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Sample records for demountable test cavity

  1. Demountable damped cavity for HOM-damping in ILC superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konomi, T., E-mail: konomi@ims.ac.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yasuda, F. [University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Furuta, F. [Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Saito, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-01-11

    We have designed a new higher-order-mode (HOM) damper called a demountable damped cavity (DDC) as part of the R and D efforts for the superconducting cavity of the International Linear Collider (ILC). The DDC has two design concepts. The first is an axially symmetrical layout to obtain high damping efficiency. The DDC has a coaxial structure along the beam axis to realize strong coupling with HOMs. HOMs are damped by an RF absorber at the end of the coaxial waveguide and the accelerating mode is reflected by a choke filter mounted at the entrance of the coaxial waveguide. The second design concept is a demountable structure to facilitate cleaning, in order to suppress the Q-slope problem in a high field. A single-cell cavity with the DDC was fabricated to test four performance parameters. The first was frequency matching between the accelerating cavity and the choke filter. Since the bandwidth of the resonance frequency in a superconducting cavity is very narrow, there is a possibility that the accelerating field will leak to the RF absorber because of thermal shrinkage. The design bandwidth of the choke filter is 25 kHz. It was demonstrated that frequency matching adjusted at room temperature could be successfully maintained at 2 K. The second parameter was the performance of the demountable structure. At the joint, the magnetic field is 1/6 of the maximum field in the accelerating cavity. Ultimately, the accelerating field reached 19 MV/m and Q{sub 0} was 1.5×10{sup 10} with a knife-edge shape. The third parameter was field emission and multipacting. Although the choke structure has numerous parallel surfaces that are susceptible to the multipacting problem, it was found that neither field emission nor multipacting presented problems in both an experiment and simulation. The final parameter was the Q values of the HOM. The RF absorber adopted in the system is a Ni–Zn ferrite type. The RF absorber shape was designed based on the measurement data of permittivity

  2. Demountable damped cavity for HOM-damping in ILC superconducting accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomi, T.; Yasuda, F.; Furuta, F.; Saito, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a new higher-order-mode (HOM) damper called a demountable damped cavity (DDC) as part of the R and D efforts for the superconducting cavity of the International Linear Collider (ILC). The DDC has two design concepts. The first is an axially symmetrical layout to obtain high damping efficiency. The DDC has a coaxial structure along the beam axis to realize strong coupling with HOMs. HOMs are damped by an RF absorber at the end of the coaxial waveguide and the accelerating mode is reflected by a choke filter mounted at the entrance of the coaxial waveguide. The second design concept is a demountable structure to facilitate cleaning, in order to suppress the Q-slope problem in a high field. A single-cell cavity with the DDC was fabricated to test four performance parameters. The first was frequency matching between the accelerating cavity and the choke filter. Since the bandwidth of the resonance frequency in a superconducting cavity is very narrow, there is a possibility that the accelerating field will leak to the RF absorber because of thermal shrinkage. The design bandwidth of the choke filter is 25 kHz. It was demonstrated that frequency matching adjusted at room temperature could be successfully maintained at 2 K. The second parameter was the performance of the demountable structure. At the joint, the magnetic field is 1/6 of the maximum field in the accelerating cavity. Ultimately, the accelerating field reached 19 MV/m and Q 0 was 1.5×10 10 with a knife-edge shape. The third parameter was field emission and multipacting. Although the choke structure has numerous parallel surfaces that are susceptible to the multipacting problem, it was found that neither field emission nor multipacting presented problems in both an experiment and simulation. The final parameter was the Q values of the HOM. The RF absorber adopted in the system is a Ni–Zn ferrite type. The RF absorber shape was designed based on the measurement data of permittivity and

  3. Photovoltaic mounting/demounting unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic arrangement comprising a photovoltaic assembly comprising a support structure defining a mounting surface onto which a photovoltaic module is detachably mounted; and a mounting/demounting unit comprising at least one mounting/demounting apparatus...... which when the mounting/demounting unit is moved along the mounting surface, causes the photovoltaic module to be mounted or demounted to the support structure; wherein the photovoltaic module comprises a carrier foil and wherein a total thickness of the photo voltaic module is below 500 muiotaeta....... The present invention further relates to an associated method for mounting/demounting photovoltaic modules....

  4. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q 0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons

  5. Demountable fuel assembly for light water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, B.

    1990-01-01

    The guide tube is fixed in an adaptor plate by a blocking sleeve. The blocking sleeve has a part for expanding the tube and a fixing ring in the adaptor plate. The fixing ring has cylindrical sections separated by slots disposed following the direction to generate the ring. The cylindrical sections present deformations to the interior of the cavity of a radial direction compared to the hole through the adaptor plate to assure the fixing of the blocking sleeve. The cylindrical sections of the fixing ring can be bent over towards the inside to disengage the deformations from the cavities before extraction of the blocking sleeve to allow demounting of the connection between the guide tube and the adaptor plate [fr

  6. RF Tests of an 805 MHz Pillbox Cavity at Lab G of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Li; J. Corlett; R. MacGill; M. Zisman; J. Norem; A. Moretti; Z. Qian; J. Wallig; V. Wu; Y. Torun; R.A. Rimmer

    2003-01-01

    We report recent high power RF tests on an 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity with demountable windows over beam apertures at Lab G of Fermilab, a dedicated facility for testing of MUCOOL (muon cooling) components. The cavity is installed inside a superconducting solenoidal magnet. A 12 MW peak RF power klystron is used for the tests. The cavity has been processed both with and without magnetic field. Without magnetic field, a gradient of 34 MV/m was reached rather quickly with very low sparking rate. In a 2.5 T solenoidal field, a 16 MV/m gradient was achieved, following several weeks of conditioning. Strong multipacting effects associated with high radiation levels were measured during processing with the magnetic field. More recently Be windows with TiN-coated surface have been installed and tested with and without the external magnetic field. 16 MV/m gradient without magnetic field was reached quickly as planned. Less multipacting was observed during the conditioning, indicating that the TiN-coated surface on the windows had indeed helped to reduce the secondary electron emission significantly. A gradient of 16.5 MV/m was finally achieved with magnet on in solenoidal mode and the field up to 4 T. Preliminary inspection of the Be window surface found no visual damage, in comparison with Cu windows where substantial surface damage was found. Preliminary understanding of conditioning the cavity in a strong magnetic field has been developed. More thorough window and cavity surface inspection is under way

  7. RF tests of an 805 MHz pillbox cavity at Lab G of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Rimmer, R.; Norem, J.; Torun, Y.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent high power RF tests on an 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity with demountable windows for beam apertures at Lab G of Fermilab, a dedicated facility for testing of MUCOOL (muon cooling) components. The cavity is installed inside a superconducting solenoidal magnet. A 12 MW peak RF power klystron is used for the tests. The cavity has been processed both with and without magnetic field. Without magnetic field, a gradient of 34 MV/m was reached rather quickly with very low sparking rate. In a 2.5 T solenoidal field, a 16 MV/m gradient was achieved, and it had to take many weeks of conditioning. Strong multipacting effects associated with high radiation levels were measured during the processing with the magnetic field. More recently Be windows with TiN-coated surface have been installed and tested at conditions of with and without the external magnetic field. A conservative 16 MV/m gradient without magnetic field was reached quickly as planned. Less multipacting was observed during the conditioning, it indicated that the TiN-coated surface on the windows had indeed helped to reduce the secondary electron emissions significantly. A modest gradient of 16.5 MV/m was finally achieved with magnet on in solenoidal mode and the field up to 4 T. Preliminary inspection on Be windows surface found no damage at all, in comparison with Cu windows where substantial surface damage was found. Preliminary understanding of conditioning cavity in a strong magnetic field has been developed. More through window and cavity surface inspection is under way

  8. A superconducting test cavity for DORIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.; Brandelik, A.; Lekmann, W.; Szecsi, L.

    1978-03-01

    A summary of experimental goals, technical requirements and possible solutions for the construction of a superconducting accelerating cavity to be tested at DORIS is given. The aim of the experiment is to prove the applicability of superconducting cavities in storage rings and to study the problems typical for this application. The paper collects design considerations about cavity geometry and fabrication, input coupling, output coupling for higher modes, tuner, cryostat and controls. (orig.) [de

  9. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity

  10. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity.

  11. Beam tests and operation of superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akai, Kazunori

    1990-01-01

    Beam tests and operation of superconducting cavities conducted since the third workshop on RF superconductivity (Argonne, Sep. 1987) are reported in this paper. The paper is concerned particularly with electron machines. Storage and acceleration of the beam are discussed, focusing on the CERN test in SPS, the DESY test in PETRA, the superconducting injector at Darmstadt, and the KEK beam tests in T-AR. Then, long-term performance of the cavity in the ring is discussed focusing on Eacc (max) and O-value, environmental conditions, and operational experience in T-MR. RF controllability is addressed, centering on the Robinson stability, cavity tuning loop, quench detection and interlocks, recovery procedure, field calibration, and phase adjustment. Higher order modes are also discussed. Superconducting cavities have been operated successfully in accelerators. It has been confirmed that the superconducting cavities can be used stably for experimental use. For more than 5000 hours the cavities have indicated no essential degradation of the cavity performance. The study of long-term performance should be continued in longer range of period. (N.K.)

  12. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments

  13. Mechanical design and fabrication of power feed cavity test setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Dhavle, A.S.; Sharma, Vijay; Sarkar, Shreya; Kumar, Mahendra; Nayak, Susanta; Barnwal, Rajesh; Jayaprakash, D.; Mondal, J.; Nimje, V.T.; Mittal, K.C.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Power feed cavity set up consists of nine number of accelerating cavity and eight numbers of coupling cavity for testing of power feed cavity with coupling flange for 2856 MHz S band standing wave coupled cavity linac. When we are assembling the cavity and applying the pressure, its resonance frequency changes with applied pressure/load. After some critical pressure/load frequency change becomes negligible or zero. This set up will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. Top four cavity or eight half cells as well as bottom four cavity or eight half cells will be brazed separately. Power feed cavity will be sandwiched between this two brazed cavity assemblies. This paper discuss about linear motion bush, linear motion rod, load cell, hydraulic actuator, power pack, stepper motor PLC control, jig boring, alignment, tolerances and assembly procedure for this test setup. (author)

  14. Radiation measurements during cavities conditioning on APS RF test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grudzien, D.M.; Kustom, R.L.; Moe, H.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the shielding structure around the Advanced Photon Source (APS) synchrotron and storage ring RF stations, the X-ray radiation has been measured in the near field and far field regions of the RF cavities during the normal conditioning process. Two cavity types, a prototype 352-MHz single-cell cavity and a 352-MHz five-cell cavity, are used on the APS and are conditioned in the RF test stand. Vacuum measurements are also taken on a prototype 352-MHz single-cell cavity and a 352-MHz five-cell cavity. The data will be compared with data on the five-cell cavities from CERN

  15. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, B.L.; Wolf, A.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  16. RF Power Requirements for PEFP SRF Cavity Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2011-01-01

    For the future extension of the PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) Proton linac, preliminary study on the SRF (superconducting radio-frequency) cavity is going on including a five-cell prototype cavity development to confirm the design and fabrication procedures and to check the RF and mechanical properties of a low-beta elliptical cavity. The main parameters of the cavity are like followings. - Frequency: 700 MHz - Operating mode: TM010 pi mode - Cavity type: Elliptical - Geometrical beta: 0.42 - Number of cells: 5 - Accelerating gradient: 8 MV/m - Epeak/Eacc: 3.71 - Bpeak/Eacc: 7.47 mT/(MV/m) - R/Q: 102.3 ohm - Epeak: 29.68 MV/m (1.21 Kilp.) - Geometrical factor: 121.68 ohm - Cavity wall thickness: 4.3 mm - Stiffening structure: Double ring - Effective length: 0.45 m For the test of the cavity at low temperature of 4.2 K, many subsystems are required such as a cryogenic system, RF system, vacuum system and radiation shielding. RF power required to generate accelerating field inside cavity depends on the RF coupling parameters of the power coupler and quality factor of the SRF cavity and the quality factor itself is affected by several factors such as operating temperature, external magnetic field level and surface condition. Therefore, these factors should be considered to estimate the required RF power for the SRF cavity test

  17. Test of superconducting radio-frequency cavity bombarded by protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. M.; McCloud, B. J.; Morris, C. L.; McClelland, J. B.; Rusnak, B.; Thiessen, H. A.; Langenbrunner, J. L.

    1992-05-01

    A beam of 2 × 10 10 protons/s was focused onto a small area on the high-field iris of a superconducting cavity operating at the resonance frequency. The input, reflected, and stored power were monitored. The cavity remained in steady state during this test. We conclude that such superconducting cavities will remain viable in the high-proton-flux environments proposed in the design of a superconducting accelerator for pions (PILAC).

  18. Test of superconducting radio-frequency cavity bombarded by protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, J.M.; McCloud, B.J.; Morris, C.L.; McClelland, J.B.; Rusnak, B.; Thiessen, H.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Langenbrunner, J.L. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States))

    1992-05-10

    A beam of 2x10{sup 10} protons/s was focused onto a small area on the high-field iris of a superconducting cavity operating at the resonance frequency. The input, reflected, and stored power were monitored. The cavity remained in steady state during this test. We conclude that such superconducting cavities will remain viable in the high-proton-flux environments proposed in the design of a superconducting accelerator for pions (PILAC). (orig.).

  19. A database for superconducting cavities for the TESLA Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, P.D.; Goessel, A.; Gubarev, V.; Iversen, J.

    2006-01-01

    We look back on 10 years experience using a database for superconducting cavities for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). The database was developed to collect data of every preparation step and measurement in order to optimize cavity production and preparation techniques to meet the ambitious goal of high accelerating gradients at high quality factors. Data from 110 superconducting 9-cell cavities, 50 single cell cavities, several 2- to 7-cell cavities and about 60 RF couplers were collected in the database. In addition, company measurements on sub-assemblies and parts forming the next 30 9-cell cavities were stored, thus establishing the database as part of a quality management system. This database is dynamically accessible via an extensive graphical web-interface based on ORACLE products, which enables the users to select and analyse the collected data easily from anywhere

  20. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A. T.; Lu, X. Y.; Rimmer, R. A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I-V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson-Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  1. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A.T.; Lu, X.Y.; Rimmer, R.A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I–V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson–Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  2. Fabrication and Testing of Deflecting Cavities for APS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammosser, John; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert; Jim, Henry; Katherine, Wilson; Dhakal, Pashupati; Ali, Nassiri; Jim, Kerby; Jeremiah, Holzbauer; Genfa, Wu; Joel, Fuerst; Yawei, Yang; Zenghai, Li

    2013-09-01

    Jefferson Lab (Newport News, Virginia) in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL) has fabricated and tested four first article, 2.8 GHz, deflecting SRF cavities, for Argonne's Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) project. These cavities are unique in many ways including the fabrication techniques in which the cavity cell and waveguides were fabricated. These cavity subcomponents were milled from bulk large grain niobium ingot material directly from 3D CAD files. No forming of sub components was used with the exception of the beam-pipes. The challenging cavity and helium vessel design and fabrication results from the stringent RF performance requirements required by the project and operation in the APS ring. Production challenges and fabrication techniques as well as testing results will be discussed in this paper.

  3. Fundamental tests in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of quantum physics, Einstein and Bohr had the dream to confine a photon in a box and to use this contraption in order to illustrate the strange laws of the quantum world. Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics has now made this dream real, allowing us to actually achieve in the laboratory variants of the thought experiments of the founding fathers of quantum theory. In our work at Ecole Normale Supérieure, we use a beam of Rydberg atoms to manipulate and probe non-destructively microwave photons trapped in a very high Q superconducting cavity. We realize ideal quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements of photon numbers, observe the radiation quantum jumps due to cavity relaxation and prepare non-classical fields such as Fock and Schrödinger cat states. Combining QND photon counting with a homodyne mixing method, we reconstruct the Wigner functions of these non-classical states and, by taking snapshots of these functions at increasing times, obtain movies of the decoherence process. These experiments ope...

  4. Fault Diagnosis of Demountable Disk-Drum Aero-Engine Rotor Using Customized Multiwavelet Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor is an important piece of equipment that greatly impacts the safe operation of aircraft. However, assembly looseness or crack fault has led to several unscheduled breakdowns and serious accidents. Thus, condition monitoring and fault diagnosis technique are required for identifying abnormal conditions. Customized ensemble multiwavelet method for aero-engine rotor condition identification, using measured vibration data, is developed in this paper. First, customized multiwavelet basis function with strong adaptivity is constructed via symmetric multiwavelet lifting scheme. Then vibration signal is processed by customized ensemble multiwavelet transform. Next, normalized information entropy of multiwavelet decomposition coefficients is computed to directly reflect and evaluate the condition. The proposed approach is first applied to fault detection of an experimental aero-engine rotor. Finally, the proposed approach is used in an engineering application, where it successfully identified the crack fault of a demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor. The results show that the proposed method possesses excellent performance in fault detection of aero-engine rotor. Moreover, the robustness of the multiwavelet method against noise is also tested and verified by simulation and field experiments.

  5. SRF cavity testing using a FPGA Self Excited Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2018-01-01

    This document provides a detailed description of procedures for very-high precision calibration and testing of superconducting RF cavities using digital Low-Level RF (LLRF) electronics based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). The use of a Self-Excited Loop with an innovative procedure for fast turn-on allows the measurement of the forward, reflected and transmitted power from a single port of the directional coupler in front of the cavity, thus eliminating certain measurement errors. Various procedures for measuring the quality factor as a function of cavity fields are described, including a single RF pulse technique. Errors are estimated for the measurements.

  6. Microphonics Testing of the CEBAF Upgrade 7-Cell Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.K. Davis; J.R. Delayen; M. Drury; T. Hiatt; C. Hovater; T. Powers; J. Preble

    2001-01-01

    An upgrade cryomodule is being developed for CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. In support of this effort, vibration testing was performed on a single SRF cavity at cryogenic temperature in a Horizontal Test Bed. The tests included response to excitation from background vibration, swept sinusoids, high-power RF pulses, and mechanical impulses. Test procedures, apparatus, and results are presented, along with a description of planned follow-up tests

  7. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands

  8. CRYOGENIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR FERMILAB'S ILC VERTICAL CAVITY TEST FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-01-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands

  9. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, Edmond; Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin; Vynckier, Stefaan; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE 0 and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E 0 and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE 0 )/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm 2 parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm 3 size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy straggling if step size is not

  10. Demountable toroidal fusion core facility for physics optimization and fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogart, S.L.; Wagner, C.E.; Krall, N.A.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Weggel, C.F.; Lund, K.O.; Sedehi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Following a successful compact ignition tokamak (CIT) experiment, a fusion facility will be required for physics optimization (POF) and fusion engineering research (FERF). The POF will address issues such as high-beta operation, current drive, impurity control, and will test geometric and configurational variations such as the spherical torus or the reversed-field pinch (RFP). The FERF will be designed to accumulate rapidly a large neutron dose in prototypical fusion subsystems exposed to radiation. Both facilities will require low-cost replacement cores and rapid replacement times. The Demountable Toroidal Fusion Core (DTFC) facility is designed to fulfill these requirements. It would be a cost-effective stepping stone between the CIT and a demonstration fusion reactor

  11. Geant4 and Fano cavity test: where are we?

    CERN Document Server

    Elles, S; Maire, M; Urbàn, L

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport algorithm implemented in Geant4 has been recently revised. The modifications concern several physics aspects of the simulation model: the step limitation, the energy loss along a step and the multiple scattering. The Fano cavity setup was used to test these developments. The upgrades increase significantly the accuracy of the electron transport simulation. The ratio of simulated to theoretical dose deposition in the cavity is stable to ~1% while varying several parameters and within ~1.5% of the expected value for water and graphite. Work is underway to identify and resolve the remaining shift.

  12. SRF cavity testing using a FPGA Self Excited Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Various authors have previously studied the theory and practice of cavity testing, notably an extensive treatment by Powers [1] and Padamsee [2]. The advent of the digital Low Level RF (LLRF) electronics based on Field Programmable Logic Arrays (FPGA) provides various improvements over the rather complex systems used in the past as well as enabling new measurement techniques.In this document we reintroduce a technique that seems to have fallen out of practice in recent times, that is obtaining the coupling constant β through measurements from just one port, the reflected power port, of the directional coupler placed in front of the cavity.

  13. Beam loading and cavity compensation for the ground test accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jachim, S.P.; Natter, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) will be a heavily beam-loaded H/sup minus/ linac with tight tolerances on accelerating field parameters. The methods used in modeling the effects of beam loading in this machine are described. The response of the cavity to both beam and radio-frequency (RF) drive stimulus is derived, including the effects of cavity detuning. This derivation is not restricted to a small-signal approximation. An analytical method for synthesizing a predistortion network that decouples the amplitude and phase responses of the cavity is also outlined. Simulation of performance, including beam loading, is achieved through use of a control system analysis software package. A straightforward method is presented for extrapolating this work to model large coupled structures with closely spaced parasitic modes. Results to date have enabled the RF control system designs for GTA to be optimized and have given insight into their operation. 6 refs., 10 figs

  14. Beam-to-Column Connections with Demountable Energy Dissipative Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile-Mircea Venghiac

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of steel structures subjected to seismic actions depends directly on the connections behavior. There are two current tendencies for ensuring the structural ductility: allowing the formation of plastic hinges in the beams by using reduced beam sections or reduced web sections or by ensuring the plastic hinge formation in the connection by using dissipative elements. This paper presents a new perspective regarding the energy dissipation mechanism formation within the beam-to-column connection. The design of connections capable of dissipating large amounts of energy, with an acceptable strength and ductile behavior is a real challenge for engineers. Sustainability is a big advantage for these connections. Another big advantage is the possibility of restoring the functionality of the damaged construction in a short time interval and with reduced costs. The introduction of connections with demountable energy dissipative plates can be a step forward in designing new beam-to-column connections for steel structures.

  15. Experiences with the design and production of an industrial, flexible and demountable (IFD) building system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gassel, van F.J.M.; Stone, W.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Dutch government encourages innovative construction by subsidizing cohesive industrial, flexible and demountable building (lFD) pilot projects. Industrial building concerns the process-related aspects of production. robotization, mechanization, automation, prefabrication, communication, etc.

  16. Novel automatic phase lock determination for superconducting cavity tests at vertical test stand at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kunver Adarsh Pratap; Mohania, Praveen; Rajput, Vikas; Baxy, Deodatta; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT has developed a Vertical Test Stand (VTS) which is used to test the Nb superconducting cavities under cryogenic conditions. In the VTS, RF cavity is characterized for its quality factor variation vs the accelerating gradient. The RF system is an essential part of the VTS which is required to provide stable RF power to the cavity in terms of amplitude, frequency and phase. RF system of VTS consists of several modules including the LLRF system. The LLRF system consists of the 'Frequency Control Module' which controls the input frequency to the SCRF cavity. Due to high quality factor, bandwidth of the cavity is less than 1 Hz. Even slight mechanical vibrations (microphonics) causes change in cavity resonance frequency resulting in total reflection of incident power. A PLL based frequency tracking module has been used to track the resonant frequency of RF cavity. This module changes RF source frequency according to change in Cavity resonance frequency. A novel method using a LabView based computer program has been developed which changes the phase of input RF signal using IQ modulator and monitors the transmitted power, incident and reflected power. The program plots the graph between phase and ratio of transmitted power to incident/reflected power and gives optimum locking phase for operation which has resulted in significant saving in the overall process time for the tests of the cavities in VTS. (author)

  17. Radionuclide Partitioning in an Underground Nuclear Test Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, T P; Hu, Q; Zhao, P; Conrado, C L; Dickerson, R; Eaton, G F; Kersting, A B; Moran, J E; Nimz, G; Powell, B A; Ramon, E C; Ryerson, F J; Williams, R W; Wooddy, P T; Zavarin, M

    2009-01-09

    In 2004, a borehole was drilled into the 1983 Chancellor underground nuclear test cavity to investigate the distribution of radionuclides within the cavity. Sidewall core samples were collected from a range of depths within the re-entry hole and two sidetrack holes. Upon completion of drilling, casing was installed and a submersible pump was used to collect groundwater samples. Test debris and groundwater samples were analyzed for a variety of radionuclides including the fission products {sup 99}Tc, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 155}Eu, the activation products {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu, and the actinides U, Pu, and Am. In addition, the physical and bulk chemical properties of the test debris were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Microprobe measurements. Analytical results were used to evaluate the partitioning of radionuclides between the melt glass, rubble, and groundwater phases in the Chancellor test cavity. Three comparative approaches were used to calculate partitioning values, though each method could not be applied to every nuclide. These approaches are based on: (1) the average Area 19 inventory from Bowen et al. (2001); (2) melt glass, rubble, and groundwater mass estimates from Zhao et al. (2008); and (3) fission product mass yield data from England and Rider (1994). The U and Pu analyses of the test debris are classified and partitioning estimates for these elements were calculated directly from the classified Miller et al. (2002) inventory for the Chancellor test. The partitioning results from this study were compared to partitioning data that were previously published by the IAEA (1998). Predictions of radionuclide distributions from the two studies are in agreement for a majority of the nuclides under consideration. Substantial differences were noted in the partitioning values for {sup 99}Tc, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 129}I, and uranium. These differences are attributable to two factors

  18. Cryogenics for a vertical test stand facility for testing superconducting radio frequency cavities at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Kush, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical Test Stand (VTS) Facility is located in a newly constructed building of Cryo-Engineering and Cryo-Module Development Division (CCDD). This test facility is one of the important facilities to develop SCRF technologies for superconducting accelerators like Indian Spallation Neutron Source. VTS has to be used for regular testing of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Niobium cavities at nominal frequency of 1.3 GHz/ 650 MHz at 4 K / 2 K liquid helium (LHe) bath temperatures. Testing of these cavities at 2 K evaluates cavity processing methods, procedures and would also serve as a pre-qualification test for cavity to test it in horizontal cryostat, called horizontal test stand, with other cavity components such as tuner and helium vessel. Cryogenic technologies play a major role in these cavity testing facilities. Achieving and maintaining a stable temperature of 2 K in these test stands on regular and reliable basis is a challenging task and require broad range of cryogenic expertise, large scale system level understanding and many in-house technological and process developments. Furthermore this test stand will handle large amount of liquid helium. Therefore, an appropriately designed infrastructure is required to handle such large amount of helium gas generated during the operation of VTS .This paper describes the different cryogenic design aspects, initial cryogenic operation results and different cryogenic safety aspects. (author)

  19. Design and test of SX-FEL cavity BPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Renxian; Zhou Weimin; Chen Zhichu; Yu Luyang; Wang Baopen; Leng Yongbin

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the design and cold test of the cavity beam position monitor (CBPM) for SX-FEL to fulfill the requirement of beam position measurement resolution of less than 1 μm, even 0.1 μm. The CBPM was optimized by using a coupling slot to damp the TM 010 mode in the output signal. The isolation of TM 010 mode is about 117 dB, and the shunt impedance is about 200 Ω@4.65 GHz with the quality factor 80 from MAFIA simulation and test result. A special antenna was designed to load power for reducing excitation of other modes in the cavity. The resulting output power of TM 110 mode was about 90 mV/mm when the source was 6 dBm, and the accomplishable minimum voltage was about 200 μV. The resolution of the CBPM was about 0.1 μm from the linear fitting result based on the cold test. (authors)

  20. High power tests of dressed supconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocker, A.; Harms, E.R.; Lunin, A.; Sukhanov, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A single-cavity test cryostat is used to conduct pulsed high power RF tests of superconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities at 2 K. The cavities under test are welded inside individual helium vessels and are outfitted ('dressed') with a fundamental power coupler, higher-order mode couplers, magnetic shielding, a blade tuner, and piezoelectric tuners. The cavity performance is evaluated in terms of accelerating gradient, unloaded quality factor, and field emission, and the functionality of the auxiliary components is verified. Test results from the first set of dressed cavities are presented here.

  1. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  2. Cavity BPM system tests for the ILC energy spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, M.; Adolphsen, C.; Arnold, R.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; Gournaris, F.; Hildreth, M.; Hlaing, C.; Jackson, F.; Khainovski, O.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lyapin, A.; Maiheu, B.; McCormick, D.; Miller, D. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Szalata, Z.; Thomson, M.; Ward, D.; Wing, M.; Woods, M.

    2008-07-01

    The main physics programme of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a measurement of the beam energy at the interaction point with an accuracy of 10-4 or better. To achieve this goal a magnetic spectrometer using high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs) has been proposed. This paper reports on the cavity BPM system that was deployed to test this proposal. We demonstrate sub-micron resolution and micron level stability over 20 h for a 1 m long BPM triplet. We find micron-level stability over 1 h for 3 BPM stations distributed over a 30 m long baseline. The understanding of the behaviour and response of the BPMs gained from this work has allowed full spectrometer tests to be carried out.

  3. Test Results of the 3.9 GHz Cavity at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Solyak, N

    2004-01-01

    Fermilab is developing two types of 3.9 GHz superconducting cavities to improve performances of A0 and TTF photoinjectors. In frame of this project we have built and tested two nine-cell copper models and one 3-cell niobium accelertating cavity and series of deflecting cavities. Properties of the high order modes were carefully studied in a chain of two copper cavities at room temperature. High gradient performance were tested at helium temperature. Achieved gradients and surface resistances are exceed goal parameters. In paper we discuss results of cold tests of the 3-cell accelerating and deflecting cavities.

  4. Cavity temperature and flow characteristics in a gas-core test reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putre, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    A test reactor concept for conducting basic studies on a fissioning uranium plasma and for testing various gas-core reactor concepts is analyzed. The test reactor consists of a conventional fuel-element region surrounding a 61-cm-(2-ft-) diameter cavity region which contains the plasma experiment. The fuel elements provide the neutron flux for the cavity region. The design operating conditions include 60-MW reactor power, 2.7-MW cavity power, 200-atm cavity pressure, and an average uranium plasma temperature of 15,000 K. The analytical results are given for cavity radiant heat transfer, hydrogen transpiration cooling, and uranium wire or powder injection.

  5. Analysis of the Qualification-Tests Performance of the Superconducting Cavities for the SNS Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Delayen, J R; Ozelis, O

    2004-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerating Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cryomodules for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cold linac. This consists of 11 medium-beta (β=0.61) cyomodules of 3 cavities each, and 12 high-beta (β=0.81) cryomodules of 4 cavities each. Before assembly into cavity strings the cavities undergo individual qualification tests in a vertical cryostat (VTA). In this paper we analyze the performance of the cavities during these qualification tests, and attempt to correlate this performance with cleaning, assembly, and testing procedures. We also compare VTA performance with performance in completed cryomodules.

  6. Operating experience with superconducting cavities at the TESLA test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Wolf-Dietrich

    2003-01-01

    A description of the TESLA Test Facility, which has been set up at DESY by the TeV Energy Superconducting Accelerator (TESLA) collaboration, will be given as it is now after five years of installation and operation. The experience with the first three modules, each containing 8 superconducting 9-cell cavities, installed and operated in the TTF-linac will be described. The measurements in the vertical and horizontal cryostats as well as in the modules will be compared. Recent results of the operation at the TESLA design current, macropulses of 800 μsec with bunches of 3.2 nC at a rate of 2.25 MHz are given. New measurement results of the higher order modes (HOM) will be presented. The operation and optimisation of the TTF Free Electron Laser (TTF-FEL) will also be covered in this paper. (author)

  7. Leak-tightness assessment of demountable joints for the super fluid helium system of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, J.C.; Poncet, A.; Trilhe, P.

    1994-01-01

    The future high energy accelerator LHC presently considered at CERN, will make heavy use of demountable cryogenic joints operating at superfluid helium temperatures (1.8 K). These joints will be required for connecting the cryomagnets to their feeding lines, helium safety valves to cold masses, both on their measuring benches and eventually in their final installation set-up. The very large size of the future machine and, consequently, the large number of cryogenic joints imply that their reliability in leak tightness be very high, in particular after extreme loading conditions such as the high helium pressures resulting from superconducting magnet quenches. For these reasons, a test set-up has been especially built at CERN to reproduce these conditions, and to assess the leak tightness reliability of commercially available joints. A description of the facility is presented, together with the first test results

  8. Design of horizontal test cryostat for testing two 650 MHz cavities: cryogenic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, P.; Gilankar, S.; Kush, P. K.; Lakshminarayanan, A.; Choubey, R.; Ghosh, R.; Jain, A.; Patel, H.; Gupta, P. D.; Hocker, A.; Ozelis, J. P.; Geynisman, M.; Reid, C.; Poloubotko, V.; Mitchell, D.; Peterson, T. J.; Nicol, T. H.

    2017-02-01

    Horizontal Test Cryostat has been designed for testing two 650 MHz "dressed" Superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities in a single testing cycle at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, India (RRCAT) in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, USA (FNAL). This cryostat will facilitate testing of two 5-cell 650 MHz SCRF cavities, in CW or pulsed regime, for upcoming High Intensity Superconducting Proton Accelerator projects at both countries. Two such HTS facilities are planned, one at RRCAT for Indian Spallation Neutron Source project (ISNS), which is on the horizon, and the other at FNAL, USA. A test cryostat, a part of horizontal test stand-2 (HTS-2) will be set up at RRCAT for Indian project. In order to maximize the utility of this facility, it can also be used to test two dressed 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities and other similarly-sized devices. The facility assumes, as an input, the availability of liquid nitrogen at 80 K and liquid helium at 4.5 K and 2 K, with a refrigeration capacity of approximately 50 W at 2 K. Design work of cryostat has been completed and now procurement process is in progress. This paper discusses salient features of the cryostat. It also describes different design calculations and ANSYS analysis for cool down of few subsystems like cavity support system and liquid nitrogen cooled thermal radiation shield of horizontal test cryostat..

  9. Analysis of the cool down related cavity performance of the European XFEL vertical acceptance tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc; Schaffran, J.

    2017-09-15

    For the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) cavity production, the cold radio-frequency (RF) test of the cavities at 2 K after delivery from the two vendors was the mandatory acceptance test. It has been previously reported, that the cool down dynamics of a cavity across T{sub c} has a significant influence on the observed intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}, which is a measure of the losses on the inner cavity surface. A total number of 367 cool downs is used to analyze this correlation and we show that such a correlation is not observed during the European XFEL cavity production.

  10. PAL-XFEL cavity beam position monitor pick-up design and beam test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sojeong, E-mail: sojung8681@postech.ac.kr; Park, Young Jung; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Seung Hwan; Shin, Dong Cheol; Han, Jang-Hui; Ko, In Soo

    2016-08-11

    As an X-ray Free Electron Laser, PAL-XFEL is about to start beam commissioning. X-band cavity beam position monitor (BPM) is used in the PAL-XFEL undulator beam line. Prototypes of cavity BPM pick-up were designed and fabricated to test the RF characteristics. Also, the beam test of a cavity BPM pick-up was done in the Injector Test Facility (ITF). In the beam test, the raw signal properties of the cavity BPM pick-up were measured at a 200 pC bunch charge. According to the RF test and beam test results, the prototype cavity BPM pick-up design was confirmed to meet the requirements of the PAL-XFEL cavity BPM system.

  11. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzminski, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. (author)

  12. A Novel Demountable TF Joint Design for Low Aspect Ratio Spherical Torus Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley, R.D.

    2009-01-01

    A novel shaped design for the radial conductors and demountable electrical joints connecting inner and outer legs of copper TF system conductors in low aspect ratio tokamaks is described and analysis results are presented. Specially shaped designs can optimize profiles of electrical current density, magnetic force, heating, and mechanical stress

  13. A Novel Demountable TF Joint Design for Low Aspect Ratio Spherical Torus Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A novel shaped design for the radial conductors and demountable electrical joints connecting inner and outer legs of copper TF system conductors in low aspect ratio tokamaks is described and analysis results are presented. Specially shaped designs can optimize profiles of electrical current density, magnetic force, heating, and mechanical stress.

  14. Test results for a heat-treated 4-cell 805 MHz superconducting cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusnak, B.; Shapiro, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    Assessing superconducting technology for potential upgrades to existing proton accelerators as well as applications to future high-current machines necessitates developing expertise in the processing and handling of multicell cavities at useful frequencies. In order to address some of these technological issues, Los Alamos has purchased a 4-cell 805-MHz superconducting cavity from Siemens AG. The individual cavity cells were double-sided titanium heat-treated after equatorial welding, then the irises were welded to complete the cavity assembly. The resulting high RRR (residual resistance ratio) in the cells enables stable operation at higher cavity field levels than are possible with lower RRR material. Additionally, the high thermal conductivity of the material is conducive to rf and high peak power processing. The cavity was also cleaned at Los Alamos with high-pressure water rinsing. Results from the initial cavity tests, utilizing various processing techniques, are presented

  15. The Test of LLRF control system on superconducting cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zhenglong; Wang, Xianwu; Wen, Lianghua; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Gao, Zheng; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The first generation Low-Level radio frequency(LLRF) control system independently developed by IMPCAS, the operating frequency is 162.5MHz for China ADS, which consists of superconducting cavity amplitude stability control, phase stability control and the cavity resonance frequency control. The LLRF control system is based on four samples IQ quadrature demodulation technique consisting an all-digital closed-loop feedback control. This paper completed the first generation of ADS LLRF control s...

  16. Vertical and horizontal test results of 3.9-GHz accelerating cavities at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabiboulline, T.; Edwards, H.; Foley, M.; Harms, E.; Hocker, James Andrew; Mitchell, D.; Rowe, A.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The 3rd harmonic 3.9GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam performance of the VUV FEL, FLASH. In the frame of a collaborative agreement, Fermilab will provide DESY with a cryomodule containing a string of four cavities. Seven 9-cell Nb cavities were tested and six of them did reach accelerating gradient up to 24 MV/m almost twice more than design value of 14 MV/m. Two of these cavities are with new HOM couplers with improved design. In this paper we present all results of the vertical and horizontal tests.

  17. Test/QA Plan for Verification of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy Systems for Ammonia Monitoring in Stack Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) technology test and quality assurance plan is to specify procedures for a verification test applicable to commercial cavity ringdown spectroscopy technologies. The purpose of the verification test is to evaluate the performa...

  18. Test results of the Los Alamos ferrite-tuned rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrichs, C.C.; Spalek, G.; Carlini, R.D.; Smythe, W.R.

    1987-03-01

    An rf accelerating cavity appropriate for use in a 20% frequency bandwidth synchrotron has been designed, fabricated, and is now being tested at Los Alamos. The cavity-amplifier system was designed to produce a peak rf gap voltage of 90 kV over the range from 50 to 60 MHz. Special features of the system are the transversely biased ferrite tuner, capacitive coupling of the amplifier to the cavity, and a 15-cm beam pipe. High-power rf testing of the cavity-amplifier system started in August 1986, using an adjustable dc power supply to bias the ferrite. This paper describes the cavity-amplifier circuit and the test results to the present time. Future plans are also discussed

  19. Large-Grain Superconducting Gun Cavity Testing Program Phase One Closing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cullen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dai, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Degen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hahn, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Masi, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schultheiss, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seda, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kellerman, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tallerico, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Todd, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-10-31

    This report details the experimental configuration and RF testing results for the first phase of a large-grained niobium electron gun cavity testing program being conducted in the Small Vertical Testing Facility in the Collider-Accelerator Department. This testing is meant to explore multi-pacting in the cavity and shed light on the behavior of a counterpart cavity of identical geometry installed in the Energy Recovery LINAC being constructed in the Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This test found that the Q of the large-grained cavity at 4 K reached ~6.5 × 108 and at 2 K reached a value of ~6 × 109. Both of these values are about a factor of 10 lower than would be expected for this type of cavity given the calculated surface resistance and the estimated geometry factor for this half-cell cavity. In addition, the cavity reached a peak voltage of 0.6 MV before there was sig-nificant decline in the Q value and a substantial increase in field emission. This relatively low volt-age, coupled with the low Q and considerable field emission suggest contamination of the cavity interior, possibly during experimental assembly. The results may also suggest that additional chemical etching of the interior surface of the cavity may be beneficial. Throughout the course of testing, various challenges arose including slow helium transfer to the cryostat and cable difficulties. These difficulties and others were eventually resolved, and the re-port discusses the operating experience of the experiment thus far and the plans for future work aimed at exploring the nature of multipacting with a copper cathode inserted into the cavity.

  20. Buffer Chemical Polishing and RF Testing of the 56 MHz SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill,A.

    2009-01-01

    The 56 MHz cavity presents a unique challenge in preparing it for RF testing prior to construction of the cryomodule. This challenge arises due to the physical dimensions and subsequent weight of the cavity, and is further complicated by the coaxial geometry, and the need to properly chemically etch and high pressure rinse the entire inner surface prior to RF testing. To the best of my knowledge, this is the largest all niobium SRF cavity to be chemically etched and subsequently tested in a vertical dewar at 4K, and these processes will be the topic of this technical note.

