisition are discussed.

  20. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  1. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  2. Performance of Production SRF Cavities for CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles; Benesch, Jay; Mammosser, John; Kneisel, Peter; Kushnick, Peter; Powers, Thomas

    1993-06-01

    Construction for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date.Over 250 of the eventual into hermetic pairs and completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Among these, 52% demonstrated usable gradients greater than 10 MV/m.although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of Q0=2.4 * 10^9 at 5 MV/m, the usual limiting phenomena during production cavity testing is presented.The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m.The distributions of frequency and Q for a higher-order mode are also presented.

  3. Does the availability of artificial cavities affect cavity excavation rates in red-cockaded woodpeckers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph; Richard R. Schaefer

    2002-01-01

    Rates of cavity excavation by Red-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) were examined from 1983 to 1999 on the Angelina National Forest in east Texas. We compared the rare of natural cavity excavation between 1983 and 1990 (before artificial cavities were available) with the rate of cavity excavation between 1992 and 1993, a period when...

  4. Exploration of Quench Initiation Due to Intentional Geometrical Defects in a High Magnetic Field Region of an SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Dai, K. Zhao, G.V. Eremeev, R.L. Geng, A.D. Palczewski; Dai, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, A. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Geng, R. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhao, K. [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01

    A computer program which was used to simulate and analyze the thermal behaviors of SRF cavities has been developed at Jefferson Lab using C++ code. This code was also used to verify the quench initiation due to geometrical defects in high magnetic field region of SRF cavities. We built a CEBAF single cell cavity with 4 artificial defects near equator, and this cavity has been tested with T-mapping. The preheating behavior and quench initiation analysis of this cavity will be presented here using the computer program.

  5. CAVITY BEAM POSITION MONITOR SYSTEM FOR ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F; Joshi, N; Lyapin, A; Aryshev, A; Honda, Y; Naito, T; Terunuma, N; Urakara, J; Heo, A; Kim, E-S; Kim, Y I; McCormick, D; Frisch, J; Nelson, J; Smith, T; White, G R

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) in KEK, Japan, is a prototype scaled demonstrator system for the final focus required for a future high energy lepton linear collider. The ATF2 beam-line is instrumented with a total of 41 high resolution C and S band resonant cavity beam position monitors (BPM) with associated mixer electronics and digitisers. In addition 4 high resolution BPMs have been recently installed at the interaction point, we briefly describe the first operational experience of these cavities in the ATF2 beam-line. The current status of the overall BPM system is also described, with a focus on operational techniques and performance.

  6. Development of a Cavity Beam Position Monitor for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cullinan, F; Joshi, N; Lyapin, A; Calvo, E; Chritin, N; Guillot-Vignot, F; Lefevre, T; Søby, L; Lunin, A; Wendt, M; Yakovlev, V P; Smith, S

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) project presents many challenges to its subsystems and the beam diagnostics in particular must perform beyond current limitations. The requirements for the CLIC main beam position monitors foresee a spacial resolution of 50 nm while delivering a 50 ns temporal resolution within the bunch train. We discuss the design of the microwave cavity pick-up and associated electronics, bench top tests with the first prototype cavity, as well as some of the machine-specific integration and operational issues.

  7. MALPOSITIONED LMA CONFUSED AS FOREIGN BODY IN NASAL CAVITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sidharth; Mehta, Nitika; Mehta, Nandita; Mehta, Satish; Verma, Jayeeta

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of confusing white foreign body in the nasal cavity detected during Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (ESS) in a 35-yr-old male which turned out to be a malposition of classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Although malposition of LMA is a known entity to the anesthesiologist, if ventilation is adequate, back folded LMA in nasal cavity might not be recognized by the surgeon and lead to catastrophic consequences during endoscopic sinus surgery. In principle, misfolding and malpositioning can be reduced by pre usage testing, using appropriate sizes, minimizing cuff volume, and early identification and correction of malposition.

  8. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-ENS-CNRS, Paris (France); Van Brackel, Emmanuel [Département de Physique, ENS, Paris (France); Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier [Département Mesures Physiques, ONERA, Châtillon (France); Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele [Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés, IN2P3-CNRS, Lyon (France)

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  9. Spontaneous Photon Emission in Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alber G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate spontaneous photon emission processes of two-level atoms in parabolic and ellipsoidal cavities thereby taking into account the full multimode scenario. In particular, we calculate the excitation probabilities of the atoms and the energy density of the resulting few-photon electromagnetic radiation field by using semiclassical methods for the description of the multimode scenario. Based on this approach photon path representations are developed for relevant transition probability amplitudes which are valid in the optical frequency regime where the dipole and the rotating-wave approximations apply. Comparisons with numerical results demonstrate the quality of these semiclassical results even in cases in which the wave length of a spontaneously emitted photon becomes comparable or even larger than characteristic length scales of the cavity. This is the dynamical regime in which diffraction effects become important so that geometric optical considerations are typically not applicable.

  10. Dissipative structures in optomechanical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquín; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Patera, Giuseppe; Roldán, Eugenio; de Valcárcel, Germán J.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the increasing interest in the properties of multimode optomechanical devices, here we study a system in which a driven longitudinal mode of a large-area optical cavity is dispersively coupled to a deformable mechanical element. Two different models naturally appear in such scenario, for which we predict the formation of periodic patterns, localized structures (cavity solitons), and domain walls, among other complex nonlinear phenomena. Further, we propose a realistic design based on intracavity membranes where our models can be studied experimentally. Apart from its relevance to the field of nonlinear optics, the results put forward here are a necessary step towards understanding the quantum properties of optomechanical systems in the multimode regime of both the optical and the mechanical degrees of freedom.

  11. Retention proposal in complex cavities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alvarez Rodríguez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental Operatory is the main structure in which Odontology lies. It is not an easy discipline that gives enjoyable results with little effort due to the difficulties that a correct reconstruction of a destroyed dental element offers.The frequency with which pulpar injury occurs while anchoring additional retainers in complex cavities, the technical difficulties the lack of these devices cause and the need to simplify dental procedures lead this study to show the advantages to substitute additional retainers for a retainer surcus. Method: An observational descriptive study was applied to 53 patients(42% of the universe , sample which was selected by means of a simple randomized sample . From a proximal-occlusal cavity, the preparations were extended in a box-like shape towards the bucal or lingual region and the additional retainers were substituted for a surcus which was performed in the gingival wall of the preparation. Calcium Hydroxide of rapid dryness was used as a cavity cover and Policarboxilate cement as a base; then the amalgam restoration was performed. The number of restorations were studied taking into account the patient´s age and the failures due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were assessed taking into consideration the patient´s age and a one- year follow up. Results: Most of the amalgam restorations were performed in patients aged from 35 to 59 years and the relative frequencies due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were very low. Conclusion: The substitution of additional retainers for a retainer surcus in complex cavities of vital molars showed to be advantageous because it guarantees a less degree of pulpar damage and less pulpar damage.

  12. First coupled CH power cavity for the FAIR proton injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodhage, Robert; Vinzenz, Wolfgang [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany); Almomani, Ali; Ratzinger, Ulrich [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Uni Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    For the research program with cooled antiprotons at FAIR a dedicated 70 MeV, 70 mA proton injector is required. The main acceleration of this room temperature linac will be provided by six CH cavities operated at 325 MHz. Each cavity will be powered by a 2.5 MW Klystron. For the second acceleration unit from 11.5 MeV to 24.2 MeV a 1:2 scaled model has been built. Low level RF measurements have been performed to determine the main parameters and to prove the concept of coupled CH cavities. In 2012, the assembly and tuning of the first power prototype was finished. Until then, the cavity was tested with a preliminary aluminum drift tube structure, which was used for precise frequency and field tuning. In 2013 the final drift tube structure has been welded inside the main tanks and the preparation for copper plating has taken place. This paper reports on the main tuning and commissioning steps towards that novel type of DTL, and it shows the latest results measured on a fully operational and copper plated CH proton cavity.

  13. First coupled CH power cavity for the FAIR proton injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodhage, Robert; Ratzinger, Ulrich [IAP, Frankfurt University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vinzenz, Wolfgang; Clemente, Gianluigi [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    For the research program with cooled antiprotons at FAIR a dedicated 70 MeV, 70 mA proton injector is required. The main acceleration of this room temperature linac will be provided by six CH cavities operated at 325 MHz. Each cavity will be powered by a 2.5 MW Klystron. For the second acceleration unit from 11.5 MeV to 24.2 MeV a 1:2 scaled model has been built. Low level RF measurements have been performed to determine the main parameters and to prove the concept of coupled CH cavities. In Summer 2012, the assembly and tuning of the first power prototype was finished. Until then, the cavity was tested with a preliminary aluminum drift tube structure, which was used for precise frequency and field tuning. Before Spring 2013 the final drift tube structure will be welded inside the main tanks and the preparation for copper plating will take place. This paper reports on the main tuning and commissioning steps towards that novel type of DTL and it shows the latest results measured on a fully operational CH proton cavity.

  14. Residential thermal storage by water encapsulation in stud wall cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.H.; Harris, G.P.; Kiley, M.N.; Cengel, Y.A. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Thermal storage in wall cavities of standard stick frame housing was investigated. Possible applications relate to electric utility time of use charging, or solar hot air charging. Various thermal storage methods were surveyed, and water stored in the stud cavities was selected. Air was used to charge the encapsulated water. Exterior and interior walls were investigated. Experimental tests were run on full size wall cavities, for both heating and cooling runs. Experimental results were compared and validated with a mathematical model predicting the system performance. Results show that the rate of heat lost by the system while charging is greater than while discharging. The exterior walls performed best in terms of speed of charging, and the maximum charge held. The best charging efficiency was achieved for the lowest air flow rate while charging. Universal curves that describe the basic system responses were developed.

  15. Cavity Control and Cooling of Nanoparticles in High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, James

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres, and control the rotation of nanorods, with the potential to produce cold, aligned nanostructures. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  16. Cavity Cooling of Nanoparticles: Towards Matter-Wave experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, James; Kuhn, Stefan; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres a few hundred nanometers in size. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  17. Experimental investigation on the cavity-based scramjet model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU HongBin; CHEN LiHong; CHANG XinYu

    2009-01-01

    The present work focused on improving the engine performance with different fuel equivalence ratios and fuel injections.A scramjet model with strut/cavity integrated configurations was tested under Math 5.8 flows.The results showed that the strut may sreve as an effective tool in a kerosene-fueled scramjet.The integration of strut/cavities also had great effect on stablizing the combustion in a wide range of fuel equivalence ratio.The one-sdimensional analysis method was used to analyze the main characteristics of the model.The two-stage fuel injection should have better performance in increasing the chemical reaction rate in the first cavity region.

  18. Higher Order Reentrant Post Modes in Cylindrical Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    McAllister, Ben T; Parker, Stephen R; Tobar, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Reentrant cavities are microwave resonant devices employed in a number of different areas of physics. They are appealing due to their simple frequency tuning mechanism, which offers large tuning ranges. Reentrant cavities are, in essence, 3D lumped LC circuits consisting of a conducting central post embedded in a resonant cavity. The lowest order reentrant mode (which transforms from the TM010 mode) has been extensively studied in past publications. In this work we show the existence of higher order reentrant post modes (which transform from the TM01n mode family). We characterize these new modes in terms of their frequency tuning, filling factors and quality factors, as well as discuss some possible applications of these modes in fundamental physics tests.

  19. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-08-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO2 dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  20. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinglan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  1. The inner cavity of the circumnuclear disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, M.; Morris, M. R.; Frank, A.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Duschl, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    The circumnuclear disc (CND) orbiting the Galaxy's central black hole is a reservoir of material that can ultimately provide energy through accretion, or form stars in the presence of the black hole, as evidenced by the stellar cluster that is presently located at the CND's centre. In this paper, we report the results of a computational study of the dynamics of the CND. The results lead us to question two paradigms that are prevalent in previous research on the Galactic Centre. The first is that the disc's inner cavity is maintained by the interaction of the central stellar cluster's strong winds with the disc's inner rim, and secondly, that the presence of unstable clumps in the disc implies that the CND is a transient feature. Our simulations show that, in the absence of a magnetic field, the interaction of the wind with the inner disc rim actually leads to a filling of the inner cavity within a few orbital time-scales, contrary to previous expectations. However, including the effects of magnetic fields stabilizes the inner disc rim against rapid inward migration. Furthermore, this interaction causes instabilities that continuously create clumps that are individually unstable against tidal shearing. Thus the occurrence of such unstable clumps does not necessarily mean that the disc is itself a transient phenomenon. The next steps in this investigation are to explore the effect of the magnetorotational instability on the disc evolution and to test whether the results presented here persist for longer time-scales than those considered here.

  2. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Djafari-Rouhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  3. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arruda, Milena Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis.

