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Sample records for demonstration experiment based

  1. The Effect of Group Works and Demonstrative Experiments Based on Conceptual Change Approach: Photosynthesis and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Ayse Sert; Diken, Emine Hatun; Darcin, Emine Selcen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of group works and demonstration experiments based on conceptual change approach in the elimination of misconception about the subject of photosynthesis and respiration in plants in pre-service science teachers. This study was conducted with 78 pre-service science teachers including…

  2. A Size-Distance Scaling Demonstration Based on the Holway-Boring Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Shawn P.; Hoefling, Crystal L.

    2013-01-01

    We explored size-distance scaling with a demonstration based on the classic Holway-Boring experiment. Undergraduate psychology majors estimated the sizes of two glowing paper circles under two conditions. In the first condition, the environment was dark and, with no depth cues available, participants ranked the circles according to their angular…

  3. A Size-Distance Scaling Demonstration Based on the Holway-Boring Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Shawn P.; Hoefling, Crystal L.

    2013-01-01

    We explored size-distance scaling with a demonstration based on the classic Holway-Boring experiment. Undergraduate psychology majors estimated the sizes of two glowing paper circles under two conditions. In the first condition, the environment was dark and, with no depth cues available, participants ranked the circles according to their angular…

  4. The Effect of Group Works and Demonstrative Experiments Based on Conceptual Change Approach: Photosynthesis and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Ayse Sert; Diken, Emine Hatun; Darcin, Emine Selcen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of group works and demonstration experiments based on conceptual change approach in the elimination of misconception about the subject of photosynthesis and respiration in plants in pre-service science teachers. This study was conducted with 78 pre-service science teachers including…

  5. Fluorine-fixing efficiency on calcium-based briquette: pilot experiment, demonstration and promotion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jiao-lan; CHEN Dong-qing; LI Shu-min; YUE Yin-ling; JIN Xin; ZHAO Bing-cheng; YING Bo

    2010-01-01

    Background The fluorosis derived from coal burning is a very serious problem in China. By using fluorine-fixing technology during coal burning we are able to reduce the release of fluorides in coal at the source in order to reduce pollution to the surrounding environment by coal burning pollutants as well as decrease the intake and accumulating amounts of fluorine in the human body. The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot experiment on calcium-based fluorine-fixing material efficiency during coal burning to demonstrate and promote the technology based on laboratory research.Methods A proper amount of calcium-based fluorine sorbent was added into high-fluorine coal to form briquettes so that the fluorine in high-fluorine coal can be fixed in coal slag and its release into atmosphere reduced. We determined figures on various components in briquettes and fluorine in coal slag as well as the concentrations of indoor air pollutants, including fluoride, sulfur dioxide and respirable particulate matter (RPM), and evaluated the fluorine-fixing efficiency of calcium-based fluorine sorbents and the levels of indoor air pollutants.Results Pilot experiments on fluorine-fixing efficiency during coal burning as well as its demonstration and promotion were carried out separately in Guiding and Longli Counties of Guizhou Province, two areas with coal burning fluorosis problems. If the calcium-based fluorine sorbent mixed coal was made into honeycomb briquettes the average fluorine-fixing ratio in the pilot experiment was 71.8%. If the burning calcium-based fluorine-fixing bitumite was made into a coalball, the average of fluorine-fixing ratio was 77.3%. The concentration of fluoride, sulfur dioxide and PM10 of indoor air were decreased significantly. There was a 10% increase in the cost of briquettes due to the addition of calcium-based fluorine sorbent.Conclusions The preparation process of calcium-based fluorine-fixing briquette is simple yet highly flammable and it is

  6. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) experiment design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, D. L.; Bowden, M. L.

    1982-03-01

    The Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment concept is to erect a hybrid deployed/assembled structure as an early space experiment in large space structures technology. The basic objectives can be broken down into three generic areas: (1) by performing assembly tasks both in space and in neutral buoyancy simulation, a mathematical basis will be found for the validity conditions of neutral buoyancy, thus enhancing the utility of water as a medium for simulation of weightlessness; (2) a data base will be established describing the capabilities and limitations of EVA crewmembers, including effects of such things as hardware size and crew restraints; and (3) experience of the M.I.T. Space Systems Lab in neutral buoyancy simulation of large space structures assembly indicates that the assembly procedure may create the largest loads that a structure will experience during its lifetime. Data obtained from the experiment will help establish an accurate loading model to aid designers of future space structures.

  7. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, David L.; Mills, Raymond A.; Bowden, Mary L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) was to create a near-term Shuttle flight experiment focusing on the deployment and erection of structural truss elements. The activities of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory consist of three major areas: preparing and conducting neutral buoyancy simulation test series; producing a formal SADE Experiment plan; and studying the structural dynamics issues of the truss structure. Each of these areas is summarized.

  8. Ground-Based Measurement Experiment and First Results with Geosynchronous-Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer Engineering Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Bingham, Gail E.; Huppi, Ronald J.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Zollinger, Lori J.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Tansock, Joseph J.; Reisse, Robert A.; Hooker, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    The geosynchronous-imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (GIFTS) engineering demonstration unit (EDU) is an imaging infrared spectrometer designed for atmospheric soundings. It measures the infrared spectrum in two spectral bands (14.6 to 8.8 microns, 6.0 to 4.4 microns) using two 128 x 128 detector arrays with a spectral resolution of 0.57 cm(exp -1) with a scan duration of approximately 11 seconds. From a geosynchronous orbit, the instrument will have the capability of taking successive measurements of such data to scan desired regions of the globe, from which atmospheric status, cloud parameters, wind field profiles, and other derived products can be retrieved. The GIFTS EDU provides a flexible and accurate testbed for the new challenges of the emerging hyperspectral era. The EDU ground-based measurement experiment, held in Logan, Utah during September 2006, demonstrated its extensive capabilities and potential for geosynchronous and other applications (e.g., Earth observing environmental measurements). This paper addresses the experiment objectives and overall performance of the sensor system with a focus on the GIFTS EDU imaging capability and proof of the GIFTS measurement concept.

  9. Experiments Demonstrate Geothermal Heating Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    When engineers design heat-pump-based geothermal heating systems for homes and other buildings, they can use coil loops buried around the perimeter of the structure to gather low-grade heat from the earth. As an alternative approach, they can drill well casings and store the summer's heat deep in the earth, then bring it back in the winter to warm…

  10. Technologies of democracy: experiments and demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Brice

    2011-12-01

    Technologies of democracy are instruments based on material apparatus, social practices and expert knowledge that organize the participation of various publics in the definition and treatment of public problems. Using three examples related to the engagement of publics in nanotechnology in France (a citizen conference, a series of public meetings, and an industrial design process), the paper argues that Science and Technology Studies provide useful tools and methods for the analysis of technologies of democracy. Operations of experiments and public demonstrations can be described, as well as controversies about technologies of democracy giving rise to counter-experiments and counter-demonstrations. The political value of the analysis of public engagement lies in the description of processes of stabilization of democratic orders and in the display of potential alternative political arrangements.

  11. Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R. D.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Combs, Dustin C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Mertens, S.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; O' Shaughnessy, Mark D.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Soin, Aleksandr; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-07-08

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment is currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, USA. An overview and status of the experiment are given.

  12. Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, R D; Aguayo, E; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Combs, D C; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Gusev, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Hegai, A; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, J; MacMullin, S; Mertens, S; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Pushkin, K; Radford, D C; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Schubert, A G; Shanks, B; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Snyder, N; Soin, A; Suriano, A M; Thompson, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V

    2013-01-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment is currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, USA. An overview and status of the experiment are given.

  13. AFRL's Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherbarth, M.; Adler, A.; Smith, D.; Loretti, V.; Stuart, J.

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Space Vehicles Directorate has developed the Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) mission to research technologies needed to significantly advance Department of Defense (DoD) capabilities to operate spacecraft in the harsh radiation environment of medium-earth orbits (MEO). The ability to operate effectively in the MEO environment significantly increases the DoDs capability to field space systems that provide persistent global targeting-grade space surveillance and reconnaissance, high-speed satellite-based communication, lower-cost GPS navigation, and protection from space weather and environmental effects on a responsive satellite platform. The three DSX physics-based research/experiment areas are: 1. Wave Particle Interaction Experiment (WPIx): Researching the physics of very-low-frequency (VLF) electro-magnetic wave transmissions through the ionosphere and in the magnetosphere and characterizing the feasibility of natural and man-made VLF waves to reduce and precipitate space radiation; 2. Space Weather Experiment (SWx): Characterizing, mapping, and modeling the space radiation environment in MEO, an orbital regime attractive for future DoD, Civil, and Commercial missions; 3. Space Environmental Effects (SFx): Researching and characterizing the MEO space weather effects on spacecraft electronics and materials. Collectively, thirteen individual payloads are synergized together from these three research areas and integrated onto a single platform (DSX) which provides a low-cost opportunity for AFRL due to their common requirements. All three groups of experiments require a 3-axis stabilized spacecraft bus (but no propulsion), a suite of radiation sensors, and extended duration in a low inclination, elliptical, MEO orbit. DSX will be launch ready in summer 2010 for a likely launch co-manifest with an operational DoD satellite on an EELV (evolved expendable launch vehicle).

  14. Experiments to Demonstrate Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirí

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials are used in many current applications. The purpose of this paper is to explain the basic properties of pyroelectric and piezoelectric effects and demonstrate them in simple experiments. Pyroelectricity is presented on lead zirconium titanate (PZT) ceramics as an electric charge generated by the temperature…

  15. Experiments To Demonstrate Chemical Process Safety Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorathy, Brian D.; Mooers, Jamisue A.; Warren, Matthew M.; Mich, Jennifer L.; Murhammer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the need to educate undergraduate chemical engineering students on chemical process safety and introduces the content of a chemical process safety course offered at the University of Iowa. Presents laboratory experiments demonstrating flammability limits, flash points, electrostatic, runaway reactions, explosions, and relief design.…

  16. Demonstration projects : learning by experience : the Seabird Island demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-10-15

    This article described the Seabird Island sustainable community housing demonstration project near Agassiz, British Columbia. The project provides a sustainable, affordable place for 7 families and demonstrates a new way to build and design communities using renewable energy technologies to provide residents with better quality, energy efficient housing while reducing costs and minimizing environmental impacts. The design integrates renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and geothermal energy to save on heating and lighting costs. This article noted some of the dubious design features that could have been screened out at the design stage if careful analysis had been carried out. It described features such as the solar orientation; climatic factors that influenced the form and details of the building; the high-efficiency, condensing, natural gas water heater for space heating combined with a forced-air and radiant-floor heating system; solariums that provided solar preheating of domestic hot water; ventilation air preheating; the solar roof; an earth-tube ventilation system; and 3 wind turbines to generate electricity to offset conventional electricity sources. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation has monitored several of the systems in order to evaluate the extent to which these features have influenced the performance of the dwelling units. The energy use in all 7 units was documented along with indoor air quality. An energy performance rating of EnerGuide 80 was achieved, which is comparable to R-2000. The monitoring study revealed that wind energy at this location was not sufficient to justify the installation of the wind turbines. The solar steel roof/solarium energy system did not perform as expected. In addition, the earth-tube ventilation system provided little heat and its overall contribution to ventilation was uncertain. Other deficiencies were also noted, such as leaky ductwork, non-operational dampers and poorly integrated control systems. The

  17. Some simple demonstration experiments involving homopolar motors

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart,Seán M.

    2007-01-01

    The ready availability of very strong permanent magnets in the form of rare-earth magnetic alloys such as neodymium-iron-boron has lead to renewed interest in one of the oldest types of electric motors - the homopolar motor. The ease with which a demonstration homopolar motor can now be built and operated when neodymium magnets are used is quite remarkable. In this paper some simple homopolar motors employing neodymium magnets suitable for demonstrational purposes are described and discussed.

  18. Demonstration Experiments with a Stirling Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Christopher G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes an investigation with the primary purpose of allowing students to generate and interpret a pressure/volume diagram of a Stirling engine. Explains how the Stirling engine can be used to demonstrate the principles of operation of a refrigerator and a heat pump. (DDR)

  19. Demonstration Experiments with a Stirling Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Christopher G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes an investigation with the primary purpose of allowing students to generate and interpret a pressure/volume diagram of a Stirling engine. Explains how the Stirling engine can be used to demonstrate the principles of operation of a refrigerator and a heat pump. (DDR)

  20. Relay Mirror Experiment overview: a GBL pointing and tracking demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierks, Jeffrey S.; Ross, Susan E.; Brodsky, Aaron; Kervin, Paul W.; Holm, Richard W.

    1991-08-01

    The Relay Mirror Experiment (RME) has successfully demonstrated long-range, low-jitter tracking and pointing capabilities appropriate for ground-based laser (GBL) propagation. The RME program includes (1) a passively maneuverable, free-flying low-orbit spacecraft with a laser diode beacon and spoiled retroreflectors as acquisition aids; (2) a payload experiment package (PEP) consisting of sensors, optics, steerable mirrors, and control electronics. This subsystem accomplishes GBL tracking and pointing and the associated positioning of a space-based relay mirror sufficiently to relay an infrared beam between two ground sites. Design considerations for the control system included base motion disturbance and calibration; (3) two GBL sites each a tracking and pointing exercise in itself, using a combination of sensors and acquisition and tracking capabilities. One site includes a beam relay scoring capability.

  1. An Experiment to Demonstrate Cherenkov / Scintillation Signal Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Caravaca, J; Land, B J; Wallig, J; Yeh, M; Gann, G D Orebi

    2016-01-01

    The ability to separately identify the Cherenkov and scintillation light components produced in scintillating mediums holds the potential for a major breakthrough in neutrino detection technology, allowing development of a large, low-threshold, directional detector with a broad physics program. The CHESS (CHErenkov / Scintillation Separation) experiment employs an innovative detector design with an array of small, fast photomultiplier tubes and state-of-the-art electronics to demonstrate the reconstruction of a Cherenkov ring in a scintillating medium based on photon hit time and detected photoelectron density. This paper describes the physical properties and calibration of CHESS along with first results. The ability to reconstruct Cherenkov rings is demonstrated in a water target, and a time precision of 338 +/- 12 ps FWHM is achieved. Monte Carlo based predictions for the ring imaging sensitivity with a liquid scintillator target predict an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov hits of 94 +/- 1% and 81 +/- 1...

  2. Cosmogenic Induced Background Estimation for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brandon; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrino-less double beta (0 νββ) decay experiments probe for such rare events that the suppression and understanding of backgrounds are major experimental concerns. Cosmogenic induced isotopes have the potential to be a major background for such experiments. For the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Experiment 76Ge isotope is used as both detector and source and pure electroformed copper is primarily used for detector housing. The isotopes 68Ge and 60Co are cosmogenically produced when the Germanium and Copper components are near Earth's surface. The decay of these isotopes can mimic events in the region of interest. The experiment is located at the 4850 foot level at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota to suppress cosmogenic activation. In this talk I will present the calculations of cosmogenic backgrounds for the enriched 76Ge and electroformed Copper materials used in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The activation is determined by the surface exposure time of materials. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  3. SADE: A space experiment to demonstrate structural assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. K.; Cramblit, D. C.

    1983-05-01

    The Structural Assembly and Demonstration Experiment (SADE) demonstrates that the Shuttle is a suitable base for space construction; this includes a test of the Shuttle's control system to determine its performance when a long attached truss or beam is extended from the bay. Examples of Shuttle-related systems that will receive special attention are the RMS, the lighting system, and the crew assembly capabilities. A second purpose is to determine the extent to which the assembly results from the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator can be used to forecast the results of space assembly is determined. Finally, the SADE truss design will be validated by measuring the performance of the deployment, the special connectors, and the assembly methods.

  4. ePsych: interactive demonstrations and experiments in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Gary L; Steinman, Bernard; McCarley, Nancy

    2002-05-01

    ePsych (http://epsych.msstate.edu), a new Web site currently under active development, is intended to teach students about the discipline of psychology. The site presumes little prior knowledge about the field and so may be used in introductory classes, but it incorporates sufficient depth of coverage to be useful in more advanced classes as well. Numerous interactive and dynamic elements are incorporated into various modules, orientations, and guidebooks. These elements include Java-based experiments and demonstrations, video clips, and animated diagrams. Rapid access to all material is provided through a layer-based navigation system that allows users to visit various "Worlds of the Mind." Active learning is encouraged, by challenging students with puzzles and problems and by providing the opportunity to "dig deeper" to learn more about the phenomena at hand.

  5. Design and Demonstration of Minimal Lunar Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boche-Sauvan, L.; Foing, B. H.; Exohab Team

    2009-04-01

    Introduction: We propose a conceptual analysis of a first minimal lunar base, in focussing on the system aspects and coordinating every different part as part an evolving architecture [1-3]. We justify the case for a scientific outpost allowing experiments, sample analysis in laboratory (relevant to the origin and evolution of the Earth, geophysical and geochemical studies of the Moon, life sciences, observation from the Moon). Research: Research activities will be conducted with this first settlement in: - science (of, from and on the Moon) - exploration (robotic mobility, rover, drilling), - technology (communication, command, organisation, automatism). Life sciences. The life sciences aspects are considered through a life support for a crew of 4 (habitat) and a laboratory activity with biological experiments performed on Earth or LEO, but then without any magnetosphere protection and therefore with direct cosmic rays and solar particle effects. Moreover, the ability of studying the lunar environment in the field will be a big asset before settling a permanent base [3-5]. Lunar environment. The lunar environment adds constraints to instruments specifications (vacuum, extreme temperature, regolith, seism, micrometeorites). SMART-1 and other missions data will bring geometrical, chemical and physical details about the environment (soil material characteristics, on surface conditions …). Test bench. To assess planetary technologies and operations preparing for Mars human exploration. Lunar outpost predesign modular concept: To allow a human presence on the moon and to carry out these experiments, we will give a pre-design of a human minimal lunar base. Through a modular concept, this base will be possibly evolved into a long duration or permanent base. We will analyse the possibilities of settling such a minimal base by means of the current and near term propulsion technology, as a full Ariane 5 ME carrying 1.7 T of gross payload to the surface of the Moon

  6. The Majorana Demonstrator Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarczyk, Ralph; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay searches play a major role in determining neutrino properties. The Majorana Collaboration is constructing an ultra-low background, modular high-purity Ge detector array to search for this decay in 76Ge. Located at the 4850-ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, the Demonstrator detector assembly has the goal to show that it is possible to achieve background rates necessary for future ton-scale experiments. The talk will give a short introduction to the experiment, an overview of the achievements made in detector construction, data analysis and simulation. After the first commissioning phase last year with more than half of the detectors in their final configuration, the current status of the Demonstrator will be presented in this talk as well as plans for the future. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  7. Low-cost home experiments and demonstrations in optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejías, P. M.; Martínez-Herrero, R.; Serna, J.; Piquero, G.

    2005-10-01

    More than 60 demonstrations and basic experiments in Optics have been compiled. They can be carried out by secondary and university students in the classroom or at home, and have been conceived considering low cost and easy-to-get materials. The goal is to offer didactic resources, showing that Optics can be taught in an attractive and amusing way. The experiments try to stimulate scientific curiosity, and generate interest in the observation of our physical world. The work could be collected as a book, where each demonstration would be contained in one or two pages, including a title, a list of the required materials and a concise explanation about what to do and observe. Associated with the experimental content, we propose a web page, namely, http://www.ucm.es/info/expoptic, that accepts experiments sent by anyone interested in Optics, which can be used as a forum to interchange information on this educational topic.

  8. Rocket Experiment Demonstration of a Soft X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Herman

    This proposal is the lead proposal. Boston University will submit, via NSPIRES, a Co-I proposal, per instructions for Suborbital proposals for multiple-award. Our scientific goal of the Rocket Experiment Demonstration of a Soft X-ray Polarimeter (REDSoX Polarimeter) is to make the first measurement of the linear X-ray polarization of an extragalactic source in the 0.2-0.8 keV band. The first flight of the REDSoX Polarimeter would target Mk 421, which is commonly modeled as a highly relativistic jet aimed nearly along the line of sight. Such sources are likely to be polarized at a level of 30-60%, so the goal is to obtain a significant detection even if it is as low as 10%. Significant revisions to the models of jets emanating from black holes at the cores of active galaxies would be required if the polarization fraction lower than 10%. We employ multilayer-coated mirrors as Bragg reflectors at the Brewster angle. By matching to the dispersion of a spectrometer, one may take advantage of high multilayer reflectivities and achieve polarization modulation factors over 90%. Using replicated foil mirrors from MSFC and gratings made at MIT, we construct a spectrometer that disperses to three laterally graded multilayer mirrors (LGMLs). The lateral grading changes the wavelength of the Bragg peak for 45 degree reflections linearly across the mirror, matching the dispersion of the spectrometer. By dividing the entrance aperture into six equal sectors, pairs of blazed gratings from opposite sectors are oriented to disperse to the same LGML. The position angles for the LGMLs are 120 degrees to each other. CCD detectors then measure the intensities of the dispersed spectra after reflection and polarizing by the LGMLs, giving the three Stokes parameters needed to determine the source polarization. We will rely on components whose performance has been verified in the laboratory or in space. The CCD detectors are based on Chandra and Suzaku heritage. The mirror fabrication team

  9. Use of demonstrations and experiments in teaching business statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Johnson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of a business statistics course should be to help students think statistically and to interpret and understand data, rather than to focus on mathematical detail and computation. To achieve this students must be thoroughly involved in the learning process, and encouraged to discover for themselves the meaning, importance and relevance of statistical concepts. In this paper we advocate the use of experiments and demonstrations as aids to achieving these goals. A number of demonstrations are given which can be used to illustrate and explain some key statistical ideas.

  10. APPLICATION OF INTERACTIVE ONLINE SIMULATIONS FOR DEMONSTRATION EXPERIMENT IN PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Dementievska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of modern school physics experiment is related to the extensive use of ICT not only for data processing and visualization. Interactive computer simulation for processes and phenomena, developed by scientists and methodologists by the site Phet, helps to improve the physical demonstration experiment with the support of modern pedagogical technologies that change the traditional procedure to form students' understanding of the processes and phenomena, active cognitive activity. To study the influence of methods to integrate interactive computer simulations for better understanding the students' physical processes, phenomena and laws of the international community, teachers and Ukrainian scientists and teachers of physics have been involved. The aim of the article is to introduce the research results in the development and testing of individual components of educational technology in performing a physical experiment in secondary school.

  11. The Construction of Physics Classroom Experiment Demonstration Model Based on VR Technology%基于VR技术的生物课堂演示实验教学模式的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾凤梅

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the theory basis of the physics classroom experiment demonstration model based on virtual reality technology. It also talks about its content, the intrinsic mechanism, characteristics, as well as the differences and similarities with other forms of study. The model can effectively perform the interaction between teaching and learning, get the students involved in the classroom experiment demonstration teaching, so that to stir the students' initiative to participate in classroom teaching demonstration and make them perform the experiments independently.%探索了基于VR技术的中学生物课堂演示实验教学模式的理论基础,对课堂演示实验学习的内涵、内在机制、特征以及与其他学习方式的区别与联系作了阐述。该模式能够实现有效的教学交往和互动,让学生主动参与到课堂演示教学中来,以发挥学生主体的积极性、主动性,让学生在以后的实验课上能够完全独立地完成实验。

  12. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  13. Test data from the US-Demonstration Poloidal Coil experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, T.A.; Steeves, M.M.; Takayasu, M.; Gung, C.; Hoenig, M.O. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center; Tsuji, H.; Ando, T.; Hiyama, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Nishi, M.; Yoshida, K.; Okuno, K.; Nakajima, H.; Kato, T.; Sugimoto, M.; Isono, T.; Kawano, K.; Koizumi, N.; Osikiri, M.; Hanawa, H.; Ouchi, H.; Ono, M.; Ishida, H.; Hiue, H.; Yoshida, J.; Kamiyauchi, Y.; Ouchi, T.; Tajiri, F.; Kon, Y.; Shimizu, H.; Matsuzaki, Y.; Oomori, S.; Tani, T.; Oomori, K.; Terakado, T.; Yagyu, J.; Oomori, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Superconducting Magnet Lab.

    1992-01-01

    The US Demonstration Poloidal Field Coil (US-DPC) experiment took place successfully at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in late 1990. The 8 MJ niobium-tin coil was leak tight; it performed very well in DC tests; it performed well in AC tests, achieving approximately 70% of its design goal. An unexpected ramp-rate barrier at high currents was identified. The barrier could not be explored in the regime of higher fields and slower ramp rates due to limitations of the background-field coils. This document presents the results of the experiment with as little editing as possible. The coil, conductor, and operating conditions are given. The intent is to present data in a form that can be used by magnet analysts and designers.

  14. A simple experiment that demonstrates the ``green flash''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtial, Johannes

    2012-11-01

    The green flash occurs when, under certain atmospheric conditions, the top segment of the low sun is visibly green. It is surrounded—in at least a few minds—by an air of mystery. I describe a simple experiment that demonstrates different aspects of the green flash. The experiment uses an odd-shaped, water-filled, fish tank to simulate the refractive properties of the atmosphere; milk powder added to the water mimicks the atmosphere's scattering properties. A circular white-light source is viewed through the fish tank and the combination of refraction and scattering makes one end of the light source look green. The setup also allows experimentation with mirage effects, thereby drawing attention to their often neglected contribution to the green flash.

  15. SAR Experiments Using a Conformal Antenna Array Radar Demonstrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Knott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conformal antenna arrays have been studied for several years but only few examples of applications in modern radar or communication systems may be found up to date due to technological difficulties. The objective of the “Electronic Radar with Conformal Array Antenna” (ERAKO demonstrator system which has been developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR is to demonstrate the feasibility of an active electronically scanned antenna for conformal integration into small and medium sized airborne platforms. For practical trials the antenna has been adapted for operation with the Phased Array Multifunctional Imaging Radar (PAMIR system developed at the institute. The antenna in combination with the PAMIR front-end needed to undergo a special calibration procedure for beam forming and imaging post-processing. The present paper describes the design and development of the conformal antenna array of the demonstrator system, its connection to the PAMIR system and results of recently conducted synthetic aperture radar (SAR experiments.

  16. MHD performance demonstration experiment, October 1, 1080-September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, G. L.; Christenson, L. S.; Felderman, E. J.; Lowry, R. L.; Bordenet, E. J.

    1981-12-01

    The Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) has been under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) since December 1973 to conduct a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) High Performance Demonstration Experiment (HPDE). The objective of this experimental research is to demonstrate the attainment of MHD performance on a sufficiently large scale to verify that projected commercial MHD objectives are possible. This report describes the testing of the system under power-producing conditions during the period from October 1, 1980 to September 30, 1981. Experimental results have been obtained with the channel configured in the Faraday mode. Test conditions were selected to produce low supersonic velocity along the entire channel length. Tests have been conducted at magnetic fields up to 4.1 Tesla (T) (70% of design). Up to 30.5 MW of power has been produced to date (60% of design) for an enthalpy extraction of approximately 11%. The high Hall voltage transient, observed during the previous series of tests has been reduced. The reduction is mostly probably due to the fuel and seed being introduced simultaneously. The replacement of the ATJ graphite caps on the electrode walls with pyrolytic graphite caps has resulted in significantly higher surface temperature. As a result, the voltage drop is some 60% of the cold wall voltage drop during the previous series of tests. However, the absolute value of the present voltage drop is still greater than the original design predictions. Test results indicate, however, that the overall enthalpy extraction objective can be achieved.

  17. Diatom-Based Material Production Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    diatom cell walls. ............................................................... 19! Fig. 12 Setup for sieving diatom cell walls on the left, metal ...of diatom biomass. .............. 15! Table 4 P1 and P2 step details for cleaning of diatom cell walls at the farm. .................. 19! Table 5...are the most silicified and have the most intricate structures . Diatom valves are used to identify diatoms based on their morphology. Diatom

  18. DEMONSTRATION EXPERIMENTS OF LIGHT POLARIZATION IN PHYSICS COURSE

    OpenAIRE

    Brazhkin, Y.; Kalenkov, S.; Nizhegorodov, V.

    2008-01-01

    The article presents layout of experiments for observatiion of polarizing effects on light passage through crossed polarizers. Addition of the third polarizer leads to appearance of light on the screen. Experiment is for cases with a laser light source, reflection of light under the Brewster's angle. Photos of the installations realizing the given effects are resulted.

  19. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Combs, Dustin C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Mertens, S.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; O' Shaughnessy, Mark D.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, Werner; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Williams, T.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta (ββ (0ν)) decay of the isotope 76Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. TheDemonstrator is being assembled at the 4850-foot level of the SanfordUnderground Research Facility in Lead, SouthDakota. The array will be situated in a low-background environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. Here we describe the science goals of the Demonstrator and the details of its design.

  20. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Abgrall

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta (ββ0ν decay of the isotope Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Demonstrator is being assembled at the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be situated in a low-background environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. Here we describe the science goals of the Demonstrator and the details of its design.

  1. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, Frank T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Combs, Dustin C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Mertens, S.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, Werner; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Williams, T.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-06-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for the neutrinoless double-beta (ββ(0ν)) decay of the isotope 76Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The DEMONSTRATOR is being assembled at the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be situated in a low-background environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. Here we describe the science goals of the DEMONSTRATOR and the details of its design.

  2. The {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Combs, D C; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Gusey, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Hegai, A; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Knecht, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, S; Martin, R D; Mertens, S; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Pushkin, K; Radford, D C; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Ronquest, M C; Schubert, A G; Shanks, B; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Snyder, N; Steele, D; Strain, J; Suriano, A M; Thompson, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C-H; Yumatov, V

    2013-01-01

    The {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the isotope Ge-76 with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate the neutrino is its own antiparticle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The {\\sc Demonstrator} is being assembled at the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be situated in a low-background environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. Here we describe the science goals of the {\\sc Demonstrator} and the details of its design.

  3. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the implosion requirements to achieve inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept were recently conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z coils. Despite the relatively slow implosion velocity (70 km/s) in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were approximately 3 keV, and thermonuclear DD neutron yields up to 2e12 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had a width ranging from 60-120 microns over a roughly 6 mm height and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray spectra from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.4 g/cm3 . In these experiments 1-5e10 secondary DT neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized. This is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the DT neutron time of flight spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and DD yields greater than 1e10. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to radiate away the laser energy deposited in the fuel also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Science Experiments on File. Experiments, Demonstrations and Projects for School and Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Vicki, Ed.

    This book, addressed to students for their independent use as well as to teachers as a supplement to the standard texts, contains nearly 100 practical science experiments that cover a wide range of subjects at different grade and ability levels. It is designed to involve students in active scientific experimentation, demonstrations, and projects…

  5. Installation of the AGATA Demonstrator and commissioning experiments at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recchia, Francesco, E-mail: recchia@pd.infn.i [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    The first phase of the AGATA project, namely the AGATA Demonstrator Array, consists of a subset of 5 triple clusters of the final array and will be used to demonstrate the feasibility of the {gamma}-ray tracking. The performance of the instrument has been estimated up to now only through Monte Carlo simulations and indirect measurements. The first installation is presently ongoing ay the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, where it has replaced the CLARA array at the target position of the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer. In the present contribution, the details of the installation will be reviewed and preliminary results from the first in-beam commissioning test will be given.

  6. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  7. A Simple Experiment to Demonstrate the Effects of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, C. F.

    2007-01-01

    The role of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere is the subject of considerable discussion and debate. Global warming is well-documented, as is the continually increasing amount of greenhouse gases that human activity puts in the air. Is there a relationship between the two? The simple experiment described in this paper provides a good demonstration…

  8. A Simple Experiment to Demonstrate the Effects of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, C. F.

    2007-01-01

    The role of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere is the subject of considerable discussion and debate. Global warming is well-documented, as is the continually increasing amount of greenhouse gases that human activity puts in the air. Is there a relationship between the two? The simple experiment described in this paper provides a good demonstration…

  9. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hess, M. H. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 10{sup 12} have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm{sup 3}. In these experiments, up to 5 × 10{sup 10} secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm{sup 2}, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 10{sup 10}. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  10. Stoichiometric Experiments with Alkane Combustion: A Classroom Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilin, Denis M.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, effective demonstration of the concept of limiting and excess reagent is presented. Mixtures of either air/methane (from a gas line) or air/butane (from a disposable cigarette lighter) contained in a plastic 2 L soda bottles are ignited. The mixtures combust readily when air/fuel ratios are stoichiometric, but not at a 2-fold excess of…

  11. Domestic Violence and Dependency Courts: The "Greenbook" Demonstration Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Neena M.; Silverman, Jerry; Wang, Kathleen; Janczewski, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    This field study reports on a cross-site evaluation of dependency courts in communities receiving federal funding to implement the "Greenbook" initiative, a multisite demonstration for community improvement of coordinated responses to families victimized by domestic violence and child maltreatment. This article focuses on the dependency court,…

  12. An Imposed Dynamo Current Drive Experiment: Demonstration of Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, Thomas; Hansen, Chris; Hossack, Aaron; Marklin, George; Morgan, Kyle; Nelson, Brian; Sutherland, Derek; Victor, Brian

    2014-10-01

    An experiment for studying and developing the efficient sustainment of a spheromak with sufficient confinement (current-drive power heats the plasma to its stability β-limit) and in the keV temperature range is discussed. A high- β spheromak sustained by imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) is justified because: previous transient experiments showed sufficient confinement in the keV range with no external toroidal field coil; recent results on HIT-SI show sustainment with sufficient confinement at low temperature; the potential of IDCD of solving other fusion issues; a very attractive reactor concept; and the general need for efficient current drive in magnetic fusion. The design of a 0.55 m minor radius machine with the required density control, wall loading, and neutral shielding for a 2 s pulse is presented. Peak temperatures of 1 keV and toroidal currents of 1.35 MA and 16% wall-normalized plasma beta are envisioned. The experiment is large enough to address the key issues yet small enough for rapid modification and for extended MHD modeling of startup and code validation.

  13. Domestic violence and dependency courts: the Greenbook demonstration experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Neena M; Silverman, Jerry; Wang, Kathleen; Janczewski, Colleen

    2008-07-01

    This field study reports on a cross-site evaluation of dependency courts in communities receiving federal funding to implement the Greenbook initiative, a multisite demonstration for community improvement of coordinated responses to families victimized by domestic violence and child maltreatment. This article focuses on the dependency court, where child maltreatment cases are heard, specifically court participation in collaborative activities and court practice improvements. Findings indicate that perceptions of judicial leadership varied considerably by site. Cross-training appeared to increase over time, particularly with court staff. Collaborative efforts emerged across the Greenbook initiative with regard to the courts, and some innovative practices appeared within Greenbook sites, such as separate case plans for perpetrators and victims of violence in families, reducing the likelihood of controversial failure to protect charges. Results also highlight challenges inherent in changing court practices. Research and practice implications are discussed, focusing on relevance to other communities attempting to work collaboratively with the court system.

  14. Design and Realization of Teaching Demonstration System Based on .Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailian Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the systematic planning for teaching demonstration, this article proposed a teaching demonstration system based on .Net. The system adopted the techniques of Windows forms and serialization, Windows tree controls and the type and level of algorithm, component interface, advanced realization of windows graphics device interface, graphics drawing application programming interface, object link embedded, platform/assembly technology based on SOA, and was applied successfully in the development of the project, providing an effective method for informatization teaching.

  15. Demonstration of a refractometric sensor based on optical microfiber resonator

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a refractometric sensor based on a coated optical microfiber coil resonator. It is robust, compact, and comprises an intrinsic fluidic channel. A sensitivity of about 40 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) has been measured, in agreement with predictions.

  16. A renewable energy based hydrogen demonstration park in Turkey. HYDEPARK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilhan, Niluefer; Ersoez, Atilla [TUEBITAK Marmara Research Center Energy Institute, Gebze Kocaeli (Turkey); Cubukcu, Mete [Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey). Solar Energy Inst.

    2010-07-01

    The main goal of this national project is to research hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications. Solar and wind energy are utilized to obtain hydrogen via electrolysis, which can either be used in the fuel cell or stored in cylinders for further use. The management of all project work packages was carried by TUeBITAK Marmara Research Center (MRC) Energy Institute (EI) with the support of the collaborators. The aim of this paper is to present the units of the renewable energy based hydrogen demonstration park, which is in the demonstration phase now and share the experimental results. (orig.)

  17. Demonstrated reserve base for coal in New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, G.K.

    1995-02-01

    The new demonstrated reserve base estimate of coal for the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, is 11.28 billion short tons. This compares with 4.429 billion short tons in the Energy Information Administration`s demonstrated reserve base of coal as of January 1, 1992 for all of New Mexico and 2.806 billion short tons for the San Juan Basin. The new estimate includes revised resource calculations in the San Juan Basin, in San Juan, McKinley, Sandoval, Rio Arriba, Bernalillo and Cibola counties, but does not include the Raton Basin and smaller fields in New Mexico. These estimated {open_quotes}remaining{close_quotes} coal resource quantities, however, include significant adjustments for depletion due to past mining, and adjustments for accessibility and recoverability.

  18. Experiences with TRIDEC's Crisis Management Demonstrator in the Turkish NEAMWave12 exercise tsunami scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammitzsch, Martin; Necmioglu, Ocal; Lendholt, Matthias; Reißland, Sven; Schulz, Jana; Aksari, Dogan; Koseoglu, Aysegul; Ozer, Ceren; Comoglu, Mustafa; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Wächter, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    On November 27-28, 2012, the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) joined other countries in the North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas (NEAM) region as participants in an international tsunami response exercise. The exercise, titled NEAMWave12, simulated widespread Tsunami Watch situations throughout the NEAM region. It is the first international exercise as such, in this region, where the UNESCO-IOC ICG/NEAMTWS tsunami warning chain has been tested to a full scale for the first time with different systems. One of the systems is developed in the project Collaborative, Complex, and Critical Decision-Support in Evolving Crises (TRIDEC) and has been validated in this exercise among others by KOERI. KOERI, representing the Tsunami National Contact (TNC) and Tsunami Warning Focal Point (TWFP) for Turkey, is one of the key partners in TRIDEC. KOERI is responsible for the operation of a National Tsunami Warning Centre (NTWC) for Turkey and establishes candidate Tsunami Watch Provider (TWP) responsibilities for the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean, Marmara and Black Seas. Based on this profound experience KOERI is contributing valuable requirements to the overall TRIDEC system and is responsible for the definition and development of feasible tsunami-related scenarios in the context of UNESCO-IOC ICG/NEAMTWS activities. However, KOERI's, most important input focuses on testing and evaluating the TRIDEC system according to specified evaluation and validation criteria in order to meet ICG/NEAMTWS requirements. The TRIDEC system will be implemented in three phases, each with a demonstrator. Successively, the demonstrators are addressing related challenges. The first and second phase system demonstrator, deployed at KOERI's crisis management room has been designed and implemented, firstly, to support plausible scenarios for the Turkish NTWC to demonstrate the treatment of simulated tsunami threats with an essential subset of a NTWC

  19. [Spreading experience of demonstration plots and strengthening control of parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wang

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes the achievements and experiences of demonstration plots carrying out comprehensive control measures of parasite diseases in China, and elaborates the hard task of the control of parasitic diseases as one of main public health problems. The article also elaborates the significance of spreading the experiences of demonstration plots carrying out comprehensive control measures of parasite diseases for improving the health of people and promoting the construction of new countryside.

  20. Sustainability Logistics Basing - Science and Technology Objective - Demonstration; Industry Assessment and Demonstration Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    response to this notice that is marked Proprietary will be handled accordingly. Responses may not include Classified material. Responses to this notice...following minimum entrance criteria (initial): -TRL level and justification: Documented demonstration including bench test results that the

  1. Turning Plastic into Gold: An Analogy to Demonstrate The Rutherford Gold Foil Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    The Rutherford-Geiger-Marsden gold foil experiment is demonstrated to give students a useful mental image of the concept or principle of chemistry. The experiment shows students that in a short time one unexpected result can change the way science looks at the world.

  2. The Colorful Chemical Bottle Experiment Kit: From School Laboratory To Public Demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    Limpanuparb, Taweetham; Hsu, Suphattra

    2015-01-01

    The blue bottle experiment was first introduced to the chemical education literature as a simple demonstration on kinetics. Its original formulation contains only glucose, NaOH and small amount of methylene blue. The solution turns blue when shaken and fades to colorless upon standing. This bluing/de-bluing cycle may be repeated and may be compared to blood colors in animal's respiratory cycle. Inspired by the blue bottle experiment, the colorful chemical bottle experiment kit was commerciall...

  3. BATMAN: a DMD-based MOS demonstrator on Galileo Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Spanò, Paolo; Bon, William; Riva, Marco; Lanzoni, Patrick; Nicastro, Luciano; Molinari, Emilio; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Gonzalez, Manuel; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Coretti, Igor; Cirami, Roberto; Manetta, Marco; Zerbi, Filippo; Tresoldi, Daniela; Valenziano, Luca

    2012-09-01

    Multi-Object Spectrographs (MOS) are the major instruments for studying primary galaxies and remote and faint objects. Current object selection systems are limited and/or difficult to implement in next generation MOS for space and groundbased telescopes. A promising solution is the use of MOEMS devices such as micromirror arrays which allow the remote control of the multi-slit configuration in real time. We are developing a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) - based spectrograph demonstrator called BATMAN. We want to access the largest FOV with the highest contrast. The selected component is a DMD chip from Texas Instruments in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. Our optical design is an all-reflective spectrograph design with F/4 on the DMD component. This demonstrator permits the study of key parameters such as throughput, contrast and ability to remove unwanted sources in the FOV (background, spoiler sources), PSF effect, new observational modes. This study will be conducted in the visible with possible extension in the IR. A breadboard on an optical bench, ROBIN, has been developed for a preliminary determination of these parameters. The demonstrator on the sky is then of prime importance for characterizing the actual performance of this new family of instruments, as well as investigating the operational procedures on astronomical objects. BATMAN will be placed on the Nasmyth focus of Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) during next year.

  4. Demonstration of a Chip-based Nonlinear Optical Isolator

    CERN Document Server

    Hua, Shiyue; Jiang, Xiaoshun; Hua, Qian; Jiang, Liang; Xiao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Despite fundamentally challenging in integrated (nano)photonics, achieving chip-based light nonreciprocity becomes increasingly urgent in signal processing and optical communications. Because of material incompatibilities in conventional approaches based on Faraday effects, alternative solutions have resorted to nonlinear processes to obtain one-way transmission. However, revealed dynamic reciprocity in a recent theoretical analysis has pinned down the functionalities of these nonlinear isolators. To overcome this dynamic reciprocity, we here report the first demonstration of a nonlinear optical isolator on a silicon chip enforced by phase-matched parametric amplification. Using a high-Q microtoroid resonator, we realize highly nonreciprocal transport at the 1,550 nm wavelength when waves are simultaneously launched in both forward and backward directions. Our design, compatible with current CMOS technique, yields convincing isolation performance with sufficiently low insertion loss for a wide range of input ...

  5. Geneva University - The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    Geneva University École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 14 March 2012 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE 11.15 a.m. - Science II, Auditoire 1S081, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography Dr Chiara CASELLA   ETH Zurich   PET (Positron Emission Tomography) is a tool for in-vivo functional imaging, successfully used since the earliest days of nuclear medicine. It is based on the detection of the two coincident 511 keV photons from the annihilation of a positron, emitted from a radiotracer injected into the body. Tomographic analysis of the coincidence data allows for a 3D reconstructed image of the source distribution. The AX-PET experiment proposes a novel geometrical approach for a PET scanner, in which l...

  6. The Colorful Chemical Bottle Experiment Kit: From School Laboratory To Public Demonstration

    CERN Document Server

    Limpanuparb, Taweetham

    2015-01-01

    The blue bottle experiment was first introduced to the chemical education literature as a simple demonstration on kinetics. Its original formulation contains only glucose, NaOH and small amount of methylene blue. The solution turns blue when shaken and fades to colorless upon standing. This bluing/de-bluing cycle may be repeated and may be compared to blood colors in animal's respiratory cycle. Inspired by the blue bottle experiment, the colorful chemical bottle experiment kit was commercially developed in 2006. The kit is a versatile pedagogical tool, not only for physical chemistry but also for analytical, biological and organic chemistry. It also helps teaching concepts in scientific method and laboratory safety. This manuscript contains four parts, brief review on literature relating to the blue bottle experiment, description of the colorful chemical bottle experiment kit, pedagogical discussion of the experiments and preliminary evaluation from students.

  7. "What's (the) Matter?", A Show on Elementary Particle Physics with 28 Demonstration Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Dreiner, Herbi K; Borzyszkowski, Mikolaj; Braun, Maxim; Faßbender, Alexander; Hampel, Julia; Hansen, Maike; Hebecker, Dustin; Heepenstrick, Timo; Heinz, Sascha; Hortmanns, Katharina; Jost, Christian; Kortmann, Michael; Kruckow, Matthias U; Leuteritz, Till; Lütz, Claudia; Mahlberg, Philip; Müllers, Johannes; Opferkuch, Toby; Paul, Ewald; Pauli, Peter; Rossbach, Merlin; Schaepe, Steffen; Schiffer, Tobias; Schmidt, Jan F; Schüller-Ruhl, Jana; Schürmann, Christoph; Ubaldi, Lorenzo; Wagner-Carena, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We present the screenplay of a physics show on particle physics, by the Physikshow of Bonn University. The show is addressed at non-physicists aged 14+ and communicates basic concepts of elementary particle physics including the discovery of the Higgs boson in an entertaining fashion. It is also demonstrates a successful outreach activity heavily relying on the university physics students. This paper is addressed at anybody interested in particle physics and/or show physics. This paper is also addressed at fellow physicists working in outreach, maybe the experiments and our choice of simple explanations will be helpful. Furthermore, we are very interested in related activities elsewhere, in particular also demonstration experiments relevant to particle physics, as often little of this work is published. Our show involves 28 live demonstration experiments. These are presented in an extensive appendix, including photos and technical details. The show is set up as a quest, where 2 students from Bonn with the aid...