  1. First cold test of TESLA superconducting RF cavity in horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzminski, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the TESLA project, the horizontal cryostat (CHECHIA) was built to test a superconducting RF cavity equipped with its helium vessel, magnetic shielding, cold tuner, main coupler and higher order modes couplers under realistic conditions before final assembly of eight cavities into TESLA Test Facility cryo-module. The results of the first cold tests in CHECHIA, performed at DESY with a 9-cell cavity (C19) to be used in the TTF injector are presented. Additional measurements of mechanical stability under RF operation (frequency variation with He pressure, Lorentz detuning) and cryogenic and electric measurements of power dissipation are presented. (author)

  2. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Binping; Alberty, Luis; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdu-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC) shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity's electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  3. Computer simulation and cold model testing of CCL cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.R.; Yao, C.G.; Swenson, D.A.; Funk, L.W.

    1993-01-01

    The SSC coupled-cavity-linac (CCL) consists of nine modules with eight tanks in each module. Multicavity magnetically coupled bridge couplers are used to couple the eight tanks within a module into one RF resonant chain. The operating frequency is 1282.851 MHz. In this paper the authors discuss both computer calculations and cold model measurements to determine the geometry dimension of the RF structure

  4. Performance of 3.9 GHz SRF cavities at Fermilab's ILCTA_MDB nhorizontal test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Elvin; Hocker, Andy; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    Fermilab is building a cryomodule containing four 3.9 GHz superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) facility at the Deutsches Elektronen-SYnchrotron (DESY) laboratory. Before assembling the cavities into the cryomodule, each individual cavity is tested at Fermilab's Horizontal Test Stand (HTS). The HTS provides the capability to test fully-dressed SRF cavities at 1.8 K with high-power pulsed RF in order to verify that the cavities achieve performance requirements under these conditions. The performance at the HTS of the 3.9 GHz cavities built for FLASH is presented here.

  5. Design of a high-power test model of the PEP-II rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.D.; Bell, R.A.; Hodgson, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The design of a normal-conducting high-power test cavity (HPTC) for PEP-II is described. The cavity includes HOM loading waveguides and provisions for testing two alternate input coupling schemes. 3-D electromagnetic field simulations provided input information for the surface power deposition. Finite element codes were utilized for thermal and stress analyses of the cavity to arrive at a suitable mechanical design capable of handling the high power dissipation. The mechanical design approach with emphasis on the cooling channel layout and mechanical stress reduction is described

  6. Results of SC proton cavity tests (B = 1 and B = 0.65)

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F et al

    2013-01-01

    The two superconducting cavities were carefully designed for challenging performance. They were fabricated in industry with intermediate tests and specialized processing in CEA and CNRS. The results are promising, except for a degradation of the field flatness of the low velocity cavity, after electron-beam welding. This might reduce the accelerating gradient. Due to delays in manufacturing, the final performance tests will be carried out in the coming months.

  7. Continuous observation of cavity growth and coalescence by creep-fatigue tests in SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Masayuki; Ogata, Takashi; Nitta, Akito

    1995-01-01

    Structural components operating at high temperatures in power plants are subjected to interaction of thermal fatigue and creep which results in creep-fatigue damage. In evaluating the life of those components, it is important to understand microscopic damage evolution under creep-fatigue conditions. In this study, static creep and creep-fatigue tests with tensile holdtime were conducted on SUS304 stainless steel by using a high-temperature fatigue machine combined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and cavity growth and coalescence behaviors on surface grain boundaries were observed continuously by the SEM. Quantitative analysis of creep cavity growth based on the observation was made for comparison with theoretical growth models. As a result, it was found that grain boundary cavities nucleate at random and grow preferentially on grain boundaries in a direction almost normal to the stress axis. Under the creep condition, the cavities grow monotonously on grain boundaries while they remain the elliptical shape. On the other hand, under the creep-fatigue condition the cavities grow with an effect of local strain distribution around the grain boundary due to cyclic loading and the micro cracks of one grain-boundary length were formed by coalescence of the cavities. Also, cavity nucleation and growth rates for creep-fatigue were more rapid than those for static creep and the constrained cavity growth model coincided well with the experimental data for creep. (author)

  8. Fabrication, Treatment and Testing of a 1.6 Cell Photo-injector Cavity for HZB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, P.; Kamps, T.; Knobloch, J.; Kugeler, O.; Neumann, A.; Nietubyc, R.; Sekutowicz, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Forschungszentrum Dresden (FZD) and JLab we have fabricated and tested after appropriate surface treatment a 1.5 cell, 1300 MHz RRR niobium photo-injector cavity to be used in a demonstration test at BESSY*. Following a baseline test at JLab, the cavity received a lead spot coating of ∼ 8 mm diameter deposited with a cathode arc at the Soltan Institute on the endplate made from large grain niobium. It had been demonstrated in earlier tests with a DESY built 1.5 cell cavity - the original design - that a lead spot of this size can be a good electron source, when irradiated with a laser light of 213 nm. In the initial test with the lead spot we could measure a peak surface electric field of ∼ 29 MV/m; after a second surface treatment, carried out to improve the cavity performance, but which was not done with sufficient precaution, the lead spot was destroyed and the cavity had to be coated a second time. This contribution reports about the experiences and results obtained with this cavity.

  9. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binping Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity’s electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  10. Method and device for demounting in a radiation detector a photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persyk, D.E.; Stoub, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    A device is described for demounting in a radiation detector a photomultiplier tube which is bonded with its scintillation crystal assembly by means of an elastic light transparent adhesive, comprising: (a) a music wire of about 0.01 to 0.03 inch diameter which forms a noose between its wire ends, the noose being provided for being placed aroung the bond; and (b) twisting means connected with both wire ends for twisting them such that the noose becomes smaller thereby sharing the bond

  11. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1  μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  12. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. I.; Ainsworth, R.; Aryshev, A.; Boogert, S. T.; Boorman, G.; Frisch, J.; Heo, A.; Honda, Y.; Hwang, W. H.; Huang, J. Y.; Kim, E.-S.; Kim, S. H.; Lyapin, A.; Naito, T.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Mellor, R. E.; Molloy, S.; Nelson, J.; Park, S. J.; Park, Y. J.; Ross, M.; Shin, S.; Swinson, C.; Smith, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tauchi, T.; Urakawa, J.; White, G. R.

    2012-04-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM) system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  13. Performance of Ferrite Vector Modulators in the LLRF System of the Fermilab HINS 6-Cavity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varghese, Philip [Fermilab; Barnes, Barry [Fermilab; Chase, Brian [Fermilab; Cullerton, Ed [Fermilab; Tan, Cong [Fermilab

    2013-04-01

    The High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) 6-cavity test is a part of the Fermilab HINS Linac R&D program for a low energy, high intensity proton Hsup>- linear accelerator. One of the objectives of the 6-cavity test is to demonstrate the use of high power RF Ferrite Vector Modulators(FVM) for independent control of multiple cavities driven by a single klystron. The beamline includes an RFQ and six cavities. The LLRF system provides a primary feedback loop around the RFQ and the distribution of the regulated klystron output is controlled by secondary learning feed-forward loops on the FVMs for each of the six cavities. The feed-forward loops provide pulse to pulse correction to the current waveform profiles of the FVM power supplies to compensate for beam-loading and other disturbances. The learning feed-forward loops are shown to successfully control the amplitude and phase settings for the cavities well within the 1 % and 1 degree requirements specified for the system.

  14. Cryomodule tests of the TESLA-like superconducting cavity in KEK-STF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kako, Eiji; Sato, Masato; Shishido, Toshio; Noguchi, Shuichi; Hatori, Hirofumi; Hayano, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Construction of STF (Superconducting RF Test Facility) is being carried out at KEK. The STF-Baseline superconducting cavity system, which includes four TESLA-like 9-cell cavities, input couplers and frequency tuners, has been developed for the future ILC project. A 6-m cryomodule including one of four TESLA-like cavities was assembled, and the cryomodule was installed in the tunnel for the initial test, called the STF Phase-0.5. The first cool-down of the cryomodule and high power tests of the cavity had been carried out at 2 K from October to November, 2007. The maximum accelerating gradient (Eacc, max) of 19.3 MV/m was achieved in a specific pulse width of 1.5 msec and a repetition rate of 5 Hz, (23.4 MV/m in a shorter pulse width of 0.6 msec). Compensation of Lorentz force detuning at 18 MV/m was successfully demonstrated by using a piezo tuner. The second cryomodule test for four cavities, called the STF Phase-1.0, is scheduled in July, 2008. (author)

  15. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  16. Design and development of RF system for vertical test stand for characterization of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohania, Praveen; Rajput, Vikas; Baxy, Deodatta; Agrawal, Ankur; Mahawar, Ashish; Adarsh, Kunver; Singh, Pratap; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2011-01-01

    RRCAT is developing a Vertical Test Stand (VTS) to test and qualify 1.3 GHz/650 MHz, SCRF Cavities in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) under Indian Institutions' Fermilab Collaboration. The technical details for VTS is being provided by FNAL, USA. The RF System of VTS needs to provide stable RF power to SCRF cavity with control of amplitude, relative phase and frequency. The incident, reflected, transmitted power and field decay time constant of the cavity are measured to evaluate cavity performance parameters (E, Qo). RF Power is supplied via 500 W Solid State amplifier, 1270-1310 MHz being developed by PHPMS, RRCAT. VTS system is controlled by PXI Platform and National Instruments LabVIEW software. Low Level RF (LLRF) system is used to track the cavity frequency using Phase Locked Loop (PLL). The system is comprised of several integrated functional modules which would be assembled, optimized, and tested separately. Required components and instruments have been identified and procurement for the same is underway. Inhouse development for the Solid State RF amplifier and instrument interfacing is in progress. This paper describes the progress on the development of the RF system for VTS. (author)

  17. Real-time cavity simulator-based low-level radio-frequency test bench and applications for accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Liu, Na; Wibowo, Sigit Basuki

    2018-03-01

    A Low-level radio-frequency (LLRF) control systems is required to regulate the rf field in the rf cavity used for beam acceleration. As the LLRF system is usually complex, testing of the basic functions or control algorithms of this system in real time and in advance of beam commissioning is strongly recommended. However, the equipment necessary to test the LLRF system, such as superconducting cavities and high-power rf sources, is very expensive; therefore, we have developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based cavity simulator as a substitute for real rf cavities. Digital models of the cavity and other rf systems are implemented in the FPGA. The main components include cavity baseband models for the fundamental and parasitic modes, a mechanical model of the Lorentz force detuning, and a model of the beam current. Furthermore, in our simulator, the disturbance model used to simulate the power-supply ripples and microphonics is also carefully considered. Based on the presented cavity simulator, we have established an LLRF system test bench that can be applied to different cavity operational conditions. The simulator performance has been verified by comparison with real cavities in KEK accelerators. In this paper, the development and implementation of this cavity simulator is presented first, and the LLRF test bench based on the presented simulator is constructed. The results are then compared with those for KEK accelerators. Finally, several LLRF applications of the cavity simulator are illustrated.

  18. Real-time cavity simulator-based low-level radio-frequency test bench and applications for accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Low-level radio-frequency (LLRF control systems is required to regulate the rf field in the rf cavity used for beam acceleration. As the LLRF system is usually complex, testing of the basic functions or control algorithms of this system in real time and in advance of beam commissioning is strongly recommended. However, the equipment necessary to test the LLRF system, such as superconducting cavities and high-power rf sources, is very expensive; therefore, we have developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA-based cavity simulator as a substitute for real rf cavities. Digital models of the cavity and other rf systems are implemented in the FPGA. The main components include cavity baseband models for the fundamental and parasitic modes, a mechanical model of the Lorentz force detuning, and a model of the beam current. Furthermore, in our simulator, the disturbance model used to simulate the power-supply ripples and microphonics is also carefully considered. Based on the presented cavity simulator, we have established an LLRF system test bench that can be applied to different cavity operational conditions. The simulator performance has been verified by comparison with real cavities in KEK accelerators. In this paper, the development and implementation of this cavity simulator is presented first, and the LLRF test bench based on the presented simulator is constructed. The results are then compared with those for KEK accelerators. Finally, several LLRF applications of the cavity simulator are illustrated.

  19. Coldbox installation for HL-LHC crab cavity test in the SPS tunnel (BA6)

    CERN Document Server

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2018-01-01

    The Cold-box, produced by Linde Kryotechnik for the SPS crab-cavity test stand for HL-LHC, on its arrival at CERN. It wll be transported into the tunnel in horizontal position and then will have to be tilted in its operational position, on its vertical axis, before connecting it to cryogenics lines.

  20. Cavity-Type BPMs For The TESLA Test Facility Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Waldmann, H

    2003-01-01

    For measurements of the beam position at the undulator section of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY cavity-type beam position monitors were developed, installed and brought into operation. Besides of some theoretical aspects results of in-beam measurements at the TTF are presented and pros and cons of this monitor concept are discussed.

  1. High field tests of 1.3 GHz niobium superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kako, Eiji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki

    1993-01-01

    Four single-cell cavities prepared by various surface treatments have been tested repeatedly since 1991. A maximum accelerating gradient of 25.1 MV/m with a high Q 0 value of ∼10 10 was successfully achieved after heat treatment at 1400degC. A temperature mapping system with a high thermal sensitivity under superfluid helium was developed to understand phenomena limiting a maximum accelerating gradient. The cavity performances and the phenomena at high fields are reported in this paper. (author)

  2. Design, fabrication and low power RF testing of a prototype beta=1, 1050 MHz cavity developed for electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K.C.

    2013-01-01

    A single cell 1050 MHz β = 1 elliptical cavity has been designed for possible use in High energy electron accelerator. A prototype Aluminium cavity has been fabricated by die punch method and low power testing of the cavity has been carried out by using VNA. The fundamental mode frequency of the prototype cavity is found out to be 1051.38 MHz and Q (loaded) and Q0 values corresponding to 2 modes are 8439 and 10013 respectively. Cell to cell coupling coefficient is 1.82 % from measurement which matches with the designed value (1.84%). The higher order mode frequencies are also measured and electric field of the cavity is confirmed by bead pull method. Low power RF measurements on the prototype cavity indicate that the critical RF parameters (Qo, f, Kc etc) for the cavity are consistent with the designed value. (author)

  3. Development and investigation of the stressed-deformed state of the demountable foundation for support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabitov, L. S.; Kashapov, N. F.; Gilmanshin, I. R.; Strelkov, Yu M.; Khusainov, D. M.

    2017-09-01

    The development is demountable foundation for support, including separate reinforced concrete blocks in the form of prisms mounted on the surface of the base and pulled together by horizontal strands, and anchor devices for fixing the supports. The reinforced concrete blocks are made in the form of hollow prisms consisting of walls and square bottoms, and the strands are made in the form of bolts that tighten the walls along the top and bottom, while the anchoring devices for fixing the supports are made in the form of anchors on the bottom of the central prism and horizontal spacers between the support and the walls of the prism in its upper part. Numerical studies of the foundation have been carried out and its optimal sizes have been found in the PK Lira SAPR.

  4. Cavity digital control testing system by Simulink step operation method for TESLA linear accelerator and free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Simrock, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The cavity control system for the TESLA -- TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator project is initially introduced in this paper. The FPGA -- Field Programmable Gate Array technology has been implemented for digital controller stabilizing cavity field gradient. The cavity SIMULINK model has been applied to test the hardware controller. The step operation method has been developed for testing the FPGA device coupled to the SIMULINK model of the analog real plant. The FPGA signal processing has been verified according to the required algorithm of the reference MATLAB controller. Some experimental results have been presented for different cavity operational conditions.

  5. Measurements of Conversion Efficiency for a Flat Plate Thermophotovoltaic System Using a Photonic Cavity Test System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.J.; Ballinger, C.T.; Burger, S.R.; Charache, G.W.; Danielson, L.R.; DePoy, D.M.; Donovan, T.J.; LoCascio, M.

    2000-01-01

    The performance of a 1 cm 2 thermophotovoltaic (TPV) module was recently measured in a photonic cavity test system. A conversion efficiency of 11.7% was measured at a radiator temperature of 1076 C and a module temperature of 29.9 C. This experiment achieved the highest direct measurement of efficiency for an integrated TPV system. Efficiency was calculated from the ratio of the peak (load matched) electrical power output and the heat absorption rate. Measurements of these two parameters were made simultaneously to assure the validity of the measured efficiency value. This test was conducted in a photonic cavity which mimicked a typical flat-plate TPV system. The radiator was a large, flat graphite surface. The module was affixed to the top of a copper pedestal for heat absorption measurements. The heat absorption rate was proportional to the axial temperature gradient in the pedestal under steady-state conditions. The test was run in a vacuum to eliminate conductive and convective heat transfer mechanisms. The photonic cavity provides the optimal test environment for TPV efficiency measurements because it incorporates all important physical phenomena found in an integrated TPV system: high radiator emissivity and blackbody spectral shape, photon recycling, Lambertian distribution of incident radiation and complex geometric effects. Furthermore, the large aspect ratio between radiating surface area and radiator/module spacing produces a view factor approaching unity with minimal photon leakage

  6. RESULTS OF ACCELERATED LIFE TESTING OF LCLS-II CAVITY TUNER MOTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2018-04-01

    An Accelerated Life Test (ALT) of the Phytron stepper motor used in the LCLS-II cavity tuner has been conducted at JLab. Since the motor will reside inside the cryomodule, any failure would lead to a very costly and arduous repair. As such, the motor was tested for the equivalent of 30 lifetimes before being approved for use in the production cryomodules. The 9-cell LCLS-II cavity is simulated by disc springs with an equivalent spring constant. Plots of the motor position vs. tuner position ' measured via an installed linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) ' are used to measure motor motion. The titanium spindle was inspected for loss of lubrication. The motor passed the ALT, and is set to be installed in the LCLS-II cryomodules.

  7. Production and Test of 352 MHZ Niobum-Sputtered Reduced-$\\beta$ Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Calatroni, Sergio; Chiaveri, Enrico; Tückmantel, Joachim

    1997-01-01

    Three types of 352 MHz single-cell cavities foreseen for different particle speeds (v/c=0.8, 0.625 and 0.48) have been designed and built with the niobium sputtered on copper technique. We report on the results of the cold tests at 4.5 and 2.5 K and the actual status of the data analysis.

  8. Commissioning and operation of the horizontal test apparatus at SNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL; Neustadt, Thomas S. [ORNL; Howell, Matthew P. [ORNL; Hannah, Brian S. [ORNL; Doleans, Marc [ORNL; Saunders, Jeffrey W. [ORNL

    2015-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) has built, commissioned and operated a Horizontal Test Apparatus (HTA) vessel in the Radiofrequency Test Facility (RFTF) test cave. It can be operated at 4.5 K using the independent Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF). The HTA is designed to be a single cavity version of an SNS cryomodule with the ability to demount and replace the cavity. It provides the functionality for testing a single dressed SNS medium or high beta Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) cavity. The HTA is currently being used in support of R&D for in-situ plasma processing of the cavity's inner niobium surface. The design and commissioning of the HTA at 4.5 K will be presented as well as results from operating the HTA including cool-down, warm-up and steady state operations. Results from plasma processing a warm SCRF cavity in-between cold HTA tests will also be reported.

  9. Nucleate pool boiling investigation on a silicon test section with micro-fabricated cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanna, A.; Kenning, D.B.R.; Karayiannis, T.G.; Hutter, C.; Sefiane, K.; Nelson, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The basic mechanisms of nucleate boiling are still not completely understood, in spite of the many numerical and experimental studies dedicated to the topic. The use of a hybrid code allows reasonable computational times for simulations of a solid plate with a large population of artificial micro-cavities with fixed distribution. This paper analyses the guidelines for the design, through numerical simulations, of the location and sizes of micro-fabricated cavities on a new silicon test section immersed in FC-72 at the saturation temperature for different pressures with an imposed heat flux applied at the back of the plate. Particular focus is on variations of wall temperature around nucleation sites. (author)

  10. Fabrication and vertical test experience of the European X-ray Free Electron Laser 3.9 GHz superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierini, P.; Bertucci, M.; Bosotti, A.; Chen, J. F.; Maiano, C. G.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.; Moretti, M.; Pagani, C.; Paparella, R.; Sertore, D.; Vogel, E.

    2017-04-01

    We report the experience of the production, processing and qualification testing of the superconducting radio frequency cavities at 3.9 GHz for the third harmonic system at the European XFEL (EXFEL) injector. The rf structure concept, originally developed for the FLASH FEL facility, was adapted to the new interfaces provided by the EXFEL design and the cavities were procured from a qualified vendor, delivered ready for the testing at the INFN infrastructure. A total of 23 cavities, three prototypes and two batches of 10, have been realized and tested up to specifications.

  11. Testing of plain and fibrous concrete single cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) models were fabricated and tested to failure to demonstrate the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of models cast from high-strength concretes. Concretes with design compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa (10,000 psi) were developed for this investigation. One model was cast from plain concrete and failed in shear at the head region. The second model was cast from fiber reinforced concrete and failed by rupturing the circumferential prestressing at the sidewall of the structure. The tests also demonstrated the capabilities of the liner system to maintain a leak-tight pressure boundary. 3 refs., 4 figs

  12. GCFR 1/20-scale PCRV central core cavity closure model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.C.; Dougan, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting structural response tests of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) closures for the 300-MW(e) gas-cooled fast reactor demonstration power plant. This report describes the third in a series of tests of small-scale closure plug models. The model represents a redesign of the central core cavity closure plug. The primary objective was to demonstrate structural performance and ultimate load capacity of the closure plug. Secondary objectives included obtaining data on crack development and propagation and on mode of failure of the composite structure

  13. High-power tests of a single-cell copper accelerating cavity driven by two input couplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Bromberek, D.; Meyer, D.; Waldschmidt, G.

    2008-01-01

    High-power tests were conducted on a 350-MHz, single-cell copper accelerating cavity driven simultaneously by two H-loop input couplers for the purpose of determining the reliability, performance, and power-handling capability of the cavity and related components, which have routinely operated at 100-kW power levels. The test was carried out utilizing the APS 350-MHz RF Test Stand, which was modified to split the input rf power into two frac12-power feeds, each supplying power to a separate H-loop coupler on the cavity. Electromagnetic simulations of the two-coupler feed system were used to determine coupler match, peak cavity fields, and the effect of phasing errors between the coupler feed lines. The test was conducted up to a maximum total rf input power of 164-kW CW. Test apparatus details and performance data will be presented.

  14. Generalist predator, cyclic voles and cavity nests: testing the alternative prey hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöysä, Hannu; Jalava, Kaisa; Paasivaara, Antti

    2016-12-01

    The alternative prey hypothesis (APH) states that when the density of the main prey declines, generalist predators switch to alternative prey and vice versa, meaning that predation pressure on the alternative prey should be negatively correlated with the density of the main prey. We tested the APH in a system comprising one generalist predator (pine marten, Martes martes), cyclic main prey (microtine voles, Microtus agrestis and Myodes glareolus) and alternative prey (cavity nests of common goldeneye, Bucephala clangula); pine marten is an important predator of both voles and common goldeneye nests. Specifically, we studied whether annual predation rate of real common goldeneye nests and experimental nests is negatively associated with fluctuation in the density of voles in four study areas in southern Finland in 2000-2011. Both vole density and nest predation rate varied considerably between years in all study areas. However, we did not find support for the hypothesis that vole dynamics indirectly affects predation rate of cavity nests in the way predicted by the APH. On the contrary, the probability of predation increased with vole spring abundance for both real and experimental nests. Furthermore, a crash in vole abundance from previous autumn to spring did not increase the probability of predation of real nests, although it increased that of experimental nests. We suggest that learned predation by pine marten individuals, coupled with efficient search image for cavities, overrides possible indirect positive effects of high vole density on the alternative prey in our study system.

  15. Design and commissioning of Fermilab's vertical test stand for ILC SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Carcagno, Ruben; Ginsburg, Camille M.; Huang, Yuenian; Norris, Barry; Peterson, Thomas; Poloubotko, Valeri; Rabehl, roger; Rakhno, Igor; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    As part of its ILC program, Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities. It operates at a nominal temperature of 2K, using a cryoplant that can supply LHe in excess of 20g/sec and provide bath pumping capacity of 125W at 2K. The below-grade cryostat consists of a vacuum vessel and LHe vessel, equipped with magnetic shielding to reduce the ambient magnetic field to <10mG. Internal fixed and external movable radiation shielding ensures that exposure to personnel is minimized. The facility features an integrated personnel safety system consisting of RF switches, interlocks, and area radiation monitors.

  16. Design and commissioning of Fermilab's vertical test stand for ILC SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Carcagno, Ruben; Ginsburg, Camille M.; Huang, Yuenian; Norris, Barry; Peterson, Thomas; Poloubotko, Valeri; Rabehl, roger; Rakhno, Igor; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-01-01

    As part of its ILC program, Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities. It operates at a nominal temperature of 2K, using a cryoplant that can supply LHe in excess of 20g/sec and provide bath pumping capacity of 125W at 2K. The below-grade cryostat consists of a vacuum vessel and LHe vessel, equipped with magnetic shielding to reduce the ambient magnetic field to <10mG. Internal fixed and external movable radiation shielding ensures that exposure to personnel is minimized. The facility features an integrated personnel safety system consisting of RF switches, interlocks, and area radiation monitors

  17. Test measurement of a new TESLA cavity beam position monitor at the ELBE linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargsyan, V.; Schreiber, H.J.; Evtushenko, P.; Schurig, R.

    2004-01-01

    A new type of a cavity BPM proposed for beam position determination along the TESLA linac was tested at the accelerator ELBE in Rossendorf / Dresden. Measurements using an improved BPM (large and stable cross-talk isolation, significantly less energy dissipation, a novel LO signal generation) were performed in single- and multi-bunch regimes. Agreement with expectations was found. The low bunch charge available allowed for preliminary measurements on sensitivity and position resolution, which extrapolated to TESLA would ful l the demands for precise bunch-to-bunch position determination. Possible improvements, in particular on the signal processing scheme, are also discussed. (orig.)

  18. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Duane P.; Bruckner, Jim; Fisher, Jen; Czerwinski, Ken; Russell, Charles E.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2010-09-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program’s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  19. Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Duane P; Czerwinski, Ken; Russell, Charles E; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2010-07-13

    This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program's Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  20. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Duane P.; Bruckner, Jim; Fisher, Jen; Czerwinski, Ken; Russell, Charles E.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2010-01-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program's Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H 2 and SO 4 2- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  1. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, J.; Palczewski, A.; Popović, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Im, Do; Phillips, H. L.; Vušković, L.

    2017-12-01

    An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity's inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  2. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  3. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Medium-Beta 650 MHz SRF Cavity Prototypes for Project-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhauser, F.; Clemens, W.A.; Henry, J.; Kneisel, P.; Martin, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Slack, G.; Turlington, L.; Williams, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    A new type of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity shape with a shallow equator dome to reduce electron impact energies for suppressing multipacting barriers has been proposed. The shape is in consideration for the first time in the framework of Project-X to design a potential multi-cell cavity candidate for the medium-beta section of the SRF proton CW linac operating at 650 MHz. Rationales covering the design of the multi-cell cavity, the manufacture, post-processing and high power testing of two single-cell prototypes are presented.

  4. Experimental plans for LMFBR cavity liner sodium spill test LT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, R.K.; Newell, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    Reinforced concrete is an important material of construction in LMFBR cavities and cells. Steel liners are often installed on the concrete surfaces to provide a gastight seal for minimizing air inleakage to inerted cell atmospheres and to protect the concrete from direct contact with sodium in the event of a sodium spill. In making safety assessment analyses, it is of interest to determine the adequacy of the liners to maintain their leaktightness during postulated accidents involving large sodium spills. However, data for basing analytical assessments of cell liners are very meager and an experimental program is underway at HEDL to provide some of the needed information. The HEDL cell liner evaluation program consists of both bench-scale feature tests and large-scale sodium spill demonstration tests. The plans for the first large-scale sodium spill test (LT-1) are the subject of this paper

  5. First heavy ion beam tests with a superconducting multigap CH cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, W.; Aulenbacher, K.; Basten, M.; Busch, M.; Dziuba, F.; Gettmann, V.; Heilmann, M.; Kürzeder, T.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Podlech, H.; Rubin, A.; Schnase, A.; Schwarz, M.; Yaramyshev, S.

    2018-02-01

    Very compact accelerating-focusing structures, as well as short focusing periods, high accelerating gradients and short drift spaces are strongly required for superconducting (sc) accelerator sections operating at low and medium energies for continuous wave (cw) heavy ion beams. To keep the GSI-super heavy element (SHE) program competitive on a high level and even beyond, a standalone sc cw linac (Helmholtz linear accelerator) in combination with the GSI high charge state injector (HLI), upgraded for cw operation, is envisaged. Recently the first linac section (financed by Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and GSI) as a demonstration of the capability of 217 MHz multigap crossbar H-mode structures (CH) has been commissioned and extensively tested with heavy ion beam from the HLI. The demonstrator setup reached acceleration of heavy ions up to the design beam energy. The required acceleration gain was achieved with heavy ion beams even above the design mass to charge ratio at high beam intensity and full beam transmission. This paper presents systematic beam measurements with varying rf amplitudes and phases of the CH cavity, as well as phase space measurements for heavy ion beams with different mass to charge ratio. The worldwide first and successful beam test with a superconducting multigap CH cavity is a milestone of the R&D work of HIM and GSI in collaboration with IAP in preparation of the HELIAC project and other cw-ion beam applications.

  6. A case study testing the cavity mode model of the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on a case study we test the cavity mode model of the magnetosphere, looking for eigenfrequencies via multi-satellite and multi-instrument measurements. Geotail and ACE provide information on the interplanetary medium that dictates the input parameters of the system; the four Cluster satellites monitor the magnetopause surface waves; the POLAR (L=9.4 and LANL 97A (L=6.6 satellites reveal two in-situ monochromatic field line resonances (FLRs with T=6 and 2.5 min, respectively; and the IMAGE ground magnetometers demonstrate latitude dependent delays in signature arrival times, as inferred by Sarafopoulos (2004b. Similar dispersive structures showing systematic delays are also extensively scrutinized by Sarafopoulos (2005 and interpreted as tightly associated with the so-called pseudo-FLRs, which show almost the same observational characteristics with an authentic FLR. In particular for this episode, successive solar wind pressure pulses produce recurring ionosphere twin vortex Hall currents which are identified on the ground as pseudo-FLRs. The BJN ground magnetometer records the pseudo-FLR (alike with the other IMAGE station responses associated with an intense power spectral density ranging from 8 to 12 min and, in addition, two discrete resonant lines with T=3.5 and 7 min. In this case study, even though the magnetosphere is evidently affected by a broad-band compressional wave originated upstream of the bow shock, nevertheless, we do not identify any cavity mode oscillation within the magnetosphere. We fail, also, to identify any of the cavity mode frequencies proposed by Samson (1992.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetosphereionosphere interactions; Solar wind-magnetosphere interactions; MHD waves and instabilities

  7. Bulge testing of copper and niobium tubes for hydroformed RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.S., E-mail: kim.3237@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sumption, M.D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Susner, M.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lim, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Collings, E.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-01-27

    The heat treatment, tensile testing, and bulge testing of Cu and Nb tubes has been carried out to gain experience for the subsequent hydroforming of Nb tube into seamless superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for high energy particle acceleration. In the experimental part of the study samples removed from representative tubes were prepared for heat treatment, tensile testing, residual resistance ratio measurement, and orientation imaging electron microscopy (OIM). After being optimally heat treated Cu and Nb tubes were subjected to hydraulic bulge testing and the results analyzed. In the final part of the study finite-element models (FEM) incorporating constitutive (stress–strain) relationships analytically derived from the tensile and bulge tests, respectively, were used to replicate the bulge test. As expected, agreement was obtained between the experimental bulge parameters and the FEM model based on the bulge-derived constitutive relationship. Not so for the FEM model based on tensile-test data. It is concluded that a constitutive relationship based on bulge testing is necessary to predict a material's performance under hydraulic deformation.

  8. Bulge testing of copper and niobium tubes for hydroformed RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.S.; Sumption, M.D.; Susner, M.A.; Lim, H.; Collings, E.W.

    2016-01-01

    The heat treatment, tensile testing, and bulge testing of Cu and Nb tubes has been carried out to gain experience for the subsequent hydroforming of Nb tube into seamless superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for high energy particle acceleration. In the experimental part of the study samples removed from representative tubes were prepared for heat treatment, tensile testing, residual resistance ratio measurement, and orientation imaging electron microscopy (OIM). After being optimally heat treated Cu and Nb tubes were subjected to hydraulic bulge testing and the results analyzed. In the final part of the study finite-element models (FEM) incorporating constitutive (stress–strain) relationships analytically derived from the tensile and bulge tests, respectively, were used to replicate the bulge test. As expected, agreement was obtained between the experimental bulge parameters and the FEM model based on the bulge-derived constitutive relationship. Not so for the FEM model based on tensile-test data. It is concluded that a constitutive relationship based on bulge testing is necessary to predict a material's performance under hydraulic deformation.

  9. High power tests of the prototype 352 MHz beta 0.85 five cell cavity for the TRASCO project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaveri, E.; Losito, R.; Calatroni, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Five-cell beta 0.85 cavities built at CERN for the development of the TRASCO project is fully tested at the CERN SL-CT Test Bench. The cavity, built using the standard Niobium on Copper technique, was previously tested in a vertical cryostat, showing Qo and Field exceeding the design goal for the TRASCO Project (2.5x10 9 and 5.5 MV/m at 4.5 K). After the successful test we decided to check the performances of the cavity installed in a horizontal Cryostat and equipped with a LEP-II Type high power main coupler and HOM couplers. The cavity was equipped with the Helium Tank, Tuners and couplers at CERN and tested at the SL-CT facility at CERN under a collaboration agreement between INFN and CERN. The behavior of the fully equipped cavity substantially confirmed the results of the preliminary production tests in the vertical Cryostat. The quality factor at low field was substantially unchanged. No MP activity was detected confirming the soundness of the design and the quality of the surface treatment. (author)

  10. Cryogenic aspects of a demountable toroidal field magnet system for tokamak type fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, S.Y.; Powell, J.; Lehner, J.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept for superconducting Toroidal Field (TF) magnet construction is presented. It is termed the ''Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress'' (DEALS) magnet system. In contrast to continuous wound conventional superconducting coils, each magnet coil is made from several straight coil segments to form a polygon which can be joined and disjoined to improve reactor maintenance accessibility or to replace failed coil segments if necessary. A design example is presented of a DEALS magnet system for a UWMAK II size reactor. The overall magnet system is described, followed by a detailed analysis of the major heat loads in order to assess the refrigeration requirements for the concept. Despite the increased heat loads caused by high current power leads (200,000 amps) and the coil warm reinforcement support system, the analysis shows that at most, only about one percent (approximately 20 Mw) of the plant electrical output (approximately 2,000 Mw) is needed to operate the magnet cryogenic system. The advantages and the drawbacks of the DEALS magnet system are also discussed. The advantages include: capability to replace failed coils, increased accessibility to the blanket shield assembly, reduced reliability requirements for the magnet, much lower stress in conductor, easier application of improved high field brittle superconductors like Nb 3 Sn, improved magnet safety features, etc. The drawbacks are the increased refrigeration requirements and the necessity of a movable coil support system. A comparison with a conventional magnet system is made. It is concluded that the benefits of the DEALS approach far outweigh its penalties, and that the DEALS concept is the most practical, economical way to construct TF magnet systems for Tokamak reactors

  11. Cryogenic rf test of the first SRF cavity etched in an rf Ar/Cl2 plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Upadhyay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An apparatus and a method for etching of the inner surfaces of superconducting radio frequency (SRF accelerator cavities are described. The apparatus is based on the reactive ion etching performed in an Ar/Cl2 cylindrical capacitive discharge with reversed asymmetry. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity was used. The single cell cavity was mechanically polished and buffer chemically etched and then rf tested at cryogenic temperatures to provide a baseline characterization. The cavity’s inner wall was then exposed to the capacitive discharge in a mixture of Argon and Chlorine. The inner wall acted as the grounded electrode, while kept at elevated temperature. The processing was accomplished by axially moving the dc-biased, corrugated inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish a sequence of longitudinally segmented discharges. The cavity was then tested in a standard vertical test stand at cryogenic temperatures. The rf tests and surface condition results, including the electron field emission elimination, are presented.

  12. Magnesium diboride on inner wall of copper tube: A test case for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenura K. Withanage

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Superconductor magnesium diboride is considered one of the viable materials to substitute bulk niobium for superconducting radio frequency cavities. Utilizing a MgB_{2} coating on the inner wall of a copper cavity will allow operation at higher temperatures (20–25 K than Nb cavities due to the high transition temperature of MgB_{2} (39 K and the high thermal conductivity of Cu. In this paper, we present results of MgB_{2} coating on Cu tubes with similar dimensions to a 3 GHz cavity, as the first step towards coating the actual cavity, using the hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition technique. The results show successful coating of a uniform MgB_{2} layer on the inner wall of the Cu tubes with T_{c} as high as 37 K.

  13. Magnesium diboride on inner wall of copper tube: A test case for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withanage, Wenura K.; Lee, N. H.; Penmatsa, Sashank V.; Wolak, M. A.; Nassiri, A.; Xi, X. X.

    2017-10-01

    Superconductor magnesium diboride is considered one of the viable materials to substitute bulk niobium for superconducting radio frequency cavities. Utilizing a MgB2 coating on the inner wall of a copper cavity will allow operation at higher temperatures (20-25 K) than Nb cavities due to the high transition temperature of MgB2 (39 K) and the high thermal conductivity of Cu. In this paper, we present results of MgB2 coating on Cu tubes with similar dimensions to a 3 GHz cavity, as the first step towards coating the actual cavity, using the hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition technique. The results show successful coating of a uniform MgB2 layer on the inner wall of the Cu tubes with Tc as high as 37 K.

  14. Optimizing Centrifugal Barrel Polishing For Mirror Finish SRF Cavity And RF Tests At Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli; Tian, Hui

    2012-01-01

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on a 1.3 GHz fine grain TESLA single cell cavity and 1.5 GHz fine grain CEBAF high gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) single cell cavity following a modified recipe originally developed at Fermi National Accelerator Lab (FNAL). We were able to obtain a mirror like surface similar to that obtained at FNAL, while reducing the number of CBP steps and total processing time. This paper will discuss the change in surface and subsequent cavity performance post CBP, after a 800 C bake (no pre-bake chemistry) and minimal controlled electro-polishing (10 micron). In addition to Q vs. E ACC thermometry mapping with preheating characteristics and optical inspection of the cavity after CBP will also be shown.

  15. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injektor Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Eremeev, G V; Kneisel, P; Stirbet, M; Turlington, L

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac [1]. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning; the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing [2] was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test were carried out at TJNAF’s production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (Ø10 mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects a...

  16. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injector Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, A.; Murcek, P.; Teichert, J.; Xiang, R.; Eremeev, G. V.; Kneisel, P.; Stirbet, M.; Turlington, L.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning, the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test was carried out at TJNAF's production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (O-slash10mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects appeared in the least accessible cathode cell. This contribution reports about our experiences, initial results and the on-going diagnostic work to understand and fix the problems

  17. Design and Testing of the MIT-Bates Stern-Gerlach Polarimeter Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, P; Luccio, A U; MacKay, W W

    2005-01-01

    Historically, beam polarization measurement has been accomplished by scattering experiments, with the attendant complexity of target and detector installation and operation, and smallness and uncertainty of analyzing powers. The purpose of the present effort is to accomplish fast and accurate polarization measurement not as a scattering experiment, but rather as conventional beam instrumentation, with a resonant cavity pickup. This requires that the coupling of the beam magnetic moment to the pickup be enhanced to bring the signal above the noise floor, and that coupling of the beam charge to the pickup be diminished to reduce the dynamic range problem. We discuss details of cavity design that have been implemented to accomplish these ends. Presently, it is planned to install the cavity in the Bates Ring in early May of this year. Beyond polarimetry, successful polarization measurement will verify the underlying principles, and by pickup/kicker reciprocity will open the serious consideration of the possibilit...

  18. Velocity Measurements in Nasal Cavities by Means of Stereoscopic Piv - Preliminary Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Fabio; Felisati, Giovanni; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2017-08-01

    The prediction of detailed flow patterns in human nasal cavities using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can provide essential information on the potential relationship between patient-specific geometrical characteristics of the nasal anatomy and health problems, and ultimately led to improved surgery. The complex flow structure and the intricate geometry of the nasal cavities make achieving such goals a challenge for CFD specialists. The need for experimental data to validate and improve the numerical simulations is particularly crucial. To this aim an experimental set-up based on Stereo PIV and a silicon phantom of nasal cavities have been designed and realized at Politecnico di Milano. This work describes the main features and challenges of the set-up along with some preliminary results.