  4. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  5. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); El-Jallal, Said [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Physique du Rayonnement et de l’Interaction Laser Matière, Faculté des sciences, Université de Moulay Ismail, Meknès (Morocco)

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  6. Differential cavity mode spectroscopy: A new cavity enhanced technique for the detection of weak transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Glenn de [Centre for Gravitational Physics, Faculty of Science, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)], E-mail: glenn.devine@jpl.nasa.gov; McClelland, David E.; Gray, Malcolm B. [Centre for Gravitational Physics, Faculty of Science, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2008-06-16

    We present a new cavity enhanced, continuous wave spectroscopic technique for the detection of weak atomic and molecular transitions. Differential Cavity Mode Spectroscopy (DCMS) measures the difference in absorption between two adjacent cavity longitudinal modes to yield a highly sensitive, yet relatively simple, cavity enhanced spectroscopic technique. In addition this relative absorption measurement is, to first order, independent of both laser frequency noise and cavity acoustic noise. Here we present both a theoretical description of this new technique and an initial experimental demonstration.

  7. Qualification of the Second Batch Production 9-Cell Cavities Manufactured by AES and Validation of the First US Industrial Cavity Vendor for ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, R. L. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Golden, B. A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Kushnick, P. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Overton, R. B. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Calderaro, M. [AES, Medford, NY (United States); Peterson, E. [AES, Medford, NY (United States); Rathke, J. [AES, Medford, NY (United States); Champion, M. S. [FNAL, Batavia, IL (United States); Follkie, J. [FNAL, Batavia, IL (United States); Crawford, A. C. [FNAL, Batavia, IL (United States); Forehand, D. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    One of the major goals of ILC SRF cavity R&D is to develop industrial capabilities of cavity manufacture and processing in all three regions. In the past several years, Jefferson Lab, in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, has processed and tested all the 9-cell cavities of the first batch (4 cavities) and second batch (6 cavities) production cavities manufactured by Advanced Energy Systems Inc. (AES). Over the course, close information feedback was maintained, resulting in changes in fabrication and processing procedures. A light buffered chemical polishing was introduced, removing the weld splatters that could not be effectively removed by heavy EP alone. An 800 Celsius 2 hour vacuum furnace heat treatment procedure replaced the original 600 Celsius 10 hour procedure. Four out of the six 9-cell cavities of the second production bath achieved a gradient of 36-41 MV/m at a Q0 of more than 8E9 at 35 MV/m. This result validated AES as the first ''ILC certified'' industrial vendor in the US for ILC cavity manufacture.

  8. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, B. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Smith, J. D.A. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Rimmer, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Delayen, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Calaga, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  9. Plasmonic Coupled Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupled cavity modes on Moire surfaces. An experimental study has been made of the propagation of SPPs on a thin silver surface that is textured with Moire surface pattern using interference lithography. The Moire surface contains periodic array of one dimensional cavities. The distance between the cavities can be controlled by changing the periodicities of Moire surface. When the SPP cavity separation is sufficiently small, we show splitting of strongly coupled plasmonic cavity modes through numerical simulations. Conversely, when the SPP cavity separation is sufficiently large, SPP cavity modes are found to be localized and do not show splitting of SPP cavity modes . This splitting of SPP cavity modes are well explained with a tight binding model that has been succesfully applied in photonic coupled cavities. Reflection measurements and numerical simulation of a large number of adjacent SPP cavities have shown a coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) type plasmonic waveguide band formation within the band gap region of unperturbed uniform grating.

  10. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  11. CHECHIA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Technical Univ. Warsaw (Poland). ELHEP Laboratory, ISE; Simrock, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). TESLA

    2005-07-01

    The initial control of the superconductive cavity has recently been performed by applying the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system in DESY Hamburg. This first experiment turned attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the cavity is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The cavity parameters identification is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  12. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  13. SPS RF System an Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X.

  14. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Möhle, Katharina; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-01-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1 x 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (> 1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  15. Evaluation of cavity wall adaptation of bulk esthetic materials to restore class II cavities in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaintantzopoulou, Maria D; Gopinath, Vellore K; Zinelis, Spiros

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the cavity wall adaptation and gap formation of a bulk fill composite resin and reinforced conventional glass ionomer cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement in class II restorations on primary molars. Standardized class II slot cavity preparations were prepared in exfoliating primary molars. Teeth were restored with one of the three tested materials (n = 10): SonicFill bulk fill composite resin (SF), EQUIA Fil conventional reinforced glass ionomer cement (EQF), and Vitremer resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (VT). Cavity wall adaptation of the restorations was investigated by computerized X-ray micro-tomography and the percentage void volume fraction (%VVF) was calculated. Same specimens were sectioned and the interfaces were evaluated by reflection optical microscopy to measure the percentage linear length (%LD) of the interfacial gaps. Samples were further evaluated by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). EQF and SF showed significantly lower %VVF and %LD values than VT (p materials showed good cavity wall adaptation. Short operating time and good cavity wall adaptation are advantages of the materials in restorative and pediatric dentistry, especially while working on children with limited attention span.

  16. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  17. Development of superconducting crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dziuba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The crossbar-H-mode (CH structure is the first superconducting multicell drift tube cavity for the low and medium energy range operated in the H_{21} mode. Because of the large energy gain per cavity, which leads to high real estate gradients, it is an excellent candidate for the efficient acceleration in high power proton and ion accelerators with fixed velocity profile. A prototype cavity has been developed and tested successfully with a gradient of 7  MV/m. A few new superconducting CH cavities with improved geometries for different high power applications are under development at present. One cavity (f=325  MHz, β=0.16, seven cells is currently under construction and studied with respect to a possible upgrade option for the GSI UNILAC. Another cavity (f=217  MHz, β=0.059, 15 cells is designed for a cw operated energy variable heavy ion linac application. Furthermore, the EUROTRANS project (European research program for the transmutation of high level nuclear waste in an accelerator driven system, 600 MeV protons, 352 MHz is one of many possible applications for this kind of superconducting rf cavity. In this context a layout of the 17 MeV EUROTRANS injector containing four superconducting CH cavities was proposed by the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. The status of the cavity development related to the EUROTRANS injector is presented.

  18. Single atoms on demand for cavity QED experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, I.

    2007-09-06

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) describes electromagnetic fields in a confined space and the radiative properties of atoms in such fields. The simplest example of such system is a single atom interacting with one mode of a high-finesse resonator. Besides observation and exploration of fundamental quantum mechanical effects, this system bears a high potential for applications quantum information science such as, e.g., quantum logic gates, quantum communication and quantum teleportation. In this thesis I present an experiment on the deterministic coupling of a single neutral atom to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator. In Chapter 1 I describe our basic techniques for trapping and observing single cesium atoms. As a source of single atoms we use a high-gradient magneto-optical trap, which captures the atoms from background gas in a vacuum chamber and cools them down to millikelvin temperatures. The atoms are then transferred without loss into a standing-wave dipole trap, which provides a conservative potential required for experiments on atomic coherence such as quantum information processing and metrology on trapped atoms. Moreover, shifting the standing-wave pattern allows us to deterministically transport the atoms (Chapter 2). In combination with nondestructive fluorescence imaging of individual trapped atoms, this enables us to control their position with submicrometer precision over several millimeters along the dipole trap. The cavity QED system can distinctly display quantum behaviour in the so-called strong coupling regime, i.e., when the coherent atom-cavity coupling rate dominates dissipation in the system. This sets the main requirements on the resonator's properties: small mode volume and high finesse. Chapter 3 is devoted to the manufacturing, assembling, and testing of an ultra-high finesse optical Fabry-Perot resonator, stabilized to the atomic transition. In Chapter 4 I present the transportation of single atoms into the

  19. Plasma Processing of SRF Cavities for the next Generation Of Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuskovic, Leposava

    2015-11-23

    The cost-effective production of high frequency accelerating fields are the foundation for the next generation of particle accelerators. The Ar/Cl2 plasma etching technology holds the promise to yield a major reduction in cavity preparation costs. Plasma-based dry niobium surface treatment provides an excellent opportunity to remove bulk niobium, eliminate surface imperfections, increase cavity quality factor, and bring accelerating fields to higher levels. At the same time, the developed technology will be more environmentally friendly than the hydrogen fluoride-based wet etching technology. Plasma etching of inner surfaces of standard multi-cell SRF cavities is the main goal of this research in order to eliminate contaminants, including niobium oxides, in the penetration depth region. Successful plasma processing of multi-cell cavities will establish this method as a viable technique in the quest for more efficient components of next generation particle accelerators. In this project the single-cell pill box cavity plasma etching system is developed and etching conditions are determined. An actual single cell SRF cavity (1497 MHz) is plasma etched based on the pill box cavity results. The first RF test of this plasma etched cavity at cryogenic temperature is obtained. The system can also be used for other surface modifications, including tailoring niobium surface properties, surface passivation or nitriding for better performance of SRF cavities. The results of this plasma processing technology may be applied to most of the current SRF cavity fabrication projects. In the course of this project it has been demonstrated that a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge can be successfully used for etching curved niobium surfaces, in particular the inner walls of SRF cavities. The results could also be applicable to the inner or concave surfaces of any 3D structure other than an SRF cavity.

  20. Effects of dentin depth and cavity configuration on bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, T; Sano, H; Burrow, M F; Tagami, J; Pashley, D H

    1999-04-01

    During polymerization of resin composites, shrinkage stresses compete with resin-dentin bonds in a manner that can cause failure of the bond, depending upon the configuration of the cavity, its depth, and the restorative technique. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the effect of cavity configuration (C) and remaining dentin thickness (RDT) influence resin bond strength to the dentin of Class I cavity floors. The occlusal enamel was ground to expose a flat superficial dentin surface as a control (superficial dentin, C-factor = 1) in human extracted third molars. Cavities 3 mm long x 4 mm wide were prepared to a depth 2 mm below the ground dentin surfaces (deep dentin within cavity floor, C-factor = 3). To assess the relationship between C-factor and RDT, we removed the walls of cavities, making a deep flat surface for bonding (deep dentin, C-factor = 1). The teeth were restored with either Clearfil Liner Bond II (LB II), One-Step (OS), or Super-Bond D Liner (DL), followed by Clearfil Photo Posterior resin composite. After 24 hrs' storage in water, the teeth were sectioned vertically into 3 or 4 slabs (0.7 mm thick) and trimmed for the micro-tensile bond test so that we could determine the strength of the resin bonds to the pulpal floor. All groups gave high bond strengths to superficial dentin, but OS and DL gave significantly lower bond strengths to flat deep dentin when the C-factor was 1. When the C-factor was increased to 3 by the creation of a three-dimensional cavity preparation, the bond strengths of all materials fell (range, 21 to 35%), but the difference was significant (p bond strengths tended to exhibit cohesive failures within the hybrid layer, while specimens exhibiting low bond strengths showed failures at the top of the hybrid layer. Some adhesives do not bond well to deep dentin, making them more susceptible to polymerization shrinkage stress that develops in cavities with high C-factors.

  1. 8:1 thermal cavity problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresho, P M; Sutton, S

    2000-10-11

    We present results for the 8:1 thermal cavity problem using FIDAP on 3 meshes--each using 3 elements. A brief summary of related results is also included. This contribution comes via the rather versatile and general commercial finite element code, FIDAP. This code still offers the user a wide selection with respect to element choices, statement of governing equations, (e.g., advective form, divergence form) implicit time integrators (variable-step or fixed step, first-order or second-order), and solution techniques for both the nonlinear and linear sets of equations. We have tested quite a number of these variations on this problem; here we report on an interesting subset and will present the remainder at the conference.

  2. Development of a compact cylindrical reaction cavity for a microwave dielectric heating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myungsik; Kim, Kwangsoo

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a compact reaction cavity for a microwave-assisted synthesis system. The microwave dielectric heating is a key technology to improve synthesizing yield, however, the large size of the microwave generation and reaction parts in an all-in-one system is a major obstacle when applying the technique to various systems, of which the installation space is limited. For this particular problem, a compact stand-alone cylindrical reaction cavity was developed in the current study. A microwave excited from a monopole probe, which is inserted into the side of the cavity, is transferred to a reaction mixture through the upper hole of the cavity. The cavity is miniaturized by filling it with an alumina ceramic dielectric. Fine-tuning of the resonance frequency becomes available by controlling the length of the inserted screw between the probe and the upper hole. The physical properties of the cavity were simulated using high frequency structural simulator (HFSS) and the produced cavity was tested using an Agilent E8357A network analyzer. The test results show that the developed cavity is able to send enough energy to various solvents.

  3. Dynamical tunneling in optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Hackenbroich, G; Hackenbroich, Gregor; Noeckel, Jens U.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetime of whispering gallery modes in a dielectric cavity with a metallic inclusion is shown to fluctuate by orders of magnitude when size and location of the inclusion are varied. We ascribe these fluctuations to tunneling transitions between resonances quantized in different regions of phase space. This interpretation is confirmed by a comparison of the classical phase space structure with the Husimi distribution of the resonant modes. A model Hamiltonian is introduced that describes the phenomenon and shows that it can be expected in a more general class of systems.