  8. A readout system for the micro-vertex-detector demonstrator for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, Christoph

    2011-06-09

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment (CBM) is a fixed target heavy ion experiment currently in preparation at the future FAIR accelerator complex in Darmstadt. The CBM experiment focuses on the measurements of diagnostic probes of the early and dense phase of the fireball at beam energies from 8 up to 45 AGeV. As observables, rare hadronic, leptonic and photonic probes are used, including open charm. Open charm will be identified by reconstructing the secondary decay vertex of the corresponding short lived particles. As the central component for track reconstruction, a detector system based on silicon semiconductor detectors is planned. The first three stations of the Silicon Tracking System (STS) make up the so-called Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) operating in moderate vacuum. Because of the well-balanced compromise between an excellent spatial resolution (few {mu}m), low material budget ({proportional_to}50 {mu}m Si), adequate radiation tolerance and readout speed, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) based on CMOS technology are more suited than any other technology for the reconstruction of the secondary vertex in CBM. A new detector concept has to be developed. Two MVD-Demonstrator modules have been successfully tested with 120 GeV pions at the CERN-SPS. The main topic of this thesis is the development of a control and readout concept of several MVD-Demonstrator modules with a common data acquisition system. In order to achieve the required results a front-end electronics device has been developed which is capable of reading the analogue signals of two sensors on a ex-print cable. The high data rate of the MAPS sensors (1.2 Gbit per second and sensor by 50 MHz and 12 bit ADC resolution) requires a readout system which processes the data on-line in a pipeline to avoid dead times. In order to implement the pipeline processing an FPGA is used, which is located on an additional hardware platform. In order to integrate the MVD-Demonstrator readout board in the

  9. UV lifetime demonstrator for space-based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michael; Puffenburger, Kent; Schum, Tom; Fitzpatrick, Fran; Litvinovitch, Slava; Jones, Darrell; Rudd, Joseph; Hovis, Floyd

    2016-05-01

    A long-lived UV laser is an enabling technology for a number of high-priority, space-based lidar instruments. These include next generation cloud and aerosol lidars that incorporates a UV channel, direct detection 3-D wind lidars, and ozone DIAL (differential absorption lidar) systems. In previous SBIR funded work we developed techniques for increasing the survivability of components in high power UV lasers and demonstrated improved operational lifetimes. In this Phase III ESTO funded effort we are designing and building a TRL (Technology Readiness Level) 6 demonstrator that will have increased output power and a space-qualifiable package that is mechanically robust and thermally-stable. For full space compatibility, thermal control will be through pure conductive cooling. Contamination control processes and optical coatings will be chosen that are compatible with lifetimes in excess of 1 billion shots. The 1064nm output will be frequency tripled to provide greater than 100 mJ pulses of 355 nm light at 150 Hz. The laser module build was completed in the third quarter of 2015 at which time a series of life tests were initiated. The first phase of the lifetime testing is a 532 nm only test that is expected to complete in April 2016. The 532 nm lifetest will be followed by a 4 month half power UV life test and then a four month full power UV life test. The lifetime tests will be followed by thermal/vacuum (TVAC) and vibration testing to demonstrate that the laser optics module design is at TRL 6.

  10. Interactive remote control for an STS-based superfluid helium transfer demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Jeff C.; Robinson, Frank A.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's superfluid helium on-orbit transfer (SHOOT) experiment, which is a Shuttle-based demonstration of the technology required to service cryogenically cooled satellites in space, is described. The SHOOT Command and Monitoring System software, developed on Macintosh II, will provide a near-real-time highly interactive interface making it possible to control the experiment and to analyze and display its telemetry. User interface is discussed as well as conversion functions, and hardware.

  11. Sustainability Logistics Basing - Science and Technology Objective - Demonstration; Demonstration #1 - 50 Person Camp Demo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-17

    while maintaining or improving the quality of life at expeditionary base camps in the size range of 50-1000 personnel. The SLB-STO-D is using...Weight Data for Load Bank Operation ............................................. 49 Figure 42: Power and Fuel Weight Data for Battery Charger...ECUs) to maintain internal temperatures. The MANGEN provides an operational energy capability in the 1kW range that is currently not available to

  12. Demonstration of optical computing logics based on binary decision diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shiyun; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi

    2012-01-16

    Optical circuits are low power consumption and fast speed alternatives for the current information processing based on transistor circuits. However, because of no transistor function available in optics, the architecture for optical computing should be chosen that optics prefers. One of which is Binary Decision Diagram (BDD), where signal is processed by sending an optical signal from the root through a serial of switching nodes to the leaf (terminal). Speed of optical computing is limited by either transmission time of optical signals from the root to the leaf or switching time of a node. We have designed and experimentally demonstrated 1-bit and 2-bit adders based on the BDD architecture. The switching nodes are silicon ring resonators with a modulation depth of 10 dB and the states are changed by the plasma dispersion effect. The quality, Q of the rings designed is 1500, which allows fast transmission of signal, e.g., 1.3 ps calculated by a photon escaping time. A total processing time is thus analyzed to be ~9 ps for a 2-bit adder and would scales linearly with the number of bit. It is two orders of magnitude faster than the conventional CMOS circuitry, ~ns scale of delay. The presented results show the potential of fast speed optical computing circuits.

  13. Demonstration of new frequency-based flame monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khesin, M. [MK Engineering Inc., North Andover, MA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Methods of flame monitoring and combustion diagnostics based on analysis of temporal frequency spectra of flame radiation are attracting growing attention. It has been demonstrated that valuable flame quality information can be extracted from the chaos of burner flames by applying advanced signal analysis. A new flame diagnostics system (Flamenco), based on the application of new signal processing algorithms, have been developed and tested. The system generates an array of statistical values correlating with main combustion parameters of individual burner flames. Along with the main system, several derivative software systems were developed to enhance the testing and analysis capabilities. This paper presents preliminary results of pilot-scale testing of the new system, conducted at a single-burner combustion test facility, with support of Forney Corporation. Pilot-scale testing was conducted on a 1.0 Mbtu/hr single-burner gas-fired boiler, equipped with analytical instrumentation to measure NOx, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CO. The tests were conducted for the full range of air flow changes at different loads. The results have proven that the new system generates output signals correlated with measured burner parameters, such as NOx and airflow. The new system offers an effective and economical new method of flame monitoring and combustion diagnostics, to facilitate balancing and adjustment of individual burners and it is applicable to both single and multi-burner installations.

  14. The "Chocolate Experiment"--A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using…

  15. The "Chocolate Experiment"--A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using…

  16. Defining and Demonstrating Capabilities for Experience-Based Narrative Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    missing and elided information in the story. For example, given a brief synopsis of Shakespeare’s Macbeth plot, the Genesis system can fill in the...results of certain actions, such as that “if Ducan kills Macbeth , Macbeth is dead.” This information was then fed into the Analogical Story Merging (ASM...notes the detailed similarities of Macbeth and Hamlet, how Julius Caesar shares some structure with Macbeth and Hamlet but nowhere near as much, and

  17. 'Natural experiment' demonstrates top-down control of spiders by birds on a landscape level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haldre Rogers

    Full Text Available The combination of small-scale manipulative experiments and large-scale natural experiments provides a powerful approach for demonstrating the importance of top-down trophic control on the ecosystem scale. The most compelling natural experiments have come from studies examining the landscape-scale loss of apex predators like sea otters, wolves, fish and land crabs. Birds are dominant apex predators in terrestrial systems around the world, yet all studies on their role as predators have come from small-scale experiments; the top-down impact of bird loss on their arthropod prey has yet to be examined at a landscape scale. Here, we use a unique natural experiment, the extirpation of insectivorous birds from nearly all forests on the island of Guam by the invasive brown tree snake, to produce the first assessment of the impacts of bird loss on their prey. We focused on spiders because experimental studies showed a consistent top-down effect of birds on spiders. We conducted spider web surveys in native forest on Guam and three nearby islands with healthy bird populations. Spider web densities on the island of Guam were 40 times greater than densities on islands with birds during the wet season, and 2.3 times greater during the dry season. These results confirm the general trend from manipulative experiments conducted in other systems however, the effect size was much greater in this natural experiment than in most manipulative experiments. In addition, bird loss appears to have removed the seasonality of spider webs and led to larger webs in at least one spider species in the forests of Guam than on nearby islands with birds. We discuss several possible mechanisms for the observed changes. Overall, our results suggest that effect sizes from smaller-scale experimental studies may significantly underestimate the impact of bird loss on spider density as demonstrated by this large-scale natural experiment.

  18. Regularity-based functional streamflow disaggregation: 2. Extended demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, P.; Gerlinger, K.; Hattermann, F. F.; Krysanova, V.; Schilling, C.; Behrendt, H.

    2008-03-01

    Within the scope of a program to empirically assess the pathways across large river systems of substances from diffuse sources, a method has been proposed and demonstrated in part 1 of blind functional streamflow disaggregation (FSD). It yields fast, transient, and (s)low conceptual, parallel component flows. We apply the technique here to German and Austrian gauging stations from watersheds of the Elbe and Danube basins, covering geomorphologic conditions from lowlands to alpine. Potential relations to the classical concept of river runoff composition (base flow, interflow, and overland flow) are evaluated by contrasting FSD analyses with direct rainfall-runoff syntheses using the distributed models Large Area Runoff Simulation Model (LARSIM), Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), and Soil and Water Integrated Model (SWIM). The material is supplemented in part by another empirical technique, Differentielle Ganglinien-Analyse (DIFGA), and by the Hydrologiska Byrans Vattenbalansavdelning (HBV) model in a lumped mode. Blind FSD in its shortcut version turns out to be competitive in general with the simulations consulted. A moderately higher surface and subsurface flow diversification, however, like the one borne in a "greedy" FSD process, is indicated. We shed a glance in passing at further useful applications, from supporting hydrologic modeling to tracing climatic signatures in internal changes of the terrestrial hydrologic cycle.

  19. Low-cost nonlinear optics experiment for undergraduate instructional laboratory and lecture demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchiello, Rozane de F.; Pereira, Luiz A. A.; Gómez, Sergio L.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a simple and affordable experiment on the thermal lens effect, suitable for an undergraduate educational laboratory or as a tabletop demonstration in a lecture on nonlinear optics. Such an experiment exploits the formation of a lens in an absorbing medium illuminated by a laser beam with a Gaussian intensity profile. As an absorber, we use a commercial soy sauce, which exhibits a strong thermal lensing effect. Additionally, we show how to measure the radius of a Gaussian beam using the knife-edge method, and how to estimate the focal length of the induced thermal lens.

  20. Tethered elevator and platforms as space station facilities: Systems studies and demonstrative experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Several key concepts of the science and applications tethered platforms were studied. Some conclusions reached are herein listed. Tether elevator and platform could improve the space station scientific and applicative capabilities. The space elevator presents unique characteristics as microgravity facility and as a tethered platform servicing vehicle. Pointing platforms could represent a new kind of observation facility for large class of payloads. The dynamical, control and technological complexity of these concepts advised demonstrative experiments. The on-going tethered satellite system offers the opportunity to perform such experiments. And feasibility studies are in progress.

  1. Laser Spectroscopy Based Multi-Gas Monitor Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The timing was right in the “evolution” of low power tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) to design a spacecraft cabin air monitor around technology being developed at a small company funded by SBIR grants. NASA Centers had been monitoring their progress hoping that certain key gaps in the long term gas monitoring development roadmap could be filled by TDLS. The first iteration of a monitor for multiple gases called the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM) which measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor, as well as temperature and pressure. In January 2013, the ISS Program being particularly interested in ammonia funded a technology demonstration of MGM. The project was a joint effort between Vista Photonics for the sensor, NASA-JSC for project management and laboratory calibration, and Nanoracks for the enclosure and payload certification/integration. Nanoracks was selected in order to use their new experimental infrastructure located in an EXPRESS rack in the JEM. The MGM enclosure has multiple power supply options including 5VDC USB interface to the Nanoracks Frame, 28VDC Express Rack power and internal rechargeable batteries. MGM was calibrated at NASA-JSC in July 2013, delivered to ISS on 37 Soyuz in November 2013 and was installed and activated in February 2014. MGM resided in the Nanoracks Frame making continuous measurements the majority of the time, but also spent a day in Node 3 on battery power, and a month in the US Lab Module on 28VDC power, as part of the demonstration. Data was downloaded via Nanoracks on roughly a weekly basis. Comparisons were made with data from the Major Constituents Analyzer (MCA) which draws and analyzes air from JEM and other modules several times per hour. A crewmember challenged the carbon dioxide channel by breathing into the intake upon startup, and challenged the ammonia channel later using a commercial ammonia inhalant. Many interesting phenomena in the cabin atmosphere were detected during the tech demo

  2. Lattice design and expected performance of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment demonstration of ionization cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterized neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavor at a neutrino factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at a muon collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE aims to demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using rf cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and reacceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling. A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised experiment can deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with its predicted cooling performance.

  3. Experimental demonstration on the deterministic quantum key distribution based on entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Zangana, Alaa Jabbar Jumaah; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Wu, Juan; Han, Yun-Guang; Wang, Shuang; Li, Hong-Wei; He, De-Yong; Tawfeeq, Shelan Khasro; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can; Chen, Wei; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-02-01

    As an important resource, entanglement light source has been used in developing quantum information technologies, such as quantum key distribution(QKD). There are few experiments implementing entanglement-based deterministic QKD protocols since the security of existing protocols may be compromised in lossy channels. In this work, we report on a loss-tolerant deterministic QKD experiment which follows a modified “Ping-Pong”(PP) protocol. The experiment results demonstrate for the first time that a secure deterministic QKD session can be fulfilled in a channel with an optical loss of 9 dB, based on a telecom-band entangled photon source. This exhibits a conceivable prospect of ultilizing entanglement light source in real-life fiber-based quantum communications.

  4. The `Chocolate Experiment' - A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using their bare hands in this experiment because they learned in early science lessons that skin is not a reliable detector of heat transfer. Moreover, when the experiment is conducted in a school laboratory, it is often difficult for students to perceive the slight differences in heat transfer on the dull black and silvery aluminum leaves attached to their hands. Rather than replacing students' bare hands with such sophisticated apparatus as a data logger and temperature probe, I suggest using a simple (and delicious!) low-cost instrument, i.e., chocolate, which simply melts when it receives radiation.

  5. Letter of Intent for a Demonstration Experiment in Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Assmann, R; Bingham, R; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Delerue, N; Dias, F M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Elsen, E; Fartoukh, S; Ferreira, C M; Fonseca, R A; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Gruelke, O; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jarozinsky, D; Jolly, S; Joshi, C; Kumar, N; Lu, W; Lopes, N; Kaur, M; Lotov, K; Malka, V; Meddahi, M; Mete, O; Mori, W B; Mueller, A; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Norreys, P; Osterhoff, J; Pozimski, J; Pukhov, A; Reimann, O; Roesler, S; Ruhl, H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, H v d; Schoening, A; Seryi, A; Simon, F; Silva, L O; Tajima, T; Trines, R; Tueckmantel, T; Upadhyay, A; Vieira, J; Willi, O; Wing, M; Xia, G; Yakimenko, V; Yan, X; Zimmermann, F; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2011-01-01

    We propose an experiment on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PDPWA) which could lead to a future TeV-scale e+- collider of much reduced length compared to conventional designs. Proton bunches are ideal drivers for high energy lepton accelerators, with the potential of reducing drastically the number of required driver stages. By using a plasma to modulate a long proton bunch, a strong plasma wave can be generated by a series of ‘micro-bunches’, so that an experimental program can start today with the existing proton beams. In this letter of intent, we propose a demonstration experiment using the existing CERN SPS beam. This project would be the first beam-driven wakefield acceleration experiment in Europe, and the first proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment worldwide. We have set as an initial goal the demonstration of 1 GeV energy gain for electrons in 10 m of plasma. A proposal for reaching 100 GeV within 100 m of plasma will be developed using results from the initial roun...

  6. Demonstrative pronouns in Spanish : a discourse-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zulaica Hernández, Iker

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation constitutes an exploration into the discourse anaphoric properties of Spanish demonstrative anaphors esto eso and aquello (cf. this/that). This basic issue, largely ignored in the studies of Spanish linguistics so far, is fully addressed here from a semantic and pragmatic perspecti

  7. Artificial neural network based on SQUIDs: demonstration of network training and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, F.; Carelli, P.; Castellano, M. G.; Torrioli, G.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a scheme for the realization of artificial neural networks based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In order to demonstrate the operation of this scheme we designed and successfully tested a small network that implements an XOR gate and is trained by means of examples. The proposed scheme can be particularly convenient as support for superconducting applications such as detectors for astrophysics, high energy experiments, medicine imaging and so on.

  8. Multiplatform information-based sensor management: an inverted UAV demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreucher, Chris; Wegrzyn, John; Beauvais, Michel; Conti, Ralph

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes an experimental demonstration of a distributed, decentralized, low communication sensor management algorithm. We first review the mathematics surrounding the method, which includes a novel combination of particle filtering for predictive density estimation and information theory for maximizing information flow. Earlier work has shown the utility via Monte Carlo simulations. Here we present a laboratory demonstration to illustrate the utility and to provide a stepping stone toward full-up implementation. To that end, we describe an inverted Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) test-bed developed by The General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems (GDAIS) Michigan Research and Development Center (MRDC) to facilitate and promote the maturation of the research algorithm into an operational, field-able system. Using a modular design with wheeled robots as surrogates to UAVs, we illustrate how the method is able to detect and track moving targets over a large surveillance region by tasking a collection of limited field of view sensors.

  9. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Rigby, A.; Bott, A.; Bell, A. R.; Bingham, R.; Casner, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Churazov, E. M.; Emig, J.; Flocke, N.; Fiuza, F.; Forest, C. B.; Foster, J.; Graziani, C.; Katz, J.; Koenig, M.; Li, C.-K.; Meinecke, J.; Petrasso, R.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Ryu, D.; Ryutov, D.; Weide, K.; White, T. G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2017-04-01

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model behind cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the values observed. We have conceived experiments that aim to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through simulation campaigns using FLASH, a highly capable radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that we have developed, and large-scale three-dimensional simulations on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results indicate that the experimental platform may be capable of reaching a turbulent plasma state and determining the dynamo amplification. We validate and compare our numerical results with a small subset of experimental data using synthetic diagnostics.

  10. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeferacos, P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Rigby, A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Bott, A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Bell, A. R. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Bingham, R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX, United Kingdom; Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, United Kingdom; Casner, A. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon, France; Cattaneo, F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Churazov, E. M. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, D-85741 Garching, Germany; Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow 117997, Russia; Emig, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Flocke, N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Fiuza, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Forest, C. B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; Foster, J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, West Berkshire, RG7 4PR, United Kingdom; Graziani, C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Katz, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation de Lasers Intenses, UMR7605, CNRS CEA, Université Paris VI Ecole Polytechnique, France; Li, C. -K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Meinecke, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Petrasso, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Park, H. -S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Ryu, D. [Department of Physics, UNIST, Ulsan 689-798, South Korea; Ryutov, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Weide, K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; White, T. G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Reville, B. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, United Kingdom; Miniati, F. [Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich, Switzerland; Schekochihin, A. A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Gregori, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Lamb, D. Q. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA

    2017-03-22

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model behind cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the values observed. We have conceived experiments that aim to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through simulation campaigns using FLASH, a highly capable radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that we have developed, and large-scale three-dimensional simulations on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results indicate that the experimental platform may be capable of reaching a turbulent plasma state and determining the dynamo amplification. We validate and compare our numerical results with a small subset of experimental data using synthetic diagnostics.

  11. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  12. Ground based materials science experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  13. Experience gained with the Synroc demonstration plant at ANSTO and its relevance to plutonium immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jostsons, A.; Ridal, A.; Mercer, D.J.; Vance, E.R.L. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1996-05-01

    The Synroc Demonstration Plant (SDP) was designed and constructed at Lucas Heights to demonstrate the feasibility of Synroc production on a commercial scale (10 kg/hr) with simulated Purex liquid HLW. Since commissioning of the SDP in 1987, over 6000 kg of Synroc has been fabricated with a range of feeds and waste loadings. The SDP utilises uniaxial hot-pressing to consolidate Synroc. Pressureless sintering and hot-isostatic pressing have also been studied at smaller scales. The results of this extensive process development have been incorporated in a conceptual design for a radioactive plant to condition HLW from a reprocessing plant with a capacity to treat 800 tpa of spent LWR fuel. Synroic containing TRU, including Pu, and fission products has been fabricated and characterised in a glove-box facility and hot cells, respectively. The extensive experience in processing of Synroc over the past 15 years is summarised and its relevance to immobilization of surplus plutonium is discussed.

  14. Design of a K/Q-Band Beacon Receiver for the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload (TDP) #5 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jacquelynne R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a coherent KQ-band (2040 GHz) beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed at the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) for use in the Alphasat Technology Demonstration Payload 5 (TDP5) beacon experiment. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation at 40 GHz to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models in the Q-band. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation. The receiver system has been characterized in the lab and demonstrates a system dynamic range performance of better than 58 dB at 1 Hz and better than 48 dB at 10 Hz rates.

  15. Experiment and Modeling of ITER Demonstration Discharges in the DIII-D Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Myung [ORNL; Doyle, E. J. [University of California, Los Angeles; Ferron, J.R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Holcomb, C T [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Jackson, G. L. [General Atomics; Lao, L. L. [General Atomics; Luce, T.C. [General Atomics, San Diego; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Murakami, Masanori [ORNL; Osborne, T. H. [General Atomics; Politzer, P. A. [General Atomics, San Diego; Prater, R. [General Atomics; Snyder, P. B. [General Atomics

    2011-01-01

    DIII-D is providing experimental evaluation of 4 leading ITER operational scenarios: the baseline scenario in ELMing H-mode, the advanced inductive scenario, the hybrid scenario, and the steady state scenario. The anticipated ITER shape, aspect ratio and value of I/{alpha}B were reproduced, with the size reduced by a factor of 3.7, while matching key performance targets for {beta}{sub N} and H{sub 98}. Since 2008, substantial experimental progress was made to improve the match to other expected ITER parameters for the baseline scenario. A lower density baseline discharge was developed with improved stationarity and density control to match the expected ITER edge pedestal collisionality ({nu}*{sub e} {approx} 0.1). Target values for {beta}{sub N} and H{sub 98} were maintained at lower collisionality (lower density) operation without loss in fusion performance but with significant change in ELM characteristics. The effects of lower plasma rotation were investigated by adding counter-neutral beam power, resulting in only a modest reduction in confinement. Robust preemptive stabilization of 2/1 NTMs was demonstrated for the first time using ECCD under ITER-like conditions. Data from these experiments were used extensively to test and develop theory and modeling for realistic ITER projection and for further development of its optimum scenarios in DIII-D. Theory-based modeling of core transport (TGLF) with an edge pedestal boundary condition provided by the EPED1 model reproduces T{sub e} and T{sub i} profiles reasonably well for the 4 ITER scenarios developed in DIII-D. Modeling of the baseline scenario for low and high rotation discharges indicates that a modest performance increase of {approx} 15% is needed to compensate for the expected lower rotation of ITER. Modeling of the steady-state scenario reproduces a strong dependence of confinement, stability, and noninductive fraction (f{sub NI}) on q{sub 95}, as found in the experimental I{sub p} scan, indicating that

  16. Status Update of the Majorana Demonstrator Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruzko, Julieta [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rielage, Keith Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Xu, Wenqin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Elliott, Steven Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Massarczyk, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goett, John Jerome III [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Pinghan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Neutrinoless double beta decay searches play a major role in determining neutrino properties, in particular the Majorana or Dirac nature of the neutrino and the absolute scale of the neutrino mass. The consequences of these searches go beyond neutrino physics, with implications for Grand Unification and leptogenesis. The Majorana Collaboration is assembling a low-background array of high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. The Majorana Demonstrator, which is currently being constructed and commissioned at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, will contain 44 kg (30 kg enriched in 76Ge) of HPGe detectors. Its primary goal is to demonstrate the scalability and background required for a tonne-scale Ge experiment. This is accomplished via a modular design and projected background of less than 3 cnts/tonne-yr in the region of interest. The experiment is currently taking data with the first of its enriched detectors.

  17. Status Update of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gruszko, Julieta; Arnquist, Isaac; Avignone, Frank; Barabash, Alexander; Bertrand, Fred; Bradley, Adam; Brudanin, Viktor; Busch, Matthew; Buuck, Micah; Byram, Dana; Caldwell, Adam; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Chu, Pinghan; Cuesta, Clara; Detwiler, Jason; Dunagan, Colter; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, Hiroyasu; Elliott, Steven; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Gilliss, Tom; Giovanetti, Graham K; Goett, Johnny; Green, Matthew P; Guinn, Ian; Guiseppe, Vince; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric; Howard, Stanley; Howe, Mark; Jasinski, Ben; Keeter, Kara; Kidd, Mary; Konovalov, Sergey; Kouzes, Richard T; LaFerriere, Brian; Leon, Jonathan; MacMullin, Jacqueline; Martin, Ryan; Massarczyk, Ralph; Meijer, Sam; Mertens, Susanne; OShaughnessy, Christopher; Orrell, John; Poon, Alan; Radford, David; Rager, Jamin; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R G Hamish; Romero-Romero, Elisa; Shanks, Benjamin; Shirchenko, Mark; Snyder, Nathan; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Tedeschi, David; Trimble, Jim; Varner, Robert; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris; White, Brandon; Wilkerson, John F; Wiseman, Clint; Xu, Wenqin; Yakushev, E; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhitnikov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay searches play a major role in determining neutrino properties, in particular the Majorana or Dirac nature of the neutrino and the absolute scale of the neutrino mass. The consequences of these searches go beyond neutrino physics, with implications for Grand Unification and leptogenesis. The \\textsc{Majorana} Collaboration is assembling a low-background array of high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in $^{76}$Ge. The \\textsc{Majorana Demonstrator}, which is currently being constructed and commissioned at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, will contain 44 kg (30 kg enriched in $^{76}$Ge) of HPGe detectors. Its primary goal is to demonstrate the scalability and background required for a tonne-scale Ge experiment. This is accomplished via a modular design and projected background of less than 3 cnts/tonne-yr in the region of interest. The experiment is currently taking data with the first of its enriched det...

  18. Demonstration of scattering suppression in retardation-based plasmonic nanoantennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.G.; Pors, A.; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard;

    2010-01-01

    Modifications in scattering strength of and local field enhancement by retardation-based plasmonic nanoantennas when being transformed from straight nanorods to split-ring resonators are investigated experimentally. Scattering properties are characterized with linear reflection and extinction...... is decreased, a feature that is attributed to the decrease in the nanoantenna electric-dipole response when bending the nanorods. The experimental observations are corroborated with numerical simulations using the finite-element method....

  19. Demonstrating Change with Astronaut Photography Using Object Based Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollier, Andi; Jagge, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Every day, hundreds of images of Earth flood the Crew Earth Observations database as astronauts use hand held digital cameras to capture spectacular frames from the International Space Station. The variety of resolutions and perspectives provide a template for assessing land cover change over decades. We will focus on urban growth in the second fastest growing city in the nation, Houston, TX, using Object-Based Image Analysis. This research will contribute to the land change science community, integrated resource planning, and monitoring of the rapid rate of urban sprawl.

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF AN ATCA BASED RF CONTROL SYSTEM AT FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Simrock, S N; Jezynski, T; Koprek, W; Butkowski, L; Jablonski, G W; Jalmuzna, W; Makowski, D R; Piotrowski, A; Czuba, K

    2009-01-01

    Future rf control systems will require simultaneous data acquisition of up to 100 fast ADC channels at sampling rates of around 100 MHz and real time signal processing within a few hundred nanoseconds. At the same time the standardization of Low-Level RF systems are common objectives for all laboratories for cost reduction, performance optimization and machine reliability. Also desirable are modularity and scalability of the design as well as compatibility with accelerator instrumentation needs including the control system. All these requirements can be fulfilled with the new telecommunication standard ATCA when adopted to the domain of instrumentation. We describe the architecture and design of an ATCA based LLRF system for the European XFEL. The operation of a prototype capable of controlling the vectorsum of 24-cavities and providing measurements of forward and reflected power are presented.

  1. SBSS Demonstrator: A design for efficient demonstration of Space-based Space Surveillance end-to-end capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzmann, Jens; Flohrer, Tim; Schildknecht, Thomas; Wagner, Axel; Silha, Jiri; Willemsen, Philip; Teston, Frederic

    This paper presents the capabilities of a Space-Based Space Surveillance (SBSS) demonstration mission for Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) based on a micro-satellite platform. The results have been produced in the frame of ESA’s "Assessment Study for Space Based Space Surveillance Demonstration Mission" performed by the Airbus Defence and Space consortium. Space Surveillance and Tracking is part of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and covers the detection, tracking and cataloguing of space debris and satellites. Derived SST services comprise a catalogue of these man-made objects, collision warning, detection and characterisation of in-orbit fragmentations, sub-catalogue debris characterisation, etc. The assessment of SBSS in a SST system architecture has shown that both an operational SBSS and also already a well-designed space-based demonstrator can provide substantial performance in terms of surveillance and tracking of beyond-LEO objects. Especially the early deployment of a demonstrator, possible by using standard equipment, could boost initial operating capability and create a self-maintained object catalogue. Furthermore, unique statistical information about small-size LEO debris (mm size) can be collected in-situ. Unlike classical technology demonstration missions, the primary goal is the demonstration and optimisation of the functional elements in a complex end-to-end chain (mission planning, observation strategies, data acquisition, processing and fusion, etc.) until the final products can be offered to the users. Also past and current missions by the US (SBV, SBSS) and Canada (Sapphire, NEOSSat) underline the advantages of space-based space surveillance. The presented SBSS system concept takes the ESA SST System Requirements (derived within the ESA SSA Preparatory Program) into account and aims at fulfilling SST core requirements in a stand-alone manner. Additionally, requirments for detection and characterisation of small-sized LEO debris are

  2. Operating experience during high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenti, P.J.; Elliott, D.I.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides a summary of operational experiences, component and system performance, and lessons learned associated with the operation of the Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The VF was designed to convert stored high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stable waste form (borosilicate glass) suitable for disposal in a federal repository. Following successful completion on nonradioactive test, HLW processing began in July 1995. Completion of Phase 1 of HLW processing was reached on 10 June 1998 and represented the processing of 9.32 million curies of cesium-137 (Cs-137) and strontium-90 (Sr-90) to fill 211 canisters with over 436,000 kilograms of glass. With approximately 85% of the total estimated curie content removed from underground waste storage tanks during Phase 1, subsequent operations will focus on removal of tank heel wastes.

  3. Demonstration of simultaneous experiments using thin crystal multiplexing at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y; Alonso-Mori, R; Barends, T R M; Blank, V D; Botha, S; Chollet, M; Damiani, D S; Doak, R B; Glownia, J M; Koglin, J M; Lemke, H T; Messerschmidt, M; Nass, K; Nelson, S; Schlichting, I; Shoeman, R L; Shvyd'ko, Yu V; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Stoupin, S; Terentyev, S; Williams, G J; Zhu, D; Robert, A; Boutet, S

    2015-05-01

    Multiplexing of the Linac Coherent Light Source beam was demonstrated for hard X-rays by spectral division using a near-perfect diamond thin-crystal monochromator operating in the Bragg geometry. The wavefront and coherence properties of both the reflected and transmitted beams were well preserved, thus allowing simultaneous measurements at two separate instruments. In this report, the structure determination of a prototypical protein was performed using serial femtosecond crystallography simultaneously with a femtosecond time-resolved XANES studies of photoexcited spin transition dynamics in an iron spin-crossover system. The results of both experiments using the multiplexed beams are similar to those obtained separately, using a dedicated beam, with no significant differences in quality.

  4. Coronagraphic demonstration experiment using aluminum mirrors for space infrared astronomical observations

    CERN Document Server

    Oseki, Shinji; Ishihara, Daisuke; Enya, Keigo; Haze, Kanae; Kotani, Takayuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nishiyama, Miho; Abe, Lyu; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu

    2015-01-01

    For future space infrared astronomical coronagraphy, we perform experimental studies on the application of aluminum mirrors to a coronagraph. Cooled reflective optics is required for broad-band mid-infrared observations in space, while high-precision optics is required for coronagraphy. For the coronagraph instrument originally proposed for the next-generation infrared astronomical satellite project SPICA (SCI: SPICA Coronagraph Instrument), we fabricated and evaluated the optics consisting of high-precision aluminum off-axis mirrors with diamond-turned surfaces, and conducted a coronagraphic demonstration experiment using the optics with a coronagraph mask. We first measured the wave front errors (WFEs) of the aluminum mirrors with a He-Ne Fizeau interferometer to confirm that the power spectral densities of the WFEs satisfy the SCI requirements. Then we integrated the mirrors into an optical system and evaluated the overall performance of the system. As a result, we estimate the total WFE of the optics to b...

  5. 驻波演示实验研究%The Demonstrating Experiment of Standing Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳建国; 陈钺

    2015-01-01

    详析驻波演示实验,分析驻波稳定出现时,因音叉臂的振幅(即入射波源的振幅)恒为A0,故弦线长必为:L=nλ±λ(n=1,2,3,…),以校正一些资料中取L=nλ(n=1,2,3,…)之误.2122%This paper presents a detailed analysis of the standing waves demonstrating experiment. Through investigating that when the standing waves stability appears, the amplitude of the tuning fork arm (i.e., the amplitude of Incident wave source) identically equals toA0, so the length of the string must be L=nλ±λ (n=1, 2, 3,…), this paper corrects the error that some 2 12 documents make taking L=nλ (n=1, 2, 3,…).

  6. A Visual Demonstration of Solvent Effect in Chemical Kinetics through Blue Bottle Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *R. Azmat

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the study of chemical kinetics, usually solvent effect was explained to show the consequences on rate of reaction theoretically which is difficult to understand for under graduate students. The blue bottle experiment as a “one day activity” can be used to explain well visually the solvent effect through demonstration of color change. Kinetics of reduction of methylene green by sucrose and mannose in pure and aqueous methanol medium in presence of NaOH has been investigated for demonstration of solvent effect. The two sugars sucrose and mannose were selected for the experiment those acts as a reducing agents in a basic solution and reduces the methylene green into colorless form. The progress of this reduction reaction was followed by the color changes that the methylene green goes through in variable percentage of alcohol. When the bottle is shaken the oxygen in the air mixes with the solution and oxidizes the methylene green back to its intermediate state (purple. The color of the solution will gradually change and become purple (intermediate and then colorless in 5-10% methanol but in pure methanol color transition were Blue-> purple-> pink indicate the color due to the alcoholic medium. It was observed that increase in percentage in the solvent composition decrease the rate of reduction. The pink color continues due to alcoholic medium which may be attributed with the solvent effect. The observed variation in reading with solvent compositions has been interpreted in terms of interactions of media with the reacting species and the transitions state involved in this reaction.

  7. The High Altitude Balloon Experiment demonstration of acquisition, tracking, and pointing technologies (HABE-ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimiduk, D.; Caylor, M.; Williamson, D.; Larson, L.

    1995-01-01

    The High Altitude Balloon Experiment demonstration of Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing (HABE-ATP) is a system built around balloon-borne payload which is carried to a nominal 26-km altitude. The goal is laser tracking thrusting theater and strategic missiles, and then pointing a surrogate laser weapon beam, with performance levels end a timeline traceable to operational laser weapon system requirements. This goal leads to an experiment system design which combines hardware from many technology areas: an optical telescope and IR sensors; an advanced angular inertial reference; a flexible multi-level of actuation digital control system; digital tracking processors which incorporate real-time image analysis and a pulsed, diode-pumped solid state tracking laser. The system components have been selected to meet the overall experiment goals of tracking unmodified boosters at 50- 200 km range. The ATP system on HABE must stabilize and control a relative line of sight between the platform and the unmodified target booster to a 1 microrad accuracy. The angular pointing reference system supports both open loop and closed loop track modes; GPS provides absolute position reference. The control system which positions the line of sight for the ATP system must sequence through accepting a state vector handoff, closed-loop passive IR acquisition, passive IR intermediate fine track, active fine track, and then finally aimpoint determination and maintenance modes. Line of sight stabilization to fine accuracy levels is accomplished by actuating wide bandwidth fast steering mirrors (FSM's). These control loops off-load large-amplitude errors to the outer gimbal in order to remain within the limited angular throw of the FSM's. The SWIR acquisition and MWIR intermediate fine track sensors (both PtSi focal planes) image the signature of the rocket plume. After Hard Body Handover (HBHO), active fine tracking is conducted with a visible focal plane viewing the laser-illuminated target

  8. Demonstration of Chemical Equilibrium through Regeneration of Color in Blue Bottle Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *R. Azmat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Concept of equilibrium is very difficult to understand for under graduate students. This experiment has a good visual impact of demonstration of equilibrium and would be one way of stimulating awareness in chemistry. An alkaline solution of arabinose and methylene green in aqueous medium can be used to explain equilibrium visually through reaction of dissolved oxygen which was observed in “BLUE BOTTLE EXPERIMENT” that showed the shift of equilibrium by regeneration of color during shaking and upon standing equilibrium shift in the forward direction and color loss was observed. Shaking the solution raises the concentration of oxygen in the mixture and oxidizes the methylene green back to its blue form. When the dissolved oxygen has been consumed, the methylene green is slowly reduced back to its colorless form by the remaining arabinose and the cycle can be repeated many times by further shaking. The experiment was repeated with various concentrations of dye indicator, arabinose and sodium hydroxide concentration. It was observed that regeneration of color and colorloss is the best visual example of explanation of equilibrium.

  9. Hillslope-scale experiment demonstrates role of convergence during two-step saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, A. I.; Teuling, A. J.; Uijlenhoet, R.; DeLong, Stephen B.; Huxman, T. E.; Pangle, L. A.; Breshears, David D.; Chorover, J.; Pelletier, John D.; Saleska, S. R.; Zeng, X.; Troch, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface flow and storage dynamics at hillslope scale are difficult to ascertain, often in part due to a lack of sufficient high-resolution measurements and an incomplete understanding of boundary conditions, soil properties, and other environmental aspects. A continuous and extreme rainfall experiment on an artificial hillslope at Biosphere 2's Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) resulted in saturation excess overland flow and gully erosion in the convergent hillslope area. An array of 496 soil moisture sensors revealed a two-step saturation process. First, the downward movement of the wetting front brought soils to a relatively constant but still unsaturated moisture content. Second, soils were brought to saturated conditions from below in response to rising water tables. Convergent areas responded faster than upslope areas, due to contributions from lateral subsurface flow driven by the topography of the bottom boundary, which is comparable to impermeable bedrock in natural environments. This led to the formation of a groundwater ridge in the convergent area, triggering saturation excess runoff generation. This unique experiment demonstrates, at very high spatial and temporal resolution, the role of convergence on subsurface storage and flow dynamics. The results bring into question the representation of saturation excess overland flow in conceptual rainfall-runoff models and land-surface models, since flow is gravity-driven in many of these models and upper layers cannot become saturated from below. The results also provide a baseline to study the role of the co-evolution of ecological and hydrological processes in determining landscape water dynamics during future experiments in LEO.

  10. Demonstrations of LSS active vibration control technology on representative ground-based testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, David C.; Phillips, Douglas J.; Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes two experiments which successfully demonstrate control of flexible structures. The first experiment involved control design and implementation for the ACES structure at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, while the second experiment was conducted using the Multi-Hex Prototype structure. The paper concludes with some remarks on the lessons learned from conducting these experiments.

  11. The Majorana Demonstrator: Progress towards showing the feasibility of a 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnerty, P.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, Jim; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Looker, Q.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, Werner; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0*) of the 76Ge isotope with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate the neutrino is its own anti-particle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass-scale of the neutrino. The Demonstrator is being assembled at the 4850 foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be contained in a lowbackground environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. The goals for the Demonstrator are: demonstrating a background rate less than 3 counts tonne -1 year-1 in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) surrounding the 2039 keV 76Ge endpoint energy; establishing the technology required to build a tonne-scale germanium based double-beta decay experiment; testing the recent claim of observation of 0; and performing a direct search for lightWIMPs (3-10 GeV/c2).

  12. The large area crop inventory experiment: An experiment to demonstrate how space-age technology can contribute to solving critical problems here on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The large area crop inventory experiment is being developed to predict crop production through satellite photographs. This experiment demonstrates how space age technology can contribute to solving practical problems of agriculture management.

  13. Joint DIII-D/EAST Experiments Toward Steady State AT Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Meneghini, O.; Staebler, G. M.; van Zeeland, M. A.; Gong, X.; Ding, S.; Qian, J.; Ren, Q.; Xu, G.; Grierson, B. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Holcomb, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    Joint DIII-D/EAST experiments on fully noninductive operation at high poloidal beta have demonstrated several attractive features of this regime for a steady-state fusion reactor. Very large bootstrap fraction (>80 %) is desirable because it reduces the demands on external noninductive current drive. High bootstrap fraction with an H-mode edge results in a broad current profile and internal transport barriers (ITBs) at large minor radius, leading to high normalized energy confinement and high MHD stability limits. The ITB radius expands with higher normalized beta, further improving both stability and confinement. Electron density ITB and large Shafranov shift lead to low AE activity in the plasma core and low anomalous fast ion losses. Both the ITB and the current profile show remarkable robustness against perturbations, without external control. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466 & DE-AC52-07NA27344 & by NMCFSP under contracts 2015GB102000 and 2015GB110001.

  14. A Technology Demonstration Experiment for Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Maleki, L.; Gibble, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-cooling apparatus for flight on the International Space Station (ISS), with the intention of demonstrating linewidths on the cesium clock transition narrower than can be realized on the ground. GLACE (the Glovebox Laser- cooled Atomic Clock Experiment) is scheduled for launch on Utilization Flight 3 (UF3) in 2002, and will be mounted in one of the ISS Glovebox platforms for an anticipated 2-3 week run. Separate flight definition projects funded at NIST and Yale by the Micro- gravity Research Division of NASA as a part of its Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program will follow GLACE. Core technologies for these and other LCAP missions are being developed at JPL, with the current emphasis on developing components such as the laser and optics subsystem, and non-magnetic vacuum-compatible mechanical shutters. Significant technical challenges in developing a space qualifiable laser cooling apparatus include reducing the volume, mass, and power requirements, while increasing the ruggedness and reliability in order to both withstand typical launch conditions and achieve several months of unattended operation. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography for NAPL Source Zone Characterization: Sandbox Experiment Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, M. A.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing the distribution and extent of NAPL contamination is an important step in determining appropriate remedial actions. NAPL has a complex mode of transportation in the heterogeneous subsurface domain, which results in difficulties for cleaning up contaminated sites. Here, we use sandbox experiments to demonstrate the effectiveness of Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography (OHT) for NAPL source zone characterization. In a saturated soil fluid system, the effective hydraulic conductivity (K) is dependent on the soil properties, fluid density, and fluid viscosity. By taking advantage of the differences of fluid properties before and after NAPL intrusion, we can estimate the NAPL source zone migration throughout time by imaging changes in effective K. Using OHT testing, we can derive the K heterogeneities before, during and after NAPL intrusion. NAPL source zone can be located by subtracting the background K from the K tomogram after NAPL intrusion. This approach can avoid mass extraction and injection that occurs in traditional hydraulic tomography approaches while obtain a good estimation of subsurface K heterogeneity and NAPL migration. We believe this method is more cost effective and efficient for field remediation applications.

  16. [Study on mobile phone based wireless ECG monitoring technology system typical demonstration applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Based on the mobile phone platform with wireless real-time ECG monitoring system developed in our lab, this article is dedicated to evaluate its practical value in people test. A series of new conceptual experiments were designed and performed. Particularly, ECG characteristics under different age, gender, health and motion conditions are evaluated. Effects of living habits such as drinking wine, coffee including various psychological conditions such as excitation, anxiety etc. to the ECG response are investigated. The human ECG under different time in a day such as morning, afternoon and late-night was evaluated. These conceptual experiments, which are hard to conduct otherwise using conventional devices, demonstrate the pervasive merits of the new system for fundamental study of heart disease as well as daily healthcare.

  17. Will recently proposed experiments be able to demonstrate quantum behavior of entire living organisms?

    CERN Document Server

    Herzenberg, C L

    2009-01-01

    Recently proposed experiments consider creating and observing the quantum superposition of small living organisms. Those proposed experiments are examined here for feasibility on the basis of results of earlier studies identifying a boundary separating obligatory classical behavior from quantum behavior. It appears that the proposed experiments may be expected to succeed for the case of viruses, but most probably fail for the case of the appreciably larger organisms that are also considered.

  18. Overcoming limitations of the ERP method with Residue Iteration Decomposition (RIDE): a demonstration in go/no-go experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Guang; Schacht, Annekathrin; Zhou, Changsong; Sommer, Werner

    2013-03-01

    The usefulness of the event-related potential (ERP) method can be compromised by violations of the underlying assumptions, for example, confounding variations of latency and amplitude of ERP components within and between conditions. Here we show how the ERP subtraction method might yield misleading information due to latency variability of ERP components. We propose a solution to this problem by correcting for latency variability using Residue Iteration Decomposition (RIDE), demonstrated with data from representative go/no-go experiments. The overlap of N2 and P3 components in go/no-go data gives rise to spurious topographical localization of the no-go-N2 component. RIDE decomposes N2 and P3 based on their latency variability. The decomposition restored the N2 topography by removing the contamination from latency-variable late components. The RIDE-derived N2 and P3 give a clearer insight about their functional relevance in the go/no-go paradigm.

  19. An Educational Laboratory Experiment to Demonstrate the Development of Fires in a Long Enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinuddin, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    This paper is aimed at describing an experiment involving flame-front movement across the fuel package located within long enclosures and associated heat transfer mechanism. There is a growing interest in incorporating safety education in the chemical engineering curriculum, especially in relation to "facility siting." This experiment is…

  20. Mitigating Agricultural Diffuse Pollution: Learning from The River Eden Demonstration Test Catchment Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaney, S. M.; Barker, P. A.; Haygarth, P.; Quinn, P. F.; Aftab, A.; Barber, N.; Burke, S.; Cleasby, W.; Jonczyk, J. C.; Owen, G. J.; Perks, M. T.; Snell, M. A.; Surridge, B.

    2016-12-01

    Freshwater systems continue to fail to achieve their ecological potential and provide associated ecological services due to poor water quality. A key driver of the failure to achieve good status under the EU Water Framework Directive derives from non-point (diffuse) pollution of sediment, phosphorus and nitrogen from agricultural landscapes. While many mitigation options exist, a framework is lacking which provides a holistic understanding of the impact of mitigation scheme design on catchment function and agronomics. The River Eden Demonstration Test Catchment project (2009-2017) in NW England uses an interdisciplinary approach including catchment hydrology, sediment-nutrient fluxes and farmer attitudes, to understand ecological function and diffuse pollution mitigation feature performance. Water flow (both surface and groundwater) and quality monitoring focused on three ca. 10km2 catchments with N and P measurements every 30 minutes. Ecological status was determined by monthly diatom community analysis and supplemented by macrophyte, macroinvertebrate and fish surveys. Changes in erosion potential and hydrological connectivity were monitored using extensive Landsat images and detailed UAV monitoring. Simulation modelling work utilised hydrological simulation models (CRAFT, CRUM3 and HBV-Light) and SCIMAP based risk mapping. Farmer behaviour and attitudes have been assessed with surveys, interviews and diaries. A suite of mitigation features have been installed including changes to land management - e.g. aeriation, storage features within a `treatment train', riparian fencing and woodland creation. A detailed dataset of the integrated catchment hydrological, water quality and ecological behaviour over multiple years, including a drought period and an extreme rainfall event, highlights the interaction between ecology, hydrological and nutrient dynamics that are driven by sediment and nutrients exported within a small number of high magnitude storm events. Hence

  1. Large-scale pollination experiment demonstrates the importance of insect pollination in winter oilseed rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Sandra A M; Herbertsson, Lina; Rundlöf, Maj; Smith, Henrik G; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    Insect pollination, despite its potential to contribute substantially to crop production, is not an integrated part of agronomic planning. A major reason for this are knowledge gaps in the contribution of pollinators to yield, which partly result from difficulties in determining area-based estimates of yield effects from insect pollination under field conditions. We have experimentally manipulated honey bee Apis mellifera densities at 43 oilseed rape Brassica napus fields over 2 years in Scandinavia. Honey bee hives were placed in 22 fields; an additional 21 fields without large apiaries in the surrounding landscape were selected as controls. Depending on the pollination system in the parental generation, the B. napus cultivars in the crop fields are classified as either open-pollinated or first-generation hybrids, with both types being open-pollinated in the generation of plants cultivated in the fields. Three cultivars of each type were grown. We measured the activity of flower-visiting insects during flowering and estimated yields by harvesting with small combine harvesters. The addition of honey bee hives to the fields dramatically increased abundance of flower-visiting honey bees in those fields. Honey bees affected yield, but the effect depended on cultivar type (p = 0.04). Post-hoc analysis revealed that open-pollinated cultivars, but not hybrid cultivars, had 11% higher yields in fields with added honey bees than those grown in the control fields (p = 0.07). To our knowledge, this is the first whole-field study in replicated landscapes to assess the benefit of insect pollination in oilseed rape. Our results demonstrate that honey bees have the potential to increase oilseed rape yields, thereby emphasizing the importance of pollinator management for optimal cultivation of oilseed rape.