  19. Performance in the vertical test of the 832 nine-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, D.; Gubarev, V.; Schaffran, J.; Steder, L.; Walker, N.; Wenskat, M.; Monaco, L.

    2017-04-01

    The successful production and associated vertical testing of over 800 superconducting 1.3 GHz accelerating cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) represents the culmination of over 20 years of superconducting radio-frequency R&D. The cavity production took place at two industrial vendors under the shared responsibility of INFN Milano-LASA and DESY. Average vertical testing rates at DESY exceeded 10 cavities per week, peaking at up to 15 cavities per week. The cavities sent for cryomodule assembly at Commissariat à l'énergie atomique (CEA) Saclay achieved an average maximum gradient of approximately 33 MV /m , reducing to ˜30 MV /m when the operational specifications on quality factor (Q) and field emission were included (the so-called usable gradient). Only 16% of the cavities required an additional surface retreatment to recover their low performance (usable gradient less than 20 MV /m ). These cavities were predominantly limited by excessive field emission for which a simple high pressure water rinse (HPR) was sufficient. Approximately 16% of the cavities also received an additional HPR, e.g. due to vacuum problems before or during the tests or other reasons, but these were not directly related to gradient performance. The in-depth statistical analyses presented in this report have revealed several features of the series produced cavities.

  20. Performance in the vertical test of the 832 nine-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Reschke

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The successful production and associated vertical testing of over 800 superconducting 1.3 GHz accelerating cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL represents the culmination of over 20 years of superconducting radio-frequency R&D. The cavity production took place at two industrial vendors under the shared responsibility of INFN Milano–LASA and DESY. Average vertical testing rates at DESY exceeded 10 cavities per week, peaking at up to 15 cavities per week. The cavities sent for cryomodule assembly at Commissariat à l’énergie atomique (CEA Saclay achieved an average maximum gradient of approximately 33  MV/m, reducing to ∼30  MV/m when the operational specifications on quality factor (Q and field emission were included (the so-called usable gradient. Only 16% of the cavities required an additional surface retreatment to recover their low performance (usable gradient less than 20  MV/m. These cavities were predominantly limited by excessive field emission for which a simple high pressure water rinse (HPR was sufficient. Approximately 16% of the cavities also received an additional HPR, e.g. due to vacuum problems before or during the tests or other reasons, but these were not directly related to gradient performance. The in-depth statistical analyses presented in this report have revealed several features of the series produced cavities.

  1. Measurement Report for the Four-Rod LHC Crab Cavity. Cold Tests held in July 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro Tapia, Maria; Calaga, Rama; Hernandez Chahin, Karim Gibran; Junginger, Tobias; Macpherson, Alick; Torres-Sanchez, Roberto; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the four-rod cavity prototype considered for the HL-LHC upgrade has already been assessed at CERN at cryogenic temperatures three times in the last two years [1, 2, 3]. In this report, the results of the latest measurements, carried out in July 2014, are shown. These measurements were to check the improvement of the cavity performance due to the change of the input and pick-up antennas. An estimation of the residual resistance of the Niobium was also performed.

  2. Fabrication and Testing of the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Prototype Cryomodule Renascence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles Reece; Edward Daly; Stephen Manning; Robert Manus; Samuel Morgan; Joseph Ozelis; Larry Turlington

    2005-01-01

    Twelve seven-cell niobium cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade prototype cryomodule Renascence have been fabricated at JLab and tested individually. This set includes four of the ''Low Loss'' (LL) design and eight of the ''High Gradient'' (HG) design. The fabrication strategy was an efficient mix of batch job-shop component machining and in-house EBW, chemistry, and final-step machining to meet mechanical tolerances. Process highlights will be presented. The cavities have been tested at 2.07 K, the intended CEBAF operating temperature. Performance exceeded the tentative design requirement of 19.2 MV/m cw with less than 29 W dynamic heat dissipation. These results, as well as the HOM damping performance will be presented

  3. Fabrication and Testing of the SRF cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Prototype Cryomodule Renascence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. E. Reece; E. F. Daly; S. Manning; R. Manus; S. Morgan; J. P. Ozelis; L. Turlington

    2005-01-01

    Twelve seven-cell niobium cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade prototype cryomodule Renascence have been fabricated at JLab and tested individually. This set includes four of the ''Low Loss'' (LL) design and eight of the ''High Gradient'' (HG) design. The fabrication strategy was an efficient mix of batch job-shop component machining and in-house EBW, chemistry, and final-step machining to meet mechanical tolerances. Process highlights will be presented. The cavities have been tested at 2.07 K, the intended CEBAF operating temperature. Performance exceeded the tentative design requirement of 19.2 MV/m CW with less than 29 W dynamic heat dissipation. These results, as well as the HOM damping performance are presented

  4. SQUID-based Nondestructive Testing Instrument of Dished Niobium Sheets for SRF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Q. S. Shu; I. Ben-Zvi; G. Cheng; I. M. Phipps; J. T. Susta; P. Kneisel; G. Myneni; J. Mast; R. Selim

    2007-01-01

    Currently available technology can only inspect flat sheets and allow the elimination of defective flat sheets before the expensive forming and machining of the SRF cavity half-cells, but it does not eliminate the problem of remaining or uncovered surface impurities after partial chemical etching of the half-cells, nor does it detect any defects that may have been added during the fabrication of the half-cells. AMAC has developed a SQUID scanning system based on eddy current technique that allows the scanning of curved Nb samples that are welded to make superconducting RF cavity half-cells. AMAC SQUID scanning system successfully located the defects (Ta macro particles about 100 mm diameter) in a flat Nb sample (top side) and was able to also locate the defects in a cylindrical surface sample (top side). It is more significant that the system successfully located the defects on the backside of the flat sample and curved sample or 3-mm from the top surface. The 3-D SQUID-based Nondestructive instrument will be further optimized and improved in making SRF cavities and allow inspection and detection during cavity manufacturing for achieving highest accelerating fields

  5. Tests on model of a prestressed concrete nuclear pressure vessel with multiple cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, R.; Koprna, M.; Jaccoud, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The prestressed concrete pressure vessel (prototype) is a cylinder having a diameter of 48 m and a height of 39 m. It has 25 vertical cavities (reactor, heat exchangers, heat recuperators) and 3 horizontal cavities (gas turbines of 500 kw). The cavities are closed by plugs, and their tightness is ensured by a steel lining. A model, on a scale of 1/20, made of microconcrete, was loaded in several cycles, by a uniform inner pressure in the cavities, increasing to the point of failure. The three successive stages were examined: stage of globally elastic behavior, cracking stage, ultimate stage. The behavior of the model is globally elastic up to an inner pressure of 120 to 130 kp/cm 2 , corresponding to about twice the maximum pressure of service, equal to 65 kp/cm 2 . The prestressed tendons at this stage show practically no stress increase. The first detectable cracks appear on the lateral side half-way up the model, as soon as the pressure exceeded 120 kp/cm 2 . From 150-165 kp/cm 2 , the cracking stage can be considered as achieved and the main crack pattern entirely formed. A horizontal crack continues in the middle of the barrel, as well as vertical cracks at each outer cavity. Beyond a pressure of 150-165 kp/cm 2 the ultimate stage begins. The strains of the stresses in the tendons grow more rapidly. The steel lining is highly solicited. Above about 210 kp/cm 2 the model behaves like a structure composed of a group of concrete blocks bound by the tendons and the lining. The failure (240 kp/cm 2 ) occurred through a mechanism of ejection and bending of the concrete ring at the periphery of the barrel of the vessel, which was solicited mainly in tension

  6. Ferruleless coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube cold-test characteristics simulated with micro-SOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Dana L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional, electromagnetic circuit analysis code, Micro-SOS, can be used to reduce expensive and time consuming experimental 'cold-testing' of traveling-wave tube (TWT) circuits. The frequency-phase dispersion and beam interaction impedance characteristics of a ferruleless coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit were simulated using the code. Computer results agree closely with experimental data. Variations in the cavity geometry dimensions of period length and gap-to-period ratio were modeled. These variations can be used in velocity taper designs to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) phase velocity in synchronism with the decelerating electron beam. Such circuit designs can result in enhanced TWT power and efficiency.

  7. The Prototype Fundamental Power Coupler For The Spallation Neutron Source Superconducting Cavities: Design And Initial Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. M. Wilson; I. E. Campisi; E. F. Daly; G. K. Davis; M. Drury; J. E. Henry; P. Kneisel; G. Myneni; T. Powers; W. J. Schneider; M. Stirbet; Y. Kang; K. Cummings; T. Hardek

    2001-01-01

    Each of the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is powered via a coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) with a 50 Omega impedance and a warm planar alumina window. The design is derived from the experience of other laboratories; in particular, a number of details are based on the coupler developed for the KEK B-Factory superconducting cavities. However, other design features have been modified to account for the fact that the SNS FPC will transfer a considerably lower average power than the KEK-B coupler. Four prototypes have been manufactured so far, and preliminary tests performed on two of them at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). During these tests, peak powers of over 500 kW were transferred through the couplers in the test stand designed and built for this purpose. This paper gives details of the coupler design and of the results obtained from the RF tests on the test stand during the last few months. A more comprehensive set of tests is planned for the near future

  8. On sample size of the kruskal-wallis test with application to a mouse peritoneal cavity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chunpeng; Zhang, Donghui; Zhang, Cun-Hui

    2011-03-01

    As the nonparametric generalization of the one-way analysis of variance model, the Kruskal-Wallis test applies when the goal is to test the difference between multiple samples and the underlying population distributions are nonnormal or unknown. Although the Kruskal-Wallis test has been widely used for data analysis, power and sample size methods for this test have been investigated to a much lesser extent. This article proposes new power and sample size calculation methods for the Kruskal-Wallis test based on the pilot study in either a completely nonparametric model or a semiparametric location model. No assumption is made on the shape of the underlying population distributions. Simulation results show that, in terms of sample size calculation for the Kruskal-Wallis test, the proposed methods are more reliable and preferable to some more traditional methods. A mouse peritoneal cavity study is used to demonstrate the application of the methods. © 2010, The International Biometric Society.

  9. HOM (higher-order mode) test of the storage ring single-cell cavity with a 20-MeV e- beam for the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.

    1993-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of damping techniques of the APS storage ring single-cell cavity, a beamline has been designed and assembled to use the ANL Chemistry Division linac beam (20-MeV, FWHM of 20 ps). A single-cell cavity will be excited by the electron beam to investigate the effect on higher-order modes (HOMs) with and without coaxial dampers (H-loop damper, E-probe damper), and wideband aperture dampers. In order for the beam to propagate on- and off-center of the cavity, the beamline consists of two sections -- a beam collimating section and a cavity measurement section -- separated by two double Aluminum foil windows. RF cavity measurements were made with coupling loops and E-probes. The results are compared with both the TBCI calculations and 'cold' measurements with the bead-perturbation method. The data acquisition system and beam diagnostics will be described in a separate paper

  10. Upgrade of the cryogenic infrastructure of SM18, CERN main test facility for superconducting magnets and RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, A.; Dhalla, F.; Gayet, P.; Serio, L.

    2017-12-01

    SM18 is CERN main facility for testing superconducting accelerator magnets and superconducting RF cavities. Its cryogenic infrastructure will have to be significantly upgraded in the coming years, starting in 2019, to meet the testing requirements for the LHC High Luminosity project and for the R&D program for superconducting magnets and RF equipment until 2023 and beyond. This article presents the assessment of the cryogenic needs based on the foreseen test program and on past testing experience. The current configuration of the cryogenic infrastructure is presented and several possible upgrade scenarios are discussed. The chosen upgrade configuration is then described and the characteristics of the main newly required cryogenic equipment, in particular a new 35 g/s helium liquefier, are presented. The upgrade implementation strategy and plan to meet the required schedule are then described.

  11. Engineering, design and prototype tests of a 3.9 GHz transverse-mode superconducting cavity for a radiofrequency-separated kaon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark S. Champion et al.

    2001-01-01

    A research and development program is underway to construct superconducting cavities to be used for radiofrequency separation of a Kaon beam at Fermilab. The design calls for installation of twelve 13-cell cavities operating in the 3.9 GHz transverse mode with a deflection gradient of 5 MV/m. They present the mechanical, cryogenic and vacuum design of the cavity, cryomodule, rf power coupler, cold tuner and supporting hardware. The electromagnetic design of the cavity is presented in a companion paper by Wanzenberg and McAshan. The warm tuning system (for field flatness) and the vertical test system is presented along with test results of bench measurements and cold tests on single-cell and five-cell prototypes

  12. Test of small-scale central-core-cavity closure for a 300-MW(e) GCFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.C.; Dougan, J.R.; Naus, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    Under the Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel (PCRV) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, model tests are conducted to verify the design of the PCRV for a 300 MW(e) Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). Prominent features of the 1:20-scale central core cavity model included a close pitched array of fifty-five penetration tubes, forty-four segmented gusset/bearing plate assemblies, and intermeshed reinforcing steel. The closure model which was designed for a maximum cavity pressure (MCP) of 10.08 MPa was initially tested by applying 10 pressurization cycles from essentially no load to the MCP with strain and deflection data obtained during each cycle. This was followed by pressurization cycles to 32.8 MPa, 41.3 MPa, 48.3 MPa, 58.4 MPa and 79.3 MPa. At a pressure of 79.3 MPa an end cap on a penetration tube developed leaks and the test was terminated. An inelastic analysis was conducted to provide an estimate of the ultimate strength of the closure plug and to determine the potential mode of failure

  13. The LHC superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

    1999-01-01

    The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

  14. Testing of inductive output tube based RF amplifier for 650 MHz SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, A.; Som, S.; Manna, S.K.; Ghosh, S.; Seth, S.; Thakur, S.K.; Saha, S.; Panda, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    A 650 MHz IOT based RF amplifier has been developed in VECC. It can be used to power several cavity modules in high energy high current proton linear accelerator to be built for ADSS programme in India and in Project-X at Fermilab, USA. The IOT based amplifier requires different powers supplies, water cooling and forced air cooling for its operation. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based interlocks has been incorporated to take care of systematic on/off of the power supplies and driver amplifier, water flow, air flow and other interlocks for the safe operation of the RF System. In addition to that EPICS based RF operating console and data logging/monitoring system has been added. (author)

  15. A Laboratory Test Setup for in Situ Measurements of the Dielectric Properties of Catalyst Powder Samples under Reaction Conditions by Microwave Cavity Perturbation: Set up and Initial Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Dietrich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR of nitrogen oxides (NOX depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia.

  16. A laboratory test setup for in situ measurements of the dielectric properties of catalyst powder samples under reaction conditions by microwave cavity perturbation: set up and initial tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Markus; Rauch, Dieter; Porch, Adrian; Moos, Ralf

    2014-09-10

    The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOX) depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia.

  17. A high gradient test of a single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a feedback waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, Roman; Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Kazakov, Sergey; Wu, Genfa; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Rowe, Allan; Rathke, John

    2015-09-01

    The most severe problem of the international linear collider (ILC-type) is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the collider. In current technology, the maximum acceleration gradient in superconducting (SC) structures is determined mainly by the value of the surface RF magnetic field. In order to increase the gradient, a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure is suggested. Utilization of STWA structure with small phase advance per cell for future high energy linear colliders such as ILCs may provide an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 times larger [1] than a standing wave structure. However, STWA structure requires a feedback waveguide for power redirecting from the end of the structure back to the front end of accelerating structure. Recent tests of a 1.3 GHz model of a single-cell cavity with waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient of a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer [2]. In the present paper, high gradient test results are presented.

  18. Measurements of higher-order mode damping in the PEP-II low-power test cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Goldberg, D.A.

    1993-05-01

    The paper describes the results of measurements of the Higher-Order Mode (HOM) spectrum of the low-power test model of the PEP-II RF cavity and the reduction in the Q's of the modes achieved by the addition of dedicated damping waveguides. All the longitudinal (monopole) and deflecting (dipole) modes below the beam pipe cut-off are identified by comparing their measured frequencies and field distributions with calculations using the URMEL code. Field configurations were determined using a perturbation method with an automated bead positioning system. The loaded Q's agree well with the calculated values reported previously, and the strongest HOMs are damped by more than three orders of magnitude. This is sufficient to reduce the coupled-bunch growth rates to within the capability of a reasonable feedback system. A high power test cavity will now be built to validate the thermal design at the 150 kW nominal operating level, as described elsewhere at this conference

  19. Cryogenic testing of the 2.1 GHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terrence L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results from cryogenic tests of the multi-cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving high average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery-linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam break-up instability, caused by parasitic higher order modes (HOMs) interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The multi-cell cavity was designed and fabricated of niobium. Two cryogenic (vertical) tests were conducted. The high unloaded Q-factor was demonstrated at a temperature of 4.2 K at accelerating gradients up to 3 MV/m. The measured value of the unloaded Q-factor was 1.55 × 108, in agreement with prediction.

  20. Testing of super conducting low-beta 704 Mhz cavities at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate in view of SPL- first results

    CERN Document Server

    Höfle, W; Lollierou, J; Valuch, D; Chel, S; Devanz, G; Desmons, M; Piquet, O; Paparella, R; Pierini, P

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the preparatory phase for the luminosity upgrade of the LHC (SLHC-PP ) it is foreseen to characterize two superconducting RF cavities and demonstrate compliance of the required SPL field stability in amplitude and phase using a prototype LLRF system. We report on the preparation for testing of two superconducting low-beta cavities at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate including the setting-up of the low level RF control system to evaluate the performance of the piezo-tuning system and cavity field stability in amplitude and phase. Results from tests with 50 Hz pulse repetition rate are presented. Simulations of the RF system will be used to predict the necessary specifications for power and bandwidth to control the cavity field and derive specifications for the RF system and its control. Exemplary results of the simulation are presented.

  1. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  2. A final report on the Phase 1 testing of a molten-salt cavity receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, J M [ed.; Smith, D C [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Barberton, OH (United States). Nuclear Equipment Div.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and testing of a solar central receiver using molten nitrate salt as a heat exchange fluid. Design studies for large commercial plants (30--100 MWe) have shown molten salt to be an excellent fluid for solar thermal plants as it allows for efficient thermal storage. Plant design studies concluded that an advanced receiver test was required to address uncertainties not covered in prior receiver tests. This recommendation led to the current test program managed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy. The 4.5 MWt receiver is installed at Sandia National Laboratories' Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The receiver incorporates features of large commercial receiver designs. This report describes the receiver's configuration, heat absorption surface (design and sizing), the structure and supporting systems, and the methods for control. The receiver was solar tested during a six-month period at the Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. The purpose of the testing was to characterize the operational capabilities of the receiver under a number of solar operating and stand-by conditions. This testing consisted of initial check-out of the systems, followed by steady-state performance, transient receiver operation, receiver operation in clouds, receiver thermal loss testing, receiver start-up operation, and overnight thermal conditioning tests. This report describes the design, fabrication, and results of testing of the receiver.

  3. High gradient RF test results of S-band and C-band cavities for medical linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiovanni, A.; Bonomi, R.; Garlasché, M.; Verdú-Andrés, S.; Wegner, R.; Amaldi, U.

    2018-05-01

    TERA Foundation has proposed and designed hadrontherapy facilities based on novel linacs, i.e. high gradient linacs which accelerate either protons or light ions. The overall length of the linac, and therefore its cost, is almost inversely proportional to the average accelerating gradient. With the scope of studying the limiting factors for high gradient operation and to optimize the linac design, TERA, in collaboration with the CLIC Structure Development Group, has conducted a series of high gradient experiments. The main goals were to study the high gradient behavior and to evaluate the maximum gradient reached in 3 and 5.7 GHz structures to direct the design of medical accelerators based on high gradient linacs. This paper summarizes the results of the high power tests of 3.0 and 5.7 GHz single-cell cavities.

  4. Model to Test Electric Field Comparisons in a Composite Fairing Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Burford, Janessa

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This study shows cumulative distribution function (CDF) comparisons of composite a fairing electromagnetic field data obtained by computational electromagnetic 3D full wave modeling and laboratory testing. This work is an extension of the bare aluminum fairing perfect electric conductor (PEC) model. Test and model data correlation is shown.

  5. Project Rio Blanco: project scientist's summary report of production test data and preliminary analysis of top chimney/cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, J.

    1975-03-01

    The reentry drilling established communication with the top Rio Blanco detonation region at a depth of 1704 meters, or about 76 meters above the top detonation center. A total of 2.8 x 10 6 m 3 of dry gas at standard conditions has now been produced during two separate test periods. Radioactive and chemical analysis of this gas and the modeling of the stimulated reservoir shows the following main results: (1) No permeable connection exists between the top and the middle detonation regions, since no significant amount of the tracer incorporated in the center explosive canister was detected in the produced gas. As a consequence, results for the top detonation region only are available at this time. (2) The initial cavity radius is deduced to be 20 m or well within expectations. (3) Integration of the 85 Kr produced indicates a yield of 34 +- 3 kt for the top explosive. (4) Of the approximately 1000 Ci of tritium produced in the top explosion region, about 5 percent is incorporated in the gas phase. (5) Pressure drawdown and buildup data are best reproduced by a two-layer reservoir model showing stimulated permeabilities about 10 and 30 times original formation permeabilities, and extending to a distance of about three cavity radii from the wellbore. (6) The capacity of the reservoir intercepted by the top explosive is deduced to be about 0.2 millidarcy-meters, as contrasted with preshot estimates ranging from 1.3 md-m to 2.3 md-m. (U.S.)

  6. Rotating optical cavity experiment testing Lorentz invariance at the 10-17 level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S.; Senger, A.; Moehle, K.; Nagel, M.; Kovalchuk, E. V.; Peters, A.

    2009-01-01

    We present an improved laboratory test of Lorentz invariance in electrodynamics by testing the isotropy of the speed of light. Our measurement compares the resonance frequencies of two orthogonal optical resonators that are implemented in a single block of fused silica and are rotated continuously on a precision air bearing turntable. An analysis of data recorded over the course of one year sets a limit on an anisotropy of the speed of light of Δc/c∼1x10 -17 . This constitutes the most accurate laboratory test of the isotropy of c to date and allows to constrain parameters of a Lorentz violating extension of the standard model of particle physics down to a level of 10 -17 .

  7. Sci-Sat AM: Radiation Dosimetry and Practical Therapy Solutions - 05: Not all geometries are equivalent for magnetic field Fano cavity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkov, Victor N.; Rogers, David W.O. [Carleton University (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    The coupling of MRI and radiation treatment systems for the application of magnetic resonance guided radiation therapy necessitates a reliable magnetic field capable Monte Carlo (MC) code. In addition to the influence of the magnetic field on dose distributions, the question of proper calibration has arisen due to the several percent variation of ion chamber and solid state detector responses in magnetic fields when compared to the 0 T case (Reynolds et al., Med Phys, 2013). In the absence of a magnetic field, EGSnrc has been shown to pass the Fano cavity test (a rigorous benchmarking tool of MC codes) at the 0.1 % level (Kawrakow, Med.Phys, 2000), and similar results should be required of magnetic field capable MC algorithms. To properly test such developing MC codes, the Fano cavity theorem has been adapted to function in a magnetic field (Bouchard et al., PMB, 2015). In this work, the Fano cavity test is applied in a slab and ion-chamber-like geometries to test the transport options of an implemented magnetic field algorithm in EGSnrc. Results show that the deviation of the MC dose from the expected Fano cavity theory value is highly sensitive to the choice of geometry, and the ion chamber geometry appears to pass the test more easily than larger slab geometries. As magnetic field MC codes begin to be used for dose simulations and correction factor calculations, care must be taken to apply the most rigorous Fano test geometries to ensure reliability of such algorithms.

  8. Laboratory testing of joints between windows and highly insulated cavity walls. Investigations of tightness against rain and wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjaer, A

    1983-10-01

    In the Danish energy research programme, 1EFP 80, a number of laboratory tests have been carried out on models of highly insulated cavity brick walls in order to study rain- and wind tightness of the joints between windows and such walls. Tests have been carried out with joints tightened only with a rain barrier as well as with joints according to the two stage joint principle. In the exterior part of the joint has in both cases been used a mortar, and expanding gasket, an EPDM-profile and wooden battens. Further an experiment has been carried out on a plastic window, where mastic was used as well in the exterior as the interior part of the joint. The findings were that a two-stage joint gives the best performance as well regarding air tightness as rain tightness. Further the experiments have shown that a window frame should have a depth of at least 90 mm in order to design a joint between window and wall, which is satisfactory as well regarding thermal insulation as resistance to rain and wind.

  9. An acetone breath analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy: an initial test with human subjects under various situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuji; Surampudi, Anand B

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a portable breath acetone analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS). The instrument was initially tested by measuring the absorbance of breath gases at a single wavelength (266 nm) from 32 human subjects under various conditions. A background subtraction method, implemented to obtain absorbance differences, from which an upper limit of breath acetone concentration was obtained, is described. The upper limits of breath acetone concentration in the four Type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects, tested after a 14 h overnight fast, range from 0.80 to 3.97 parts per million by volume (ppmv), higher than the mean acetone concentration (0.49 ppmv) in non-diabetic healthy breath reported in the literature. The preliminary results show that the instrument can tell distinctive differences between the breath from individuals who are healthy and those with T1D. On-line monitoring of breath gases in healthy people post-exercise, post-meals and post-alcohol-consumption was also conducted. This exploratory study demonstrates the first CRDS-based acetone breath analyzer and its potential application for point-of-care, non-invasive, diabetic monitoring

  10. Superconducting TESLA cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aune

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with an accelerating gradient of E_{acc}≥25 MV/m at a quality factor Q_{0}≥5×10^{9}. The design goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF linac was set to the more moderate value of E_{acc}≥15 MV/m. In a first series of 27 industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} was measured to be 20.1±6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering from serious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTF cavities, additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular, an eddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusions and stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. The average gradient of these cavities at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} amounts to 25.0±3.2 MV/m with the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only a moderate improvement in production and preparation techniques will be needed to meet the ambitious TESLA goal with an adequate safety margin. In this paper we present a detailed description of the design, fabrication, and preparation of the TESLA Test Facility cavities and their associated components and report on cavity performance in test cryostats and with electron beam in the TTF linac. The ongoing research and development towards higher gradients is briefly addressed.

  11. High-Gradient Test of a 3 GHz Single-Cell Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, S; Bonomi, R; Degiovanni, A; Garlasché, M; Garonna, A; Mellace, C; Pearce, P; S. Verdú-Andrés; Wegner, R

    2010-01-01

    Pro­ton and car­bon ion beams pre­sent ad­van­ta­geous depth-dose dis­tri­bu­tions with re­spect to X-rays. Car­bon ions allow a bet­ter con­trol of "ra­diore­sis­tant" tu­mours due to their high­er bi­o­log­i­cal re­sponse. For deep-seat­ed tu­mours pro­ton and car­bon ion beams of some nA and en­er­gies of about 200 MeV and 400 MeV/u re­spec­tive­ly are need­ed. For these ap­pli­ca­tions TERA pro­posed the "cy­clinac": a high-fre­quen­cy linac which boosts the hadrons ac­cel­er­at­ed by a cy­clotron. The di­men­sions of the com­plex can be re­duced if high­er ac­cel­er­at­ing gra­di­ents are achieved in the linac. To test the max­i­mum achiev­able fields, a 3 GHz cav­i­ty has been built by TERA. The 19 mm-long cell is fore­seen to be ex­cit­ed at 200 Hz by 3 us RF puls­es and should reach a 40 MV/m ac­cel­er­at­ing gra­di­ent, which cor­re­sponds to a peak sur­face elec­tric field Es of 260 MV/m. In a first high-pow­er test per­for...

  12. High power tests of an electroforming cavity operating at 11.424 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgashev, V. A.; Gatti, G.; Higashi, Y.; Leonardi, O.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Marcelli, A.; Rosenzweig, J.; Spataro, B.; Tantawi, S. G.; Yeremian, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    The achievement of ultra high accelerating gradients is mandatory in order to fabricate compact accelerators at 11.424 GHz for scientific and industrial applications. An extensive experimental and theoretical program to determine a reliable ultra high gradient operation of the future linear accelerators is under way in many laboratories. In particular, systematic studies on the 11.424 GHz frequency accelerator structures, R&D on new materials and the associated microwave technology are in progress to achieve accelerating gradients well above 120 MeV/m. Among the many, the electroforming procedure is a promising approach to manufacture high performance RF devices in order to avoid the high temperature brazing and to produce precise RF structures. We report here the characterization of a hard high gradient RF accelerating structure at 11.424 GHz fabricated using the electroforming technique. Low-level RF measurements and high power RF tests carried out at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on this prototype are presented and discussed. In addition, we present also a possible layout where the water-cooling of irises based on the electroforming process has been considered for the first time.

  13. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  14. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  15. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  16. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients E_{acc} up to 35  MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP and up to 42  MV/m after electropolishing (EP. More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients E_{acc} of 30–35  MV/m were measured after BCP and E_{acc} up to 40  MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of E_{acc}=30–35  MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and

  17. Design, Construction, and Initial Test of High Spatial Resolution Thermometry Arrays for Detection of Surface Temperature Profiles on SRF Cavities in Super Fluid Helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Grigory Eremeev

    2011-07-01

    We designed and built two high resolution (0.6-0.55mm special resolution [1.1-1.2mm separation]) thermometry arrays prototypes out of the Allen Bradley 90-120 ohm 1/8 watt resistor to measure surface temperature profiles on SRF cavities. One array was designed to be physically flexible and conform to any location on a SRF cavity; the other was modeled after the common G-10/stycast 2850 thermometer and designed to fit on the equator of an ILC (Tesla 1.3GHz) SRF cavity. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each array and their construction. In addition we will present a case study of the arrays performance on a real SRF cavity TB9NR001. TB9NR001 presented a unique opportunity to test the performance of each array as it contained a dual (4mm separation) cat eye defect which conventional methods such as OST (Oscillating Superleak second-sound Transducers) and full coverage thermometry mapping were unable to distinguish between. We will discuss the new arrays ability to distinguish between the two defects and their preheating performance.

  18. Multipactors in klystron cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kazutaka; Iyeki, Hiroshi; Kikunaga, Toshiyuki.

    1993-01-01

    A multipactor phenomenon in a klystron causes gain shortage or instability problem. Some tests using a prototype klystron input cavity revealed the microwave discharges in vacuum with magnetic field. The test results and the methods to avoid multipactors are discussed in this paper. (author)

  19. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  20. Improvement of cavity performance in the Saclay/Cornell/DESY's SC cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kako, E.; Noguchi, S.; Ono, M.

    2000-01-01

    Development of 1.3 GHz Nb superconducting cavities for TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) has been carried out with international collaboration. Three Saclay single-cell cavities, one Cornell two-cell cavity and one DESY nine-cell cavity were sent to KEK in order to compare the cavity performance. These cavities were tested at KEK after the following surface treatment: 1) high pressure rinsing, HPR, 2) chemical polishing and HPR, 3) electropolishing and HPR. The test results, especially, improvement of the cavity performance due to electropolishing are reported in this paper. (author)

  1. Using dynamic N-mixture models to test cavity limitation on northern flying squirrel demographic parameters using experimental nest box supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priol, Pauline; Mazerolle, Marc J; Imbeau, Louis; Drapeau, Pierre; Trudeau, Caroline; Ramière, Jessica

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic N-mixture models have been recently developed to estimate demographic parameters of unmarked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. We propose an application of the Dail and Madsen (2011: Biometrics, 67, 577-587) dynamic N-mixture model in a manipulative experiment using a before-after control-impact design (BACI). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis of cavity limitation of a cavity specialist species, the northern flying squirrel, using nest box supplementation on half of 56 trapping sites. Our main purpose was to evaluate the impact of an increase in cavity availability on flying squirrel population dynamics in deciduous stands in northwestern Québec with the dynamic N-mixture model. We compared abundance estimates from this recent approach with those from classic capture-mark-recapture models and generalized linear models. We compared apparent survival estimates with those from Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models. Average recruitment rate was 6 individuals per site after 4 years. Nevertheless, we found no effect of cavity supplementation on apparent survival and recruitment rates of flying squirrels. Contrary to our expectations, initial abundance was not affected by conifer basal area (food availability) and was negatively affected by snag basal area (cavity availability). Northern flying squirrel population dynamics are not influenced by cavity availability at our deciduous sites. Consequently, we suggest that this species should not be considered an indicator of old forest attributes in our study area, especially in view of apparent wide population fluctuations across years. Abundance estimates from N-mixture models were similar to those from capture-mark-recapture models, although the latter had greater precision. Generalized linear mixed models produced lower abundance estimates, but revealed the same relationship between abundance and snag basal area. Apparent survival estimates from N-mixture models were higher and less precise

  2. SU-E-T-180: Fano Cavity Test of Proton Transport in Monte Carlo Codes Running On GPU and Xeon Phi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, E; Sorriaux, J; Souris, K; Lee, J; Vynckier, S; Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In proton dose calculation, clinically compatible speeds are now achieved with Monte Carlo codes (MC) that combine 1) adequate simplifications in the physics of transport and 2) the use of hardware architectures enabling massive parallel computing (like GPUs). However, the uncertainties related to the transport algorithms used in these codes must be kept minimal. Such algorithms can be checked with the so-called “Fano cavity test”. We implemented the test in two codes that run on specific hardware: gPMC on an nVidia GPU and MCsquare on an Intel Xeon Phi (60 cores). Methods: gPMC and MCsquare are designed for transporting protons in CT geometries. Both codes use the method of fictitious interaction to sample the step-length for each transport step. The considered geometry is a water cavity (2×2×0.2 cm 3 , 0.001 g/cm 3 ) in a 10×10×50 cm 3 water phantom (1 g/cm 3 ). CPE in the cavity is established by generating protons over the phantom volume with a uniform momentum (energy E) and a uniform intensity per unit mass I. Assuming no nuclear reactions and no generation of other secondaries, the computed cavity dose should equal IE, according to Fano's theorem. Both codes were tested for initial proton energies of 50, 100, and 200 MeV. Results: For all energies, gPMC and MCsquare are within 0.3 and 0.2 % of the theoretical value IE, respectively (0.1% standard deviation). Single-precision computations (instead of double) increased the error by about 0.1% in MCsquare. Conclusion: Despite the simplifications in the physics of transport, both gPMC and MCsquare successfully pass the Fano test. This ensures optimal accuracy of the codes for clinical applications within the uncertainties on the underlying physical models. It also opens the path to other applications of these codes, like the simulation of ion chamber response

  3. SU-E-T-180: Fano Cavity Test of Proton Transport in Monte Carlo Codes Running On GPU and Xeon Phi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterpin, E; Sorriaux, J; Souris, K; Lee, J; Vynckier, S [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Jia, X; Jiang, S [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In proton dose calculation, clinically compatible speeds are now achieved with Monte Carlo codes (MC) that combine 1) adequate simplifications in the physics of transport and 2) the use of hardware architectures enabling massive parallel computing (like GPUs). However, the uncertainties related to the transport algorithms used in these codes must be kept minimal. Such algorithms can be checked with the so-called “Fano cavity test”. We implemented the test in two codes that run on specific hardware: gPMC on an nVidia GPU and MCsquare on an Intel Xeon Phi (60 cores). Methods: gPMC and MCsquare are designed for transporting protons in CT geometries. Both codes use the method of fictitious interaction to sample the step-length for each transport step. The considered geometry is a water cavity (2×2×0.2 cm{sup 3}, 0.001 g/cm{sup 3}) in a 10×10×50 cm{sup 3} water phantom (1 g/cm{sup 3}). CPE in the cavity is established by generating protons over the phantom volume with a uniform momentum (energy E) and a uniform intensity per unit mass I. Assuming no nuclear reactions and no generation of other secondaries, the computed cavity dose should equal IE, according to Fano's theorem. Both codes were tested for initial proton energies of 50, 100, and 200 MeV. Results: For all energies, gPMC and MCsquare are within 0.3 and 0.2 % of the theoretical value IE, respectively (0.1% standard deviation). Single-precision computations (instead of double) increased the error by about 0.1% in MCsquare. Conclusion: Despite the simplifications in the physics of transport, both gPMC and MCsquare successfully pass the Fano test. This ensures optimal accuracy of the codes for clinical applications within the uncertainties on the underlying physical models. It also opens the path to other applications of these codes, like the simulation of ion chamber response.

  4. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Wastine, B.; Rella, C. W.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Delmotte, M.; Kazan, V.; Darding, M.; Lebègue, B.; Kaiser, C.; Xueref-Rémy, I.; Ramonet, M.

    2015-09-01

    To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about 10 years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments) and in the field (15 instruments). The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  5. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yver Kwok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about 10 years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments and in the field (15 instruments. The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  6. Upgraded cavities for the positron accumulator ring of the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Jiang, X.; Mangra, D.

    1997-01-01

    Upgraded versions of cavities for the APS positron accumulator ring (PAR) have been built and are being tested. Two cavities are in the PAR: a fundamental 9.8-MHz cavity and a twelfth harmonic 117.3-MHz cavity. Both cavities have been manufactured for higher voltage operation with improved Q-factors, reliability, and tuning capability. Both cavities employ current-controlled ferrite tuners for control of the resonant frequency. The harmonic cavity can be operated in either a pulsed mode or a CW mode. The rf properties of the cavities are presented

  7. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepke, K.

    1995-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.)

  8. Development of superconducting cavities at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, N.

    2001-01-01

    Development of superconducting (SC) cavities is continued for the high intensity proton accelerator in JAERI. In FY-1999, we carried out R and D work; (1) 2nd vertical test of β=0.886 single-cell cavity, (2) vertical test for observation of Q-disease without heat treatment after electropolishing, (3) vertical test of β=0.5 5-cell cavity, (4) pretuning, surface treatment and vertical test of β=0.886 5-cell cavity, (5) pulsed operation of β=0.886 single-cell cavity in the vertical test to confirm the validity of a new model calculation. This paper describes the present status of the R and D work for the SC cavities in JAERI. (author)

  9. Investigation of superconducting niobium 1170 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Bibko, S.I.; Fadeyev, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication and experiments with superconducting L-band single cell cavities are described. These cavities model a cell of an accelerating RF structure. The cavities have been fabricated from technical grade and higher purity grade sheet niobium using deep-drawing, electron beam welding and chemical polishing. They have spherical geometry and are excited in the TM 010 mode. A computerized set-up was used for cavity tests. Qo=1.5 x 10 9 and E acc = 4.3 MV/m were obtained in the cavity made of higher purity grade niobium. 6 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  10. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-01-01

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  11. Development of the L-band superconducting cavity system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, T.; Kakutani, N.; Sukenobu, S. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama, Kanagawa (JP)] [and others

    2000-02-01

    R and D activities on superconducting cavities in 1998 at TOSHIBA are presented. An L-band single-cell niobium cavity with four ports on the beam pipes was fabricated in our company and tested at KEK. The cryostat and refrigerator system for the cavity were designed and fabricated. The cryostat installed the cavity was tested in low temperature. R and D of hydroforming to fabricate seamless cavities is also presented. (author)

  12. Development of the L-band superconducting cavity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, T.; Kakutani, N.; Sukenobu, S.

    2000-01-01

    R and D activities on superconducting cavities in 1998 at TOSHIBA are presented. An L-band single-cell niobium cavity with four ports on the beam pipes was fabricated in our company and tested at KEK. The cryostat and refrigerator system for the cavity were designed and fabricated. The cryostat installed the cavity was tested in low temperature. R and D of hydroforming to fabricate seamless cavities is also presented. (author)

  13. Coupling of an overdriven cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbin, H.D.

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that when a nuclear test is conducted in a sufficiently large cavity, the resulting seismic signal is sharply reduced when compared to a normal tamped event. Cavity explosions are of interest in the seismic verification community because of this possibility of reducing the seismic energy generated which can lower signal amplitudes and make detection difficult. Reduced amplitudes would also lower seismic yield estimates which has implications in a Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT). In the past several years, there have been a number of nuclear tests at NTS (Nevada Test Site) inside hemispherical cavities. Two such tests were MILL YARD and MISTY ECHO which had instrumentation at the surface and in the free-field. These two tests differ in one important aspect. MILL YARD was completely decoupled i.e., the cavity wall behaved in an elastic manner. It was estimated that MILL YARD's ground motion was reduced by a factor of at least 70. In contrast, MISTY ECHO was detonated in a hemispherical cavity with the same dimensions as MILL YARD, but with a much larger device yield. This caused an inelastic behavior on the wall and the explosion was not fully decoupled

  14. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  15. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  16. Ex-vessel boiling experiments: laboratory- and reactor-scale testing of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention. Pt. II. Reactor-scale boiling experiments of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Slezak, S.E.; Pasedag, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., p.77-88 (1997). This paper summarizes the results of a reactor-scale ex-vessel boiling experiment for assessing the flooded cavity design of the heavy water new production reactor. The simulated reactor vessel has a cylindrical diameter of 3.7 m and a torispherical bottom head. Boiling outside the reactor vessel was found to be subcooled nucleate boiling. The subcooling mainly results from the gravity head, which in turn results from flooding the side of the reactor vessel. The boiling process exhibits a cyclic pattern with four distinct phases: direct liquid-solid contact, bubble nucleation and growth, coalescence, and vapor mass dispersion. The results show that, under prototypic heat load and heat flux distributions, the flooded cavity will be effective for in-vessel core retention in the heavy water new production reactor. The results also demonstrate that the heat dissipation requirement for in-vessel core retention, for the central region of the lower head of an AP-600 advanced light water reactor, can be met with the flooded cavity design. (orig.)