  4. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  5. LS1 Report: A stubborn cavity will soon be replaced

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Testing on the LHC’s replacement RF cryomodule was completed last week in SM18. This module will bring them all to design-level, replacing a faulty cavity that has been acting up since the machine’s start-up.   A LHC cryomodule undergoes testing in SM18. Distributed between four cryomodules, the LHC is home to a total of 16 radiofrequency (RF) cavities. Each is designed to provide a 2 MV accelerating field… and all but one has been succeeding at this job. Ever since the machine’s startup, one stubborn cavity in a Point 4 module has quenched whenever it had to stay at 2 MV. The accelerator team found that no amount of conditioning could get the cavity to behave, and the highest continuous wave voltage it could perform at was 1.3 MV. “This was fine for physics,” says Pierre Maesen, who is leading the repair and replacement of the LHC’s cryomodules. “We were able to compensate for this ‘missing’...

  6. Cavities in molecular liquids and the theory of hydrophobic solubilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Thermal configurational data on neat liquids are used to obtain the work of formation of hard spherical cavities of atomic size in six molecular solvents: n-hexane, n-dodecane, n-undecyl alcohol, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, and water. These results are used to test a recent suggestion that the differences between nonaqueous solvents and liquid water in solvation of inert gases are not principally due to the hydrogen-bonded structure of liquid water but rather to the comparatively small size of the water molecule. The frequencies of occurrence of cavities in liquid water can be meaningfully distinguished from those in the organic solvents. Liquid water has a larger fractional free volume, but that free volume is distributed in smaller packets. With respect to cavity work, water is compared to a solvent of the same molecular density and composed of hard spheres of the same size as the water molecule. That comparison indicates that the hard-sphere liquid finds more ways to configure its free volume in order to accommodate an atomic solute of substantial size and thus, would be more favorable solvent for inert gases. The scaled particle model of inert gas solubility in liquid water predicts cavity works 20% below the numerical data for TIP4P water at 300 K and 1.0 g/cm3 for cavity radii near 2.0 angstroms. It is argued that the sign of this difference is just the sign that ought to be expected and that the magnitude of this difference measures structural differences between water and the directly comparable hard-sphere liquid. In conjunction with previous data, these results indicate that atomic sized cavities should be considered submacroscopic.

  7. Relationship between non-destructive OCT evaluation of resins composites and bond strength in a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsh, T. A.; Sadr, A.; Shimada, Y.; Khunkar, S.; Tagami, J.; Sumi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Formation of microgaps under the composite restorations due to polymerization stress and other causes compromise the adhesion to the dental substrate and restoration durability. However, the relationship between cavity adaptation and bond strength is not clear. In this paper, we introduce a new testing method to assess cavity adaptation by swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and microtensile bond strength (MTBS) in the same class-I cavity. Methods: Round class-I cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm in depth were prepared on 10 human premolars. After application of Tokuyama Bond Force adhesive, the cavities were filled by one of the two techniques; incremental technique using Estelite Sigma Quick universal composite or flowable lining using Palfique Estelite LV with bulk filling using the universal composite. Ten serial B-scan images were obtained throughout each cavity by SS-OCT. Significant peaks in the signal intensity were detected at the bonded interface of the cavity floor and to compare the different filling techniques. The specimens were later cut into beams (0.7x0.7 mm) and tested to measure MTBS at the cavity floor. Results: Flowable lining followed by bulk filling was inferior in terms of cavity adaptation and MTBS compared to the incremental technique (p<0.05, t-test). The adaptation (gap free cavity floor) and MTBS followed similar trends in both groups. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of dental restorations by OCT can provide additional information on the performance and effectiveness of dental composites and restoration techniques. This study was supported by Global Center of Excellence, Tokyo Medical and Dental University and King Abdulaziz University.

  8. Nanobeam photonic crystal cavity quantum dot laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Yiyang; Shambat, Gary; Sarmiento, Tomas; Harris, James S; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The lasing behavior of one dimensional GaAs nanobeam cavities with embedded InAs quantum dots is studied at room temperature. Lasing is observed throughout the quantum dot PL spectrum, and the wavelength dependence of the threshold is calculated. We study the cavity lasers under both 780 nm and 980 nm pump, finding thresholds as low as 0.3 uW and 19 uW for the two pump wavelengths, respectively. Finally, the nanobeam cavity laser wavelengths are tuned by up to 7 nm by employing a fiber taper in near proximity to the cavities. The fiber taper is used both to efficiently pump the cavity and collect the cavity emission.

  9. [Trichomonosomycosis of the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnatowska, A J; Kurnatowski, P

    1999-01-01

    Protozoa and fungi of the oral cavity, although frequently occuring and connected with considerable clinical adverse effects, are as yet insufficiently known. The aims of the study were to estimate the prevalence of common invasions of Trichomonas tenax and fungi, to associate the symptoms with the diagnosis of trichomonosis complicated by mycosis and to determine trichomonacidal properties of ornidazole, tinidazole and metronidazole. 936 dentist patients with different diagnoses were included into the study. The collected material consisted of rinsings, with simultaneous application of selective media, different for protozoa and for fungi 6ultures. Among the examined patients T. tenax was found in 90 cases including 85 cases where it occurred together with fungi (11 species), on the basis of which the diagnosis of trichomonosomycosis of the oral cavity was established. It was the most often in patients with leukoplakia and Lichen Wilsoni. We received a statistically significant association (0.001 tenax with fungi and xerostomia, burning sensation, periodontal pockets and denuded teeth. Trichomonas tenax was not found in any patiem with caries and with aphthe recidivans.

  10. Rationale for designing cavity preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laswell, H R; Welk, D A

    1985-04-01

    Increased resistance to caries, increased dental awareness, superior diagnostic capabilities, better illumination, optical aids that significantly enhance vision, improved and standardized materials for restoration, and a deeper understanding of the caries process enable a far more conservative approach to tooth preparation. The dentist can concentrate on preserving as much sound tooth structure as possible with less attention being devoted to resistance and retention form that previously demanded in bulk restorations and massive channels and locks that are no longer appropriate. Although caries inhibitory effects have been shown with materials such as silicate cement, glass ionomers, and resins that leach fluoride, in general, dentists should not rely on restorative materials to inhibit the development of future decay. Characteristics of the carious lesion are unique for each tooth according to many factors centering around the plaque pattern for that tooth and not according to zones of natural susceptibility or immunity strictly dictated by morphology. Therefore, no single cavity preparation duplicated from a textbook is likely to be satisfactory for an individual tooth. Furthermore, novices learning the subject of cavity preparation often leave decalcified enamel when they attempt to replicate under clinical conditions that which they have learned in technique courses. This is the major invitation to future caries reappearing adjacent to restorations. Also, failure to duplicate the exact morphology of the tooth surface that has been replaced is likely to alter the pattern of plaque accumulation and create other caries prone areas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Human papilloma virus and DNA test for inverted papillomas of the nasal cavities%人乳头状瘤病毒感染及其亚型与鼻内翻性乳头状瘤相关性探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小平; 陈兵; 古吉敏; 杨登权; 代伟; 杜聃

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解不同亚型的人乳头状瘤病毒(human papillomavirus,HPV)在鼻内翻性乳头状瘤(nasal inverted papilloma,NIP)中的分布,探讨其在NIP发病中的作用.方法 将78例NIP腊包埋组织标本分为单纯NIP组、伴不典型增生NIP组和NIP癌变组,同时选取40例健康体检者鼻腔粘膜组织作为健康对照组,采用聚合酶链反应(PCR)技术检测HPV6、11、16及18型感染情况.结果 78例NIP石蜡包埋组织标本HPV总阳性率为61.5%.单纯NIP组、伴不典型增生NIP组和NIP癌变组阳性率分别达59.5%、73.9%和46.2%.随着NIP临床分期级别的升高,HPV感染率也呈相应的上升趋势.单纯NIP组以低危型HPV6、11型感染为主,NIP癌变组则同时检出高危型HPV16型和HPV18型.结论 HPV感染在NIP发病中起着重要作用,其中高危型HPV感染能扩大NIP病变范围,而HPV16、18型可能与NIP恶变有关联.%Objective To understand the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in inverted papillomas of the nasal cavities (NIP) and the role of HPV in suffer from NIP.Methods A total of 78 specimens of inverted papillomas of nasal cavities and 40 specimens of healthy volunteers were examined for the presence of HPV using polymerase chain reaction (PCR).The specimens of NIP cases were classified to three groups as following:pure NIP,NIP with atypical hyperplasia,and malignancy group.Results Among the 78 specimens of NIP,the positive rate of HPV was 61.5%,while the number was 59.5%,73.9% and 46.2% in pure NIP group,NIP with atypical hyperplasia,and malignancy group.With the clinical stages increased,the HPV positive rate shows an upward trend.Most pure NIP specimens were infected with low risk HPV such as HPV6 and HPVll,while cases in malignancy group were infected with high risk HPV16 and HPV18.Conclusions HPV plays an important role in attach NIP,high risk subtype HPV enable enlarge the lesion of NIP,and there might be association between HPV16,18 and malignancy

  12. Ray splitting in paraxial optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Puentes, G; Woerdman, J P

    2003-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the ray dynamics in a paraxial optical cavity when a ray splitting mechanism is present. The cavity is a conventional two-mirror stable resonator and the ray splitting is achieved by inserting an optical beam splitter perpendicular to the cavity axis. We show that depending on the position of the beam splitter the optical resonator can become unstable and the ray dynamics displays a positive Lyapunov exponent.

  13. Tunable Cavity Optomechanics with Ultracold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Purdy, T P; Botter, T; Brahms, N; Ma, Z -Y; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2010-01-01

    We present an atom-chip-based realization of quantum cavity optomechanics with cold atoms localized within a Fabry-Perot cavity. Effective sub-wavelength positioning of the atomic ensemble allows for tuning the linear and quadratic optomechanical coupling parameters, varying the sensitivity to the displacement and strain of a compressible gaseous cantilever. We observe effects of such tuning on cavity optical nonlinearity and optomechanical frequency shifts, providing their first characterization in the quadratic-coupling regime.

  14. Cavity QED-based quantum walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    di, Tiegang; Hillery, Mark; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2004-09-01

    We discuss a possible experimental scheme for the implementation of a quantum walk. The scheme is based on the passage of an atom inside a high- Q cavity. The chirality is characterized by the atomic states and the displacement is characterized by the photon number inside the cavity. The quantum steps are described by appropriate interactions with a sequence of classical and quantized cavity fields.

  15. Continuously tunable, split-cavity gyrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, G. F.; Gross, M.

    1985-12-01

    Attention is given to a gyrotron cavity configuration which is split in halves longitudinally, to allow any frequency lying between the fixed cavity resonance to be assessed by mechanically changing the separation of the two halves. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that the rate-of-change in resonant frequency with separation is greatest if the minor axis of the cavity cross section is the one undergoing change. Excellent agreement with theory is noted for these results.

  16. Dither Cavity Length Controller with Iodine Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawson Marty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A cavity length controller for a seeded Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser is constructed. The cavity length controller uses a piezo-mirror dither voltage to find the optimum length for the seeded cavity. The piezo-mirror dither also dithers the optical frequency of the output pulse. [1]. This dither in optical frequency is then used to lock to an Iodine absorption line.

  17. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  18. Study of Nb-Cu 1.3 GHz SRF cavity resonators for future particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Amelin, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Niobium-coated superconducting radio-frequency cavities have a number of advantages over cavities made from bulk niobium. Cavities coated with high-power impulse magnetron sputtering are tested at CERN in order to optimize the coating and study the Q-slope that limits the performance. To accurately measure the quality factor as a function of accelerating field, it is important to have good matching between an input antenna and a cavity impedance. To improve the matching, a variable coupler that changes the length of the antenna can be used. We have shown that the Q-factor of the input antenna can be changed between $10^7-10^{11}$ by moving the antenna, which should allow to achieve critical coupling with a cavity. This technology could be used in future measurements, so that reflections are always minimized.

  19. Effectiveness of Er:YAG laser in cavity preparation for retrograde filling--in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlović, Zoran; Grgurević, Lovro; Verzak, Zeljko; Modrić, Vesna-Erika; Sorić, Pjetra; Grgurević, Josko

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sealing quality of Super EBA cement in laser prepared root-end cavities in comparison with root-end cavities classically prepared with steel burrs. Two groups of three millimeter root sections were prepared. The first group was prepared with the Er:YAG laser and the second group with a steel burr mounted on a surgical handpiece. The sections were filled with Super EBA cement and tested for leakage with fluid transport techniques. The sealing quality of Super EBA cement in the classically prepared root-end cavities was better, but there was no statistically significant difference between the two preparation techniques. The possible reason for greater leakage in the laser prepared root-end cavities was probably the irregular shape of the root-end cavity.