  2. Using "Demonstrations, Class Experiments, and the Projection Lantern" in the History of Psychology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudle, Fairfid M.

    1979-01-01

    Brief descriptions are offered of activities relevant to teaching the history of psychology. Suggestions range from simple demonstrations requiring no materials to more extensive projects. Reconstruction of early laboratory instruments such as the projection lantern, demonstrations of psychological concepts, and studies of associative processes…

  3. Theoretical analysis and concept demonstration of a novel MOEMS accelerometer based on Raman-Nath diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zuwei; Wen Zhiyu; Hu Jing

    2012-01-01

    The design and simulation of a novel microoptoelectromechanical system (MOEMS) accelerometer based on Raman-Nath diffraction are presented.The device is planned to be fabricated by microelectromechanical system technology and has a different sensing principle than the other reported MOEMS accelerometers.The fundamental theories and principles of the device are discussed in detail,a 3D finite element simulation of the flexural plate wave delay line oscillator is provided,and the operation frequency around 40 MHz is calculated.Finally,a lecture experiment is performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the device.This novel accelerometer is proposed to have the advantages of high sensitivity and anti-radiation,and has great potential for various applications.

  4. Field Demonstration of Military Bio-based Hydraulic Fluids Using Construction Equipment at Fort Leonard Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Committed to Excellence 4-7 May 2009 1 Field Demonstration of Military Bio -based Hydraulic Fluids Using Construction Equipment at Fort Leonard Wood...AND SUBTITLE Field Demonstration of Military Bio -based Hydraulic Fluids Using Construction Equipment at Fort Leonard Wood 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...4-7 May 2009 2 Outline  Background  Military Bio -based Hydraulic Fluid Specification  Field Demonstration and Results  Conclusions 4-7 May

  5. A demonstrative model of a lunar base simulation on a personal computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The initial demonstration model of a lunar base simulation is described. This initial model was developed on the personal computer level to demonstrate feasibility and technique before proceeding to a larger computer-based model. Lotus Symphony Version 1.1 software was used to base the demonstration model on an personal computer with an MS-DOS operating system. The personal computer-based model determined the applicability of lunar base modeling techniques developed at an LSPI/NASA workshop. In addition, the personnal computer-based demonstration model defined a modeling structure that could be employed on a larger, more comprehensive VAX-based lunar base simulation. Refinement of this personal computer model and the development of a VAX-based model is planned in the near future.

  6. Experiences from Swedish demonstration projects with phosphoric acid fuel cells; Erfarenheter fraan svenska demonstrationsprojekt med fosforsyrabraensleceller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Per [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sarkoezi, Laszlo [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-10-01

    In Sweden, there are today two phosphoric acid fuel cells installed, one PC25A which have been in operation in more than 4 years, and one PC25C which have been in operation for two years. The aim with this project has been two compare operation characteristics, performance, and operation experiences for these two models.

  7. Tested Demonstrations: Buffer Capacity of Various Acetic Acid-Sodium Acetate Systems: A Lecture Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Craig J.; Panek, Mary G.

    1985-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a lecture experiment which uses indicators to illustrate the concept of differing buffer capacities by titrating acetic acid/sodium acetate buffers with 1.0 molar hydrochloric acid and 1.0 molar sodium hydroxide. A table with data used to plot the titration curve is included. (JN)

  8. GIFTS EDU Ground-based Measurement Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, W. L., Sr.; Zollinger, L. J.; Huppi, R. J.; Reisse, R. A.; Larar, A. M.; Liu, X.; Tansock, J. J., Jr.; Jensen, S. M.; Revercomb, H. E.; Feltz, W. F.; Bingham, G. E.

    2007-01-01

    Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) is an imaging infrared spectrometer designed for atmospheric soundings. The EDU groundbased measurement experiment was held in Logan, Utah during September 2006 to demonstrate its extensive capabilities for geosynchronous and other applications.

  9. An Anesthetic Drug Demonstration and an Introductory Antioxidant Activity Experiment with "Eugene, the Sleepy Fish"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcena, Homar; Chen, Peishan

    2016-01-01

    Students are introduced to spectrophotometry in comparing the antioxidant activity of pure eugenol and oil of cloves from a commercial source using a modified ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The extraction of the essential oil from dried cloves is demonstrated to facilitate discussions on green chemistry. The anesthetic properties…

  10. An Inexpensive and Safe Experiment to Demonstrate Koch's Postulates Using Citrus Fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobi, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Citrus fruit (oranges, tangerines, grapefruit or lemons) purchased in a grocery store can be experimentally infected with readily-available sources of "Penicillium digitatum" to demonstrate the four basic steps of Koch's postulates, also known as proof of pathogenicity. The mould is isolated from naturally-infected citrus fruit into pure culture…

  11. Rapid heating experiments demonstrate the usefulness of organic molecules as an earthquake thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, R. E.; Polissar, P. J.; Savage, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    Measuring temperature rise due to an earthquake would elucidate the frictional characteristics of a fault during rapid slip. We developed a new paleothermometer for fault zones using the thermal maturity of organic compounds as a temperature proxy. The kinetics of these reactions are highly nonlinear, and previous experiments to constrain the kinetic parameters have only been accomplished on long time scales. We ran a series of rapid heating experiments designed to determine these parameters specifically on short time scales. Here, we focus on the kinetics of methylphenanthrenes, aromatic molecules whose pattern of methylation changes with thermal maturity. The MPI-1 thermal maturity index is a ratio of methylphenanthrene's refractory 2- and 3-methylphenanthrene isomers relative to the less stable 9- and 1-methylphenanthrene isomers, and thus increases with increasing temperature. Methylphenanthrenes are relevant to the study of fault heating as they are consistently found in faults exhumed from depths shallower than 4km. To address whether methylphenanthrenes react at earthquake rates, we conducted rapid hydrous pyrolysis experiments in a small stainless steel reactor with a carburized inner surface. For each experiment, the reactor was partially filled with water and Woodford Shale, an organic-rich, thermally immature quartzose claystone sampled in central Oklahoma. The reactor was heated for a range of times and temperatures using resistive heating coils. Temperature was controlled using an external thermocouple and a PID controller, while the temperature of the sample was recorded with an internal thermocouple. Steam pressure was monitored using a pressure transducer throughout the experiment. The expelled oil was extracted from the water contained in the reactor using a separatory funnel, and the shale fragments were crushed and extracted via sonication. Both the oil and the shale extractions were then separated using column chromatography. GCMS analysis shows

  12. Demonstration of medical communications based on an ATM broadband network technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jerome R., Jr.; Blaine, G. James; Dubetz, Martin W.; Krieger, Kenneth; Jost, R. Gilbert; Moore, Stephen M.; Richard, William D.; Turner, Jonathan S.; Winterbauer, Albert

    1992-07-01

    The research and development efforts of several university and industry groups have brought digital imaging technologies into the practice of medicine. Radiographic images based on a digital data set can now be acquired, stored, communicated and presented for both primary interpretation and access by the referring physician. Moreover, conferences between a specialist and a primary care physician can be supported with audio and video links. A demonstration project at Washington University in collaboration with Southwestern Bell and NEC-America provides a testbed for deployment of ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) broadband network technology supporting both LAN and WAN experiments in multimedia medical communications. A network based on four geographically dispersed ATM switches supports rapid display of high-resolution medical images, patient information, digital video and digitized real-time physiological signals at channel rates of 100 Mb/s. A prototype configuration of an Inquiry station is based on the NeXT computer with auxiliary displays for the medical images. Observations and preliminary performance results will be presented.

  13. Hardware Demonstrator of a Level-1 Track Finding Algorithm with FPGAs for the Phase II CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cieri, Davide

    2016-01-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches collide every 25\\,ns, producing an average of 140 pp interactions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a Level-1 (L1) hardware trigger, able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5\\,$\\mu$s. This novel L1 trigger will make use of data coming from the silicon tracker to constrain the trigger rate. Goal of this new \\textit{track trigger} will be to build L1 tracks from the tracker information. The architecture that will be implemented in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One possibility is to adopt a system entirely based on FPGA electronic. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp collision data and it is currently being demonstrated in hardware, using the ``MP7'', which is a $\\mu$TCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s. Two different implementations of the Hough tran...

  14. Hardware Demonstrator of a Level-1 Track Finding Algorithm with FPGAs for the Phase II CMS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieri, D.; CMS Collaboration; of the Time Multiplexed Track Trigger Group

    2016-10-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches collide every 25 ns, producing an average of 140 pp interactions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a Level-1 (L1) hardware trigger, able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5 μs. This novel L1 trigger will make use of data coming from the silicon tracker to constrain the trigger rate. Goal of this new track trigger will be to build L1 tracks from the tracker information. The architecture that will be implemented in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One possibility is to adopt a system entirely based on FPGA electronic. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp collision data and it is currently being demonstrated in hardware, using the “MP7”, which is a μTCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s. Two different implementations of the Hough transform technique are currently under investigation: one utilizes a systolic array to represent the Hough space, while the other exploits a pipelined approach.

  15. Hardware Demonstrator of a Level-1 Track Finding Algorithm with FPGAs for the Phase II CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090481

    2016-01-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches collide every 25\\,ns, producing an average of 140 pp interactions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a Level-1 (L1) hardware trigger, able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5\\,$\\mu$s. This novel L1 trigger will make use of data coming from the silicon tracker to constrain the trigger rate. Goal of this new \\textit{track trigger} will be to build L1 tracks from the tracker information. The architecture that will be implemented in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One possibility is to adopt a system entirely based on FPGA electronic. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp collision data and it is currently being demonstrated in hardware, using the ``MP7'', which is a $\\mu$TCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s. Two different implementations of the Hough tran...

  16. An undergraduate experiment demonstrating the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, James T.; Whitehouse, Christopher B.; Oulton, Rupert F.; Gennaro, Sylvain D.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel undergraduate research project that highlights the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans. We confirm the Helmholtz resonance nature of a single can by measuring its amplitude and phase response to a sound wave. Arranging multiple cans in arrays smaller than the wavelength, we then design an antenna that redirects sound into a preferred direction. The antenna can be thought of as a new resonator, composed of artificially engineered meta-atoms, similar to a metamaterial. These experiments are illustrative, tactile, and open ended so as to enable students to explore the physics of matter/wave interaction.

  17. A carbohydrate pulse experiment to demonstrate the sugar metabolization by S. mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Paulino,T.P.; M. Bolean; G.C.M. Bruschi Thedei; THEDEI JR., G.; Ciancaglini,P.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a fast growing organism, of low cost and easily prepared culture medium. It has been  related  primarily to  an  elevated risk  of dental cavity development  in the host due  to the  acid-induced tooth demineralization. To prevent this disease, addition of fluoride can be required, promoting the mouth  hygiene. The  main  objective  of  this  experiment  is  to  show  the  influence  of  the  carbon  source  and fluoride on the acidogenic capacity of S.  mutans. The st...

  18. Demonstration experiments for solid state physics using a table top mechanical Stirling refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, M R; Rodrigo, J G; Suderow, H; Vieira, S; 10.1088/0143-0807/33/4/757

    2012-01-01

    Liquid free cryogenic devices are acquiring importance in basic science and engineering. But they can also lead to improvements in teaching low temperature an solid state physics to graduate students and specialists. Most of the devices are relatively expensive, but small sized equipment is slowly becoming available. Here, we have designed several simple experiments which can be performed using a small Stirling refrigerator. We discuss the measurement of the critical current and temperature of a bulk YBa2Cu3O(7-d) (YBCO) sample, the observation of the levitation of a magnet over a YBCO disk when cooled below the critical temperature and the observation of a phase transition using ac calorimetry. The equipment can be easily handled by students, and also used to teach the principles of liquid free cooling.

  19. Statistical Analysis of Tract-Tracing Experiments Demonstrates a Dense, Complex Cortical Network in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ypma, Rolf J F; Bullmore, Edward T

    2016-09-01

    Anatomical tract tracing methods are the gold standard for estimating the weight of axonal connectivity between a pair of pre-defined brain regions. Large studies, comprising hundreds of experiments, have become feasible by automated methods. However, this comes at the cost of positive-mean noise making it difficult to detect weak connections, which are of particular interest as recent high resolution tract-tracing studies of the macaque have identified many more weak connections, adding up to greater connection density of cortical networks, than previously recognized. We propose a statistical framework that estimates connectivity weights and credibility intervals from multiple tract-tracing experiments. We model the observed signal as a log-normal distribution generated by a combination of tracer fluorescence and positive-mean noise, also accounting for injections into multiple regions. Using anterograde viral tract-tracing data provided by the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences, we estimate the connection density of the mouse intra-hemispheric cortical network to be 73% (95% credibility interval (CI): 71%, 75%); higher than previous estimates (40%). Inter-hemispheric density was estimated to be 59% (95% CI: 54%, 62%). The weakest estimable connections (about 6 orders of magnitude weaker than the strongest connections) are likely to represent only one or a few axons. These extremely weak connections are topologically more random and longer distance than the strongest connections, which are topologically more clustered and shorter distance (spatially clustered). Weak links do not substantially contribute to the global topology of a weighted brain graph, but incrementally increased topological integration of a binary graph. The topology of weak anatomical connections in the mouse brain, rigorously estimable down to the biological limit of a single axon between cortical areas in these data, suggests that they might confer functional advantages for integrative

  20. Infiltration experiments demonstrate an explicit connection between heterogeneity and anomalous diffusion behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovitch, N.; Hill, K. M.; Longjas, A.; Voller, V. R.

    2016-07-01

    Transport in systems containing heterogeneity distributed over multiple length scales can exhibit anomalous diffusion behaviors, where the time exponent, determining the spreading length scale of the transported scalar, differs from the expected value of n=1/2. Here we present experimental measurements of the infiltration of glycerin, under a fixed pressure head, into a Hele-Shaw cell containing a 3-D printed distribution of flow obstacles; a system that is an analog for infiltration into a porous medium. In support of previously presented direct simulation results, we experimentally demonstrate that, when the obstacles are distributed as a fractal carpet with fractal dimension H < 2, the averaged progress of infiltration exhibits a subdiffusive behavior n<1/2. We further show that observed values of the subdiffusion time exponent appear to be quadratically related to the fractal dimension of the carpet.

  1. MANUAL OF LECTURE DEMONSTRATIONS, LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, AND OBSERVATIONAL EQUIPMENT FOR TEACHING ELEMENTARY METEOROLOGY IN SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEUBERGER, HANS; NICHOLAS, GEORGE

    INCLUDED IN THIS MANUAL WRITTEN FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEACHERS ARE DESCRIPTIONS OF DEMONSTRATION MODELS, EXPERIMENTS PERTAINING TO SOME OF THE FUNDAMENTAL AND APPLIED METEOROLOGICAL CONCEPTS, AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAKING SIMPLE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS. THE CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF TOPICS WERE EASE AND COST OF CONSTRUCTING APPARATUS AS WELL…

  2. The Molecular Boat: A Hands-On Experiment to Demonstrate the Forces Applied to Self-Assembled Monolayers at Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Charlene J.; Salaita, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrating how surface chemistry and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) control the macroscopic properties of materials is challenging as it often necessitates the use of specialized instrumentation. In this hands-on experiment, students directly measure a macroscopic property, the floatation of glass coverslips on water as a function of…

  3. Investigating the Inverse Square Law with the Timepix Hybrid Silicon Pixel Detector: A CERN [at] School Demonstration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyntie, T.; Parker, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Timepix hybrid silicon pixel detector has been used to investigate the inverse square law of radiation from a point source as a demonstration of the CERN [at] school detector kit capabilities. The experiment described uses a Timepix detector to detect the gamma rays emitted by an [superscript 241]Am radioactive source at a number of different…

  4. Light and Plants. A Series of Experiments Demonstrating Light Effects on Seed Germination, Plant Growth, and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, R. J.; And Others

    A brief summary of the effects of light on plant germination, growth and development, including photoperiodism and pigment formation, introduces 18 experiments and demonstrations which illustrate aspects of these effects. Detailed procedures for each exercise are given, the expected results outlined, and possible sources of difficulty discussed.…

  5. Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

  6. Uptake of uranium in Atlantic salmon gills following exposure experiments demonstrated by SR-XRF tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, O.C.; Cagno, S.; Brit Salbu, H.C.T. [Centre of Excellence in Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, Norwegian University of Life Sciences - UMB (Norway); Vanmeert, F.; Nuyts, G.; Janssens, K. [University of Antwerp (Belgium); Alfeld, M.; Falkenberg, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron - DESY (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide as well as a heavy metal that can be found in elevated concentrations (mg/L) in the aquatic environment and therefore may pose a risk to aquatic organisms including fish. The major challenges in monitoring the fate of U in complex media, such as soils, sediments and water are to identify mobile and bioavailable U species, interactions with environmental components, transfer to organisms via sorption to surfaces and across membranes, and the internal distribution of target organs. As part of a larger study, U accumulation in gills and internal organs (e.g. liver) as well as mortality of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) were studied as a function of U concentration as well as pH of the exposure water. As Atlantic salmon does not ingest freshwater, the major pathway for uptake of U in the liver is hypothesized to be by transfer across the gills. However, to our best knowledge, active uptake of U within gill filaments has never been proven. In the present work, we demonstrate that following 96 hours exposure of 6 mg U/l in freshwater at pH 7 and 1 mg U/l at pH 5, U was actively taken up in the Atlantic Salmon gill filaments. The internal distribution of U within exposed organisms was visualized using μXRF/μXRD two-dimensional scanning and XRF/XRD tomography at the microprobe end-station of the PETRA III P06 beamline. The recently developed and highly efficient Maia detector array was successfully employed to record extended high-resolution element-specific maps of the tissue samples. First, conventional 2D μXRF/μXRD mapping allowed to identify the axial planes in the samples actually containing U. On the same samples, higher resolution virtual cross-sections were obtained (18 keV, 0.6 μm beam size) by means of μXRF/μXRD tomography of the planes in which U was encountered. The results proved that U not only adheres to the external boundary of the fish gills, but it is also taken up via gills. The results of this work

  7. SVD-based unfolding: implementation and experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072546

    2011-01-01

    With the first year of data taking at the LHC by the experiments, unfolding methods for measured spectra are reconsidered with much interest. Here, we present a novel ROOT-based implementation of the Singular Value Decomposition approach to data unfolding, and discuss concrete analysis experience with this algorithm.

  8. A carbohydrate pulse experiment to demonstrate the sugar metabolization by S. mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.P. Paulino

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans is a fast growing organism, of low cost and easily prepared culture medium. It has been  related  primarily to  an  elevated risk  of dental cavity development  in the host due  to the  acid-induced tooth demineralization. To prevent this disease, addition of fluoride can be required, promoting the mouth  hygiene. The  main  objective  of  this  experiment  is  to  show  the  influence  of  the  carbon  source  and fluoride on the acidogenic capacity of S.  mutans. The strain was cultivated in microaerophilia, at 37ºC for 12  hours  in  complete  medium  (stationary  phase.  The  cells  were  harvested  by  centrifugation  at  room temperature,  washed  with  saline  solution  and  suspended  in  the  same  solution.  The  absorbance  was adjusted  to  1  and  the  pH  to  7.3  using  0,1  mol/L  KOH  solution.  To  10  mL  of  the  cell  suspension,  distinct carbohydrates  (glucose,  xilose,  sucrose,  fructose  or  maltose  were  added,  enough  to  establish  a  50 mMol/L final concentration. Fluoride was added (1 mmol/L final concentration and the pH was monitored during  2 hours. In this  incubation  period,  the  suspension  was  kept  at  room  temperature  with  slow  stirring and  the  pH  was  monitored  each  7  minutes.  In  the  20  initial  minutes  of  incubation  with  glucose,  fructose, maltose  and  sucrose,  an  intense  and  very  similar  pH  decrease  (2.5  units  can  be  observed.  This acidification reflects both the sugar uptake and anaerobic metabolization. After this initial acid liberation, a phase of slow pH decrease is observed, continuing up to 120 minutes of incubation. In presence of xilose, the  acidification  is  less  intense  and  reaches  a  similar  value  to  that  of  the  control  without

  9. Demonstration of quantum synchronization based on second-order quantum coherence of entangled photons

    CERN Document Server

    Quan, Runai; Wang, Mengmeng; Hou, Feiyan; Wang, Shaofeng; Xiang, Xiao; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Shougang; Dong, Ruifang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the second-order quantum interference between frequency entangled photons that are generated by parametric down conversion, a quantum strategic algorithm for synchronizing two spatially separated clocks has been recently presented. In the reference frame of a Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interferometer, photon correlations are used to define simultaneous events. Once the HOM interferometer is balanced by use of an adjustable optical delay in one arm, arrival times of simultaneously generated photons are recorded by each clock. The clock offset is determined by correlation measurement of the recorded arrival times. Utilizing this algorithm, we demonstrate a proof-of-principle experiment for synchronizing two clocks separated by 4km fiber link. A minimum timing stability of 0.4 ps at averaging time of 16000 s is achieved with an absolute time accuracy of 59.4 ps. The timing stability is verified to be limited by the correlation measurement device and ideally can be better than 10 fs. Such results shine a light...

  10. Field Experience Exchange Meeting for the Southern Region of National Agricultural Standardization Demonstration Area Held in Chengdu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ An Experience Exchange Meeting of National Agricultural Standardization Demonstration Area was held in Chengdu, Sichuan Province during May 18~21,2004. This meeting was of great importance to the overall promotion of agricultural standardization demonstration area work, more than 100 representatives from quality & technology supervision bureaus of 15 provinces, autonomous regions, municipalities directly under the Central Government and some cities independently listed city in the state plan, the Ministry of Agriculture, the Ministry of Water Resources, All-China Federation of Supply and Marketing Cooperatives, State Forestry Administration, State Grain Administration, State Tobacco Monopoly Administration etc.

  11. Practices and experience of demonstration base project for typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever comprehensive control in Guizhou%贵州省伤寒副伤寒综合防治示范基地项目做法与体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐光鹏; 刘明强; 孙正勇; 王子军; 黄艳; 孙军玲; 姚光海; 张静; 田克诚; 王定明; 黎明; 赵启良; 陈学

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过在伤寒副伤寒高发地区建立综合防治示范基地,探索综合防治措施,为贵州省伤寒副伤寒防控工作提供决策依据和实践经验,为有效控制伤寒副伤寒疫情提供科学依据.方法 设置干预区和对照区,建立发热病例监测系统,对干预区实施传染病源管理、水源消毒管理、开展健康教育等综合性防治措施.结果 干预区干预后发病率4.27/10万,较干预前(44.61/10万)下降90.43%,较对照区(16.29/10万)下降71.02%.结论 开展发热病例监测,以病原学为依据,提高实验室诊断病例报告率,及早发现病人;加强水源消毒管理,是预防控制伤寒副伤寒等肠道传染病流行或暴发的关键环节;在学校开设健康教育课,或通过“1+2”健康教育方法是宣传传染病防治知识的最佳有效方式.%Objective To establish demonstration base in typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever high - incidence areas, explore the comprehensive measures, provide decision basis and practical experiences in order to provide scientific basis for valid control the diseases. Method Setting up intervention area and control area, construction fever cases monitoring systems, implementation infectious diseases and water disinfection management , development health education and other comprehensive control measures in the intervention area. Results After intervention, the incidence rate of intervention area was 4. 27/10 million, it was decreased 90.43% than before (44.61/10 million) , and it was decreased 71.02% than control area (16. 29/10 million ) . Contusions Improvement the laboratory diagnosis reporting rate and finding patients early by carrying out fever cases monitoring and strengthening the management of water disinfection were the key steps to stop the typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever prevalence and outbreak. Health education classes or 1 + 2 health education method in schools were the most effective ways to transmit the knowledge

  12. Results of a demonstration experiment: Hydrogenation of pyrolysis oils from biomass; Ergebnisse eines Demonstrationsversuchs zur Hydrierung von Pyrolyseoelen aus Biomassen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, M. [DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Sump phase hydrogenation is a technique specially developed for coal liquefaction; it provides a possibility of processing the liquid products of biomass pyrolyis into high-grade carburettor fuels. A demonstration experiment was carried out at the hydrogenation plant of DMT. The plant has a capacity of 10 kg/h. The technical feasibility of hydrogenation of biomass oils was demonstrated in a continuous experiment. The contribution describes the experimental conditions, yields, and product qualities. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die fuer die Kohleverfluessigung entwickelte Sumpfphasenhydrierung bietet die Moeglichkeit, die Fluessigprodukte der Pyrolyse von Biomassen zu hochwertigen Vergaserkraftstoffen zu veredeln. Im Hydriertechnikum der DMT wurde hierzu ein Demonstrationsversuch durchgefuehrt. Die Anlage ist fuer einen Kohledurchsatz von 10 kg/h ausgelegt. In einem kontinuierlichen Versuchslauf wurde mit dieser Anlage die technische Machbarkeit der Hydrierung von Bio-Oelen demonstriert. In dem vorliegenden Beitrag werden die Versuchsbedingungen, Ausbeuten und Produktqualitaeten vorgestellt. (orig.)

  13. Designing Scholarships to Improve College Success: Final Report on the Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander K.; Patel, Reshma; Rudd, Timothy; Ratledge, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Performance-based scholarships have two main goals: (1) to give students more money for college; and (2) to provide incentives for academic progress. MDRC launched the Performance-Based Scholarship (PBS) Demonstration in 2008 to evaluate the effectiveness of these scholarships in a diverse set of states, institutions, and low-income student…

  14. Experimental demonstration of the maximum likelihood-based chromatic dispersion estimator for coherent receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Robert; Johannisson, Pontus; Wymeersch, Henk;

    2014-01-01

    We perform an experimental investigation of a maximum likelihood-based (ML-based) algorithm for bulk chromatic dispersion estimation for digital coherent receivers operating in uncompensated optical networks. We demonstrate the robustness of the method at low optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) ...

  15. The Microgravity Research Experiments (MICREX) Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    An electronic data base identifying over 800 fluids and materials processing experiments performed in a low-gravity environment has been created at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The compilation, called MICREX (MICrogravity Research Experiments) was designed to document all such experimental efforts performed (1) on U.S. manned space vehicles, (2) on payloads deployed from U.S. manned space vehicles, and (3) on all domestic and international sounding rockets (excluding those of China and the former U.S.S.R.). Data available on most experiments include (1) principal and co-investigator (2) low-gravity mission, (3) processing facility, (4) experimental objectives and results, (5) identifying key words, (6) sample materials, (7) applications of the processed materials/research area, (8) experiment descriptive publications, and (9) contacts for more information concerning the experiment. This technical memorandum (1) summarizes the historical interest in reduced-gravity fluid dynamics, (2) describes the importance of a low-gravity fluids and materials processing data base, (4) describes thE MICREX data base format and computational World Wide Web access procedures, and (5) documents (in hard-copy form) the descriptions of the first 600 fluids and materials processing experiments entered into MICREX.

  16. Novel water-based antiseptic lotion demonstrates rapid, broad-spectrum kill compared with alcohol antiseptic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Steven E; Cozean, Jesse; Cozean, Colette

    2014-01-01

    A novel alcohol-based antiseptic and a novel water-based antiseptic lotion, both with a synergistic combination of antimicrobial ingredients containing 0.2% benzethonium chloride, were evaluated using the standard time-kill method against 25 FDA-specified challenge microorganisms. The purpose of the testing was to determine whether a non-alcohol product could have equivalent rapid and broad-spectrum kill to a traditional alcohol sanitizer. Both the alcohol- and water-based products showed rapid and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The average 15-s kill was 99.999% of the challenge organism for the alcohol-based antiseptic and 99.971% for the water-based antiseptic. The alcohol-based product demonstrated 100% of peak efficacy (60s) within the first 15s, whereas the water-based product showed 99.97%. The novel alcohol-based antiseptic reduced concentrations of 100% of organisms by 99.999%, whereas the water-based antiseptic lotion showed the same reduction for 96% of organisms. A novel water-based antiseptic product demonstrated equivalent rapid, broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity to an alcohol-based sanitizer and provided additional benefits of reduced irritation, persistent effect, and greater efficacy against common viruses. The combination of rapid, broad-spectrum immediate kill and persistent efficacy against pathogens may have significant clinical benefit in limiting the spread of disease.

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  18. A Desk-top tutorial Demonstration of Model-based Fault Detection and Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, John Z.; Elshanti, Ali; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a demonstration on the model-based approach for fault detection has been presented. The aim of this demo is to provide students a desk-top tool to start learning model-based approach. The demo works on a traditional three-tank system. After a short review of the model-based approach, this paper emphasizes on two difficulties often asked by students when they start learning model-based approach: how to develop a system model and how to generate residual for fault detection. The ...

  19. Demonstrating coherent control in 85Rb2 using ultrafast laser pulses: a theoretical outline of two experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Martay, Hugo E L; England, Duncan G; Friedman, Melissa E; Petrovic, Jovana; Walmsley, Ian A

    2009-01-01

    Calculations relating to two experiments that demonstrate coherent control of preformed rubidium-85 molecules in a magneto-optical trap using ultrafast laser pulses are presented. In the first experiment, it is shown that pre-associated molecules in an incoherent mixture of states can be made to oscillate coherently using a single ultrafast pulse. A novel mechanism that can transfer molecular population to more deeply bound vibrational levels is used in the second. Optimal parameters of the control pulse are presented for the application of the mechanism to molecules in a magneto-optical trap. The calculations make use of an experimental determination of the initial state of molecules photoassociated by the trapping lasers in the magneto-optical trap and use shaped pulses consistent with a standard ultrafast laser system.

  20. Base isolation system and verificational experiment of base isolated building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mikio; Harada, Osamu; Aoyagi, Sakae; Matsuda, Taiji

    1987-05-15

    With the objective of rationalization of the earthquake resistant design and the economical design based thereupon, many base isolation systems have been proposed and its research, development and application have been made in recent years. In order to disseminate the system, it is necessary to accumulate the data obtained from vibration tests and earthquake observations and verify the reliability of the system. From this viewpoint, the Central Research Institute of Electric power Industry and Okumura Corporation did the following experiments with a base isolated building as the object: 1) static power application experiments, 2) shaking experiments, 3) free vibration experiments, 4) regular slight vibration observations and 5) earthquake response observations (continuing). This article reports the outline of the base isolation system and the base isolated building concerned as well as the results of the verification experiments 1) through 3) above. From the results of these verification experiments, the basic vibration characteristics of the base isolation system consisting of laminated rubber and plastic damper were revealed and its functions were able to be verified. Especially during the free vibration experiments, the initial displacement even up to a maximum of 10cm was applied to the portion between the foundation and the structure and this displacement corresponds to the responded amplitude in case of the earthquake of seismic intensity of the 6th degree. It is planned to continue the verification further. (18 figs, 3 tabs, 3 photos, 6 refs)

  1. Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Sandvig

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,” (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

  2. Progress in the research and demonstration of Everglades periphyton-based stormwater treatment areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, J S; Knight, R L; Wenkert, L; Clarke, R; Gong, S

    2001-01-01

    The South Florida Water Management District (District) is conducting research focused on potential advanced treatment technologies to support reduction of phosphorus (P) loads in surface water entering the remaining Everglades. Periphyton-based stormwater treatment areas (PSTA) are one of the advanced treatment technologies being researched by the District. This detailed research and demonstration project is being conducted in two phases. Basic research in field-based mesocosm experiments was conducted during the first phase within the District's Everglades Nutrient Removal Project (ENR). Studies were conducted in 24 portable PSTA mesocosms and three of the south ENR test cells. Phase 1 studies addressed the effects of system substrate (shellrock, organic peat, or sand), water depth, hydraulic loading rate, vegetation presence, depth:width ratio, and inhibition of algal growth on total phosphorus removal performance of the PSTA mesocosms. A second phase of research is currently under way, during which PSTA feasibility will be evaluated further in four field-scale constructed mesocosms totaling about 2 ha, and follow up studies within the ENR test cells and portable mesocosms will be conducted to further investigate the effects of other inorganic substrates, shallow water depth, and velocity on treatment performance. Phase 1 monitoring has determined that periphyton-dominated communities can be established in constructed wetlands within 5 months. The algal component of these periphyton plant communities is characteristic of natural Everglades periphyton. High macrophyte densities resulted from use of peat soils in PSTA mesocosms, while shellrock and sand soils promoted more desirable sparse macrophyte stands. P removal rates under the conditions of this research were relatively high considering the low influent total P concentrations tested (average 23 microg/L). PSTA mesocosms on shellrock soils were able to attain long-term average outflow total P concentrations

  3. Cognitive Support for Learning Computer-Based Tasks Using Animated Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cognitive support for learning computer-based tasks using animated demonstration (AD) on instructional efficiency. Cognitive support included (1) segmentation and learner control introducing interactive devices that allow content sequencing through a navigational menu, and content pacing through stop and…

  4. 75 FR 15693 - Extension of Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... related services, including non-medical counseling and advice services to Active Duty Service members...-based technology. DATES: This extension will be effective April 1, 2010. The demonstration project will... and accessible counseling to Service members and their families who live in locations that are...

  5. Comparison of Methods for Demonstrating Passage of Time When Using Computer-Based Video Prompting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Bryant, Kathryn J.; Spencer, Galen P.; Ayres, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Two different video-based procedures for presenting the passage of time (how long a step lasts) were examined. The two procedures were presented within the framework of video prompting to promote independent multi-step task completion across four young adults with moderate intellectual disability. The two procedures demonstrating passage of the…

  6. Evaluating a "Second Life" Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Demonstrator Project: What Can We Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Chris; Savin-Baden, Maggi; Conradi, Emily; Poulton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a demonstrator project to evaluate how effectively Immersive Virtual Worlds (IVWs) could support problem-based learning. The project designed, created and evaluated eight scenarios within "Second Life" (SL) for undergraduate courses in health care management and paramedic training. Evaluation was…

  7. Evaluating a "Second Life" Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Demonstrator Project: What Can We Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Chris; Savin-Baden, Maggi; Conradi, Emily; Poulton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a demonstrator project to evaluate how effectively Immersive Virtual Worlds (IVWs) could support problem-based learning. The project designed, created and evaluated eight scenarios within "Second Life" (SL) for undergraduate courses in health care management and paramedic training. Evaluation was…

  8. Microcontroller-based Feedback Control Laboratory Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available this paper is a result of the implementation of the recommendations on enhancing hands-on experience of control engineering education using single chip, small scale computers such as microcontrollers. A set of microcontroller-based feedback control experiments was developed for the Electrical Engineering curriculum at the University of North Florida. These experiments provided hands-on techniques that students can utilize in the development of complete solutions for a number of servo control problems. Significant effort was devoted to software development of feedback controllers and the associated signal conditioning circuits interfacing between the microcontroller and the physical plant. These experiments have stimulated the interest of our students in control engineering.

  9. Industrial Experience with the Architecture based Reengineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Li, Jinxiu

    2005-01-01

    The practice of software reengineering has not been fully exploited industrially in significant ways. In this paper, we will report our experience with the architecture based reengineering on a Network Planning System (NPS). Our approach for effective reengineering is focusing on architecture...

  10. Feasibility and demonstration of a cloud-based RIID analysis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Michael C., E-mail: wrightmc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hertz, Kristin L.; Johnson, William C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Sword, Eric D.; Younkin, James R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A significant limitation in the operational utility of handheld and backpack radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) is the inability of their onboard algorithms to accurately and reliably identify the isotopic sources of the measured gamma-ray energy spectrum. A possible solution is to move the spectral analysis computations to an external device, the cloud, where significantly greater capabilities are available. The implementation and demonstration of a prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system have shown this type of system to be feasible with currently available communication and computational technology. A system study has shown that the potential user community could derive significant benefits from an appropriately implemented cloud-based analysis system and has identified the design and operational characteristics required by the users and stakeholders for such a system. A general description of the hardware and software necessary to implement reliable cloud-based analysis, the value of the cloud expressed by the user community, and the aspects of the cloud implemented in the demonstrations are discussed. - Highlights: • A prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system was implemented and demonstrated. • A cloud-based system was shown to be feasible with currently available technology. • A system study identified the operational characteristics required by the users. • The system study showed that the user community could derive significant benefit. • An architecture was defined for field testing by users in relevant environments.

  11. Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrik, Michael [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ruhl, Robert [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels. Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

  12. Demonstrating an additional law of relativistic velocities based on squeezed light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Da-Bao; Li Yan; Zhang Fu-Lin; Chen Jing-Ling

    2012-01-01

    The special relativity is the foundation for many branches of modern physics,of which the theoretical results are far beyond our daily experience and hard to realized in kinematic experiments.However,its outcomes could be demonstrated by making use of the convenient substitute,i.e.,the squeezed light in the present paper.The squeezed light is very important in the field of quantum optics,and the corresponding transformation can be regarded as the coherent state of SU(1,1).In this paper,the connection between the squeezed operator and the Lorentz boost is built under certain conditions.Furthermore,the additional law of relativistic velocities and the angle of the Wigner rotation are deduced as well.

  13. Experimental demonstration of Generalized Phase Contrast based Gaussian beam-shaper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tauro, Sandeep; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin

    2011-01-01

    -cost binary-phase optics fabricated using photolithography and chemical etching techniques can replace the SLM in static and high power beam shaping applications. The design parameters for the binary-phase elements of the module are chosen according to the results of our previously conducted analysis...... and numerical demonstrations [Opt. Express 15, 11971 (2007)]. Beams with a variety of cross-sections such as circular, rectangular and square, with near flat-top intensity distributions are demonstrated. GPC-based beam shaping is inherently speckle-free and the shaped beams maintain a flat output phase. The non...

  14. Demonstration experiment of a laser synchrotron source for tunable, monochromatic x-rays at 500 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, A.; Fischer, R.; Fisher, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS) was proposed to generate short-pulsed, tunable x-rays by Thomson scattering of laser photons from a relativistic electron beam. A proof-of-principle experiment was performed to generate x-ray photons of 20 eV. A demonstration experiment is being planned and constructed to generate x-ray photons in the range of {approximately}500 eV. Laser photons of {lambda}=1.06 {mu}m are Thomson backscattered by a 4.5 MeV electron beam which is produced by an S-band RF electron gun. The laser photons are derived from either (i) a 15 Joules, 3 nsec Nd:glass laser, (ii) the uncompressed nsec: pulse of the NRL table-top terawatt (T{sup 3}) laser, or (iii) the compressed sub-picosec pulse of the T{sup 3} laser. The RF electron gun is being constructed with initial operation using a thermionic cathode. It will be upgraded to a photocathode to produce high quality electron beams with high current and low emittance. The x-ray pulse structure consists of {approximately}10 psec within an envelope of a macropulse whose length depends on the laser used. The estimated x-ray photon flux is {approximately}10{sup 18} photons/sec, and the number of photons per macropulse is {approximately}10{sup 8}. Design parameters and progress of the experiment will be presented.

  15. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, K. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Sorbonne Universités, CNRS, ENS-PSL Research University, Collège de France, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Le Jeannic, H.; Ruaudel, J.; Morin, O.; Laurat, J., E-mail: julien.laurat@upmc.fr [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-Sorbonne Universités, CNRS, ENS-PSL Research University, Collège de France, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-12-15

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  16. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K; Ruaudel, J; Morin, O; Laurat, J

    2014-01-01

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  17. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K; Le Jeannic, H; Ruaudel, J; Morin, O; Laurat, J

    2014-12-01

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  18. Demonstration of Cathode Emittance Dominated High Bunch Charge Beams in a DC gun-based Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (greater than or equal to 100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell Energy Recovery Linac Photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittance measured at 9-9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and Free Electron Lasers (FELs).

  19. SEXTANT: A Demonstration of X-ray Pulsar-Based Navigation Using NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Paul S.; Mitchell, Jason W; Winternitz, Luke M; Hasouneh, Monther A; Price, Samuel R; Valdez, Jennifer; Yu, Wayne H; Semper, Sean R; Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Litchford, Ronald J; Gendreau, Keith

    2014-08-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a technology-demonstration enhancement to the Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission. NICER is a NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity that will be hosted on the International Space Station (ISS). SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray pulsar-based navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. The SEXTANT XNAV demonstration will exploit the large collecting area (>1800 cm^2), low background (nature’s most stable clocks, the SEXTANT flight software will demonstrate real-time orbit determination with error less than 10 km in any direction, through measurements made over 2 weeks or less in the highly dynamic low-Earth ISS orbit. The completed technology demonstration will bring the XNAV concept and algorithms to a Technology Readiness Level of 8 and will inform the design and configuration of future practical XNAV implementations.

  20. Demonstrating the value of community-based ('citizen science') observations for catchment modelling and characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Eleanor; Parkin, Geoff; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Large, Andy; Quinn, Paul; Gibson, Ceri

    2017-05-01

    Despite there being well-established meteorological and hydrometric monitoring networks in the UK, many smaller catchments remain ungauged. This leaves a challenge for characterisation, modelling, forecasting and management activities. Here we demonstrate the value of community-based ('citizen science') observations for modelling and understanding catchment response as a contribution to catchment science. The scheme implemented within the 42 km2 Haltwhistle Burn catchment, a tributary of the River Tyne in northeast England, has harvested and used quantitative and qualitative observations from the public in a novel way to effectively capture spatial and temporal river response. Community-based rainfall, river level and flood observations have been successfully collected and quality-checked, and used to build and run a physically-based, spatially-distributed catchment model, SHETRAN. Model performance using different combinations of observations is tested against traditionally-derived hydrographs. Our results show how the local network of community-based observations alongside traditional sources of hydro-information supports characterisation of catchment response more accurately than using traditional observations alone over both spatial and temporal scales. We demonstrate that these community-derived datasets are most valuable during local flash flood events, particularly towards peak discharge. This information is often missed or poorly represented by ground-based gauges, or significantly underestimated by rainfall radar, as this study clearly demonstrates. While community-based observations are less valuable during prolonged and widespread floods, or over longer hydrological periods of interest, they can still ground-truth existing traditional sources of catchment data to increase confidence during characterisation and management activities. Involvement of the public in data collection activities also encourages wider community engagement, and provides important

  1. THz Discrimination of materials: demonstration of a bioinspired apparatus based on metasurfaces selective filters

    CERN Document Server

    Carelli1, P; Torrioli, G; Castellano, M G

    2016-01-01

    We present an apparatus for terahertz fingerprint discrimination of materials designed to be fast, simple, compact and economical in order to be suitable for preliminary on-field analysis. The system working principles, bioinspired by the human vision of colors, are based on the use of microfabricated metamaterials selective filters and of a very compact optics based on metallic ellipsoidal mirrors in air. We experimentally demonstrate the operation of the apparatus in discriminating simple substances such as salt, staple foods and grease in an accurate and reproducible manner. We present the system and the obtained results and discuss issues and possible developments.

  2. Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter description report. INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration System Analysis project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Morneau, R.A.; Rudin, M.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1992-05-01

    A formal methodology has been developed for identifying technology gaps and assessing innovative or postulated technologies for inclusion in proposed Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) remediation systems. Called the Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter, the methodology provides a formalized selection process where technologies and systems are rated and assessments made based on performance measures, and regulatory and technical requirements. The results are auditable, and can be validated with field data. This analysis methodology will be applied to the remedial action of transuranic contaminated waste pits and trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  3. Seasat-A ASVT: Commercial demonstration experiments. Results analysis methodology for the Seasat-A case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The SEASAT-A commercial demonstration program ASVT is described. The program consists of a set of experiments involving the evaluation of a real time data distributions system, the SEASAT-A user data distribution system, that provides the capability for near real time dissemination of ocean conditions and weather data products from the U.S. Navy Fleet Numerical Weather Central to a selected set of commercial and industrial users and case studies, performed by commercial and industrial users, using the data gathered by SEASAT-A during its operational life. The impact of the SEASAT-A data on business operations is evaluated by the commercial and industrial users. The approach followed in the performance of the case studies, and the methodology used in the analysis and integration of the case study results to estimate the actual and potential economic benefits of improved ocean condition and weather forecast data are described.

  4. Description-based and experience-based decisions: individual analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Kudryavtsev

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyze behavior in two basic classes of decision tasks: description-based and experience-based. In particular, we compare the prediction power of a number of decision learning models in both kinds of tasks. Unlike most previous studies, we focus on individual, rather than aggregate, behavioral characteristics. We carry out an experiment involving a battery of both description- and experience-based choices between two mixed binary prospects made by each of the participants, and employ a number of formal models for explaining and predicting participants' choices: Prospect theory (PT (Kahneman and Tversky, 1979; Expectancy-Valence model (EVL (Busemeyer and Stout, 2002; and three combinations of these well-established models. We document that the PT and the EVL models are best for predicting people's decisions in description- and experience-based tasks, respectively, which is not surprising as these two models are designed specially for these kinds of tasks. Furthermore, we find that models involving linear weighting of gains and losses perform better in both kinds of tasks, from the point of view of generalizability and individual parameter consistency. We therefore, conclude that, overall, when both prospects are mixed, the assumption of diminishing sensitivity does not improve models' prediction power for individual decision-makers. Finally, for some of the models' parameters, we document consistency at the individual level between description- and experience-based tasks.

  5. Personalization and Contextualization of Learning Experiences based on Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Capuano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context-aware e-learning is an educational model that foresees the selection of learning resources to make the e-learning content more relevant and suitable for the learner in his/her situation. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an ontological approach can be used to define leaning contexts and to allow contextualizing learning experiences finding out relevant topics for each context. To do that, we defined a context model able to formally describe a learning context, an ontology-based model enabling the representation of a teaching domain (including context information and a methodology to generate personalized and context-aware learning experiences starting from them. Based on these theoretical components we improved an existing system for personalized e-learning with contextualisation features and experimented it with real users in two University courses. The results obtained from this experimentation have been compared with those achieved by similar systems.

  6. In vivo demonstration of injectable microstimulators based on charge-balanced rectification of epidermically applied currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivorra, Antoni; Becerra-Fajardo, Laura; Castellví, Quim

    2015-12-01

    Objective. It is possible to develop implantable microstimulators whose actuation principle is based on rectification of high-frequency (HF) current bursts supplied through skin electrodes. This has been demonstrated previously by means of devices consisting of a single diode. However, previous single diode devices caused dc currents which made them impractical for clinical applications. Here flexible thread-like stimulation implants which perform charge balance are demonstrated in vivo. Approach. The implants weigh 40.5 mg and they consist of a 3 cm long tubular silicone body with a diameter of 1 mm, two electrodes at opposite ends, and, within the central section of the body, an electronic circuit made up of a diode, two capacitors, and a resistor. In the present study, each implant was percutaneously introduced through a 14 G catheter into either the gastrocnemius muscle or the cranial tibial muscle of a rabbit hindlimb. Then stimulation was performed by delivering HF bursts (amplitude neuromuscular stimulation. The implants were well-tolerated during the 4 weeks. Significance. Existing power supply methods, and, in particular inductive links, comprise stiff and bulky parts. This hinders the development of minimally invasive implantable devices for neuroprostheses based on electrical stimulation. The proposed methodology is intended to relieving such bottleneck. In terms of mass, thinness, and flexibility, the demonstrated implants appear to be unprecedented among the intramuscular stimulation implants ever assayed in vertebrates.