  17. European infrastructures for R&D and test of superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryo-modules

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    The volume is copyright CERN and can be distributed under CC-BY license. The need for a European facility to build and test superconducting RF accelerating structures and cryo‐modules (SRF test facility) was extensively discussed during the preparation of EuCARD [1,2]. It comprised a distributed network of equipment across Europe to be assessed and, if needed, completed by hardware. It also addressed the quest for a deeper basic understanding, a better control and optimisation of the manufacture of superconducting RF structures with the aim of a substantial improvement of the accelerating gradient, a reduction of its spread and a cost minimisation. However, consequent to EU budget restrictions, the proposal was not maintained. Instead, a more detailed analysis was requested by a sub‐task inside the EuCARD Network [3] AccNet ‐ RFTech [4]. The main objective of this “SRF sub‐task” consists of intensifying a collaborative effort between European accelerator labs. The aim focused on planning and later...

  18. Evaluation of Etest and macrodilution broth method for antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida sp strains isolated from oral cavities of AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVA Maria do Rosário R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of the Etest and the reference broth macrodilution susceptibility test for fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B was performed with 59 of Candida species isolated from the oral cavities of AIDS patients. The Etest method was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the reference method was performed according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards document M27-A guidelines. Our data showed that there was a good correlation between the MICs obtained by the Etest and broth dilution methods. When only the MIC results at ± 2 dilutions for both methods were considered, the agreement rates were 90.4% for itraconazole, ketoconazole and amphotericin B and 84.6% for fluconazole of the C. albicans tested. In contrast, to the reference method, the Etest method classified as susceptible three fluconazole-resistant isolates and one itraconazole-resistant isolate, representing four very major errors. These results indicate that Etest could be considered useful for antifungal sensitivity evaluation of yeasts in clinical laboratories.

  19. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorbom, B.N., E-mail: bsorbom@mit.edu; Ball, J.; Palmer, T.R.; Mangiarotti, F.J.; Sierchio, J.M.; Bonoli, P.; Kasten, C.; Sutherland, D.A.; Barnard, H.S.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Goh, J.; Sung, C.; Whyte, D.G.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • ARC reactor designed to have 500 MW fusion power at 3.3 m major radius. • Compact, simplified design allowed by high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • ARC has innovative plasma physics solutions such as inboardside RF launch. • High temperature superconductors allow high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • Liquid immersion blanket and jointed magnets greatly simplify tokamak reactor design. - Abstract: The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor is the product of a conceptual design study aimed at reducing the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a ∼200–250 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q{sub p} ≈ 13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ∼63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ∼23 T peak field on coil achievable with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External current drive is provided by two innovative inboard RF launchers using 25 MW of lower hybrid and 13.6 MW of ion cyclotron fast wave power. The resulting efficient current drive provides a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing fluorine lithium beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket is low-risk technology and provides effective neutron moderation and shielding, excellent

  20. CEBAF's SRF cavity manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benesch, J.F.; Reece, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Construction of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date. The accelerating structures in CEBAF are 169 pairs of 1.5 GHz superconducting rf cavities -- 9 pairs in an injector and 80 pairs each in two linacs. The beam is to be recirculated up to five passes through each linac. Data is presented on mechanical tolerances achieved by the industrial fabricator of the rf cavities (Siemens). Liquid helium leak rates integrated over 22 vacuum seals have been measured on over 110 cavity pairs. A roughly normal distribution of the log 10 (leak rate) is seen, centered about a rate of 10 -10.4 torr-l/s. Over 140 pairs of the cavities have been assembled and have completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Among these, 54% demonstrated usable accelerating gradients greater than 10 MV/m. Although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of 5 MV/m at Q 0 = 2.4x10 9 , the usual limiting phenomena are encountered: field emission, quenching, and occasional multipacting. A discussion of the occurrence conditions and severity of these phenomena during production cavity testing is presented. The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m

  1. Improved reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, L.R.; Demarchais, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A reactor pressure vessel disposed in a cavity has coolant inlet or outlet pipes extending through passages in the cavity walls and welded to pressure nozzles. The cavity wall has means for directing fluid away from a break at a weld away from the pressure vessel, and means for inhibiting flow of fluid toward the vessel. (author)

  2. Childhood Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cavity cancer in children is usually lymphoma or sarcoma, but most tumors of the mouth are benign. Get information about the risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, and treatment of oral cavity cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. The gastro-oesophageal common cavity revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, M. C.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    The manometric common cavity phenomenon has been used as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux of liquid or gaseous substances. Using combined pH and impedance recording as reference standard the value of a common cavity as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux was tested. Ten healthy male

  4. Superconducting rf cavities for accelerator application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proch, D.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a review of superconducting cavities for accelerator application (β = 1). The layout of a typical accelerating unit is described and important parameters are discussed. Recent cavity measurements and storage ring beam tests are reported and the present state of the art is summarized

  5. A study of beam position diagnostics with beam-excited dipole higher order modes using a downconverter test electronics in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P.; Baboi, N.; Lorbeer, B.; Wamsat, T.; Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M.; Jones, R.M.

    2012-08-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to de ne a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 m accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth dipole band, and a global resolution of 20 m over the complete module. Based on these results we decided to build a HOM electronics for the second dipole band and the fifth dipole band, so that we will have both high resolution measurements for the whole module, and localized measurements for individual cavity. The prototype electronics is being built by Fermilab and planned to be tested in FLASH by the end of 2012.

  6. A study of beam position diagnostics with beam-excited dipole higher order modes using a downconverter test electronics in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, N.; Lorbeer, B.; Wamsat, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Jones, R.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to de ne a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 m accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth dipole band, and a global resolution of 20 m over the complete module. Based on these results we decided to build a HOM electronics for the second dipole band and the fifth dipole band, so that we will have both high resolution measurements for the whole module, and localized measurements for individual cavity. The prototype electronics is being built by Fermilab and planned to be tested in FLASH by the end of 2012.

  7. Testing of methods for decontamination of stainless steels and carbon steels conformably to demountable equipment of nuclear power plant with WWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dergunova, G.M.; Nazarov, V.K.; Ozolin, A.B.; Smirnov, L.M.; Stel'mashuk, V.P.; Yulikov, E.I.; Vlasov, I.N.

    1978-01-01

    Results are given of experiments on decontamination of stainless steel by the oxidation-reduction method and also results of decontamination of carbon steel by means of solutions based on oxalic acid, citric acid and phosphoric acid. Investigations of efficiency of oxidation-reduction treatment were done on samples of stainless steel cut from the pipeline of the primary coolant circuit of reactor. Comparison is given of efficiency of oxidation-reduction methods of contamination of stainless steel in the case of application of different compositions of decontaminating solutions. Dependences are given for decontamination completeness on duration of operations, on temperature and on ratio of volume of decontaminating solutions to surface are of the sample. For carbon steels parameters are given for decontamination process by means of oxalic, citric and phosphoric acid solutions. (I.T.) [ru

  8. Tests of a niobium split-ring superconducting heavy ion accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Jaffey, A.H.; Khoe, T.K.; Olesen, M.C.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wesolowski, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A niobium split-ring accelerating structure designed for use in the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion energy booster was successfully tested. The superconducting resonator has a resonant frequency of 97 MHz and an optimum particle velocity β = 0.11. Ultimate performance is expected to be limited by peak surface fields, which in this structure are 4.7 E/sub a/ electric and 170 E/sub a/ (Gauss) magnetic, where E/sub a/ is the effective accelerating gradient in MV/m. The rf losses in two demountable superconducting joints severely limited performance in initial tests. Following independent measurements of the rf loss properties of several types of demountable joints, one demountable joint was eliminated and the other modified. Subsequently, the resonator could be operated continuously at E/sub a/ = 3.6 MV/m (corresponding to an energy gain of 1.3 MeV per charge) with 10W rf input power. Maximum field level was limited by electron loading. The mechanical stability of the resonator under operating conditions is excellent: vibration induced eigenfrequency noise is less than 120 Hz peak to peak, and the radiation pressure induced frequency shift is Δf/f = 1.6 x 10 -6 E/sub a/ 2

  9. Tests of a niobium split-ring superconducting heavy ion accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Jaffey, A.H.; Khoe, T.K.; Olesen, M.C.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wesolowski, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A niobium split-ring accelerating structure designed for use in the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion energy booster was successfully tested. The superconducting resonator has a resonant frequency of 97 MHz and an optimum particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.11. Ultimate performance is expected to be limited by peak surface fields, which in this structure are 4.7 E/sub a/ electric and 170 E/sub a/ (Gauss) magnetic, where E/sub a/ is the effective accelerating gradient in MV/m. The rf losses in two demountable superconducting joints severely limited performance in initial tests. Following independent measurements of the rf loss properties of several types of demountable joints, one demountable joint was eliminated and the other modified. Subsequently, the resonator could be operated continuously at E/sub a/ = 3.6 MV/m (corresponding to an energy gain of 1.3 MeV per charge) with 10W rf input power. Maximum field level was limited by electron loading. The mechanical stability of the resonator under operating conditions is excellent: vibration induced eigenfrequency noise is less than 120 Hz peak to peak, and the radiation pressure induced frequency shift is ..delta..f/f = 1.6 x 10/sup -6/ E/sub a//sup 2/.

  10. Automated Hydroforming of Seamless Superconducting RF Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Tomohiko; Shinozawa, Seiichi; Abe, Noriyuki; Nagakubo, Junki; Murakami, Hirohiko; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Hitoshi; Yamanaka, Masashi; Ueno, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    We are studying the possibility of automated hydroforming process for seamless superconducting RF cavities. Preliminary hydroforming tests of three-cell cavities from seamless tubes made of C1020 copper have been performed. The key point of an automated forming is to monitor and strictly control some parameters such as operation time, internal pressure and material displacements. Especially, it is necessary for our studies to be able to control axial and radial deformation independently. We plan to perform the forming in two stages to increase the reliability of successful forming. In the first stage hydroforming by using intermediate constraint dies, three-cell cavities were successfully formed in less than 1 minute. In parallel, we did elongation tests on cavity-quality niobium and confirmed that it is possible to achieve an elongation of >64% in 2 stages that is required for our forming of 1.3 GHz cavities.

  11. Performance test of a vertically-directed electric-field cavity resonator made for the rapid gelation apparatus with microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Shigeru; Ogawa, Toru; Hasegawa, Atsushi.

    1996-06-01

    A cavity resonator with vertically-directed electric field was produced and attached to 'the rapid gelation apparatus with microwave heating' previously reported. Using the rapid gelation apparatus, drops of a simulated solution and of U-containing solutions for internal gelation were heated. The results indicated that the heating required for gelation of the U-containing solutions was possible. However, the electric field strength in the cavity resonator at that time was comparable to that causing the discharge due to the gaseous ammonia released from the heated drops. As a result, gel microspheres were not obtained in a stable state. The discussion suggests that the stable gelation would be realized by improving the cavity resonator shape and/or by modifying the power supply accompanied with using a power stabilizer. (author)

  12. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  13. Present status of superconducting cavity developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Hasegawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-11-01

    An R and D work of a superconducting (SC) cavity for the high intensity proton linac has begun at JAERI in collaboration with KEK. The RF field calculation and the structural analysis have been made to determine the cavity shape in the proton energy range between 100 and 1500 MeV. The results indicate the feasibility of a SC proton linac. A vertical test stand with clean room, water rinsing system, cavity evacuation pumping system, cryostat and data acquisition system has been installed to demonstrate the cavity performance. A single cell cavity of {beta}=0.5 has been fabricated and tested at the test stand to obtain the Q-value and the maximum surface electric field strength. The measured Q-values have been found to be high enough for our requirement while the field strength was limited to about 75% of the specification by the multipacting. We describe the preliminary design of the SC cavity, the overview of the vertical test stand and experimental results of the single cell cavity. (author)

  14. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  15. New achievements in RF cavity manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, G.; Pimiskern, K.; Kaiser, H.

    1993-01-01

    Dornier has been engaged in development, manufacturing and testing of Cu-, Cu/Nb- and Nb-cavities for many years. Recently, several different types of RF cavities were manufactured. A prototype superconducting (s.c.) B-Factory accelerating cavity (1-cell, 500 MHz) was delivered to Cornell University, Laboratory of Nuclear Studies. A second lot of 6 s.c. cavities (20-cell, 3000 MHz) was fabricated on contract from Technical University of Darmstadt for the S-DALINAC facility. Finally, the first copper RF structures (9-cell, 1300 MHz) for TESLA were finished and delivered to DESY, two s.c. niobium structures of the same design are in production. Highlights from the manufacturing processes of these cavities are described and first performance results will be reported

  16. Ferrite measurements for SNS accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendall, R.G.; Church, R.A.

    1979-03-01

    The RF system for the SNS has six double accelerating cavities each containing seventy ferrite toroids. Difficulties experienced in obtaining toroids to the required specifications are discussed and the two toroid test cavity built to test those supplied is described. Ferrite measurements are reported which were undertaken to measure; (a) μQf as a function of frequency and RF field level and (b) bias current as a function of frequency for different ranges of ferrite permeability μ. (U.K.)

  17. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  18. Performance experience with the CEBAF SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Drury, M.; Hovater, C.; Mammosser, J.; Preble, J.

    1995-01-01

    The full complement of 169 pairs of niobium superconducting cavities has been installed in the CEBAF accelerator. This paper surveys the performance characteristics of these cavities in vertical tests, commissioning in the tunnel, and operational experience to date. Although installed performance exceeds specifications, and 3.2 GeV beam has been delivered on target, present systems do not consistently preserve the high performance obtained in vertical dewar tests as operational capability. Principal sources of these limitations are discussed

  19. Design of half-reentrant SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meidlinger, M.; Grimm, T.L.; Hartung, W.

    2006-01-01

    The shape of a TeSLA inner cell can be improved to lower the peak surface magnetic field at the expense of a higher peak surface electric field by making the cell reentrant. Such a single-cell cavity was designed and tested at Cornell, setting a world record accelerating gradient [V. Shemelin et al., An optimized shape cavity for TESLA: concept and fabrication, 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, Travemuende, Germany, September 8-12, 2003; R. Geng, H. Padamsee, Reentrant cavity and first test result, Pushing the Limits of RF Superconductivity Workshop, Argonne National Laboratory, September 22-24, 2004]. However, the disadvantage to a cavity is that liquids become trapped in the reentrant portion when it is vertically hung during high pressure rinsing. While this was overcome for Cornell's single-cell cavity by flipping it several times between high pressure rinse cycles, this may not be feasible for a multi-cell cavity. One solution to this problem is to make the cavity reentrant on only one side, leaving the opposite wall angle at six degrees for fluid drainage. This idea was first presented in 2004 [T.L. Grimm et al., IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 15(6) (2005) 2393]. Preliminary designs of two new half-reentrant (HR) inner cells have since been completed, one at a high cell-to-cell coupling of 2.1% (high-k cc HR) and the other at 1.5% (low-k cc HR). The parameters of a HR cavity are comparable to a fully reentrant cavity, with the added benefit that a HR cavity can be easily cleaned with current technology

  20. Superconducting cavity development at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore pursuing a program on 'R and D Activities for High Energy Proton Linac based Spallation Neutron Source'. Spallation neutron source (SNS) facility will provide high flux pulse neutrons for research in the areas of condensed matter physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and engineering. This will complement the existing synchrotron light source facility, INDUS-2 at RRCAT and reactor based neutron facilities at BARC. RRCAT is also participating in approved mega project on 'Physics and Advanced Technology for High Intensity Proton Accelerator' to support activities of Indian Institutions - Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC). The SNS facility will have a 1 GeV superconducting proton injector linac and 1 GeV accumulator ring. The linac will comprise of large number of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at different RF frequencies housed in suitable cryomodules. Thus, an extensive SCRF cavity infrastructure setup is being established. In addition, a scientific and technical expertise are also being developed for fabrication, processing and testing of the SCRF cavities for series production. The paper presents the status of superconducting cavity development at RRCAT

  1. Cavity design programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous computer programs are available to help accelerator physicists and engineers model and design accelerator cavities and other microwave components. This article discusses the problems these programs solve and the principles upon which these programs are based. Some examples of how these programs are used in the design of accelerator cavities are also given

  2. Cavity quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, Herbert; Varcoe, Benjamin T H; Englert, Berthold-Georg; Becker, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the work on cavity quantum electrodynamics of free atoms. In recent years, cavity experiments have also been conducted on a variety of solid-state systems resulting in many interesting applications, of which microlasers, photon bandgap structures and quantum dot structures in cavities are outstanding examples. Although these phenomena and systems are very interesting, discussion is limited here to free atoms and mostly single atoms because these systems exhibit clean quantum phenomena and are not disturbed by a variety of other effects. At the centre of our review is the work on the one-atom maser, but we also give a survey of the entire field, using free atoms in order to show the large variety of problems dealt with. The cavity interaction can be separated into two main regimes: the weak coupling in cavity or cavity-like structures with low quality factors Q and the strong coupling when high-Q cavities are involved. The weak coupling leads to modification of spontaneous transitions and level shifts, whereas the strong coupling enables one to observe a periodic exchange of photons between atoms and the radiation field. In this case, atoms and photons are entangled, this being the basis for a variety of phenomena observed, some of them leading to interesting applications in quantum information processing. The cavity experiments with free atoms reached a new domain with the advent of experiments in the visible spectral region. A review on recent achievements in this area is also given

  3. Formation of coronal cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, C.H.; Suess, S.T.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Steinolfson, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical study of the formation of a coronal cavity and its relation to a quiescent prominence is presented. It is argued that the formation of a cavity is initiated by the condensation of plasma which is trapped by the coronal magnetic field in a closed streamer and which then flows down to the chromosphere along the field lines due to lack of stable magnetic support against gravity. The existence of a coronal cavity depends on the coronal magnetic field strength; with low strength, the plasma density is not high enough for condensation to occur. Furthermore, we suggest that prominence and cavity material is supplied from the chromospheric level. Whether a coronal cavity and a prominence coexist depends on the magnetic field configuration; a prominence requires stable magnetic support

  4. Performance of TESLA Cavities After Fabrication and Preparation in Industry

    CERN Document Server

    Pekeler, Michael; Bauer, Stefan; Knobloch, Jens; Vom Stein, Peter

    2005-01-01

    In order to demonstrate cw operation of TESLA cavities in linear accelerators driving FEL applications, two TESLA cavities were manufactured and prepared by ACCEL for BESSY. After production, both cavities were prepared for vertical test at ACCEL's premises using state of the art chemical polishing and high pressure water rinsing techniques. The cavities were tested in DESY's vertical RF test installation. Accelerating gradients close to 25 MV/m were reached. One cavity was completed with a helium vessel modified for cw operation and prepared with chemical polishing, high pressure water rinsing, and assembled with the required High Power Coupler at ACCEL. The fully dressed cavity was then shipped under vacuum to BESSY and tested in the horizontal cryostat HoBiCaT. Horizontal RF test results will be presented and compared with the vertical test results.

  5. Perturbed Partial Cavity Drag Reduction at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makiharju, Simo; Elbing, Brian; Wiggins, Andrew; Dowling, David; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven

    2010-11-01

    Ventilated partial cavities were investigated at Reynolds numbers to 80 million. These cavities could be suitable for friction drag reduction on ocean going vessels and thereby lead to environmental and economical benefits. The test model was a 3.05 m wide by 12.9 m long flat plate, with a 0.18 m backward-facing step and a cavity-terminating beach, which had an adjustable slope, tilt and height. The step and beach trapped a ventilated partial cavity over the longitudinal mid-section of the model. Large-scale flow perturbations, mimicking the effect of ambient ocean waves were investigated. For the conditions tested a cavity could be maintained under perturbed flow conditions when the gas flux supplied was greater than the minimum required to maintain a cavity under steady conditions, with larger perturbations requiring more excess gas flux to maintain the cavity. High-speed video was used to observe the unsteady three dimensional cavity closure, the overall cavity shape, and the cavity oscillations. Cavities with friction drag reduction exceeding 95% were attained at optimal conditions. A simplified energy cost-benefit analysis of partial cavity drag reduction was also performed. The results suggest that PCDR could potentially lead to energy savings.

  6. RF cavity evaluation with the code SUPERFISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, T.; Nakanishi, T.; Ueda, N.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code SUPERFISH calculates axisymmetric rf fields and is most applicable to re-entrant cavities of an Alvarez linac. Some sample results are shown for the first Alvarez's in NUMATRON project. On the other hand the code can also be effectivily applied to TE modes excited in an RFQ linac when the cavity is approximately considered as positioning at an infinite distance from the symmetry axis. The evaluation was made for several RFQ cavities, models I, II and a test linac named LITL, and useful results for the resonator design were obtained. (author)

  7. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  8. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  9. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  10. High Accelerating Field Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, R. S.; Saito, K.; Furuta, F.; Saeki, T.; Inoue, H.; Morozumi, Y.; Higo, T.; Higashi, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Kazakov, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Ueno, K.; Sato, M.

    2008-06-01

    We have conducted a study of a series of single cell superconducting RF cavities at KEK. These tests were designed to investigate the effect of surface treatment on the maximum accelerating field attainable. All of these cavities are of the ICHIRO shape, based on the Low Loss shape. Our results indicate that accelerating fields as high as the theoretical maximum of 50MV/m are attainable.

  11. Compression Pad Cavity Heating Augmentation on Orion Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle heat shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  12. Use of Verbal Descriptors, Thermal Scores and Electrical Pulp Testing Scores as Predictors of Tooth Pain Before and After Application of Benzocaine Gels into Cavities of Teeth with Pulpitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangarosa, Louis P.; Ciarlone, Alfred E.; Neaverth, Elmer J.; Johnston, Carey A.; Snowden, J. Douglas; Thompson, William O.

    1989-01-01

    A double-blind pilot study was conducted on 27 consenting human volunteers who had irreversible pulpitis associated with persistent toothache pain from open carious lesions. Formulations tested contained either 0, 10%, or 20% benzocaine and were identified only by a numbered code. Before the experiment started, a small amount of a known 5% benzocaine gel was placed for 1 minute on the tongue of each patient to assure a sensation of numbness within the oral cavity. Then the test tooth was washed with a gentle stream of warm water and dried with gauze. A randomly selected test medication was placed into the open cavity and around the gingival margins for 5 minutes. Pre- and posttreatment tests were conducted at the following timed intervals: 0, 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes. The tests included degree of pain (rated: 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe); electrical pulp testing (EPT) by a modified, voltage-ramping instrument; and ice water testing (0.5 mL directed quickly onto sound enamel of the tooth and rated: 0 to 4, with 4 being intolerable). After testing, or when pain returned to baseline, endodontic procedures were performed. There was a significant increase (p pulpitis and control teeth, 3) there were no correlations between direction of EPT scores and pain relief, 4) cold water testing was a good predictor of whether or not a tooth had pulpitis, and 5) changes in cold water testing scores after treatment could not be correlated to relief of pain according to verbal descriptors. The effectiveness of benzocaine in relieving toothache pain verifies previous studies; however, a difference between 10% and 20% benzocaine could not be demonstrated probably because of two factors: 1) the present experiment had a small sample size, and 2) there was no direct measurement of duration of local anesthesia. PMID:2490060

  13. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; Molendijk, John; Timko, Helga; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently configured for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would exceed the peak klystron power and lead to saturation. A new scheme has therefore been proposed: for beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam will not be corrected (transient beam loading), but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point will be adapted for each bunch. The goal of this MD was to test a new algorithm that would adjust the voltage set point to achieve the cavity phase modulation that would minimize klystron forward power.

  14. Preparation and handling of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Takaaki

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines the recent preparation methods for superconducting cavities used in various laboratories and universities, and reports the problems of the cavity fabrication at KEK as an example of mass production. Preparation and handling are first addressed, focusing on material, fabrication, surface treatment, rinsing, clean environment, and heat treatment. Cavity production at KEK is then described, centering on defects on the surface and clean environments. Field gradients of more than 20 MV/m have been obtained by 1.5-3 GHz single cavities, for multi-cell cavities Eacc of 10 MV/m are available at any frequency range. The successful construction of thirty-two cavities for TRISTAN at KEK is due to the careful checking of the surface and quality control of all processes against the surface defects and contaminations. Eacc of 5 MV/m has been achieved by 94 % of the TRISTAN cavities at the first cold test, but 6 % of them had to be reworked because of the surface defects. These defects could not be detected by an X-ray photograph or visual inspections during the fabrication processes. (N.K.)

  15. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  16. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  17. Statistical electromagnetics: Complex cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2008-01-01

    A selection of the literature on the statistical description of electromagnetic fields and complex cavities is concisely reviewed. Some essential concepts, for example, the application of the central limit theorem and the maximum entropy principle, are scrutinized. Implicit assumptions, biased

  18. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  19. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  20. Effect of the annealing temperature for the hydrogen Q-degradation on superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Tomoko; Sukenobu, Satoru; Tanabe, Yoshio; Onishi, Yoshimichi; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki; Saito, Kenji; Shishido, Toshio; Yamazaki, Yoshishige

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen Q-degradation was studied in niobium superconducting cavities prepared by barrel polishing, and electropolishing without annealing, though a fast cooling down of cavities. Cavity performance with various annealing temperature were tested using a 1.3GHz single-cell cavity to compare the effects of annealing temperature for hydrogen Q-degradation. (author)

  1. 201 MHz Cavity R and D for MUCOOL and MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Michael; Norem, Jim; Bross, Alan; Moretti, Alfred; Norris, Barry; Torun, Yagmur; Phillips, Larry; Rimmer, Robert; Stirbet, Mircea; Reep, Michael; Summers, Don

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, analysis and preliminary testing of the prototype 201 MHz copper cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. Cavity applications include the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as well as cooling channels for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. This cavity was developed by the US muon cooling (MUCOOL) collaboration and is being tested in the MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab. To achieve a high accelerating gradient, the cavity beam irises are terminated by a pair of curved, thin beryllium windows. Several fabrication methods developed for the cavity and windows are novel and offer significant cost savings as compared to conventional construction methods. The cavity's thermal and structural performances are simulated with an FEA model. Preliminary high power RF commissioning results will be presented

  2. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  3. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  4. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  5. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  6. Adaptive compensation of Lorentz force detuning in superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Schappert, Warren [Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities and considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate. Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  7. Progress on SCRF cavity manufacturing activities at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntambekar, A.; Dwivedi, J.; Mundra, G.; Srivastava, P.; Joshi, S.C.; Gupta, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    The work on development of SCRF cavities and associated technologies is ongoing at RRCAT to support its upcoming projects involving SC LINAC. RRCAT is also a member of Indian Institution Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC) working on development of SCRF cavities and associated technologies. Subsequent to 1.3 GHz single cell SCRF cavities, a 650 MHz single cell, a 1.3 GHz five cell and a 1.3 GHz nine cell SCRF cavities have been fabricated. These were tested for their mechanical, vacuum and RF qualifications at RRCAT for pre qualifications. The 1.3 GHz five cell SCRF cavity and 650 MHz single cell SCRF cavity has been processed and successfully tested at Fermi lab under IIFC. The 1.3 GHz five-cell cavity has achieved E acc of 20.3 MV/m at 2 K and 42 MV/m at 1.5-1.7 K with Q o of 2 x 10 10 . The 650 MHz single cell cavity has achieved the E acc > 19.3 MV/m with Q> 4x 10 10 at 2K. A 15 kW Electron Beam Welding (EBW) Machine has also been installed and commissioned at RRCAT as part of special infrastructure for development of SCRF cavities. One each 1.3 GHz and 650 MHz single cell SCRF cavities have also been fabricated using this EBW facility. Present focus of work is towards development of 650 MHz (β=0.92) multi-cell SCRF cavities. This paper will present the various technology development efforts on SCRF cavity fabrication, cavity test results and future plans. (author)

  8. Earth-ionosphere cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, A.; Polk, C.

    1976-01-01

    To analyze ELF wave propagation in the earth-ionosphere cavity, a flat earth approximation may be derived from the exact equations, which are applicable to the spherical cavity, by introducing a second-order or Debye approximation for the spherical Hankel functions. In the frequency range 3 to 30 Hz, however, the assumed conditions for the Debye approximation are not satisfied. For this reason an exact evaluation of the spherical Hankel functions is used to study the effects of the flat earth approximation on various propagation and resonance parameters. By comparing the resonance equation for a spherical cavity with its flat earth counterpart and by assuming that the surface impedance Z/sub i/ at the upper cavity boundary is known, the relation between the eigenvalue ν and S/sub v/, the sine of the complex angle of incidence at the lower ionosphere boundary, is established as ν(ν + 1) = (kaS/sub v/) 2 . It is also shown that the approximation ν(ν + 1) approximately equals (ν + 1/2) 2 which was used by some authors is not adequate below 30 Hz. Numerical results for both spherical and planar stratification show that (1) planar stratification is adequate for the computation of the lowest three ELF resonance frequencies to within 0.1 Hz; (2) planar stratification will lead to errors in cavity Q and wave attenuation which increase with frequency; (3) computation of resonance frequencies to within 0.1 Hz requires the extension of the lower boundary of the ionosphere to a height where the ratio of conduction current to displacement current, (sigma/ωepsilon 0 ), is less than 0.3; (4) atmospheric conductivity should be considered down to ground level in computing cavity Q and wave attenuation

  9. Atmospheric signals produced by cavity rebound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.M.; App, F.N.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of the atmospheric acoustic signals produced by a class of low-yield tests conducted just below the base of the alluvial cover in Yucca Flat of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), has revealed a clear manifestation of an elastic, cavity rebound signal. We use modeling as the basis for understanding the observed phenomena

  10. Materials for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    The ideal material for superconducting cavities should exhibit a high critical temperature, a high critical field, and, above all, a low surface resistance. Unfortunately, these requirements can be conflicting and a compromise has to be found. To date, most superconducting cavities for accelerators are made of niobium. The reasons for this choice are discussed. Thin films of other materials such as NbN, Nb 3 Sn, or even YBCO compounds can also be envisaged and are presently investigated in various laboratories. It is shown that their success will depend critically on the crystalline perfection of these films. (author)

  11. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1999-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. New methods for isolation of keratolytic bacteria inducing intractable hoof wall cavity (Gidoh) in a horse; double screening procedures of the horn powder agar-translucency test and horn zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Atsutoshi; Niwa, Hidekazu; Arai, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    To establish a new system to isolate keratolytic bacteria from the hoof wall cavity ( Gidoh ) of a racehorse, we invented the horn powder agar-translucency (HoPAT) test and horn zymography (HZ). Using routine bacteriological techniques and these methods, we isolated five strains of keratolytic soil bacteria, which were then identified by means of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing analysis. The findings from the study on the horse suggested that Brevibacterium luteolum played the main role in the local fragility of the hoof, eventually forming a Gidoh in coordination with four other strains of keratolytic bacteria. The double screening procedures of the HoPAT test and HZ were useful and easy techniques for isolating the keratolytic bacteria from the horn lesions.

  14. Electroacoustic oscillations in the LEP SC. cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Tückmantel, Joachim

    1996-01-01

    The LEP superconducting cavities have been plagued by electroacoustic oscillations. Tests have been done to eliminate these by a special feed-back loop in the tuning circuit as well as a feed-forward path, but they could only be eliminated safely up to the design field by running the cavities close to tune neglecting beam-loading compensation. This technique proved successful during the first LEP2 test run at 70 GeV. The mechanism and essential parameters driving these oscillations have been analysed as well as the corresponding stronger loading of the power coupler.

  15. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests

  16. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-10

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests.

  17. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradin, Michael; Dominguez, A.; Tokuhiro, Akira; Hamman, K.

    2014-01-01

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  18. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradin, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Muci, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Hassan, Yassin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Dominguez, A. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tokuhiro, Akira [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Hamman, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2014-10-15

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  19. What's a Cavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and deeper over time. Cavities are also called dental caries (say: KARE-eez), and if you have a ... made up mostly of the germs that cause tooth decay. The bacteria in your mouth make acids and when plaque clings to your teeth, the acids can eat away at the outermost ...

  20. Vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides a vertical cavity laser comprising a grating layer comprising an in-plane grating, the grating layer having a first side and having a second side opposite the first side and comprising a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index...

  1. Oral cavity and jaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solntsev, A.M.; Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Radioanatome of oral cavity and jaw is described. Diseases of the teeth, jaw, large salivary glands, temporo-mandibular articulation are considered. Roentgenograms of oral cacity and jaw of healthy people are presented and analyzed as well as roentgenograms in the above-mentioned diseases

  2. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  3. Superconducting elliptical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J K

    2011-01-01

    We give a brief overview of the history, state of the art, and future for elliptical superconducting cavities. Principles of the cell shape optimization, criteria for multi-cell structures design, HOM damping schemes and other features are discussed along with examples of superconducting structures for various applications.

  4. Additive Manufactured Superconducting Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric; Rosen, Yaniv; Woolleet, Nathan; Materise, Nicholas; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Morris; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Dubois, Jonathan

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities provide an ultra-low dissipative environment, which has enabled fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, materials properties, and the search for new particles in and beyond the standard model. However, resonator designs are constrained by limitations in conventional machining techniques. For example, current through a seam is a limiting factor in performance for many waveguide cavities. Development of highly reproducible methods for metallic parts through additive manufacturing, referred to colloquially as 3D printing\\x9D, opens the possibility for novel cavity designs which cannot be implemented through conventional methods. We present preliminary investigations of superconducting cavities made through a selective laser melting process, which compacts a granular powder via a high-power laser according to a digitally defined geometry. Initial work suggests that assuming a loss model and numerically optimizing a geometry to minimize dissipation results in modest improvements in device performance. Furthermore, a subset of titanium alloys, particularly, a titanium, aluminum, vanadium alloy (Ti - 6Al - 4V) exhibits properties indicative of a high kinetic inductance material. This work is supported by LDRD 16-SI-004.

  5. Cavity Nesting Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgil E. Scott; Keith E. Evans; David R. Patton; Charles P. Stone

    1977-01-01

    Many species of cavity-nesting birds have declined because of habitat reduction. In the eastern United States, where primeval forests are gone, purple martins depend almost entirely on man-made nesting structures (Allen and Nice 1952). The hole-nesting population of peregrine falcons disappeared with the felling of the giant trees upon which they depended (Hickey and...

  6. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  7. Open microwave cavities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šeba, Petr; Rotter, I.; Mueller, M.; Persson, C.; Pichugin, Konstantin N.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2001), s. 484-487 ISSN 1386-9477 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A02/98:Z1-010-914 Keywords : microwave cavity * resonances Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.009, year: 2001

  8. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  9. Superconducting cavity material for the European XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Brinkmann, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Navitski, A.; Tamashevich, Y.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of the strategy for superconducting cavity material procurement and quality management is done on the basis of the experience with the cavity production for the European x-ray free electron laser (EXFEL) facility. An adjustment of the material specification to EXFEL requirements, procurement of material, quality control (QC), documentation, and shipment to cavity producers have been worked out and carried out by DESY. A multistep process of qualification of the material suppliers included detailed material testing, single- and nine-cell cavity fabrication, and cryogenic radiofrequency tests. Production of about 25 000 semi-finished parts of high purity niobium and niobium-titanium alloy in a period of three years has been divided finally between companies Heraeus, Tokyo Denkai, Ningxia OTIC, and PLANSEE. Consideration of large-grain (LG) material as a possible option for the EXFEL has resulted in the production of one cryogenic module consisting of seven (out of eight) LG cavities. LG materials fulfilled the EXFEL requirements and showed even 25% to 30% higher unloaded quality factor. A possible shortage of the required quantity of LG material on the market led, however, to the choice of conventional fine-grain (FG) material. Eddy-current scanning (ECS) has been applied as an additional QC tool for the niobium sheets and contributed significantly to the material qualification and sorting. Two percent of the sheets have been rejected, which potentially could affect up to one-third of the cavities. The main imperfections and defects in the rejected sheets have been analyzed. Samples containing foreign material inclusions have been extracted from the sheets and electrochemically polished. Some inclusions remained even after 150 μm surface layer removal. Indications of foreign material inclusions have been found in the industrially fabricated and treated cavities and a deeper analysis of the defects has been performed.

  10. Implosion of the small cavity and large cavity cannonball targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Katsunobu; Yamanaka, Chiyoe.

    1984-01-01

    Recent results of cannonball target implosion research are briefly reviewed with theoretical predictions for GEKKO XII experiments. The cannonball targets are classified into two types according to the cavity size ; small cavity and large cavity. The compression mechanisms of the two types are discussed. (author)

  11. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  12. HOM Survey of the First CEBAF Upgrade Style Cavity Pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhauser, Frank; Daly, Edward; Davis, G.; Drury, Michael; Grenoble, Christiana; Hogan, John; Manus, Robert; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles; Rimmer, Robert; Tian, Kai; Wang, Haipeng

    2009-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) requires ten new superconducting rf (SRF) cavity cryomodules to double the beam energy to the envisaged 12 GeV. Adequate cavity Higher Order Mode (HOM) suppression is essential to avoid multipass, multibunch beam break-up (BBU) instabilities of the recirculating beam. We report on detailed HOM surveys performed for the first two upgrade style cavities tested in a dedicated cavity pair cryomodule at 2K. The safety margin to the BBU threshold budget at 12 GeV has been assessed.

  13. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  14. Optimization of photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present optimization of photonic crystal cavities. The optimization problem is formulated to maximize the Purcell factor of a photonic crystal cavity. Both topology optimization and air-hole-based shape optimization are utilized for the design process. Numerical results demonstrate...... that the Purcell factor of the photonic crystal cavity can be significantly improved through optimization....

  15. Nuclear reactor cavity streaming shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, R.J.; Stephen, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    The upper portion of a nuclear reactor vessel supported in a concrete reactor cavity has a structure mounted below the top of the vessel between the outer vessel wall and the reactor cavity wall which contains hydrogenous material which will attenuate radiation streaming upward between vessel and the reactor cavity wall while preventing pressure buildup during a loss of coolant accident

  16. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  17. Cavity Processing and Preparation of 650 MHz Elliptical Cell Cavities for PIP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Allan [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, Saravan Kumar [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Merio, Margherita [Fermilab; Reid, Thomas [Argonne (main); Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    The PIP-II project at Fermilab requires fifteen 650 MHz SRF cryomodules as part of the 800 MeV LINAC that will provide a high intensity proton beam to the Fermilab neutrino program. A total of fifty-seven high-performance SRF cavities will populate the cryomodules and will operate in both pulsed and continuous wave modes. These cavities will be processed and prepared for performance testing utilizing adapted cavity processing infrastructure already in place at Fermilab and Argonne. The processing recipes implemented for these structures will incorporate state-of-the art processing and cleaning techniques developed for 1.3 GHz SRF cavities for the ILC, XFEL, and LCLS-II projects. This paper describes the details of the processing recipes and associated chemistry, heat treatment, and cleanroom processes at the Fermilab and Argonne cavity processing facilities. This paper also presents single and multi-cell cavity test results with quality factors above 5·10¹⁰ and accelerating gradients above 30 MV/m.

  18. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang, Chuji

    2012-09-01

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 109 (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 106 (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 1012 (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min-1; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the detection limit to 131 ppb. These elements in lower

  19. Preliminary Results from a Superconducting Photocathode Sample Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Kneisel, Peter; Lipski, Andrzej; Sekutowicz, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    Pure niobium has been proposed as a photocathode material and recently a successful test has been conducted with a niobium single cell cavity to extract photo-currents from the surface of this cavity. However, the quantum efficiency of niobium is ~2·10-4, whereas electrodeposited lead has a ~15 times higher quantum efficiency. We have designed and tested a photo-injector niobium cavity, which can be used to insert photo-cathodes made of different materials in the high electric field region of the cavity. Experiments have been conducted with niobium and lead, which show that neither the Q- values of the cavity nor the obtainable surface fields are significantly lowered. This paper reports about the results from these tests.