  20. Engineering of a Superconducting 400 MHz Crabbing Cavity for the LHC HiLumi Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, D; De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed new simplified design for the 400 MHz LHC crabbing cavity presents attractive properties compared to conventional designs. The proposed approach can be equally compact in both transverse dimensions and allows horizontal as well as vertical deflection of the beam in the collider. The significant modification of the parallel-bar design with the bars merged to the side walls of the cavity gives improved properties, such as better mode separation and reduced surface fields*. A transverse deflecting voltage of 3 to 5 MV in a single cavity can be expected with the peak surface electric field lower then 50 MV/m and peak magnetic field below 100 mT. This paper presents engineering issues of the proof-of-concept crabbing cavity d esign and discusses the manufacturing techniques. The paper discusses present status of the project including fabrication of the niobium cavity, as well as room temperature and cryogenic testing.

  1. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  2. Novel Geometries for the LHC CRAB Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme b...

  3. Cavity quantum electrodynamics: coherence in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, H; Doherty, A C

    2002-11-15

    Modern cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) illuminates the most fundamental aspects of coherence and decoherence in quantum mechanics. Experiments on atoms in cavities can be described by elementary models but reveal intriguing subtleties of the interplay of coherent dynamics with external couplings. Recent activity in this area has pioneered powerful new approaches to the study of quantum coherence and has fueled the growth of quantum information science. In years to come, the purview of cavity QED will continue to grow as researchers build on a rich infrastructure to attack some of the most pressing open questions in micro- and mesoscopic physics.

  4. State of the Art SRF Cavity Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Lilje, L

    2004-01-01

    The paper will review superconducting RF cavity performance for β=1 cavities used in both linear and circular accelerators. These superconducting cavities are used in two kinds of applications: High current storage rings and efficient high duty cycle linacs. In recent years the performance of those cavities has been improving steadily. High accelerating gradients have been achieved using advanced surface preparation techniques like electropolishing and surface cleaning methods like high pressure water rinsing. High intensity beams can be handled with advanced higher-order-mode damping schemes.

  5. Engineering topological materials in microwave cavity arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Brandon M; Owens, Clai; Schuster, David I; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present a scalable architecture for the exploration of interacting topological phases of photons in arrays of microwave cavities, using established techniques from cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics. A time-reversal symmetry breaking (non-reciprocal) flux is induced by coupling the microwave cavities to ferrites, allowing for the production of a variety of topological band structures including the $\\alpha=1/4$ Hofstadter model. Effective photon-photon interactions are included by coupling the cavities to superconducting qubits, and are sufficient to produce a $\

  6. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  7. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Salut Underground Nuclear Test in U20ak, Nevada National Security Site, and the Impact of Stability of the Ground Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-04-25

    At the request of Jerry Sweeney, the LLNL Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Salut underground nuclear test in U20ak to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Review of the Salut site is complicated because the test experienced a subsurface, rather than surface, collapse. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Salut detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeologogy due to the nuclear detonation. Sweeney's proposal requires physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Test Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site), and focuses on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow, and deep geophysical surveys.

  8. Comparison of coherently coupled multi-cavity and quantum dot embedded single cavity systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Serdar; Sayan, Gönül Turhan

    2016-12-12

    Temporal group delays originating from the optical analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) are compared in two systems. Similar transmission characteristics are observed between a coherently coupled high-Q multi-cavity array and a single quantum dot (QD) embedded cavity in the weak coupling regime. However, theoretically generated group delay values for the multi-cavity case are around two times higher. Both configurations allow direct scalability for chip-scale optical pulse trapping and coupled-cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED).

  9. Effects of Active and Passive Control Techniques on Mach 1.5 Cavity Flow Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Aradag

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic flow over cavities has been of interest since 1960s because cavities represent the bomb bays of aircraft. The flow is transient, turbulent, and complicated. Pressure fluctuations inside the cavity can impede successful weapon release. The objective of this study is to use active and passive control methods on supersonic cavity flow numerically to decrease or eliminate pressure oscillations. Jet blowing at several locations on the front and aft walls of the cavity configuration is used as an active control method. Several techniques are used for passive control including using a cover plate to separate the flow dynamics inside and outside of the cavity, trailing edge wall modifications, such as inclination of the trailing edge, and providing curvature to the trailing edge wall. The results of active and passive control techniques are compared with the baseline case in terms of pressure fluctuations, sound pressure levels at the leading edge, trailing edge walls, and cavity floor and in terms of formation of the flow structures and the results are presented. It is observed from the results that modification of the trailing edge wall is the most effective of the control methods tested leading to up to 40 dB reductions in cavity tones.

  10. A temperature-mapping system for multi-cell SRF accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, M; Furuta, F; Smith, E; Liepe, M; Posen, S; Padamsee, H; Hartill, D; Mi, X

    2015-01-01

    A Temperature mapping (T-map) system for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities consists of a thermometer array positioned precisely on an exterior cavity wall, capable of detecting small increases in temperature; therefore it is a powerful tool for research on the quality factor (Q0) of SRF cavities. A new multi-cell T-mapping system is has been developed at Cornell University. The system has nearly two thousand thermometers to cover 7-cell SRF cavities for Cornell ERL project. A new multiplexing scheme was adopted to reduce number of wires. A 1mK resolution of the temperature increase Delta T is achieved. A 9-cell cavity of TESLA geometry was tested with the T-map system. By converting Delta T to power loss and quality factor, it has been found that for this cavity, most surface losses were generated by the first cell when the accelerating gradient is increased above 15MV/m. The comparison of Q-value between with and without hotspots shows the heating on cavity wall degraded cavity Q0 about 1.65 tim...

  11. A novel electromagnetic design and a new manufacturing process for the cavity BPM (Beam Position Monitor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Craievich, Paolo; Baruzzo, Roberto; De Monte, Raffaele; Ferianis, Mario; Lamanna, Giuseppe; Vescovo, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The Cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is a beam diagnostic instrument which, in a seeded Free Electron Laser (FEL), allows the measurement of the electron beam position in a non-destructive way and with sub-micron resolution. It is composed by two resonant cavities called reference and position cavity, respectively. The measurement exploits the dipole mode that arises when the electron bunch passes off axis. In this paper we describe the Cavity BPM that has been designed and realized in the context of the FERMI@Elettra project [1]. New strategies have been adopted for the microwave design, for both the reference and the position cavities. Both cavities have been simulated by means of Ansoft HFSS [2] and CST Particle Studio [3], and have been realized using high precision lathe and wire-EDM (Electro-Discharge) machine, with a new technique that avoids the use of the sinker-EDM machine. Tuners have been used to accurately adjust the working frequencies for both cavities. The RF parameters have been estimated, and the modifications of the resonant frequencies produced by brazing and tuning have been evaluated. Finally, the Cavity BPM has been installed and tested in the presence of the electron beam.

  12. A novel electromagnetic design and a new manufacturing process for the cavity BPM (Beam Position Monitor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Forno, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.dalforno@phd.units.it [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information Technology, University of Trieste (Italy); Craievich, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.craievich@elettra.trieste.it [Sicrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Baruzzo, Roberto [Cinel Strumenti Scientifici s.r.l., Vigonza, Padova (Italy); De Monte, Raffaele; Ferianis, Mario [Sicrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Lamanna, Giuseppe [Cinel Strumenti Scientifici s.r.l., Vigonza, Padova (Italy); Vescovo, Roberto [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information Technology, University of Trieste (Italy)

    2012-01-11

    The Cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is a beam diagnostic instrument which, in a seeded Free Electron Laser (FEL), allows the measurement of the electron beam position in a non-destructive way and with sub-micron resolution. It is composed by two resonant cavities called reference and position cavity, respectively. The measurement exploits the dipole mode that arises when the electron bunch passes off axis. In this paper we describe the Cavity BPM that has been designed and realized in the context of the FERMI-Elettra project . New strategies have been adopted for the microwave design, for both the reference and the position cavities. Both cavities have been simulated by means of Ansoft HFSS and CST Particle Studio , and have been realized using high precision lathe and wire-EDM (Electro-Discharge) machine, with a new technique that avoids the use of the sinker-EDM machine. Tuners have been used to accurately adjust the working frequencies for both cavities. The RF parameters have been estimated, and the modifications of the resonant frequencies produced by brazing and tuning have been evaluated. Finally, the Cavity BPM has been installed and tested in the presence of the electron beam.

  13. Theoretical study on setup of expanded-base pile considering cavity contraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐昌广; 刘干斌; 王艳; 邓岳保

    2015-01-01

    When an expanded-base pile is installed into ground, the cavity expansion associated with penetration of the enlarged pile base is followed by cavity contraction along the smaller-diameter pile shaft. In order to account for the influence of cavity contraction on the change of bearing capacity of expanded-base pile, a theoretical calculation methodology, predicting the setup of expanded-base pile, was established by employing the cavity contraction theory to estimate the shaft resistance of expanded-base pile, and horizontal consolidation theory to predict the dissipation of excess pore pressure. Finally, the numerical solutions for the setup of expanded-base pile were obtained. The parametric study about the influence of cavity contraction on setup of expanded-base pile was carried out, while a field test was introduced. The parametric study shows that the decrements in radial pressure and the maximum pore water pressure after considering cavity contraction are increased as the expanded ratio (base diameter/shaft diameter) and rigidity index of soil are raised. The comparison between calculated and measured values shows that the calculated results of ultimate bearing capacity for expanded-base pile considering cavity contraction agree well with the measured values; however, the computations ignoring cavity contraction are 2.5−3.0 times the measured values.

  14. Theoretical study on setup of expanded-base pile considering cavity contraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐昌广; 刘干斌; 王艳; 邓岳保

    2015-01-01

    When an expanded-base pile is installed into ground, the cavity expansion associated with penetration of the enlarged pile base is followed by cavity contraction along the smaller-diameter pile shaft. In order to account for the influence of cavity contraction on the change of bearing capacity of expanded-base pile, a theoretical calculation methodology, predicting the setup of expanded-base pile, was established by employing the cavity contraction theory to estimate the shaft resistance of expanded-base pile, and horizontal consolidation theory to predict the dissipation of excess pore pressure. Finally, the numerical solutions for the setup of expanded-base pile were obtained. The parametric study about the influence of cavity contraction on setup of expanded-base pile was carried out, while a field test was introduced. The parametric study shows that the decrements in radial pressure and the maximum pore water pressure after considering cavity contraction are increased as the expanded ratio(base diameter/shaft diameter) and rigidity index of soil are raised. The comparison between calculated and measured values shows that the calculated results of ultimate bearing capacity for expanded-base pile considering cavity contraction agree well with the measured values; however, the computations ignoring cavity contraction are 2.5-3.0 times the measured values.

  15. The effect of resorption cavities on bone stiffness is site dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderoost, Jef; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2014-01-01

    Resorption cavities formed during the bone remodelling cycle change the structure and thus the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. We tested the hypotheses that bone stiffness loss due to resorption cavities depends on anatomical location, and that for identical eroded bone volumes, cavities would cause more stiffness loss than homogeneous erosion. For this purpose, we used beam-shell finite element models. This new approach was validated against voxel-based FE models. We found an excellent agreement for the elastic stiffness behaviour of individual trabeculae in axial compression (R(2) = 1.00) and in bending (R(2)>0.98), as well as for entire trabecular bone samples to which resorption cavities were digitally added (R(2) = 0.96, RMSE = 5.2%). After validation, this new method was used to model discrete cavities, with dimensions taken from a statistical distribution, on a dataset of 120 trabecular bone samples from three anatomical sites (4th lumbar vertebra, femoral head, iliac crest). Resorption cavities led to significant reductions in bone stiffness. The largest stiffness loss was found for samples from the 4th lumbar vertebra, the lowest for femoral head samples. For all anatomical sites, resorption cavities caused significantly more stiffness loss than homogeneous erosion did. This novel technique can be used further to evaluate the impact of resorption cavities, which are known to change in several metabolic bone diseases and due to treatment, on bone competence.

  16. Towards achieving strong coupling in three-dimensional-cavity with solid state spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Delhote, N.; Aubourg, M.; Madrangeas, V.; Cros, D.; Castelletto, S.; Tobar, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the microwave magnetic field confinement in several microwave three-dimensional (3D)-cavities, using a 3D finite-element analysis to determine the best design and achieve a strong coupling between microwave resonant cavity photons and solid state spins. Specifically, we design cavities for achieving strong coupling of electromagnetic modes with an ensemble of nitrogen vacancy (NV) defects in diamond. We report here a novel and practical cavity design with a magnetic filling factor of up to 4 times (2 times higher collective coupling) than previously achieved using one-dimensional superconducting cavities with a small mode volume. In addition, we show that by using a double-split resonator cavity, it is possible to achieve up to 200 times better cooperative factor than the currently demonstrated with NV in diamond. These designs open up further opportunities for studying strong and ultra-strong coupling effects on spins in solids using alternative systems with a wider range of design parameters. The strong coupling of paramagnetic spin defects with a photonic cavity is used in quantum computer architecture, to interface electrons spins with photons, facilitating their read-out and processing of quantum information. To achieve this, the combination of collective coupling of spins and cavity mode is more feasible and offers a promising method. This is a relevant milestone to develop advanced quantum technology and to test fundamental physics principles.