  7. The Solar Umbrella: A Low-cost Demonstration of Scalable Space Based Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Michael T.; Trease, Brian P.; Sherwood, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Within the past decade, the Space Solar Power (SSP) community has seen an influx of stakeholders willing to entertain the SSP prospect of potentially boundless, base-load solar energy. Interested parties affiliated with the Department of Defense (DoD), the private sector, and various international entities have all agreed that while the benefits of SSP are tremendous and potentially profitable, the risk associated with developing an efficient end to end SSP harvesting system is still very high. In an effort to reduce the implementation risk for future SSP architectures, this study proposes a system level design that is both low-cost and seeks to demonstrate the furthest transmission of wireless power to date. The overall concept is presented and each subsystem is explained in detail with best estimates of current implementable technologies. Basic cost models were constructed based on input from JPL subject matter experts and assume that the technology demonstration would be carried out by a federally funded entity. The main thrust of the architecture is to demonstrate that a usable amount of solar power can be safely and reliably transmitted from space to the Earth's surface; however, maximum power scalability limits and their cost implications are discussed.

  8. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  9. Experimental demonstration of an all-optical fiber-based Fredkin gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostinski, Natalie; Fok, Mable P; Prucnal, Paul R

    2009-09-15

    We propose and report on what we believe to be the first experimental demonstration of an all-optical fiber-based Fredkin gate for reversible digital logic. The simple 3-input/3-output fiber-based nonlinear optical loop mirror architecture requires only minor alignment for full operation. A short nonlinear element, heavily doped GeO(2) fiber (HDF), allows for a more compact design than typical nonlinear fiber gates. The HDF is ideal for studying reversibility, functioning as a noise-limited medium, as compared to the semiconductor optical amplifier, while allowing for cross-phase modulation, a nondissipative optical interaction. We suggest applications for secure communications, based on "cool" computing.

  10. Architecture Design and Experimental Platform Demonstration of Optical Network based on OpenFlow Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangyuan; Wang, Honghuan; Yin, Hongxi; Li, Ming; Luo, Shenzi; Wu, Chenguang

    2016-02-01

    With the extensive application of cloud computing and data centres, as well as the constantly emerging services, the big data with the burst characteristic has brought huge challenges to optical networks. Consequently, the software defined optical network (SDON) that combines optical networks with software defined network (SDN), has attracted much attention. In this paper, an OpenFlow-enabled optical node employed in optical cross-connect (OXC) and reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM), is proposed. An open source OpenFlow controller is extended on routing strategies. In addition, the experiment platform based on OpenFlow protocol for software defined optical network, is designed. The feasibility and availability of the OpenFlow-enabled optical nodes and the extended OpenFlow controller are validated by the connectivity test, protection switching and load balancing experiments in this test platform.

  11. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR: Progress towards showing the feasibility of a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Finnerty, P; Amman, M; Avignone., F T; Barabash, A S; Barton, P J; Beene, J R; Bertrand, F E; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Chan, Y -D; Christofferson, C D; Collar, J I; Combs, D C; Cooper, R J; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Fields, N; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gehman, V M; Giovanetti, G K; Green, M P; Guiseppe, V E; Gusey, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Horton, M; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Johnson, R A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Knecht, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; Luke, P N; MacMullin, S; Marino, M G; Martin, R D; Merriman, J H; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; Overman, N R; Perumpilly, G; Phillips., D G; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Ronquest, M C; Schubert, A G; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Steele, D; Strain, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Varner, R L; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; Wilkerson, J F; Yakushev, E; Yaver, H; Young, A R; Yumatov., C-H Yu and V

    2012-01-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the 76Ge isotope with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate the neutrino is its own anti-particle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass-scale of the neutrino. The DEMONSTRATOR is being assembled at the 4850 foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be contained in a low-background environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. The goals for the DEMONSTRATOR are: demonstrating a background rate less than 3 t$^{-1}$ y$^{-1}$ in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) surrounding the 2039 keV 76Ge endpoint energy; establishing the technology required to build a tonne-scale germanium based double-beta decay experiment; testing the recent claim of observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay [H. V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus and I. V. Krivosheina, Mod. Ph...

  12. BASE - The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Bojtar, L.; Borchert, M.; Franke, K. A.; Higuchi, T.; Leefer, N.; Nagahama, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Mooser, A.; Niemann, M.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Sellner, S.; Tanaka, T.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2015-11-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) aims at performing a stringent test of the combined charge parity and time reversal (CPT) symmetry by comparing the magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton with high precision. Using single particles in a Penning trap, the proton/antiproton g-factors, i.e. the magnetic moment in units of the nuclear magneton, are determined by measuring the respective ratio of the spin-precession frequency to the cyclotron frequency. The spin precession frequency is measured by non-destructive detection of spin quantum transitions using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, and the cyclotron frequency is determined from the particle*s motional eigenfrequencies in the Penning trap using the invariance theorem. By application of the double Penning-trap method we expect that in our measurements a fractional precision of δg/g 10-9 can be achieved. The successful application of this method to the antiproton will consist a factor 1000 improvement in the fractional precision of its magnetic moment. The BASE collaboration has constructed and commissioned a new experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. This article describes and summarizes the physical and technical aspects of this new experiment.

  13. The Hardware Implementation of Demonstrator Air Independent Electric Supply System Based on Pem Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzeczka G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the research project whose the main goal was to build a technology demonstrator of an electric supply system based on the PEM fuel cell. The electric supply system is dedicated to operation on a board of a submarine during emergency situations. The underwater conditions influence on a specific architecture of supply subsystems of the PEM fuel cell system. In this case the fuel cell stack is supplied by both clean hydrogen and clean oxygen stored in pressurized tanks. The hydrogen has to be delivered in a closed loop, while the oxygen can be delivered in a closed or an open loop. In the technology demonstrator, the supply of the fuel cell stack by the hydrogen in the closed loop and the oxygen in the open loop with a precise control of its flow were used.

  14. Demonstration of three gorges archaeological relics based on 3D-visualization technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenli

    2015-12-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the digital demonstration of three gorges archeological relics to exhibit the achievements of the protective measures. A novel and effective method based on 3D-visualization technology, which includes large-scaled landscape reconstruction, virtual studio, and virtual panoramic roaming, etc, is proposed to create a digitized interactive demonstration system. The method contains three stages: pre-processing, 3D modeling and integration. Firstly, abundant archaeological information is classified according to its history and geographical information. Secondly, build up a 3D-model library with the technology of digital images processing and 3D modeling. Thirdly, use virtual reality technology to display the archaeological scenes and cultural relics vividly and realistically. The present work promotes the application of virtual reality to digital projects and enriches the content of digital archaeology.

  15. Evaluation of a Web-Based App Demonstrating an Exclusionary Algorithmic Approach to TNM Cancer Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Matthew

    2015-04-02

    TNM staging plays a critical role in the evaluation and management of a range of different types of cancers. The conventional combinatorial approach to the determination of an anatomic stage relies on the identification of distinct tumor (T), node (N), and metastasis (M) classifications to generate a TNM grouping. This process is inherently inefficient due to the need for scrupulous review of the criteria specified for each classification to ensure accurate assignment. An exclusionary approach to TNM staging based on sequential constraint of options may serve to minimize the number of classifications that need to be reviewed to accurately determine an anatomic stage. Our aim was to evaluate the usability and utility of a Web-based app configured to demonstrate an exclusionary approach to TNM staging. Internal medicine residents, surgery residents, and oncology fellows engaged in clinical training were asked to evaluate a Web-based app developed as an instructional aid incorporating (1) an exclusionary algorithm that polls tabulated classifications and sorts them into ranked order based on frequency counts, (2) reconfiguration of classification criteria to generate disambiguated yes/no questions that function as selection and exclusion prompts, and (3) a selectable grid of TNM groupings that provides dynamic graphic demonstration of the effects of sequentially selecting or excluding specific classifications. Subjects were asked to evaluate the performance of this app after completing exercises simulating the staging of different types of cancers encountered during training. Survey responses indicated high levels of agreement with statements supporting the usability and utility of this app. Subjects reported that its user interface provided a clear display with intuitive controls and that the exclusionary approach to TNM staging it demonstrated represented an efficient process of assignment that helped to clarify distinctions between tumor, node, and metastasis

  16. Experimental demonstration of a compact epithermal neutron source based on a high power laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Raspino, D.; Ansell, S.; Wilson, L. A.; Armstrong, C.; Butler, N. M. H.; Clarke, R. J.; Higginson, A.; Kelleher, J.; Murphy, C. D.; Notley, M.; Rusby, D. R.; Schooneveld, E.; Borghesi, M.; McKenna, P.; Rhodes, N. J.; Neely, D.; Brenner, C. M.; Kar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Epithermal neutrons from pulsed-spallation sources have revolutionised neutron science allowing scientists to acquire new insight into the structure and properties of matter. Here, we demonstrate that laser driven fast (˜MeV) neutrons can be efficiently moderated to epithermal energies with intrinsically short burst durations. In a proof-of-principle experiment using a 100 TW laser, a significant epithermal neutron flux of the order of 105 n/sr/pulse in the energy range of 0.5-300 eV was measured, produced by a compact moderator deployed downstream of the laser-driven fast neutron source. The moderator used in the campaign was specifically designed, by the help of MCNPX simulations, for an efficient and directional moderation of the fast neutron spectrum produced by a laser driven source.

  17. Demonstration of a chip-based optical isolator with parametric amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Shiyue; Wen, Jianming; Jiang, Xiaoshun; Hua, Qian; Jiang, Liang; Xiao, Min

    2016-11-01

    Despite being fundamentally challenging in integrated (nano)photonics, achieving chip-based light non-reciprocity becomes increasingly urgent in signal processing and optical communications. Because of material incompatibilities in conventional approaches based on the Faraday effect, alternative solutions have resorted to nonlinear processes to obtain one-way transmission. However, dynamic reciprocity in a recent theoretical analysis has pinned down the functionalities of these nonlinear isolators. To bypass such dynamic reciprocity, we here demonstrate an optical isolator on a silicon chip enforced by phase-matched parametric amplification in four-wave mixing. Using a high-Q microtoroid resonator, we realize highly non-reciprocal transport at the 1,550 nm wavelength when waves are injected from both directions in two different operating configurations. Our design, compatible with current complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, yields convincing isolation performance with sufficiently low insertion loss for a wide range of input power levels. Moreover, our work demonstrates the possibility of designing chip-based magnetic-free optical isolators for information processing and laser protection.

  18. Feasibility and Demonstration of a Cloud-Based RIID Analysis System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Michael C [ORNL; Hertz, Kristin [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Johnson, Will [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Sword, Eric D [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Sadler, L.E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

    2014-01-01

    A significant limitation in the operational utility of handheld and backpack radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) is the inability of their onboard algorithms to accurately and reliably identify the isotopic sources of the measured gamma-ray energy spectrum. A possible solution is to move the spectral analysis computations to an external device, the cloud, where significantly greater capabilities are available. The implementation and demonstration of a prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system have shown this type of system to be feasible with currently available communication and computational technology. A system study has shown that the potential user community could derive significant benefits from an appropriately implemented cloud-based analysis system and has identified the design and operational characteristics required by the users and stakeholders for such a system. A general description of the hardware and software necessary to implement reliable cloud-based analysis, the value of the cloud expressed by the user community, and the aspects of the cloud implemented in the demonstrations are discussed.

  19. Feasibility and demonstration of a cloud-based RIID analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael C.; Hertz, Kristin L.; Johnson, William C.; Sword, Eric D.; Younkin, James R.; Sadler, Lorraine E.

    2015-06-01

    A significant limitation in the operational utility of handheld and backpack radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) is the inability of their onboard algorithms to accurately and reliably identify the isotopic sources of the measured gamma-ray energy spectrum. A possible solution is to move the spectral analysis computations to an external device, the cloud, where significantly greater capabilities are available. The implementation and demonstration of a prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system have shown this type of system to be feasible with currently available communication and computational technology. A system study has shown that the potential user community could derive significant benefits from an appropriately implemented cloud-based analysis system and has identified the design and operational characteristics required by the users and stakeholders for such a system. A general description of the hardware and software necessary to implement reliable cloud-based analysis, the value of the cloud expressed by the user community, and the aspects of the cloud implemented in the demonstrations are discussed.

  20. GaN ultraviolet detector based demonstrator board for UV-index monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Man; Xie, Feng; Wang, Jun; Wang, Tanglin; Guo, Jin

    2015-04-01

    Currently, various types of III nitride-based materials have been successfully used for short-wavelength optoelectronic devices. The GaN ultraviolet detector has been wildly used for UV-Index(UVI) monitoring, UV curing and water disinfection. The global solar UVI describes the levels of solar UV radiation at the Earth's surface. The higher the UVI value, the greater the potential damage to the skin and eyes. The UVI monitoring demonstrator board with GaN detector is briefly introduced in this paper.

  1. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  2. Multiplexed readout demonstration of a TES-based detector array in a resistance locked loop

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kuur, Jan; Kiviranta, Mikko; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Khosropanah, Pourya; Hartog, Roland den; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Jackson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    TES-based bolometer and microcalorimeter arrays with thousands of pixels are under development for several space-based and ground-based applications. A linear detector response and low levels of cross talk facilitate the calibration of the instruments. In an effort to improve the properties of TES-based detectors, fixing the TES resistance in a resistance-locked loop (RLL) under optical loading has recently been proposed. Earlier theoretical work on this mode of operation has shown that the detector speed, linearity and dynamic range should improve with respect to voltage biased operation. This paper presents an experimental demonstration of multiplexed readout in this mode of operation in a TES-based detector array with noise equivalent power values (NEP) of $3.5\\cdot 10^{-19} $W/$\\sqrt{\\mathrm{Hz}}$. The measured noise and dynamic properties of the detector in the RLL will be compared with the earlier modelling work. Furthermore, the practical implementation routes for future FDM systems for the readout of ...

  3. WHITE PAPER: DEMONSTRATION OF EQUIVALENCY OF CANE AND SOFTWOOD BASED CELOTEX FOR 9975 PACKAGING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varble, J

    2007-11-20

    Cane-based Celotex{trademark} has been used extensively in various DOE packages as a thermal insulator and impact absorber. Cane-based Celotex{trademark} for the 9975 was manufactured by Knight-Celotex Fiberboard at their Marrero Plant in Louisiana. However, Knight-Celotex Fiberboard shut down their Marrero Plant in early 2007 due to impacts from hurricane Katrina and other economic factors. Therefore, cane-based Celotex{trademark} is no longer available for use in the manufacture of new 9975 packages. Knight-Celotex Fiberboard has Celotex{trademark} manufacturing plants in Danville, VA and Sunbury, PA that use softwood and hardwood, respectively, as a raw material in the manufacturing of Celotex{trademark}. The purpose of this White Paper is to demonstrate that softwood-based Celotex{trademark} from the Knight-Celotex Danville Plant has performance equivalent to cane-based Celotex{trademark} from the Knight-Celotex Marrero Plant for transportation in a 9975 package.

  4. Demonstrating the benefits of template-based design-technology co-optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann, Lars; Hibbeler, Jason; Hieter, Nathaniel; Pileggi, Larry; Jhaveri, Tejas; Moe, Matthew; Rovner, Vyacheslav

    2010-03-01

    The concept of template-based design-technology co-optimization as a means of curbing escalating design complexity and increasing technology qualification risk is described. Data is presented highlighting the design efficacy of this proposal in terms of power, performance, and area benefits, quantifying the specific contributions of complex logic gates in this design optimization. Experimental results from 32nm technology node bulk CMOS wafers are presented to quantify the variability and design-margin reductions as well as yield and manufacturability improvements achievable with the proposed template-based design-technology co-optimization technique. The paper closes with data showing the predictable composability of individual templates, demonstrating a fundamental requirement of this proposal.

  5. Demonstration of base catalyzed decomposition process, Navy Public Works Center, Guam, Mariana Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Brown, M.D.; Zacher, A.H.; Neuenschwander, G.N.; Wilcox, W.A.; Gano, S.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kim, B.C.; Gavaskar, A.R. [Battelle Columbus Div., OH (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Base Catalyzed Decomposition (BCD) is a chemical dehalogenation process designed for treating soils and other substrate contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), pesticides, dioxins, furans, and other hazardous organic substances. PCBs are heavy organic liquids once widely used in industry as lubricants, heat transfer oils, and transformer dielectric fluids. In 1976, production was banned when PCBs were recognized as carcinogenic substances. It was estimated that significant quantities (one billion tons) of U.S. soils, including areas on U.S. military bases outside the country, were contaminated by PCB leaks and spills, and cleanup activities began. The BCD technology was developed in response to these activities. This report details the evolution of the process, from inception to deployment in Guam, and describes the process and system components provided to the Navy to meet the remediation requirements. The report is divided into several sections to cover the range of development and demonstration activities. Section 2.0 gives an overview of the project history. Section 3.0 describes the process chemistry and remediation steps involved. Section 4.0 provides a detailed description of each component and specific development activities. Section 5.0 details the testing and deployment operations and provides the results of the individual demonstration campaigns. Section 6.0 gives an economic assessment of the process. Section 7.0 presents the conclusions and recommendations form this project. The appendices contain equipment and instrument lists, equipment drawings, and detailed run and analytical data.

  6. Demonstration of base catalyzed decomposition process, Navy Public Works Center, Guam, Mariana Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Brown, M.D.; Zacher, A.H.; Neuenschwander, G.N.; Wilcox, W.A.; Gano, S.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kim, B.C.; Gavaskar, A.R. [Battelle Columbus Div., OH (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Base Catalyzed Decomposition (BCD) is a chemical dehalogenation process designed for treating soils and other substrate contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), pesticides, dioxins, furans, and other hazardous organic substances. PCBs are heavy organic liquids once widely used in industry as lubricants, heat transfer oils, and transformer dielectric fluids. In 1976, production was banned when PCBs were recognized as carcinogenic substances. It was estimated that significant quantities (one billion tons) of U.S. soils, including areas on U.S. military bases outside the country, were contaminated by PCB leaks and spills, and cleanup activities began. The BCD technology was developed in response to these activities. This report details the evolution of the process, from inception to deployment in Guam, and describes the process and system components provided to the Navy to meet the remediation requirements. The report is divided into several sections to cover the range of development and demonstration activities. Section 2.0 gives an overview of the project history. Section 3.0 describes the process chemistry and remediation steps involved. Section 4.0 provides a detailed description of each component and specific development activities. Section 5.0 details the testing and deployment operations and provides the results of the individual demonstration campaigns. Section 6.0 gives an economic assessment of the process. Section 7.0 presents the conclusions and recommendations form this project. The appendices contain equipment and instrument lists, equipment drawings, and detailed run and analytical data.

  7. Hanford tank initiative vehicle/based waste retrieval demonstration report phase II, track 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglin, E.J.

    1997-07-31

    Using the versatile TracPUMpTm, Environmental Specialties Group, LLC (ES) performed a successful Phase 11 demonstration of a Vehicle- Based Waste Retrieval System (VWRS) for removal of waste material and residual liquid found in the Hanford Underground Storage Tanks (ousts). The purpose of this demonstration was to address issues pertaining to the use of a VWRS in OUSTS. The demonstration also revealed the waste removal capabilities of the TracPumpTm and the most effective techniques and equipment to safely and effectively remove waste simulants. ES successfully addressed the following primary issues: I . Dislodge and convey the waste forms present in the Hanford OUSTS; 2. Access the UST through tank openings as small as twenty-four inches in diameter; 3. Traverse a variety of terrains including slopes, sludges, rocks and hard, slippery surfaces without becoming mired; 4. Dislodge and convey waste within the confinement of the Decontamination Containment Capture Vessel (DCCV) and with minimal personnel exposure; 5. Decontaminate equipment to acceptable limits during retrieval from the UST; 6. Perform any required maintenance within the confinement of the DCCV; and 7. Maintain contaminate levels ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA) within the DCCV due to its crevice and comer-free design. The following materials were used to simulate the physical characteristics of wastes found in Hanford`s OUSTS: (1) Hardpan: a clay-type material that has high shear strength; (2) Saltcake: a fertilizer-based material that has high compressive strength; and (3) Wet Sludge.- a sticky, peanut- butter- like material with low shear strength. Four test beds were constructed of plywood and filled with a different simulant to a depth of eight to ten inches. Three of the test beds were of homogenous simulant material, while the fourth bed consisted of a mixture of all three simulant types.

  8. Demonstration of space-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering capability for warm dense matter experiments on the Z accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, T.; Harding, E. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Lemke, R. W.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hansen, S. B.; Smith, I. C.; Geissel, M.; Maurer, A.; Reneker, J.; Romero, D.; Sinars, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Benage, J. F.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments on the Sandia Z pulsed-power accelerator have demonstrated the ability to produce warm dense matter (WDM) states with unprecedented uniformity, duration, and size, which are ideal for investigations of fundamental WDM properties. For the first time, space-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) spectra from shocked carbon foams were recorded on Z. The large (>20 MA) electrical current produced by Z was used to launch Al flyer plates up to 25 km/s. The impact of the flyer plate on a CH2 foam target produced a shocked state with an estimated pressure of 0.75 Mbar, density of 0.52 g/cm3, and temperature of 4.3 eV. Both unshocked and shocked portions of the foam target were probed with 6.2 keV x-rays produced by focusing the Z-Beamlet laser onto a nearby Mn foil. The data are composed of three spatially distinct spectra that were simultaneously captured with a single spectrometer with high spectral (4.8 eV) and spatial (190 μm) resolutions. Detailed spectral information from three target locations is provided simultaneously: the incident x-ray source, the scattered signal from unshocked foam, and the scattered signal from shocked foam.

  9. A field experiment demonstrating plant life-history evolution and its eco-evolutionary feedback to seed predator populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anurag A; Johnson, Marc T J; Hastings, Amy P; Maron, John L

    2013-05-01

    The extent to which evolutionary change occurs in a predictable manner under field conditions and how evolutionary changes feed back to influence ecological dynamics are fundamental, yet unresolved, questions. To address these issues, we established eight replicate populations of native common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis). Each population was planted with 18 genotypes in identical frequency. By tracking genotype frequencies with microsatellite DNA markers over the subsequent three years (up to three generations, ≈5,000 genotyped plants), we show rapid and consistent evolution of two heritable plant life-history traits (shorter life span and later flowering time). This rapid evolution was only partially the result of differential seed production; genotypic variation in seed germination also contributed to the observed evolutionary response. Since evening primrose genotypes exhibited heritable variation for resistance to insect herbivores, which was related to flowering time, we predicted that evolutionary changes in genotype frequencies would feed back to influence populations of a seed predator moth that specializes on O. biennis. By the conclusion of the experiment, variation in the genotypic composition among our eight replicate field populations was highly predictive of moth abundance. These results demonstrate how rapid evolution in field populations of a native plant can influence ecological interactions.

  10. SpaceWire- Based Control System Architecture for the Lightweight Advanced Robotic Arm Demonstrator [LARAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, Marek; Coates, Adam; Montano, Giuseppe; Allouis, Elie; Jameux, David

    2015-09-01

    The Lightweight Advanced Robotic Arm Demonstrator (LARAD) is a state-of-the-art, two-meter long robotic arm for planetary surface exploration currently being developed by a UK consortium led by Airbus Defence and Space Ltd under contract to the UK Space Agency (CREST-2 programme). LARAD has a modular design, which allows for experimentation with different electronics and control software. The control system architecture includes the on-board computer, control software and firmware, and the communication infrastructure (e.g. data links, switches) connecting on-board computer(s), sensors, actuators and the end-effector. The purpose of the control system is to operate the arm according to pre-defined performance requirements, monitoring its behaviour in real-time and performing safing/recovery actions in case of faults. This paper reports on the results of a recent study about the feasibility of the development and integration of a novel control system architecture for LARAD fully based on the SpaceWire protocol. The current control system architecture is based on the combination of two communication protocols, Ethernet and CAN. The new SpaceWire-based control system will allow for improved monitoring and telecommanding performance thanks to higher communication data rate, allowing for the adoption of advanced control schemes, potentially based on multiple vision sensors, and for the handling of sophisticated end-effectors that require fine control, such as science payloads or robotic hands.

  11. CO2 Reduction Assembly Prototype Using Microlith-Based Sabatier Reactor for Ground Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaedi, Christian; Hawley, Kyle; Walsh, Dennis; Roychoudhury, Subir; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of CO2 to produce life support consumables, such as O2 and H2O, via the Sabatier reaction is an important aspect of NASA's cabin Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) and In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) architectures for both low-earth orbit and long-term manned space missions. Carbon dioxide can be reacted with H2, obtained from the electrolysis of water, via Sabatier reaction to produce methane and H2O. Methane can be stored and utilized as propellant while H2O can be either stored or electrolyzed to produce oxygen and regain the hydrogen atoms. Depending on the application, O2 can be used to replenish the atmosphere in human-crewed missions or as an oxidant for robotic and return missions. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI), with support from NASA, has previously developed an efficient and compact Sabatier reactor based on its Microlith® catalytic technology and demonstrated the capability to achieve high CO2 conversion and CH4 selectivity (i.e., =90% of the thermodynamic equilibrium values) at high space velocities and low operating temperatures. This was made possible through the use of high-heat-transfer and high-surface-area Microlith catalytic substrates. Using this Sabatier reactor, PCI designed, developed, and demonstrated a stand-alone CO2 Reduction Assembly (CRA) test system for ground demonstration and performance validation. The Sabatier reactor was integrated with the necessary balance-of-plant components and controls system, allowing an automated, single "push-button" start-up and shutdown. Additionally, the versatility of the test system prototype was demonstrated by operating it under H2-rich (H2/CO2 of >4), stoichiometric (ratio of 4), and CO2-rich conditions (ratio of water recovery rates. In this paper, the development of the CRA test system for ground demonstration will be discussed. Additionally, the performance results from testing the system at various operating conditions and the results from durability testing will be

  12. 77 FR 8837 - Termination of the Department of Defense Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... family difficulties and pressures, crisis intervention, anxiety, self-esteem, loneliness, and critical... Demonstration AGENCY: Department of Defense, DoD. ACTION: Notice of demonstration termination. SUMMARY:...

  13. Demonstration of Emulator-Based Bayesian Calibration of Safety Analysis Codes: Theory and Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Yurko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available System codes for simulation of safety performance of nuclear plants may contain parameters whose values are not known very accurately. New information from tests or operating experience is incorporated into safety codes by a process known as calibration, which reduces uncertainty in the output of the code and thereby improves its support for decision-making. The work reported here implements several improvements on classic calibration techniques afforded by modern analysis techniques. The key innovation has come from development of code surrogate model (or code emulator construction and prediction algorithms. Use of a fast emulator makes the calibration processes used here with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling feasible. This work uses Gaussian Process (GP based emulators, which have been used previously to emulate computer codes in the nuclear field. The present work describes the formulation of an emulator that incorporates GPs into a factor analysis-type or pattern recognition-type model. This “function factorization” Gaussian Process (FFGP model allows overcoming limitations present in standard GP emulators, thereby improving both accuracy and speed of the emulator-based calibration process. Calibration of a friction-factor example using a Method of Manufactured Solution is performed to illustrate key properties of the FFGP based process.

  14. A chitosan based, laser activated thin film surgical adhesive, 'SurgiLux': preparation and demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, L John R; Karsten, Elizabeth

    2012-10-23

    Sutures are a 4,000 year old technology that remain the 'gold-standard' for wound closure by virtue of their repair strength (~100 KPa). However, sutures can act as a nidus for infection and in many procedures are unable to effect wound repair or interfere with functional tissue regeneration.(1) Surgical glues and adhesives, such as those based on fibrin and cyanoacrylates, have been developed as alternatives to sutures for the repair of such wounds. However, current commercial adhesives also have significant disadvantages, ranging from viral and prion transfer and a lack of repair strength as with the fibrin glues, to tissue toxicity and a lack of biocompatibility for the cyanoacrylate based adhesives. Furthermore, currently available surgical adhesives tend to be gel-based and can have extended curing times which limit their application.(2) Similarly, the use of UV lasers to facilitate cross-linking mechanisms in protein-based or albumin 'solders' can lead to DNA damage while laser tissue welding (LTW) predisposes thermal damage to tissues.(3) Despite their disadvantages, adhesives and LTW have captured approximately 30% of the wound closure market reported to be in excess of US $5 billion per annum, a significant testament to the need for sutureless technology.(4) In the pursuit of sutureless technology we have utilized chitosan as a biomaterial for the development of a flexible, thin film, laser-activated surgical adhesive termed 'SurgiLux'. This novel bioadhesive uses a unique combination of biomaterials and photonics that are FDA approved and successfully used in a variety of biomedical applications and products. SurgiLux overcomes all the disadvantages associated with sutures and current surgical adhesives (see Table 1). In this presentation we report the relatively simple protocol for the fabrication of SurgiLux and demonstrate its laser activation and tissue weld strength. SurgiLux films adhere to collagenous tissue without chemical modification such as

  15. Erythrocyte-based Pig-a gene mutation assay: demonstration of cross-species potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phonethepswath, Souk; Bryce, Steven M; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2008-12-08

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors attach specific proteins to the cell surface of hematopoietic cells. Of the genes required to form GPI anchors, only Pig-a is located on the X-chromosome. Prior work with rats suggests that the GPI anchor deficient phenotype is a reliable indicator of Pig-a mutation [Bryce et al., Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 49 (2008) 256-264]. The current report extends this line of investigation by describing simplified blood handling procedures, and by testing the assay principle in a second species, Mus musculus. With this method, erythrocytes are isolated, incubated with anti-CD24-PE, and stained with SYTO 13. Flow cytometric analyses quantify GPI anchor-deficient erythrocytes and reticulocytes. After reconstruction experiments with mutant-mimicking cells demonstrated that the analytical performance of the method is high, CD-1 mice were treated on three occasions with 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 75 mg/kg/day) or ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU, 40 mg/kg/day). Two weeks after the final treatment, DMBA-treated mice were found to exhibit markedly elevated frequencies of GPI anchor deficient erythrocytes and reticulocytes. For the ENU experiment, blood specimens were collected at weekly intervals over a 5-week period. Whereas the frequencies of mutant reticulocytes were significantly elevated 1 week after the last administration, the erythrocyte population was unchanged until the second week. Thereafter, both populations exhibited persistently elevated frequencies for the duration of the experiment (mean frequency at termination=310x10(-6) and 523x10(-6) for erythrocyte and reticulocyte populations, respectively). These data provide evidence that Pig-a mutation does not convey an appreciable positive or negative cell survival advantage to affected erythroid progenitors, although they do suggest that affected erythrocytes have a reduced lifespan in circulation. Collectively, accumulated data support the hypothesis that flow cytometric

  16. A Monte-Carlo based model of the AX-PET demonstrator and its experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solevi, P; Oliver, J F; Gillam, J E; Bolle, E; Casella, C; Chesi, E; De Leo, R; Dissertori, G; Fanti, V; Heller, M; Lai, M; Lustermann, W; Nappi, E; Pauss, F; Rudge, A; Ruotsalainen, U; Schinzel, D; Schneider, T; Séguinot, J; Stapnes, S; Weilhammer, P; Tuna, U; Joram, C; Rafecas, M

    2013-08-21

    AX-PET is a novel PET detector based on axially oriented crystals and orthogonal wavelength shifter (WLS) strips, both individually read out by silicon photo-multipliers. Its design decouples sensitivity and spatial resolution, by reducing the parallax error due to the layered arrangement of the crystals. Additionally the granularity of AX-PET enhances the capability to track photons within the detector yielding a large fraction of inter-crystal scatter events. These events, if properly processed, can be included in the reconstruction stage further increasing the sensitivity. Its unique features require dedicated Monte-Carlo simulations, enabling the development of the device, interpreting data and allowing the development of reconstruction codes. At the same time the non-conventional design of AX-PET poses several challenges to the simulation and modeling tasks, mostly related to the light transport and distribution within the crystals and WLS strips, as well as the electronics readout. In this work we present a hybrid simulation tool based on an analytical model and a Monte-Carlo based description of the AX-PET demonstrator. It was extensively validated against experimental data, providing excellent agreement.

  17. Design and Experimental Demonstration of Cherenkov Radiation Source Based on Metallic Photonic Crystal Slow Wave Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Yang, Zi-Qiang; Ouyang, Zheng-Biao

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a kind of Cherenkov radiation source based on metallic photonic crystal (MPC) slow-wave structure (SWS) cavity. The Cherenkov source designed by linear theory works at 34.7 GHz when the cathode voltage is 550 kV. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of the SWS shows the operating frequency of 35.56 GHz with a single TM01 mode is basically consistent with the theoretically one under the same parameters. An experiment was implemented to testify the results of theory and PIC simulation. The experimental system includes a cathode emitting unit, the SWS, a magnetic system, an output antenna, and detectors. Experimental results show that the operating frequency through detecting the retarded time of wave propagation in waveguides is around 35.5 GHz with a single TM01 mode and an output power reaching 54 MW. It indicates that the MPC structure can reduce mode competition. The purpose of the paper is to show in theory and in preliminary experiment that a SWS with PBG can produce microwaves in TM01 mode. But it still provides a good experimental and theoretical foundation for designing high-power microwave devices.

  18. Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerstedt, Henrik; Muschter, Steffen; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, Christian; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

    2015-10-01

    The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS [1] is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new readout system will be installed in one slice of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. This will allow the proposed upgrade to be thoroughly evaluated well before the planned 2023 deployment in all slices, especially with regard to long term reliability. Different firmware strategies alongside with their integration in the demonstrator are presented in the context of high reliability protection against hardware malfunction and radiation induced errors.

  19. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Hexley, A; Spitz, J; Conrad, J M

    2015-01-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600~torr gas composed of 87.5% $^4$He and 12.5% CF$_4$ for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. We describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of Ne, as a replacement for $^4$He, in the gas mixture. Our discussion focuses on the advantages of Ne as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events ($\\lesssim$100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. We find that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the Ne mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to $\\sim$ 20% with the $^4$He mixture.

  20. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexley, Allie

    2016-03-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% helium-4 and 12.5% tetrafluoromethane for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. I describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of neon, as a replacement for helium-4, in the gas mixture. My discussion focuses on the advantages of neon as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. I show that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the neon mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to 20% with the helium-4 mixture.

  1. INVESTIGATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF DRY CARBON-BASED SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Hunt; Mark Fox; Lillian Stan; Sheila Haythornthwaite; Justin Smith; Jason Ruhl

    1998-10-01

    This quarterly report describes the activities that have taken place during the first full quarter of the Phase II project ''Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control''. Modifications were completed and sampling began at the 600 acfm pilot-scale particulate control module (PCM) located at the Comanche Station in Pueblo, CO. The PCM was configured as an electrostatic precipitator for these tests. A Perkin-Elmer flue gas mercury analyzer was installed on-site and operated. Initial test results using both manual sampling methodology and the mercury analyzer are presented herein. Preparations were made during this period for full-scale mercury testing of several PSCo units. A site visit was made to Arapahoe and Cherokee Generating Stations to determine sample locations and to develop a test plan.

  2. Experimental demonstration of programmable multi-functional spin logic cell based on spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Wan, C. H.; Yuan, Z. H.; Fang, C.; Kong, W. J.; Wu, H.; Zhang, Q. T.; Tao, B. S.; Han, X. F.

    2017-04-01

    Confronting with the gigantic volume of data produced every day, raising integration density by reducing the size of devices becomes harder and harder to meet the ever-increasing demand for high-performance computers. One feasible path is to actualize more logic functions in one cell. In this respect, we experimentally demonstrate a prototype spin-orbit torque based spin logic cell integrated with five frequently used logic functions (AND, OR, NOT, NAND and NOR). The cell can be easily programmed and reprogrammed to perform desired function. Furthermore, the information stored in cells is symmetry-protected, making it possible to expand into logic gate array where the cell can be manipulated one by one without changing the information of other undesired cells. This work provides a prospective example of multi-functional spin logic cell with reprogrammability and nonvolatility, which will advance the application of spin logic devices.

  3. Demonstration of a GaAs-based 1550-nm continuous wave photomixer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W.-D., E-mail: weidong.zhang@wright.edu; Brown, E. R. [Terahertz Sensor Laboratory, Departments of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Middendorf, J. R. [Mound Laser and Photonics Center, Inc., Kettering, Ohio 45420 (United States)

    2015-01-12

    An Er:GaAs-based 1550-nm CW photomixer is demonstrated. The related mechanism is extrinsic photoconductivity with optical absorption between the localized deep levels created by the Er and the extended states above the conduction band edge of GaAs. With the power boost made possible by a fiber-coupled erbium-doped-fiber amplifier, the Er:GaAs photomixers, operating at 1550 nm, radiate THz power levels easily measured by a Golay cell, and display a power spectrum having a −3 dB roll-off frequency of 307 GHz. This corresponds to a photocarrier lifetime of 520 fs, in good agreement with a previous measurement of the bandwidth of the same material in a photoconductive switch.

  4. Active vibration-based SHM system: demonstration on an operating Vestas V27 wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tcherniak, Dmitri; Mølgaard, Lasse Lohilahti

    2016-01-01

    with the system and a 3.5 month monitoring campaign was conducted while the turbine was operating normally. During the campaign, a defect – a trailing edge opening – was artificially introduced into the blade and its size was gradually increased from the original 15 cm to 45 cm. Using an unsupervised learning......This study presents a system that is able to detect defects like cracks, leading/trailing edge opening or delamination of at least 15 cm size, remotely, without stopping the wind turbine. The system is vibration-based: mechanical energy is artificially introduced by means of an electromechanical......-to-noise ratio. At the same time, the corresponding wavelength is short enough to deliver required damage detection resolution and long enough to be able to propagate the entire blade length. The paper demonstrates the system on a 225 kW Vesta s V27 wind turbine. One blade of the wind turbine was equipped...

  5. Collaborative virtual experience based on reconfigurable simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, Qonita M.; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Ko, Heedong

    2006-10-01

    Virtual Reality simulation enables immersive 3D experience of a Virtual Environment. A simulation-based Virtual Environment can be used to map real world phenomena onto virtual experience. With a reconfigurable simulation, users can reconfigure the parameters of the involved objects, so that they can see different effects from the different configurations. This concept is suitable for a classroom learning of physics law. This research studies the Virtual Reality simulation of Newton's physics law on rigid body type of objects. With network support, collaborative interaction is enabled so that people from different places can interact with the same set of objects in immersive Collaborative Virtual Environment. The taxonomy of the interaction in different levels of collaboration is described as: distinct objects and same object, in which there are same object - sequentially, same object - concurrently - same attribute, and same object - concurrently - distinct attributes. The case studies are the interaction of users in two cases: destroying and creating a set of arranged rigid bodies. In Virtual Domino, users can observe physics law while applying force to the domino blocks in order to destroy the arrangements. In Virtual Dollhouse, users can observe physics law while constructing a dollhouse using existing building blocks, under gravity effects.

  6. Experience with the COMPASS Conditions Data Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TakeakiToeda; MassimoLamanna; 等

    2001-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN is starting data taking in summer 2001,The COMPASS off-line framework(CORAL)will use the CERN Conditions Data Base(CDB)to handle time dependent quantities like calibration constants and data from the slow control system.We describe the use of the CDB within CORAL and the fullscale performance tests on the COMPASS Computing Farm(CCF),The CDB has been interfaced to the SCADA PVSS slow control system.To continuously transfer all the data to the CDB and make them available to the users,We describe this interface,a feasibility study performed using mock data and we predict the expected performance.

  7. Experiments with SQUID-based metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butz, Susanne; Jung, Philipp [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Shitov, Sergey V. [Institute of Radio Engenieering and Electronics (IREE RAS), Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Ustinov, Alexey V. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Metamaterials consist of elements that are artificially created to obtain a specific, predetermined interaction with an electromagnetic wave. The size of individual elements is much smaller than the wavelength of the incoming radiation. Conventionally, split ring resonators are used to interact with the magnetic field component of the wave. The interaction with the electric component is realized by thin metallic wires. We designed a Josephson junction based metamaterial where the split ring resonators are replaced by rf-SQUIDs. The benefits compared to conventional metamaterials are that the losses are reduced and that the inductance of the Josephson junction can be tuned by an external magnetic field. This, in turn, changes the resonance frequency of the metamaterial, making the magnetic permeability, μ{sub r}, tunable in situ. We will report on first experiments investigating such a SQUID metamaterial composed of a coplanar waveguide coupled to a one-dimensional array of rf-SQUIDs. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations.