  20. Leaching materials from cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, T.D.; Jordan, T.W.J.

    1980-01-01

    A material is leached from a cavity by contacting the material with a liquid and subjecting the liquid to a number of pressure cycles, each pressure cycle involving a decrease in pressure to cause boiling of the liquid, followed by a rise in pressure to inhibit the boiling. The method may include the step of heating the liquid to a temperature near to its boiling point. The material may be nuclear fuel pellets or calcium carbonate pellets. (author)

  1. Superconducting cavities for HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwersteg, B.; Ebeling, W.; Moeller, W.D.; Renken, D.; Proch, D.; Sekutowicz, J.; Susta, J.; Tong, D.

    1988-01-01

    Superconducting 500 MHz cavities are developed to demonstrate the feasibility of upgrading the e-beam energy of the HERA storage ring. A prototype module with 2 x 4 cell resonators and appropriate fundamental and higher mode couplers has been designed at DESY and is being built by industrial firms. The design and results of RF and cryogenic measurements are reported in detail. 17 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  2. Q0 Degradation of LANL 700-MHZ β = 0.64 Elliptical Cavities and ANL 340 MHZ Spoke Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Chan, Kwok-Chi D.; Edwards, Randall L.; Gentzlinger, Robert C.; Kelley, John Patrick; Krawczyk, Frank L.; Madrid, Michael A.; Montoya, Debbie I.; Schrage, Dale L.; Shapiro, Alan H.

    2002-01-01

    The quality factor (Q 0 ) of most of the six LANL β = 0.64 700-MHz 5-cell elliptical cavities starts to drop at E acc = 8-10 MV/m, which may be related to multipacting. Residual resistances of these cavities were measured to be 5.0-7.6 n(Omega). The sensitivity of surface resistance to the external magnetic field was measured to be 0.22 n(Omega)/mG. Q disease tests have shown no significant Q 0 degradation for both elliptical cavities and a spoke cavity with our 100 (micro)m BCP.

  3. Capture cavity II results at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branlard, Julien; Chase, Brian; Cancelo, G.; Carcagno, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Hanna, B.; Harms, Elvan; Hocker, A.; Koeth, T.; Kucera, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    As part of the research and development towards the International Linear Collider (ILC), several test facilities have been developed at Fermilab. This paper presents the latest Low Level RF (LLRF) results obtained with Capture Cavity II (CCII) at the ILC Test Accelerator (ILCTA) test facility. The main focus will be on controls and RF operations using the SIMCON based LLRF system developed in DESY [1]. Details about hardware upgrades and future work will be discussed.

  4. Superconducting radio frequency cavities: design, development and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, P.N.; Mistri, K.K.; Sonti, S.S.K.; Sacharias, J.; Raiand, A.; Kanjilal, D.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the development of superconducting niobium cavities has evoked a lot of interest among the accelerator physics community of India. Many laboratories are planning to develop superconducting niobium cavities for new accelerators and applications. Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) has been engaged in the indigenous development of niobium resonators for over a decade. During this period, several quarter wave resonators have been successfully built, tested and installed in the superconducting linac at IUAC. A new niobium low beta resonator for the High Current Injector (HCI) project has been designed, prototyped and tested. In addition to the in-house projects, IUAC is nearing completion of two niobium single spoke resonators (SSR1) for Fermi Lab, USA. Under the Indian Institutions and Fermi Lab Collaboration (IIFC), Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore and Inter-University Accelerator Centre have jointly developed TESLA-type 1.3 GHz single cell cavities which have achieved very high accelerating gradients. Buoyed by the success of this work, a 5-cell 1.3 GHz cavity with simple end tubes has been successfully built. This cavity is presently at Fermi Lab for 2 K tests. Recently, a 650 MHz, β=0.9 single cell cavity has also been successfully completed and is ready for cold tests. There are plans to develop a 650 MHz, β=0.6 single cell cavity in collaboration with VECC, Kolkata. This paper presents the status of the niobium cavities developed at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. (author)

  5. Manufacturing of the L band 9-cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Masanori; Ohkubo, Kohichi; Yamanaka, Toshiyuki; Kako, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Shishido, Toshio; Ono, Masaaki; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, L-band niobium superconducting cavities have been developed with collaboration between our company and National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). The manufacturing procedure and the performance of 9-cell superconducting cavity are presented. The maximum accelerating gradient of 12 MV/m was attained in a cold test. (author)

  6. Strain absorbent modules for cavity filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Strain absorbent modules made from weldmesh panels and helical steel binders can be used, together with timber packing, to support the roof and sides of cavities instead of softwood and hardwood nogs. A description of these modules and a series of load tests and underground trials carried out on the modules is given.

  7. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Yuuji; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Ishimaru, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A cryogenic system consisting of a helium refrigerator (4 kW at 4.4 K) and a liquid helium distribution transfer system for TRISTAN 508 MHz 32 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities was designed and constructed. After the performance test of the cryogenic system, 16 x 5-cell superconducting RF cavities in 8 cryostats were installed in underground TRISTAN electron-positron collider and connected to the helium refrigerator on the ground level through the transfer line (total length about 330 m) and cooled by liquid helium pool boiling in parallel. The cryogenic system and its operation experience are described. (author)

  8. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yong; Hirshfield, Jay Leonard

    2016-01-01

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10"-"7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise Δ T. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field E_s_u_r"m"a"x< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating Δ T"m"a"x< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power - as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  9. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  10. Atoms and cavities: Explorations of quantum entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimond, J. M.; Hagley, E.; Maitre, X.; Nogues, G.; Wunderlich, C.; Brune, M.; Haroche, S.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of circular Rydberg atoms with a high-quality microwave cavity makes it possible to realize complex quantum state manipulations. The state of an atom can be 'copied' onto the cavity. Reversing this operation at a later time with a second atom, we realize an elementary 'quantum memory' holding an atomic quantum coherence for a while in a cavity mode. We have also generated two-atom entangled states of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen type. At variance with previous experiments, this one implies massive particles in a completely controlled process. These entanglement manipulations can be generalized to more complex or to mesoscopic systems and open the way to new tests of fundamental aspects of the quantum world

  11. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  12. A prototype superconducting cavity for TRISTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, T.; Hara, K.; Hosoyama, K.

    1987-01-01

    Following the feasibility study on the 3-cell superconducting cavity in the TRISTAN Accumulation Ring (TAR), a 5-cell 508 MHz Nb cavity was constructed and tested in the TAR. The cavity was equipped with a RF input coupler on a beam pipe, two HOM couplers on the other beam pipe and two additional HOM couplers on the equator of an end cell. The maximum accelerating field (Eaxx) was 4.5 MV/m with a Q value of about 1x10 9 at 4.2 deg K. The field was limited by the electron field emission and neither electron multipacting nor breakdown caused by couplers was observed. Damping of the HOM was sufficient and the input coupler was tested up to 82 KW in total reflection. A frequency tuning system consisted of two piezo electric and mechanical tuners. The piezo tuner was fast enough and the mechanical tuner covered wide range. In the beam test, the single bunch electron current of 29 mA was captured by the superconducting cavity alone and 13 mA was accelerated to 4.8 GeV. The maximum power transferred to the beam was 26 KW. The refrigeration system worked very stably

  13. Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on the Performance of a Superconducting Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer

    2005-01-01

    A special two-cell cavity was designed to obtain surface field distributions suitable for investigation of electric and magnetic field effects on cavity performance. The cavity design and preliminary results were presented in a previous contribution. The bulk niobium cavity was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace at 1250 C to improve thermal conductivity. Three seamless hydroformed Nb/Cu cavities of the same design were fabricated to investigate the role of the electron beam welds located in high field areas. This paper will present RF test results at 2 K for the bulk niobium and one of the seamless cavities

  14. Development of a high-power RF cavity for the PEP-II B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Allen, M.A.; Saba, J.; Schwarz, H.

    1995-03-01

    The authors describe the development and fabrication of the first high-power RF cavity for PEP-II. Design choices and fabrication technologies for the first cavity and subsequent production cavities are described. Conditioning and high-power testing of the first and subsequent cavities are discussed, as well as integration of the cavity into modular RF systems for both high-energy and low-energy rings. Plans for installation of the cavity raft assemblies in the RF sections of the PEP tunnel are also considered

  15. Impact of the cosmetic mouthwash “Jack Pro Spülung plus” (“rheodol-Spülung plus” on the oral cavity flora, tested in a monocentric, controlled, randomized, blind, cross-over comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göhring, Jana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aim: Jack Pro Spülung Plus (also available as “rheodol-Spülung plus” is recommended to mechanically maintain oral hygiene as part of an overall oral hygiene concept. Because Jack Pro Spülung Plus contains the active agents polihexanide and tosylchloramide sodium in concentrations below microbicidal efficacy, this study tested the hypothesis that the combination of mechanical rinsing and bacteriostatic effect surpasses the effect of mechanical rinsing alone.Method: The study was performed with 30 volunteers as a monocentric, controlled, randomized, blind, cross-over comparative study. The efficacy of the test product (active agents polihexanide 0.02–0.03% and tosylchloramide sodium 0.004–0.006% was compared to an aqueous solution of polihexanide (0.02–0.03% and to Ringer solution as negative control. The efficacy was measured as the reduction of colony forming units (cfu on buccal mucosa after aerobic and anaerobic cultivation. After determination of pre-values, the volunteers performed mouthrinsing for 30 sec with each of the 3 tested solutions. After 1, 10 and 60 minutes, cfu numbers were determined again. The reduction factor was calculated as the difference between log of the measured cfu before and after mouthrinsing with the test solution. The sampling was performed using a template with a smear area of 1 x 1 cm. Results: Using Ringer solution led to a slight mechanically-induced reduction of cfu in the oral cavity 1 min after rinsing the mouth cavity with the solution. After 10 min and 60 min, no influence on the cfu number could be detected. Using Jack pro Spülung Plus led to a bacteriostatic effect up to 60 min after mouthrinsing; 10 min and 60 min after rinsing the efficacy of Ringer solution was also significantly surpassed. The aqueous solution of polihexanide was less effective than Jack pro Spülung Plus after 10 and 60 min. Conclusion: Based on these observations, we conclude that Jack pro Spülung Plus is

  16. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  17. Seismic wave interaction with underground cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Felix M.; Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    Realization of the future Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) will require ensuring its compliance, making the CTBT a prime example of forensic seismology. Following indications of a nuclear explosion obtained on the basis of the (IMS) monitoring network further evidence needs to be sought at the location of the suspicious event. For such an On-Site Inspection (OSI) at a possible nuclear test site the treaty lists several techniques that can be carried out by the inspection team, including aftershock monitoring and the conduction of active seismic surveys. While those techniques are already well established, a third group of methods labeled as "resonance seismometry" is less well defined and needs further elaboration. A prime structural target that is expected to be present as a remnant of an underground nuclear explosion is a cavity at the location and depth the bomb was fired. Originally "resonance seismometry" referred to resonant seismic emission of the cavity within the medium that could be stimulated by an incident seismic wave of the right frequency and observed as peaks in the spectrum of seismic stations in the vicinity of the cavity. However, it is not yet clear which are the conditions for which resonant emissions of the cavity could be observed. In order to define distance-, frequency- and amplitude ranges at which resonant emissions could be observed we study the interaction of seismic waves with underground cavities. As a generic model for possible resonances we use a spherical acoustic cavity in an elastic full-space. To solve the forward problem for the full elastic wave field around acoustic spherical inclusions, we implemented an analytical solution (Korneev, 1993). This yields the possibility of generating scattering cross-sections, amplitude spectrums and synthetic seismograms for plane incident waves. Here, we focus on the questions whether or not we can expect resonant responses in the wave field scattered from the cavity. We show

  18. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  19. Cryostat for TRISTAN superconducting cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsunobu, S.; Furuya, T.; Hara, K.

    1990-01-01

    Superconducting cavities generate rather high heat load of hundreds watts in one cryostat and have high sensitivity for pressure. We adopted usual pool-boiling type cooling for its stable pressure operation. Two 5-cell Nb cavities were installed in one flange type cryostat. Tuning mechanics actuated by a pulse-motor and a Piezo-electric element are set at outside of vacuum end flange. The design and performance of the cryostat for TRISTAN superconducting cavities are described. (author)

  20. Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsee, Hasan S.

    2014-10-01

    Superconducting cavities have been operating routinely in a variety of accelerators with a range of demanding applications. With the success of completed projects, niobium cavities have become an enabling technology, offering upgrade paths for existing facilities and pushing frontier accelerators for nuclear physics, high-energy physics, materials science, and the life sciences. With continued progress in basic understanding of radio-frequency superconductivity, the performance of cavities has steadily improved to approach theoretical capabilities.

  1. Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenci, S.J.; Eisen, E.L.; Dickey, D.L.; Sainz, J.E.; Utay, P.F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2009-01-01

    Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system

  2. CEBAF: Accelerating cavities look good

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The first assembled pairs of superconducting accelerating cavities from German supplier Interatom for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, have exceeded performance specifications.

  3. CEBAF: Accelerating cavities look good

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The first assembled pairs of superconducting accelerating cavities from German supplier Interatom for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, have exceeded performance specifications

  4. Progress on a prototype main ring rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, G.; Kandarian, R.; Thiessen, H.A.; Poirier, R.; Smythe, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    A prototype rf cavity and rf drive system for a hadron facility main ring has been designed and will be tested in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos as a part of a collaborative effort between LANL and TRIUMF. The cavity uses an orthogonally biased ferrite tuner. The design provides for accelerating gap voltages up to 200 kV for the 49.3 to 50.8 MHz range. Progress on the cavity construction and testing is described. 13 refs., 5 figs

  5. Aero-Heating of Shallow Cavities in Hypersonic Freestream Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Berger, Karen T.; Merski, N. R., Jr.; Woods, William A.; Hollingsworth, Kevin E.; Hyatt, Andrew; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments and analysis was to augment the heating database and tools used for assessment of impact-induced shallow-cavity damage to the thermal protection system of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The effect of length and depth on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These rapid-response experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated immediately prior to the launch of STS-114, the initial flight in the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program, and continued during the first week of the mission. Previously-designed and numerically-characterized blunted-nose baseline flat plates were used as the test surfaces. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process and the two-dimensional flow assumptions used for the data analysis. The experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions on a no-cavity test article. Two test plates were developed, each containing 4 equally-spaced spanwise-distributed cavities. The first test plate contained cavities with a constant length-to-depth ratio of 8 with design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.35, and 0.5. The second test plate contained cavities with a constant design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratio of 0.35 with length-to-depth ratios of 8, 12, 16, and 20. Cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary results indicate that the floor-averaged Bump Factor (local heating rate nondimensionalized by upstream reference) at the tested conditions is approximately 0.3 with a standard deviation of 0.04 for laminar-in/laminar-out conditions when the cavity length-to-boundary-layer thickness is between 2.5 and 10 and for

  6. X-ray imaging of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Susan Elizabeth

    The goal of this research was to develop an improved diagnostic technique to identify the location of defects that limit superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity performance during cavity testing or in existing accelerators. SRF cavities are primarily constructed of niobium. Electrons within the metal of a cavity under high electric field gradient have a probability of tunneling through the potential barrier. i e. leave the surface or are field emitted in regions where defects are encountered. Field emitted electrons are accelerated in the electric fields within the cavity. The electrons can have complicated trajectories and strike the cavity walls thus producing x-rays via Coulomb interactions and/or bremsstrahlung radiation. The endpoint energy of an x-ray spectrum predicts the electron maximum final kinetic energy within the cavity. Field emission simulations can then predict the source of the field-emitted electrons and the defect(s). In a multicell cavity the cells are coupled together and act as a set of coupled oscillators. There are multiple passbands of excitation for a multicell structure operating in a particular mode. For different passbands of operation the direction and amplitude of the fields within a cavity change from that of the normal accelerating mode. Field emitted electrons have different trajectories depending on the mode and thus produce x-rays in different locations. Using a collimated sodium iodide detector and subjecting a cavity to multiple passband modes at high electric field gradient the source of a cavity's x-rays can be determined. Knowing the location of the x-rays and the maximum electron kinetic energy; field emission simulations for different passband modes can be used to determine and verify the source of the field emitted electrons from mode to mode. Once identified, the defect(s) can be repaired or modifications made to the manufacturing process.

  7. CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    CERN News: Slow ejection efficiency at the PS; Vacuum tests on the ISR; Fire in the neutrino beam-line; Prototype r.f . cavity for the Booster; Crane-bridge in ISR experimental hall; Modifications to the r.f . system at the PS

  8. Researches on bake effect on RF superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jiankui; Zhao Kui; Zhu Feng

    2005-01-01

    The Q-slope at high gradient affects the performance of superconducting cavity greatly. Recent researches show that low temperature (100-150) degree C heat treatment (bake) has positive effects on the performance of superconducting cavities. A lot of cavity tests are analyzed based on bake treatment. The average gradient E acc,max and E acc at Q=1 x 10 10 are increased by more than 3.5 MV/m. Q at E acc,max is increased and the Q-slope is improved. Analysis on bake temperature shows that higher bake temperature leads to higher Q value. Comparison of BCP and EP cavities shows that at least 60-80 μm EP is needed for BCP surface. More than 10-15 μm removal of the surface by BCP will degrade the performance of an EP cavity. Oxygen diffusion model is used to illustrate bake effect. (authors)

  9. Test of a cryogenic helium pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.; Walstrom, P.L.; Herz, W.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a cryogenic helium pump for circulating liquid helium in a magnet and the design of a test loop for measuring the pump performance in terms of mass flow vs pump head at various pump speeds are described. A commercial cryogenic helium pump was tested successfully. Despite flaws in the demountable connections, the piston pump itself has performed satisfactorily. A helium pump of this type is suitable for the use of flowing supercritical helium through Internally Cooled Superconductor (ICS) magnets. It has pumped supercritical helium up to 7.5 atm with a pump head up to 2.8 atm. The maximum mass flow rate obtained was about 16 g/s. Performance of the pump was degraded at lower pumping speeds

  10. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Freemire

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF_{6} and O_{2} were measured.

  11. Single and Coupled Nanobeam Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Shyroki, Dzmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    for analysis and design of photonic crystal devices, such as 2D ring resonators for filters, single and coupled nanobeam cavities, birefringence in photonic crystal cavities, threshold analysis in photonic crystal lasers, gap solitons in photonic crystals, novel photonic atolls, dynamic characteristics...

  12. Lineshape test on overlapped transitions (R9F1, R9F2) of the 2v3 band of 12CH4 by frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Lin, H.; Plimmer, M. D.; Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.

    2018-05-01

    The performances of a multi-spectral fit for the spectra of pressure-broadened overlapping lines (R9F1, R9F2) of 12CH4 in binary mixtures with N2 were studied by applying different lineshape models, from the simplest Voigt profile (VP) to the Harmann-Tran profile (HTP). Line-mixing was approximated in the first order in the spectral fits. Data were acquired using a high-resolution cavity ring-down spectrometer of minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 2.8 × 10-12 cm-1. The lines were observed with a signal-to-noise ratio of 19 365 for pressures from 5 to 40 kPa. The study reveals that the multi-spectral fits using the HTP and the speed-dependent Nelkin-Ghatak profile (SDNGP) yield the best among all tested. The two models gave the maximum relative residuals of less than 0.065 %. All things considered, the HTP and the SDNGP appear to be the most reliable models for treating the present case of multi-spectral fitting of unresolved dual-component spectra.

  13. Technical tasks in superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kenji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The feature of superconducting rf cavities is an extremely small surface resistance on the wall. It brings a large energy saving in the operation, even those are cooled with liquid helium. That also makes possible to operate themselves in a higher field gradient comparing to normal conducting cavities, and brings to make accelerators compact. These merits are very important for the future accelerator engineering which is planed at JAERI for the neutron material science and nuclear waste transmutation. This machine is a high intensity proton linac and uses sc cavities in the medium and high {beta} sections. In this paper, starting R and D of proton superconducting cavities, several important technical points which come from the small surface resistance of sc cavities, are present to succeed it and also differences between the medium and high - {beta} structures are discussed. (author)

  14. Pacer processing: cavity inventory relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, R.J.; Gritzo, L.A.

    1975-09-01

    The pacer cavity and its associated primary power loop comprise a recirculating system in which materials are introduced by a series of thermonuclear explosions while debris is continuously removed by radioactive decay, sorption phenomena, and deliberate processing. Safe, reliable, and economical realization of the Pacer concept depends on the removal and control of both noxious and valuable by-products of the fusion reaction. Mathematical relationships are developed that describe the quantities of materials that are introduced into the Pacer cavity by a series of discrete events and are removed continuously by processing and decay. An iterative computer program based on these relationships is developed that allows both the total cavity inventory and the amounts of important individual species to be determined at any time during the lifetime of the cavity in order to establish the effects of the thermonuclear event, the cavity, the flow, and various processing parameters on Pacer design requirements

  15. Spiral loaded cavities for heavy ion acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schempp, A.; Klein, H.

    1976-01-01

    A transmission line theory of the spiral resonator has been performed and the calculated and measured properties will be compared. Shunt impedances up to 50 MΩ/m have been measured. In a number of high power tests the structure has been tested and its electrical and mechanical stability has been investigated. The static frequency shift due to ponderomotoric forces was between 0.2 and 50 kHz/kW dependent on the geometrical parameters of the spirals. The maximum field strength obtained on the axis was 16 MV/m in pulsed operation and 9.2 MV/m in cw, corresponding to a voltage gain per cavity of up to 0.96 MV. The results show that spiral resonators are well suited as heavy ion accelerator cavities. (author)

  16. Prototype rf cavity for the HISTRAP accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosko, S.W.; Dowling, D.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    HISTRAP, a proposed synchrotron-cooling-storage ring designed to both accelerate and decelerate very highly charged very heavy ions for atomic physics research, requires an rf accelerating system to provide /+-/2.5 kV of peak accelerating voltage per turn while tuning through a 13.5:1 frequency range in a fraction of a second. A prototype half-wave, single gap rf cavity with biased ferrite tuning was built and tested over a continuous tuning range of 200 kHz through 2.7 MHz. Initial test results establish the feasibility of using ferrite tuning at the required rf power levels. The resonant system is located entirely outside of the accelerator's 15cm ID beam line vacuum enclosure except for a single rf window which serves as an accelerating gap. Physical separation of the cavity and the beam line permits in situ vacuum baking of the beam line at 300/degree/C

  17. Heat loss from an open cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

  18. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, G.; Kneisel, P.; Brawley, J.; Bundy, R.; Campisi, I.; Davis, K.; Macha, K.; Machie, D.; Mammosser, J.; Morgan, S.; Sundelin, R.; Turlington, L.; Wilson, K.; Doleans, M.; Kim, S.H.; Barni, D.; Pagani, C.; Pierini, P.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, R.; Schrage, D.; Parodi, R.; Sekutowicz, J.; Ylae-Oijala, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 192 MeV to 1000 MeV, operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical beta - values of beta= 0.61 and beta= 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jlab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four beta= 0.61 cavities and two beta= 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four beta= 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the beta=0.61 cavity and the beta= 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: E acc = 1 0.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10 9 at 2.1K for beta= 0.61 and E acc = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10 9 at 2.1K for beta= 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning will be done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper will describe the cavity design with respect to electrical and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop

  19. Defect Detection in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity Surface Using C + + and OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Samantha; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) uses superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities to accelerate an electron beam. If theses cavities have a small particle or defect, it can degrade the performance of the cavity. The problem at hand is inspecting the cavity for defects, little bubbles of niobium on the surface of the cavity. Thousands of pictures have to be taken of a single cavity and then looked through to see how many defects were found. A C + + program with Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) was constructed to reduce the number of hours searching through the images and finds all the defects. Using this code, the SRF group is now able to use the code to identify defects in on-going tests of SRF cavities. Real time detection is the next step so that instead of taking pictures when looking at the cavity, the camera will detect all the defects.

  20. Eccentric superconducting rf cavity separator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggus, J.R.; Giordano, S.T.; Halama, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    An accelerator apparatus is described having an eccentric-shaped, iris-loaded deflecting cavity for an rf separator for a high energy high momentum, charged particle accelerator beam. In one embodiment, the deflector is superconducting, and the apparatus of this invention provides simplified machining and electron beam welding techniques. Model tests have shown that the electrical characteristics provide the desired mode splitting without adverse effects

  1. Recent Developments in SRF Cavity Science and Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ciovati

    2006-08-10

    The performances of SRF cavities made of high purity bulk niobium have been improving in the last few years and surface magnetic fields (Bp) close to the thermodynamic critical field of niobium have been achieved in a few cases. The recommendation made in 2004 in favor of SRF as the technology of choice for the International Linear Collider (ILC), requires improving the reliability of multi-cell cavities operating at accelerating gradients (Eacc) of the order of 35 MV/m. Additionally, a better understanding of the present limitations to cavity performance, such as the high-field Q-drop is needed. This contribution presents some recent developments in SRF cavity science and performance. Among the most significant advances of the last few years, new cavity shapes with lower ratio Bp/Eacc were designed and tested. Cavities made of large-grain niobium became available, promising lower cost at comparable performance to standard fine-grain ones and several tests on single-cell cavities were done to gain a better understanding of high-field losses. In addition, studies to improve the reliability of electropolishing are being carried out by several research groups.

  2. Results of charpy V-notch impact testing of structural steel specimens irradiated at ∼30 degrees C to 1 x 1016 neutrons/cm2 in a commercial reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Stoller, R.E.

    1997-04-01

    A capsule containing Charpy V-notch (CVN) and mini-tensile specimens was irradiated at ∼ 30 degrees C (∼ 85 degrees F) in the cavity of a commercial nuclear power plant to a fluence of 1 x 10 16 neutrons/cm 2 (> 1MeV). The capsule included six CVN impact specimens of archival High Flux Isotope Reactor A212 grade B ferritic steel and five CVN impact specimens of a well-studied A36 structural steel. This irradiation was part of the ongoing study of neutron-induced damage effects at the low temperature and flux experienced by reactor supports. The plant operators shut down the plant before the planned exposure was reached. The exposure of these specimens produced no significant irradiation-induced embrittlement. Of interest were the data on unirradiated specimens in the L-T orientation machined from a single plate of A36 structural steel, which is the same specification for the structural steel used in some reactor supports. The average CVN energy of five unirradiated specimens obtained from one region of the plate and tested at room temperature was ∼ 99 J, while the energy of 11 unirradiated specimens from other locations of the same plate was 45 J, a difference of ∼ 220%. The CVN impact energies for all 18 specimens ranged from a low of 32 J to a high of 111 J. Moreover, it appears that the University of Kansas CVN impact energy data of the unirradiated specimens at the 100-J level are shifted toward higher temperatures by about 20 K. The results were an example of the extent of scatter possible in CVN impact testing. Generic values for the CVN impact energy of A36 should be used with caution in critical applications

  3. Early prototype of a superconducting RF cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    As early as 1979, before LEP became an approved project, studies were located in the ISR Division. Although Cu-cavities were foreseen, certainly for the 1st energy-stage, superconducting cavities were explored as a possible alternative for the 2nd energy-stage. This began with very basic studies of manufacture and properties of Nb-cavities. This one, held by Mr.Girel, was made from bulk Nb-sheet, 2.5 mm thick. It was dimensioned for tests at 500 MHz (LEP accelerating RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 8004204, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  4. RF-cavity for the X-ray generator NESTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.P.; Gvozd, A.M.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Chernov, K.N.; Ostreyko, G.N.; Sedlyarov, I.K.

    2007-01-01

    In the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology 225 MeV electron storage ring NESTOR is under development. The paper describes the design and parameters of a 700 MHz cavity that has been fabricated at BINP for the NESTOR RF-system. Now the low-power and vacuum tests of the cavity are under way at BINP. We present here the results of 3D simulations of the cavity with ANSYS code. The problem of multibunch instabilities in NESTOR is also discussed

  5. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  6. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  7. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Manjón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden.

  8. Heat transfer in window frames with internal cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsen, Arild

    2001-07-01

    Heat transfer in window frames with internal air cavities is studied in this thesis. Investigations focus on two- and three-dimensional natural convection effects inside air cavities, the dependence of the emissivity on the thermal transmittance, and the emissivity of anodized and untreated aluminium profiles. The investigations are mostly conducted on window frames which are the same size as real frames found in residential buildings. Numerical and experimental investigations were performed to study the effectiveness of one commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program for simulating combined natural convection and heat transfer in simple three-dimensional window frames with internal air cavities. The accuracy of the conjugate CFD simulations was evaluated by comparing results for surface temperature on the warm side of the specimens to results from experiments that use infrared (IR) thermography to map surface temperatures during steady-state thermal tests. In general, there was good agreement between the simulations and experiments. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic and conduction simulations are performed to study the difference between treating air cavities as a fluid and as a solid when calculating the thermal transmittance of window frames. The simulations show that traditional software codes, simulating only conduction and using equivalent conductivities for the air cavities, give Uvalues that compare well with results from fluid flow simulations. The difference between the two models are mostly limited to the temperature distribution inside air cavities. It is also found that cavities with an interconnection less than about 7 mm can be treated as separate cavities. Three-dimensional natural convection effects in simple and custom-made PVC and thermally broken aluminum window frames with one open internal cavity were studied, with the use of CFD simulations and thermography experiments. Focus was put on corner effects and heat transfer

  9. Photons in a spherical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu-Pallas, N.; Vlad, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    The spectrum of black body radiation at the absolute temperature T, in an ideal spherical cavity of radius R, is studied. The departures from the classical predictions of Planck's theory, due to the discrete energies of the radiation quanta confined inside the cavity, depend on the adiabatic invariant RT and are significant for RT≤ 1 cm K. Special attention was paid to evidence sudden changes in the spectrum intensities, forbidden bands of frequency, as well as major modifications of the total energy for RT≤ 1 cm K. Similar effects were present in case of a cubic cavity too. (authors)

  10. Construction and present status of KEKB superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Akai, K.; Ezura, E; Furuya, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Mitsunobu, S.

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting cavity (SCC) for KEKB is 508 MHz single-cell cavity that has large beam pipes (22 cm and 30 cm i.d.) so that higher-order modes propagate out of the cavity and be absorbed by a lossy material. The input coupler is the TRISTAN-type coaxial one with some modifications such that dc bias voltage can be applied to avoid multipactoring during beam operation, fins to efficiently cool the outer conductor and a heater to remove condensed gases. The higher-order mode absorber is made of ferrite directly sinter-bonded on the inner surface of the copper pipe using a technique called Hot Isostatic Press (HIP). One prototype cavity was tested up to 0.57 A at TRISTAN Accumulation Ring (AR) in 1996. Then, four cavities were constructed for KEKB. One of the cavities achieved an accelerating field of 19 MV/m at a test in a vertical cryostat; this field is the world record at this frequency to our knowledge. No degradation of the field after assembly into horizontal cryostats was observed up to the available power of 300 kW that corresponds to ∼12 MV/m. These four cavities were installed in KEKB tunnel and are expected to supply 6 MV in total voltage to the 1.1 A electron beam in high energy ring (HER). Since beam commissioning started in Dec. 1998, the system has been supplying 6 MV and working very smoothly without any trouble. The maximum current has been 0.51 A and power delivered to beam per cavity is 370-380 kW/cavity up to the end of Apr., 1999. (author)

  11. Heating Augmentation Due to Compression Pad Cavities on the Project Orion CEV Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  12. TESLA cavity modeling and digital implementation in FPGA technology for control system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarski, T.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S.; Simrock, S.

    2006-01-01

    The electromechanical model of the TESLA cavity has been implemented in FPGA technology for real-time testing of the control system. The model includes Lorentz force detuning and beam loading effects. Step operation and vector stimulus operation modes are applied for the evaluation of a FPGA cavity simulator operated by a digital controller. The performance of the cavity hardware model is verified by comparing with a software model of the cavity implemented in the MATLAB system. The numerical aspects are considered for an optimal DSP calculation. Some experimental results are presented for different cavity operational conditions. (orig.)

  13. Status and outlook for high power processing of 1.3 GHz TESLA multicell cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchgessner, J.; Barnes, P.; Graber, J.; Metzger, D.; Mofat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.; Tigner, M.; Matheisen, A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to increase the usable accelerating gradient in Superconducting TESLA cavities, the field emission threshold barrier must be raised. As has been previously demonstrated on S-band cavities, a way to accomplish this is with the use of high peak power RF processing. A transmitter with a peak power of 2 Mwatt and 300 μsec pulse length has been assembled and has been used to process TESLA cavities. Several five cell TESLA cavities at 1.3 GHz have been manufactured for this purpose. This transmitter and the cavities will be described and the results of the tests will be presented

  14. Signal attenuation due to cavity leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, M.H.; Modera, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation of sound waves in fluids requires information about three properties of the system: capacitance (compressibility), resistance (friction), and inductance (inertia). Acoustical design techniques to date have tended to ignore the frictional effects associated with airflow across the envelope of the acoustic cavity (e.g., resistive vents). Since such leakage through the cavity envelope is best expressed with a power law dependence on the pressure, standard Fourier techniques that rely on linearity cannot be used. In this article, the theory relevant to nonlinear leakage is developed and equations presented. Potential applications of the theory to techniques for quantifying the leakage of buildings are presented. Experimental results from pressure decays in a full-scale test structure are presented and the leakage so measured is compared with independent measurements to demonstrate the technique

  15. HPV and cancer of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübbers, Christian U; Akgül, Baki

    2015-01-01

    Increased awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological cause of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has increased the interest in analysis of distinct oral sub-sites. It is currently under debate, whether HPV plays a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). The weakness in most published studies is the lack of performing different HPV detection tests combined with analysis for biological activity of the virus. In addition, different sub-sites of the oral cavity had been combined to a single entity, which retrospectively leads to a highly heterogeneous basis of data. In this review we mainly discuss the unclear role of HPV in OSCC development.

  16. Cavity and goaf control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stassen, P

    1978-01-01

    A summary of stowing, including a definition, calculation of stowing material requirements and settling of packs is given. A) Stowing using dirt found locally - the dirt bands in the seam - the use of ripping dirt brought down by the scraper loader and used for packing purposes and the construction of dummy roads. B) Control of cavities by leaving short, thick props and timber chocks in place. C) Stowing methods involving imported firt: packing by hand, use of scraper loaders, slinger stowing and control led-gravity stowing. D) Pneumatic stowing: describes the various types of machine and their scope; pipelines, their installation and cost price; pneumatic stowing in conjunc tion with powered supports; the use of crusher-stowers for stowing ripping dirt; construction of anhydrite packs by means of a pneumatic stower. E) Hydraulic stowing: how it works, the materials involved, utilization conditions, the surface storage post, pipes, stoppings with stowed material, water removal, rates of hydraulic stowing, results of theoretical studies, and the use of hydraulic stowing in the metal-mines. F) Pumped packs: how they work, how the packs are installed, the strength of the packs and their various uses. G) Caving: describes the principle of caving, support patterns, caving with packs and makes a comparison between caving and stowing. H) Comparison between the various methods of stowing compares pneumatic with hydraulic stowing methods; compares packing by hand and mechanical stowing compares surface subsidence in terms of the method of goaf used underground. An appendix gives details of equipment used. (15 refs.) (In French)

  17. Low energy booster radio frequency cavity structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.

    1994-01-01

    The structural design of the Superconducting Super Collider Low Energy Booster (LEB) Radio Frequency (RF) Cavity is very unique. The cavity is made of three different materials which all contribute to its structural strength while at the same time providing a good medium for magnetic properties. Its outer conductor is made of thin walled stainless steel which is later copper plated to reduce the electrical losses. Its tuner housing is made of a fiber reinforced composite laminate, similar to G10, glued to stainless steel plating. The stainless steel of the tuner is slotted to significantly diminish the magnetically-induced eddy currents. The composite laminate is bonded to the stainless steel to restore the structural strength that was lost in slotting. The composite laminate is also a barrier against leakage of the pressurized internal ferrite coolant fluid. The cavity's inner conductor, made of copper and stainless steel, is subjected to high heat loads and must be liquid cooled. The requirements of the Cavity are very stringent and driven primarily by deflection, natural frequency and temperature. Therefore, very intricate finite element analysis was used to complement conventional hand analysis in the design of the cavity. Structural testing of the assembled prototype cavity is planned to demonstrate the compliance of the cavity design to all of its requirements

  18. Low energy booster radio frequency cavity structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.

    1993-04-01

    The structural design of the Superconducting Super Collider Low Energy Booster (LEB) Radio Frequency (RF) Cavity is very unique. The cavity is made of three different materials which all contribute to its structural strength while at the same time providing a good medium for magnetic properties. Its outer conductor is made of thin walled stainless steel which is later copper plated to reduce the electrical losses. Its tuner housing is made of a fiber reinforced composite laminate, similar to G10, glued to stainless steel plating. The stainless steel of the tuner is slotted to significantly diminish the magnetically-induced eddy currents. The composite laminate is bonded to the stainless steel to restore the structural strength that was lost in slotting. The composite laminate is also a barrier against leakage of the pressurized internal ferrite coolant fluid. The cavity's inner conductor, made of copper and stainless steel, is subjected to high heat loads and must be liquid cooled. The requirements of the Cavity are very stringent and driven primarily by deflection, natural frequency and temperature. Therefore, very intricate finite element analysis was used to complement conventional hand analysis in the design of the cavity. Structural testing of the assembled prototype cavity is planned to demonstrate the compliance of the cavity design to all of its requirements

  19. Electron beam weld parameter set development and cavity cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Brawley; John Mammossor; Larry Philips

    1997-01-01

    Various methods have recently been considered for use in the cost-effective manufacturing of large numbers of niobium cavities. A method commonly assumed to be too expensive is the joining of half cells by electron beam welding (EBW), as has been done with multipurpose EBW equipment for producing small numbers of cavities at accelerator laboratories. The authors have begun to investigate the advantages that would be available if a single-purpose, task-specific EBW processing tool were used to produce cavities in a high-volume commercial-industrial context. For such a tool and context they have sought to define an EBW parameter set that is cost-effective not only in terms of per-cavity production cost, but also in terms of the minimization of quench-producing weld defects. That is, they define cavity cost-effectiveness to include both production and performance costs. For such an EBW parameter set, they have developed a set of ideal characteristics, produced and tested samples and a complete cavity, studied the weld-defect question, and obtained industrial estimates of cavity high-volume production costs. The investigation in ongoing. This paper reports preliminary findings

  20. LEP superconducting accelerating cavity module

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. The excavation of the LEP tunnel was Europe’s largest civil-engineering project prior to the Channel Tunnel. Three tunnel-boring machines started excavating the tunnel in February 1985 and the ring was completed three years later. In its first phase of operation, LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions. LEP was commissioned in July 1989 and the first beam circulated in the collider on 14 July. The collider's initial energy was chosen to be around 91 GeV, so that Z bosons could be produced. The Z boson and its charged partner the W boson, both discovered at CERN in 1983, are responsible for the weak force, which drives the Sun, for example. Observing the creation and decay of the short-lived Z boson was a critical test of...

  1. Loggerhead oral cavity morphometry study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard external morphometrics and internal oral cavity morphometrics data were collected on wild and captive reared loggerhead sea turtles in size classes ranging...

  2. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  3. Bistability of Cavity Magnon Polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Pu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Dengke; Li, Tie-Fu; Hu, C.-M.; You, J. Q.

    2018-01-01

    We report the first observation of the magnon-polariton bistability in a cavity magnonics system consisting of cavity photons strongly interacting with the magnons in a small yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere. The bistable behaviors emerged as sharp frequency switchings of the cavity magnon polaritons (CMPs) and related to the transition between states with large and small numbers of polaritons. In our experiment, we align, respectively, the [100] and [110] crystallographic axes of the YIG sphere parallel to the static magnetic field and find very different bistable behaviors (e.g., clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis loops) in these two cases. The experimental results are well fitted and explained as being due to the Kerr nonlinearity with either a positive or negative coefficient. Moreover, when the magnetic field is tuned away from the anticrossing point of CMPs, we observe simultaneous bistability of both magnons and cavity photons by applying a drive field on the lower branch.

  4. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM 210 mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities

  5. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  6. Cavity Heating Experiments Supporting Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Berger, Karen T.; Bey, Kim S.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.

    2011-01-01

    The two-color thermographic phosphor method has been used to map the local heating augmentation of scaled idealized cavities at conditions simulating the windward surface of the Shuttle Orbiter Columbia during flight STS-107. Two experiments initiated in support of the Columbia Accident Investigation were conducted in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Generally, the first test series evaluated open (length-to-depth less than 10) rectangular cavity geometries proposed as possible damage scenarios resulting from foam and ice impact during launch at several discrete locations on the vehicle windward surface, though some closed (length-to-depth greater than 13) geometries were briefly examined. The second test series was designed to parametrically evaluate heating augmentation in closed rectangular cavities. The tests were conducted under laminar cavity entry conditions over a range of local boundary layer edge-flow parameters typical of re-entry. Cavity design parameters were developed using laminar computational predictions, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred from the heating measurements. An analysis of the aeroheating caused by cavities allowed exclusion of non-breeching damage from the possible loss scenarios being considered during the investigation.