  17. Computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a high-power S-band klystron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, D.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Pal, D.; Meena, R.; Nangru, S. C.; Joshi, L. M.

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a S-band klystron operating at 2856 MHz. State-of-the-art electromagnetic simulation tools SUPERFISH, CST Microwave studio, HFSS and MAGIC have been used for cavity design. After finalising the geometrical details of the cavity through simulation, it has been fabricated and characterised through cold testing. Detailed results of the computer-aided simulation and cold measurements are presented in this article.

  18. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Norbo Underground Nuclear Test in U8c, Nevada Nuclear Security Site, and the Impact on Stability of the Ground Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-06-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Norbo underground nuclear test in U8c to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This request is similar to one made for the Salut site in U8c (Pawloski, 2012b). Review of the Norbo site is complicated because the test first exhibited subsurface collapse, which was not unusual, but it then collapsed to the surface over one year later, which was unusual. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Norbo detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeology due to the nuclear detonation. Aviva Sussman from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has also proposed work at this site. Both proposals require physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and focus on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow and deep geophysical surveys.

  19. Single Cavity Trapped Vortex Combustor Dynamics – Part-1: Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Singhal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a water-cooled, modular, atmospheric pressure Trapped Vortex Combustor (TVC test rig is designed and fabricated for reacting and non-reacting flow experiments. The unique features of this rig consist of a continuously variable length-to-depth ratio (L/D of the cavity and optical access through quartz plates provided on three sides for visualization. Flame stabilization in the single cavity TVC was successfully achieved with methane as fuel and the range of flow conditions for stable operation were identified. From these, a few cases were selected for detailed experimentation. Reacting flow experiments for the selected cases indicated that reducing L/D ratio and increasing cavity-air velocity favour stable combustion. The pressure drop across the single cavity TVC is observed to be lower as compared to conventional combustors. Temperatures are measured at the exit using thermocouples and corrected for radiative losses. Species concentrations are measured at the exit using an exhaust gas analyzer. The combustion efficiency is observed to be around 97-99 % and the pattern factor is observed to be in the range of 0.08 to 0.13. High-speed imaging made possible by the optical access indicates that the overall combustion is fairly steady, and there is no vortex shedding downstream.

  20. CAVITY LIKE COMPLETIONS IN WEAK SANDS PREFERRED UPSTREAM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Palmer; John McLennan

    2004-04-30

    The technology referred to as Cavity Like Completions (CLC) offers a new technique to complete wells in friable and unconsolidated sands. A successfully designed CLC provides significant increases in well PI (performance index) at lower costs than alternative completion techniques. CLC technology is being developed and documented by a partnership of major oil and gas companies through a GPRI (Global Petroleum Research Institute) joint venture. Through the DOE-funded PUMP program, the experiences of the members of the joint venture will be described for other oil and gas producing companies. To date six examples of CLC completions have been investigated by the JV. The project was performed to introduce a new type of completion (or recompletion) technique to the industry that, in many cases, offers a more cost effective method to produce oil and gas from friable reservoirs. The project's scope of work included: (1) Further develop theory, laboratory and field data into a unified model to predict performance of cavity completion; (2) Perform at least one well test for cavity completion (well provided by one of the sponsor companies); (3) Provide summary of geo-mechanical models for PI increase; and (4) Develop guidelines to evaluate success of potential cavity completion. The project tracks the experiences of a joint industry consortium (GPRI No. 17) over a three year period and compiles results of the activities of this group.

  1. Prediction of Hydrodynamic Noise of Open Cavity Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Donghan; WANG Yu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the hydrodynamically generated noise by the flow over an open cavity is studied. First, aeroacoustic theories and computational aeroacoustic(CAA)methodologies are reviewed in light of hydrodynamic acoustics, based on which, a hybrid method is presented. In the coupling procedure, the unsteady cavity flow field is computed using large-eddy simulation(LES), while the radiated sound is calculated by the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings(FW-H)acoustic analogy with acoustic source terms extracted from the time-dependent solutions of the unsteady flow. The hybrid LES-FW-H acoustic analogy method is tested with an open cavity flow at Mach number of 0.006 and Reynolds number of 105. Following the reflection theorem of Powell, the contributions from different source terms are quantified, and the terms involving wall-pressure fluctuations are found to account for most of the radiated intensity. The radiation field is investigated in the frequency domain. For the longitudinal direction, the sound propagates with a dominant radiation downstream the cavity in the near-field and a flatter directivity in the far-field, while for the spanwise direction, the acoustic waves have a similar propagation along +z and-z directions, with no visible directivity.

  2. Slow plasmons in grating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, Atilla; Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-03-01

    Recent research on surface plasmon polaritons and their applications have brought forward a wealth of information and continues to be of interest to many. In this report, we concentrate on propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and their interaction with matter. Using grating based metallic structures, it is possible to control the electrodynamics of propagating SPPs. Biharmonic gratings loaded with periodic Si stripes allow excitation of SPPs that are localized inside the band gap with grating coupling. The cavity state is formed due to periodic effective index modulation obtained by one harmonic of the grating and loaded Si stripes. More complicated grating structures such as metallic Moiré surfaces have also been shown to form a localized state inside the band gap when excited with Kretschmann configuration.

  3. Leaky Modes of Dielectric Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuripur, Masud; Jakobsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of external excitation, light trapped within a dielectric medium generally decays by leaking out (and also by getting absorbed within the medium). We analyze the leaky modes of a parallel-plate slab, a solid glass sphere, and a solid glass cylinder, by examining those solutions of Maxwell's equations (for dispersive as well as non-dispersive media) which admit of a complex-valued oscillation frequency. Under certain circumstances, these leaky modes constitute a complete set into which an arbitrary distribution of the electromagnetic field residing inside a dielectric body can be expanded. We provide completeness proofs, and also present results of numerical calculations that illustrate the relationship between the leaky modes and the resonances of dielectric cavities formed by a simple parallel-plate slab, a glass sphere, and a glass cylinder.

  4. Primary leiomyosarcoma of peritoneal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Naresh Bharti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyosarcomas of soft tissue are the rare tumors and the retroperitoneum is the most common site involved. We report a case of primary leiomyosarcoma of the peritoneal cavity which clinically presented with suprapubic, freely mobile, nontender mass which measured 10×10 cm in size. Contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed well defined heterogenous hypodense solid cystic mass. The mass was surgically excised out in its entirety. The histopathological examination revealed spindle cells arranged in alternating fascicles having pleomorphic nuclei, indistinct margin and eosinophilic cytoplasm with foci of haemorrhage, necrosis and 5-6 mitosis/HPF. The spindle cells were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, desmin and negative for S-100, CD-34 and c-kit. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were helpful in making the final confirmatory diagnosis. Leiomyosarcomas are aggressive tumors, with poor prognosis and often difficult to treat. The survival rates are lowest among all soft tissue sarcomas.

  5. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  6. Performance of a high resolution cavity beam position monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Sean; Boogert, Stewart; Chung, Carl; Fitsos, Pete; Frisch, Joe; Gronberg, Jeff; Hayano, Hitoshi; Honda, Yosuke; Kolomensky, Yury; Lyapin, Alexey; Malton, Stephen; May, Justin; McCormick, Douglas; Meller, Robert; Miller, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ross, Marc; Slater, Mark; Smith, Steve; Smith, Tonee; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Thomson, Mark; Urakawa, Junji; Vogel, Vladimir; Ward, David; White, Glen

    2007-07-01

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than 1 nm. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 μrad over a dynamic range of approximately ±20 μm.

  7. Assessing microleakage of composite restorations in class V cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser irradiation or diamond bur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Arami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to make a comparison between microleakage of conventionally restored class V cavities using bur and acid etchant and, the ones prepared and conditioned by Er:YAG laser. Materials and Methods: 30 recently extracted intact caries and filling free human permanent molars were used for this study. Then, Cold cure acrylic resin was used to seal the apices. The samples were randomly assigned to 5 groups of six each. Class V cavities were prepared one on buccal and one on lingual surface of each sample. Group 1: cavity preparation by diamond bur and turbine + acid etch, Group 2: cavity preparation by Er:YAG laser + acid etch, Group 3: cavity preparation by Er:YAG laser + Laser etching, Group 4: cavity preparation by diamond bur and turbine + laser etching, Group 5: cavity preparation by Er:YAG laser with no conditioning procedure. The cavities restored with restorative composite resin. Samples were then immersed in 2% methylene blue solution for 24 hours. The data were then analyzed using Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Kruskal-Wallis statistical tests. Results: The Kruskal Wallis test showed a significant difference (P < 0.05 between enamel and cementum margin microleakage, while the higher microleakage was related to the cementum margin of restorations. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in evaluating microleakeage degree of cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser and diamond bur.

  8. Secondary electron emission from plasma processed accelerating cavity grade niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  9. Secondary Electron Emission from Plasma Processed Accelerating Cavity Grade Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basovic, Milos [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  10. A scheme for implementing quantum game in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaoShuai; Fang Mao-Fa; Liu Jian-Bin; Wang Xin-Wen; Zheng Xiao-juan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme fot implementing quantum game (QG) in cavity quantum electrodynam-ics(QED). In the scheme, the cavity is only virtually excited and thus the proposal is insensitive to the cavity fields states and cavity decay. So our proposal can be experimentally realized in the range of current cavity QED techniques.

  11. Scheme for Implementation of Quantum Game in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Chun; CAO Shu-Ai; WU Yue-Qin; FANG Mao-Fa; LI Huai-Fan; ZHENG Xiao-Juan; ZHAO Ren; WANG Xin-Wen; LI Ze-Hua

    2008-01-01

    We propose an experimentally feasible scheme to implement two-player quantum game in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). During the process, the cavity is only virtually excited, thus our scheme is insensitive to the cavity field states and cavity decay. The scheme can be realized in the range of current cavity QED techniques.

  12. Temperature stabilization of optofluidic photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamutsch, Christian; Smith, Cameron L.C.; Graham, Alexandra;

    2009-01-01

    We present a principle for the temperature stabilization of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities based on optofluidics. We introduce an analytic method enabling a specific mode of a cavity to be made wavelength insensitive to changes in ambient temperature. Using this analysis, we experimentally demon...

  13. Coupled-cavity traveling-wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, D. J.; Omalley, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program is developed for analysis of coupled cavity traveling waves tubes (TWT's) which are used in variety of radar and communications applications. Programmers can simulate tubes of arbitrary complexity such as input and output couplers and other features peculiar to one or few cavities which may be modeled by correct choices of input data.

  14. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Kneisel, Peter [Williamsburg, VA; Cameiro, Tadeu [McMurray, PA

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  15. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  16. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James; Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for the preparation of a maximally entangled state of two atoms in an optical cavity. Starting from an arbitrary initial state, a singlet state is prepared as the unique fixed point of a dissipative quantum dynamical process. In our scheme, cavity decay is no longer...... as compared to preparation protocols based on coherent unitary dynamics...

  17. Continuous optical discharge in a laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivel', Yu. A.

    2016-08-01

    Optical discharge in a laser cavity is experimentally studied. A significant increase in the absorption of laser radiation (up to total absorption) is revealed. Optical schemes for initiation and maintaining of optical discharge in the cavity are proposed for technological applications of the optical discharge.

  18. Collapsing cavities in reactive and nonreactive media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Neil K.; Field, John E.

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents results of a high-speed photographic study of cavities collapsed asymmetrically by shocks of strengths in the range 0.26 GPa to 3.5 GPa. Two-dimensional collapses of cavity configurations punched into a 12% by weight gelatine in water sheet, and an ammonium nitrate/sodium nitrate (AN/SN) emulsion explosive were photographed using schlieren optics. The single cavity collapses were characterized by the velocity of the liquid jet formed by the upstream wall as it was accelerated by the shock and by the time taken for the cavity to collapse. The shock pressure did not qualitatively affect the collapse behaviour but jet velocities were found to exceed incident shock velocities at higher pressures. The more violent collapses induced light emission from the compressed gas in the cavity. When an array of cavities collapsed, a wave, characterized by the particle velocity in the medium, the cavity diameter and the inter-cavity spacing, was found to run through the array. When such an array was created within an emulsion explosive, ignition of the reactive matrix occurred ahead of the collapse wave when the incident shock was strong.

  19. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmidt, D. J.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D. K.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  20. A spherical cavity in an Einstein universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofinti, N.K.