  8. Ash-Based Building Panels Production and Demonstration of Aerock Decking Building Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan E. Bland; Jesse Newcomer

    2007-06-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) of Laramie, Wyoming and AeRock, LLC of Eagar, Arizona (formerly of Bellevue, Washington) partnered, under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE-NETL), to support the development of rapid-setting, ash-based, fiber-incorporated ''green'' building products. Green building materials are a rapidly growing trend in the building and construction industry in the US. A two phase project was implemented wherein Phase I assessed, through chemical and physical testing, ash, ash-based cement and fiber composites exhibiting superior structural performance when applied to the AeRock mixing and extrusion process and involved the conduct of pilot-scale production trials of AeRock products, and wherein Phase II involved the design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale plant to confirm production issues and to produce panels for performance evaluations. Phase I optimized the composite ingredients including ash-based cement, Class F and Class C DFGD ash, and various fiber reinforcements. Additives, such as retardants and accelerators, were also evaluated as related to extruder performance. The optimized composite from the Phase I effort was characterized by a modulus of rupture (MOR) measured between 1,931 and 2,221 psi flexural strength, comparable to other wood and non-wood building materials. Continuous extrusion of the optimum composite in the AeRock pilot-scale facility produced an excellent product that was assembled into a demonstration for exhibit and durability purposes. Finishes, from plain to marbled, from bright reds to muted earth tones and with various textures, could easily be applied during the mixing and extrusion process. The successful pilot-scale demonstration was in turn used to design the production parameters and extruder dies for a commercial scale demonstration at Ultrapanel Pty, Ltd of Ballarat, Australia under Phase II. The initial

  9. Unmanned Carrier-based Aircraft System: Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its Requirements and Available Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    UNMANNED CARRIER -BASED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its Requirements and Available...DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Unmanned Carrier -based Aircraft System: Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its...UNMANNED CARRIER -BASED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its Requirements and Available Resources Why GAO Did This Study The

  10. Demonstration of Protein-Based Human Identification Using the Hair Shaft Proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Tami; Anex, Deon S.; Hilmer, Jonathan K.; Matsunami, Nori; Baird, Lisa; Stevens, Jeffery; Parsawar, Krishna; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P.; Rocke, David M.; Nelson, Chad; Fairbanks, Daniel J.; Wilson, Andrew S.; Rice, Robert H.; Woodward, Scott R.; Bothner, Brian; Hart, Bradley R.; Leppert, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Human identification from biological material is largely dependent on the ability to characterize genetic polymorphisms in DNA. Unfortunately, DNA can degrade in the environment, sometimes below the level at which it can be amplified by PCR. Protein however is chemically more robust than DNA and can persist for longer periods. Protein also contains genetic variation in the form of single amino acid polymorphisms. These can be used to infer the status of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism alleles. To demonstrate this, we used mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics to characterize hair shaft proteins in 66 European-American subjects. A total of 596 single nucleotide polymorphism alleles were correctly imputed in 32 loci from 22 genes of subjects’ DNA and directly validated using Sanger sequencing. Estimates of the probability of resulting individual non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism allelic profiles in the European population, using the product rule, resulted in a maximum power of discrimination of 1 in 12,500. Imputed non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism profiles from European–American subjects were considerably less frequent in the African population (maximum likelihood ratio = 11,000). The converse was true for hair shafts collected from an additional 10 subjects with African ancestry, where some profiles were more frequent in the African population. Genetically variant peptides were also identified in hair shaft datasets from six archaeological skeletal remains (up to 260 years old). This study demonstrates that quantifiable measures of identity discrimination and biogeographic background can be obtained from detecting genetically variant peptides in hair shaft protein, including hair from bioarchaeological contexts. PMID:27603779

  11. Toward Elimination of Dog-Mediated Human Rabies: Experiences from Implementing a Large-scale Demonstration Project in Southern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpolya, Emmanuel Abraham; Lembo, Tiziana; Lushasi, Kennedy; Mancy, Rebecca; Mbunda, Eberhard M; Makungu, Selemani; Maziku, Matthew; Sikana, Lwitiko; Jaswant, Gurdeep; Townsend, Sunny; Meslin, François-Xavier; Abela-Ridder, Bernadette; Ngeleja, Chanasa; Changalucha, Joel; Mtema, Zacharia; Sambo, Maganga; Mchau, Geofrey; Rysava, Kristyna; Nanai, Alphoncina; Kazwala, Rudovick; Cleaveland, Sarah; Hampson, Katie

    2017-01-01

    A Rabies Elimination Demonstration Project was implemented in Tanzania from 2010 through to 2015, bringing together government ministries from the health and veterinary sectors, the World Health Organization, and national and international research institutions. Detailed data on mass dog vaccination campaigns, bite exposures, use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), and human rabies deaths were collected throughout the project duration and project areas. Despite no previous experience in dog vaccination within the project areas, district veterinary officers were able to implement district-wide vaccination campaigns that, for most part, progressively increased the numbers of dogs vaccinated with each phase of the project. Bite exposures declined, particularly in the southernmost districts with the smallest dog populations, and health workers successfully transitioned from primarily intramuscular administration of PEP to intradermal administration, resulting in major cost savings. However, even with improved PEP provision, vaccine shortages still occurred in some districts. In laboratory diagnosis, there were several logistical challenges in sample handling and submission but compared to the situation before the project started, there was a moderate increase in the number of laboratory samples submitted and tested for rabies in the project areas with a decrease in the proportion of rabies-positive samples over time. The project had a major impact on public health policy and practice with the formation of a One Health Coordination Unit at the Prime Minister's Office and development of the Tanzania National Rabies Control Strategy, which lays a roadmap for elimination of rabies in Tanzania by 2030 by following the Stepwise Approach towards Rabies Elimination (SARE). Overall, the project generated many important lessons relevant to rabies prevention and control in particular and disease surveillance in general. Lessons include the need for (1) a specific unit in the

  12. Physiological advantages of C4 grasses in the field: a comparative experiment demonstrating the importance of drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Samuel H; Ripley, Brad S; Martin, Tarryn; De-Wet, Leigh-Ann; Woodward, F Ian; Osborne, Colin P

    2014-06-01

    Global climate change is expected to shift regional rainfall patterns, influencing species distributions where they depend on water availability. Comparative studies have demonstrated that C4 grasses inhabit drier habitats than C3 relatives, but that both C3 and C4 photosynthesis are susceptible to drought. However, C4 plants may show advantages in hydraulic performance in dry environments. We investigated the effects of seasonal variation in water availability on leaf physiology, using a common garden experiment in the Eastern Cape of South Africa to compare 12 locally occurring grass species from C4 and C3 sister lineages. Photosynthesis was always higher in the C4 than C3 grasses across every month, but the difference was not statistically significant during the wettest months. Surprisingly, stomatal conductance was typically lower in the C3 than C4 grasses, with the peak monthly average for C3 species being similar to that of C4 leaves. In water-limited, rain-fed plots, the photosynthesis of C4 leaves was between 2.0 and 7.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) higher, stomatal conductance almost double, and transpiration 60% higher than for C3 plants. Although C4 average instantaneous water-use efficiencies were higher (2.4-8.1 mmol mol(-1)) than C3 averages (0.7-6.8 mmol mol(-1)), differences were not as great as we expected and were statistically significant only as drought became established. Photosynthesis declined earlier during drought among C3 than C4 species, coincident with decreases in stomatal conductance and transpiration. Eventual decreases in photosynthesis among C4 plants were linked with declining midday leaf water potentials. However, during the same phase of drought, C3 species showed significant decreases in hydrodynamic gradients that suggested hydraulic failure. Thus, our results indicate that stomatal and hydraulic behaviour during drought enhances the differences in photosynthesis between C4 and C3 species. We suggest that these drought responses are

  13. Physiological advantages of C4 grasses in the field: a comparative experiment demonstrating the importance of drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Samuel H; Ripley, Brad S; Martin, Tarryn; De-Wet, Leigh-Ann; Woodward, F Ian; Osborne, Colin P

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change is expected to shift regional rainfall patterns, influencing species distributions where they depend on water availability. Comparative studies have demonstrated that C4 grasses inhabit drier habitats than C3 relatives, but that both C3 and C4 photosynthesis are susceptible to drought. However, C4 plants may show advantages in hydraulic performance in dry environments. We investigated the effects of seasonal variation in water availability on leaf physiology, using a common garden experiment in the Eastern Cape of South Africa to compare 12 locally occurring grass species from C4 and C3 sister lineages. Photosynthesis was always higher in the C4 than C3 grasses across every month, but the difference was not statistically significant during the wettest months. Surprisingly, stomatal conductance was typically lower in the C3 than C4 grasses, with the peak monthly average for C3 species being similar to that of C4 leaves. In water-limited, rain-fed plots, the photosynthesis of C4 leaves was between 2.0 and 7.4 μmol m−2 s−1 higher, stomatal conductance almost double, and transpiration 60% higher than for C3 plants. Although C4 average instantaneous water-use efficiencies were higher (2.4–8.1 mmol mol−1) than C3 averages (0.7–6.8 mmol mol−1), differences were not as great as we expected and were statistically significant only as drought became established. Photosynthesis declined earlier during drought among C3 than C4 species, coincident with decreases in stomatal conductance and transpiration. Eventual decreases in photosynthesis among C4 plants were linked with declining midday leaf water potentials. However, during the same phase of drought, C3 species showed significant decreases in hydrodynamic gradients that suggested hydraulic failure. Thus, our results indicate that stomatal and hydraulic behaviour during drought enhances the differences in photosynthesis between C4 and C3 species. We suggest that these drought responses

  14. Technology policy for energy and climate change. Lessons from a retrospective of thirty years on research, development, and demonstration experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlay, R.C.; Koske, B.H. [Office of Policy and International Affairs, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2005-08-15

    Increasing accumulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the Earth atmosphere have raised concerns about the potential for climate change and related consequences. These concerns have heightened attention to GHG emissions and the various means for their mitigation. If substantial reductions in anthropogenic emissions of GHGs were to be required over the course of the 21 Century, fundamental changes would need to take place in the way the world produces and uses energy, as well as in many other GHG-emitting aspects of industry, agriculture, land management and use, and other activities associated with modern civilization. New and advanced technologies could enable and facilitate a gradual, long-term transformation to a future society characterized by significantly lower GHG emissions. Progress could be made by providing improved and less costly means for reducing, avoiding, capturing and sequestering GHG emissions, while also providing the energy and other services needed to sustain expanding economic activity and serve the rising aspirations of a growing world population. It is generally agreed that certain policies aimed at stimulating technological innovation toward this end, including investment in research, development and demonstration (RD and D), constitute an important component of any long-term strategy aimed at addressing climate change. Beyond RD and D, however, there appears to be little agreement as to the answers to two key questions. Might augmenting policies, beyond RD and D, be justified today to spur technology development and adoption? If so, what does history suggest about the kinds of policies that might be most appropriate, and to what extent would they be applicable? This paper attempts to provide insights to the answers to these two questions. It notes in passing the current state of climate change science and its uncertainties, which suggests the potential efficacy of so-called hedging strategies to reduce

  15. Toward Elimination of Dog-Mediated Human Rabies: Experiences from Implementing a Large-scale Demonstration Project in Southern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpolya, Emmanuel Abraham; Lembo, Tiziana; Lushasi, Kennedy; Mancy, Rebecca; Mbunda, Eberhard M.; Makungu, Selemani; Maziku, Matthew; Sikana, Lwitiko; Jaswant, Gurdeep; Townsend, Sunny; Meslin, François-Xavier; Abela-Ridder, Bernadette; Ngeleja, Chanasa; Changalucha, Joel; Mtema, Zacharia; Sambo, Maganga; Mchau, Geofrey; Rysava, Kristyna; Nanai, Alphoncina; Kazwala, Rudovick; Cleaveland, Sarah; Hampson, Katie

    2017-01-01

    A Rabies Elimination Demonstration Project was implemented in Tanzania from 2010 through to 2015, bringing together government ministries from the health and veterinary sectors, the World Health Organization, and national and international research institutions. Detailed data on mass dog vaccination campaigns, bite exposures, use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), and human rabies deaths were collected throughout the project duration and project areas. Despite no previous experience in dog vaccination within the project areas, district veterinary officers were able to implement district-wide vaccination campaigns that, for most part, progressively increased the numbers of dogs vaccinated with each phase of the project. Bite exposures declined, particularly in the southernmost districts with the smallest dog populations, and health workers successfully transitioned from primarily intramuscular administration of PEP to intradermal administration, resulting in major cost savings. However, even with improved PEP provision, vaccine shortages still occurred in some districts. In laboratory diagnosis, there were several logistical challenges in sample handling and submission but compared to the situation before the project started, there was a moderate increase in the number of laboratory samples submitted and tested for rabies in the project areas with a decrease in the proportion of rabies-positive samples over time. The project had a major impact on public health policy and practice with the formation of a One Health Coordination Unit at the Prime Minister’s Office and development of the Tanzania National Rabies Control Strategy, which lays a roadmap for elimination of rabies in Tanzania by 2030 by following the Stepwise Approach towards Rabies Elimination (SARE). Overall, the project generated many important lessons relevant to rabies prevention and control in particular and disease surveillance in general. Lessons include the need for (1) a specific unit in the

  16. Trends in Global Demonstrations of Carbon Management Technologies to Advance Coal- Based Power Generation With Carbon Capture and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, K. K.; Plasynski, S.; Feeley, T. J.

    2008-05-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations increased an estimated 35% since preindustrial levels two centuries ago, reportedly due to the burning of fossil fuels combined with increased deforestation. In the U.S., energy-related activities account for 75% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, with more than 50% from large stationary sources such as power plants and about one-third from transportation. Mitigation technologies for CO2 atmospheric stabilization based on energy and economic scenarios include coal-based power plant- carbon capture and storage (CCS), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is assessing CCS operations and supporting technologies at U.S. locations and opportunities abroad reported here. The Algerian In Salah Joint Industry Project injecting 1 million tons CO2 (MtCO2)/year into a gas field sandstone, and the Canadian Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project injecting over 1.8 MtCO2/year into carbonate oil reservoirs are ongoing industrial-scale storage operations DOE participates in. DOE also supports mid-scale CCS demonstrations at the Australian Otway Project and CO2SINK in Germany. Enhanced oil recovery operations conducted for decades in west Texas and elsewhere have provided the industrial experience to build on, and early pilots such as Frio-I Texas in 2004 have spearheaded technology deployment. While injecting 1,600 tons of CO2 into a saline sandstone at Frio, time-lapse borehole and surface seismic detected P-wave velocity decreases and reflection amplitude changes resulting from the replacement of brine with CO2 in the reservoir. Just two of many cutting-edge technologies tested at Frio, these and others are now deployed by U.S. researchers with international teams to evaluate reservoir injectivity, capacity, and integrity, as well as to assess CO2 spatial distribution, trapping, and unlikely leakage. Time-lapse Vertical Seismic Profiling at Otway and microseismic at In Salah and Otway, monitor injection and reservoir

  17. MO-FG-303-03: Demonstration of Universal Knowledge-Based 3D Dose Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, S; Moore, K L [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a knowledge-based 3D dose prediction methodology that can accurately predict achievable radiotherapy distributions. Methods: Using previously treated plans as input, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict 3D dose distributions based on 14 patient-specific anatomical parameters including the distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) boundary, organ-at-risk (OAR) boundary distances, and angular position ( θ,φ). 23 prostate and 49 stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) cases with ≥1 nearby OARs were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to prescription doses of 81Gy for prostate and 12–30Gy for SRS. Site-specific ANNs were trained using all prostate 23 plans and using a 24 randomly-selected subset for the SRS model. The remaining 25 SRS plans were used to validate the model. To quantify predictive accuracy, the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction were calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis δD(r,θ,φ)=Dclin(r,θ,φ)-Dpred(r, θ,φ). Grouping voxels by boundary distance, the mean <δ Dr>=(1/N)Σ -θ,φ D(r,θ,φ) and inter-quartile range (IQR) quantified the accuracy of this method for deriving DVH estimations. The standard deviation (σ) of δ D quantified the 3D dose prediction error on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Results: The ANNs were highly accurate in predictive ability for both prostate and SRS plans. For prostate, <δDr> ranged from −0.8% to +0.6% (max IQR=3.8%) over r=0–32mm, while 3D dose prediction accuracy averaged from σ=5–8% across the same range. For SRS, from r=0–34mm the training set <δDr> ranged from −3.7% to +1.5% (max IQR=4.4%) while the validation set <δDr> ranged from −2.2% to +5.8% (max IQR=5.3%). 3D dose prediction accuracy averaged σ=2.5% for the training set and σ=4.0% over the same interval. Conclusion: The study demonstrates this technique’s ability to predict achievable 3D dose distributions for VMAT SRS and prostate. Future

  18. Demonstration of DSI-semen--A novel DNA methylation-based forensic semen identification assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserstrom, Adam; Frumkin, Dan; Davidson, Ariane; Shpitzen, Moshe; Herman, Yael; Gafny, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether the source tissue of biological material is semen is important in confirming sexual assaults, which account for a considerable percentage of crime cases. The gold standard for confirming the presence of semen is microscopic identification of sperm cells, however, this method is labor intensive and operator-dependent. Protein-based immunologic assays, such as PSA, are highly sensitive and relatively fast, but suffer from low specificity in some situations. In addition, proteins are less stable than DNA under most environmental insults. Recently, forensic tissue identification advanced with the development of several approaches based on mRNA and miRNA for identification of various body fluids. Herein is described DNA source identifier (DSI)-semen, a DNA-based assay that determines whether the source tissue of a sample is semen based on detection of semen-specific methylation patterns in five genomic loci. The assay is comprised of a simple single tube biochemical procedure, similar to DNA profiling, followed by automatic software analysis, yielding the identification (semen/non-semen) accompanied by a statistical confidence level. Three additional internal control loci are used to ascertain the reliability of the results. The assay, which aims to replace microscopic examination, can easily be integrated by forensic laboratories and is automatable. The kit was tested on 135 samples of semen, saliva, venous blood, menstrual blood, urine, and vaginal swabs and the identification of semen vs. non-semen was correct in all cases. In order to test the assay's applicability in "real-life" situations, 33 actual casework samples from the forensic biological lab of the Israeli police were analyzed, and the results were compared with microscopic examination performed by Israeli police personnel. There was complete concordance between both analyses except for one sample, in which the assay identified semen whereas no sperm was seen in the microscope. This

  19. Preliminary Results of the Ground/Orbiter Lasercomm Demonstration Experiment between Table Mountain and teh ETS-V1 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K. E.; Lesh, J. R.; Araki, K.; Arimoto, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The Ground/Orbiter Lasercomm Demonstration (GOLD) is an optical communications demonstration between the Japanese Engineering Test Satellite (ETS-V1) and an optical ground transmitting and receiving station at the Table Mountain FAcility in Wrightwood California. Laser transmissions to the satellite are performed approximately four hours every third night when the satellite is at apogee above Table Mountain.

  20. Making a Low-Cost Soda Can Ethanol Burner for Out-of-Laboratory Flame Test Demonstrations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Henson L. Lee; Domingo, Perfecto N., Jr.; Yanza, Elliard Roswell S.; Guidote, Armando M., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates how to make a low-cost ethanol burner utilizing soda cans. It burns with a light blue flame suitable for out-of-laboratory flame test demonstrations where interference from a yellow flame needs to be avoided.

  1. Preliminary Results of the Ground/Orbiter Lasercomm Demonstration Experiment between Table Mountain and teh ETS-V1 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K. E.; Lesh, J. R.; Araki, K.; Arimoto, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The Ground/Orbiter Lasercomm Demonstration (GOLD) is an optical communications demonstration between the Japanese Engineering Test Satellite (ETS-V1) and an optical ground transmitting and receiving station at the Table Mountain FAcility in Wrightwood California. Laser transmissions to the satellite are performed approximately four hours every third night when the satellite is at apogee above Table Mountain.

  2. Demonstration of a residential CHP system based on PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliucci, G.; Petruzzi, L.; Cerelli, E.; Garzisi, A.; La Mendola, A.

    Fuel cell-based CHP systems are very attractive for stationary energy generation, since they allow production of electricity and heat in a decentralised, quiet, efficient and environmentally friendly way. As a means of evaluating this new technology, Enel Produzione installed a beta-version fuel cell CHP system, supplied by H-Power, at its experimental area sited in Livorno (Italy), and submitted it to a series of tests. The system is a co-generative unit, converting natural gas into electricity and heat: the former is delivered to local loads using electric load following capability; the latter is delivered to the experimental area hydraulic refrigeration circuit. Experiments were aimed at assessing the suitability of this kind of system to supply Italian residential customers. Factors such as performances, flexibility and operational requirements were evaluated under all the possible operating conditions, both under grid connected and stand alone configurations. At the same time, a mathematical model of the FC/CHP unit was developed to allow for the prediction of system performances and operating parameters under off-design conditions. This model can be used as an effective tool to optimise system operation when a particular customer has to be supplied. Results show that the prototype behaved as expected by a first "proof of concept" system and outline improvements to be achieved in order to satisfy the energy needs of small residential applications.

  3. Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Akerstedt, H; The ATLAS collaboration; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, C; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new read-out system will be installed in one slice of ...

  4. Highlights from a Mach 4 Experimental Demonstration of Inlet Mode Transition for Turbine-Based Combined Cycle Hypersonic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Lancert E.; Saunders, John D., Jr.; Sanders, Bobby W.; Weir, Lois J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is focused on technologies for combined cycle, air-breathing propulsion systems to enable reusable launch systems for access to space. Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion systems offer specific impulse (Isp) improvements over rocket-based propulsion systems in the subsonic takeoff and return mission segments along with improved safety. Among the most critical TBCC enabling technologies are: 1) mode transition from the low speed propulsion system to the high speed propulsion system, 2) high Mach turbine engine development and 3) innovative turbine based combined cycle integration. To address these challenges, NASA initiated an experimental mode transition task including analytical methods to assess the state-of-the-art of propulsion system performance and design codes. One effort has been the Combined-Cycle Engine Large Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE-LIMX) which is a fully integrated TBCC propulsion system with flowpath sizing consistent with previous NASA and DoD proposed Hypersonic experimental flight test plans. This experiment was tested in the NASA GRC 10 by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) Facility. The goal of this activity is to address key hypersonic combined-cycle engine issues including: (1) dual integrated inlet operability and performance issues-unstart constraints, distortion constraints, bleed requirements, and controls, (2) mode-transition sequence elements caused by switching between the turbine and the ramjet/scramjet flowpaths (imposed variable geometry requirements), and (3) turbine engine transients (and associated time scales) during transition. Testing of the initial inlet and dynamic characterization phases were completed and smooth mode transition was demonstrated. A database focused on a Mach 4 transition speed with limited off-design elements was developed and will serve to guide future TBCC system studies and to validate higher level analyses.

  5. Intrinsic unfoldase/foldase activity of the chaperonin GroEL directly demonstrated using multinuclear relaxation-based NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libich, David S.; Tugarinov, Vitali; Clore, G. Marius

    2015-01-01

    The prototypical chaperonin GroEL assists protein folding through an ATP-dependent encapsulation mechanism. The details of how GroEL folds proteins remain elusive, particularly because encapsulation is not an absolute requirement for successful re/folding. Here we make use of a metastable model protein substrate, comprising a triple mutant of Fyn SH3, to directly demonstrate, by simultaneous analysis of three complementary NMR-based relaxation experiments (lifetime line broadening, dark state exchange saturation transfer, and Carr–Purcell–Meinboom–Gill relaxation dispersion), that apo GroEL accelerates the overall interconversion rate between the native state and a well-defined folding intermediate by about 20-fold, under conditions where the “invisible” GroEL-bound states have occupancies below 1%. This is largely achieved through a 500-fold acceleration in the folded-to-intermediate transition of the protein substrate. Catalysis is modulated by a kinetic deuterium isotope effect that reduces the overall interconversion rate between the GroEL-bound species by about 3-fold, indicative of a significant hydrophobic contribution. The location of the GroEL binding site on the folding intermediate, mapped from 15N, 1HN, and 13Cmethyl relaxation dispersion experiments, is composed of a prominent, surface-exposed hydrophobic patch. PMID:26124125

  6. BASE - The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, C; Bojtar, L.; Borchert, M.; Franke, K.A.; Higuchi, T.; Leefer, N.; Nagahama, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Mooser, A.; Niemann, M.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Sellner, S.; Tanaka, T.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) aims at performing a stringent test of the combined charge parity and time reversal (CPT) symmetry by comparing the magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton with high precision. Using single particles in a Penning trap, the proton/antiproton $g$-factors, i.e. the magnetic moment in units of the nuclear magneton, are determined by measuring the respective ratio of the spin-precession frequency to the cyclotron frequency. The spin precession frequency is measured by non-destructive detection of spin quantum transitions using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, and the cyclotron frequency is determined from the particle's motional eigenfrequencies in the Penning trap using the invariance theorem. By application of the double Penning-trap method we expect that in our measurements a fractional precision of $\\delta g/g$ 10$^{-9}$ can be achieved. The successful application of this method to the antiproton will represent a factor 1000 improvement in the frac...

  7. Demonstrating the viability and value of community-based monitoring schemes in catchment science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Eleanor; Parkin, Geoff; Quinn, Paul; Large, Andy

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological catchments are complex systems which need to be monitored over time in order to characterise their behaviour on a local level, model, implement mitigation measures and meet policy targets. Despite hydrometric monitoring techniques being well developed, data is often inadequate within rural areas. Local knowledge and experiences are also vital sources of information in this sector but they are not routinely harvested. Long-term evidence is required to provide stakeholders with confidence and innovation is required to fully engage with and inform the public. Citizen science and volunteered geographical information (VGI) projects are encouraging volunteers to participate in crowdsourcing activities and generate new knowledge, but they have not been fully investigated within catchment science. A citizen science approach has therefore been implemented within the 42km2 Haltwhistle Burn catchment (northern England) using effective engagement techniques. This catchment responds rapidly, experiences flash flood events, and like many, it does not benefit from any traditional monitoring equipment. Participation levels confirm that members of the public do want to monitor their local water environment, with flooding being a key driver. Regular 'River Watch' volunteers and passers-by are sharing their knowledge and monitoring rainfall, river levels, water quality parameters, sediment issues, flood events and performance of flood risk management features. This has enabled a variety of low-cost data collection and submission tools to be tested over a two year period. Training has encouraged good quality data to be collected and volunteers are ready to capture meaningful information during unexpected flood events. Although volunteers are capable of collecting quantitative information, photographs and videos are submitted more readily. Twitter has also been used to share real-time observations successfully. A traditional monitoring network has been running in parallel

  8. Medium-Range Predictability of Contrail-Cirrus Demonstrated during Experiments Ml-Cirrus and Access-Ii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Contrail Cirrus Prediction model CoCiP (doi:10.5194/gmd-5-543-2012) has been applied quasi operationally to predict contrails for flight planning of ML-CIRRUS (C. Voigt, DLR, et al.) in Europe and for ACCESS II in California (B. Anderson, NASA, et al.) in March-May 2014. The model uses NWP data from ECMWF and past airtraffic data (actual traffic data are used for analysis). The forecasts provided a sequence of hourly forecast maps of contrail cirrus optical depth for 3.5 days, every 12 h. CoCiP has been compared to observations before, e.g. within a global climate-aerosol-contrail model (Schumann, Penner et al., ACPD, 2015, doi:10.5194/acpd-15-19553-2015). Good predictions would allow for climate optimal routing (see, e.g., US patent by Mannstein and Schumann, US 2012/0173147 A1). The predictions are tested by: 1) Local eyewitness reports and photos, 2) satellite observed cloudiness, 3) autocorrelation analysis of predictions for various forecast periods, 4) comparisons of computed with observed optical depth from COCS (doi:10.5194/amt-7-3233-2014, 2014) by IR METEOSAT-SEVIRI observations over Europe. The results demonstrate medium-range predictability of contrail cirrus to a useful degree for given traffic, soot emissions, and high-quality NWP data. A growing set of satellite, Lidar, and in-situ data from ML-CIRRUS and ACCENT are becoming available and will be used to further test the forecast quality. The autocorrelation of optical depth predictions is near 70% for 3-d forecasts for Europe (outside times with high Sahara dust loads), and only slightly smaller for continental USA. Contrail cirrus is abundant over Europe and USA. More than 1/3 of all cirrus measured with the research aircraft HALO during ML-CIRRUS was impacted by contrails. The radiative forcing (RF) is strongly daytime and ambience dependent. The net annual mean RF, based on our global studies, may reach up to 0.08 W/m2 globally, and may well exceed 1 W/m2 regionally, with maximum over Europe

  9. Field demonstration for bioremediation treatment: Technology demonstration of soil vapor extraction off-gas at McClellan Air Force Base. Final report November 1997--April 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magar, V.S.; Tonga, P.; Webster, T.; Drescher, E.

    1999-01-12

    McClellan Air Force Base (AFB) is a National Test Location designated through the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), and was selected as the candidate test site for a demonstration of soil vapor extraction (SVE) off-gas treatment technology. A two-stage reactor system was employed for the treatment of the off-gas. The biological treatment was conducted at Operable Unit (OU) D Site S, located approximately 400 ft southwest of Building 1093. The SVE system at this area normally operates at a nominal volumetric flowrate of approximately 500 to 600 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm). The contaminated air stream from the SVE system that was fed to the reactor system operated at a flowrate of 5 to 10 scfm. The two-stage reactor system consisted of a fixed-film biofilter followed by a completely mixed (by continuous stirring), suspended-growth biological reactor. This reactor configuration was based on a review of the literature, on characterization of the off-gas from the SVE system being operated at McClellan AFB, and on the results of the laboratory study conducted by Battelle and Envirogen for this study.

  10. Network Science Based Quantification of Resilience Demonstrated on the Indian Railways Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Udit; Kumar, Devashish; Kodra, Evan; Ganguly, Auroop R

    2015-01-01

    The structure, interdependence, and fragility of systems ranging from power-grids and transportation to ecology, climate, biology and even human communities and the Internet have been examined through network science. While response to perturbations has been quantified, recovery strategies for perturbed networks have usually been either discussed conceptually or through anecdotal case studies. Here we develop a network science based quantitative framework for measuring, comparing and interpreting hazard responses as well as recovery strategies. The framework, motivated by the recently proposed temporal resilience paradigm, is demonstrated with the Indian Railways Network. Simulations inspired by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami and the 2012 North Indian blackout as well as a cyber-physical attack scenario illustrate hazard responses and effectiveness of proposed recovery strategies. Multiple metrics are used to generate various recovery strategies, which are simply sequences in which system components should be recovered after a disruption. Quantitative evaluation of these strategies suggests that faster and more efficient recovery is possible through network centrality measures. Optimal recovery strategies may be different per hazard, per community within a network, and for different measures of partial recovery. In addition, topological characterization provides a means for interpreting the comparative performance of proposed recovery strategies. The methods can be directly extended to other Large-Scale Critical Lifeline Infrastructure Networks including transportation, water, energy and communications systems that are threatened by natural or human-induced hazards, including cascading failures. Furthermore, the quantitative framework developed here can generalize across natural, engineered and human systems, offering an actionable and generalizable approach for emergency management in particular as well as for network resilience in general.

  11. Network Science Based Quantification of Resilience Demonstrated on the Indian Railways Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udit Bhatia

    Full Text Available The structure, interdependence, and fragility of systems ranging from power-grids and transportation to ecology, climate, biology and even human communities and the Internet have been examined through network science. While response to perturbations has been quantified, recovery strategies for perturbed networks have usually been either discussed conceptually or through anecdotal case studies. Here we develop a network science based quantitative framework for measuring, comparing and interpreting hazard responses as well as recovery strategies. The framework, motivated by the recently proposed temporal resilience paradigm, is demonstrated with the Indian Railways Network. Simulations inspired by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami and the 2012 North Indian blackout as well as a cyber-physical attack scenario illustrate hazard responses and effectiveness of proposed recovery strategies. Multiple metrics are used to generate various recovery strategies, which are simply sequences in which system components should be recovered after a disruption. Quantitative evaluation of these strategies suggests that faster and more efficient recovery is possible through network centrality measures. Optimal recovery strategies may be different per hazard, per community within a network, and for different measures of partial recovery. In addition, topological characterization provides a means for interpreting the comparative performance of proposed recovery strategies. The methods can be directly extended to other Large-Scale Critical Lifeline Infrastructure Networks including transportation, water, energy and communications systems that are threatened by natural or human-induced hazards, including cascading failures. Furthermore, the quantitative framework developed here can generalize across natural, engineered and human systems, offering an actionable and generalizable approach for emergency management in particular as well as for network resilience in general.

  12. Web services-based text-mining demonstrates broad impacts for interoperability and process simplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegers, Thomas C; Davis, Allan Peter; Mattingly, Carolyn J

    2014-01-01

    The Critical Assessment of Information Extraction systems in Biology (BioCreAtIvE) challenge evaluation tasks collectively represent a community-wide effort to evaluate a variety of text-mining and information extraction systems applied to the biological domain. The BioCreative IV Workshop included five independent subject areas, including Track 3, which focused on named-entity recognition (NER) for the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org). Previously, CTD had organized document ranking and NER-related tasks for the BioCreative Workshop 2012; a key finding of that effort was that interoperability and integration complexity were major impediments to the direct application of the systems to CTD's text-mining pipeline. This underscored a prevailing problem with software integration efforts. Major interoperability-related issues included lack of process modularity, operating system incompatibility, tool configuration complexity and lack of standardization of high-level inter-process communications. One approach to potentially mitigate interoperability and general integration issues is the use of Web services to abstract implementation details; rather than integrating NER tools directly, HTTP-based calls from CTD's asynchronous, batch-oriented text-mining pipeline could be made to remote NER Web services for recognition of specific biological terms using BioC (an emerging family of XML formats) for inter-process communications. To test this concept, participating groups developed Representational State Transfer /BioC-compliant Web services tailored to CTD's NER requirements. Participants were provided with a comprehensive set of training materials. CTD evaluated results obtained from the remote Web service-based URLs against a test data set of 510 manually curated scientific articles. Twelve groups participated in the challenge. Recall, precision, balanced F-scores and response times were calculated. Top balanced F-scores for gene, chemical and

  13. A Course at the Master Level Demonstrating Quality Assurance by Spectrophotometric Determination of Iron in two experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In two experiments, the first a batch determination of iron, and the second determination of iron by flow injection analysis, the students perform a number of repetitions. The measurements were repeated until it became possible to estimate which one of the two methods exhibited the better perform...

  14. A home-based individualized information communication technology training program for older adults: a demonstration of effectiveness and value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthanat, Sajay; Vroman, Kerryellen G; Lysack, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness and value of a home-based information communication technology (ICT) training program for older adults. Thirteen older adults were provided in-home ICT training by graduate occupational therapy students using an iPad. The breadth and frequency of ICT use, perspectives on technology, and perceived independence were recorded at baseline, during the 3-month training and at follow-up, along with an end-of-study questionnaire. Non-parametric Friedman analysis was conducted to verify trends in the outcome measures. The qualitative data were examined by content analysis. Participants' breadth of ICT activities showed a significant trend across 6 months. Leisure accounted for the significant increase, while health management and social connections activities increased modestly. A positive trend in participants' perspectives on technology was evident along with a marginal increase in perceived independence. Participants' perspectives were thematically categorized as technology experiences, interactions with coach, training approach, and specific activities. As reflection of the training program's value, 12 of the 13 participants took ownership of the iPad at the end of the study. Building capacity of older adults to utilize the multifaceted potential of ICT is critical in addressing declines in health, impending disabilities, and social isolation. Implications for Rehabilitation A one-on-one home-based individualized information communication technology (ICT) training program for older adults could result in a progressive increase in the breadth of online activities carried out by them. Specifically, the increase in their usage of ICT could be expected in leisure-based online activities. Individualized training programs designed based on needs, priorities, and learning style of older adults could have a positive impact on their technological perspectives and intrinsic motivation to adopt ICT.

  15. Demonstration of low-loss electron beam transport and mm-wave experiments of the fusion-FEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, W. H.; Bongers, W. A.; van Dijk, G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; de Kruif, R.; Manintveld, P.; Pluygers, J.; Poelman, A. J.; Schüller, F. C.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Valentini, M.; van der Wiel, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    In the Fusion-FEM electrostatic Free Electron Maser, an electron beam loss current of less than 0.2% is essential for long-pulse operation. At reduced beam current, 3 A instead of the nominal 12 A, we have demonstrated electron beam acceleration and transport through the undulator at current losses

  16. Reduction of Mental Distress in the Dissection Course by Introducing the Body Donor Experience through Anatomical Demonstrations of Organ Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockers, Anja; Baader, Christoph; Fassnacht, Ulrich Kai; Ochsner, Wolfgang; Bockers, Tobias Maria

    2012-01-01

    The practice of dissection teaches students not only the foundations of anatomical knowledge but also encourages the development of professional competencies. Yet, the dissection of cadavers in the gross anatomy course can be a stress factor for medical students. There are a minor proportion of students who demonstrate strong emotional reactions…

  17. Reduction of Mental Distress in the Dissection Course by Introducing the Body Donor Experience through Anatomical Demonstrations of Organ Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockers, Anja; Baader, Christoph; Fassnacht, Ulrich Kai; Ochsner, Wolfgang; Bockers, Tobias Maria

    2012-01-01

    The practice of dissection teaches students not only the foundations of anatomical knowledge but also encourages the development of professional competencies. Yet, the dissection of cadavers in the gross anatomy course can be a stress factor for medical students. There are a minor proportion of students who demonstrate strong emotional reactions…

  18. Nurses', midwives' and key stakeholders' experiences and perceptions on requirements to demonstrate the maintenance of professional competence.

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Mary; Cooney, Adeline; O'Connell, Rhona; Hegarty, Josephine; Brady, Anne-Marie; O'Reilly, Pauline; Kennedy, Catriona; Heffernan, Elizabeth; Fealy, Gerard; McNamara, Martin; O' Connor, Laserina

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To present the qualitative findings from a study on the development of scheme(s) to give evidence of maintenance of professional competence for nurses and midwives. Background: Key issues in maintenance of professional competence include notions of self- assessment, verification of engagement and practice hours, provision of an evidential record, the role of the employer and articulation of possible consequences for non-adherence with the requirements. Schemes to demonstrate the maintena...

  19. An Evaluation and Demonstration of a Network Based Aircraft Telemetry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldersen, Matt; Schnarr, Otto, III

    2017-01-01

    The primary topics of this presentation describe the testing of network based telemetry and RF modulation techniques. The overall intend is to aid the aerospace industry in transitioning to a network based telemetry system.

  20. DOD Joint Bases: Implementation Challenges Demonstrate Need to Reevaluate the Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    joint basing initiative as the mechanism through which it could achieve greater economies of scale and savings by consolidating and eliminating...questions differently than we intended, we pretested the questionnaire with knowledgeable representatives from four joint bases .3...Special Operations Command Units to Cannon Air Force Base , New Mexico . GAO-08-244R. Washington, D.C.: January 18, 2008. Military Base Realignments and

  1. Development of a thiol-ene based screening platform for enzyme immobilization demonstrated using horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Pinelo, Manuel; Woodley, John

    2017-01-01

    Efficient immobilization of enzymes on support surfaces requires an exact match between the surface chemistry and the specific enzyme. A successful match would normally be identified through time consuming screening of conventional resins in multiple experiments testing individual immobilization ...... is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......Efficient immobilization of enzymes on support surfaces requires an exact match between the surface chemistry and the specific enzyme. A successful match would normally be identified through time consuming screening of conventional resins in multiple experiments testing individual immobilization...

  2. 大学物理课堂演示实验应定位在科学性实验%The University Physics Classroom Demonstration Experiment Should be Positioned in Scientific Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    At present , the demonstration experiment of college physics is often used to demonstrate the physical phenomenon , which doesn’t fully play the role of the demonstration experiment . Demonstration experiment should be positioned in scientific experiments .The classroom demonstration experiment design should reflect the strictness and scientific nature .The demonstration experiment not only verifies the theory knowledge , but also lets students learn the scientific analysis method and experimental method .As the main body of college physics demonstration experiment ,students should participate in the demonstration experiment operation ,data acquisition and analysis ;Teachers in the classroom is mainly to question ,inspire thinking and guide the debate , and acts as the experiment operator and guides the student .%目前大学物理课堂教学中演示实验通常用于演示物理现象,没有充分发挥出演示实验的作用。本文指出,演示实验应定位在科学性实验。为此,课堂演示实验的设计要体现出物理的严密性、科学性,在验证理论知识的同时,让学生也学会科学的分析方法与实验方法。学生应作为大学物理演示实验的主体,参与到演示实验的操作、数据采集、分析中;教师在课堂教学中主要是提出问题、启发思路和引导争论,充当实验操作员与引导学生的角色。

  3. Demonstration of polarization sensitivity of emulsion-based pair conversion telescope for cosmic gamma-ray polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ozaki, Keita; Aoki, Shigeki; Kamada, Keiki; Kaneyama, Taichi; Nakagawa, Ryo; Rokujo, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Linear polarization of high-energy gamma-rays (10 MeV-100 GeV) can be detected by measuring the azimuthal angle of electron-positron pairs and observing the modulation of the azimuthal distribution. To demonstrate the gamma-ray polarization sensitivity of emulsion, we conducted a test using a polarized gamma-ray beam at SPring-8/LEPS. Emulsion tracks were reconstructed using scanning data, and gamma-ray events were selected automatically. Using an optical microscope, out of the 2381 gamma-ray conversions that were observed, 1372 remained after event selection, on the azimuthal angle distribution of which we measured the modulation. From the distribution of the azimuthal angles of the selected events, a modulation factor of 0.21 + 0.11 - 0.09 was measured, from which the detection of a non-zero modulation was established with a significance of 3.06 $\\sigma$. This attractive polarimeter will be applied to the GRAINE project, a balloon-borne experiment that observes cosmic gamma-rays with an emulsion-based pair ...

  4. Demonstration of Tokamak ohmic flux saving by transient coaxial helicity injection in the national spherical torus experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R; Mueller, D; Nelson, B A; Jarboe, T R; Gerhardt, S; Kugel, H W; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Menard, J; Ono, M; Paul, S; Roquemore, L; Sabbagh, S; Soukhanovskii, V

    2010-03-05

    Transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) started discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have attained peak currents up to 300 kA and when coupled to induction, it has produced up to 200 kA additional current over inductive-only operation. CHI in NSTX has shown to be energetically quite efficient, producing a plasma current of about 10 A/J of capacitor bank energy. In addition, for the first time, the CHI-produced toroidal current that couples to induction continues to increase with the energy supplied by the CHI power supply at otherwise similar values of the injector flux, indicating the potential for substantial current generation capability by CHI in NSTX and in future toroidal devices.

  5. Academic Success in Context-Based Chemistry: Demonstrating Fluid Transitions between Concepts and Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna Therese; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum developers and researchers have promoted context-based programmes to arrest waning student interest and participation in the enabling sciences at high school and university. Context-based programmes aim for student connections between scientific discourse and real-world contexts to elevate curricular relevance without diminishing…

  6. Academic Success in Context-Based Chemistry: Demonstrating Fluid Transitions between Concepts and Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna Therese; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum developers and researchers have promoted context-based programmes to arrest waning student interest and participation in the enabling sciences at high school and university. Context-based programmes aim for student connections between scientific discourse and real-world contexts to elevate curricular relevance without diminishing…

  7. Demonstration of Market-Based Real-Time Electricity Pricing on a Congested Feeder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Emil Mahler; Pinson, Pierre; le Ray, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Congestion management can delay grid reinforcements needed due to the growth of distributed technologies like photovoltaics and electric vehicles. This paper presents a method of congestion management for low voltage feeders using indirect control from the smart grid demonstration EcoGrid EU, where...... five minute electricity pricing is sent to demand. A method for forecasting demand and generating prices in a market framework is presented, and a novel mechanism to ensure prices are fair to customers who can and cannot participate is developed. The proposed market is currently being used to send...... prices to 1900 houses, with a virtual feeder of 28 houses receiving congestion pricing. Simulations are used to calculate the cost from using this congestion management method, while demonstration results indicate that congestion can be managed successfully....

  8. Community-based benchmarking of the CMIP DECK experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleckler, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    A diversity of community-based efforts are independently developing "diagnostic packages" with little or no coordination between them. A short list of examples include NCAR's Climate Variability Diagnostics Package (CVDP), ORNL's International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB), LBNL's Toolkit for Extreme Climate Analysis (TECA), PCMDI's Metrics Package (PMP), the EU EMBRACE ESMValTool, the WGNE MJO diagnostics package, and CFMIP diagnostics. The full value of these efforts cannot be realized without some coordination. As a first step, a WCRP effort has initiated a catalog to document candidate packages that could potentially be applied in a "repeat-use" fashion to all simulations contributed to the CMIP DECK (Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima) experiments. Some coordination of community-based diagnostics has the additional potential to improve how CMIP modeling groups analyze their simulations during model-development. The fact that most modeling groups now maintain a "CMIP compliant" data stream means that in principal without much effort they could readily adopt a set of well organized diagnostic capabilities specifically designed to operate on CMIP DECK experiments. Ultimately, a detailed listing of and access to analysis codes that are demonstrated to work "out of the box" with CMIP data could enable model developers (and others) to select those codes they wish to implement in-house, potentially enabling more systematic evaluation during the model development process.

  9. A Graphical Simulation of Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium for Use as an Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment and to Demonstrate the Concept of Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David L.; Terry, Ronald E.

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrating petroleum engineering concepts in undergraduate laboratories often requires expensive and time-consuming experiments. To eliminate these problems, a graphical simulation technique was developed for junior-level laboratories which illustrate vapor-liquid equilibrium and the use of mathematical modeling. A description of this…

  10. HyperOncology: demonstration of an evolving comprehensive hypermedia-based workstation for the radiation oncologist.

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, P. A.; Foxlee, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    HyperOncology is a prototype hypermedia-based workstation designed for the practicing radiation oncologist. Individual patient records consist of linked demographic, clinical history, presentation, staging, course, laboratory and treatment data. Searching and sorting capabilities, navigational aids, information printing and archiving, plotting capability, and graphics and updating tools are available. Upon integration with an evolving knowledge base, HyperOncology will eventually become a com...

  11. An evaluation capacity building toolkit for principal investigators of undergraduate research experiences: A demonstration of transforming theory into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorrer, Audrey S

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the approach and process undertaken to develop evaluation capacity among the leaders of a federally funded undergraduate research program. An evaluation toolkit was developed for Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering(1) Research Experiences for Undergraduates(2) (CISE REU) programs to address the ongoing need for evaluation capacity among principal investigators who manage program evaluation. The toolkit was the result of collaboration within the CISE REU community with the purpose being to provide targeted instructional resources and tools for quality program evaluation. Challenges were to balance the desire for standardized assessment with the responsibility to account for individual program contexts. Toolkit contents included instructional materials about evaluation practice, a standardized applicant management tool, and a modulated outcomes measure. Resulting benefits from toolkit deployment were having cost effective, sustainable evaluation tools, a community evaluation forum, and aggregate measurement of key program outcomes for the national program. Lessons learned included the imperative of understanding the evaluation context, engaging stakeholders, and building stakeholder trust. Results from project measures are presented along with a discussion of guidelines for facilitating evaluation capacity building that will serve a variety of contexts.

  12. DEMONSTRATION OF EQUIVALENCY OF CANE AND SOFTWOOD BASED CELOTEX FOR MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, R; Jason Varble, J

    2008-05-27

    Cane-based Celotex{trademark} has been used extensively in various Department of Energy (DOE) packages as a thermal insulator and impact absorber. Cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard was only manufactured by Knight-Celotex Fiberboard at their Marrero Plant in Louisiana. However, Knight-Celotex Fiberboard shut down their Marrero Plant in early 2007 due to impacts from hurricane Katrina and other economic factors. Therefore, cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is no longer available for use in the manufacture of new shipping packages requiring the material as a component. Current consolidation plans for the DOE Complex require the procurement of several thousand new Model 9975 shipping packages requiring cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard. Therefore, an alternative to cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is needed. Knight-Celotex currently manufactures Celotex{trademark} fiberboard from other cellulosic materials, such as hardwood and softwood. A review of the relevant literature has shown that softwood-based Celotex{trademark} meets all parameters important to the Model 9975 shipping package.

  13. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT.

  14. Multi-objectives fuzzy optimization model for ship form demonstration based on information entropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Selecting optimization ship form scheme is an important content in the process of concept design of ship. Multi-objective fuzzy decision-making model for ship form demonstration is set up according to the fuzzy pattern-recognition theory. Weight coefficients of each target of ship form scheme are determined by information entropy and individual subjective partiality. This model is used to select the optimal ship form scheme,the example shows that the model is exact and the result is credible. It can provide a reference for choosing the optimization scheme of ship form.

  15. Spin based heat engine: demonstration of multiple rounds of algorithmic cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, C A; Moussa, O; Baugh, J; Laflamme, R

    2008-04-11

    We experimentally demonstrate multiple rounds of heat-bath algorithmic cooling in a 3 qubit solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor. By pumping entropy into a heat bath, we are able to surpass the closed system limit of the Shannon bound and purify a single qubit to 1.69 times the heat-bath polarization. The algorithm combines both high fidelity coherent control and a deliberate interaction with the environment. Given this level of quantum control in systems with larger reset polarizations, nearly pure qubits should be achievable.

  16. Natural experiment demonstrates that bird loss leads to cessation of dispersal of native seeds from intact to degraded forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, Eleanor M; Jennings, Summer B; Hillerislambers, Janneke; Tewksbury, Joshua J; Rogers, Haldre S

    2013-01-01

    In healthy forests, vertebrate frugivores move seeds from intact to degraded forests, aiding in the passive regeneration of degraded forests. Yet vertebrate frugivores are declining around the world, and little is known about the impact of this loss on regeneration of degraded areas. Here, we use a unique natural experiment to assess how complete vertebrate frugivore loss affects native seed rain in degraded forest. All native vertebrate frugivores (which were primarily avian frugivores) have been functionally extirpated from the island of Guam by the invasive brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis), whereas the nearby island of Saipan has a relatively intact vertebrate frugivore community. We captured seed rain along transects extending from intact into degraded forest and compared the species richness, density and condition of the seed rain from native bird-dispersed tree species between the two islands. Considering seeds from native bird-dispersed species, approximately 1.66 seeds landed per 26 days in each square meter of degraded forest on Saipan, whereas zero seeds landed per 26 days per square meter in degraded forest on Guam. Additionally, on Saipan, 69% of native bird-dispersed seeds in intact forest and 77% of seeds in degraded forest lacked fleshy fruit pulp, suggesting ingestion by birds, compared to 0% of all seeds on Guam. Our results show an absence of seed rain in degraded forests on Guam, correlated with the absence of birds, whereas on Saipan, frugivorous birds regularly disperse seeds into degraded forests, providing a mechanism for re-colonization by native plants. These results suggest that loss of frugivores will slow regeneration of degraded forests on Guam.

  17. Natural experiment demonstrates that bird loss leads to cessation of dispersal of native seeds from intact to degraded forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor M Caves

    Full Text Available In healthy forests, vertebrate frugivores move seeds from intact to degraded forests, aiding in the passive regeneration of degraded forests. Yet vertebrate frugivores are declining around the world, and little is known about the impact of this loss on regeneration of degraded areas. Here, we use a unique natural experiment to assess how complete vertebrate frugivore loss affects native seed rain in degraded forest. All native vertebrate frugivores (which were primarily avian frugivores have been functionally extirpated from the island of Guam by the invasive brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis, whereas the nearby island of Saipan has a relatively intact vertebrate frugivore community. We captured seed rain along transects extending from intact into degraded forest and compared the species richness, density and condition of the seed rain from native bird-dispersed tree species between the two islands. Considering seeds from native bird-dispersed species, approximately 1.66 seeds landed per 26 days in each square meter of degraded forest on Saipan, whereas zero seeds landed per 26 days per square meter in degraded forest on Guam. Additionally, on Saipan, 69% of native bird-dispersed seeds in intact forest and 77% of seeds in degraded forest lacked fleshy fruit pulp, suggesting ingestion by birds, compared to 0% of all seeds on Guam. Our results show an absence of seed rain in degraded forests on Guam, correlated with the absence of birds, whereas on Saipan, frugivorous birds regularly disperse seeds into degraded forests, providing a mechanism for re-colonization by native plants. These results suggest that loss of frugivores will slow regeneration of degraded forests on Guam.

  18. Natural Experiment Demonstrates That Bird Loss Leads to Cessation of Dispersal of Native Seeds from Intact to Degraded Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Rogers, Haldre S.