  7. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  8. Resonant cavity enhanced multi-analyte sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstein, David Alan

    Biological research and medicine increasingly depend on interrogating binding interactions among small segments of DNA, RNA, protein, and bio-specific small molecules. Microarray technology, which senses the affinity for target molecules in solution for a multiplicity of capturing agents fixed to a surface, has been used in biological research for gene expression profiling and in medicine for molecular biomarker detection. Label-free affinity sensing is preferable as it avoids fluorescent labeling of the target molecules, reducing test cost and variability. The Resonant Cavity Imaging Biosensor (RCIB) is a label-free optical inference based technique introduced that scales readily to high throughput and employs an optical resonant cavity to enhance sensitivity by a factor of 100 or more. Near-infrared light centered at 1512.5 nm couples resonantly through a cavity constructed from Si/SiO2 Bragg reflectors, one of which serves as the binding surface. As the wavelength is swept 5 nm, an Indium-Gallium-Arsenide digital camera monitors cavity transmittance at each pixel with resolution 128 x 128. A wavelength shift in the local resonant response of the optical cavity indicates binding. Positioning the sensing surface with respect to the standing wave pattern of the electric field within the cavity, one can control the sensitivity of the measurement to the presence of bound molecules thereby enhancing or suppressing sensitivity where appropriate. Transmitted intensity at thousands of pixel locations are recorded simultaneously in a 10 s, 5 nm scan. An initial proof-of-principle setup was constructed. A sample was fabricated with 25, 100 mum wide square regions, each with a different density of 1 mum square depressions etched 12 nm into the S1O 2 surface. The average depth of each etched region was found with 0.05 nm RMS precision when the sample remains loaded in the setup and 0.3 nm RMS precision when the sample is removed and replaced. Selective binding of the protein

  9. The quest for high-gradient superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavities excel in applications requiring continuous waves or long pulse voltages. Since power losses in the walls of the cavity increase as the square of the accelerating voltage, copper cavities become uneconomical as demand for high continuous wave voltage grows with particle energy. For these reasons, RF superconductivity has become an important technology for high energy and high luminosity accelerators. The state of art in performance of sheet metal niobium cavities is best represented by the statistics of more than 300 5-cell, 1.5-GHz cavities built for CEBAF. Key aspects responsible for the outstanding performance of the CEBAF cavities set are the anti-multipactor, elliptical cell shape, good fabrication and welding techniques, high thermal conductivity niobium, and clean surface preparation. On average, field emission starts at the electric field of 8.7 MV/m, but there is a large spread, even though the cavities received nominally the same surface treatment and assembly procedures. In some cavities, field emission was detected as low as 3 MV/m. In others, it was found to be as high as 19 MV/m. As we will discuss, the reason for the large spread in the gradients is the large spread in emitter characteristics and the random occurrence of emitters on the surface. One important phenomenon that limits the achievable RF magnetic field is thermal breakdown of superconductivity, originating at sub-millimeter-size regions of high RF loss, called defects. Simulation reveal that if the defect is a normal conducting region of 200 mm radius, it will break down at 5 MV/m. Producing high gradients and high Q in superconducting cavities demands excellent control of material properties and surface cleanliness. The spread in gradients that arises from the random occurrence of defects and emitters must be reduced. It will be important to improve installation procedures to preserve the excellent gradients now obtained in laboratory test in vertical cryostats

  10. Results of Cavity Series Fabrication at Jefferson Laboratory for the Cryomodule 'R100'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhauser, F.; Clemens, W.A.; Drury, M.A.; Forehand, D.; Henry, J.; Manning, S.; Overton, R.B.; Williams, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    A series production of eight superconducting RF cavities for the cryomodule R100 was conducted at JLab in 2010. The cavities underwent chemical post-processing prior to vertical high power testing and routinely exceeded the envisaged performance specifications. After cryomodule assembly, cavities were successfully high power acceptance tested. In this paper, we present the achievements paving the way for the first demonstration of 100 MV (and beyond) in a single cryomodule to be operated at CEBAF.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a device that consists of a compound intended to coat a prepared cavity of a tooth before insertion of...

  12. Experimental study of pulsed heating of electromagnetic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritzkau, D.P.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    An experiment to study the effects of pulsed heating in electromagnetic cavities will be performed. Pulsed heating is believed to be the limiting mechanism of high acceleration gradients at short wavelengths. A cylindrical cavity operated in the TE 011 mode at a frequency of 11.424 GHz will be used. A klystron will be used to supply a peak input power of 20 MW with a pulse length of 1.5 μs. The temperature response of the cavity will be measured by a second waveguide designed to excite a TE 012 mode in the cavity with a low-power CW signal at a frequency of 17.8 GHz. The relevant theory of pulsed heating will be discussed and the results from cold-testing the structure will be presented

  13. The DAΦNE 3RD harmonic cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alesini, D.; Boni, R.; Clozza, A.; Gallo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; Palumbo, L.; Pellegrino, L.; Sgamma, F.; Zobov, M.

    2001-01-01

    The installation of a passive 3rd harmonic cavity in both the e + and e - rings of the Frascati Φ-factory DAΦNE has been decided in order to improve the Touschek lifetime by increasing the bunch length. The implications of the RF harmonic system on the beam dynamics, in particular those related to the gap in the bunch filling pattern, have been carefully studied by means of analytical and numerical tools. A single-cell cavity incorporating a ferrite ring for the HOM damping has been designed through the extensive use of MAFIA and HFSS simulation codes. One cavity prototype has been built and extensively bench tested, while the fabrication of the two final cavities is almost completed. A description of the design and construction activities, and a set of experimental measurements are reported in this paper

  14. Correlation Between the Two Manual and Cavity Preparation Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moravej-Salehi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Acquiring fine psychomotor skills is challenging for dental students. Objectives This study aimed to assess the correlation of cavity preparation skills with drawing skills and handwriting of dental students. Methods Ninety-two male and female dental students taking the preclinical course of restorative dentistry in Shahid Beheshti dental school participated in three tests of handwriting, drawing a smile and an amalgam class (CL I cavity preparation and were scored using a specific scoring system. The correlation among the three skills was assessed using multivariate linear regression. Results Most dental students had cavity preparation, handwriting and drawing skills above the average. A significant correlation was found between drawing and tooth preparation skills (P < 0.05. Conclusions A statistically significant difference existed between drawing and cavity preparation skills in students; however, this correlation was not clinically considerable.

  15. High-Q perpendicular-biased ferrite-tuned cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.D.; Thiessen, H.A.; Potter, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid-cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Modest power tests of a small (10-cm-dia) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by nickel-zinc ferrites and aluminum-doped garnets indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity at power levels from 2 to 200 watts

  16. An Automated 476 MHz RF Cavity Processing Facility at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, P; Schwarz, H

    2003-01-01

    The 476 MHz accelerating cavities currently used at SLAC are those installed on the PEP-II B-Factory collider accelerator. They are designed to operate at a maximum accelerating voltage of 1 MV and are routinely utilized on PEP-II at voltages up to 750 kV. During the summer of 2003, SPEAR3 will undergo a substantial upgrade, part of which will be to replace the existing 358.54 MHz RF system with essentially a PEP-II high energy ring (HER) RF station operating at 476.3 MHz and 3.2 MV (or 800 kV/cavity). Prior to installation, cavity RF processing is required to prepare them for use. A dedicated high power test facility is employed at SLAC to provide the capability of conditioning each cavity up to the required accelerating voltage. An automated LabVIEW based interface controls and monitors various cavity and test stand parameters, increasing the RF fields accordingly such that stable operation is finally achieved. This paper describes the high power RF cavity processing facility, highlighting the features of t...

  17. TEM observations of crack tip: cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, J.A.; Ohr, S.M.; Jesser, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Crack tip-cavity interactions have been studied by performing room temperature deformation experiments in a transmission electron microscope on ion-irradiated type 316 stainless steel with small helium containing cavities. Slip dislocations emitted from a crack tip cut, sheared, and thereby elongated cavities without a volume enlargement. As the crack tip approached, a cavity volume enlargement occurred. Instead of the cavities continuing to enlarge until they touch, the walls between the cavities fractured. Fracture surface dimples do not correlate in size or density with these enlarged cavities

  18. Superconducting cavities for the APT accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Haynes, B.; Montoya, D.I.; Rusnak, B.; Shapiro, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    The design of an Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) facility being investigated at Los Alamos includes a linear accelerator using superconducting rf-cavities for the acceleration of a high-current cw proton beam. For electron accelerators with particles moving at the speed of light (β ∼ 1.0), resonators with a rounded shape, consisting of ellipsoidal and cylindrical sections, are well established. They are referred to as elliptical cavities. For the APT-design, this shape has been adapted for much slower proton beams with β ranging from 0.60 to 0.94. This is a new energy range, in which resonators of an elliptical type have never been used before. Simulations with the well-proven electromagnetic modeling tools MAFIA and SUPERFISH were performed. The structures have been optimized for their rf and mechanical properties as well as for beam dynamics requirements. The TRAK-RF simulation code is used to investigate potential multipacting in these structures. All the simulations will be put to a final test in experiments performed on single cell cavities that have started in the structures laboratory

  19. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed

  20. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed.

  1. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  2. Hydroforming of superconducting TESLA cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, W.; Kaiser, H.; Singer, X.

    2003-01-01

    Seamless fabrication of single-cell and multi-cell TESLA shape cavities by hydroforming has been developed at DESY. The forming takes place by expanding the seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Tube radius and axial displacement are being computer controlled in accordance with results of FEM simulations and the experimentally obtained strain-stress curve of tube material. Several Nb single cell cavities have been produced. A first bulk Nb double cell cavity has been fabricated. The Nb seamless tubes have been produced by spinning and deep drawing. Surface treatment such as buffered chemical polishing, (BCP), electropolishing (EP), high pressure ultra pure water rinsing (HPR), annealing at 800degC and baking at ca. 150degC have been applied. The best single cell bulk Nb cavity has reached an accelerating gradient of Eacc > 42 MV/m after ca. 250 μm BCP and 100 μm EP. Several bimetallic NbCu single cell cavities of TESLA shape have been fabricated. The seamless tubes have been produced by explosive bonding and subsequent flow forming. The thicknesses of Nb and Cu layers in the tube wall are about 1 mm and 3 mm respectively. The RF performance of NbCu clad cavities is similar to that of bulk Nb cavities. The highest accelerating gradient achieved was 40 MV/m after ca. 180 μm BCP, annealing at 800degC and baking at 140degC for 30 hours. The degradation of the quality factor Qo after repeated quenching is moderate, after ca. 150 quenches it reaches the saturation point of Qo=1.4x10 10 at low field. This indicates that on the basis of RF performance and material costs the combination of hydroforming with tube cladding is a very promising option. (author)

  3. Partial Cavity Flows at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makiharju, Simo; Elbing, Brian; Wiggins, Andrew; Dowling, David; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven

    2009-11-01

    Partial cavity flows created for friction drag reduction were examined on a large-scale. Partial cavities were investigated at Reynolds numbers up to 120 million, and stable cavities with frictional drag reduction of more than 95% were attained at optimal conditions. The model used was a 3 m wide and 12 m long flat plate with a plenum on the bottom. To create the partial cavity, air was injected at the base of an 18 cm backwards-facing step 2.1 m from the leading edge. The geometry at the cavity closure was varied for different flow speeds to optimize the closure of the cavity. Cavity gas flux, thickness, frictional loads, and cavity pressures were measured over a range of flow speeds and air injection fluxes. High-speed video was used extensively to investigate the unsteady three dimensional cavity closure, the overall cavity shape and oscillations.

  4. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, P., E-mail: kneisel@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Saito, K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Singer, W.; Singer, X. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Myneni, G.R., E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of E{sub acc}=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  5. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-01-01

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  6. Thermal conditions within tree cavities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests: potential implications for cavity users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierling, Kerri T.; Lorenz, Teresa J.; Cunningham, Patrick; Potterf, Kelsi

    2017-11-01

    Tree cavities provide critical roosting and breeding sites for multiple species, and thermal environments in these cavities are important to understand. Our objectives were to (1) describe thermal characteristics in cavities between June 3 and August 9, 2014, and (2) investigate the environmental factors that influence cavity temperatures. We placed iButtons in 84 different cavities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in central Washington, and took hourly measurements for at least 8 days in each cavity. Temperatures above 40 °C are generally lethal to developing avian embryos, and 18% of the cavities had internal temperatures of ≥ 40 °C for at least 1 h of each day. We modeled daily maximum cavity temperature, the amplitude of daily cavity temperatures, and the difference between the mean internal cavity and mean ambient temperatures as a function of several environmental variables. These variables included canopy cover, tree diameter at cavity height, cavity volume, entrance area, the hardness of the cavity body, the hardness of the cavity sill (which is the wood below the cavity entrance which forms the barrier between the cavity and the external environment), and sill width. Ambient temperature had the largest effect size for maximum cavity temperature and amplitude. Larger trees with harder sills may provide more thermally stable cavity environments, and decayed sills were positively associated with maximum cavity temperatures. Summer temperatures are projected to increase in this region, and additional research is needed to determine how the thermal environments of cavities will influence species occupancy, breeding, and survival.

  7. Red-cockaded woodpecker nest-cavity selection: relationships with cavity age and resin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph; William G. Ross; David L. Kulhavy

    1998-01-01

    The authors evaluated selection of nest sites by male red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) in Texas relative to the age of the cavity when only cavities excavated by the woodpeckers were available and when both naturally excavated cavities and artificial cavities were available. They also evaluated nest-cavity selection relative to the ability of naturally...

  8. Development of Side Coupled Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conto, J.M. de; Carretta, J.M.; Gomez-Martinez, Y.; Micoud, R.

    2008-01-01

    Side coupled Cavities are good candidates for proton accelerations in the 90-180 MeV range, as it has been first proposed for the CERN LINAC4 project. A side coupled Linac is made of a lump chain of resonant cavities, alternatively accelerating and coupling. A side coupled cavity has been designed in a CERN-LPSC collaboration to achieve LINAC4 requirements. After RF studies, a complete thermal study has been done, showing that 10-15% is the absolute maximum duty-cycle achievable by such a cavity. Error studies have been developed. They have shown that a tuning ring is mandatory and that a K equals 3% coupling factor is a good choice. A prototype has been built and each cell has been measured and tuned. A simple and accurate method has been used to get both the resonant frequency and the coupling factor, with a movable tuner and a linear fit. A similar method has been used to get the second order coupling factor. A large dispersion is observed on K. This is mainly due to the shape of the coupling apertures, which are very sensitive to mechanical errors. A future and realistic design must be very careful to guarantee a constant aperture (the important parameter is more the dispersion of k than its exact value). Finally, we analyse how to tune the cavity. This has to checked carefully and probably improved or corrected. Results are expected for mid-2008

  9. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-01-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R sun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R sun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  10. Review of cavity optomechanical cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong-Chun; Hu Yu-Wen; Xiao Yun-Feng; Wong Chee Wei

    2013-01-01

    Quantum manipulation of macroscopic mechanical systems is of great interest in both fundamental physics and applications ranging from high-precision metrology to quantum information processing. For these purposes, a crucial step is to cool the mechanical system to its quantum ground state. In this review, we focus on the cavity optomechanical cooling, which exploits the cavity enhanced interaction between optical field and mechanical motion to reduce the thermal noise. Recent remarkable theoretical and experimental efforts in this field have taken a major step forward in preparing the motional quantum ground state of mesoscopic mechanical systems. This review first describes the quantum theory of cavity optomechanical cooling, including quantum noise approach and covariance approach; then, the up-to-date experimental progresses are introduced. Finally, new cooling approaches are discussed along the directions of cooling in the strong coupling regime and cooling beyond the resolved sideband limit. (topical review - quantum information)

  11. Inter-assemblage facilitation: the functional diversity of cavity-producing beetles drives the size diversity of cavity-nesting bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydenham, Markus A K; Häusler, Lise D; Moe, Stein R; Eldegard, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Inter-specific interactions are important drivers and maintainers of biodiversity. Compared to trophic and competitive interactions, the role of non-trophic facilitation among species has received less attention. Cavity-nesting bees nest in old beetle borings in dead wood, with restricted diameters corresponding to the body size of the bee species. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the functional diversity of cavity-producing wood boring beetles - in terms of cavity diameters - drives the size diversity of cavity-nesting bees. The invertebrate communities were sampled in 30 sites, located in forested landscapes along an elevational gradient. We regressed the species richness and abundance of cavity nesting bees against the species richness and abundance of wood boring beetles, non-wood boring beetles and elevation. The proportion of cavity nesting bees in bee species assemblage was regressed against the species richness and abundance of wood boring beetles. We also tested the relationships between the size diversity of cavity nesting bees and wood boring beetles. The species richness and abundance of cavity nesting bees increased with the species richness and abundance of wood boring beetles. No such relationship was found for non-wood boring beetles. The abundance of wood boring beetles was also related to an increased proportion of cavity nesting bee individuals. Moreover, the size diversity of cavity-nesting bees increased with the functional diversity of wood boring beetles. Specifically, the mean and dispersion of bee body sizes increased with the functional dispersion of large wood boring beetles. The positive relationships between cavity producing bees and cavity nesting bees suggest that non-trophic facilitative interactions between species assemblages play important roles in organizing bee species assemblages. Considering a community-wide approach may therefore be required if we are to successfully understand and conserve wild bee

  12. A superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the phase space of pion beams at LAMPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, J.M.; Davis, J.; DeHaven, R.A.; Gray, E.; Johnson, R.; Lomax, R.E.; McCloud, B.J.; McGill, J.A.; Morris, C.L.; Novak, J.; Rusnak, B.; Tubb, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Applegate, J.M.; Averett, T.D.; Beck, J.; Ritchie, B.G. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)); Haebel, E. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Kiehlmann, D.; Klein, U.; Peniger, M.; Schaefer, P.; Vogel, H. (Siemens AG, Accelerator and Magnet Technology, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany)); Ward, H.; Moore, C.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

    1992-07-15

    The SCRUNCHER is a superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the longitudinal phase space of the secondary pion beam from the low energy pion channel at LAMPF. Test results of the cavity performance and initial results from in-beam tests are presented. (orig.).

  13. A superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the phase space of pion beams at LAMPF

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. M.; Davis, J.; DeHaven, R. A.; Gray, E.; Johnson, R.; Lomax, R. E.; McCloud, B. J.; McGill, J. A.; Morris, C. L.; Novak, J.; Rusnak, B.; Tubb, G.; Applegate, J. M.; Averett, T. D.; Beck, J.; Ritchie, B. G.; Haebel, E.; Kiehlmann, D.; Klein, U.; Peiniger, M.; Schäfer, P.; Vogel, H.; Ward, H.; Fred Moore, C.

    1992-07-01

    The SCRUNCHER is a superconducting radio-frequency cavity for manipulating the longitudinal phase space of the secondary pion beam from the low energy pion channel at LAMPF. Test results of the cavity performance and initial results from in-beam tests are presented.

  14. Fabrication of the prototype 201.25 MHZ cavity for a muon ionization cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Manning, S.; Manus, R.; Phillips, L.; Stirbet, M.; Worland, K.; Wu, G.; Li, D.; MacGill, R.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.S.; Taminger, K.; Hafley, R.; Martin, R.; Summers, D.; Reep, M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and assembly of the first prototype 201. 25 MHz copper cavity for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). This cavity was developed by the US MUCOOL collaboration and will be tested in the new MUCOOL Test Area at Fermilab. We outline the component and subassembly fabrication steps and the various metal forming and joining methods used to produce the final cavity shape. These include spinning, brazing, TIG welding, electron beam welding, electron beam annealing and deep drawing. Some of the methods developed for this cavity are novel and offer significant cost savings over conventional methods

  15. On niobium sputter coated cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnolds-Mayer, G.; Kaufmann, U.; Downar, H.

    1988-01-01

    To coat copper cavities with a thin film of niobium, facilities for electropolishing and sputter deposition have been installed at Dornier. Experiments have been performed on samples to optimize electropolishing and deposition parameters. In this paper, characteristics concerning surface properties, adhesion of the niobium film to the copper substrate, and film properties were studied on planar samples. A 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper was sputter coated twice. First rf measurements were performed in the temperature range from 300 K to 2 K

  16. Orion EFT-1 Cavity Heating Tile Experiments and Environment Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Oliver, Brandon; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Developing aerothermodynamic environments for deep cavities, such as those produced by micrometeoroids and orbital debris impacts, poses a great challenge for engineers. In order to assess existing cavity heating models, two one-inch diameter cavities were flown on the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). These cavities were manufactured with depths of 1.0 in and 1.4 in, and they were both instrumented. Instrumentation included surface thermocouples upstream, downstream and within the cavities, and additional thermocouples at the TPS-structure interface. This paper will present the data obtained, and comparisons with computational predictions will be shown. Additionally, the development of a 3D material thermal model will be described, which will be used to account for the three-dimensionality of the problem when interpreting the data. Furthermore, using a multi-dimensional inverse heat conduction approach, a reconstruction of a time- and space-dependent flight heating distribution during EFT1 will be presented. Additional discussions will focus on instrumentation challenges and calibration techniques specific to these experiments. The analysis shown will highlight the accuracies and/or deficiencies of current computational techniques to model cavity flows during hypersonic re-entry.

  17. The performance of gas storage cavities leached in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugout, B.; Roger, C.

    1990-01-01

    Unlike other underground gas storage techniques, the gas storage cavities leached in salt and operated by compression-expansion are able to operate at high send-out rates with relatively small amounts of immobilized gas. The entire working gas capacity can be withdrawn within a period of between a few days and a few weeks, as opposed to several months for an aquifer or depleted field storage. To evaluate the deliverability of a cavity, which varies considerably during withdrawal, it is necessary to know at all times the gas pressure and temperature in the cavity and at all points in the production well and surface equipment, up to the point of injection into the network (manifold, filter, dehydration unit, meter run, and pressure governor). For this, a code (SITHERGAZ) based on the integration of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics equations was developed by Gaz be France. It has been operational since 1980. The experience acquired by Gaz de France in the operation of around twenty cavities, some of which have been in service for years, and the results of numerous simulations using the SITHERGAZ programme have made it possible to prove the legitimacy of a certain number of simplifying hypotheses. Using these hypotheses, the performance of cavities can be evaluated with reasonable accuracy by simple means. This paper describes the test procedures which provide a simple means to determine the flow pressure-loss coefficients and presents the practical calculation of cavity performance. (author). 5 figs

  18. Study of superconducting cavities for high power proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biarrotte, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The research program on hybrid reactors has started in France in order to study the technologies allowing the transmutation of radioactive wastes thanks to a spallation neutron source supplied by a linear high intensity proton accelerator. The study of the high energy part of this accelerator (superconducting accelerator for hybrid) has started, and its aim is the design of superconducting radiofrequency cavities which make the two different sections of the accelerator (0.47 and 0.65). This thesis presents the advance of the work carried out on this topic since 1997, in particular the design and optimization of the 5-cell cavities which work at the 704.4 MHz frequency. The experimental part of the study has been carried out in parallel with the industrial fabrication (Cerca) of several prototypes of mono-cell cavities. These cavities have shown very good RF performances during the tests in vertical cryostat; the A 102 A cavity, in particular develops a Q0 of 7.10 10 (indicating very low RF losses) and reaches an accelerator field of 25 MV/m, i.e. more than two times the specified value (about 10 MV/V). Finally, a new risk analysis method for the excitation of the upper modes is proposed. This method shows in particular the uselessness of the implementation of HOM couplers on the cavities for a continuous beam use. (J.S.)

  19. Apparatus and method for plasma processing of SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, J.; Im, Do; Peshl, J.; Bašović, M.; Popović, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A.-M.; Phillips, L.; Vušković, L.

    2016-05-01

    An apparatus and a method are described for plasma etching of the inner surface of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Accelerator SRF cavities are formed into a variable-diameter cylindrical structure made of bulk niobium, for resonant generation of the particle accelerating field. The etch rate non-uniformity due to depletion of the radicals has been overcome by the simultaneous movement of the gas flow inlet and the inner electrode. An effective shape of the inner electrode to reduce the plasma asymmetry for the coaxial cylindrical rf plasma reactor is determined and implemented in the cavity processing method. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise way to establish segmented plasma columns. The test structure was a pillbox cavity made of steel of similar dimension to the standard SRF cavity. This was adopted to experimentally verify the plasma surface reaction on cylindrical structures with variable diameter using the segmented plasma generation approach. The pill box cavity is filled with niobium ring- and disk-type samples and the etch rate of these samples was measured.

  20. Modeling Coupled Evaporation and Seepage in Ventilated Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghezzehei, T.; Trautz, R.; Finsterle, S.; Cook, P.; Ahlers, C.

    2004-01-01

    Cavities excavated in unsaturated geological formations are important to activities such as nuclear waste disposal and mining. Such cavities provide a unique setting for simultaneous occurrence of seepage and evaporation. Previously, inverse numerical modeling of field liquid-release tests and associated seepage into cavities were used to provide seepage-related large-scale formation properties by ignoring the impact of evaporation. The applicability of such models was limited to the narrow range of ventilation conditions under which the models were calibrated. The objective of this study was to alleviate this limitation by incorporating evaporation into the seepage models. We modeled evaporation as an isothermal vapor diffusion process. The semi-physical model accounts for the relative humidity, temperature, and ventilation conditions of the cavities. The evaporation boundary layer thickness (BLT) over which diffusion occurs was estimated by calibration against free-water evaporation data collected inside the experimental cavities. The estimated values of BLT were 5 to 7 mm for the open underground drifts and 20 mm for niches closed off by bulkheads. Compared to previous models that neglected the effect of evaporation, this new approach showed significant improvement in capturing seepage fluctuations into open cavities of low relative humidity. At high relative-humidity values (greater than 85%), the effect of evaporation on seepage was very small

  1. Industrialization of the nitrogen-doping preparation for SRF cavities for LCLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, D.; Aderhold, S.; Burrill, A.; Daly, E.; Davis, K.; Grassellino, A.; Grimm, C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Marhauser, F.; Melnychuk, O.; Palczewski, A.; Posen, S.; Ross, M.; Sergatskov, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Wilson, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is a new state-of-the-art coherent X-ray source being constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. It employs 280 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in order operate in continuous wave (CW) mode. To reduce the overall cryogenic cost of such a large accelerator, nitrogen-doping of the SRF cavities is being used. Nitrogen-doping has consistently been shown to increase the efficiency of SRF cavities operating in the 2.0 K regime and at medium fields (15-20 MV/m) in vertical cavity tests and horizontal cryomodule tests. While nitrogen-doping's efficacy for improvement of cavity performance was demonstrated at three independent labs, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and Cornell University, transfer of the technology to industry for LCLS-II production was not without challenges. Here we present results from the beginning of LCLS-II cavity production. We discuss qualification of the cavity vendors and the first cavities from each vendor. Finally, we demonstrate that nitrogen-doping has been successfully transferred to SRF cavity vendors, resulting in consistent production of cavities with better cryogenic efficiency than has ever been achieved for a large-scale accelerator.

  2. Calibration and field testing of cavity ring-down laser spectrometers measuring CH4, CO2, and δ13CH4 deployed on towers in the Marcellus Shale region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Miles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Four in situ cavity ring-down spectrometers (G2132-i, Picarro, Inc. measuring methane dry mole fraction (CH4, carbon dioxide dry mole fraction (CO2, and the isotopic ratio of methane (δ13CH4 were deployed at four towers in the Marcellus Shale natural gas extraction region of Pennsylvania. In this paper, we describe laboratory and field calibration of the analyzers for tower-based applications and characterize their performance in the field for the period January–December 2016. Prior to deployment, each analyzer was tested using bottles with various isotopic ratios, from biogenic to thermogenic source values, which were diluted to varying degrees in zero air, and an initial calibration was performed. Furthermore, at each tower location, three field tanks were employed, from ambient to high mole fractions, with various isotopic ratios. Two of these tanks were used to adjust the calibration of the analyzers on a daily basis. We also corrected for the cross-interference from ethane on the isotopic ratio of methane. Using an independent field tank for evaluation, the standard deviation of 4 h means of the isotopic ratio of methane difference from the known value was found to be 0.26 ‰ δ13CH4. Following improvements in the field tank testing scheme, the standard deviation of 4 h means was 0.11 ‰, well within the target compatibility of 0.2 ‰. Round-robin style testing using tanks with near-ambient isotopic ratios indicated mean errors of −0.14 to 0.03 ‰ for each of the analyzers. Flask to in situ comparisons showed mean differences over the year of 0.02 and 0.08 ‰, for the east and south towers, respectively. Regional sources in this region were difficult to differentiate from strong perturbations in the background. During the afternoon hours, the median differences of the isotopic ratio measured at three of the towers, compared to the background tower, were &minus0.15 to 0.12 ‰ with standard deviations of the 10

  3. Calibration and field testing of cavity ring-down laser spectrometers measuring CH4, CO2, and δ13CH4 deployed on towers in the Marcellus Shale region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Natasha L.; Martins, Douglas K.; Richardson, Scott J.; Rella, Christopher W.; Arata, Caleb; Lauvaux, Thomas; Davis, Kenneth J.; Barkley, Zachary R.; McKain, Kathryn; Sweeney, Colm

    2018-03-01

    Four in situ cavity ring-down spectrometers (G2132-i, Picarro, Inc.) measuring methane dry mole fraction (CH4), carbon dioxide dry mole fraction (CO2), and the isotopic ratio of methane (δ13CH4) were deployed at four towers in the Marcellus Shale natural gas extraction region of Pennsylvania. In this paper, we describe laboratory and field calibration of the analyzers for tower-based applications and characterize their performance in the field for the period January-December 2016. Prior to deployment, each analyzer was tested using bottles with various isotopic ratios, from biogenic to thermogenic source values, which were diluted to varying degrees in zero air, and an initial calibration was performed. Furthermore, at each tower location, three field tanks were employed, from ambient to high mole fractions, with various isotopic ratios. Two of these tanks were used to adjust the calibration of the analyzers on a daily basis. We also corrected for the cross-interference from ethane on the isotopic ratio of methane. Using an independent field tank for evaluation, the standard deviation of 4 h means of the isotopic ratio of methane difference from the known value was found to be 0.26 ‰ δ13CH4. Following improvements in the field tank testing scheme, the standard deviation of 4 h means was 0.11 ‰, well within the target compatibility of 0.2 ‰. Round-robin style testing using tanks with near-ambient isotopic ratios indicated mean errors of -0.14 to 0.03 ‰ for each of the analyzers. Flask to in situ comparisons showed mean differences over the year of 0.02 and 0.08 ‰, for the east and south towers, respectively. Regional sources in this region were difficult to differentiate from strong perturbations in the background. During the afternoon hours, the median differences of the isotopic ratio measured at three of the towers, compared to the background tower, were &minus0.15 to 0.12 ‰ with standard deviations of the 10 min isotopic ratio differences of 0.8

  4. Development of Infrastructure Facilities for Superconducting RF Cavity Fabrication, Processing and 2 K Characterization at RRCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S. C.; Raghavendra, S.; Jain, V. K.; Puntambekar, A.; Khare, P.; Dwivedi, J.; Mundra, G.; Kush, P. K.; Shrivastava, P.; Lad, M.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-02-01

    An extensive infrastructure facility is being established at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) for a proposed 1 GeV, high intensity superconducting proton linac for Indian Spallation Neutron Source. The proton linac will comprise of a large number of superconducting Radio Frequency (SCRF) cavities ranging from low beta spoke resonators to medium and high beta multi-cell elliptical cavities at different RF frequencies. Infrastructure facilities for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and performance characterization at 2 K are setup to take-up manufacturing of large number of cavities required for future projects of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). RRCAT is also participating in a DAE’s approved mega project on “Physics and Advanced technology for High intensity Proton Accelerators” under Indian Institutions-Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC). In the R&D phase of IIFC program, a number of high beta, fully dressed multi-cell elliptical SCRF cavities will be developed in collaboration with Fermilab. A dedicated facility for SCRF cavity fabrication, tuning and processing is set up. SCRF cavities developed will be characterized at 2K using a vertical test stand facility, which is already commissioned. A Horizontal Test Stand facility has also been designed and under development for testing a dressed multi-cell SCRF cavity at 2K. The paper presents the infrastructure facilities setup at RRCAT for SCRF cavity fabrication, processing and testing at 2K.

  5. Conduction cooling systems for linear accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Robert

    2017-05-02

    A conduction cooling system for linear accelerator cavities. The system conducts heat from the cavities to a refrigeration unit using at least one cavity cooler interconnected with a cooling connector. The cavity cooler and cooling connector are both made from solid material having a very high thermal conductivity of approximately 1.times.10.sup.4 W m.sup.-1 K.sup.-1 at temperatures of approximately 4 degrees K. This allows for very simple and effective conduction of waste heat from the linear accelerator cavities to the cavity cooler, along the cooling connector, and thence to the refrigeration unit.

  6. Sterility of the uterine cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Birger R.; Kristiansen, Frank V.; Thorsen, Poul

    1995-01-01

    from the same sites. Nearly a quarter of all the patients harbored one or more microorganisms in the uterus, mostly Gardnerella vaginalis, Enterobacter and Streptococcus agalactiae. We found that in a significant number of cases, the uterine cavity is colonized with potentially pathogenic organisms...

  7. Flux trapping in superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, C.; Bolore, M.; Bonin, B.; Charrier, J.P.; Daillant, B.; Gratadour, J.; Koechlin, F.; Safa, H.

    1992-01-01

    The flux trapped in various field cooled Nb and Pb samples has been measured. For ambient fields smaller than 3 Gauss, 100% of the flux is trapped. The consequences of this result on the behavior of superconducting RF cavities are discussed. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs

  8. Field emission in RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Electron field emission limits the accelerating gradient in superconducting cavities. It is shown how and why it is an important problem. The phenomenology of field emission is then described, both in DC and RF regimes. Merits of a few plausible 'remedies' to field emission are discussed. (author)

  9. Thoracic cavity after thoracic operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.

    1983-01-01

    The problems of roentgenologic method application to detect postoperative c omplications in pulmonary tissue, bronchi, pleural cavity, mediastinum, have been considered. It is shown, that the use of the above mentioned method permit s to judge on the rates and degrees of the lungs straightening, anatomic structures shift, the change in air- and blood-filling, accumulation of liquid a nd air in pleuritic

  10. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  11. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also d...

  12. Superconducting cavities for beauty factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengeler, H.

    1992-01-01

    The possibilities and merits of superconducting accelerating cavities for Beauty-factories are considered. There exist already large sc systems of size and frequency comparable to the ones needed for Beauty-factories. Their status and operation experience is discussed. A comparison of normal conducting and superconducting systems is done for two typical Beauty-factory rings

  13. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, W [DESY (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. The equator welds are particularly critical. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on halfcells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The established procedure is suitable for large series production. The main aspects of quality assurance management are mentioned. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and EBW. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35–45 MV·m–1 can be achieved by applying Electropolishing (EP) treatment. Furthermore, the single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is promising. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the

  14. Tuner Design for PEFP Superconducting RF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yazhe; An, Sun; Zhang, Liping; Cho, Yong Sub

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity will be used to accelerate a proton beam after 100 MeV at 700 MHz in a linac of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) and its extended project. In order to control the SRF cavity's operating frequency at a low temperature, a new tuner has been developed for the PEFP SRF cavities. Each PEFP superconducting RF cavity has one tuner to match the cavity resonance frequency with the desired accelerator operating frequency; or to detune a cavity frequency a few bandwidths away from a resonance, so that the beam will not excite the fundamental mode, when the cavity is not being used for an acceleration. The PEFP cavity tuning is achieved by varying the total length of the cavity. The length of the cavity is controlled differentially by tuner acting with respect to the cavity body. The PEFP tuner is attached to the helium vessel and drives the cavity Field Probe (FP) side to change the frequency of the cavity

  15. RF Processing of the Couplers for the SNS Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y.Kang; I.E. Campisi; D. Stout; A. Vassioutchenko; M. Stirbet; M. Drury; T. Powers

    2005-01-01

    All eighty-one fundamental power couplers for the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the SNS linac have been RF conditioned and installed in the cryomodules successfully. The couplers were RF processed at JLAB or at the SNS in ORNL: more than forty couplers have been RF conditioned in the SNS RF Test Facility (RFTF) after the first forty couplers were conditioned at JLAB. The couplers were conditioned up to 650 kW forward power at 8% duty cycle in traveling and standing waves. They were installed on the cavities in the cryomodules and then assembled with the airside waveguide transitions. The couplers have been high power RF tested with satisfactory accelerating field gradients in the cooled cavities

  16. Analytical & Experimental Study of Radio Frequency Cavity Beam Profile Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, Mario D. [Fermilab; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2017-10-22

    The purpose of this analytical and experimental study is multifold: 1) To explore a new, radiation-robust, hadron beam profile monitor for intense neutrino beam applications; 2) To test, demonstrate, and develop a novel gas-filled Radio-Frequency (RF) cavity to use in this monitoring system. Within this context, the first section of the study analyzes the beam distribution across the hadron monitor as well as the ion-production rate inside the RF cavity. Furthermore a more effecient pixel configuration across the hadron monitor is proposed to provide higher sensitivity to changes in beam displacement. Finally, the results of a benchtop test of the tunable quality factor RF cavity will be presented. The proposed hadron monitor configuration consists of a circular array of RF cavities located at a radial distance of 7cm { corresponding to the standard deviation of the beam due to scatering { and a gas-filled RF cavity with a quality factor in the range 400 - 800.

  17. Overview of electrical axis measurement in TESLA-type cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labanc, Anton

    2007-01-01

    The cells of TESLA cavities are mechanically aligned and tuned before the cavities are installed into the cryomodule. The alignment minimizes unwanted interaction of the accelerated beam with the transverse electric field component and the magnetic field of the accelerating TM 010 -π mode. It also reduces an interaction with higher order modes. The tuning equalizes field amplitudes of the accelerating mode in all cells. Until now, the eccentricity (misalignment) of cells is measured mechanically with residual misalignment after tuning up to 0.4 mm. Unfortunately the mechanical measurement is only weakly related to the electromagnetic fields inside a cavity, both for the accelerating and higher order modes. For improvement of the precision a new method of electromagnetic field mapping inside a cavity, based on small perturbation theory was developed. This method can be applied to modes which do not propagate through the beam pipes. In the setup built for the axis measurement a metallic needle is used as field perturbing object. Conducted tests confirmed high precision of 0.1 mm. Tests on the copper model for which it is possible to excite all of considered modes and on several niobium cavities were performed. In this paper an overview of measurement method, equipment and first results are reported. (orig.)

  18. Waveguide based external cavity semiconductor lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Klein, E.J.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Lee, Christopher James; Verhaegen, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress of the project waveguide based external cavity semiconductor laser (WECSL) arrays. Here we present the latest results on our efforts to mode lock an array of tunable, external cavity semiconductor lasers.

  19. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  20. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained.......Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  1. An economical wireless cavity-nest viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel P. Huebner; Sarah R. Hurteau

    2007-01-01

    Inspection of cavity nests and nest boxes is often required during studies of cavity-nesting birds, and fiberscopes and pole-mounted video cameras are sometimes used for such inspection. However, the cost of these systems may be prohibitive for some potential users. We describe a user-built, wireless cavity viewer that can be used to access cavities as high as 15 m and...