    1980-03-01

    Suitable metric forms for the regions and a outside a sperical cavity in an Einstein universe are derived by means of perturbation. It is shown that for low proper pressure, the cavity behaves like ''negative'' Schwarzchild mass. Finally, the possibility of carrying over to the exact theory a proposed definition of the gravitational field in a matter is examined.

  1. Cavity-enhanced absorption for optical refrigeration

    CERN Document Server

    Seletskiy, Denis V; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    A 20-fold increase over the single path optical absorption is demonstrated with a low loss medium placed in a resonant cavity. This has been applied to laser cooling of Yb:ZBLAN glass resulting in 90% absorption of the incident pump light. A coupled-cavity scheme to achieve active optical impedance matching is analyzed.

  2. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  3. Hydrogen density measurements using an open-ended microwave cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, N. C.; Smetana, J.

    1972-01-01

    The density measurement of liquid hydrogen and two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous hydrogen is considered. This paper describes a complete prototype system that uses an open-ended microwave cavity for making dynamic density measurements of flowing hydrogen in a transfer line. The theory of operation along with test results for both the single- and two-phase cases are presented and discussed.

  4. Coaxial HOM coupler for the 500 MHz RF damped cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Koseki, T; Takahashi, T; Kamiya, Yu; Satoh, K; Ogata, H

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new higher-order modes (HOMs) coupler of coaxial waveguide type for the 500 MHz damped cavity. An SiC ceramics is adopted as microwave absorber. Two prototype models of the HOM coupler have been fabricated and tested. The detailed design of the coupler is described in this paper. The results of RF characteristics measurement and high power conditioning are also presented.

  5. Subglacial Silicic Eruptions: Wet Cavities and Moist Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J. A.; McGarvie, D. W.; Gilbert, J. S.; Smellie, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    ice produces water, however in the Kerlingarfjöll eruption (which is thought to have been relatively brief and the vesicular magma is likely to have contained less heat per unit volume) the volumes were small and the subglacial cavity could be appropriately described as 'moist'. The Prestahnúkur eruption occurred in a 'wet' cavity but 'lacustrine' conditions were never developed and the ice was always close to the edifice. Poor sorting and structure in the subglacial deposits are due to a lack of time and space for sorting to occur. In contrast to more mafic eruptions, which are characterised by very strong meltwater-ice interactions, the main influence of the ice during subglacial rhyolite eruptions is reflected in the confinement of eruptive products.

  6. Niobium Cavity Electropolishing Modelling and Optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, L M A; Forel, S; Shirra, J A

    2013-01-01

    It’s widely accepted that electropolishing (EP) is the most suitable surface finishing process to achieve high performance bulk Nb accelerating cavities. At CERN and in preparation for the processing of the 704 MHz high-beta Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cavities a new vertical electropolishing facility has been assembled and a study is on-going for the modelling of electropolishing on cavities with COMSOL® software. In a first phase, the electrochemical parameters were taken into account for a fixed process temperature and flow rate, and are presented in this poster as well as the results obtained on a real SPL single cell cavity. The procedure to acquire the data used as input for the simulation is presented. The modelling procedure adopted to optimise the cathode geometry, aimed at a uniform current density distribution in the cavity cell for the minimum working potential and total current is explained. Some preliminary results on fluid dynamics is also briefly described.

  7. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave-mixing between photons and phonons and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong nonlocal effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a novel multi-cavity optomechanical device: a "photon see-saw", in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of the see-saw, are modulated anti-symmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other...

  8. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave mixing between photons and phonons, and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong non-local effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a multicavity optomechanical device in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of this 'photon see-saw', are modulated antisymmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation, which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other empty cavity during every oscillation cycle in a well-regulated fashion.

  9. Proven procedures guide cavity VCO design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrak, F.

    1981-05-01

    The design of a high performance voltage-tuned cavity oscillator is discussed. The circuit is to be modeled with an equivalent inductance and capacitance. Close attention is to be given to the influence of cavity loading. Center frequency and impedance are computed on the basis of the model's L and C values. The last step is particularly important, since the size of a cavity-based oscillator, such as the Gunn/varactor version is directly related to operating frequency. Attention is given to the parallel L-C circuit representing the cavity, parameter relations concerning the height, higher-order TE modes, and effects of post inductance. The basic oscillator consists of a hollow cavity with metal walls, and diodes mounted on posts.

  10. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Fischer, A.J.; Allerman, A.A.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.

    1999-07-22

    For many applications, the device performance of edge emitting semiconductor lasers can be significantly improved through the use of multiple section devices. For example, cleaved coupled cavity (C3) lasers have been shown to provide single mode operation, wavelength tuning, high speed switching, as well as the generation of short pulses via mode-locking and Q-switching [1]. Using composite resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the coupling between the monolithic cavities, incorporate passive or active resonators which are spectrally degenerate or detuned, and to fabricate these devices in 2-dimensional arrays. Composite resonator vertical cavity lasers (CRVCL) have been examined using optical pumping and electrical injection [2-5]. We report on CRVCL diodes and show that efficient modulation of the laser emission can be achieved by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity within a CRVCL.

  11. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  12. A gas jet impacting a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiffler, A. Kent; Bakhsh, Hazoor

    1986-11-01

    A subsonic jet impinging upon a cavity is studied to explain the resultant heating phenomenon. Flow visualization within the cavity shows a large central vortex dominating the flow pattern. Velocity measurements inside the cavity are made using a hot-wire anemometer. Temperature is measured with a copper-constantan thermocouple. The velocity field within the cavity is described by a modified Rankine combined vortex. An uncommon form of the energy equation is used to account for turbulent heating in adverse pressure gradients. A theoretical solution is developed to model the temperature field in the cavity. There is a good agreement between the calculated and measured temperatures. The heating effect is related to Ranque-Hilsch tubes.

  13. Cavity cooling below the recoil limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Matthias; Klinner, Julian; Keßler, Hans; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-07-06

    Conventional laser cooling relies on repeated electronic excitations by near-resonant light, which constrains its area of application to a selected number of atomic species prepared at moderate particle densities. Optical cavities with sufficiently large Purcell factors allow for laser cooling schemes, avoiding these limitations. Here, we report on an atom-cavity system, combining a Purcell factor above 40 with a cavity bandwidth below the recoil frequency associated with the kinetic energy transfer in a single photon scattering event. This lets us access a yet-unexplored regime of atom-cavity interactions, in which the atomic motion can be manipulated by targeted dissipation with sub-recoil resolution. We demonstrate cavity-induced heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequent cooling at particle densities and temperatures incompatible with conventional laser cooling.

  14. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Ivo R; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disk on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  15. Vertical external cavity surface emitting semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, M

    2001-01-01

    Active stabilisation showed a relative locked linewidth of approx 3 kHz. Coarse tuning over 7 nm was achieved using a 3-plate birefingent filter plate while fine-tuning using cavity length change allowed tuning over 250 MHz. Vertical external cavity semiconductor lasers have emerged as an interesting technology based on current vertical cavity semiconductor laser knowledge. High power output into a single transverse mode has attracted companies requiring good fibre coupling for telecommunications systems. The structure comprises of a grown semiconductor Bragg reflector topped with a multiple quantum well gain region. This is then included in an external cavity. This device is then optically pumped to promote laser action. Theoretical modelling of AIGaAs based VECSEL structures was undertaken, showing the effect of device design on laser characteristics. A simple 3-mirror cavity was constructed to assess the static characteristics of the structure. Up to 153 mW of output power was achieved in a single transver...

  16. Cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, A G; Gurevich, S V; Panajotov, K; Averlant, E; Tlidi, M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a control of the motion of localized structures of light by means of delay feedback in the transverse section of a broad area nonlinear optical system. The delayed feedback is found to induce a spontaneous motion of a solitary localized structure that is stationary and stable in the absence of feedback. We focus our analysis on an experimentally relevant system namely the Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL). In the absence of the delay feedback we present experimental evidence of stationary localized structures in a 80 $\\mu$m aperture VCSEL. The spontaneous formation of localized structures takes place above the lasing threshold and under optical injection. Then, we consider the effect of the time-delayed optical feedback and investigate analytically the role of the phase of the feedback and the carrier lifetime on the self-mobility properties of the localized structures. We show that these two parameters affect strongly the space time dynamics of two-dimensional localized structures...

  17. Cavity solitons and localized patterns in a finite-size optical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyreff, G. [Optique Nonlineaire Theorique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), CP 231 (Belgium); Gelens, L. [Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium)

    2011-08-15

    In appropriate ranges of parameters, laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities can support a wide variety of optical patterns, which could be used to carry information. The intensity peaks appearing in these patterns are called cavity solitons and are individually addressable. Using the Lugiato-Lefever equation to model a perfectly homogeneous cavity, we show that cavity solitons can only be located at discrete points and at a minimal distance from the edges. Other localized states which are attached to the edges are identified. By interpreting these patterns in an information coding frame, the information capacity of this dynamical system is evaluated. The results are explained analytically in terms of the the tail characteristics of the cavity solitons. Finally, the influence of boundaries and of cavity imperfections on cavity solitons are compared.

  18. Cavity solitons and localized patterns in a finite-size optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreff, G.; Gelens, L.

    2011-08-01

    In appropriate ranges of parameters, laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities can support a wide variety of optical patterns, which could be used to carry information. The intensity peaks appearing in these patterns are called cavity solitons and are individually addressable. Using the Lugiato-Lefever equation to model a perfectly homogeneous cavity, we show that cavity solitons can only be located at discrete points and at a minimal distance from the edges. Other localized states which are attached to the edges are identified. By interpreting these patterns in an information coding frame, the information capacity of this dynamical system is evaluated. The results are explained analytically in terms of the the tail characteristics of the cavity solitons. Finally, the influence of boundaries and of cavity imperfections on cavity solitons are compared.

  19. Comparison of buffered chemical polished and electropolished 3.9 GHz cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Helen; Cooper, Charlie A.; Ge, Mingqi; Gonin, Ivan V.; Harms, Elvin R.; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Solyak, Nikolay; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Five 3.9 GHz 9 cell cavities have been measured for the DESY FLASH module. These cavities were BCP processed and reached gradients of typically about 25 MV/m with Q drop starting at about 20 MV/m. Recently a few one cell cavities have been processed with EP and at least one has tested to a gradient of 30 MV/m with Q drop starting at about 25 MV/m. We will compare the results and give an update to the thermal analysis in relation to global thermal breakdown at 3.9 GHz.

  20. Development of the superconducting rf 2-cell cavity for cERL injector at KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Noguchi, S.; Kako, E.; Umemori, K.; Shishido, T.

    2013-06-01

    An injector cryomodule for the compact energy recovery linac (cERL) is under development at KEK. This injector cryomodule has 3 L-band 2-cell superconducting rf cavities. The cERL is required to accelerate a 10-mA CW electron beam to 5 MeV. The required accelerating gradient per cavity is 7.5-12.5 MV/m at ˜30 kW input power to the cavity and the beam. The operational frequency is 1300 MHz at 2 K and the mode of operation is CW. In this application, the critical hardware components are not the cavities, but the rf input couplers and higher-order-mode (HOM) dampers. Initially, a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler was chosen for HOM damping of the injector cavities. However, this HOM coupler had a heating problem at low gradients (a few MV/m) in CW operation. The components heated in the accelerating mode were the HOM body and the feedthrough that extracts HOM power from the cavity. To control the heating problem, a new HOM coupler was designed based on a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler, and the feedthrough was also modified based on a Kyocera N-R type connector to have better thermal conductivity. A prototype 2-cell cavity and 3 other 2-cell cavities with 5 new HOM couplers for actual operation were fabricated through May 2011. Vertical tests of these cavities were carried out after standard surface preparation at the KEK Superconducting Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-STF) through March 2012. The accelerating gradient achieved exceeded 50 MV/m without quenching during the vertical test using the prototype 2-cell cavity and feedthroughs. The magnetic field at the cell equator was 2127 Oe. Three 2-cell cavities passing the criteria of the High Pressure Gas Safety Institute of Japan exceeded 25 MV/m without field emissions. The cavities with the best performance were prepared in March 2012 for the cERL injector. The designs of the HOM couplers and feedthroughs and the results of the vertical tests to evaluate their performance are reported here.

  1. Measurement of Frequency, Temperature, RF Field Dependence of Surface Resistance of Superconductors Using a Half Wave Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyekyoung; Delayen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    A theory of surface resistance of superconductor was rigorously formulated by Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer more than 50 years ago. Since then the accelerator community has been used the theory as a guideline to improve the surface resistance of the superconducting cavity. It has been observed that the surface resistance is dependent on frequency, temperature and rf field strength, and surface preparation. To verify these dependences, a well-controlled study is required. Although many different types of cavities have been tested, the typical superconducting cavities are built for specific frequencies of their application. They do not provide data other than at its own frequency. A superconducting half wave cavity is a cavity that enables us to collect the surface resistance data across frequencies of interest for particle accelerators and evaluate preparation techniques. This paper will present the design of the half wave cavity, its electromagnetic mode characteristics and experimental results. Research supported by NSF Award PHY-1416051.