    2013-01-01

    In healthy forests, vertebrate frugivores move seeds from intact to degraded forests, aiding in the passive regeneration of degraded forests. Yet vertebrate frugivores are declining around the world, and little is known about the impact of this loss on regeneration of degraded areas. Here, we use a unique natural experiment to assess how complete vertebrate frugivore loss affects native seed rain in degraded forest. All native vertebrate frugivores (which were primarily avian frugivores) have been functionally extirpated from the island of Guam by the invasive brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis), whereas the nearby island of Saipan has a relatively intact vertebrate frugivore community. We captured seed rain along transects extending from intact into degraded forest and compared the species richness, density and condition of the seed rain from native bird-dispersed tree species between the two islands. Considering seeds from native bird-dispersed species, approximately 1.66 seeds landed per 26 days in each square meter of degraded forest on Saipan, whereas zero seeds landed per 26 days per square meter in degraded forest on Guam. Additionally, on Saipan, 69% of native bird-dispersed seeds in intact forest and 77% of seeds in degraded forest lacked fleshy fruit pulp, suggesting ingestion by birds, compared to 0% of all seeds on Guam. Our results show an absence of seed rain in degraded forests on Guam, correlated with the absence of birds, whereas on Saipan, frugivorous birds regularly disperse seeds into degraded forests, providing a mechanism for re-colonization by native plants. These results suggest that loss of frugivores will slow regeneration of degraded forests on Guam. PMID:23741503

  19. Application based on ArcObject inquiry and Google maps demonstration to real estate database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, JinTsong

    2007-06-01

    Real estate industry in Taiwan has been flourishing in recent years. To acquire various and abundant information of real estate for sale is the same goal for the consumers and the brokerages. Therefore, before looking at the property, it is important to get all pertinent information possible. Not only this beneficial for the real estate agent as they can provide the sellers with the most information, thereby solidifying the interest of the buyer, but may also save time and the cost of manpower were something out of place. Most of the brokerage sites are aware of utilizes Internet as form of media for publicity however; the contents are limited to specific property itself and the functions of query are mostly just provided searching by condition. This paper proposes a query interface on website which gives function of zone query by spatial analysis for non-GIS users, developing a user-friendly interface with ArcObject in VB6, and query by condition. The inquiry results can show on the web page which is embedded functions of Google Maps and the UrMap API on it. In addition, the demonstration of inquiry results will give the multimedia present way which includes hyperlink to Google Earth with surrounding of the property, the Virtual Reality scene of house, panorama of interior of building and so on. Therefore, the website provides extra spatial solution for query and demonstration abundant information of real estate in two-dimensional and three-dimensional types of view.

  20. Demonstration of integrated polarization rotator based on an asymmetric silicon waveguide with a trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yudeuk; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Moon-Hyeok; Lee, Min Hee; Yoo, Dong Eun; Kim, Ki Nam; Jeon, Sang Chul; Kim, Kyong Hon

    2016-09-01

    An integrated polarization rotator is demonstrated experimentally by forming a strip waveguide with an asymmetric trench on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The trench is located asymmetrically in the strip waveguide. It induces the evolution of an orthogonal polarization mode upon a linearly polarized beam input, and thus causes polarization rotation. The device is fabricated using a conventional complementary metal oxide semiconductor process with a single dry etching step. The fabricated device shows a maximum transverse electric (TE)-to-transverse magnetic (TM) polarization conversion efficiency of 21.3 dB and an insertion loss of -0.95 dB at a 1550 nm wavelength with a device length of 67 μm. The device exhibits a polarization conversion efficiency and insertion loss of 21.1 dB and -2.12 dB, respectively, for the TM-to-TE polarization conversion. The optimum parameters for the waveguide size and trench size are investigated by performing numerical simulations, and by demonstrating experimental fabrication and measurement.

  1. Feasibility of a multi-purpose demonstration neutron source based on a compact superconducting spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemaut, C., E-mail: christophe.guillemaut@ccfe.ac.uk [Insituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Ciudad Universitaria, 04511 Coyoacán, D.F. (Mexico); Herrera Velázquez, J.J.E. [Insituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Ciudad Universitaria, 04511 Coyoacán, D.F. (Mexico); Suarez, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Asociación EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Tokamak neutron sources would allow near term applications of fusion such as fusion–fission hybrid reactors, elimination of nuclear wastes, production of radio-isotopes for nuclear medicine, material testing and tritium production. The generation of neutrons with fusion plasmas does not require energetic efficiency; thus, nowadays tokamak technologies would be sufficient for such purposes. This paper presents some key technical details of a compact (∼1.8 m{sup 3} of plasma) superconducting spherical tokamak neutron source (STNS), which aims to demonstrate the capabilities of such a device for the different possible applications already mentioned. The T-11 transport model was implemented in ASTRA for 1.5 D simulations of heat and particle transport in the STNS core plasma. According to the model predictions, total neutron production rates of the order of ∼10{sup 15} s{sup −1} and ∼10{sup 13} s{sup −1} can be achieved with deuterium/tritium and deuterium/deuterium respectively, with 9 MW of heating power, 1.4 T of toroidal magnetic field and 1.5 MA of plasma current. Engineering estimates indicate that such scenario could be maintained during ∼20 s and repeated every ∼5 min. The viability of most of tokamak neutron source applications could be demonstrated with a few of these cycles and around ∼100 cycles would be required in the worst cases.

  2. Academic Success in Context-Based Chemistry: Demonstrating fluid transitions between concepts and context

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna Therese; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2013-05-01

    Curriculum developers and researchers have promoted context-based programmes to arrest waning student interest and participation in the enabling sciences at high school and university. Context-based programmes aim for student connections between scientific discourse and real-world contexts to elevate curricular relevance without diminishing conceptual understanding. This interpretive study explored the learning transactions in one 11th grade context-based chemistry classroom where the context was the local creek. The dialectic of agency/structure was used as a lens to examine how the practices in classroom interactions afforded students the agency for learning. The results suggest that first, fluid transitions were evident in the student-student interactions involving successful students; and second, fluid transitions linking concepts to context were evident in the students' successful reports. The study reveals that the structures of writing and collaborating in groups enabled students' agential and fluent movement between the field of the real-world creek and the field of the formal chemistry classroom. Furthermore, characteristics of academically successful students in context-based chemistry are highlighted. Research, teaching, and future directions for context-based science teaching are discussed.

  3. Experimental Demonstration of Higher Precision Weak-Value-Based Metrology Using Power Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Tao; Tang, Jian-Shun; Hu, Gang; Wang, Jian; Yu, Shang; Zhou, Zong-Quan; Cheng, Ze-Di; Xu, Jin-Shi; Fang, Sen-Zhi; Wu, Qing-Lin; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-12-01

    The weak-value-based metrology is very promising and has attracted a lot of attention in recent years because of its remarkable ability in signal amplification. However, it is suggested that the upper limit of the precision of this metrology cannot exceed that of classical metrology because of the low sample size caused by the probe loss during postselection. Nevertheless, a recent proposal shows that this probe loss can be reduced by the power-recycling technique, and thus enhance the precision of weak-value-based metrology. Here we experimentally realize the power-recycled interferometric weak-value-based beam-deflection measurement and obtain the amplitude of the detected signal and white noise by discrete Fourier transform. Our results show that the detected signal can be strengthened by power recycling, and the power-recycled weak-value-based signal-to-noise ratio can surpass the upper limit of the classical scheme, corresponding to the shot-noise limit. This work sheds light on higher precision metrology and explores the real advantage of the weak-value-based metrology over classical metrology.

  4. Varietal Dynamics and Yam Agro-Diversity Demonstrate Complex Trajectories Intersecting Farmers’ Strategies, Networks, and Disease Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Laurent; Cornet, Denis; Blazy, Jean-Marc; Alleyne, Angela; Barthe, Emilie; Bussière, François; Guyader, Sébastien; Pavis, Claudie; Pétro, Dalila

    2016-01-01

    Loss of varietal diversity is a worldwide challenge to crop species at risk for genetic erosion, while the loss of biological resources may hinder future breeding objectives. Loss of varieties has been mostly investigated in traditional agricultural systems where variety numbers are dramatically high, or for most economically important crop species for which comparison between pre-intensive and modern agriculture was possible. Varietal dynamics, i.e., turnover, or gains and losses of varieties by farmers, is nevertheless more rarely studied and while we currently have good estimates of genetic or varietal diversity for most crop species, we have less information as to how on farm agro-diversity changes and what cause its dynamics. We therefore investigated varietal dynamics in the agricultural yam system in the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe. We interviewed producers about varieties they cultivated in the past compared to their current varieties, in addition to characterizing yam cropping characteristics and both farm level and producers socio-economic features. We then used regression tree analyses to investigate the components of yam agro-diversity, varietal dynamics and impact of anthracnose on varieties. Our data demonstrated that no dramatic loss of varieties occurred within the last decades. Cultivation changes mostly affected widespread cultivars while frequency of uncommon varieties stayed relatively stable. Varietal dynamics nevertheless followed sub-regional patterns, and socio-economic influences such as producer age or farm crop diversity. Recurrent anthracnose epidemics since the 1970s did not alter varietal dynamics strongly, but sometimes translated into transition from Dioscorea alata to less susceptible species or into a decrease of yam cultivation. Factors affecting changes in agro-diversity were not relating to agronomy in our study, and surprisingly there were different processes delineating short term from long term varietal dynamics

  5. Varietal Dynamics and Yam Agro-Diversity Demonstrate Complex Trajectories Intersecting Farmers' Strategies, Networks, and Disease Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Laurent; Cornet, Denis; Blazy, Jean-Marc; Alleyne, Angela; Barthe, Emilie; Bussière, François; Guyader, Sébastien; Pavis, Claudie; Pétro, Dalila

    2016-01-01

    Loss of varietal diversity is a worldwide challenge to crop species at risk for genetic erosion, while the loss of biological resources may hinder future breeding objectives. Loss of varieties has been mostly investigated in traditional agricultural systems where variety numbers are dramatically high, or for most economically important crop species for which comparison between pre-intensive and modern agriculture was possible. Varietal dynamics, i.e., turnover, or gains and losses of varieties by farmers, is nevertheless more rarely studied and while we currently have good estimates of genetic or varietal diversity for most crop species, we have less information as to how on farm agro-diversity changes and what cause its dynamics. We therefore investigated varietal dynamics in the agricultural yam system in the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe. We interviewed producers about varieties they cultivated in the past compared to their current varieties, in addition to characterizing yam cropping characteristics and both farm level and producers socio-economic features. We then used regression tree analyses to investigate the components of yam agro-diversity, varietal dynamics and impact of anthracnose on varieties. Our data demonstrated that no dramatic loss of varieties occurred within the last decades. Cultivation changes mostly affected widespread cultivars while frequency of uncommon varieties stayed relatively stable. Varietal dynamics nevertheless followed sub-regional patterns, and socio-economic influences such as producer age or farm crop diversity. Recurrent anthracnose epidemics since the 1970s did not alter varietal dynamics strongly, but sometimes translated into transition from Dioscorea alata to less susceptible species or into a decrease of yam cultivation. Factors affecting changes in agro-diversity were not relating to agronomy in our study, and surprisingly there were different processes delineating short term from long term varietal dynamics

  6. Landscape-based population viability models demonstrate importance of strategic conservation planning for birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas W. Bonnot; Frank R. Thompson; Joshua J. Millspaugh; D. Todd. Jones-Farland

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to conserve regional biodiversity in the face of global climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation will depend on approaches that consider population processes at multiple scales. By combining habitat and demographic modeling, landscape-based population viability models effectively relate small-scale habitat and landscape patterns to regional population...

  7. Single acquisition electrical property mapping based on relative coil sensitivities: A proof-of-concept demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques, J.P.; Sodickson, D.K.; Ipek, O.; Collins, C.M.; Gruetter, R.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeAll methods presented to date to map both conductivity and permittivity rely on multiple acquisitions to compute quantitatively the magnitude of radiofrequency transmit fields, B-1(+). In this work, we propose a method to compute both conductivity and permittivity based solely on relative rec

  8. Demonstration of Noncorrosive, Capacitance- Based Water-Treatment Technology for Chilled-Water Cooling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Beitelman 2009), HQUSACE published interim implementation guidance in Engineering and Construction Bulletin ECB 2012-10, Non-Chemical Treatment of...incorporation into UFGS 23 25 00. The suggested imple- mentation language includes a designer’s note based on text from ECB 2012-10, plus new language

  9. A TEST TO DEMONSTRATE A DIGITAL WEB-BASED OILFIELD DATA COLLECTION SERVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochelle, J.

    2001-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy and HIS Energy tested a web-based field data collection service, FieldDIRECT, at NPR-3. FieldDIRECT provided a way to digitally collect oil and gas data from the field, transfer it quickly, accurately and securely via the Internet, and utilize it immediately to generate executive, operational and administrative reports.

  10. An Inquiry-Based Exercise for Demonstrating Prey Preference in Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Aaron J.; Abramson, Charles I.

    2006-01-01

    The recent promotion of inquiry-based learning techniques (Uno, 1990) is well suited to the use of animals in the classroom. Working with living organisms directly engages students and stimulates them to actively participate in the learning process. Students develop a greater appreciation for living things, the natural world, and their impact on…

  11. Single acquisition electrical property mapping based on relative coil sensitivities: A proof-of-concept demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques, J.P.; Sodickson, D.K.; Ipek, O.; Collins, C.M.; Gruetter, R.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeAll methods presented to date to map both conductivity and permittivity rely on multiple acquisitions to compute quantitatively the magnitude of radiofrequency transmit fields, B-1(+). In this work, we propose a method to compute both conductivity and permittivity based solely on relative rec

  12. Molecular System Based on Novel Photochromic Biindenylidenedione Derivative Demonstrating Photomodulation of Magnetism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇; 庞美丽; 程凯歌; 王英; 孟继本

    2012-01-01

    Stable nitronyl nitroxide radical and imino nitroxide radical were incorporated into the benzene rings of novel photochromic 7,7'-dimethyl-[2,2'-bi-lH-indene]-3,3'-diethyl-3,3'-dihydroxy-l,l'-dione (1), leading to the synthesis of novel multifunctional compounds 4 and 5. The photochromic properties, ESR spectroscopy and magnetic proper- ties of the title compounds were investigated. Compounds 4 and 5 possess visible photochromism upon photoirra- diation, and their ESR signals undergo secular broadening after photoirradiation. The magnetic susceptibility meas- urement shows that the antiferromagnetic interaction of 4 and 5 becomes stronger after photoirradiation. In compounds 4 and 5 there are two kinds of spin centers after photoirradiation: one is nitroxide radical, and the other is photo-generated radicals from two indanone moieties. Our results demonstrated that the colour and magnetic properties of compounds 4 and 5 could be modulated by photoirradiation.

  13. Ground Demonstration of Planetary Gas Lidar Based on Optical Parametric Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Kawa, Stephen R.; Krainak, Michael; Abshire, James

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development effort of a nanosecond-pulsed optical parametric amplifier (OPA) for remote trace gas measurements for Mars and Earth. The OPA output has high spectral purity and is widely tunable both at near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths, with an optical-optica1 conversion efficiency of up to approx 39 %. Using this laser source, we demonstrated open-path measurements of CH4 (3291 nm and 1651 nm), CO2 (1573 nm), H2O (1652 nm), and CO (4764 nm) on the ground. The simplicity, tunability. and power scalability of the OPA make it a strong candidate for general planetary lidar instruments, which will offer important information on the origins of the planet's geology, atmosphere, and potential for biology,

  14. Demonstration of a 4H SiC Betavoltaic Nuclear Battery Based on Schottky Barrier Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Da-Yong; YUAN Wei-Zheng; GAO Peng; YAO Xian-Wang; ZANG Bo; ZHANG Lin; GUO Hui; ZHANG Hong-Jian

    2008-01-01

    A 4H SiC betavoltaic nuclear battery is demonstrated. A Schottky barrier diode is utilized for carrier separation.Under illumination of Ni-63 source with an apparent activity of 4mCi/cm2, an open circuit voltage of 0.49 V and a short circuit current density of 29.44 nA/cm2 are measured. A power conversion effciency of 1.2% is obtained.The performance of the device is limited by low shunt resistance, backscattering and attenuation of electron energy in air and Schottky electrode. It is expected to be significantly improved by optimizing the design and processing technology of the device.

  15. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Actuator-Based, Polarization Reconfigurable Patch Antenna Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2002-01-01

    A nearly square patch antenna with a contact actuator along a radiating edge for polarization reconfiguration was demonstrated at Ka-band frequencies at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The layout of the antenna is shown in the following sketch. This antenna has the following advantages: 1) It can be dynamically reconfigured to receive and transmit a linearly polarized signal or a circularly polarized signal. This feature allows the substitution of multiple antennas on a satellite by a single antenna, thereby resulting in significant cost savings. 2) In our approach, the polarization is switched between the two states without affecting the frequency of operation; thus, valuable frequency spectrum is conserved. 3) The ability to switch polarization also helps mitigate propagation effects due to adverse weather on the performance of a satellite-to-ground link. Hence, polarization reconfigurability enhances link reliability.

  16. GAMA: multi-level and complex environment for agent-based models and simulations (demonstration)

    OpenAIRE

    Drogoul, Alexis; Amouroux, Edouard; Caillou, Philippe; Gaudou, Benoit; Grignard, Arnaud; Marilleau, Nicolas; Taillandier, Patrick; Vavaseur, Maroussia; Vo, Duc-An; Zucker, Jean-Daniel

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Agent-based models are now used in numerous application domains (ecology, social sciences, etc.) but their use is still impeded by the lack of generic yet ready-to-use tools sup- porting the design and the simulation of complex models in- tegrating multiple level of agency and realistic environments. The GAMA modeling and simulation platform is proposed to address such issues. It allows modelers to build com- plex models thanks to high-level modeling language, various ...

  17. SUSTAINABILITY LOGISTICS BASING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OBJECTIVE DEMONSTRATION; 50, 300, 1000 PERSON BASE CAMP, ANALYSIS OF FY12 OPERATIONALLY RELEVANT TECHNICAL BASELINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    BASING – SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OBJECTIVE – DEMONSTRATION; 50, 300, 1000-PERSON BASE CAMP, ANALYSIS OF FY12 OPERATIONALLY RELEVANT TECHNICAL...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2012 – November 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SUSTAINABILITY LOGISTICS BASING – SCIENCE AND...Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center’s Sustainability/Logistics-Basing - Science and Technology Objective – Demonstration to

  18. Demonstration of an RF front-end based on GaN HEMT technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ture, Erdin; Musser, Markus; Hülsmann, Axel; Quay, Rüdiger; Ambacher, Oliver

    2017-05-01

    The effectiveness of the developed front-end on blocking the communication link of a commercial drone vehicle has been demonstrated in this work. A jamming approach has been taken in a broadband fashion by using GaN HEMT technology. Equipped with a modulated-signal generator, a broadband power amplifier, and an omni-directional antenna, the proposed system is capable of producing jamming signals in a very wide frequency range between 0.1 - 3 GHz. The maximum RF output power of the amplifier module has been software-limited to 27 dBm (500 mW), complying to the legal spectral regulations of the 2.4 GHz ISM band. In order to test the proof of concept, a real-world scenario has been prepared in which a commercially-available quadcopter UAV is flown in a controlled environment while the jammer system has been placed in a distance of about 10 m from the drone. It has been proven that the drone of interest can be neutralized as soon as it falls within the range of coverage (˜3 m) which endorses the promising potential of the broadband jamming approach.

  19. Logic reversibility and thermodynamic irreversibility demonstrated by DNAzyme-based Toffoli and Fredkin logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Ron; Remacle, Françoise; Levine, R D; Willner, Itamar

    2012-12-26

    The Toffoli and Fredkin gates were suggested as a means to exhibit logic reversibility and thereby reduce energy dissipation associated with logic operations in dense computing circuits. We present a construction of the logically reversible Toffoli and Fredkin gates by implementing a library of predesigned Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzymes and their respective substrates. Although the logical reversibility, for which each set of inputs uniquely correlates to a set of outputs, is demonstrated, the systems manifest thermodynamic irreversibility originating from two quite distinct and nonrelated phenomena. (i) The physical readout of the gates is by fluorescence that depletes the population of the final state of the machine. This irreversible, heat-releasing process is needed for the generation of the output. (ii) The DNAzyme-powered logic gates are made to operate at a finite rate by invoking downhill energy-releasing processes. Even though the three bits of Toffoli's and Fredkin's logically reversible gates manifest thermodynamic irreversibility, we suggest that these gates could have important practical implication in future nanomedicine.

  20. Experimental demonstration of a dynamic bowtie for region-based CT fluence optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Vance; Smith, Walt; Rui, Xue; Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; Fitzgerald, Paul; De Man, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Technology development in Computed Tomography (CT) is driven by clinical needs, for example the need for image quality sufficient for the clinical task, and the need to obtain the required image quality using the lowest possible radiation dose to the patient. One approach to manage dose without compromising image quality is to spatially vary the X-ray flux such that regions of high interest receive more radiation while regions of low interest or regions sensitive to radiation receive less dose. If the region of interest (ROI) is centered at the CT system's axis of rotation, a simple stationary bowtie mounted between the X-ray tube and the patient is sufficient to reduce the X-ray flux outside the central region. If the ROI is off center, then a dynamic bowtie that can track the ROI as the gantry rotates is preferred. We experimentally demonstrated the dynamic bowtie using a design that is relatively simple, low cost, requires no auxiliary power supply, and can be retrofitted to an existing clinical CT scanner. We installed our prototype dynamic bowtie on a clinical CT scanner, and we scanned a phantom with a pre-selected off-center ROI. The dynamic bowtie reduced the X-ray intensity outside the targeted ROI tenfold. As a result, the reconstructed image shows significantly lower noise within the dynamic bowtie ROI compared to regions outside it. Our preliminary results suggest that a dynamic bowtie could be an effective solution for further reducing CT radiation dose.

  1. Demonstration of laccase-based removal of lignin from wood and non-wood plant feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ana; Rencoret, Jorge; Cadena, Edith M; Rico, Alejandro; Barth, Dorothee; del Río, José C; Martínez, Angel T

    2012-09-01

    The ability of Trametes villosa laccase, in conjuction with 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT) as mediator and alkaline extraction, to remove lignin was demonstrated during treatment of wood (Eucalyptus globulus) and non-wood (Pennisetum purpureum) feedstocks. At 50 Ug(-1) laccase and 2.5% HBT concentration, 48% and 32% of the Eucalyptus and Pennisetum lignin were removed, respectively. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of the feedstocks, swollen in dimethylsulfoxide-d(6), revealed the removal of p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl and syringyl lignin units and aliphatic (mainly β-O-4'-linked) side-chains of lignin, and a moderate removal of p-coumaric acid (present in Pennisetum) without a substantial change in polysaccharide cross-signals. The enzymatic pretreatment (at 25 Ug(-1)) of Eucalyptus and Pennisetum feedstocks increased the glucose (by 61% and 12% in 72 h) and ethanol (by 4 and 2 g L(-1) in 17 h) yields from both lignocellulosic materials, respectively, as compared to those without enzyme treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Demonstration of a plasma mirror based on a laminar flow water film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-22

    A plasma mirror based on a laminar water film with low flow speed 0.5-2 cm/s has been developed and characterized, for use as an ultrahigh intensity optical reflector. The use of flowing water as atarget surface automatically results in each laser pulse seeing a new interaction surface and avoids the need for mechanical scanning of the target surface. In addition, the breakdown of water does notproduce contaminating debris that can be deleterious to vacuum chamber conditions and optics, such as is the case when using conventional solid targets. The mirror exhibits 70percent reflectivity, whilemaintaining high-quality of the reflected spot.

  3. Sustainability Logistics Basing Science and Technology Objective. Demonstration #1 - 1000 Person Camp Demo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    zero. These points are data collection artifacts and likely due to wireless communications issues. 0.00 200.00 400.00 600.00 800.00 1,000.00...There is an artifact in the data at 1050 hours that causes a drop to zero – this data point should be disregarded. This was likely the result of... Hospitals . 138  More useful during R&D phase of base camp development, not in a deployed environment.  Any size camp before hardwiring and

  4. A Cloud-Based Global Flood Disaster Community Cyber-Infrastructure: Development and Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhanming; Hong, Yang; Khan, Sadiq; Gourley, Jonathan; Flamig, Zachary; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Tang, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Flood disasters have significant impacts on the development of communities globally. This study describes a public cloud-based flood cyber-infrastructure (CyberFlood) that collects, organizes, visualizes, and manages several global flood databases for authorities and the public in real-time, providing location-based eventful visualization as well as statistical analysis and graphing capabilities. In order to expand and update the existing flood inventory, a crowdsourcing data collection methodology is employed for the public with smartphones or Internet to report new flood events, which is also intended to engage citizen-scientists so that they may become motivated and educated about the latest developments in satellite remote sensing and hydrologic modeling technologies. Our shared vision is to better serve the global water community with comprehensive flood information, aided by the state-of-the- art cloud computing and crowdsourcing technology. The CyberFlood presents an opportunity to eventually modernize the existing paradigm used to collect, manage, analyze, and visualize water-related disasters.

  5. Demonstration of a refractometric sensor based on an optical micro-fiber three-beam interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunyang; Ding, Hui; Lv, Fangxing

    2014-12-01

    With diameter close to the wavelength of the guided light and high index contrast between the fiber and the surrounding, an optical micro-fiber shows a variety of interesting waveguiding properties, including widely tailorable optical confinement, strong evanescent fields and waveguide dispersion. Among various micro-fiber applications, optical sensing has been attracting increasing research interest due to its possibilities of realizing miniaturized fiber optic sensors with small footprint, high sensitivity, and low optical power consumption. Typical micro-fiber based sensing structures, including Michelson interferometer, Mach-Zenhder interferometer, Fabry-Perot interferometer, micro-fiber ring resonator, have been proposed. The sensitivity of these structures heavily related to the fraction of evanescent field outside micro-fiber. In this paper, we report the first theoretical and experimental study of a new type of refractometric sensor based on micro-fiber three-beam interferometer. Theoretical and experimental analysis reveals that the sensitivity is not only determined by the fraction of evanescent field outside the micro-fiber but also related to the values of interferometric arms. The sensitivity can be enhanced significantly when the effective lengths of the interferometric arms tends to be equal. We argue that this has great potential for increasing the sensitivity of refractive index detection.

  6. Demonstration of a refractometric sensor based on an optical micro-fiber three-beam interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunyang; Ding, Hui; Lv, Fangxing

    2014-12-16

    With diameter close to the wavelength of the guided light and high index contrast between the fiber and the surrounding, an optical micro-fiber shows a variety of interesting waveguiding properties, including widely tailorable optical confinement, strong evanescent fields and waveguide dispersion. Among various micro-fiber applications, optical sensing has been attracting increasing research interest due to its possibilities of realizing miniaturized fiber optic sensors with small footprint, high sensitivity, and low optical power consumption. Typical micro-fiber based sensing structures, including Michelson interferometer, Mach-Zenhder interferometer, Fabry-Perot interferometer, micro-fiber ring resonator, have been proposed. The sensitivity of these structures heavily related to the fraction of evanescent field outside micro-fiber. In this paper, we report the first theoretical and experimental study of a new type of refractometric sensor based on micro-fiber three-beam interferometer. Theoretical and experimental analysis reveals that the sensitivity is not only determined by the fraction of evanescent field outside the micro-fiber but also related to the values of interferometric arms. The sensitivity can be enhanced significantly when the effective lengths of the interferometric arms tends to be equal. We argue that this has great potential for increasing the sensitivity of refractive index detection.

  7. MRI contrast demonstration of antigen-specific targeting with an iron-based ferritin construct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Edward G., E-mail: edward_walsh@brown.edu [Brown University, Department of Neuroscience (United States); Mills, David R. [Rhode Island Hospital/Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine (United States); Lim, Sierin; Sana, Barindra [Nanyang Technological University, Division of Bioengineering (Singapore); Brilliant, Kate E. [Rhode Island Hospital/Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine (United States); Park, William K. C. [Rhode Island Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (United States)

    2013-01-15

    A genetically modified ferritin has been examined for its properties as a tumor-selective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The engineered ferritin described herein was derived from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (AfFtn-AA), which stores a significantly greater quantity of iron than wild-type ferritins. Relaxivity measurements were taken at 3 Tesla of ferritin particles uniformly distributed in an agarose gel to assess relaxivities r{sub 1} and r{sub 2}. The r{sub 1} and r{sub 2} values of the uniformly distributed modified ferritin were significantly higher (r{sub 1} = 1,290 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} and r{sub 2} = 5,740 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1}) than values observed for wild-type ferritin (e.g., horse spleen, r{sub 1} = 0.674 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1}, r{sub 2} = 95.54 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1}). The modified iron-enriched ferritin (14.5 nm diameter) was conjugated with a monoclonal antibody (10 nm length) against rat Necl-5, a cell surface glycoprotein overexpressed by many epithelial cancers. In vitro studies showed strong reactivity of the assembled nanoconjugate to transformed Necl-5 positive rat prostate epithelial cells. Furthermore, MRI demonstrated a significant T{sub 2} contrast with negligible T{sub 1} effect when bound to cells. These findings highlight the utility of the modified ferritin construct as a novel MRI contrast agent that can be manipulated to target antigen-specific tissues.

  8. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodrich-Mahoney, John; Donnelly, Ellen

    2009-12-31

    This project demonstrated that developing environmental credits on private land—including abandoned mined lands—is dependent on a number of factors, some of them beyond the control of the project team. In this project, acid mine drainage (AMD) was successfully remediated through the construction of a passive AMD treatment system. Extensive water quality sampling both before and after the installation of the passive AMD treatment system showed that the system achieved removal efficiencies and pollutant loading reductions for acidity, iron, aluminum and manganese that were consistent with systems of similar size and design. The success of the passive AMD treatment system should have resulted in water credits if the project had not been terminated. Developing carbon sequestration credits, however, was much more complex and was not achieved in this project. The primary challenge that the project team encountered in meeting the full project objectives was the unsuccessful attempt to have the landowner sign a conservation easement for his property. This would have allowed the project team to clear and reforest the site, monitor the progress of the newly planted trees, and eventually realize carbon sequestration credits once the forest was mature. The delays caused by the lack of a conservation easement, as well as other factors, eventually resulted in the reforestation portion of the project being cancelled. The information in this report will help the public make more informed decisions regarding the potential of using water and carbon, and other credits to support the remediation of minded lands through out the United States. The hope is that by using credits that more mined lands with be remediated.

  9. Experimental demonstration of an OFDM receiver based on a silicon-nanophot onic discrete Fourier transform filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Ros, Francesco; Nolle, Markus; Meuer, C.

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the demultiplexing of 8×13.4 Gbaud OFDM-QPSK subcarriers using a silicon nanophotonic-based discrete Fourier transform (DFT) filter. All eight subcarriers showed less than 1.5 dB OSNR penalty compared to the theoretical limit.......We experimentally demonstrate the demultiplexing of 8×13.4 Gbaud OFDM-QPSK subcarriers using a silicon nanophotonic-based discrete Fourier transform (DFT) filter. All eight subcarriers showed less than 1.5 dB OSNR penalty compared to the theoretical limit....

  10. Experimental demonstration of security-enhanced WDM-PON based on chaotic optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hongxi; Chen, Xiaolei; Yue, Hehe; Zhao, Qingchun; Hao, Yang; Wu, Chenguang; Zhao, Nan

    2015-08-01

    The message-decryption process of subtracting chaotic synchronization carrier from receiving signal is explained by modeling and numerically solving the rate equations for semiconductor lasers. An experimental system of wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network (WDM-PON) based on chaotic-light secure communications is first built up. The bidirectional transmissions of downstream and upstream data are experimentally realized with only two lasers and a single wavelength channel in a WDM fiber-optic link. When the data rate is 1.25 Gb/s, the secure transmission distance can be up to 11 km with SSMF of G.652. After sampling and decision, the BER of the recovered messages is calculated to be approximately 1×10-4.

  11. Optical diagnostics based on elastic scattering: An update of clinical demonstrations with the Optical Biopsy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigio, I.J.; Boyer, J.; Johnson, T.M.; Lacey, J.; Mourant, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Conn, R. [Lovelace Medical Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bohorfoush, A. [Wisconsin Medical School, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has continued the development of the Optical Biopsy System (OBS) for noninvasive, real-time in situ diagnosis of tissue pathologies. Our clinical studies have expanded since the last Biomedical Optics Europe conference (Budapest, September 1993), and we report here on the latest results of clinical tests in gastrointestinal tract. The OBS invokes a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathologies based on the elastic scattering properties, over a wide range of wavelengths, of the tissue. The use of elastic scattering as the key to optical tissue diagnostics in the OBS is based on the fact that many tissue pathologies, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest significant architectural changes at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Since the cellular components that cause elastic scattering have dimensions typically on the order of visible to near-IR wavelengths, the elastic (Mie) scattering properties will be wavelength dependent. Thus, morphology and size changes can be expected to cause significant changes in an optical signature that is derived from the wavelength-dependence of elastic scattering. The OBS employs a small fiberoptic probe that is amenable to use with any endoscope or catheter, or to direct surface examination. The probe is designed to be used in optical contact with the tissue under examination and has separate illuminating and collecting fibers. Thus, the light that is collected and transmitted to the analyzing spectrometer must first scatter through a small volume of the tissue before entering the collection fiber(s). Consequently, the system is also sensitive to the optical absorption spectrum of the tissue, over an effective operating range of <300 to 950 nm, and such absorption adds valuable complexity to the scattering spectral signature.

  12. Optical diagnostics based on elastic scattering: Recent clinical demonstrations with the Los Alamos Optical Biopsy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigio, I.J.; Loree, T.R.; Mourant, J.; Shimada, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Story-Held, K.; Glickman, R.D. [Texas Univ. Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Ophthalmology; Conn, R. [Lovelace Medical Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Urology

    1993-08-01

    A non-invasive diagnostic tool that could identify malignancy in situ and in real time would have a major impact on the detection and treatment of cancer. We have developed and are testing early prototypes of an optical biopsy system (OBS) for detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. The OBS invokes a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathologies based on the elastic scattering properties, over a wide range of wavelengths, of the microscopic structure of the tissue. The use of elastic scattering as the key to optical tissue diagnostics in the OBS is based on the fact that many tissue pathologies, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest significant architectural changes at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Since the cellular components that cause elastic scattering have dimensions typically on the order of visible to near-IR wavelengths, the elastic (Mie) scattering properties will be strongly wavelength dependent. Thus, morphology and size changes can be expected to cause significant changes in an optical signature that is derived from the wavelength dependence of elastic scattering. The data acquisition and storage/display time with the OBS instrument is {approximately}1 second. Thus, in addition to the reduced invasiveness of this technique compared with current state-of-the-art methods (surgical biopsy and pathology analysis), the OBS offers the possibility of impressively faster diagnostic assessment. The OBS employs a small fiber-optic probe that is amenable to use with any endoscope, catheter or hypodermic, or to direct surface examination (e.g. as in skin cancer or cervical cancer). It has been tested in vitro on animal and human tissue samples, and clinical testing in vivo is currently in progress.

  13. Demonstration Stirling Engine based Micro-CHP with ultra-low emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeberg, Rolf; Olsson, Fredrik [Carl Bro Energikonsult AB (Sweden); Paalsson, Magnus [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden)

    2004-03-01

    This project has been initiated in order to develop a new type of natural gas fired low emission combustion system for a Stirling engine CHP-unit, and to demonstrate and evaluate the unit with the newly developed combustion system in a CHP application. The Stirling engine technology is well developed, but mostly used in special applications and CHP-applications are scarce. The very low exhaust emissions with the new combustion system would make the Stirling engine very suitable for installation in as a CHP-unit in domestic areas. The Stirling engine used in the project has been a V161 engine produced by Solo Kleinmotoren GmbH in Sindelfingen. The unit has a nominal output of 7,5 kW{sub el} and 20 kW{sub heat} (Hot water). The new combustion system was developed at Lund University and the very strict emission targets that were set up could be achieved, both in the laboratory tests and during the site-testing period. Typical performance and emission figures measured at the site installation are: Generator output (kW): 7,3; Hot water output (kW): 15; El. efficiency (%): 25,4; Total efficiency (%): 77,8; NO{sub x} (ppm): 14; CO (ppm): 112; HC (ppm): < 1; O{sub 2} (%): 8,0; Noise level 1 m from the unit (dBA): 83. The NO{sub x} emissions were reduced with almost 97 % as compared to a standard Stirling combustion system. The emission figures are considerably lower than what could be achieved in an internal combustion engine of similar size with an oxidation catalyst (report SGC 106), while the performance figures are similar for the two technologies. The site testing was carried out during a period of 1,5 year at a site owned by Goeteborg Energi. The site comprises a building structure with workshops, offices etc. covering a ground area of 2,500 m{sup 2}. A gas fired boiler with an output of 250 kW supplies hot water to a local grid for heating and tap water. The annual heat demand is typically 285 MWh and the hot water temperatures are normally 60-80 deg C. The site

  14. Practice of Developing Low-carbon Leisure Agriculture in Agricultural Sci-tech Experiment and Demonstration Park: A Case Study of Xinglong Tropical Botanical Park

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan; OUYANG; Huasong; WU; Aiqin; LIU; Huan; YU; Hongmei; FU

    2013-01-01

    The Agricultural Science and Technology Experiment and Demonstration Park,as a unique tourist scenic spot,is a new model for the development of low-carbon leisure agriculture.In this paper,with Xinglong Tropical Botanical Park as a study case,the practice of developing a model of low-carbon agricultural science and technology tourism in the park is explored.Main measures for developing low-carbon leisure agriculture in Agricultural Science and Technology Experiment and Demonstration Park are summarized,including development of low carbon attractors,construction of low carbon facilities,strengthening low-carbon management,building low-carbon environment and so on,according to analysis on the models for development of low-carbon agricultural science tourism in this park.

  15. Alternative landfill cover technology demonstration at Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karr, L.A.; Harre, B. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, CA (United States); Hakonson, T.E. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Surface covers to control water infiltration to waste buried in landfills will be the remediation alternative of choice for most hazardous and sanitary landfills operated by the Department of Defense. Although surface covers are the least expensive method of remediation for landfills, they can still be expensive solutions. Conventional wisdom suggests that landfill capping technology is well developed as evidenced by the availability of EPA guidance for designing and constructing what has become known as the {open_quotes}RCRA Cap{close_quotes}. In practice, however, very little testing of the RCRA cap, or any other design, has been done to evaluate how effective these designs are in limiting infiltration of water into waste. This paper describes a low cost alternative to the {open_quotes}RCRA Cap{close_quotes} that is being evaluated at Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Kaneohe Bay. This study uses an innovative, simple and inexpensive concept to manipulate the fate of water falling on a landfill. The infiltration of water through the cap will be controlled by combining the evaporative forces of vegetation to remove soil water, with engineered structures that limit infiltration of precipitation into the soil. This approach relies on diverting enough of the annual precipitation to runoff, so that the water that does infiltrate into the soil can easily be removed by evapotranspiration.

  16. A field based, self-excited compulsator power supply for a 9 MJ railgun demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walls, W.A.; Pratap, S.B.; Brinkman, W.G.; Cook, K.G.; Herbst, J.D.; Manifold, S.M.; Reah, B.M.; Thelen, R.F.; Thompson, R.C. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    Fabrication efforts have begun on a field-based compulsator for firing 9 MJ projectiles from a railgun launcher. The machine is designed to store 200 MJ kinetic energy and fire a salvo of nine rounds in three minutes at velocities between 2.5 and 4.0 km/s. Prime power required to meet this firing schedule is 1,865 kW and will be supplied by a gas turbine engine. It is also possible to fire a burst of two shots in rapid succession, if desired. Operating speed of the machine is 8,250 rpm and it has design ratings of 3.2 MA peak current and 20 GW peak power into a 9 MJ railgun load. A detailed description of the machine as designed, and its auxiliary and control systems, is provided in this paper. Fabrication and assembly methods are reviewed and the current status of the project is discussed. In conjunction with this project, a lightweight railgun is being developed and is discussed in a companion paper presented at the 5th EML conference.

  17. Development and demonstration of an enhanced spreadsheet-based well log analysis software. Final report, May 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watney, W.L.; Doveton, J.H.; Guy, W.J.

    1998-10-01

    The Advanced Class Work Program is a field-based research and demonstration program for demonstration of advanced or improved technologies identified in the Department of Energy`s Class Field Demonstration Projects. The objective of the Advanced Class Work program is to conduct field demonstrations of technologies for which a small, incremental amount of work will produce or improve a transferable, useful technology for oil recovery. The goal of the program is to enhance the products of near-term Class projects and maximize the applicability and effectiveness of project results. PfEFFER (Petrofacies Evaluation of Formations For Engineering Reservoirs) is a well log analysis computer package. The software was tested and successfully applied in Schaben Field, a DOE Class 2 Field Demonstration Project to assist in improving reservoir characterization and assessing reservoir performance. PfEFFER v.1 was released in January, 1996 as a commercial spreadsheet-based well-log analysis program developed and distributed through the Kansas Geological Survey. The objectives of this project were: Task 1 -- Enhance the PfEFFER software package; Task 2 -- Develop major new modules to significantly augment PfEFFER capabilities; Task 3 -- Conduct field demonstration of software application using the necessary reservoir data acquired from oil operators and construct a database; and Task 4 -- Perform technology transfer activities that include workshops, reports, presentations, or other methods to communicate results to interested parties.

  18. A comparison of innovative air pollution control technology demonstrations at McClellan Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, T.E. [BDM Federal, McClellan AFB, CA (United States); Mook, P.H. Jr.; Wong, K.B. [SM-ALC/EMR, McClellan AFB, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    McClellan Air Force Base (AFB), located near Sacramento, California, is one of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program`s National Environmental Technology Test Sites. As part of the on-going environmental clean-up of McClellan AFB, the US Air Force has evaluated several innovative and conventional technologies for the treatment of vapor phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This paper presents an overview and comparison of the cost and performance of seven innovative technologies tested at McClellan AFB. McClellan AFB has found conventional off-gas treatment technologies to be effective but costly. Operation and maintenance (O and M) costs for treatment systems are increasingly becoming a major component of the environmental clean-up budget. The cost and performance of photolytic destruction, titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation, advanced polymer absorption media, flameless thermal oxidation, non-thermal plasma destruction, electron-beam destruction, and an advanced regenerative adsorption system are presented. Destruction removal efficiencies for VOCs have ranged from greater than 99.9 percent for flameless thermal oxidation to zero for the advanced polymer absorption media. Like the conventional technologies in use, all of the innovative technologies tested have been shown to be effective for treating a wide range of vapor phase contaminants, but each is only cost effective over limited range of off-gas concentrations. Some of the innovative technologies evaluated were found not to be useful over a wide range of contaminants or too costly to operate at their current stage of development. For example, titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation cannot effectively treat chlorinated VOCs in off-gas streams that contain moderate amounts of long-chain hydrocarbons.

  19. Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jim Butz; Terry Hunt

    2005-11-01

    Public Service Company of Colorado and ADA Technologies, Inc. have performed a study of the injection of activated carbon for the removal of vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas streams. The project was completed under contract to the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with contributions from EPRI and Public Service Company. The prime contractor for the project was Public Service Company, with ADA Technologies as the major subcontractor providing technical support to all aspects of the project. The research and development effort was conducted in two phases. In Phase I a pilot facility was fabricated and tests were performed using dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control on a coal-fired flue gas slipstream extracted from an operating power plant. Phase II was designed to move carbon injection technology towards commercial application on coal-fired power plants by addressing key reliability and operability concerns. Phase II field work included further development work with the Phase I pilot and mercury measurements on several of PSCo's coal-fired generating units. In addition, tests were run on collected sorbent plus fly ash to evaluate the impact of the activated carbon sorbent on the disposal of fly ash. An economic analysis was performed where pilot plant test data was used to develop a model to predict estimated costs of mercury removal from plants burning western coals. Testing in the pilot plant was undertaken to quantify the effects of plant configuration, flue gas temperature, and activated carbon injection rate on mercury removal. All three variables were found to significantly impact the mercury removal efficiency in the pilot. The trends were clear: mercury removal rates increased with decreasing flue gas temperature and with increasing carbon injection rates. Mercury removal was much more efficient with reverse-gas and pulse-jet baghouse configurations than with an ESP as the particulate

  20. Demonstration of Model Assisted Reliability Assessment Protocol on a Proposed Low Frequency Vibration Based Damage Sensing Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    demonstration and broad use of the methodology and protocol. INTRODUCTION The successful deployment of systems for health monitoring of...based damage detection method. An ETrema brand Terfenol-D magnetostrictive actuator was used for band-limited pseudo-random excitation up to 1200 Hz

  1. Demonstration of an All-Optical 2-to-4 Level Encoder Based on an Optical Parametric Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a novel technique for all-optical 2-to-4 level amplitude-shift keying (ASK coding based on a fiber optical parametric amplifier. A 20-Gb/s signal is realized by multiplexing two 10-Gb/s data streams.

  2. Experiences in home-based growth monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suelan, F; Briones, H

    1992-01-01

    A growth monitoring project (GMP) of child weighing was implemented by the Philippines' Department of Health (DOH) through the Integrated Provincial Health Office to monitor either children's nutritional progress or their faltering of growth. Weaknesses, however, were found in the GMP. For example, only 31% of preschoolers included in the Nutrition Center of the Philippines (NCP) survey had growth charts. An 1990 UNICEF-DOH survey also found that the growth chart was used primarily by mothers and service providers to record infant immunization. Mothers brought their children to well-baby clinics in barangay health centers only when their children were sick. Conducted only once per year, weighing was not perceived as a tool in detecting and preventing sickness, and ensuring normal growth. Asked to help improve the GMP, the NCP consulted intended beneficiaries and cooperators to develop a plan to pilot an intensive monitoring project in four towns of Negros Occidental, starting in January 1991 and ending in December 1992. The resultant Home-Based Growth Monitoring (HBGM) project would place emphasis upon enabling rural mothers to become self-sustaining agents for child growth monitoring. A key feature was the establishment of a weighing post in a strategic place for every 2-3 family clusters. The HBGM project was piloted in 1991 in Calatrava, Toboso, Cauayan, and Sipalay. This paper describes project implementation, problems and solutions, and results.

  3. Laparoscopic liver resection: Experience based guidelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has been progressivelydeveloped along the past two decades. Despiteinitial skepticism, improved operative results madelaparoscopic approach incorporated to surgical practiceand operations increased in frequency and complexity.Evidence supporting LLR comes from case-series,comparative studies and meta-analysis. Despite lack oflevel 1 evidence, the body of literature is stronger andexisting data confirms the safety, feasibility and benefitsof laparoscopic approach when compared to openresection. Indications for LLR do not differ from thosefor open surgery. They include benign and malignant(both primary and metastatic) tumors and living donorliver harvesting. Currently, resection of lesions locatedon anterolateral segments and left lateral sectionectomyare performed systematically by laparoscopy in hepatobiliaryspecialized centers. Resection of lesions locatedon posterosuperior segments (1, 4a, 7, 8) and majorliver resections were shown to be feasible but remaintechnically demanding procedures, which should bereserved to experienced surgeons. Hand-assisted andlaparoscopy-assisted procedures appeared to increasethe indications of minimally invasive liver surgery andare useful strategies applied to difficult and majorresections. LLR proved to be safe for malignant lesionsand offers some short-term advantages over openresection. Oncological results including resection marginstatus and long-term survival were not inferior to openresection. At present, surgical community expects highquality studies to base the already perceived betteroutcomes achieved by laparoscopy in major centers'practice. Continuous surgical training, as well as newtechnologies should augment the application of lap-aroscopic liver surgery. Future applicability of newtechnologies such as robot assistance and image-guidedsurgery is still under investigation.