  2. Magnesium Diboride thin Films, multilayers, and coatings for SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoxing [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities currently use low-temperature superconductor niobium, and the Nb SRF cavities have approached the performance levels predicted theoretically. Compared to Nb, MgB2 becomes superconducting at a much higher temperature and promises a better RF performance in terms of higher quality factor Q and higher acceleration capability. An MgB2 SRF technology can significantly reduce the operating costs of particle accelerators when these potentials are realized. This project aimed to advance the development of an MgB2 SRF technology. It had two main objectives: (1) materials issues of MgB2 thin films and multilayers related to their applications in SRF cavities; and (2) coating single-cell cavities for testing at RF frequencies. The key technical thrust of the project is the deposition of high quality clean MgB2 films and coatings by the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) technique, which was developed in my group. We have achieved technical progress in each of the two areas. For the first objective, we have confirmed that MgB2 thin film coatings can be used to effectively enhance the vortex penetration field of an SRF cavity. A vortex is a normal region in the shape of spaghetti that threads through a superconductor. Its existence is due to an applied magnetic field that is greater than a so-called lower critical field, Hc1. Once a vortex enters the superconductor, its movement leads to loss. This has been shown to be the reason for an SRF cavity to break down. Thus, enhancing the magnetic field for a vortex to enter the superconductor that forms the SRF cavity has be a goal of intense research. To this end, Gurevich proposed that a coating of thin superconductor layer can impede the vortex entrance. In this project, we have done two important experiment to test this concept. One, we showed that the enhancement of Hc1 can be

  3. Progress on the Design of a Perpendicularly Biased 2nd Harmonic Cavity for the Fermilab Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrak, R. L. [Fermilab; Dey, J. E. [Fermilab; Duel, K. L. [Fermilab; Kuharik, J. C. [Fermilab; Pellico, W. A. [Fermilab; Reid, J. S. [Fermilab; Romanov, G. [Fermilab; Slabough, M. [Fermilab; Sun, D. [Fermilab; Tan, C. Y. [Fermilab; Terechkine, I. [Fermilab

    2016-10-01

    perpendicularly biased 2nd harmonic cavity is being designed and built for the Fermilab Booster. Its purpose is to flatten the bucket at injection and thus change the longitudinal beam distribution to decrease space charge effects. It can also help at extraction. The cavity frequency range is 76 – 106 MHz. The power amplifier will be built using the Y567B tetrode, which is also used for the fundamental mode cavities in the Fermilab Booster. We discuss recent progress on the cavity, the biasing solenoid design and plans for testing the tuner's garnet material

  4. Electrodynamic characterisitcs measurements of higher order modes in S-band cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donetsky, R.; Lalayan, M.; Sobenin, N. P.; Orlov, A.; Bulygin, A.

    2017-12-01

    The 800 MHz superconducting cavities with grooved beam pipes were suggested as one of the harmonic cavities design options for High Luminosity LHC project. Cavity simulations were carried out and scaled aluminium prototype having operational mode frequency of 2400 MHz was manufactured for testing the results of simulations. The experimental measurements of transverse shunt impedance with error estimation for higher order modes TM 110 and TE 111 for S-band elliptical cavity were done. The experiments using dielectric and metallic spherical beads and with ring probe were carried out. The Q-factor measurements for two-cell structure and array of two cells were carried out.

  5. Deep drawing experiences of niobium disk for PEFP SRF cavity prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; An, Sun; Zhang, Liping; Tang, Yazhe; Li, Ying Min; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a geometrical beta of 0.42 has been designed to accelerate a proton beam after 100 MeV for an extension of Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP). The designed cavity shape is an elliptical and the resonant frequency is 700 MHz. In order to confirm the RF and mechanical properties of the cavity, two prototypes of copper cavities have been fabricated and tested. Based on the experiences gained with the copper prototypes, two niobium prototypes have been designed. One is two-cell cavity and the other is five cell cavity. The two-cell cavity is for finalizing the niobium cavity production procedure and testing the cavity RF properties at a low temperature and moderate power level. The five-cell cavity is for checking the production quality and testing vertical test system in the future. Both of them are under fabrication. Through the fabrication of the niobium prototype, several issues such as deep drawing, electron beam welding and surface treatment will be addressed. The drawing of the PEPF SRF low beta cavity is shown in Fig. 1. Major parameters for the cavity are like following. - Frequency: 700 MHz - Operating mode: TM010 pi mode - Cavity type: Elliptical - Geometrical beta: 0.42 - Number of cells: 5 per cavity - Accelerating gradient: 8 MV/m - Epeak/Eacc: 3.71 - Bpeak/Eacc: 7.47 mT/(MV/m) - R/Q: 102.3 ohm - Epeak: 29.68 MV/m - Field flatness: 1.56 % - Cell to cell coupling: 1.41 % - Geometrical factor: 121.68 ohm - Cavity wall thickness: 4.3 mm - Lorentz force detuning: 0.4 Hz/(MV/m)2 - Stiffening structure: Double ring - Effective length: 0.45 m - External Q of FPC: 8.0E5 ±20 % - HOM load: less than 2 W - HOM Qext requirement: less than 3.0E5 At present, all the niobium disk and plates for cavity and NbTi flanges for beam pipe flange are prepared

  6. Preparation of niobium coated copper superconducting rf cavities for the large electron positron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Chiaveri, E.; Hilleret, N.; Minestrini, M.; Weingarten, W.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1980 development work has been carried out at CERN aiming at producing niobium coated superconducting RF cavities in the framework of the foreseen LEP energy upgrading above the initial 55 GeV. During 1987 a 4-cell LEP cavity without coupling ports has been successfully coated for the first time. Meanwhile, cathodes for coating the coupling ports were built and tested. The effort has been subsequently directed to preparing at least one (possibly 2) coated cavity(ies) to be installed in LEP during 1989. In this paper the various production steps of these cavities are reconsidered in view of industrial production

  7. Telescope-based cavity for negative ion beam neutralization in future fusion reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Hreibi, Ali; Chaibi, Walid

    2018-03-01

    In future fusion reactors, heating system efficiency is of the utmost importance. Photo-neutralization substantially increases the neutral beam injector (NBI) efficiency with respect to the foreseen system in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) based on a gaseous target. In this paper, we propose a telescope-based configuration to be used in the NBI photo-neutralizer cavity of the demonstration power plant (DEMO) project. This configuration greatly reduces the total length of the cavity, which likely solves overcrowding issues in a fusion reactor environment. Brought to a tabletop experiment, this cavity configuration is tested: a 4 mm beam width is obtained within a ≃1.5  m length cavity. The equivalent cavity g factor is measured to be 0.038(3), thus confirming the cavity stability.

  8. Study of Low Work Function Materials for Hot Cavity Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Catherall, R; Fedosseev, V; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Menna, Mariano; Österdahl, F; Raeder, S; Schwellnus, F; Stora, T; Wendt, K; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization on the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high-temperature, low-work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE / CERN, Geneva and RISIKO / University of Mainz.

  9. Study of low work function materials for hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Schwellnus, F; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Mattolat, Ch; Menna, M; Österdahl, F K; Raeder, S; Stora, T; Wendta, K

    2009-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization of the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high temperature, low work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE/CERN, Geneva and RISIKO/University of Mainz.

  10. Nanometer cavities studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogensen, O.E.

    1992-01-01

    Positronium (Ps) is trapped in cavities in insulating solids, and the lifetime of ortho Ps is determined by the size of the cavity. The information on the properties of the cavities obtained by use of the standard slow positron beam and the 'normal' positron annihilation techniques is compared for several selected cases. (author)

  11. Computer codes for RF cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K.

    1992-08-01

    In RF cavity design, numerical modeling is assuming an increasingly important role with the help of sophisticated computer codes and powerful yet affordable computers. A description of the cavity codes in use in the accelerator community has been given previously. The present paper will address the latest developments and discuss their applications to cavity toning and matching problems

  12. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  13. Computer codes for RF cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K.

    1992-01-01

    In RF cavity design, numerical modeling is assuming an increasingly important role with the help of sophisticated computer codes and powerful yet affordable computers. A description of the cavity codes in use in the accelerator community has been given previously. The present paper will address the latest developments and discuss their applications to cavity tuning and matching problems. (Author) 8 refs., 10 figs

  14. A Many-Atom Cavity QED System with Homogeneous Atom-Cavity Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jongmin; Vrijsen, Geert; Teper, Igor; Hosten, Onur; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a many-atom-cavity system with a high-finesse dual-wavelength standing wave cavity in which all participating rubidium atoms are nearly identically coupled to a 780-nm cavity mode. This homogeneous coupling is enforced by a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by the field of a 1560-nm cavity mode.

  15. Gastrophysics of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-01-01

    Gastrophysics is the science that pertains to the physical and physico-chemical description of the empirical world of gastronomy, with focus on sensory perception in the oral cavity and how it is related to the materials properties of food and cooking processes. Flavor (taste and smell), mouthfeel, chemesthesis, and astringency are all related to the chemical properties and the texture of the food and how the food is transformed in the oral cavity. The present topical review will primarily focus attention on the somatosensory perception of food (mouthfeel or texture) and how it interacts with basic tastes (sour, bitter, sweet, salty, and umami) and chemesthetic action. Issues regarding diet, nutrition, and health will be put into an evolutionary perspective, and some mention will be made of umami and its importance for (oral) health.

  16. Superconducting versus normal conducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Podlech, Holger

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important issues of high-power hadron linacs is the choice of technology with respect to superconducting or room-temperature operation. The favour for a specific technology depends on several parameters such as the beam energy, beam current, beam power and duty factor. This contribution gives an overview of the comparison between superconducting and normal conducting cavities. This includes basic radiofrequency (RF) parameters, design criteria, limitations, required RF and plug power as well as case studies.

  17. Grinding Inside A Toroidal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Walter; Adams, James F.; Burley, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Weld lines ground smooth within about 0.001 in. Grinding tool for smoothing longitudinal weld lines inside toroidal cavity includes curved tunnel jig to guide grinding "mouse" along weld line. Curvature of tunnel jig matched to shape of toroid so grinding ball in mouse follows circular arc of correct radius as mouse is pushed along tunnel. Tool enables precise control of grindout shape, yet easy to use.

  18. A Green Fabry-Perot Cavity for Jefferson Lab Hall A Compton Polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Souder, Paul; Nanda, Sirish

    2009-01-01

    A green laser (CW, 532 nm) based Fabry-Perot cavity for high precision Compton Polarimetry is under development in Hall A of the Jefferson Laboratory. In this paper, we present the principle and the preliminary studies for our test cavity.

  19. Local and non-local Schroedinger cat states in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haroche, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: I will review recent experiments performed on mesoscopic state superpositions of field states in cavity QED. Proposals to extend these studies to Schroedinger cat states delocalized in two cavities will be discussed. New versions of Bell's inequality tests will probe the non-local behavior of these cats and study their sensitivity to decoherence. (author)

  20. Intra-cavity metamorphosis of a Gaussian beam to flat-top distribution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We explore an intra-cavity beam shaping approach to generate a Gaussian distribution by the metamorphosis of a Gaussian beam into a flat-top distribution on opposing mirrors. The concept is tested external to the cavity through the use of two...

  1. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Djafari-Rouhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  2. High-repetition intra-cavity source of Compton radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Agustsson, R; Campese, T; Murokh, A; Ovodenko, A; Shaftan, T

    2014-01-01

    We report our progress in developing a high-power Compton source for a diversity of applications ranging from university-scale compact x-ray light sources and metrology tools for EUV lithography, to high-brilliance gamma-sources for nuclear analysis. Our conceptual approach lies in multiplying the source’s repetition rate and increasing its average brightness by placing the Compton interaction point inside the optical cavity of an active laser. We discuss considerations in its design, our simulations, and tests of the laser’s cavity that confirm the feasibility of the proposed concept. (paper)

  3. A rugby-shaped cavity for the LMJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Bastian, J.; Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Jadaud, J.P.; Lafitte, S.; Liberatore, S.; Malinie, G.; Philippe, F.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical studies show that a rugby-shaped hohlraum for indirect drive laser ignition has some advantages: it allows a better symmetry for the X-ray irradiation of the central target and it required less laser power. Rugby-shaped cavities have been tested successfully at the Omega facility. The energetic advantage is all the more important as the cavity is bigger. Simulations have shown that a rugby-shaped hohlraum plus adequate materials for the intern wall plus an optimization of the central target could open the way to an ignition with only 160 laser beams at the LMJ (Megajoule Laser) facility. (A.C.)

  4. CAVITY BEAM POSITION MONITOR SYSTEM FOR ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F; Joshi, N; Lyapin, A; Aryshev, A; Honda, Y; Naito, T; Terunuma, N; Urakara, J; Heo, A; Kim, E-S; Kim, Y I; McCormick, D; Frisch, J; Nelson, J; Smith, T; White, G R

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) in KEK, Japan, is a prototype scaled demonstrator system for the final focus required for a future high energy lepton linear collider. The ATF2 beam-line is instrumented with a total of 41 high resolution C and S band resonant cavity beam position monitors (BPM) with associated mixer electronics and digitisers. In addition 4 high resolution BPMs have been recently installed at the interaction point, we briefly describe the first operational experience of these cavities in the ATF2 beam-line. The current status of the overall BPM system is also described, with a focus on operational techniques and performance.

  5. Image transmission through a stable paraxial cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigan, Sylvain; Lopez, Laurent; Treps, Nicolas; Maitre, Agnes; Fabre, Claude

    2005-01-01

    We study the transmission of a monochromatic 'image' through a paraxial cavity. Using the formalism of self-transform functions, we show that a transverse degenerate cavity transmits the self-transform part of the image, with respect to the field transformation over one round-trip of the cavity. This formalism gives insight into the understanding of the behavior of a transverse degenerate cavity, complementary to the transverse mode picture. An experiment of image transmission through a hemiconfocal cavity shows the interest of this approach

  6. Status of superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    For several reasons, a brief historical review seems appropriate at this time. The twenty-fifth anniversary of the first acceleration of beam with a superconducting cavity will occur shortly [1,2,3]. Also, the scope of accelerator applications of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) devices has, within the last few months, begun to increase rapidly [4] - to the point that it seems likely that early expectations for this technology will largely be fulfilled. Since the object is to accelerate beam, a simple one parameter measure of the technology is the total of how much beam has been accelerated. Figure 1 shows the total accumulated voltage in tests and/or operation of superconducting accelerating cavities with beam, up to the time indicated, as reported in the open literature [4-35]. This parameter has been divided into two terms: first, the subtotal for electron accelerating velocity-of-light structures, and second the subtotal for low-velocity, ion accelerating structures. To restate: each of these terms represents as a function of time an integrated, accumulative total voltage produced by SRF hardware and demonstrated with beam. 56 refs., 4 figs

  7. ANT tuner retrofit for LEB cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walling, L.; Goren, Y.; Kwiatkowski, S.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes a ferrite tuner design for the LEB cavity that utilizes techniques for bonding ferrite to metallic cooling plates that is utilized in the high-power rf and microwave industry. A test tuner was designed to fit into the existing LEB-built magnet and onto the Grimm LEB Cavity. It will require a new vacuum window in order to attain maximal tuning range and high voltage capability and a new center conductor of longer length and a different vacuum window connection than the Grimm center conductor. However, the new center conductor will be essentially identical to the Grimm center conductor in its basic construction and in the way it connects to the stand for support. The tuner is mechanically very similar to high-power stacked circulators built by ANT of Germany and was designed according to ANT's established engineering and design criteria and SSC LEB tuning and power requirements. The tuner design incorporates thin tiles of ferrite glued using a high-radiation-resistance epoxy to copper-plated stainless steel cooling plates of thickness 6.5 mm with water cooling channels inside the plates. The cooling plates constitute 16 pie-shaped segments arranged in a disk. They are electrically isolated from each other to suppress eddy currents. Five of these disks are arranged in parallel with high-pressure rf contacts between the plates at the outer radius. The end walls are slotted copper-plated stainless steel of thickness 3 mm

  8. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoyama, K.; Hara, K.; Kabe, A.; Kojima, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Matsumoto, K.

    1993-01-01

    A large cryogenic system has been designed, constructed and operated in the TRISTAN electron-positron collider at KEK for 508 MHz, 32x5-cell superconducting RF cavities. A 6.5 kW, 4.4 K helium refrigerator with 5 turbo-expanders on the ground level supplies liquid helium in parallel to the 16 cryostats in the TRISTAN tunnel through about 250 m long multichannel transfer line. Two 5-cell cavities are coupled together, enclosed in a cryostat and cooled by about 830 L pool boiling liquid helium. A liquid nitrogen circulation system with a turbo-expander has been adopted for 80 K radiation shields in the multichannel transfer line and the cryostats to reduce liquid nitrogen consumption and to increase the operation stability of the system. The cryogenic system has a total of about 18 000 hours of operating time from the first cool down test in August 1988 to November 1991. The design principle and outline of the cryogenic system and the operational experience are presented. (orig.)

  9. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinglan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  10. A Spin-Flip Cavity for Microwave Spectroscopy of Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Federmann, Silke; Widmann, Eberhard

    The present thesis is a contribution to the Asacusa (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) experiment. The aim of this experiment is to measure the ground-state hyperfine structure of antihydrogen. This is done using a Rabi-like spectrometer line consisting of an antihydrogen source, a microwave cavity, a sextupole magnet and a detector. The cavity induces spin-flip transitions in the ground-state hyperfine levels of antihydrogen whereas the sextupole magnet selects the antihydrogen atoms according to their spin state. Such a configuration allows the measurements of the hyperfine transition in antihydrogen with very high precision. A comparison with the corresponding transitions in hydrogen would thus provide a very sensitive test of the charge-parity-time (Cpt) symmetry. In the context of this thesis, the central piece of this spectrometer line, the spin flip cavity, was designed and implemented. The delicacy of this task was achieving the required field homogeneity: It needs to be bette...

  11. Process Factors Influence on Cavity Pressure Behavior in Microinjection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, C. A.; Dimov, S. S.; Scholz, S.

    2011-01-01

    about the filling behavior of different polymer melts. In this paper, a pressure sensor mounted inside a tool cavity was employed to analyse maximum cavity pressure, pressure increase rate during filling and pressure work. The influence of four mu IM parameters, melt temperature, mould temperature......Process monitoring of microinjection moulding (mu IM) is of crucial importance when analysing the effect of different parameter settings on the process and then in assessing its quality. Quality factors related to cavity pressure can provide valuable information about the process dynamics and also......, injection speed, and packing pressure on these three pressure-related process parameters was investigated. A design of experiment study was conducted by moulding a test part, a microfluidic component, in three different polymer materials, PP, ABS, and PC. The results show a similar process behavior for all...

  12. Beating quantum limits in an optomechanical sensor by cavity detuning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcizet, O.; Briant, T.; Heidmann, A.; Pinard, M.

    2006-01-01

    We study the quantum limits in an optomechanical sensor based on a detuned high-finesse cavity with a movable mirror. We show that the radiation pressure exerted on the mirror by the light in the detuned cavity induces a modification of the mirror dynamics and makes the mirror motion sensitive to the signal. This leads to an amplification of the signal by the mirror dynamics, and to an improvement of the sensor sensitivity beyond the standard quantum limit, up to an ultimate quantum limit only related to the mechanical dissipation of the mirror. This improvement is somewhat similar to the one predicted in detuned signal-recycled gravitational-wave interferometers, and makes a high-finesse cavity a model system to test these quantum effects

  13. Cavity Control and Cooling of Nanoparticles in High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, James

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres, and control the rotation of nanorods, with the potential to produce cold, aligned nanostructures. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  14. Cavity Cooling of Nanoparticles: Towards Matter-Wave experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, James; Kuhn, Stefan; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres a few hundred nanometers in size. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  15. A statistical model for field emission in superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.; Green, K.; Jost, W.; Wright, B.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical model is used to account for several features of performance of an ensemble of superconducting cavities. The input parameters are: the number of emitters/area, a distribution function for emitter β values, a distribution function for emissive areas, and a processing threshold. The power deposited by emitters is calculated from the field emission current and electron impact energy. The model can successfully account for the fraction of tests that reach the maximum field Epk in an ensemble of cavities, for eg, 1-cells at sign 3 GHz or 5-cells at sign 1.5 GHz. The model is used to predict the level of power needed to successfully process cavities of various surface areas with high pulsed power processing (HPP)

  16. Normal Conducting Deflecting Cavity Development at the Cockcroft Institute

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Woolley, B; Jones, R M; Grudiev, A; Dolgashev, V; Wheelhouse, A; Mackenzie, J; McIntosh, P A; Hill, C; Goudket, P; Buckley, S; Lingwood, C

    2013-01-01

    Two normal conducting deflecting structures are currently being developed at the Cockcroft Institute, one as a crab cavity for CERN linear collider CLIC and one for bunch slice diagnostics on low energy electron beams for Electron Beam Test Facility EBTF at Daresbury. Each has its own challenges that need overcome. For CLIC the phase and amplitude tolerances are very stringent and hence beamloading effects and wakefields must be minimised. Significant work has been undertook to understand the effect of the couplers on beamloading and the effect of the couplers on the wakefields. For EBTF the difficulty is avoiding the large beam offset caused by the cavities internal deflecting voltage at the low beam energy. Prototypes for both cavities have been manufactured and results will be presented.

  17. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrage, D.

    2000-01-01

    The static and dynamic structural behavior of superconducting cavities for various projects was determined by finite element structural analysis. The β = 0.61 cavity shape for the Neutron Science Project was studied in detail and found to meet all design requirements if fabricated from five millimeter thick material with a single annular stiffener. This 600 MHz cavity will have a Lorentz coefficient of minus1.8 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2 and a lowest structural resonance of more than 100 Hz. Cavities at β = 0.48, 0.61, and 0.77 were analyzed for a Neutron Science Project concept which would incorporate 7-cell cavities. The medium and high beta cavities were found to meet all criteria but it was not possible to generate a β = 0.48 cavity with a Lorentz coefficient of less than minus3 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2

  18. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-03-01

    Analysis and modeling is presented for a fast microwave tuner to operate at 700 MHz which incorporates ferroelectric elements whose dielectric permittivity can be rapidly altered by application of an external voltage. This tuner could be used to correct unavoidable fluctuations in the resonant frequency of superconducting cavities in accelerator structures, thereby greatly reducing the RF power needed to drive the cavities. A planar test version of the tuner has been tested at low levels of RF power, but at 1300 MHz to minimize the physical size of the test structure. This test version comprises one-third of the final version. The tests show performance in good agreement with simulations, but with losses in the ferroelectric elements that are too large for practical use, and with issues in bonding of ferroelectric elements to the metal walls of the tuner structure.

  19. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis and modeling is presented for a fast microwave tuner to operate at 700 MHz which incorporates ferroelectric elements whose dielectric permittivity can be rapidly altered by application of an external voltage. This tuner could be used to correct unavoidable fluctuations in the resonant frequency of superconducting cavities in accelerator structures, thereby greatly reducing the RF power needed to drive the cavities. A planar test version of the tuner has been tested at low levels of RF power, but at 1300 MHz to minimize the physical size of the test structure. This test version comprises one-third of the final version. The tests show performance in good agreement with simulations, but with losses in the ferroelectric elements that are too large for practical use, and with issues in bonding of ferroelectric elements to the metal walls of the tuner structure.

  20. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  1. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in protein, vitamins, and minerals, such as meats, poultry, grains, and fresh fruits and vegetables, tend to ... treat dry socket? Antibiotics taken by mouth A dressing soaked with an anesthetic Codeine Ear drops to ...

  2. Single atoms on demand for cavity QED experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotsenko, I.

    2007-01-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) describes electromagnetic fields in a confined space and the radiative properties of atoms in such fields. The simplest example of such system is a single atom interacting with one mode of a high-finesse resonator. Besides observation and exploration of fundamental quantum mechanical effects, this system bears a high potential for applications quantum information science such as, e.g., quantum logic gates, quantum communication and quantum teleportation. In this thesis I present an experiment on the deterministic coupling of a single neutral atom to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator. In Chapter 1 I describe our basic techniques for trapping and observing single cesium atoms. As a source of single atoms we use a high-gradient magneto-optical trap, which captures the atoms from background gas in a vacuum chamber and cools them down to millikelvin temperatures. The atoms are then transferred without loss into a standing-wave dipole trap, which provides a conservative potential required for experiments on atomic coherence such as quantum information processing and metrology on trapped atoms. Moreover, shifting the standing-wave pattern allows us to deterministically transport the atoms (Chapter 2). In combination with nondestructive fluorescence imaging of individual trapped atoms, this enables us to control their position with submicrometer precision over several millimeters along the dipole trap. The cavity QED system can distinctly display quantum behaviour in the so-called strong coupling regime, i.e., when the coherent atom-cavity coupling rate dominates dissipation in the system. This sets the main requirements on the resonator's properties: small mode volume and high finesse. Chapter 3 is devoted to the manufacturing, assembling, and testing of an ultra-high finesse optical Fabry-Perot resonator, stabilized to the atomic transition. In Chapter 4 I present the transportation of single atoms into the cavity

  3. Single atoms on demand for cavity QED experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, I.

    2007-09-06

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) describes electromagnetic fields in a confined space and the radiative properties of atoms in such fields. The simplest example of such system is a single atom interacting with one mode of a high-finesse resonator. Besides observation and exploration of fundamental quantum mechanical effects, this system bears a high potential for applications quantum information science such as, e.g., quantum logic gates, quantum communication and quantum teleportation. In this thesis I present an experiment on the deterministic coupling of a single neutral atom to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator. In Chapter 1 I describe our basic techniques for trapping and observing single cesium atoms. As a source of single atoms we use a high-gradient magneto-optical trap, which captures the atoms from background gas in a vacuum chamber and cools them down to millikelvin temperatures. The atoms are then transferred without loss into a standing-wave dipole trap, which provides a conservative potential required for experiments on atomic coherence such as quantum information processing and metrology on trapped atoms. Moreover, shifting the standing-wave pattern allows us to deterministically transport the atoms (Chapter 2). In combination with nondestructive fluorescence imaging of individual trapped atoms, this enables us to control their position with submicrometer precision over several millimeters along the dipole trap. The cavity QED system can distinctly display quantum behaviour in the so-called strong coupling regime, i.e., when the coherent atom-cavity coupling rate dominates dissipation in the system. This sets the main requirements on the resonator's properties: small mode volume and high finesse. Chapter 3 is devoted to the manufacturing, assembling, and testing of an ultra-high finesse optical Fabry-Perot resonator, stabilized to the atomic transition. In Chapter 4 I present the transportation of single atoms into the

  4. Development of superconducting crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dziuba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The crossbar-H-mode (CH structure is the first superconducting multicell drift tube cavity for the low and medium energy range operated in the H_{21} mode. Because of the large energy gain per cavity, which leads to high real estate gradients, it is an excellent candidate for the efficient acceleration in high power proton and ion accelerators with fixed velocity profile. A prototype cavity has been developed and tested successfully with a gradient of 7  MV/m. A few new superconducting CH cavities with improved geometries for different high power applications are under development at present. One cavity (f=325  MHz, β=0.16, seven cells is currently under construction and studied with respect to a possible upgrade option for the GSI UNILAC. Another cavity (f=217  MHz, β=0.059, 15 cells is designed for a cw operated energy variable heavy ion linac application. Furthermore, the EUROTRANS project (European research program for the transmutation of high level nuclear waste in an accelerator driven system, 600 MeV protons, 352 MHz is one of many possible applications for this kind of superconducting rf cavity. In this context a layout of the 17 MeV EUROTRANS injector containing four superconducting CH cavities was proposed by the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. The status of the cavity development related to the EUROTRANS injector is presented.

  5. Status and first measurement results for a high gradient CH-cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almomani, Ali; Ratzinger, Ulrich [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Frankfurt Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    This pulsed linac activity aims on compact designs and on a considerable increase of the voltage gain per meter. A high gradient CH {sup *} cavity operated at 325 MHz was developed at IAP {sup *} Frankfurt. The mean effective accelerating field for this cavity is expected well above 10 MV/m at β=0.164. This cavity is developed within a funded project. The results might influence the rebuilt of the UNILAC {sup *} Alvarez section, aiming to achieve the beam intensities specified for the GSI {sup *} FAIR project (15 mA U28+). Another motivation is the development of an efficient pulsed ion accelerator for significantly higher energies like 60 AMeV. The new GSI 3 MW Thales klystron test stand will be used for the cavity RF power tests. Detailed studies on two different types of copper plating will be performed with this cavity.

  6. Temperature Structure of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    we analyze the temperature structure of a coronal cavity observed in Aug. 2007. coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and x-rays. when these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs. It is important to establish the temperature structure of cavities in order to understand the thermodynamics of cavities in relation to their three-dimensional magnetic structure. To analyze the temperature we compare temperature ratios of a series of iron lines observed by the Hinode/EUv Imaging spectrometer (EIS). We also use those lines to constrain a forward model of the emission from the cavity and streamer. The model assumes a coronal streamer with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel lenth. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. The general cavity morphology and the cavity and streamer density have already been modeled using data from STEREO's SECCHI/EUVI and Hinode/EIS (Gibson et al 2010 and Schmit & Gibson 2011).

  7. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide...... (18, 19) for receiving light from the grating region (11) is formed within or to be connected to the grating region, and functions as an 5 output coupler for the VCL. Thereby, vertical lasing modes (16) are coupled to lateral in-plane modes (17, 20) of the in-plane waveguide formed in the silicon...

  8. Cancer of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Pablo H; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Although early diagnosis is relatively easy, presentation with advanced disease is not uncommon. The standard of care is primary surgical resection with or without postoperative adjuvant therapy. Improvements in surgical techniques combined with the routine use of postoperative radiation or chemoradiation therapy have resulted in improved survival. Successful treatment is predicated on multidisciplinary treatment strategies to maximize oncologic control and minimize impact of therapy on form and function. Prevention of oral cancer requires better education about lifestyle-related risk factors, and improved awareness and tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency of HPV in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Priscila Marinho; Có, Anna Clara Gregório; Azevedo, Pedro Leite; do Valle, Isabella Bittencourt; de Oliveira, Karine Gadioli; Gouvea, Sônia Alves; Cordeiro-Silva, Melissa Freitas; Louro, Iúri Drummond; de Podestá, José Roberto Vasconcelos; Lenzi, Jeferson; Sena, Agenor; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco; von Zeidler, Sandra Lúcia Ventorin

    2018-03-27

    The prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) varies widely. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of high-risk HPV DNA in a large Brazilian cohort of patients with oral cavity SCC. Biopsy and resected frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of oral cavity SCC were available from 101 patients who were recruited at two Brazilian centres. Stringent measures with respect to case selection and prevention of sample contamination were adopted to ensure reliability of the data. Nested PCR using MY09/MY11 and GP5 + /GP6 + as well as PGMY09/11 L1 consensus primers were performed to investigate the presence of HPV DNA in the tumours. HPV-positive cases were subjected to direct sequencing. Shapiro-Wilk and Student t test were used to evaluate data normality and to compare the means, respectively. Qualitative variables were analysed by logistic regression. Our results demonstrate that the frequency of high-risk HPV types in oral cavity SCC is very low and is less than 4%. All HPV-positive cases were HPV16. In addition, our results do not show a significant association between the tumour clinical features and the risk factors (tobacco, alcohol and HPV) for oral cavity SCC. In the current study, we observed an overlapping pattern of risk factors that are related to tumour development. This, along with a low frequency of high-risk HPV DNA, supports the findings that HPV is not involved in the genesis of oral cavity SCC in Brazilian population.

  10. Digital Measurement System for the HIE-Isolde Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, Michal

    Extensive R&D efforts are being invested at CERN into the fundamental science of the RF superconductivity, cavity design, niobium sputtering, coating and RF properties of superconducting cavities. Fast and precise characterization and measurements of RF parameters of the newly produced cavities is essential for advances with the cavity production. The currently deployed analogue measurement system based on an analogue phase discriminators and tracking RF generators is not optimal for efficient work at the SM18 superconducting cavity test stand. If exact properties of the cavity under test are not known a traditional feedback loop will not be able to find resonant frequency in a reasonable time or even at all. This is mainly due to a very high Q factor. The resonance peak is very narrow (fraction of a Hz at 100 MHz). If the resonant frequency is off by several bandwidths, small changes of the cavity field during the tuning will not be measureable. Also cavity field will react only very slowly to any change...

  11. Achievement of 35 MV/m in the superconducting nine-cell cavities for TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilje, L.; Kostin, D.; Matheisen, A.; Moeller, W.D.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Simrock, S.; Twarowski, K.; Kako, E.; Saito, K.; Schmueser, P.; Suzuki, T.

    2004-01-01

    The tera electronvolt superconducting linear accelerator TESLA is the only linear electron-positron collider project based on superconductor technology for particle acceleration. In the first stage with 500 GeV center-of-mass energy an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is needed in the superconducting niobium cavities which are operated at a temperature of 2 K and a quality factor Q 0 of 10 10 . This performance has been reliably achieved in the cavities of the TESLA test facility (TTF) accelerator. The upgrade of TESLA to 800 GeV requires accelerating gradients of 35 MV/m. Using an improved cavity treatment by electrolytic polishing it has been possible to raise the gradient to 35 - 43 MV/m in single cell resonators. Here we report on the successful transfer of the electropolishing technique to multi-cell cavities. Presently four nine-cell cavities have achieved 35 MV/m at Q 0 ≥ 5 x 10 9 , and a fifth cavity could be excited to 39 MV/m. In two high-power tests it could be verified that EP-cavities preserve their excellent performance after welding into the helium cryostat and assembly of the high-power coupler. One cavity has been operated for 1100 hours at the TESLA-800 gradient of 35 MV/m and 57 hours at 36 MV/m without loss in performance. (orig.)

  12. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Paula, L A N; Furtado, S R; Aguiar, O D; N F Oliveira Jr, N F Oliveira Jr; Castro, P J; Barroso, J J

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q 0 ) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 10 5 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 10 12 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ∼ 10 −22 Hz −1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA)

  13. LS1 Report: A stubborn cavity will soon be replaced

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Testing on the LHC’s replacement RF cryomodule was completed last week in SM18. This module will bring them all to design-level, replacing a faulty cavity that has been acting up since the machine’s start-up.   A LHC cryomodule undergoes testing in SM18. Distributed between four cryomodules, the LHC is home to a total of 16 radiofrequency (RF) cavities. Each is designed to provide a 2 MV accelerating field… and all but one has been succeeding at this job. Ever since the machine’s startup, one stubborn cavity in a Point 4 module has quenched whenever it had to stay at 2 MV. The accelerator team found that no amount of conditioning could get the cavity to behave, and the highest continuous wave voltage it could perform at was 1.3 MV. “This was fine for physics,” says Pierre Maesen, who is leading the repair and replacement of the LHC’s cryomodules. “We were able to compensate for this ‘missing’...

  14. Cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S Srinivasulu Raju; M Umapathy; G Uma

    2015-01-01

    Energy harvesting employing piezoelectric materials in mechanical structures such as cantilever beams, plates, diaphragms, etc, has been an emerging area of research in recent years. The research in this area is also focused on structural tailoring to improve the harvested power from the energy harvesters. Towards this aim, this paper presents a method for improving the harvested power from a cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester by introducing multiple rectangular cavities. A generalized model for a piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple rectangular cavities at a single section and two sections is developed. A method is suggested to optimize the thickness of the cavities and the number of cavities required to generate a higher output voltage for a given cantilever beam structure. The performance of the optimized energy harvesters is evaluated analytically and through experimentation. The simulation and experimental results show that the performance of the energy harvester can be increased with multiple cavities compared to the harvester with a single cavity. (paper)

  15. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  16. Esthesioneuroblastoma of the nasal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollen, Tyler R; Morris, Christopher G; Kirwan, Jessica M; Amdur, Robert J; Werning, John W; Vaysberg, Mikhail; Mendenhall, William M

    2015-06-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon cancer of the nasal cavity. We describe the outcomes for 26 patients treated with curative intent with photon radiotherapy (RT) at the University of Florida. Between May 1972 and June 2007, 26 patients received RT for previously untreated esthesioneuroblastoma of the nasal cavity. Sixteen patients were males and 10 were females with a median age of 55 years (range, 3 to 82 y). The modified Kadish stage distribution was: B, 7 patients; C, 17 patients; and D, 2 patients. Treatment modalities included the following: definitive RT, 5 patients; preoperative RT, 2 patients; and postoperative RT after resection, 19 patients. Elective neck irradiation (ENI) was performed in 17 (71%) of 24 N0 patients. Rates of local control, cause-specific survival, and absolute overall survival at 5 years were 79%, 72%, and 69%, respectively. Overall survival among patients treated with definitive RT was 20% at 5 years, compared with 81% among those who underwent surgery and adjuvant RT (P=0.01). One (6%) of 17 patients who received ENI developed a recurrence in the neck and was successfully salvaged. Ultimate neck control was 100% at 5 years for patients who received ENI versus 69% among those not receiving ENI (P=0.0173). Resection combined with adjuvant RT is more effective than surgery or RT alone in the treatment of esthesioneuroblastoma. ENI reduces the risk of regional relapse in patients with Kadish stage B and C cancers.

  17. Design of 325 MHz spoke cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha Peng; Huang Hong; Dai Jianping; Zu Guoquan; Li Han

    2012-01-01

    Spoke cavity can be used in the low-energy section of the proton accelerator. It has many significant advantages: compact structure, high value of R/Q, etc. The ADS (Accelerator Driven System) project will adopt many spoke cavities with different β values. Therefore, IHEP has began the research of β=0.14, 325 MHz spoke cavity. In this pa per, the dimensions, RF performances and mechanical properties of it are studied. (authors)

  18. Dither Cavity Length Controller with Iodine Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawson Marty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A cavity length controller for a seeded Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser is constructed. The cavity length controller uses a piezo-mirror dither voltage to find the optimum length for the seeded cavity. The piezo-mirror dither also dithers the optical frequency of the output pulse. [1]. This dither in optical frequency is then used to lock to an Iodine absorption line.

  19. Optical microfiber-based photonic crystal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Yi-zhi; Li, Zhi-yuan; Ding, Wei; Andrews, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Using a focused ion beam milling technique, we fabricate broad stop band (∼10% wide) photonic crystal (PhC) cavities in adiabatically-tapered silica fibers. Abrupt structural design of PhC mirrors efficiently reduces radiation loss, increasing the cavity finesse to ∼7.5. Further experiments and simulations verify that the remaining loss is mainly due to Ga ion implantation. Such a microfiber PhC cavity probably has potentials in many light-matter interaction applications. (paper)

  20. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Koprek, Waldemar; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Simrock, Stefan; Brandt, Alexander; Chase, Brian; Carcagno, Ruben; Cancelo, Gustavo; Koeth, Timothy W.

    2006-01-01

    A digital control of superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. FPGA-based controller, supported by Matlab system, was applied. Electrical model of a resonator was used for design of a control system. Calibration of the signal path is considered. Identification of cavity parameters has been carried out for adaptive control algorithm. Feed-forward and feedback modes were applied in operating the cavities. Required performance has been achieved; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time, while keeping reasonable level of the power consumption. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient

  1. Optically coupled cavities for wavelength switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costazo-Caso, Pablo A; Granieri, Sergio; Siahmakoun, Azad, E-mail: pcostanzo@ing.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: granieri@rose-hulman.edu, E-mail: siahmako@rose-hulman.edu [Department of Physics and Optical Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, 5500 Wabash Avenue, Terre Haute, IN 47803 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    An optical bistable device which presents hysteresis behavior is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The system finds applications in wavelength switching, pulse reshaping and optical bistability. It is based on two optically coupled cavities named master and slave. Each cavity includes a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), acting as the gain medium of the laser, and two pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) which define the lasing wavelength (being different in each cavity). Finally, a variable optical coupler (VOC) is employed to couple both cavities. Experimental characterization of the system performance is made analyzing the effects of the coupling coefficient between the two cavities and the driving current in each SOA. The properties of the hysteretic bistable curve and switching can be controlled by adjusting these parameters and the loss in the cavities. By selecting the output wavelength ({lambda}{sub 1} or {lambda}{sub 2}) with an external filter it is possible to choose either the invert or non-invert switched signal. Experiments were developed employing both optical discrete components and a photonic integrated circuit. They show that for 8 m-long cavities the maximum switching frequency is about 500 KHz, and for 4 m-long cavities a minimum rise-time about 21 ns was measured. The switching time can be reduced by shortening the cavity lengths and using photonic integrated circuits.

  2. LARGE-SCALE FLOWS IN PROMINENCE CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmit, D. J.; Gibson, S. E.; Tomczyk, S.; Reeves, K. K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Brooks, D. H.; Williams, D. R.; Tripathi, D.

    2009-01-01

    Regions of rarefied density often form cavities above quiescent prominences. We observed two different cavities with the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter on 2005 April 21 and with Hinode/EIS on 2008 November 8. Inside both of these cavities, we find coherent velocity structures based on spectral Doppler shifts. These flows have speeds of 5-10 km s -1 , occur over length scales of tens of megameters, and persist for at least 1 hr. Flows in cavities are an example of the nonstatic nature of quiescent structures in the solar atmosphere.

  3. Fluid Density and Impact Cavity Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Chun Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the impact cavity formed when a steel ball is dropped into aqueous solutions of densities ranging from 0.98 g·cm-3 to 1.63 g·cm-3 were investigated. A high-speed camera was used to record the formation and collapse of the cavity. The results showed cavity diameter, volume, and pinch-off time are independent of fluid density, on average. There was an unexplained reduction in cavity formation for densities of 1.34 g·cm-3 and 1.45 g·cm-3.

  4. Cooling the APS storage ring radio-frequency accelerating cavities: Thermal/stress/fatigue analysis and cavity cooling configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primdahl, K.; Kustom, R.