  2. An update on the study of high-gradient elliptical SRF cavities at 805 MHz for proton and other applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krawczyk, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Madrid, Mike [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roybal, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simakov, Evgenya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clemens, Bob [TJNAF; Macha, Jurt [TJNAF; Manus, Bob [TJNAF; Rimmer, Bob [TJNAF; Rimmer, Bob [TJNAF; Turlington, Larry [TJNAF

    2010-09-09

    An update on the study of 805 MHz elliptical SRF cavities that have been optimized for high gradient will be presented. An optimized cell shape, which is still appropriate for easy high pressure water rinsing, has been designed with the ratios of peak magnetic and electric fields to accelerating gradient being 3.75 mT/(MV/m) and 1.82, respectively. A total of 3 single-cell cavities have been fabricated. Two of the 3 cavities have been tested so far. The second cavity achieved an E{sub acc} of {approx}50 MV/m at Q{sub 0} of 1.4 x 10{sup 10}. This result demonstrates that 805 MHz cavities can, in principle, achieve as high as, or could even be better than, 1.3 GHz high-gradient cavities.

  3. Microleakage of composite resin restoration in cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser irradiation in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y; Hossain, M; Nakamura, Y; Murakami, Y; Matsumoto, K

    2002-03-01

    AIM: The purposes of this study were to investigate the surface morphology of cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser irradiation and to compare the microleakage degree after composite resin restoration with etched bur cavities in primary teeth, in vitro. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On the buccal (facial) and lingual (palatal) surfaces of 25 primary teeth, a round cavity was prepared with the Er:YAG laser system and with a high-speed diamond bur, respectively. Five cavities from each group were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The remaining cavities were filled with a composite resin and subjected to a microleakage test (0.6% rodamine B solution) under thermocycling. Only bur cavities were acid-etched before filling. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney's U test; a value of p adhesion between the restorative material and dental hard tissues; there was also no gap at the interface. DISCUSSION: The highly irregular surface or the removal of the debris-like smear layer after laser irradiation may facilitate good adhesion of composite resin with enamel or dentine, and these surfaces might play a major role in decreasing microleakage of laser cavities. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser are capable of decreasing microleakage of composite resin restorations in primary teeth, and the efficiency is similar to etched bur cavities.

  4. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  5. LEP superconducting accelerating cavity module

    CERN Multimedia

    With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was – and still is – the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. The excavation of the LEP tunnel was Europe’s largest civil-engineering project prior to the Channel Tunnel. Three tunnel-boring machines started excavating the tunnel in February 1985 and the ring was completed three years later. In its first phase of operation, LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions. LEP was commissioned in July 1989 and the first beam circulated in the collider on 14 July. The collider's initial energy was chosen to be around 91 GeV, so that Z bosons could be produced. The Z boson and its charged partner the W boson, both discovered at CERN in 1983, are responsible for the weak force, which drives the Sun, for example. Observing the creation and decay of the short-lived Z boson w...

  6. DIRECT SMEAR VS CELL BLOCK (PLASMA- THROMBIN CLOT) METHOD: DIAGNOSTIC VALUE IN SEROSAL CAVITIES FLUIDS CYTOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Mahzouni, P.; M SHARIFANI

    2000-01-01

    Introduction. To improve testing sensitivity, most laboratories use two or more preparation methods but in our laboratories only one method is used which is "direct smear". In this study we tried to evaluate the diagnostic value of cell block as adjunct to direct smear in the cytologic investigation of serosal cavities fluids. Methods. In a clinical trial study 62 specimens of serosal cavity fluids were investigated in AL-Zahrapathology laboratory (Get. 1998 to Get. 1999). Cytologic slid...

  7. On the Field Dependent Surface Resistance Observed in Superconducting Niobium Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative description is presented of the non-linear current-voltage response in superconducting niobium cavities for accelerator application. It is based on a fit for a large sample of data from cavity tests of different kind. Trial functions for the surface resistance describing this non-linear relation are established by a least square data fit. Those trial functions yielding the best fit are quantitatively explained by basic physics.

  8. High Gradient Results of ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavity in Collaboration With KEK and Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, F. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Konomi, T. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Saito, K. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Geng, R. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    KEK and Jlab have continued S0-study collaboration on ICHIRO 9-cell cavities since 2008. In 2010, we have started S0 study on ICHIRO#7, full 9-cell cavity with end groups. Surface treatments and vertical tests have been repeated at Jlab. Maximum gradient of 40MV/m was achieved so far. We will describe the details of that and further plan of S0-study on ICHIRO 9-cell.

  9. Investigation of Thermal Acoustic Effects on SRF Cavities within CM1 at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, Mike [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Martinez, Alex [Fermilab; Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Schappert, Warren [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Two TESLA-style 8-cavity cryomodules have been operated at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST), formerly the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. Operational instabilities were revealed during Radio Frequency (RF) power studies. These observations were complemented by the characterization of thermal acoustic effects on cavity microphonics manifested by apparent noisy boiling of helium involving vapor bubble and liquid vibration. The thermal acoustic measurements also consider pressure and temperature spikes which drive the phenomenon at low and high frequencies.

  10. Discrete solitons in coupled active lasing cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Prilepsky, Jaroslaw E; Johansson, Magnus; Derevyanko, Stanislav A

    2012-01-01

    We examine the existence and stability of discrete spatial solitons in coupled nonlinear lasing cavities (waveguide resonators), addressing the case of active media, where the gain exceeds damping in the linear limit. A zoo of stable localized structures is found and classified: these are bright and grey cavity solitons with different symmetry. It is shown that several new types of solitons with a nontrivial intensity distribution pattern can emerge in the coupled cavities due to the stability of a periodic extended state. The latter can be stable even when a bistability of homogenous states is absent.

  11. Piezoelectric Voltage Coupled Reentrant Cavity Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Natalia C; Floch, Jean-Michel Le; Tobar, Michael Edmund

    2014-01-01

    A piezoelectric voltage coupled microwave reentrant cavity has been developed. The central cavity post is bonded to a piezoelectric actuator allowing the voltage control of small post displacements over a high dynamic range. We show that such a cavity can be implemented as a voltage tunable resonator, a transducer for exciting and measuring mechanical modes of the structure and a transducer for measuring comparative sensitivity of the piezoelectric material. Experiments were conducted at room and cryogenic temperatures with results verified using Finite Element software.

  12. Dispersion of coupled mode-gap cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; De Rossi, Sylvain Combrié Alfredo; Mosk, Allard P

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion of a CROW made of photonic crystal mode-gap cavities is pronouncedly asymmetric. This asymmetry cannot be explained by the standard tight binding model. We show that the fundamental cause of the asymmetric dispersion is the fact that the cavity mode profile itself is dispersive, i.e., the mode wave function depends on the driving frequency, not the eigenfrequency. This occurs because the photonic crystal cavity resonances do not form a complete set. By taking into account the dispersive mode profile, we formulate a mode coupling model that accurately describes the asymmetric dispersion without introducing any new free parameters.

  13. Performance of a reentrant cavity beam position monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Simon

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The beam-based alignment and feedback systems, essential operations for the future colliders, require high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs. In the framework of the European CARE/SRF program, a reentrant cavity BPM with its associated electronics was developed by the CEA/DSM/Irfu in collaboration with DESY. The design, the fabrication, and the beam test of this monitor are detailed within this paper. This BPM is designed to be inserted in a cryomodule, work at cryogenic temperature in a clean environment. It has achieved a resolution better than 10  μm and has the possibility to perform bunch to bunch measurements for the x-ray free electron laser (X-FEL and the International Linear Collider (ILC. Its other features are a small size of the rf cavity, a large aperture (78 mm, and an excellent linearity. A first prototype of a reentrant cavity BPM was installed in the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH, at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY and demonstrated its operation at cryogenic temperature inside a cryomodule. The second, installed, also, in the FLASH linac to be tested with beam, measured a resolution of approximately 4  μm over a dynamic range ±5  mm in single bunch.

  14. Performance of a reentrant cavity beam position monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, C.; Luong, M.; Chel, S.; Napoly, O.; Novo, J.; Roudier, D. [CEA Saclay, DSM, Irfu, SACM, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Rouviere, N. [CNRS, IN2P3-IPN, F-91406 Orsay, (France); Baboi, N.; Mildner, N.; Nolle, D. [DESY, D-22603 Hamburg, (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The beam-based alignment and feedback systems, essential operations for the future colliders, require high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs). In the framework of the European CARE/SRF program, a reentrant cavity BPM with its associated electronics was developed by the CEA/DSM/Irfu in collaboration with DESY. The design, the fabrication, and the beam test of this monitor are detailed within this paper. This BPM is designed to be inserted in a cryo-module, work at cryogenic temperature in a clean environment. It has achieved a resolution better than 10 {mu}m and has the possibility to perform bunch to bunch measurements for the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Its other features are a small size of the rf cavity, a large aperture (78 mm), and an excellent linearity. A first prototype of a reentrant cavity BPM was installed in the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH), at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) and demonstrated its operation at cryogenic temperature inside a cryo-module. The second, installed, also, in the FLASH linac to be tested with beam, measured a resolution of approximately 4 {mu}m over a dynamic range {+-} 5 mm in single bunch. (authors)

  15. Handbook for Gas Filled RF Cavity Aficionados'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Chung, Moses; Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The use of hydrogen gas filled RF cavities in muon cooling channels has been proposed by Rolland Johnson. Impressive results have been obtained toward attaining high voltage gradients and rapid training in preliminary tests done at the FNAL MTA facility. However, so far it has not been possible to test them under conditions where they were subject to the transversal of a high intensity particle beam. This note is an attempt to bring together a description of some of the pertinent physical processes that take place in the dilute plasma that is generated in the hydrogen gas by the beam. Two effects dominate. The first is that the free electrons generated can load down the cavity and transfer its energy to heating the gas. The second is a question of what happens to the plasma in the longer term. There is an enormous literature on the subject of the subject of dilute hydrogen plasmas and we can tap into this information in order to understand and predict the behavior of the cavity.

  16. Complex Model of Induction Heating - Demounting of Shaft Flange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Krasl

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with exemplary solutions of one specifies problem of induction heating. This problem was partly determined by means of numerical method as a light-coupling problem. Numerical solutions were calculated with the help of professional programs (Ansys, Fluent, QuickField. Results of the solution and comparison with measurements are discussed in conclusion.

  17. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  18. Characterization of Superconducting Cavities for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, Martina

    2013-01-01

    In this report the radiofrequency measurements done for the superconducting cavities developed at CERN for the HIE-ISOLDE project are analyzed. The purpose of this project is improve the energy of the REX-ISOLDE facility by means of a superconducting LINAC. In this way it will be possible to reach higher accelerating gradients, and so higher particle energies (up to 10MeV/u). At this purpose the Niobium thin film technology was preferred to the Niobium bulk technology because of the technical advantages like the higher thermal conductivity of Copper and the higher stiffness of the cavities which are less sentitive to mechanical vibrations. The Niobium coating is being optimized on test prototypes which are qualified by RF measurements at cold.

  19. Development of high purity niobium used in SRF accelerating cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Niobium is widely used in SRF(Superconducting Radio Frequency)cavities due to its excellent superconductivity and workability.With the continuous development of technology,higher demands of material are raised.One of the key issues is that RRR(Residual Resistance Ratio)of the Nb material should be more than 300.which requires that the Nb ingot have even higher RRR.This article introduces the development and the experimental results of high purity niobium in OTIC in Ningxia(Ningxia Orient Tantalum Industry Co.Ltd.),and the test results of the single cell TESLA(Tera Electron volt energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator)shaped cavity manufactured by Peking University using Nb material from OTIC.

  20. First Experience with Dry-Ice Cleaning on SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Reschke, D

    2004-01-01

    The surface of superconducting (s.c.) accelerator cavities must be cleaned from any kind of contaminations, like particles or chemical residues. Contaminations might act as centers for field emission, thus limiting the maximum gradient. Today's final cleaning is based on high pressure rinsing with ultra pure water. Application of dry-ice cleaning might result in additional cleaning potential. Dry-ice cleaning using the sublimation-impulse method removes particulate and film contaminations without residues. As a first qualifying step intentionally contaminated niobium samples were treated by dry ice cleaning. It resulted in a drastic reduction of DC field emission up to fields of 100 MV/m as well as in the reduction of particle numbers. The dry ice jet caused no observable surface damage. First cleaning tests on single-cell cavities showed Q-values at low fields up to 4x1010

  1. Process Factors Influence on Cavity Pressure Behavior in Microinjection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, C. A.; Dimov, S. S.; Scholz, S.