  4. Report of experiments and evidence for ASC L2 milestone 4467 : demonstration of a legacy application's path to exascale.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, Matthew L.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Leung, Vitus Joseph; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick, II; Gentile, Ann C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Klundt, Ruth Ann; Ward, H. Lee; Laros, James H., III; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Fabian, Nathan D.; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Barrett, Brian W.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian; Barrett, Richard; Wheeler, Kyle Bruce; Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Rodrigues, Arun F.; Brandt, James M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Thompson, David (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); VanDyke, John P.; Oldfield, Ron A.; Tucker, Thomas (Open Grid Computing, Inc., Austin, TX); Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

    2012-03-01

    This report documents thirteen of Sandia's contributions to the Computational Systems and Software Environment (CSSE) within the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program between fiscal years 2009 and 2012. It describes their impact on ASC applications. Most contributions are implemented in lower software levels allowing for application improvement without source code changes. Improvements are identified in such areas as reduced run time, characterizing power usage, and Input/Output (I/O). Other experiments are more forward looking, demonstrating potential bottlenecks using mini-application versions of the legacy codes and simulating their network activity on Exascale-class hardware. The purpose of this report is to prove that the team has completed milestone 4467-Demonstration of a Legacy Application's Path to Exascale. Cielo is expected to be the last capability system on which existing ASC codes can run without significant modifications. This assertion will be tested to determine where the breaking point is for an existing highly scalable application. The goal is to stretch the performance boundaries of the application by applying recent CSSE RD in areas such as resilience, power, I/O, visualization services, SMARTMAP, lightweight LWKs, virtualization, simulation, and feedback loops. Dedicated system time reservations and/or CCC allocations will be used to quantify the impact of system-level changes to extend the life and performance of the ASC code base. Finally, a simulation of anticipated exascale-class hardware will be performed using SST to supplement the calculations. Determine where the breaking point is for an existing highly scalable application: Chapter 15 presented the CSSE work that sought to identify the breaking point in two ASC legacy applications-Charon and CTH. Their mini-app versions were also employed to complete the task. There is no single breaking point as more than one issue was found with the two codes. The results were

  5. Laparoscopic liver resection: Experience based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Fabricio Ferreira; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirola; Fonseca, Gilton Marques; Araújo, Raphael Leonardo Cunha; Jeismann, Vagner Birk; Perini, Marcos Vinícius; Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Cecconello, Ivan; Herman, Paulo

    2016-01-27

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has been progressively developed along the past two decades. Despite initial skepticism, improved operative results made laparoscopic approach incorporated to surgical practice and operations increased in frequency and complexity. Evidence supporting LLR comes from case-series, comparative studies and meta-analysis. Despite lack of level 1 evidence, the body of literature is stronger and existing data confirms the safety, feasibility and benefits of laparoscopic approach when compared to open resection. Indications for LLR do not differ from those for open surgery. They include benign and malignant (both primary and metastatic) tumors and living donor liver harvesting. Currently, resection of lesions located on anterolateral segments and left lateral sectionectomy are performed systematically by laparoscopy in hepatobiliary specialized centers. Resection of lesions located on posterosuperior segments (1, 4a, 7, 8) and major liver resections were shown to be feasible but remain technically demanding procedures, which should be reserved to experienced surgeons. Hand-assisted and laparoscopy-assisted procedures appeared to increase the indications of minimally invasive liver surgery and are useful strategies applied to difficult and major resections. LLR proved to be safe for malignant lesions and offers some short-term advantages over open resection. Oncological results including resection margin status and long-term survival were not inferior to open resection. At present, surgical community expects high quality studies to base the already perceived better outcomes achieved by laparoscopy in major centers' practice. Continuous surgical training, as well as new technologies should augment the application of laparoscopic liver surgery. Future applicability of new technologies such as robot assistance and image-guided surgery is still under investigation.

  6. Using the experience-based design approach to improve orthodontic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Pamela E; Silverton, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    The experience-based design (ebd) approach is a method of measuring patient experience, which deliberately draws out subjective, emotional and personal feelings of the patients using a service. We describe how the experience-based design approach has been used to measure the experiences of teenage patients at orthodontic consultation appointments in a district general hospital. This has allowed us to identify the points in the patient's journey where they experience most anxiety and nervousness and to target service improvements in these areas. We found the ebd approach effective in measuring patient experience in a teenage patient population. We demonstrate how the service improvements implemented have reduced negative feelings during new patient consultations.

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  8. Using Experience-Based Design to Improve the Care Experience for Patients With Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagensen, Ann; London, Amy E; Phillips, Jennifer J; Helton, W Scott; Picozzi, Vincent J; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-12-01

    Despite the importance of the patient care experience to quality and outcome, the literature detailing the care experience in patients with pancreatic cancer is limited. To elicit the experience of patients with pancreatic cancer for care redesign, we deployed experience-based design, an emerging methodology based on identification of events of high emotional content, known as touch points, to delineate qualitatively what matters most to patients and families. We defined touch points through direct observations, interviews, and a focus group. We then used experience questionnaires to measure emotional content and develop an experience map to graphically display the fluctuating emotional journey through the care processes. Study subjects were patients with pancreatic cancer who were cared for at Virginia Mason Medical Center, family caregivers, and staff. Redesign was initiated through an all-day improvement event in September 2013. During 2013 and 2014, we cared for 485 new patients with pancreatic cancer, the majority of whom had local disease at diagnosis. The response rate for the experience questionnaire was 23% (117 of 500 questionnaires distributed). The experience-based design results were often contrary to staff preconceptions of the care experience for patients with pancreatic cancer, and contributed to redesign in three key areas: understanding and documenting patient goals and values, providing better resources for caregivers/families, and improving care coordination and support services. Experience-based design enabled us to understand the care experience and associated emotional content for patients with pancreatic cancer and their caregivers. This knowledge then supported care redesign targeted at areas of high negative emotional content.

  9. Utilizing Problem-Based Learning in Qualitative Analysis Lab Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Randall W.; Bevsek, Holly M.

    2012-01-01

    A series of qualitative analysis (QA) laboratory experiments utilizing a problem-based learning (PBL) module has been designed and implemented. The module guided students through the experiments under the guise of cleaning up a potentially contaminated water site as employees of an environmental chemistry laboratory. The main goal was the…

  10. Fusion Core Imaging Experiment Based on the Shenguang Ⅱ Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑志坚; 曹磊峰; 滕浩; 成金秀

    2002-01-01

    A laser fusion experiment was performed based on the Shenguang Ⅱ facility. An image of thermonuclear burning region was obtained with a Fresnel zone plate-coded imaging technique, where the laser-driven target was served as an α-particle source, and the coded image obtained in the experiment was reconstructed by a numerical way.

  11. Learning by Experience in the Project-Bases Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Turner (Rodney); A. Keegan (Anne); L. Crawford

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes how project-based organizations use structured experience to aid the learning and development of individuals, and how they capture their experience of projects to feed that back into the improved management of future projects and the experiential learning of

  12. Learning by Experience in the Project-Bases Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Turner (Rodney); A. Keegan (Anne); L. Crawford

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes how project-based organizations use structured experience to aid the learning and development of individuals, and how they capture their experience of projects to feed that back into the improved management of future projects and the experiential learning of individu

  13. Honing Emotional Intelligence with Game-Based Crucible Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybourn, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the present paper is the design of multi-player role-playing game instances as crucible experiences for the exploration of one's emotional intelligence. Subsequent sections describe the design of game-based, intercultural crucible experiences and how this design was employed for training with members of the United States Marine Corps…

  14. Space shuttle recommendations based on aircraft maintenance experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, J. M.; Fox, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    Space shuttle design recommendations based on aircraft maintenance experience are developed. The recommendations are specifically applied to the landing gear system, nondestructive inspection techniques, hydraulic system design, materials and processes, and program support.

  15. Experimental demonstration of tunable multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences-based optical label for optical packets switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Qiu, Kun; Zhou, Heng; Ling, Yun; Wang, Yawei; Xu, Bo

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, the tunable multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences (MOOCS)-based optical label for optical packet switching (OPS) (MOOCS-OPS) is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. The tunable MOOCS-based optical label is performed by using fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based optical en/decoders group and optical switches configured by using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), and the optical label is erased by using Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA). Some waveforms of the MOOCS-based optical label, optical packet including the MOOCS-based optical label and the payloads are obtained, the switching control mechanism and the switching matrix are discussed, the bit error rate (BER) performance of this system is also studied. These experimental results show that the tunable MOOCS-OPS scheme is effective.

  16. Numerical analysis of the in-well vapor-stripping system demonstration at Edwards Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.D.; Gilmore, T.J.

    1996-10-01

    Numerical simulations, with the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator, were applied to the field demonstration of an in-well vapor-stripping system at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), near Mojave, California. The demonstration field site on the Edwards AFB was previously contaminated from traversing groundwater that was contained a varied composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which primarily includes trichloroethylene (TCE). Contaminant TCE originated from surface basin that had been used to collect runoff during the cleaning of experimental rocket powered planes in the 1960s and 1970s. This report documents those simulations and associated numerical analyses. A companion report documents the in- well vapor-stripping demonstration from a field perspective.

  17. Problem-Based Learning in Social Work Education: Students’ experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Merete; Mølholt, Anne-Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) constitutes a promising way of integrating academia and social work practice because PBL fosters engagement with real-life problems and enhances important skills needed in social work practice. However, little attention has been given to social work students......’ experiences of PBL. In this article we address this gap by exploring experiences of learning and learning preferences among master’s-level students in a Danish social work education setting where extensive problem-based project work is used. We find a discrepancy between students’ preferred learning and when...... they experience learning the most. Possible reasons for this discrepancy, and implications for teaching, are discussed....

  18. The role of geo-based technology in place experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tussyadiah, Iis; Zach, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Today, as various context-aware technologies have become increasingly ubiquitous, tourists have access to retrieve voluminous geographic information about tourism destinations. These technologies are suggested to aid tourists in gaining meaningful experiences with places. This study identifies how...... the use of geo-based technology plays a role in the acquisition of geographic knowledge and behavior. It is identified that the use of geo-based technology while traveling contributes to the different components that frame the structure of tourism experience. Further, this study also confirms that tourism...... experience can be seen as a part of the everyday experience as geographic behavior exhibited on a day-to-day basis is found to have an effect on tourism experience....

  19. Designing a future Conditions Database based on LHC experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00064378; Formica, Andrea; Gallas, Elizabeth; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Pfeiffer, A.; Govi, G.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a proposal for a new Conditions Database infrastructure that ATLAS and CMS (or other) experiments could use starting on the timescale of Run 3. This proposal is based on the experience that both experiments accumulated during Run 1. We will present the identified relevant data flows for conditions data and underline the common use cases that lead to a joint effort for the development of a new system. Conditions data are needed in any scientific experiment. It includes any ancillary data associated with primary data taking such as detector configuration, state or calibration or the environment in which the detector is operating. In any non-trivial experiment, conditions data typically reside outside the primary data store for various reasons (size, complexity or availability) and are best accessed at the point of processing or analysis (including for Monte Carlo simulations). The ability of any experiment to produce correct and timely results depends on the complete and efficient availability of ne...

  20. Physical assessment experience in a problem-based learning course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Justin J; Riche, Daniel M; Stover, Kayla R

    2011-10-10

    To evaluate the impact of a physical-assessment learning experience implemented in the problem-based learning (PBL) format of the third year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Students enrolled in a PBL course completed survey instruments to measure knowledge and confidence before and after participating in the learning experience. A simulation stethoscope was used to teach students abnormal pulmonary and cardiovascular sounds in 1-hour sessions for each of 12 PBL groups. The 92 students enrolled in the PBL course completed pre- and post-experience survey instruments. Students' scores on knowledge questions increased significantly (p experience questions. Students scored a median of 3 or 4 on a 5-point Likert scale after a learning experience on questions measuring confidence. Use of a simulation stethoscope in a physical-assessment learning experience increased pharmacy students' knowledge in performing pulmonary and cardiovascular assessment techniques.

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  3. Complete Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  6. Event-based simulation of neutron interferometry experiments

    CERN Document Server

    De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel

    2012-01-01

    A discrete-event approach, which has already been shown to give a cause-and-effect explanation of many quantum optics experiments, is applied to single-neutron interferometry experiments. The simulation algorithm yields a logically consistent description in terms of individual neutrons and does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation. It is shown that the simulation method reproduces the results of several single-neutron interferometry experiments, including experiments which, in quantum theoretical language, involve entanglement. Our results demonstrate that classical (non-Hamiltonian) systems can exhibit correlations which in quantum theory are associated with interference and entanglement, also when all particles emitted by the source are accounted for.

  7. Helical Undulator Based Production of Polarized Positrons and Status of the E166 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laihem, K.

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the status of the E166 experiment. The experiment is dedicated to test the helical-undulator-based polarized positron source for the international linear collider. The physics motivation for having both electrons and positrons polarized in collision is crucial and a demonstration experiment for the undulator-based production of polarized positrons is summarized. The E166 experiment uses a 1 meter long helical undulator in the 50 GeV Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC to provide MeV photons with circular polarization. These photons are then converted in a thin (0.5 radiation length X0) target into positrons (and electrons) with about 50% degree of longitudinal polarization. In this experiment, the polarization of both photons and positrons is measured simultaneously using photon transmission polarimetry.

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  10. Progress of the Laser-based Experiment OSQAR

    OpenAIRE

    Sulc, Miroslav; Pugnat, Pierre; Ballou, Rafik; Deferne, Guy; Duvillaret, Lionel; Finger Jr, Michael; Finger, Michael; Hošek, Jan; Husek, Thomas; Jost, Rémy; Kral, Miroslav; Kunc, S.; Macuchova, Karolina; Meissner, Krzysztof,; Morville, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    International audience; OSQAR experiment at CERN is based on two laser methods for search of axions and scalar particles. The light shining through the wall experiment has been using two LHC dipole magnets with an optical barrier, argon laser, and cooled 2D CCD detector for the measuring of expected regenerated photons. The second method wants to measure the Vacuum Magnetic Birefringence. An optical set-up with electro-optical modulator has been proposed, validated and subsequently improved i...

  11. Food Enterprise Web Design Based on User Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Excellent auxiliary food enterprise web design conveyed good visual transmission effect through user experience. This study was based on the food enterprise managers and customers as the main operating object to get the performance of the web page creation, web page design not only focused on the function and work efficiency, the most important thing was that the user experience in the process of web page interaction.

  12. Project-Based Laboratory Experiences in Mechanical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Sharma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe project-based laboratories in Mechanical Engineering designed to provide semester-long team experiences which mimic the real life industrial processes of design, development, testing and optimization. The labs are focused on courses at the sophomore level and thus require special attention to constraints of student backgrounds and experience. This paper describes laboratory projects in Dynamics and Fluid Mechanics.

  13. Task-based image quality assessment in radiation therapy: initial characterization and demonstration with CT simulation images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolly, Steven R.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Yu, Lifeng; Li, Hua

    2017-03-01

    In current radiation therapy practice, image quality is still assessed subjectively or by utilizing physically-based metrics. Recently, a methodology for objective task-based image quality (IQ) assessment in radiation therapy was proposed by Barrett et al.1 In this work, we present a comprehensive implementation and evaluation of this new IQ assessment methodology. A modular simulation framework was designed to perform an automated, computer-simulated end-to-end radiation therapy treatment. A fully simulated framework was created that utilizes new learning-based stochastic object models (SOM) to obtain known organ boundaries, generates a set of images directly from the numerical phantoms created with the SOM, and automates the image segmentation and treatment planning steps of a radiation therapy work ow. By use of this computational framework, therapeutic operating characteristic (TOC) curves can be computed and the area under the TOC curve (AUTOC) can be employed as a figure-of-merit to guide optimization of different components of the treatment planning process. The developed computational framework is employed to optimize X-ray CT pre-treatment imaging. We demonstrate that use of the radiation therapy-based-based IQ measures lead to different imaging parameters than obtained by use of physical-based measures.

  14. The Microgravity Research Experiments (MICREX) Data Base. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C. A.; Jones, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    An electronic data base identifying over 800 fluids and materials processing experiments performed in a low-gravity environment has been created at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The compilation, called MICREX (MICrogravity Research Experiments), was designed to document all such experimental efforts performed (1) on U.S. manned space vehicles, (2) on payloads deployed from U.S. manned space vehicles, and (3) on all domestic and international sounding rockets (excluding those of China and the former U.S.S.R.). Data available on most experiments include (1) principal and co-investigators, (2) low-gravity mission, (3) processing facility, (4) experimental objectives and results, (5) identifying key words, (6) sample materials, (7) applications of the processed materials/research area, (8) experiment descriptive publications, and (9) contacts for more information concerning the experiment. This technical memorandum (1) summarizes the historical interest in reduced-gravity fluid dynamics, (2) describes the experimental facilities employed to examine reduced gravity fluid flow, (3) discusses the importance of a low-gravity fluids and materials processing data base, (4) describes the MICREX data base format and computational World Wide Web access procedures, and (5) documents (in hard-copy form) the descriptions of the first 600 fluids and materials processing experiments entered into MICREX.

  15. The Microgravity Research Experiments (MICREX) Data Base, Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    An electronic data base identifying over 800 fluids and materials processing experiments performed in a low-gravity environment has been created at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The compilation, called MICREX (MICrogravity Research Experiments), was designed to document all such experimental efforts performed (1) on U.S. manned space vehicles, (2) on payloads deployed from U.S. manned space vehicles, and (3) on all domestic and international sounding rockets (excluding those of China and the former U.S.S.R.). Data available on most experiments include (1) principal and co-investigators (2) low-gravity mission, (3) processing facility, (4) experimental objectives and results, (5) identifying key words, (6) sample materials, (7) applications of the processed materials/research area, (8) experiment descriptive publications, and (9) contacts for more information concerning the experiment. This technical Memorandum (1) summarizes the historical interest in reduced-gravity fluid dynamics, (2) describes the importance of a low-gravity fluids and materials processing data base, (4) describes the MICREX data base format and computational World Wide Web access procedures, and (5) documents (in hard-copy form) the descriptions of the first 600 fluids and materials processing experiments entered into MICREX.

  16. The Microgravity Research Experiments (MICREX) Data Base. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    An electronic data base identifying over 800 fluids and materials processing experiments performed in a low-gravity environment has been created at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The compilation, called MICREX (MICrogravity Research Experiments), was designed to document all such experimental efforts performed (1) on U.S. manned space vehicles, (2) on payloads deployed from U.S. manned space vehicles, and (3) on all domestic and international sounding rockets (excluding those of China and the former U.S.S.R.). Data available on most experiments include (1) principal and co-investigators (2) low-gravity mission, (3) processing facility, (4) experimental objectives and results, (5) identifying key words, (6) sample materials, (7) applications of the processed materials/research area, (8) experiment descriptive publications, and (9) contacts for more information concerning the experiment. This technical memorandum (1) summarizes the historical interest in reduced-gravity fluid dynamics, (2) describes the experimental facilities employed to examine reduced gravity fluid flow, (3) discusses the importance of a low-gravity fluids and materials processing data base, (4) describes the MICREX data base format and computational World Wide Web access procedures, and (5) documents (in hard-copy form) the descriptions of the first 600 fluids and materials processing experiments entered into MICREX.

  17. Demonstration of 2.97-Gb/s video signal transmissions in DML-based IM-DDO-OFDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; He, Jing; Deng, Rui; Chen, Qinghui; Zhang, Jinlong; Chen, Lin

    2016-05-01

    To further investigate the feasibility of the digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms (e.g., symbol timing synchronization, channel estimation and equalization, and sampling clock frequency offset (SCFO) estimation and compensation) for real-time optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) system, 2.97-Gb/s real-time high-definition video signal parallel transmission is experimentally demonstrated in OFDM-based short-reach intensity-modulated direct-detection (IM-DD) systems. The experimental results show that, in the presence of ∼12 ppm SCFO between transmitter and receiver, the adaptively modulated OFDM signal transmission over 20 km standard single-mode fiber with an error bit rate less than 1 × 10-9 can be achieved by using only DSP-based small SCFO estimation and compensation method without utilizing forward error correction technique. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we successfully demonstrate that the video signal at a bit rate in excess of 1-Gb/s transmission in a simple real-valued inverse fast Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform based IM-DD optical OFDM system employing a directly modulated laser.

  18. Demonstration of photon Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders in dual-periodical multilayer structures based on porous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, J Octavio; Arriaga, Jesús; Mendez-Blas, Antonio; Reyes-Ayona, Edgar; Escorcia, José; Agarwal, Vivechana

    2012-07-23

    : Theoretical demonstration and experimental evidence of photon Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders (WSLs) in dual-periodical (DP) multilayers, based on porous silicon, are presented. An introduction of the linear gradient in refractive indices in DP structure, which is composed by stacking two different periodic substructures N times, resulted in the appearance of WSLs. Theoretical time-resolved reflection spectrum shows the photon Bloch oscillations with a period of 130 fs. Depending on the values of the structural parameters, one can observe the WSLs in the near infrared or visible region which may allow the generation of terahertz radiation with a potential applications in several fields like imaging.

  19. A primary care Web-based Intervention Modeling Experiment replicated behavior changes seen in earlier paper-based experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Treweek, S.; Francis, JJ; Bonetti, D; Barnett, K; Eccles, MP; Hudson, J.; Jones, C.; Pitts, NB; Ricketts, IW; Sullivan, F; Weal, M; MacLennan, G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Intervention Modeling Experiments (IMEs) are a way of developing and testing behavior change interventions before a trial. We aimed to test this methodology in a Web-based IME that replicated the trial component of an earlier, paper-based IME. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Three-arm, Web-based randomized evaluation of two interventions (persuasive communication and action plan) and a "no intervention" comparator. The interventions were designed to reduce the number of antibiotic p...

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  1. ICT Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Bay, Gina

    In this demonstration we present and discuss two interrelated on-line learning resources aimed at supporting international students at Danish universities in building study skills (the Study Metro) and avoiding plagiarism (Stopplagiarism). We emphasize the necessity of designing online learning r...

  2. An assessment of global meteorological droughts based on HAPPI experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenbin; Sun, Fubao; Lim, Wee Ho; Zhang, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Droughts caused water shortages could lead to serious consequences on the socioeconomic and environmental well-being. In the context of changing climate, droughts monitoring, attributions and impact assessments have been performed using observations (e.g., Sun et al., 2012; Zhang et al., 2016) and climate model projections (e.g., Liu et al., 2016, 2017); with expectation that such scientific knowledge would feed into long-term adaptation and mitigation plans to tackle potentially unfavorable future drought impacts in a warming world. Inspired by the 2015 Paris Agreement, the HAPPI (Half a degree Additional warming, Projections, Prognosis and Impacts) experiments were set up to better inform international policymakers about the socioeconomic and environmental impacts under less severe global warming conditions. This study aims to understand the potential shift in meteorological droughts from the past into the future on a global scale. Based on the HAPPI data, we evaluate the change in drought related indices (i.e., PET/P, PDSI) from the past to the future scenarios (1.5 and 2 degrees Celsius warming). Here we present some early results (MIROC5 as demonstration) on identified hotspots and discuss the differences in severity of droughts between these warming worlds and associated consequences. References: Liu W, and Sun F, 2017. Projecting and attributing future changes of evaporative demand over China in CMIP5 climate models, Journal of Hydrometeorology, doi: 10.1175/JHM-D-16-0204.1 Liu W, and Sun F, 2016. Assessing estimates of evaporative demand in climate models using observed pan evaporation over China. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmosphere 121, 8329-8349 Zhang J, Sun F, Xu J, Chen Y, Sang Y, -F, and Liu C, 2016. Dependence of trends in and sensitivity of drought over China (1961-2013) on potential evaporation model. Geophysical Research Letters 43, 206-213 Sun F, Roderick M, Farquhar G, 2012. Changes in the variability of global land precipitation

  3. A Comparison of Field-Based and Lab-Based Experiments to Evaluate User Experience of Personalised Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing debate in the literature regarding the tradeoffs between lab and field evaluation of mobile devices. This paper presents a comparison of field-based and lab-based experiments to evaluate user experience of personalised mobile devices at large sports events. A lab experiment is recommended when the testing focus is on the user interface and application-oriented usability related issues. However, the results suggest that a field experiment is more suitable for investigating a wider range of factors affecting the overall acceptability of the designed mobile service. Such factors include the system function and effects of actual usage contexts aspects. Where open and relaxed communication is important (e.g., where participant groups are naturally reticent to communicate, this is more readily promoted by the use of a field study.

  4. Demonstration of a modelling-based multi-criteria decision analysis procedure for prioritisation of occupational risks from manufactured nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristozov, Danail; Zabeo, Alex; Alstrup Jensen, Keld; Gottardo, Stefania; Isigonis, Panagiotis; Maccalman, Laura; Critto, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Several tools to facilitate the risk assessment and management of manufactured nanomaterials (MN) have been developed. Most of them require input data on physicochemical properties, toxicity and scenario-specific exposure information. However, such data are yet not readily available, and tools that can handle data gaps in a structured way to ensure transparent risk analysis for industrial and regulatory decision making are needed. This paper proposes such a quantitative risk prioritisation tool, based on a multi-criteria decision analysis algorithm, which combines advanced exposure and dose-response modelling to calculate margins of exposure (MoE) for a number of MN in order to rank their occupational risks. We demonstrated the tool in a number of workplace exposure scenarios (ES) involving the production and handling of nanoscale titanium dioxide, zinc oxide (ZnO), silver and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The results of this application demonstrated that bag/bin filling, manual un/loading and dumping of large amounts of dry powders led to high emissions, which resulted in high risk associated with these ES. The ZnO MN revealed considerable hazard potential in vivo, which significantly influenced the risk prioritisation results. In order to study how variations in the input data affect our results, we performed probabilistic Monte Carlo sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, which demonstrated that the performance of the proposed model is stable against changes in the exposure and hazard input variables.

  5. Control-based continuation: Bifurcation and stability analysis for physical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, David A. W.

    2017-02-01

    Control-based continuation is technique for tracking the solutions and bifurcations of nonlinear experiments. The idea is to apply the method of numerical continuation to a feedback-controlled physical experiment such that the control becomes non-invasive. Since in an experiment it is not (generally) possible to set the state of the system directly, the control target becomes a proxy for the state. Control-based continuation enables the systematic investigation of the bifurcation structure of a physical system, much like if it was numerical model. However, stability information (and hence bifurcation detection and classification) is not readily available due to the presence of stabilising feedback control. This paper uses a periodic auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs (ARX) to approximate the time-varying linearisation of the experiment around a particular periodic orbit, thus providing the missing stability information. This method is demonstrated using a physical nonlinear tuned mass damper.

  6. Location-based solutions in the Experience centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Alapetite, Alexandre; Holdgaard, Nanna

    In this paper we present a prototype system for location-based guiding. A user survey has been conducted and the observations are used to support design choices. The prototype allows for both indoor and outdoor navigation at and in the vicinity of the experience centre NaturBornholm1 in Denmark u...... using a combination of Bluetooth, GPS and QR-codes. Bluetooth and GPS are used for location-based information and QR-codes are used to convey user preferences....

  7. Location-based solutions in the Experience centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzner Hansen, Dan; Alapetite, Alexandre Philippe Bernard; Holdgaard, Nanna

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a prototype system for location-based guiding. A user survey has been conducted and the observations are used to support design choices. The prototype allows for both indoor and outdoor navigation at and in the vicinity of the experience centre NaturBornholm1 in Denmark u...... using a combination of Bluetooth, GPS and QRcodes. Bluetooth and GPS are used for location-based information and QR-codes are used to convey user preferences....

  8. Demonstration of long-pulse acceleration of high power positive ion beam with JT-60 positive ion source in Japan–Korea joint experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, A., E-mail: kojima.atsushi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Hanada, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Jeong, S.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Y.S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, D.H.; Kim, T.S.; Lee, K.W.; Park, M.; Jung, B.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Mogaki, K.; Komata, M.; Dairaku, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The long-pulse acceleration of the high-power positive ion beam has been demonstrated with the JT-60 positive ion source in the joint experiment among Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) under the collaboration program for the development of plasma heating and current drive systems. In this joint experiment, the increase of the heat load and the breakdowns induced by the degradation of the beam optics due to the gas accumulation was one of the critical issues for the long-pulse acceleration. As a result of development of the long-pulse operation techniques of the ion source and facilities of the neutral beam test stand in KAERI, 2 MW 100 s beam has been achieved for the first time. The achieved beam performance satisfies the JT-60SA requirement which is designed to be a 1.94 MW ion beam power from an ion source corresponding to total neutral beam power of 20 MW with 24 ion sources. Therefore, it was found that the JT-60 positive ion sources were applicable in the JT-60SA neutral beam injectors. Moreover, because this ion source is planned to be a backup ion source for KSTAR, the operational region and characteristic has been clarified to apply to the KSTAR neutral beam injector.

  9. Statistics Related Self-Efficacy A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Demonstrating a Significant Link to Prior Mathematics Experiences for Graduate Level Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Larwin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined students' statistics-related self-efficacy, as measured with the current statistics self-efficacy (CSSE inventory developed by Finney and Schraw (2003. Structural equation modeling was used to check the confirmatory factor analysis of the one-dimensional factor of CSSE. Once confirmed, this factor was used to test whether a significant link to prior mathematics experiences exists. Additionally a new post-structural equation modeling (SEM application was employed to compute error-free latent variable score for CSSE in an effort to examine the ancillary effects of gender, age, ethnicity, department, degree level, hours completed, expected course grade, number of college-level math classes, current GPA on students' CSSE scores. Results support the one-dimensional construct and as expected, the model demonstrated a significant link between CSSE scores and prior mathematics experiences to CSSE. Additionally the students' department, expected grade, and number of prior math classes were found to have a significant effect on student's CSSE scores.

  10. Studying the User Experience of a Tablet Based Math Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiili, Kristian; Ketamo, Harri; Koivisto, Antti; Finn, Enda

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first findings from Math Elements user experience (UX) studies. Math Elements is a game that makes the whole Finnish maths K-2 curriculum (kindergarten and primary school grades 1 and 2) available for players all over the world. The game is based on teachable agent approach, which means that in the game players can teach…

  11. Students' Experience of Problem-Based Learning in Virtual Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbings, Peter; Lidstone, John; Bruce, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports outcomes of a study focused on discovering qualitatively different ways students experience problem-based learning in virtual space. A well-accepted and documented qualitative research method was adopted for this study. Five qualitatively different conceptions are described, each revealing characteristics of increasingly complex…

  12. Object based data access at the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuess, S.; D0 Collaboration

    1995-11-01

    The D{O} Experiment at Fermilab is currently participating in the FNAL Computing Division`s ``Computing for Analysis Project`` (CAP) to investigate object based data storage and access. Following a short description of the CAP system architecture, the D{O} data model is explored. A brief discussion of the method of operation of the CAP system leads into a concluding section.

  13. Location-based solutions in the experience center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzner Hansen, Dan; Alapetite, Alexandre; Holdgaard, Nanna

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a prototype system for location-based guiding. A user survey has been conducted and the observations are used to support design choices. The prototype allows for both indoor and outdoor navigation at and in the vicinity of the NaturBornholm [1] experience centre in Denmark...

  14. Location-based solutions in the Experience centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Alapetite, Alexandre; Holdgaard, Nanna

    In this paper we present a prototype system for location-based guiding. A user survey has been conducted and the observations are used to support design choices. The prototype allows for both indoor and outdoor navigation at and in the vicinity of the experience centre NaturBornholm1 in Denmark...

  15. Location-based solutions in the Experience centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Alapetite, Alexandre; Holdgaard, Nanna

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a prototype system for location-based guiding. A user survey has been conducted and the observations are used to support design choices. The prototype allows for both indoor and outdoor navigation at and in the vicinity of the NaturBornholm' experience centre in Denmark...

  16. Location-based solutions in the Experience centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzner Hansen, Dan; Alapetite, Alexandre Philippe Bernard; Holdgaard, Nanna

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a prototype system for location-based guiding. A user survey has been conducted and the observations are used to support design choices. The prototype allows for both indoor and outdoor navigation at and in the vicinity of the experience centre NaturBornholm1 in Denmark...

  17. Studying the User Experience of a Tablet Based Math Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiili, Kristian; Ketamo, Harri; Koivisto, Antti; Finn, Enda

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first findings from Math Elements user experience (UX) studies. Math Elements is a game that makes the whole Finnish maths K-2 curriculum (kindergarten and primary school grades 1 and 2) available for players all over the world. The game is based on teachable agent approach, which means that in the game players can teach…

  18. Price Bubbles with Discounting: A Web-Based Classroom Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostian, AJ A.; Holt, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a Web-based classroom experiment with two assets: cash and a stock that pays a random dividend. The interest rate on cash, coupled with a well-chosen final redemption value for the stock, induces a flat trajectory for the fundamental value of the stock. However, prices typically rise above this value during a session. The…

  19. The Effect of Swimming Experience on Acquisition and Retention of Swimming-Based Taste Aversion Learning in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2010-01-01

    Swimming endows rats with an aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. The present study explored whether the experience of swimming before or after the taste-swimming trials interferes with swimming-based taste aversion learning. Experiment 1 demonstrated that a single preexposure to 20 min of swimming was as effective as four or…

  20. Community based clinical program: the Medunsa physiotherapy students` experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Taukobong

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Backgound: The aim of community based clinical training is tproduce graduates who are responsive to the health needs of their communit It is envisaged that upon completion of training graduates would go back an serve their respective communities following exposure to community need Program evaluation should therefore allow students to express the inadequacie and strengths of the program.Aim: To evaluate the community-based clinical program through student's experiences.Methodology: A qualitative research design was used. End of block students reports for both third (8 and fourth (15 year physiotherapy students (n = 23 were used to collect the data. Responses in the reports were grouped into the following categories for purpose of data analysis: feeling about the block, suggestion/s and supervision.Results: The students described the community based clinical program as an unique learning experience which equipped them with the understanding of life within communities. Sixty five percent (65% expressed satisfaction with the supervision given. The main complaints were amounts of paper work involved and clinical workload.Conclusion: The student's experiences indicated that the community-based clinical program within the MEDUNSA physiotherapy department realizes the goal of community-based clinical training as determined by WHO, except for inclusion of some multi-professional approaches and adaptation of the supervision provided.

  1. Development of Networked Virtual Experiment System Based on Virtual Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-tai Guo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available China’s higher education has been going through a period of rapid expansion in undergraduate population,and this means a much heavier demand on teaching resources such as laboratories, experiments, teaching staff,etc., which cannot possibly be made available all of a sudden.To deal with this situation, we found virtual reality (VR technology very helpful. Virtual reality (VR has found many applications in education; and the resources of virtual education such as virtual campus, virtual laboratory etc. are used more and more widely, especially in the field of higher education. But so far virtual campus was mainly regarded as a means of image exhibition, and virtual laboratories were no more than 2D display of experimental processes and equipments. To make better use of these resources, this paper puts forward the concept of networked virtual experiment systems based on virtual campus by combining the virtual laboratory and virtual campus with the technique of LAN (Local area network, and establishes its theoretical model. Finally, a networked virtual experiment system based on virtual campus is developed using VRML and 3DSMAX. Networked virtual experiment system based on virtual campus has a promising future for various applications in higher education.

  2. A rocket-based combined-cycle engine prototype demonstrating comprehensive component compatibility and effective mode transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; He, Guoqiang; Liu, Peijin; Qin, Fei; Wei, Xianggeng; Liu, Jie; Wu, Lele

    2016-11-01

    A rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine was designed to demonstrate its broad applicability in the ejector and ramjet modes within the flight range from Mach 0 to Mach 4.5. To validate the design, a prototype was fabricated and tested as a freejet engine operating at flight Mach 3 using hydrocarbon fuel. The proposed design was a single module, heat sink steel alloy model with an interior fuel supply and active control system and a fully integrated flowpath that was comprehensively instrumented with pressure sensors. The mass capture and back pressure resistance of the inlet were numerically investigated and experimentally calibrated. The combustion process and rocket operation during mode transition were investigated by direct-connect tests. Finally, the comprehensive component compatibility and multimodal operational capability of the RBCC engine prototype was validated through freejet tests. This paper describes the design of the RBCC engine prototype, reviews the testing procedures, and discusses the experimental results of these efforts in detail.

  3. A LEGO Watt Balance: An apparatus to demonstrate the definition of mass based on the new SI

    CERN Document Server

    Chao, L S; Newell, D B; Pratt, J R; Sineriz, G; Seifert, F; Cao, A; Haddad, D; Zhang, X

    2014-01-01

    A global effort to redefine our International System of Units (SI) is underway and the change to the new system is expected to occur in 2018. Within the newly redefined SI, the present base units will still exist but be derived from fixed numerical values of seven reference constants. More specifically, the unit of mass, the kilogram, will be realized through a fixed value of the Planck constant $h$. For instance, a watt balance can be used to realize the kilogram unit of mass within a few parts in $10^8$. Such a balance has been designed and constructed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. For educational outreach and to demonstrate the principle, we have constructed a LEGO tabletop watt balance capable of measuring a gram size mass to 1 % relative uncertainty. This article presents the design, construction, and performance of the LEGO watt balance and its ability to determine $h$

  4. A Ground-Based Study on Extruder Standoff Distance for the 3D Printing in Zero Gravity Technology Demonstration Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Beshears, R. D.; Rolin, T. D.; Rabenberg, E. M.; Soohoo, H. A.; Ledbetter, F. E., III; Bell, S. C.

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of phase I specimens produced as part of the 3D printing in zero G technology demonstration mission exhibited some differences in structure and performance for specimens printed onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and specimens produced on the ground with the same printer prior to its launch. This study uses the engineering test unit for the printer, identical to the unit on ISS, to conduct a ground-based investigation of the impact of the distance between the extruder tip and the build tray on material outcomes. This standoff distance was not held constant for the phase I flight prints and is hypothesized to be a major source of the material variability observed in the phase I data set.

  5. Design and Implementation of a DSP-Based MIMO System Prototype for Real-Time Demonstration and Indoor Channel Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H. Reed

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The design and implementation of the Virginia Tech Space-Time Advanced Radio (VT-STAR, a multiple antenna element space-time (ST processing prototype testbed, is presented. The testbed is a research tool for comparing practical and theoretical performance metrics (e.g., throughput, link reliability in different wireless channel conditions. The prototype builds around software-defined radio (SDR concepts on a DSP platform and provides the flexibility to implement various forms of ST techniques. Different components of the system are described in detail, including the software implementation, I/O schemes with custom hardware, and data transfer mechanisms between the DSP and the host PC. Two different example realizations are presented, a real-time demonstration and an offline measurement tool. Finally, some representative measurement results obtained in indoor environments are presented. These results show VT-STAR to be a promising tool for performing MIMO experiments and generating channel measurements that can complement simulation studies in this area.

  6. Axion Search by Laser-based Experiment OSQAR

    OpenAIRE

    Sulc, Miroslav; Pugnat, Pierre; Ballou, Rafik; Deferne, Guy; Duvillaret, Lionel; Flekova, Lucie; Finger, Michael; Finger Jr, Michael; Hošek, Jan; Husek, Thomas; Jost, Rémy; Kral, Miroslav; Kunc, Štěpán; Macuchova, Karolina; Meissner, Krzysztof,

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Laser-based experimentOSQAR in CERN is aimed to the search of the axions by twomethods. The photon regeneration experiment is using two LHC dipole magnets of the length 14.3 m and magnetic field 9.5 T equipped with an optical barrier at the end of the first magnet. It looks as light shining through the wall. No excess of events above the background was detected at this arrangement. Nevertheless, this result extends the exclusion region for the axion mass. The second me...

  7. Shifting from Production to Service to Experience-Based Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Jannis; de Lima, Edson Pinheiro

    This chapter covers the shift in focus of value added business operations from ­production to services, and in turn, to experience-based operations where customer involvement itself becomes part of the offering. The shift has significant implications for how businesses are managed. The greater service focus affects the firm's unique value proposition, which necessitates considerations on strategy, supplier relations, post-sale offerings and so on. Meanwhile, the inclusion of customer ­experiences affect the way operations are designed and employed so that these are structurally systematically captured and capitalised.

  8. Building Computer-Based Experiments in Psychology without Programming Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisoto, Pablo; Bellido, Alberto; Ruiz, Javier; Juanes, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    Research in Psychology usually requires to build and run experiments. However, although this task has required scripting, recent computer tools based on graphical interfaces offer new opportunities in this field for researchers with non-programming skills. The purpose of this study is to illustrate and provide a comparative overview of two of the main free open source "point and click" software packages for building and running experiments in Psychology: PsychoPy and OpenSesame. Recommendations for their potential use are further discussed.

  9. IGCC technology and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palonen, J. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Karhula (Finland). Hans Ahlstrom Lab.; Lundqvist, R.G. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Helsinki (Finland); Staahl, K. [Sydkraft AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    Future energy production will be performed by advanced technologies that are more efficient, more environmentally friendly and less expensive than current technologies. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants have been proposed as one of these systems. Utilising biofuels in future energy production will also be emphasised since this lowers substantially carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere due to the fact that biomass is a renewable form of energy. Combining advanced technology and biomass utilisation is for this reason something that should and will be encouraged. A. Ahlstrom Corporation of Finland and Sydkraft AB of Sweden have as one part of company strategies adopted this approach for the future. The companies have joined their resources in developing a biomass-based IGCC system with the gasification part based on pressurised circulating fluidized-bed technology. With this kind of technology electrical efficiency can be substantially increased compared to conventional power plants. As a first concrete step, a decision has been made to build a demonstration plant. This plant, located in Vaernamo, Sweden, has already been built and is now in commissioning and demonstration stage. The system comprises a fuel drying plant, a pressurised CFB gasifier with gas cooling and cleaning, a gas turbine, a waste heat recovery unit and a steam turbine. The plant is the first in the world where the integration of a pressurised gasifier with a gas turbine will be realised utilising a low calorific gas produced from biomass. The capacity of the Vaernamo plant is 6 MW of electricity and 9 MW of district heating. Technology development is in progress for design of plants of sizes from 20 to 120 MWe. The paper describes the Bioflow IGCC system, the Vaernamo demonstration plant and experiences from the commissioning and demonstration stages. (orig.)

  10. Single photon counting for space based quantum experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekara, R.; Tang, Z. K.; Tan, Y. C.; Cheng, C.; Wildfeuer, C.; Ling, A.

    2015-05-01

    We present a software based control system for Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) that enables constant photon detection efficiency irrespective of the diode's junction temperature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this control system enables passively quenched GM-APDs to double the rate of photon detection events before saturation compared to the standard control method that fixes the junction temperature and applied bias voltage. We present data demonstrating the robustness of the GM-APD control system when tested in near-space conditions using a correlated photon pair source carried by a weather balloon to an altitude of 35.5 km.

  11. Axion search by laser-based experiment OSQAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulc, M.; Pugnat, P.; Ballou, R.; Deferne, G.; Duvillaret, L.; Flekova, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Hosek, J.; Husek, T.; Jost, R.; Kral, M.; Kunc, S.; Macuchova, K.; Meissner, K. A.; Morville, J.; Romanini, D.; Schott, M.; Siemko, A.; Slunecka, M.; Vitrant, G.; Zicha, J.

    2013-08-01

    Laser-based experiment OSQAR in CERN is aimed to the search of the axions by two methods. The photon regeneration experiment is using two LHC dipole magnets of the length 14.3 m and magnetic field 9.5 T equipped with an optical barrier at the end of the first magnet. It looks as light shining through the wall. No excess of events above the background was detected at this arrangement. Nevertheless, this result extends the exclusion region for the axion mass. The second method wants to measure the ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence for the first time. An optical scheme with electro-optical modulator has been proposed, validated and subsequently improved. Cotton-Mouton constant for air was determined in this experiment setup.

  12. Axion search by laser-based experiment OSQAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulc, M., E-mail: miroslav.sulc@tul.cz [Technical University of Liberec (Czech Republic); Pugnat, P. [LNCMI-G, CNRS-UJF-UPS-INSA, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex-9 (France); Ballou, R. [Institut Néel, CNRS and Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex-9 (France); Deferne, G. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva-23 (Switzerland); Duvillaret, L. [IMEP-LAHC, UMR CNRS 5130, Minatec-INPG, 3 parvis Louis Néel, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble Cedex-1 (France); Flekova, L. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Finger, M.; Finger, M. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Hosek, J. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Husek, T. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Jost, R. [LSP, UMR CNRS 5588, Université Joseph Fourier, BP 87, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Kral, M. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Kunc, S. [Technical University of Liberec (Czech Republic); Macuchova, K. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Meissner, K.A. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw (Poland); Morville, J. [LASIM, UMR CNRS 5579, Université Claude Bernard Lyon-1, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Romanini, D. [LSP, UMR CNRS 5588, Université Joseph Fourier, BP 87, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Schott, M.; Siemko, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva-23 (Switzerland); Slunecka, M. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2013-08-01

    Laser-based experiment OSQAR in CERN is aimed to the search of the axions by two methods. The photon regeneration experiment is using two LHC dipole magnets of the length 14.3 m and magnetic field 9.5 T equipped with an optical barrier at the end of the first magnet. It looks as light shining through the wall. No excess of events above the background was detected at this arrangement. Nevertheless, this result extends the exclusion region for the axion mass. The second method wants to measure the ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence for the first time. An optical scheme with electro-optical modulator has been proposed, validated and subsequently improved. Cotton–Mouton constant for air was determined in this experiment setup.

  13. A smartphone-based introductory astronomy experiment: Seasons investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durelle, Jeremy; Jones, Jennifer; Merriman, Steven; Balan, Aurelian

    2017-02-01

    Light sensor probes are useful in experiments that investigate seasonal variations and the nature of light. However, having a dedicated light probe is not always possible or even convenient for many instructors. Modern smartphone technology gives instructors the ability to use built-in light sensors as an inexpensive alternative. This introductory experiment will have students use a smartphone loaded with a light detection app to quantitatively determine how changing latitude on Earth changes flux received. The purpose is to have students discover how the different seasons arise from the Earth-Sun system. While performing the experiment and analyzing the data, students will also discover the following important and relevant physical relationships: distance from light source and light brightness (flux), latitude and flux, and Earth's orientation and location (latitude) of maximum flux. By piecing all of these relationships together, students are able to explain the origins of the different seasons based on the data they collected.

  14. GASIS demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidas, E.H. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  15. [2]Pseudorotaxane Formation with FRET Based Luminescence Response: Demonstration of Boolean Operations through Self-Sorting on Solid Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Monalisa; Maity, Arunava; Dey, Ananta; Das, Amitava

    2016-10-07

    Binary pseudorotaxane formation between an aza crown derivative as host (H) and two different imidazolium derivatives as guests (G1 and G2) have been studied in detail by NMR ((1)H NMR, 2D NOESY), optical (steady state electronic and emission spectroscopy), and mass spectroscopy. Binding stoichiometry (1:1), association constant for the respective [2]pseudorotaxane formation (Ka(H.G1) = (2.61 ± 0.015) × 10(3) M(-1) and Ka(H.G2) = (1.27 ± 0.16) × 10(3) M(-1)), and associated thermodynamic parameters are also evaluated based on isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) studies. FRET based luminescence ON responses are observed on formation of the binary pseudorotaxane (H.G1 and H.G2) in a nonpolar medium like dichloromethane. The thermodynamic feasibility of such an energy transfer process is also examined. The higher affinity of H and 18-crown-6 toward K(+), as compared to those toward G1 or G2, and the reversibility in the host-guest binding process are utilized in demonstrating the self-sorting phenomena with associated changes in luminescence responses that could be correlated for Boolean operators like YES, INHIBIT, OR, and AND gates.