    1995-01-01

    The 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source positron storage ring requires sixteen separate 352-MHz radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities. Cavities are installed as groups of four, in straight sections used elsewhere for insertion devices. They occupy the first such straight section after injection, along with the last three just before injection. Cooling is provided by a subsystem of the sitewide deionized water system. Pumping equipment is located in a building directly adjacent to the accelerator enclosure. A prototype cavity was fabricated and tested where cooling was via twelve 19-mm-diameter [3/4 in] brazed-on tubes in a series-parallel flow configuration. Unfortunately, the thermal contact to some tubes was poor due to inadequate braze filler. Here, heat transfer studies, including finite-element analysis and test results, of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring 352-MHz rf accelerating cavities are described. Stress and fatigue life of the copper are discussed. Configuration of water cooling is presented

  5. JACoW N-doped niobium accelerating cavities: Analyzing model applicability

    CERN Document Server

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Weingarten, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this research was to analyse data from multiple cavities in order to test the viability of a model for surface resistance proposed previously. The model intends to describe the behaviour of the quality factor with respect to the RF field strength, while exploring the physical cause of this phenomenon; the model is pretty general, but will be checked here specifically for N-doped niobium cavities. The data were obtained from two single-cell 1.3 GHz cavities manufactured and tested at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, USA.

  6. SUITABLE LOCATION OF SHEET PILE UNDER DAM RESTING ON SANDY SOIL WITH CAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith J. Aziz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This research describes the seepage characteristics of experimental model test of dam with cutoff located at different region (at dam heel, at mid floor of dam, and at dam toe. It is resting on sandy soil with cavity at different locations in X and Y directions (such as in Al-Najaf soil city. Thirty three model tests are performed in laboratory by using steel box to estimate the quantity of the seepage and flow lines direction. It was concluded that the best location of the cutoff wall is at the dam toe for model test with cavity ( Xc B = 0 and 0.5, but for model test with cavity ( Xc B ≥1, the best location of the sheet pile wall becomes at the dam heel. For negative location of the cavity, the best location of the sheet pile wall is at the middle of the floor dam.

  7. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  8. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR X-RAY CAVITIES IN THE HOT GAS OF GALAXY GROUPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Ruobing; Rasmussen, Jesper; Mulchaey, John S.

    2010-01-01

    We have performed a systematic search for X-ray cavities in the hot gas of 51 galaxy groups with Chandra archival data. The cavities are identified based on two methods: subtracting an elliptical β-model fitted to the X-ray surface brightness, and performing unsharp masking. Thirteen groups in the sample (∼25%) are identified as clearly containing cavities, with another 13 systems showing tentative evidence for such structures. We find tight correlations between the radial and tangential radii of the cavities, and between their size and projected distance from the group center, in quantitative agreement with the case for more massive clusters. This suggests that similar physical processes are responsible for cavity evolution and disruption in systems covering a large range in total mass. We see no clear association between the detection of cavities and the current 1.4 GHz radio luminosity of the central brightest group galaxy, but there is a clear tendency for systems with a cool core to be more likely to harbor detectable cavities. To test the efficiency of the adopted cavity detection procedures, we employ a set of mock images designed to mimic typical Chandra data of our sample, and find that the model-fitting approach is generally more reliable than unsharp masking for recovering cavity properties. Finally, we find that the detectability of cavities is strongly influenced by a few factors, particularly the signal-to-noise ratio of the data, and that the real fraction of X-ray groups with prominent cavities could be substantially larger than the 25%-50% suggested by our analysis.

  9. Diagnostics and treatment of 1.3 GHz Nb cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamashevich, Yegor

    2017-01-01

    for quench localisation calculating the path of the second-sound wave was developed. This allows the signals from all sensors to be used, regardless of their position relative to the quench site. The new approach was validated using additional techniques such as a temperature mapping and an optical inspection of the inner cavity surface. Furthermore, a new multi-sensor for second-sound wave detection in the helium vessel of a cavity was developed and successfully tested on a serial-production XFEL cavity. The determined quench site location was confirmed by subsequent optical inspection. The algorithm localises the quench without mode measurements i.e. there is no need to dismount HOM-antennas which requires special procedures and must be performed in a clean-room. The mathematical approach described in this paper can be applied for second-sound tests of superconductive cavities of various shapes and dimensions.

  10. Diagnostics and treatment of 1.3 GHz Nb cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamashevich, Yegor

    2017-01-15

    increase the accuracy of the measurements. A new program code for quench localisation calculating the path of the second-sound wave was developed. This allows the signals from all sensors to be used, regardless of their position relative to the quench site. The new approach was validated using additional techniques such as a temperature mapping and an optical inspection of the inner cavity surface. Furthermore, a new multi-sensor for second-sound wave detection in the helium vessel of a cavity was developed and successfully tested on a serial-production XFEL cavity. The determined quench site location was confirmed by subsequent optical inspection. The algorithm localises the quench without mode measurements i.e. there is no need to dismount HOM-antennas which requires special procedures and must be performed in a clean-room. The mathematical approach described in this paper can be applied for second-sound tests of superconductive cavities of various shapes and dimensions.

  11. In-situ plasma processing to increase the accelerating gradients of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleans, M.; Tyagi, P. V.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C. J.; Ball, J. A.; Barnhart, D. L.; Blokland, W.; Crofford, M. T.; Degraff, B. D.; Gold, S. W.; Hannah, B. S.; Howell, M. P.; Kim, S.-H.; Lee, S.-W.; Mammosser, J.; Neustadt, T. S.; Saunders, J. W.; Stewart, S.; Strong, W. H.; Vandygriff, D. J.; Vandygriff, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new in-situ plasma processing technique is being developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the cavities in operation. The technique utilizes a low-density reactive oxygen plasma at room temperature to remove top surface hydrocarbons. The plasma processing technique increases the work function of the cavity surface and reduces the overall amount of vacuum and electron activity during cavity operation; in particular it increases the field emission onset, which enables cavity operation at higher accelerating gradients. Experimental evidence also suggests that the SEY of the Nb surface decreases after plasma processing which helps mitigating multipacting issues. In this article, the main developments and results from the plasma processing R&D are presented and experimental results for in-situ plasma processing of dressed cavities in the SNS horizontal test apparatus are discussed.

  12. Study of Nb-Cu 1.3 GHz SRF cavity resonators for future particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Amelin, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Niobium-coated superconducting radio-frequency cavities have a number of advantages over cavities made from bulk niobium. Cavities coated with high-power impulse magnetron sputtering are tested at CERN in order to optimize the coating and study the Q-slope that limits the performance. To accurately measure the quality factor as a function of accelerating field, it is important to have good matching between an input antenna and a cavity impedance. To improve the matching, a variable coupler that changes the length of the antenna can be used. We have shown that the Q-factor of the input antenna can be changed between $10^7-10^{11}$ by moving the antenna, which should allow to achieve critical coupling with a cavity. This technology could be used in future measurements, so that reflections are always minimized.

  13. Superconducting cavities developments efforts at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntambekar, A.; Bagre, M.; Dwivedi, J.; Shrivastava, P.; Mundra, G.; Joshi, S.C.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting RE cavities are the work-horse for many existing and proposed linear accelerators. Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) has initiated a comprehensive R and D program for development of Superconducting RF cavities suitable for high energy accelerator application like SNS and ADS. For the initial phase of technology demonstration several prototype 1.3 GHz single cell-cavities have been developed. The work began with development of prototype single cell cavities in aluminum and copper. This helped in development of cavity manufacturing process, proving various tooling and learning on various mechanical and RF qualification processes. The parts manufacturing was done at RRCAT and Electron beam welding was carried out at Indian industry. These cavities further served during commissioning trials for various cavity processing infrastructure being developed at RRCAT and are also a potential candidate for Niobium thin film deposition R and D. Based on the above experience, few single cell cavities were developed in fine grain niobium. The critical technology of forming and machining of niobium and the intermediate RF qualification were developed at RRCAT. The EB welding of bulk niobium cavities was carried out in collaboration with IUAC, New Delhi at their facility. As a next logical step efforts are now on for development of multicell cavities. The prototype dumbbells and end group made of aluminium, comprising of RF and HOM couplers ports have also been developed, with their LB welding done at Indian industry. In this paper we shall present the development efforts towards manufacturing of 1.3 GHz single cell cavities and their initial processing and qualification. (author)

  14. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  15. A foldable electrode array for 3D recording of deep-seated abnormal brain cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Dries; De Vloo, Philippe; Fierens, Guy; Ceyssens, Frederik; Hunyadi, Borbála; Bertrand, Alexander; Nuttin, Bart; Puers, Robert

    2018-06-01

    Objective. This study describes the design and microfabrication of a foldable thin-film neural implant and investigates its suitability for electrical recording of deep-lying brain cavity walls. Approach. A new type of foldable neural electrode array is presented, which can be inserted through a cannula. The microfabricated electrode is specifically designed for electrical recording of the cavity wall of thalamic lesions resulting from stroke. The proof-of-concept is demonstrated by measurements in rat brain cavities. On implantation, the electrode array unfolds in the brain cavity, contacting the cavity walls and allowing recording at multiple anatomical locations. A three-layer microfabrication process based on UV-lithography and Reactive Ion Etching is described. Electrochemical characterization of the electrode is performed in addition to an in vivo experiment in which the implantation procedure and the unfolding of the electrode are tested and visualized. Main results. Electrochemical characterization validated the suitability of the electrode for in vivo use. CT imaging confirmed the unfolding of the electrode in the brain cavity and analysis of recorded local field potentials showed the ability to record neural signals of biological origin. Significance. The conducted research confirms that it is possible to record neural activity from the inside wall of brain cavities at various anatomical locations after a single implantation procedure. This opens up possibilities towards research of abnormal brain cavities and the clinical conditions associated with them, such as central post-stroke pain.

  16. Role of thermal resistance on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2017-03-01

    Thermal stability is an important parameter for the operation of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in particle accelerators. The rf power dissipated on the inner surface of the cavities is conducted to the helium bath cooling the outer cavity surface and the equilibrium temperature of the inner surface depends on the thermal resistance. In this manuscript, we present the results of direct measurements of thermal resistance on 1.3 GHz single cell SRF cavities made from high purity large-grain and fine-grain niobium as well as their rf performance for different treatments applied to outer cavity surface in order to investigate the role of the Kapitza resistance to the overall thermal resistance and to the SRF cavity performance. The results show no significant impact of the thermal resistance to the SRF cavity performance after chemical polishing, mechanical polishing or anodization of the outer cavity surface. Temperature maps taken during the rf test show nonuniform heating of the surface at medium rf fields. Calculations of Q0(Bp) curves using the thermal feedback model show good agreement with experimental data at 2 and 1.8 K when a pair-braking term is included in the calculation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance. These results indicate local intrinsic nonlinearities of the surface resistance, rather than purely thermal effects, to be the main cause for the observed field dependence of Q0(Bp) .

  17. Role of thermal resistance on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashupati Dhakal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stability is an important parameter for the operation of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities used in particle accelerators. The rf power dissipated on the inner surface of the cavities is conducted to the helium bath cooling the outer cavity surface and the equilibrium temperature of the inner surface depends on the thermal resistance. In this manuscript, we present the results of direct measurements of thermal resistance on 1.3 GHz single cell SRF cavities made from high purity large-grain and fine-grain niobium as well as their rf performance for different treatments applied to outer cavity surface in order to investigate the role of the Kapitza resistance to the overall thermal resistance and to the SRF cavity performance. The results show no significant impact of the thermal resistance to the SRF cavity performance after chemical polishing, mechanical polishing or anodization of the outer cavity surface. Temperature maps taken during the rf test show nonuniform heating of the surface at medium rf fields. Calculations of Q_{0}(B_{p} curves using the thermal feedback model show good agreement with experimental data at 2 and 1.8 K when a pair-braking term is included in the calculation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer surface resistance. These results indicate local intrinsic nonlinearities of the surface resistance, rather than purely thermal effects, to be the main cause for the observed field dependence of Q_{0}(B_{p}.

  18. Effects of Active and Passive Control Techniques on Mach 1.5 Cavity Flow Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Aradag

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic flow over cavities has been of interest since 1960s because cavities represent the bomb bays of aircraft. The flow is transient, turbulent, and complicated. Pressure fluctuations inside the cavity can impede successful weapon release. The objective of this study is to use active and passive control methods on supersonic cavity flow numerically to decrease or eliminate pressure oscillations. Jet blowing at several locations on the front and aft walls of the cavity configuration is used as an active control method. Several techniques are used for passive control including using a cover plate to separate the flow dynamics inside and outside of the cavity, trailing edge wall modifications, such as inclination of the trailing edge, and providing curvature to the trailing edge wall. The results of active and passive control techniques are compared with the baseline case in terms of pressure fluctuations, sound pressure levels at the leading edge, trailing edge walls, and cavity floor and in terms of formation of the flow structures and the results are presented. It is observed from the results that modification of the trailing edge wall is the most effective of the control methods tested leading to up to 40 dB reductions in cavity tones.

  19. Cavity pressure history of contained nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapin, C E [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Knowledge of pressure in cavities created by contained nuclear explosions is useful for estimating the possibility of venting radioactive debris to the atmosphere. Measurements of cavity pressure, or temperature, would be helpful in evaluating the correctness of present code predictions of underground explosions. In instrumenting and interpreting such measurements it is necessary to have good theoretical estimates of cavity pressures. In this paper cavity pressure is estimated at the time when cavity growth is complete. Its subsequent decrease due to heat loss from the cavity to the surrounding media is also predicted. The starting pressure (the pressure at the end of cavity growth) is obtained by adiabatic expansion to the final cavity size of the vaporized rock gas sphere created by the explosion. Estimates of cavity size can be obtained by stress propagation computer codes, such as SOC and TENSOR. However, such estimates require considerable time and effort. In this paper, cavity size is estimated using a scheme involving simple hand calculations. The prediction is complicated by uncertainties in the knowledge of silica water system chemistry and a lack of information concerning possible blowoff of wall material during cavity growth. If wall material blows off, it can significantly change the water content in the cavity, compared to the water content in the ambient media. After cavity growth is complete, the pressure will change because of heat loss to the surrounding media. Heat transfer by convection, radiation and conduction is considered, and its effect on the pressure is calculated. Analysis of cavity heat transfer is made difficult by the complex nature of processes which occur at the wall where melting, vaporization and condensation of the gaseous rock can all occur. Furthermore, the melted wall material could be removed by flowing or dripping to the cavity floor. It could also be removed by expansion of the steam contained in the melt (blowoff) and by

  20. Characterizing Cavities in Model Inclusion Fullerenes: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Torrens

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The fullerene-82 cavity is selected as a model system in order to test several methods for characterizing inclusion molecules. The methods are based on different technical foundations such as a square and triangular tessellation of the molecular surface, spherical tessellation of the molecular surface, numerical integration of the atomic volumes and surfaces, triangular tessellation of the molecular surface, and cubic lattice approach to the molecular volume. Accurate measures of the molecular volume and surface area have been performed with the pseudorandom Monte Carlo (MCVS and uniform Monte Carlo (UMCVS methods. These calculations serve as a reference for the rest of the methods. The SURMO2 method does not recognize the cavity and may not be convenient for intercalation compounds. The programs that detect the cavities never exceed 1% deviation relative to the reference value for molecular volume and 5% for surface area. The GEPOL algorithm, alone or combined with TOPO, shows results in good agreement with those of the UMCVS reference. The uniform random number generator provides the fastest convergence for UMCVS and a correct estimate of the standard deviations. The effect of the internal cavity on the solvent-accessible surfaces has been calculated. Fullerene-82 is compared with fullerene-60 and -70.

  1. Performance of Superconducting Cavities as Required for the SPL

    CERN Document Server

    Weingarten, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    This document outlines an optimisation analysis for the RF cavities of the planned Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) at CERN with regard to the operating frequency and temperature. The analysis is based on a phenomenological assessment of the field dependent Q-value, as taken from published test results from RF cavities of various proveniences. It turns out that the design Q-value at an accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m ($\\Beta$ = 1 cavity) of $1^{.}10^{10}$ at 704 (1408) MHz is attainable at 1.9 (1.6) K, respectively, however, with the present state-of-the-art manufacturing, at the expense of some reprocessing. The optimum of the total electrical grid power consumption (composed of RF and cryogenics) is estimated as a function of frequency and operating temperature for both the low and high power SPL. This document outlines an optimisation analysis for the RF cavities of the planned Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) at CERN with regard to the operating frequency and temperature. The analysis is based on a p...

  2. Characterizing cavities in model inclusion molecules: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, F; Sánchez-Marín, J; Nebot-Gil, I

    1998-04-01

    We have selected fullerene-60 and -70 cavities as model systems in order to test several methods for characterizing inclusion molecules. The methods are based on different technical foundations such as a square and triangular tessellation of the molecule taken as a unitary sphere, spherical tessellation of the molecular surface, numerical integration of the atomic volumes and surfaces, triangular tessellation of the molecular surface, and a cubic lattice approach to a molecular space. Accurate measures of the molecular volume and surface area have been performed with the pseudo-random Monte Carlo (MCVS) and uniform Monte Carlo (UMCVS) methods. These calculations serve as a reference for the rest of the methods. The SURMO2 and MS methods have not recognized the cavities and may not be convenient for intercalation compounds. The programs that have detected the cavities never exceed 5% deviation relative to the reference values for molecular volume and surface area. The GEPOL algorithm, alone or combined with TOPO, shows results in good agreement with those of the UMCVS reference. The uniform random number generator provides the fastest convergence for UMCVS and a correct estimate of the standard deviations. The effect of the internal cavity on the accessible surfaces has been calculated.

  3. Building of radio frequency cavity for Superconducting Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahammed, M.; DuttaGupta, A.; Mandal, B.Ch.; Saha, S.; Bhattacharya, P.; Manna, B.; Hembrom, B.; Murmu, S.; Sur, S.; Murali, S.; Chaudhuri, J.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: RF cavity for Superconducting Cyclotron is a room temperature cavity having 10 m tall coaxial structure placed symmetrically above and below the median plane. The structure is made of copper and operates within the frequency range of 9 to 27 MHz. The frequency is varied with the help of sliding shorts, which moves up and down. Part of the cavity is in air and rest is in vacuum. After fabrication of individual components, assembly of sub-system has been started by carrying out numeral critical (around 500 joints approx.) soldering and brazing joints of which some of them are located within centimeter of distance. All these joints were tested for vacuum and water sealing including many temporary joints sealed by O rings and C seals. Main criticalities involve in fabricating these sub-assemblies are maintaining dimensional accuracies, concentricity and parallelism. Moreover challenges faced during transportation and handling of this subassembly while carrying out soldering and actual site assembly, were overcome by employing several specially designed fixtures. Fixtures were used to control distortion that would take place during soldering and brazing and to avoid any damage which is likely to occur because of less mechanical strength of soldering and brazing joint. This paper highlights the above difficulties and challenges faced during the actual site assembly of the whole RF system because of its limited accessibility, compactness, requirements of upper and lower resonator cavity to be symmetric and ultra cleanliness. (author)

  4. CAVITY LIKE COMPLETIONS IN WEAK SANDS PREFERRED UPSTREAM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Palmer; John McLennan

    2004-04-30

    The technology referred to as Cavity Like Completions (CLC) offers a new technique to complete wells in friable and unconsolidated sands. A successfully designed CLC provides significant increases in well PI (performance index) at lower costs than alternative completion techniques. CLC technology is being developed and documented by a partnership of major oil and gas companies through a GPRI (Global Petroleum Research Institute) joint venture. Through the DOE-funded PUMP program, the experiences of the members of the joint venture will be described for other oil and gas producing companies. To date six examples of CLC completions have been investigated by the JV. The project was performed to introduce a new type of completion (or recompletion) technique to the industry that, in many cases, offers a more cost effective method to produce oil and gas from friable reservoirs. The project's scope of work included: (1) Further develop theory, laboratory and field data into a unified model to predict performance of cavity completion; (2) Perform at least one well test for cavity completion (well provided by one of the sponsor companies); (3) Provide summary of geo-mechanical models for PI increase; and (4) Develop guidelines to evaluate success of potential cavity completion. The project tracks the experiences of a joint industry consortium (GPRI No. 17) over a three year period and compiles results of the activities of this group.

  5. Tritium and chlorine-36 migration from a nuclear explosion cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbey, T.J.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    1986-04-01

    The Radionuclide Migration (RNM) Experiment consists of a 600 gpm pumping well placed approximately 90 m away from the center of the rubble chimney and cavity created by the 1965 Cambric event. The purpose of the experiment is to deliberately draw radionuclides away from the cavity and produce breakthrough curves of the migrating radionuclides at the pumping well. Tritium and chlorine-36 are the most mobile radionuclides and they have produced breakthrough curves that are very amenable to analysis. The other radionuclides that have been observed at the pumping well are ruthenium-106, Kr-85 and I-129, in very small quantities. A conceptual model of the Cambric cavity and surrounding hydrogeologic environment was formulated using available field data such as core samples and the breakthrough curves of tritium and chlorine-36. Results show that the cavity hydraulic conductivity is about one-tenth as large as the average hydraulic conductivity of the surrounding medium. The calibrated model required the addition of retardation of the tritium. The breakthrough curve was relatively insensitive to variations in the other parameters tested in the sensitivity study

  6. Computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a high-power S-band klystron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, D.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Pal, D.; Meena, R.; Nangru, S. C.; Joshi, L. M.

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the computer-aided design of the RF-cavity for a S-band klystron operating at 2856 MHz. State-of-the-art electromagnetic simulation tools SUPERFISH, CST Microwave studio, HFSS and MAGIC have been used for cavity design. After finalising the geometrical details of the cavity through simulation, it has been fabricated and characterised through cold testing. Detailed results of the computer-aided simulation and cold measurements are presented in this article.

  7. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  8. Radiation injuries of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galantseva, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    The review is given of factors which cause the beginning of radiation injuries of oral cavity in oncologic patients following radiotherapy: dose rate absorbed with tumor and surrounding healthy tissues; irradiation procedures; size of irradiated volume. Pathogenesis and clinical picture are considered as well as prophylaxis and tactics of treatments of patients with radiation injuries of oral cavity

  9. Cavity enhancement by controlled directional scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, R.

    1980-01-01

    A method for designing cavity enclosures is presented that can be applied to the design of a nonimaging concentrator. The method maintains high transmission at the expense of some concentration in the presence of a gap between the reflector and the receiver. The slight loss of concentration may be partly offset by enhanced absorption of radiation by the receiver, resulting from the cavity effect.

  10. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Kneisel, Peter [Williamsburg, VA; Cameiro, Tadeu [McMurray, PA

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  11. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James; Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for the preparation of a maximally entangled state of two atoms in an optical cavity. Starting from an arbitrary initial state, a singlet state is prepared as the unique fixed point of a dissipative quantum dynamical process. In our scheme, cavity decay is no longer...

  12. Toroidal 12 cavity klystron : a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, A.B.R.

    2013-01-01

    A toroidal 12 cavity klystron is designed to provide with high energy power with the high frequency microwave RF- plasma generated from it. The cavities are positioned in clock hour positions. The theoretical modeling and designing is done to study the novel approach. (author)

  13. Dispersion of coupled mode-gap cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lian, Jin; Sokolov, Sergei; Yuce, E.; Combrie, S.; de Rossi, A.; Mosk, Allard

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion of a coupled resonator optical waveguide made of photonic crystal mode-gap cavities is pronouncedly asymmetric. This asymmetry cannot be explained by the standard tight binding model. We show that the fundamental cause of the asymmetric dispersion is the inherent dispersive cavity

  14. Preliminary simulation studies of accelerator cavity loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.

    1980-06-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of loading effects in a 350 MHz accelerator cavity have been performed. Electron currents of 1-10 kA have been accelerated in 5 MV/m fields. Higher order cavity modes induced by the beam may lead to emittance growth. Operation in an autoaccelerator mode has been studied

  15. Secondary Electron Emission from Plasma Processed Accelerating Cavity Grade Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basovic, Milos [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  16. Secondary electron emission from plasma processed accelerating cavity grade niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  17. Development of a high-resolution cavity-beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoichi; Hayano, Hitoshi; Honda, Yosuke; Takatomi, Toshikazu; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Urakawa, Junji; Komamiya, Sachio; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Kim, Eun-San; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Vogel, Vladimir

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution cavity-beam position monitor (BPM) to be used at the focal point of the ATF2, which is a test beam line that is now being built to demonstrate stable orbit control at ˜nanometer resolution. The design of the cavity structure was optimized for the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) beam in various ways. For example, the cavity has a rectangular shape in order to isolate two dipole modes in orthogonal directions, and a relatively thin gap that is less sensitive to trajectory inclination. A two stage homodyne mixer with highly sensitive electronics and phase-sensitive detection was also developed. Two BPM blocks, each containing two cavity BPMs, were installed in the existing ATF beam line using a rigid support frame. After testing the basic characteristics, we measured the resolution using three BPMs. The system demonstrated 8.7 nm position resolution over a dynamic range of 5μm.

  18. Analysis of performance limitations for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. R. Delayen; L. R. Doolittle; C. E. Reece

    1998-01-01

    The performance of superconducting cavities in accelerators can be limited by several factors, such as: field emission, quenches, arcing, rf power; and the maximum gradient at which a cavity can operate will be determined by the lowest of these limitations for that particular cavity. The CEBAF accelerator operates with over 300 cavities and, for each of them, the authors have determined the maximum operating gradient and its limiting factor. They have developed a model that allows them to determine the distribution of gradients that could be achieved for each of these limitations independently of the others. The result of this analysis can guide an R and D program to achieve the best overall performance improvement. The same model can be used to relate the performance of single-cell and multi-cell cavities

  19. Fiber cavities with integrated mode matching optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Podoliak, Nina; Horak, Peter; Keller, Matthias

    2017-07-17

    In fiber based Fabry-Pérot Cavities (FFPCs), limited spatial mode matching between the cavity mode and input/output modes has been the main hindrance for many applications. We have demonstrated a versatile mode matching method for FFPCs. Our novel design employs an assembly of a graded-index and large core multimode fiber directly spliced to a single mode fiber. This all-fiber assembly transforms the propagating mode of the single mode fiber to match with the mode of a FFPC. As a result, we have measured a mode matching of 90% for a cavity length of ~400 μm. This is a significant improvement compared to conventional FFPCs coupled with just a single mode fiber, especially at long cavity lengths. Adjusting the parameters of the assembly, the fundamental cavity mode can be matched with the mode of almost any single mode fiber, making this approach highly versatile and integrable.

  20. Cavity Cooling a Single Charged Levitated Nanosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, J.; Fonseca, P. Z. G.; Mavrogordatos, T.; Monteiro, T. S.; Barker, P. F.

    2015-03-01

    Optomechanical cavity cooling of levitated objects offers the possibility for laboratory investigation of the macroscopic quantum behavior of systems that are largely decoupled from their environment. However, experimental progress has been hindered by particle loss mechanisms, which have prevented levitation and cavity cooling in a vacuum. We overcome this problem with a new type of hybrid electro-optical trap formed from a Paul trap within a single-mode optical cavity. We demonstrate a factor of 100 cavity cooling of 400 nm diameter silica spheres trapped in vacuum. This paves the way for ground-state cooling in a smaller, higher finesse cavity, as we show that a novel feature of the hybrid trap is that the optomechanical cooling becomes actively driven by the Paul trap, even for singly charged nanospheres.

  1. Nb3Sn for Radio Frequency Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godeke, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the suitability of Nb3Sn to improve the performance of superconducting Radio-Frequency (RF) cavities is discussed. The use of Nb3Sn in RF cavities is recognized as an enabling technology to retain a very high cavity quality factor (Q0) at 4.2 K and to significantly improve the cavity accelerating efficiency per unit length (Eacc). This potential arises through the fundamental properties of Nb3Sn. The properties that are extensively characterized in the literature are, however, mainly related to improvements in current carrying capacity (Jc) in the vortex state. Much less is available for the Meissner state, which is of key importance to cavities. Relevant data, available for the Meissner state is summarized, and it is shown how this already validates the use of Nb3Sn. In addition, missing knowledge is highlighted and suggestions are given for further Meissner state specific research

  2. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities......) or 1/2 (Groups III and VI) of the intercuspal distance. Teeth were weighed (digital balance accurate to 0.001 g) before and after preparation to record tooth substance mass lost during cavity preparation. The prepared teeth were submitted to occlusal loading to determine their fracture strength using...... mass loss (13.91%) than composite resin preparations with the same width (10.02%). 1/2-inlay cavities had 21.34% of mass loss versus 16.19% for the 1/2-composite resin cavities. Fracture strength means (in kgf) were: GI = 187.65; GII = 143.62; GIII = 74.10; GIV = 164.22; GV = 101.92; GVI = 50...

  3. Voltage control of cavity magnon polariton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, S., E-mail: kaurs3@myumanitoba.ca; Rao, J. W.; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M., E-mail: hu@physics.umanitoba.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Yao, B. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2016-07-18

    We have experimentally investigated the microwave transmission of the cavity-magnon-polariton (CMP) generated by integrating a low damping magnetic insulator onto a 2D microwave cavity. The high tunability of our planar cavity allows the cavity resonance frequency to be precisely controlled using a DC voltage. By appropriately tuning the voltage and magnetic bias, we can observe the cavity photon magnon coupling and the magnetic coupling between a magnetostatic mode and the generated CMP. The dispersion of the generated CMP was measured by either tuning the magnetic field or the applied voltage. This electrical control of CMP may open up avenues for designing advanced on-chip microwave devices that utilize light-matter interaction.

  4. Statistics of magnetoconductance in ballistic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Ishio, H.; Burgdoerfer, J.

    1995-01-01

    The statistical properties of magnetoconductance in ballistic microcavities are investigated numerically. The distribution of conductance for chaotic cavities is found to follow the renormalized Porter-Thomas distribution suggested by random-matrix theory for the Gaussian ensemble while the conductance distribution of regular cavities in magnetic fields is nonuniversal and shifted towards the maximum value for a given number of open channels. The renormalized Porter-Thomas distribution implies a universal dependence of fluctuation amplitude on the mean conductance for chaotic cavities in the absence of time-reversal symmetry. The fluctuation amplitude for regular cavities is found to be larger than the saturation value of the fluctuation amplitude of chaotic cavities predicted by random-matrix theory. The change of the mean conductance as a function of the external magnetic field is consistent with semiclassical predictions

  5. Design of a cavity heat pipe receiver experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael G.; Brege, Mark H.; Greenlee, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A cavity heat pipe experiment has been designed to test the critical issues involved with incorporating thermal energy storage canisters into a heat pipe. The experiment is a replication of the operation of a heat receiver for a Brayton solar dynamic power cycle. The heat receiver is composed of a cylindrical receptor surface and an annular heat pipe with thermal energy storage canisters and gaseous working fluid heat exchanger tubes surrounding it. Hardware for the cavity heat pipe experiment will consist of a sector of the heat pipe, complete with gas tube and thermal energy storage canisters. Thermal cycling tests will be performed on the heat pipe sector to simulate the normal energy charge/discharge cycle of the receiver in a spacecraft application.

  6. Performance of a high resolution cavity beam position monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Sean; Boogert, Stewart; Chung, Carl; Fitsos, Pete; Frisch, Joe; Gronberg, Jeff; Hayano, Hitoshi; Honda, Yosuke; Kolomensky, Yury; Lyapin, Alexey; Malton, Stephen; May, Justin; McCormick, Douglas; Meller, Robert; Miller, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ross, Marc; Slater, Mark; Smith, Steve; Smith, Tonee; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Thomson, Mark; Urakawa, Junji; Vogel, Vladimir; Ward, David; White, Glen

    2007-07-01

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than 1 nm. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 μrad over a dynamic range of approximately ±20 μm.

  7. Effect of finite cavity width on flow oscillation in a low-Mach-number cavity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ke; Naguib, Ahmed M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The current study is focused on examining the effect of the cavity width and side walls on the self-sustained oscillation in a low Mach number cavity flow with a turbulent boundary layer at separation. An axisymmetric cavity geometry is employed in order to provide a reference condition that is free from any side-wall influence, which is not possible to obtain with a rectangular cavity. The cavity could then be partially filled to form finite-width geometry. The unsteady surface pressure is measured using microphone arrays that are deployed on the cavity floor along the streamwise direction and on the downstream wall along the azimuthal direction. In addition, velocity measurements using two-component Laser Doppler Anemometer are performed simultaneously with the array measurements in different azimuthal planes. The compiled data sets are used to investigate the evolution of the coherent structures generating the pressure oscillation in the cavity using linear stochastic estimation of the velocity field based on the wall-pressure signature on the cavity end wall. The results lead to the discovery of pronounced harmonic pressure oscillations near the cavity's side walls. These oscillations, which are absent in the axisymmetric cavity, are linked to the establishment of a secondary mean streamwise circulating flow pattern near the side walls and the interaction of this secondary flow with the shear layer above the cavity. (orig.)

  8. CAVITY BEAM POSITION MONITOR SYSTEM FOR ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, S T; Boorman, G; Molloy, S; Ross, M; Aryshev, A; Honda, Y; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J; Kim, E S; Kim, Y I; Heo, A E; Lyapin, A; Swinson, C J; Frisch, J; McCormick, D M; Nelson, J; Smith, T; White, G R

    2010-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) in KEK, Japan, is a prototype scaled demonstrator system for the final focus required for a future high energy lepton linear collider. The ATF2 beam-line is instrumented with a total of 38 C and S band resonant cavity beam position monitors (CBPM) with associated mixer electronics and digitizers. The current status of the BPM system is described, with a focus on operational techniques and performance.

  9. Investigations on helicoflex gaskets for ILC cavity flanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.; Sisakyan, A.; Shirkov, G.; Sukhanova, A.; Trubnikov, G.; Basti, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Ragonesi, A.; Kephart, R.; Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    A reliable joint of the Nb superconducting cavities is achieved due to the use of the conical Nb-Ti flanges together with a quick disconnect system (from the Garlock company). The joint was tested at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), the measured leak level is -9 mbar·1/s. This flange assembly simplifies the design, reduces the assembly time by an order of magnitude, and is expected to decrease the accelerator vacuum chamber length

  10. Operating experience with high beta superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; Doolittle, L.R.; Benesch, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The number of installed and operational β=1 superconducting rf cavities has grown significantly over the last two years in accelerator laboratories in Europe, Japan and the U.S. The total installed acceleration capability as of mid-1993 is approximately 1 GeV at nominal gradients. Major installations at CERN, DESY, KEK and CEBAF have provided large increments to the installed base and valuable operational experience. A selection of test data and operational experience gathered to date is reviewed

  11. Operating experience with high beta superconducting rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; Doolittle, L.R.; Benesch, J.F.

    1993-06-01

    The number of installed and operational β = 1 superconducting rf cavities has grown significantly over the last two years in accelerator laboratories in Europe, Japan and the US. The total installed acceleration capability as of mid-1993 is approximately 1 GeV at nominal gradients. Major installations at CERN, DESY, KEK and CEBAF have provided large increments to the installed base and valuable operational experience. A selection of test data and operational experience gathered to date is reviewed

  12. Prototype superconducting radio-frequency cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    This niobium superconducting cavity was part of the prototype stages for an upgrade to LEP, known as LEP-2. Superconducting cavities would eventually replace the traditional copper cavities and allow beam energies of 100 GeV.

  13. Electromagnetic characterization of superconducting radio-frequency cavities for gw detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantini, R.; Bernard, Ph; Chincarini, A.; Gemme, G.; Parodi, R.; Picasso, E.

    2004-03-01

    The electromagnetic properties of a prototype gravitational wave detector, based on two coupled superconducting microwave cavities, were tested. The radio-frequency (rf) detection system was carefully analysed. With the use of piezoelectric crystals small harmonic displacements of the cavity walls were induced and the parametric conversion of the electromagnetic field inside the cavities explored. Experimental results of bandwidth and sensitivity of the parametric converter versus stored energy and voltage applied to the piezoelectric crystal are reported. A rf control loop, developed to stabilize phase changes on signal paths, gave a 125 dBc rejection of the drive mode on a time scale of 1 h.

  14. Electromagnetic characterization of superconducting radio-frequency cavities for gw detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballantini, R; Bernard, Ph; Chincarini, A; Gemme, G; Parodi, R; Picasso, E

    2004-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of a prototype gravitational wave detector, based on two coupled superconducting microwave cavities, were tested. The radio-frequency (rf) detection system was carefully analysed. With the use of piezoelectric crystals small harmonic displacements of the cavity walls were induced and the parametric conversion of the electromagnetic field inside the cavities explored. Experimental results of bandwidth and sensitivity of the parametric converter versus stored energy and voltage applied to the piezoelectric crystal are reported. A rf control loop, developed to stabilize phase changes on signal paths, gave a 125 dBc rejection of the drive mode on a time scale of 1 h

  15. Electromagnetic excitation of a generic cavity with a variable e-beam pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, R.; Kerris, K.; Merkel, G.; Roberts, H.; Smith, M.

    1987-01-01

    Relativistic electron-beam nose-erosion techniques have been employed to produce an electron beam with variable pulse shape and bremsstrahlung capability (''dial a pulse''). This capability has been employed to excite a large number of electromagnetic fields inside a canonical cavity. Electron-beam and bremsstrahlung pulse-shape parameters have been varied to produce changes in the electromagnetic cavity response. For example, generic cavity test parameters such as displacement currents or conduction currents can be emphasized or de-emphasized. A theoretical interpretation of these electromagnetic excitations is presented

  16. High-power RF cavity R ampersand D for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.; Lambertson, G.; Hodgson, J.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the development of a high-power test model of the 476 MHz RF cavity for the PEP-II B Factory. This cavity is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of a high-power design with higher-order mode (HOM) damping waveguides and the fabrication technologies involved, and it can also be used to evaluate aperture or loop couplers and various RF windows. Changes to the RF design to reduce peak surface heating are discussed and results of finite-element analyses of temperature and stress are presented. Fabrication methods for the prototype and subsequent production cavities are discussed

  17. Reducing field emission in the superconducting rf cavities for the next generation of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Q.S.; Hartung, W.; Leibovich, A.; Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Sears, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on field emission, which is an obstacle to reaching the higher fields called for in future applications of superconducting radio frequency cavities to particle accelerators. The authors used heat treatment up to 1500 degrees C in an ultra-high vacuum furnace, along with processing of cavities and temperature mapping, to suppress field emission and analyze emitter properties. In 27 tests of 1-cell 1500 MHz fired accelerating cavities, on the average the accelerating field E acc increased to 24 MV/m (H pk = 1250 Oe) from 13 MV/m with chemical treatment alone; the highest E acc reached was 30.5 MV/m

  18. Status of the AC perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavity development program at TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.L.; Enchevich, I.B.

    1993-01-01

    The rf cavity for the Booster Synchrotron requires a frequency swing from 46 MHz to 61 MHz at a repetition rate of 50 Hz and a maximum accelerating voltage of 62,5 kV. These parameters have been achieved on a prototype cavity at TRIUMF using yttrium garnet ferrites rather than the conventional parallel biased NiZn ferrites. The results of the tests performed on the prototype cavity as well as some of the problems encountered and their solutions are reported. 4 refs.; 8 figs

  19. Effect of cooldown and residual magnetic field on the performance of niobium–copper clad superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2017-01-01

    Here, we present the results of rf measurements on a niobium–copper clad superconducting radio-frequency cavity with different cooldown conditions and residual magnetic field in a vertical test Dewar in order to explore the effect of thermal current induced magnetic field and its trapping on the performance of the cavity. The residual resistance, extracted from the Q 0 (T) curves in the temperature range 4.3–1.5 K, showed no dependence on a temperature gradient along the cavity during the cooldown across the critical temperature up to ~50 K m –1 . The rf losses due to the trapping of residual magnetic field during the cavity cooldown were found to be ~4.3 nΩ μT –1 , comparable to the values measured in bulk niobium cavities. An increase of residual resistance following multiple cavity quenches was observed along with evidence of trapping of magnetic flux generated by thermoelectric currents.

  20. An update on the study of high-gradient elliptical SRF cavities at 805 MHz for proton and other applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krawczyk, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Madrid, Mike [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roybal, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simakov, Evgenya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clemens, Bob [TJNAF; Macha, Jurt [TJNAF; Manus, Bob [TJNAF; Rimmer, Bob [TJNAF; Rimmer, Bob [TJNAF; Turlington, Larry [TJNAF

    2010-09-09

    An update on the study of 805 MHz elliptical SRF cavities that have been optimized for high gradient will be presented. An optimized cell shape, which is still appropriate for easy high pressure water rinsing, has been designed with the ratios of peak magnetic and electric fields to accelerating gradient being 3.75 mT/(MV/m) and 1.82, respectively. A total of 3 single-cell cavities have been fabricated. Two of the 3 cavities have been tested so far. The second cavity achieved an E{sub acc} of {approx}50 MV/m at Q{sub 0} of 1.4 x 10{sup 10}. This result demonstrates that 805 MHz cavities can, in principle, achieve as high as, or could even be better than, 1.3 GHz high-gradient cavities.