    2011-01-01

    about the filling behavior of different polymer melts. In this paper, a pressure sensor mounted inside a tool cavity was employed to analyse maximum cavity pressure, pressure increase rate during filling and pressure work. The influence of four mu IM parameters, melt temperature, mould temperature......, injection speed, and packing pressure on these three pressure-related process parameters was investigated. A design of experiment study was conducted by moulding a test part, a microfluidic component, in three different polymer materials, PP, ABS, and PC. The results show a similar process behavior for all...... three polymers, in particular a higher injection speed led to a reduction of the pressure work while a lower mould temperature reduces the pressure rate. [DOI: 10.1115/1.4003953]...

  2. RF Cavity Induced Sensitivity Limitations on Beam Loss Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastriotou, M.; Degiovanni, A.; Sousa, F. S. Domingues; Effinger, E.; Holzer, E. B.; Quirante, J. L. Navarro; del Busto, E. N.; Tecker, F.; Viganò, W.; Welsch, C. P.; Woolley, B. J.

    Due to the secondary showers generated when a particle hits the vacuum chamber, beam losses at an accelerator may be detected via radiation detectors located near the beam line. Several sources of background can limit the sensitivity and reduce the dynamic range of a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM). This document concentrates on potential sources of background generated near high gradient RF cavities due to dark current and voltage breakdowns. An optical fibre has been installed at an experiment of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF3), where a dedicated study of the performance of a loaded and unloaded CLIC accelerating structure is undergoing. An analysis of the collected data and a benchmarking simulation are presented to estimate BLM sensitivity limitations. Moreover, the feasibility for the use of BLMs optimised for the diagnostics of RF cavities is discussed.

  3. Cavity optomechanics nano- and micromechanical resonators interacting with light

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenberg, Tobias; Marquardt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years cavity-optomechanics has emerged as a new field of research. This highly interdisciplinary field studies the interaction between micro- and nanomechanical systems and light. Possible applications range from novel high-bandwidth mechanical sensing devices through the generation of squeezed optical or mechanical states to even tests of quantum theory itself. This is one of the first books in this relatively young field. it is aimed at scientists, engineers, and students who want to obtain a concise introduction to the state of the art in the field of cavity optomechanics. It is valuable to researchers in nanoscience, quantum optics, quantum information, gravitational wave detection and other cutting edge fields. Possible applications include biological sensing, frequency comb applications, silicon photonics etc. The technical content will be accessible to those who have familiarity with basic undergraduate physics.

  4. Great progress in developing 500 MHz single cell superconducting cavity in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting cavities have been adopted in many kinds of accelerator facilities such as synchrotron radiation light source, hard X-ray free electron laser linac, colliders and energy recovery linacs (ERL). The 500 MHz superconducting cavities will be a candidate to be installed in the high current accelerators and high current ERLs for their large beam aperture, low higher order modes impedance and high current threshold value. This paper presents great progress in the whole sequence of developing 500 MHz superconducting cavity in China. It describes the first in-house successful development of 500 MHz single cell superconducting cavity including the deep-drawing of niobium half cells, electron beam wielding of cavity, surface preparations and vertical testing. The highest accelerating gradient of the fabricated cavity #SCD-02 higher than 10 MV/m was obtained while the quality factor was better than 4×108 at 4.2 K, which has reached the world level of the same kind of cavities.

  5. Investigation on the fabrication of the 3rd harmonic superconducting cavity for the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhen-Yu; MA Guang-Ming; YU Hai-Bo; MAO Dong-Qing; FENG Zi-Qiang; HOU Hong-Tao; LIU Jian-Fei

    2009-01-01

    A third harmonic superconducting niobium cavity has been proposed for installation in the Shang-hai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring to improve the Touschek lifetime. In order to investigate the feasibility of the superconducting cavity fabrication indigenously and the possibility to master the fabrica-tion techniques, cavities were fabricated from copper and niobium sheets by deep drawing and electron-beam welding, and a series of measurements, such as resonant frequency, shape dimensions and wall thickness, were carried out during this process. After analysis of various problems existing in the fabrication process, tech-nique improvements were proposed, and finally the precise shape as designed and resonant frequency within 1.2 MHz were achieved for the new completed cavities. In addition, full annealing was finally proved to be a good cure for niobium sheets' tearing up during deep drawing. By fabricating niobium cavities successfully, some problems to the next step were cleared. This paper introduces the process of cavity fabrication and its technique improvements towards forming, and the initial vertical test result of niobium cavity is also presented.

  6. HOMs of the SRF Electron Gun Cavity in the BNL ERL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Hammons, L.; Litvinenko, V.; Than, Y. R.; Todd, R.; Weiss, D.; Xu, Wencan

    The Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is operated as an R&D test bed for high-current, low emittance electron beams. It comprises a superconducting five-cell cavity and a half-cell superconducting RF photo-injector electron gun. The ERL is undergoing commissioning with focus on the performance of the electron gun, not the least on the cavity Higher Order Modes (HOM). Among the various alternative solutions, a beam tube damper based on a layer of ferrite tiles was adopted for the five-cell accelerator cavity. For the gun, a ceramic-ferrite damper consisting of a lossless ceramic cylinder surrounded by damping ferrite tiles has been investigated. This design is innovative in its damper approach and combines a variety of goals including broadband HOM damping and protection of the superconducting cavity vacuum from potential damage by the separately cooled absorber. In this paper the empirical performance of an installed ceramic-ferrite damper is described by the Q reduction of a few selected gun cavity resonances. The theoretical coupling impedance presented to a traversing beam is numerically analyzed in terms of radial waveguide modes in the damper section. Strong damping of the gun cavity HOMs by the fundamental power coupler (FPC) is found and discussed. Finally, the measured Q-values of the operational gun cavity without the ceramic-ferrite damper at superconducting temperatures are presented

  7. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowring, D. L.; DeMello, A. J.; Lambert, A. R.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R. B.

    2012-05-20

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  8. Cavity prediction in sand mould production applying the DISAMATIC process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovad, Emil; Larsen, Per; Spangenberg, Jon

    2017-01-01

    The sand shot in the DISAMATIC process is simulated by the discrete element method (DEM) taking into account the influence and coupling of the airflow with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The DEM model is calibrated by a ring shear test, a sand pile experiment and a slump test. Subsequently...... with three cases of different air vent settings which control the ventilation of the chamber. These settings resulted in different air- and particle-velocities as well as different accumulated masses in the cavities, which were successfully simulated by the model....

  9. Perturbing Open Cavities: Anomalous Resonance Frequency Shifts in a Hybrid Cavity-Nanoantenna System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Freek; Doeleman, Hugo M.; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A. Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics, and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here, we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a nontrivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing backaction via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  10. Frequency combs for cavity cascades: OPO combs and graphene-coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin F.; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, C.-C.; Mohr, C.; Jiang, Jie; Schunemann, Peter G.; Schibli, T. R.; Maslowski, Piotr; Fermann, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Frequency combs can be used directly, for example as a highly precise spectroscopic light source. They can also be used indirectly, as a bridge between devices whose high precision requirements would normally make them incompatible. Here, we demonstrate two ways that a frequency comb enables new technologies by matching optical cavities. One cavity is the laser oscillator. A second cavity is a low-threshold doubly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Extending optical referencing to the doubly-resonant OPO turns the otherwise unstable device into an extremely precise midinfrared frequency comb. Another cavity is an optical enhancement cavity for amplifying spectral absorption in a gas. With the high speed of a graphene-modulated frequency comb, we can couple a frequency comb directly into a high-finesse cavity for trace gas detection.

  11. Perturbing open cavities: Anomalous resonance frequency shifts in a hybrid cavity-nanoantenna system

    CERN Document Server

    Ruesink, Freek; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a non-trivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing back-action via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  12. Interference and Chaos in Metamaterials Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchinitser, Natalia; Jose, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    Optical metamaterials are engineered artificial nanostructures that possess optical properties not available in nature. As metamaterials research continues to mature, their practical applications as well as fundamental questions on wave propagation in these materials attract significant interest. In this talk we focus on wave propagation and interference in chaotic wave cavities with negative or near-zero index of refraction and in double-slit configurations. In this context, we explicitly consider an incomplete two-dimensional D-cavity previously studied, which shows chaotic ray propagation together with scars. We have addressed the question as to how that type of wave propagation is modified by adding metamaterials in these chaotic cavities. We find that the wave interference patterns show significant qualitatively and quantitative changes depending on the effective parameters of the cavity, illumination conditions (planes waves versus beams), and geometry of the system. We will discuss possible experimental setups where these results may be validated.

  13. Two Dimensional Plasmonic Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) cavitiy modes on two dimensional Moire surfaces in the visible spectrum. Two dimensional hexagonal Moire surface can be recorded on a photoresist layer using Interference lithography (IL). Two sequential exposures at slightly different angles in IL generate one dimensional Moire surfaces. Further sequential exposure for the same sample at slightly different angles after turning the sample 60 degrees around its own axis generates two dimensional hexagonal Moire cavity. Spectroscopic reflection measurements have shown plasmonic band gaps and cavity states at all the azimuthal angles (omnidirectional cavity and band gap formation) investigated. The plasmonic band gap edge and the cavity states energies show six fold symmetry on the two dimensional Moire surface as measured in reflection measurements.

  14. Development of rebunching cavities at IAP

    CERN Document Server

    Welsch, C P; Schempp, A

    2000-01-01

    A focus of work at IAP has been the development and optimization of spiral loaded cavities since the 1970s [A. Schempp et al, NIM 135, 409 (1976)]. These cavities feature a high efficiency, a compact design and a big variety of possible fields of application. They find use both as bunchers and post accelerators to vary the final energy of the beam. In comparison to other available designs, the advantage of these structures lies in their small size. Furthermore they can easily be tuned to the required resonance frequency by varying the length of the spiral. Due to the small size of the cavities the required budget can also be kept low. Here, two slightly different types of spiral loaded cavities, which were built for the REX-ISOLDE project at CERN and the intensity upgrade program at GSI are being discussed.

  15. Stable planar mesoscopic photonic crystal cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Magno, Giovanni; Grande, Marco; Lozes-Dupuy, Françoise; Gauthier-Lafaye, Olivier; Calò, Giovanna; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Mesoscopic self-collimation in mesoscopic photonic crystals with high reflectivity is exploited to realize a novel high-Q factor cavity by means of mesoscopic PhC planar mirrors. These mirrors efficiently confine a mode inside a planar Fabry-Perot-like cavity, due to a beam focusing effect that stabilises the cavity even for small beam sizes, resembling the focusing behaviour of curved mirrors. Moreover, they show an improved reflectivity with respect to their standard distributed Bragg reflector counterparts that allows higher compactness. A Q factor higher than 10^4 has been achieved for an optimized 5-period-long mirror cavity. The optimization of the Q factor and the performances in terms of energy storage, field enhancement and confinement are detailed.

  16. Pulp response to bases and cavity depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S J; Walton, R E; Osborne, J W

    1992-04-01

    In cavities of ferret canines, preparation depth and bases were compared as to their effect on odontoblasts and to rate of dentin formation. These were measured by injecting 3H-proline at 0, 20 and 40 days post-preparation. Odontoblast activity was determined by label density in each band; inter-band distances indicated the amount of dentin formed. Correlations were by Pearson's coefficient. The following were determined: 1) cavity depth (remaining dentin thickness) was the major factor in odontoblast response and in dentin formation; deeper cavities suppressed odontoblasts with less subsequent dentin formation at all time periods; 2) basing materials had little effect on odontoblast activity or on the rate of dentin formation. An exception was in deep cavities, with Ca(OH)2 showing more label; this activity was temporary with no increased dentin formation; 3) there was no evidence of a "rebound" response.

  17. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  18. Prominence Mass Supply and the Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmit, Donald; Luna, Manuel; Karpen, Judy; Innes, Davina

    2013-01-01

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system: the cavity is under-dense because it is evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolution of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model with diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet emission (EUV) surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prominence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the SDO/AIA 171\\AA\\ bandpass near the prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset ...

  19. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  20. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy and sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Loock, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The book reviews the dramatic recent advances in the use of optical resonators for high sensitivity and high resolution molecular spectroscopy as well as for chemical, mechanical and physical sensing.  It encompasses a variety of cavities including those made of two or more mirrors, optical fiber loops, fiber gratings and spherical cavities. The book focuses on novel techniques and their applications. Each chapter is written by an expert and/or pioneer in the field. These experts also provide the theoretical background in optics and molecular physics where needed. Examples of recent breakthroughs include the use of frequency combs (Nobel prize 2005) for cavity enhanced sensing and spectroscopy, the use of novel cavity materials and geometries, the development of optical heterodyne detection techniques combined to active frequency-locking schemes. These methods allow the use and interrogation of optical resonators with a variety of coherent light sources for trace gas detection and sensing of strain, temperat...