  16. An FPGA based demonstrator for a topological processor in the,future ATLAS L1-Calo trigger (“GOLD”)

    CERN Document Server

    "Bauss, B"; The ATLAS collaboration; "Degele, R"; "Ebling, A"; "Ji, W"; "Meyer, C"; "Moritz, S"; "Schaefer, U"; "Simioni, E"; "Tapprogge, S"; "Wenzel, V"

    2011-01-01

    The existing ATLAS trigger consists of three levels. The level 1 (L1) is an FPGAs based custom designed trigger, while the second and third levels are software based. The LHC machine plans to bring the beam energy to the nominal value of 7 TeV and to increase the luminosity in the coming years. The current L1 trigger system is therefore seriously challenged. To cope with the resulting higher event rate, as part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade, a new electronics module is foreseen to be added in the L1-Calo electronics chain: the topological processor. Such processor is provided with fast optical I/O and large bandwidth capability, in order to use the information on the cluster position in space (i.e. jets in the calorimeters or muons in the muon detectors) and improve the purity of the L1 triggers streams by applying topological cuts within the latency budget. In this talk, an overview of the adopted tecnological solutions and the R&D activities on the demonstrator (“GOLD”) are presented.

  17. In situ and nonvolatile photoluminescence tuning and nanodomain writing demonstrated by all-solid-state devices based on graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Takashi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Terabe, Kazuya; Aono, Masakazu

    2015-02-24

    In situ and nonvolatile tuning of photoluminescence (PL) has been achieved based on graphene oxide (GO), the PL of which is receiving much attention because of various potential applications of the oxide (e.g., display, lighting, and nano-biosensor). The technique is based on in situ and nonvolatile tuning of the sp(2) domain fraction to the sp(3) domain fraction (sp(2)/sp(3) fraction) in GO through an electrochemical redox reaction achieved by solid electrolyte thin films. The all-solid-state variable PL device was fabricated by GO and proton-conducting mesoporous SiO2 thin films, which showed an extremely low PL background. The device successfully tuned the PL peak wavelength in a very wide range from 393 to 712 nm, covering that for chemically tuned GO, by adjusting the applied DC voltage within several hundred seconds. We also demonstrate the sp(2)/sp(3) fraction tuning using a conductive atomic force microscope. The device achieved not only writing, but also erasing of the sp(2)/sp(3)-fraction-tuned nanodomain (both directions operation). The combination of these techniques is applicable to a wide range of nano-optoelectronic devices including nonvolatile PL memory devices and on-demand rewritable biosensors that can be integrated into nano- and microtips which are transparent, ultrathin, flexible, and inexpensive.

  18. Latent profile analysis of regression-based norms demonstrates relationship of compounding MS symptom burden and negative work events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frndak, Seth E; Smerbeck, Audrey M; Irwin, Lauren N; Drake, Allison S; Kordovski, Victoria M; Kunker, Katrina A; Khan, Anjum L; Benedict, Ralph H B

    2016-10-01

    We endeavored to clarify how distinct co-occurring symptoms relate to the presence of negative work events in employed multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Latent profile analysis (LPA) was utilized to elucidate common disability patterns by isolating patient subpopulations. Samples of 272 employed MS patients and 209 healthy controls (HC) were administered neuroperformance tests of ambulation, hand dexterity, processing speed, and memory. Regression-based norms were created from the HC sample. LPA identified latent profiles using the regression-based z-scores. Finally, multinomial logistic regression tested for negative work event differences among the latent profiles. Four profiles were identified via LPA: a common profile (55%) characterized by slightly below average performance in all domains, a broadly low-performing profile (18%), a poor motor abilities profile with average cognition (17%), and a generally high-functioning profile (9%). Multinomial regression analysis revealed that the uniformly low-performing profile demonstrated a higher likelihood of reported negative work events. Employed MS patients with co-occurring motor, memory and processing speed impairments were most likely to report a negative work event, classifying them as uniquely at risk for job loss.

  19. A socio-economic study along with impact assessment for laterite based technology demonstration for arsenic mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sourav; Roy, Anirban; Mukherjee, Raka; Mondal, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Sankha; Chatterjee, Somak; Mukherjee, Munmun; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; De, Sirshendu

    2017-04-01

    Arsenic contamination mitigation technologies have been adsorption-based, but the most widely-used and traditionally available adsorbents suffered inherent limitations, including cost infeasibility and problems associated with regeneration and disposal of the spent adsorbent. The present technology is based on indigenously developed activated laterite prepared from the naturally and abundantly available material, and can hence easily be scaled up for community usage and large scale implementation. The total arsenic removal capacity is 32.5mg/g, which is the highest among all naturally occurring arsenic adsorbents. A major issue in earlier adsorbents was that during regeneration, the adsorbed arsenic would be released back into the environment (leaching), and would eventually contaminate the groundwater again. But the adsorbent in this filter does not require regeneration during its five-year lifespan and does not leach upon disposal. An attempt is made to test and demonstrate the practical implementation of the technology - its effectiveness and viability in three community (primary schools - one in Malda and two in north 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India) and 20 household filters, catering to over 5000 people in different areas of West Bengal exposed to high arsenic contamination of groundwater (ranging from 0.05 to 0.5mg/l). The work also focuses on the social impact of the real life technological solution on the lives on the affected people in the worst hit arsenic affected communities, perhaps the greatest public health risk emergency of the decade.

  20. Path Control Experiment of Mobile Robot Based on Supervised Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Chi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available To solve the weak capacity and low control accuracy of the robots which adapt to the complex working conditions, proposed that a path control method based on the driving experience and supervised learning. According to the slope road geometry characteristics, established the modeling study due to ramp pavement path control method and the control structure based on monitoring and self-learning. Made use of the Global Navigation Satellite System did the experiment. The test data illustrates that when the running speed is not greater than 5 m / s, the straight-line trajectory path transverse vertical deviation within 士20cm ,which proved that the control method has a high feasibility. 

  1. Experiment and Demonstration of Organic Manure Decomposition Agent Rot Fungus Ferment%有机肥腐熟剂腐菌酵素的示范试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永存; 刘桂芳; 李聪晓

    2011-01-01

    In order to test the effects of rot fungus ferment,a series of multi-pilot experiment and demonstration was conducted on different crops and on the decomposition of organic manure.The results showed that rot fungus ferment could not only promote the fermentation process of organic manure,shorten its maturity time,but also supply probiotics in soil,inhibit soil-borne diseases,increase crop yield and improve the quality of agricultural products,which should be widely promoted.%为了验证腐菌酵素的作用,进行了有机肥发酵试验和对多种作物的多点试验示范。结果证明:腐菌酵素不仅能够缩短有机肥发酵腐熟的时间,还能补充土壤益生菌、抑制土传病害、增加农作物产量、改善农产品品质,具有广阔的推广前景。

  2. A scintillator based muon and KLong detector for the Belle II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aushev, T; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Danilov, M; Katrenko, P; Mizuk, R; Pakhlova, G; Pakhlov, P; Rusinov, V; Solovieva, E; Tarkovsky, E; Tikhomirov, I; Uglov, T

    2014-01-01

    A new muon and K_Long detector based on scintillators will be used for the endcap and inner barrel regions in the Belle II experiment, currently under construction. The increased luminosity of the e+e- SuperKEKB collider entails challenging detector requirements. We demonstrate that relatively inexpensive polystyrene scintillator stips with wave length shifting fibers ensure a sufficient light yield at the Silcon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) photodetector, are robust and provide improved physics performance for the Belle II experiment compared to its predecessor, Belle.

  3. Demonstrating mood repair with a situation-based measure of self-compassion and self-criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Caroline J; King, John A; Brewin, Chris R

    2015-12-01

    The clinical significance of self-criticism and self-compassion has prompted the development of questionnaires assessing these constructs. However, there is a lack of measures assessing their interaction within specific contexts and potential involvement in mood repair processes. To rectify this, we developed the Self-Compassion and Self-Criticism Scales (SCCS), based on responses to specific scenarios, and examined its psychometric properties in an online survey and an experimental situation. In study 1, standard psychometric procedures were used to investigate the reliability and validity of the SCCS. In study 2, an experimental challenge involving a difficult language task was used to test its sensitivity to change. In study 1, exploratory factor analysis (n = 413) showed a clear two-factor structure of the SCCS denoting two orthogonal scales, with high internal validity (α ≥ .87). Correlations between the SCCS and existing measures also demonstrated appropriate convergent validity. Study 2 (n = 90) provided preliminary evidence that the SCCS can detect changes in self-appraisals. Participants receiving no performance feedback from the challenge task showed reduced state self-criticism and increased state self-compassion, demonstrating mood repair. The SCCS has promise as a situational measure of self-compassion and self-criticism. In the context of specific problem situations, clients' levels of self-criticism and self-compassion may well be orthogonal and can be assessed with the SCCS. In setting treatment goals and assessing treatment outcome, it may be helpful to target both self-compassion and self-criticism separately. © 2015 The Authors. Psychology and Psychotherapy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the British Psychological Society.

  4. Experience with the behavior-basedRobot development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marian, Nicolae; Bilberg, Arne

    context. Instead of having stored computer-based models of surrounding environments (deliberative systems), behavior-based robots (BBR) are guided by their users through smart cooperation and interaction. For instance, there is no programming in the robot of what a crop field, cleaning floor......, including aspects to transform social contexts into behavioral control models and to plan a behavioral strategy and make it adaptive. Validation of ideas is made in an experiment with a group of LEGO mobile robots using a range of sensors and negotiating their roles in different environments, which...

  5. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  6. MODELING AND ROBUST DESIGN OF REMANUFACTURING LOGISTICS NETWORKS BASED ON DESIGN OF EXPERIMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Shouchang; Xi Lifeng; Hu Zongwu

    2004-01-01

    The uncertainty of time, quantity and quality of recycling products leads to the bad stability and flexibility of remanufacturing logistics networks, and general design only covered the minimizing logistics cost, thus, robust design is presented here to solve the uncertainty. The mathematical model of remanufacturing logistics networks is built based on stochastic distribution of uncontrollable factors, and robust objectives are presented. The integration of mathematical simulation and design of experiment method is performed to do sensitive analysis. The influence of each factor and level on the system is investigated, and the main factors and optimum combination are studied. The numbers of factors, level of each factor and design process of experiment are investigated as well. Finally, the process of robust design based on design of experiment is demonstrated by a detailed example.

  7. Demonstration of efficient spin injection and detection in various systems using Fe3O4 based spin injectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwetha G. Bhat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Half-metal based spin injector devices for spin injection and detection application have proven to be efficient owing to their enhanced injection and detection efficiency. In this study, we extend the all-electrical spin injection and detection studies into different systems like Si and GaAs using half-metal Fe3O4 as a spin injector in the presence and absence of tunnel barrier MgO. Injection into GaAs is verified using conventional Fe/MgO/GaAs devices. Room temperature spin injection into both p-type and n-type Si is achieved and the spin injection could be observed down to 100K. Obtained spin relaxation time for these n-type and p-type Si at different temperatures agree well with the existing reports. Further, the temperature dependent spin injection and detection is also successfully achieved in Fe3O4/GaAs (n-type Schottky devices, and a comparison study of the results with control experiment using Fe/MgO/GaAs (n-type devices confirm the relaxation to be similar in the GaAs substrate, as expected. Hence, even Fe3O4 material can be effectively used as an efficient spin injector as well as detector, making it an attractive candidate for the room temperature spintronics device applications.

  8. Mercury Beating Heart: Modifications to the Classical Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdoski, Metodija; Mirceski, Valentin; Petrusevski, Vladimir M.; Demiri, Sani

    2007-01-01

    The mercury beating heart (MBH) is a commonly performed experiment, which is based on varying oxidizing agents and substituting other metals for iron. Various modified versions of the classical demonstration of the experiment are presented.

  9. The role of representation in experience-based choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben R. Newell

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently it has been observed that different choices can be made about structurally identical risky decisions depending on whether information about outcomes and their probabilities is learned by description or from experience. Current evidence is equivocal with respect to whether this choice ``gap'' is entirely an artefact of biased samples. The current experiment investigates whether a representational bias exists at the point of encoding by examining choice in light of decision makers' mental representations of the alternatives, measured with both verbal and nonverbal judgment probes. We found that, when estimates were gauged by the nonverbal probe, participants presented with information in description format (as opposed to experience had a greater tendency to overestimate rare events and underestimate common events. The choice gap, however, remained even when accounting for this judgment distortion and the effects of sampling bias. Indeed, participants' estimation of the outcome distribution did not mediate their subsequent choice. It appears that experience-based choices may derive from a process that does not explicitly use probability information.

  10. Nature-based experiences and health of cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Heather; Jakubec, Sonya L

    2014-11-01

    Although exposure to, and interaction with, natural environments are recognized as health-promoting, little is understood about the use of nature contact in treatment and rehabilitation for cancer survivors. This narrative review summarizes the literature exploring the influence of nature-based experiences on survivor health. Key databases included CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Web of Science, PubMed, PsycArticles, ProQuest, and Cancerlit databases. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Four major categories emerged: 1) Dragon boat racing may enhance breast cancer survivor quality of life, 2) Natural environment may counteract attentional fatigue in newly diagnosed breast cancer survivors, 3) Adventure programs provide a positive experience for children and adolescent survivors, fostering a sense of belonging and self-esteem, and 4) Therapeutic landscapes may decrease state-anxiety, improving survivor health. This review contributes to a better understanding of the therapeutic effects of nature-based experiences on cancer survivor health, providing a point of entry for future study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Implementing security in computer based patient records clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, K R; Heimly, V; Lundgren, T I

    1995-01-01

    In Norway, organizational changes in hospitals and a stronger focus on patient safety have changed the way of organizing and managing paper based patient records. Hospital-wide patient records tend to replace department based records. Since not only clinicians, but also other non-medical staff have access to the paper records, they also have easy access to all the information which is available on a specific patient; such a system has obvious 'side effects' on privacy and security. Computer based patient records (CPRs) can provide the solution to this apparent paradox if the complex aspects of security, privacy, effectiveness, and user friendliness are focused on jointly from the outset in designing such systems. Clinical experiences in Norway show that it is possible to design patient record systems that provide a very useful tool for clinicians and other health care personnel (HCP) while fully complying with comprehensive security and privacy requirements.

  12. Large-Scale Demonstration of Perchlorate Removal Using Weak Base Anion Resin at Well No. 3 in Rialto, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    adding ultraviolet ( UV ) disinfection to disinfect groundwater before it is introduced to the ion exchange vessels; and adding granulated activated...carbon (GAC) vessels to remove VOC that has been detected in upstream monitoring wells. The WBA demonstration system treated water upstream of the UV ...Perchlorate Removal, Destruction, and Field Monitoring Demonstration.” 5.4.3 System Disinfection Prior to delivering water from the WBA demonstration

  13. Statistical design of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Ann L; Vitek, Olga

    2009-05-01

    We review the fundamental principles of statistical experimental design, and their application to quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We focus on class comparison using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and discuss how randomization, replication and blocking help avoid systematic biases due to the experimental procedure, and help optimize our ability to detect true quantitative changes between groups. We also discuss the issues of pooling multiple biological specimens for a single mass analysis, and calculation of the number of replicates in a future study. When applicable, we emphasize the parallels between designing quantitative proteomic experiments and experiments with gene expression microarrays, and give examples from that area of research. We illustrate the discussion using theoretical considerations, and using real-data examples of profiling of disease.

  14. Ultrastable, Zerodur-based optical benches for quantum gas experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Hannes; Hellmig, Ortwin; Wenzlawski, André; Grote, Alexander; Rafipoor, Amir Jones; Rafipoor, Mona; Sengstock, Klaus; Windpassinger, Patrick

    2014-07-10

    Operating ultracold quantum gas experiments outside of a laboratory environment has so far been a challenging goal, largely due to the lack of sufficiently stable optical systems. In order to increase the thermal stability of free-space laser systems, the application of nonstandard materials such as glass ceramics is required. Here, we report on Zerodur-based optical systems which include single-mode fiber couplers consisting of multiple components jointed by light-curing adhesives. The thermal stability is thoroughly investigated, revealing excellent fiber-coupling efficiencies between 0.85 and 0.92 in the temperature range from 17°C to 36°C. In conjunction with successfully performed vibration tests, these findings qualify our highly compact systems for atom interferometry experiments aboard a sounding rocket as well as various other quantum information and sensing applications.

  15. A school-based human papillomavirus vaccination program in barretos, Brazil: final results of a demonstrative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Humberto Tavares Guerreiro Fregnani

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The implementation of a public HPV vaccination program in several developing countries, especially in Latin America, is a great challenge for health care specialists. AIM: To evaluate the uptake and the three-dose completion rates of a school-based HPV vaccination program in Barretos (Brazil. METHODS: THE STUDY INCLUDED GIRLS WHO WERE ENROLLED IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS AND WHO REGULARLY ATTENDED THE SIXTH AND SEVENTH GRADES OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (MEAN AGE: 11.9 years. A meeting with the parents or guardians occurred approximately one week before the vaccination in order to explain the project and clarify the doubts. The quadrivalent vaccine was administered using the same schedule as in the product package (0-2-6 months. The school visits for regular vaccination occurred on previously scheduled dates. The vaccine was also made available at Barretos Cancer Hospital for the girls who could not be vaccinated on the day when the team visited the school. RESULTS: Among the potential candidates for vaccination (n = 1,574, the parents or guardians of 1,513 girls (96.1% responded to the invitation to participate in the study. A total of 1,389 parents or guardians agreed to participate in the program (acceptance rate = 91.8%. The main reason for refusing to participate in the vaccination program was fear of adverse events. The vaccine uptake rates for the first, second, and third doses were 87.5%, 86.3% and 85.0%, respectively. The three-dose completion rate was 97.2%. CONCLUSIONS: This demonstrative study achieved high rates of vaccination uptake and completion of three vaccine doses in children 10-16 years old from Brazil. The feasibility and success of an HPV vaccination program for adolescents in a developing country may depend on the integration between the public health and schooling systems.

  16. Demonstration of. cap alpha. -adrenoceptors in the rabbit bladder base and urethra with /sup 3/H-dihydroergocryptine ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, B. (Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Lund, Sweden)

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the presence of ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors in a crude membrane preparation made from rabbit bladder base and urethra. This was achieved by radioligand binding studies, using /sup 3/H-dihydro-..cap alpha..-ergocryptine (/sup 3/H-DHE) as the radioligand. The specific binding, i.e. the binding that could be inhibited by 10/sup -5/ M phentolamine, was saturable with 73 fmol /sup 3/H-DHE bound per mg membrane protein. Binding was at steady state after 60 min., and reversible. Rate constants for association and dissocation were 3x10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ min./sup -1/, and 2x10/sup -2/ min./sup -1/, respectively. A number of compounds were tested for their abilities to compete with /sup 3/H-DHE for the binding sites. The relative affinity of some adrenoceptor agonists was (-)-adrenaline>(-)-noradrenaline much larger than (+-)-isoprenaline. Steroselectivity was shown, since (-)-noradrenaline had 42 times higher affinity than (+)-noradrenaline. Adrenoceptor antagonists inhibited /sup 3/H-DHE binding in the following order of potency: DHE>phentolamine much larger than (+-)-propranolol. The dissociation constant, Ksub(D), for DHE to the binding sites was estimated in three different ways. The constants were derived from saturation, competition, and kinetic studies, and gave Ksub(D) values of 1.1,1.4 and 0.7 nM, respectively. The results suggest that ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors were labelled by /sup 3/H-DHE in the tissue homogenates.

  17. RESULTS FROM A DEMONSTRATION OF RF-BASED UF6 CYLINDER ACCOUNTING AND TRACKING SYSTEM INSTALLED AT A USEC FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Morgan, Jim [Innovative Solutions; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Carrick, Bernie [USEC, Inc.; Ken, Whittle [USEC, Inc.; Johns, R E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2008-09-01

    add tamper-indicating and data authentication features to some of the pertinent system components. Future efforts will focus on these needs along with implementing protocols relevant to IAEA safeguards. The work detailed in this report demonstrates the feasibility of constructing RF devices that can survive the operational rigors associated with the transportation, storage, and processing of UF6 cylinders. The system software specially designed for this project is called Cylinder Accounting and Tracking System (CATS). This report details the elements of the CATS rules-based architecture and its use in safeguards-monitoring and asset-tracking applications. Information is also provided on improvements needed to make the technology ready, as well as options for improving the safeguards aspects of the technology. The report also includes feedback from personnel involved in the testing, as well as individuals who could utilize an RF-based system in supporting the performance of their work. The system software was set up to support a Mailbox declaration, where a declaration can be made either before or after cylinder movements take place. When the declaration is made before cylinders move, the operators must enter this information into CATS. If the IAEA then shows up unexpectedly at the facility, they can see how closely the operational condition matches the declaration. If the declaration is made after the cylinders move, this provides greater operational flexibility when schedules are interrupted or are changed, by allowing operators to declare what moves have been completed. The IAEA can then compare where cylinders are with where CATS or the system says they are located. The ability of CATS to automatically generate Mailbox declarations is seen by the authors as a desirable feature. The Mailbox approach is accepted by the IAEA but has not been widely implemented (and never in enrichment facilities). During the course of this project, we have incorporated alternative

  18. How do students improve their value-based learning with task experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLozier, Sarah; Dunlosky, John

    2015-01-01

    When learning items that vary in reward, students improve their scores (i.e., earned reward) with task experience. In four experiments, we examined whether such improvements arise from better selective encoding of items that would earn more (vs. less) reward. Participants studied and recalled words across multiple study-test trials. On each trial, 12 words were slated with different values (typically from 1 to 12), and participants earned the point value assigned to a given word if it was correctly recalled. In all experiments, participants earned more points across the first two trials. In Experiment 1, participants either self-paced their study or had experimenter-paced study and in Experiment 2, some participants were penalised for each second spent during study. Improvements in points earned were related to increases in overall recall but not to selective encoding. In Experiment 3, some participants were given value-emphasised instructions, yet they did not demonstrate selective encoding. In Experiment 4, we used a larger range of point values, but selective encoding still did not account for the improvement in point scores across lists. These results suggest that metacognitively-driven selective encoding is not necessary to observe improvements in value-based learning.

  19. FPGA based data acquisition system for COMPASS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bodlak, M; Jary, V; Huber, S; Konorov, I; Levit, D; Novy, J; Paul, S; Salac, R; Virius, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the present data acquisition system (DAQ) of the COMPASS experiment at CERN and presents development of a new DAQ. The new DAQ must preserve present data format and be able to communicate with FPGA cards. Parts of the new DAQ are based on state machines and they are implemented in C++ with usage of the QT framework, the DIM library, and the IPBus technology. Prototype of the system is prepared and communication through DIM between parts was tested. An implementation of the IPBus technology was prepared and tested. The new DAQ proved to be able to fulfill requirements.

  20. Event-based Corpuscular Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Michielsen, K; De Raedt, H

    2010-01-01

    A corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one is presented. The event-based corpuscular model is shown to give a unified description of multiple-beam fringes of a plane parallel plate, single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer, Wheeler's delayed choice, photon tunneling, quantum erasers, two-beam interference, double-slit, and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm and Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiments.

  1. Experience-based exploration of complex energy systems

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In our energy-restricted world, planners and engineers have to cope with problems of CO2 emissions and oil- and gas-shortages. Many planning activities not captured under the heading of “futures studies” share common goals like dealing with an uncertain, complex future. We focus on two novel approaches: agent-based modelling and serious games. These approaches, even though they stem from the same general systems theory roots, allow its users to experience “reality” in different ways. This has...

  2. Over-the-air demonstration of spatial multiplexing at high data rates using real-time base-band processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jungnickel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Over-the-air transmission experiments with a realtime MIMO test-bed are reported. We describe in principle a hardware architecture for spatial multiplexing at high data rates, discuss in detail the implementation on a hybrid FPGA/DSP platform and show measured bit error rates from indoor transmission experiments. Per-antenna rate control and joint transmission are enabled as well using an ideal feed-back link. A functional test of these new techniques is described while detailed transmission experiments are still ongoing.

  3. Problem based learning in mental health nursing: the students' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Carol; Carver, Neil

    2012-04-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) is well established within the field of health-care education for professionals worldwide, although little has been done to explore the experiences of students undertaking a PBL course in mental health nursing. Without firm evidence of the benefits of PBL, educationalists in mental health might be reluctant to view it as an option in curricula design. This U.K. study examined the experiences of pre-registration post-graduate mental health student nurses undertaking a 2-year educational course in which all teaching and assessment followed a PBL philosophy. Focus groups were used throughout the course to elicit in-depth qualitative data that was analysed by applying a constant comparative method. The analysis of the data uncovered the following broad themes: 'moves to autonomy, 'surviving the groups' and 'the impact of PBL'. The findings show that participants had mainly positive experiences and gained a range of study and interpersonal skills central to mental health nursing. Participants described initial anxieties resulting from engagement in PBL. However, they increasingly gained confidence in this approach, exercising increasing control over the PBL process. Despite this increased autonomy, participants continued to value the input of skilled facilitators. A recurring issue centred on the potential for interpersonal conflict within the student group and its impact on their learning. It is suggested that more research is needed examining the use of PBL in mental health nursing. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Cultural based preconceptions in aesthetic experience of architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available On a broader scale, the aim of this paper is to examine theoretically the effects a cultural context has on the aesthetic experience of images existing in perceived reality. Minimalism in architecture, as direct subject of research, is a field of particularities in which we observe functioning of this correlation. Through the experiment with the similarity phenomenon, the paper follows specific manifestations of general formal principles and variability of meaning of minimalism in architecture in limited areas of cultural backgrounds of Serbia and Japan. The goal of the comparative analysis of the examples presented is to indicate the conditions that may lead to a possibly different aesthetic experience in two different cultural contexts. Attribution of different meanings to similar formal visual language of architecture raises questions concerning the system of values, which produces these meanings in their cultural and historical perspectives. The establishment of values can also be affected by preconceptions resulting from association of perceived similarities. Are the preconceptions in aesthetic reception of architecture conditionally affected by pragmatic needs, symbolic archetypes, cultural metaphors based on tradition or ideologically constructed dogmas? Confronting philosophical postulates of the Western and Eastern traditions with the transculturality theory of Wolfgang Welsch, the answers may become more available.

  5. Cleaners' experiences with group-based workplace physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Lasse; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how work-site health promotion intervention, by involving group-based physical coordination training, may increase participants’ social awareness of new ways to use the body. Purpose: We investigated cleaners’ experiences with a one-year health promotion intervention...... involving group-based physical coordination training (PCT) during working hours. Design: We conducted a qualitative evaluation using method triangulation; continuous unfocused participant observation during the whole intervention, semi-structured focus group interview, and individual written evaluations one...... for implementation seem to be important for sustained effects of health-promotion interventions in the workplace. Originality: The social character of the physical training facilitated a community of practice, which potentially supported the learning of new competencies, and how to improve the organization...

  6. Experiences of Engineering Grid-Based Medical Software

    CERN Document Server

    Estrella, F; McClatchey, R; Odeh, M; Rogulin, D; Solomonides, T

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Grid-based technologies are emerging as potential solutions for managing and collaborating distributed resources in the biomedical domain. Few examples exist, however, of successful implementations of Grid-enabled medical systems and even fewer have been deployed for evaluation in practice. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the use in clinical practice of a Grid-based imaging prototype and to establish directions for engineering future medical Grid developments and their subsequent deployment. Method: The MammoGrid project has deployed a prototype system for clinicians using the Grid as its information infrastructure. To assist in the specification of the system requirements (and for the first time in healthgrid applications), use-case modelling has been carried out in close collaboration with clinicians and radiologists who had no prior experience of this modelling technique. A critical qualitative and, where possible, quantitative analysis of the MammoGrid prototype is presented leading...

  7. Analysis of flux estimates based on C-13-labelling experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjarke; Gombert, Andreas Karoly; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Modelling of the fluxes in central metabolism can be performed by combining labelling experiments with metabolite balancing. Using this approach, multiple samples from a cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in metabolic and isotopic steady state were analysed, and the metabolic fluxes in central...... metabolism were estimated. In the various samples, the estimates of the central metabolic pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and the anaplerotic pathway, showed an unprecedented reproducibility. The high reproducibility was obtained with fractional labellings...... of individual carbon atoms as the calculational base, illustrating that the more complex modelling using isotopomers is not necessarily superior with respect to reproducibility of the flux estimates. Based on these results some general difficulties in flux estimation are discussed....

  8. Students’ Experiences of Ability-based Streaming in Vocational Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene; Nielsen, Klaus; Helms Jørgensen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, it has been mandatory for all vocational schools in Denmark to assess the prior qualifications of all students when they begin at the school and to use this assessment to divide students into different ability-based courses (streaming) with the aim of increasing the retention of stude......Since 2007, it has been mandatory for all vocational schools in Denmark to assess the prior qualifications of all students when they begin at the school and to use this assessment to divide students into different ability-based courses (streaming) with the aim of increasing the retention...... of students. The purpose of this paper is to explore students’ experiences of being placed on a low-ability course by using case studies of two classes from separate vocational schools in Denmark with different practices regarding the streaming of students....

  9. The SUPER Program: A Research-based Undergraduate Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernakovich, J. G.; Boone, R. B.; Boot, C. M.; Denef, K.; Lavallee, J. M.; Moore, J. C.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Producing undergraduates capable of broad, independent thinking is one of the grand challenges in science education. Experience-based learning, specifically hands-on research, is one mechanism for increasing students' ability to think critically. With this in mind, we created a two-semester long research program called SUPER (Skills for Undergraduate Participation in Ecological Research) aimed at teaching students to think like scientists and enhancing the student research experience through instruction and active-learning about the scientific method. Our aim was for students to gain knowledge, skills, and experience, and to conduct their own research. In the first semester, we hosted active-learning workshops on "Forming Hypotheses", "Experimental Design", "Collecting and Managing Data", "Analysis of Data", "Communicating to a Scientific Audience", "Reading Literature Effectively", and "Ethical Approaches". Each lesson was taught by different scientists from one of many ecological disciplines so that students were exposed to the variation in approach that scientists have. In the second semester, students paired with a scientific mentor and began doing research. To ensure the continued growth of the undergraduate researcher, we continued the active-learning workshops and the students attended meetings with their mentors. Thus, the students gained technical and cognitive skills in parallel, enabling them to understand both "the how" and "the why" of what they were doing in their research. The program culminated with a research poster session presented by the students. The interest in the program has grown beyond our expectations, and we have now run the program successfully for two years. Many of the students have gone on to campus research jobs, internships and graduate school, and have attributed part of their success in obtaining their positions to their experience with the SUPER program. Although common in other sciences, undergraduate research experiences are

  10. Sustainable assessment of learning experiences based on projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio TRAVERSO RIBÓN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In a project-based learning experience, the detailed monitoring of the activities in which team members participate can be useful to evaluate their work. Using learning-oriented assessment procedures, supervisors can assess the teamwork abilities with a formative purpose. Evaluation strategies such as self-assessment, peer assessment and co-assessment are often used to make evaluation formative and sustainable. Conducting an assessment strategy is not easy for team members, since they need before to have a reasonable understanding of the evaluation process and criteria. This paper describes a learning-oriented evaluation methodology and an open data framework that can be applied to collaborative project settings. An evaluation rubric and a series of indicators that provide evidences about the developed skills have been elaborated and applied in a small-scale project-based course. Projects were managed and developed with the help of an open source software forge that contains a ticketing tool for planning and tracking of tasks, a version control repository to save the software outcomes, and using a wiki to host text deliverables. The experience provides evidences in favor of using the assessment method and open data framework to make teamwork evaluation more sustainable.

  11. Demonstration of Advanced Technologies for Multi-Load Washers in Hospitality and Healthcare -- Ozone Based Laundry Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Graham B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Petersen, Joseph M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sullivan, Greg [Efficiency Solutions, LLC (United States); Goetzler, W. [Navigant Consulting, Inc. (United States); Sutherland, T. A. [Navigant Consulting, Inc. (United States); Foley, K. J. [Navigant Consulting, Inc. (United States)

    2014-08-14

    The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate market-ready retrofit technologies for reducing the energy and water use of multi-load washers in healthcare and hospitality facilities. Specifically, this project evaluated laundry wastewater recycling technology in the hospitality sector and ozone laundry technology in both the healthcare and hospitality sectors. This report documents the demonstration of ozone laundry system installations at the Charleston Place Hotel in Charleston, South Carolina, and the Rogerson House assisted living facility in Boston, Massachusetts.

  12. A long-term field experiment of soil transplantation demonstrating the role of contemporary geographic separation in shaping soil microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Yuji; Li, Yun; Dong, Zhixin; Li, Zhongpei; Zhang, Xue-Xian

    2014-04-01

    The spatial patterns of microbial communities are largely determined by the combined effects of historical contingencies and contemporary environmental disturbances, but their relative importance remains poorly understood. Empirical biogeographic data currently available are mostly based on the traditional method of observational survey, which typically involves comparing indigenous microbial communities across spatial scales. Here, we report a long-term soil transplantation experiment, whereby the same two soils (red Acrisol and purple Cambisol from Yingtan) were placed into two geographic locations of ∼1000 km apart (i.e., Yingtan in the mid-subtropical region and Fengqiu in warm-temperate region; both located in China). Twenty years after the transplantation, the resulting soil microbial communities were subject to high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing analysis of 16S and 18S rRNA genes. Additionally, bacteria and archaea involved in nitrogen cycling were estimated using clone library analysis of four genes: archaeal amoA, bacterial amoA,nirK, and nifH. Data of subsequent phylogenetic analysis show that bacteria, fungi, and other microbial eukaryotes, as well as the nitrogen cycling genes, are grouped primarily by the factor of geographic location rather than soil type. Moreover, a shift of microbial communities toward those in local soil (i.e., Chao soil in Fengqiu) has been observed. The results thus suggest that the historical effects persistent in the soil microbial communities can be largely erased by contemporary disturbance within a short period of 20 years, implicating weak effects of historical contingencies on the structure and composition of microbial communities in the soil.

  13. Probabilistic tsunami inundation map based on stochastic earthquake source model: A demonstration case in Macau, the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Switzer, Adam D.; Wang, Yu; Chan, Chung-Han; Qiu, Qiang; Weiss, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Current tsunami inundation maps are commonly generated using deterministic scenarios, either for real-time forecasting or based on hypothetical "worst-case" events. Such maps are mainly used for emergency response and evacuation planning and do not include the information of return period. However, in practice, probabilistic tsunami inundation maps are required in a wide variety of applications, such as land-use planning, engineer design and for insurance purposes. In this study, we present a method to develop the probabilistic tsunami inundation map using a stochastic earthquake source model. To demonstrate the methodology, we take Macau a coastal city in the South China Sea as an example. Two major advances of this method are: it incorporates the most updated information of seismic tsunamigenic sources along the Manila megathrust; it integrates a stochastic source model into a Monte Carlo-type simulation in which a broad range of slip distribution patterns are generated for large numbers of synthetic earthquake events. When aggregated the large amount of inundation simulation results, we analyze the uncertainties associated with variability of earthquake rupture location and slip distribution. We also explore how tsunami hazard evolves in Macau in the context of sea level rise. Our results suggest Macau faces moderate tsunami risk due to its low-lying elevation, extensive land reclamation, high coastal population and major infrastructure density. Macau consists of four districts: Macau Peninsula, Taipa Island, Coloane island and Cotai strip. Of these Macau Peninsula is the most vulnerable to tsunami due to its low-elevation and exposure to direct waves and refracted waves from the offshore region and reflected waves from mainland. Earthquakes with magnitude larger than Mw8.0 in the northern Manila trench would likely cause hazardous inundation in Macau. Using a stochastic source model, we are able to derive a spread of potential tsunami impacts for earthquakes

  14. Advanced Transformer Demonstration And Validation Project Summary Report Based On Experiences At Nas, North Island, San Diego. California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    OPERATIONAL CONTROLS *FAN CONI.TO SWITCH The ton wcano w~ tdh con be in fte automabc, iwnua, c off podiuon. in automatic tum UM an V4d off at ft p.~mouy...TRIDENT TRAINING FAC / ANDFRSON, KTNGS nAV, rA UNITED TECHNOLOGIES / IB, WINDSOR LOC,.S. "T UNIV OF NEW MEXICO / NMERI (FALK), AI,BITOtItROI’E, NM UNIV

  15. Modulator-Based, High Bandwidth Optical Links for HEP Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Underwood, D G; Fernando, W S; Stanek, R W

    2012-01-01

    As a concern with the reliability, bandwidth and mass of future optical links in LHC experiments, we are investigating CW lasers and light modulators as an alternative to VCSELs. These links will be particularly useful if they utilize light modulators which are very small, low power, high bandwidth, and are very radiation hard. We have constructed a test system with 3 such links, each operating at 10 Gb/s. We present the quality of these links (jitter, rise and fall time, BER) and eye mask margins (10GbE) for 3 different types of modulators: LiNbO3-based, InP-based, and Si-based. We present the results of radiation hardness measurements with up to ~1012 protons/cm2 and ~65 krad total ionizing dose (TID), confirming no single event effects (SEE) at 10 Gb/s with either of the 3 types of modulators. These optical links will be an integral part of intelligent tracking systems at various scales from coupled sensors through intra-module and off detector communication. We have used a Si-based photonic transceiver to...

  16. A primary care Web-based Intervention Modeling Experiment replicated behavior changes seen in earlier paper-based experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treweek, Shaun; Francis, Jill J; Bonetti, Debbie; Barnett, Karen; Eccles, Martin P; Hudson, Jemma; Jones, Claire; Pitts, Nigel B; Ricketts, Ian W; Sullivan, Frank; Weal, Mark; MacLennan, Graeme

    2016-12-01

    Intervention Modeling Experiments (IMEs) are a way of developing and testing behavior change interventions before a trial. We aimed to test this methodology in a Web-based IME that replicated the trial component of an earlier, paper-based IME. Three-arm, Web-based randomized evaluation of two interventions (persuasive communication and action plan) and a "no intervention" comparator. The interventions were designed to reduce the number of antibiotic prescriptions in the management of uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infection. General practitioners (GPs) were invited to complete an online questionnaire and eight clinical scenarios where an antibiotic might be considered. One hundred twenty-nine GPs completed the questionnaire. GPs receiving the persuasive communication did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.70 more scenarios (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17-1.24) than those in the control arm. For the action plan, GPs did not prescribe an antibiotic in 0.63 (95% CI = 0.11-1.15) more scenarios than those in the control arm. Unlike the earlier IME, behavioral intention was unaffected by the interventions; this may be due to a smaller sample size than intended. A Web-based IME largely replicated the findings of an earlier paper-based study, providing some grounds for confidence in the IME methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gaze-based assistive technology used in daily life by children with severe physical impairments - parents' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgestig, Maria; Rytterström, Patrik; Hemmingsson, Helena

    2017-07-01

    To describe and explore parents' experiences when their children with severe physical impairments receive gaze-based assistive technology (gaze-based assistive technology (AT)) for use in daily life. Semi-structured interviews were conducted twice, with one year in between, with parents of eight children with cerebral palsy that used gaze-based AT in their daily activities. To understand the parents' experiences, hermeneutical interpretations were used during data analysis. The findings demonstrate that for parents, children's gaze-based AT usage meant that children demonstrated agency, provided them with opportunities to show personality and competencies, and gave children possibilities to develop. Overall, children's gaze-based AT provides hope for a better future for their children with severe physical impairments; a future in which the children can develop and gain influence in life. Gaze-based AT provides children with new opportunities to perform activities and take initiatives to communicate, giving parents hope about the children's future.

  18. Design of Web-Based Experiments on Acceleration and Speed Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Mani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote laboratories are becoming increasingly popular in academic arena due to availability of web-based technologies and infrastructure. Remote Labs are equipped with real instruments, where experiments are performed by controlling the instruments and observing the real data from a distant location through computer networks. They provide for student centric laboratory experience as students can perform experiments at their own convenience and requirements. Further, Remote Labs reduce management of work involved in running conventional laboratories. This paper describes design and implementation of such an experimental setup for performing characterization experiments on Transducers in general and Acceleration and Speed Transducers in particular from a remote location. The experiment can be made accessible to anyone over a TCP/IP network with a standard Web Browser, relevant plugin, and permission. This paper demonstrates that traditional experiments on sensors and transducers can be successfully made available online to both on-campus and off-campus students at their own schedule and convenience.

  19. Demonstration of a stable and uniform single-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on microfiber knot resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiping; Ren, Liyong; Ma, Chengju; Kong, Xudong; Ren, Kaili

    2016-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate an application of microfiber knot resonator (MKR) in the generation of a stable and uniform single-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL). An MKR was fabricated using a microfiber a few micrometers in diameter. By embedding the MKR to the ring cavity of the EDFL, a laser with a wavelength of 1558.818 nm and a 3-dB linewidth of 0.0149 nm is demonstrated. The side mode suppression ratio of the laser is about 30 dB, and the maximum power fluctuation is about 0.85 dB. The results demonstrate that the MKR can be employed as a high-performance comb filter to realize a stable and uniform fiber laser.

  20. The perception and experience of gender-based discrimination related to professional advancement among Japanese physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Nomura, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies from the US have found that female physicians often experience gender-based discrimination related to professional advancement. In Japan, female physicians are underrepresented in leadership positions but little is known about the prevalence of gender discrimination. We investigated the perception and prevalence of gender-based career obstacles and discrimination among Japanese physicians. The study was based on surveys of alumnae from 13 medical schools and alumni from 3 medical schools. In total, 1,684 female and 808 male physicians completed a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 83% and 58%). More women than men had the perception of gender-based career obstacles for women (77% vs. 55%; p Women with part-time positions were more likely to have the perception of gender-based career obstacles than women working full-time (OR 1.32, 95% CI: 1.01-1.73). More women than men reported experience of gender discrimination related to professional advancement (21% vs. 3%; p gender discrimination included age (p Women older than 40 years were more likely to experience gender discrimination compared with younger women (OR 5.77, 95% CI: 1.83-18.24 for women above 50, and OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.48-7.28 for women between 40 and 49) and women with PhD were more likely to experience gender discrimination (OR 4.23, 95% CI: 1.81-9.89). Our study demonstrated that a significant proportion of Japanese women experienced gender-based discrimination and perceived gender-based career obstacles compared with male physicians.

  1. A global parallel model based design of experiments method to minimize model output uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazil, Jason N; Buzzard, Gregory T; Rundell, Ann E

    2012-03-01

    Model-based experiment design specifies the data to be collected that will most effectively characterize the biological system under study. Existing model-based design of experiment algorithms have primarily relied on Fisher Information Matrix-based methods to choose the best experiment in a sequential manner. However, these are largely local methods that require an initial estimate of the parameter values, which are often highly uncertain, particularly when data is limited. In this paper, we provide an approach to specify an informative sequence of multiple design points (parallel design) that will constrain the dynamical uncertainty of the biological system responses to within experimentally detectable limits as specified by the estimated experimental noise. The method is based upon computationally efficient sparse grids and requires only a bounded uncertain parameter space; it does not rely upon initial parameter estimates. The design sequence emerges through the use of scenario trees with experimental design points chosen to minimize the uncertainty in the predicted dynamics of the measurable responses of the system. The algorithm was illustrated herein using a T cell activation model for three problems that ranged in dimension from 2D to 19D. The results demonstrate that it is possible to extract useful information from a mathematical model where traditional model-based design of experiments approaches most certainly fail. The experiments designed via this method fully constrain the model output dynamics to within experimentally resolvable limits. The method is effective for highly uncertain biological systems characterized by deterministic mathematical models with limited data sets. Also, it is highly modular and can be modified to include a variety of methodologies such as input design and model discrimination.

  2. Liquid-based endometrial cytology: the Florence and Bari experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccoliero, A M; Resta, L; Napoli, A; Taddei, G L

    2009-04-01

    Several diagnostic procedures are available to investigate the endometrium, i.e. sonography, hysteroscopy, biopsy, endometrial curettage and cytology. Among these, endometrial cytology is less commonly utilized. Although the use of cytology in the diagnosis of endometrial adenocarcinoma has already been proposed due to its low cost and simple execution, a general consensus has not been reached. The improvement of the diagnostic capacity of endometrial cytology following the introduction of a liquid-based method suggests that this test should be routinely used in endometrial diagnosis. The main advantages of this method are the reduction in confounding factors, the distribution of cells on a thin layer and the possibility to obtain more slides from the same sample. The aim of this article is to focus on the methodological procedures and diagnostic criteria in liquid-based endometrial cytology based on the experience in two Italian centres: Department of Pathology, University of Bari and Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence. The sampling method used by the Bari authors consists in the collection of liquid for uterine distension during hysteroscopy, while the Florence group used an endometrial brush. The sensitivity and specificity at Bari were 75% and 83%, respectively, and were 94-100% and 95-100% at Florence, respectively. Endometrial cytology provided sufficient diagnostic material significantly more often than biopsy. We thus propose that endometrial cytology can be used in routine diagnosis either alone or in association with other diagnostic procedures in order to improve diagnostic accuracy.

  3. Experiments on a Ground-Based Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoonyol Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and experiment of three-dimensional image formation by using a ground-based tomographic synthetic aperture radar (GB-TomoSAR system. GB-TomoSAR formulates two-dimensional synthetic aperture by the motion of antennae, both in azimuth and vertical directions. After range compression, three-dimensional image focusing is performed by applying Deramp-FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithms, both in azimuth and vertical directions. Geometric and radiometric calibrations were applied to make an image cube, which is then projected into range-azimuth and range-vertical cross-sections for visualization. An experiment with a C-band GB-TomoSAR system with a scan length of 2.49 m and 1.86 m in azimuth and vertical-direction, respectively, shows distinctive three-dimensional radar backscattering of stable buildings and roads with resolutions similar to the theoretical values. Unstable objects such as trees and moving cars generate severe noise due to decorrelation during the eight-hour image-acquisition time.

  4. New Developments in Web Based Monitoring at the CMS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgett, William; Chakaberia, Irakli; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Maeshima, Kaori; Maruyama, Sho; Soha, Aron; Sulmanas, Balys; Wan, Zongru

    2012-12-01

    The rate of performance improvements of the LHC at CERN has had a strong influence on the characteristics of the monitoring tools developed for the experiments. We present some of the latest additions to the suite of Web Based Monitoring services for the CMS experiment, and explore the aspects that address the roughly 20-fold increase in peak instantaneous luminosity over the course of 2011. One of these user-friendly tools allows collaborators to easily view, and make correlations among, accelerator configuration information such as bunch patterns, measured quantities such as intensities, vacuum pressures, and background conditions, as well as derived quantities such as luminosity and the number of simultaneous interactions per beam crossing. An additional tool summarizes the daily, weekly, and yearly luminosity and efficiency. Finally, we discuss a trigger cross section and rate fitting service that uses data from previous runs to validate current running conditions, as well as to serve as a predictive extrapolation tool for developing triggers for higher luminosity running.

  5. The Penning trap system used by the BASE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    A cut-away schematic of the Penning trap system used by BASE. The experiment receives antiprotons from CERN's AD; negative hydrogen ions are formed during injection into the apparatus. The set-up works with only a pair of particles at a time, while a cloud of a few hundred others are held in the reservoir trap, for future use. Here, an antiproton is in the measurement trap, while the negative hydyrogen ion is in held by the downstream park electrode. When the antiproton has been measured, it is moved to the upstream park electrode and the hydrogen ion is brought in to the measurement trap. This is repeated thousands of times, enabling a high-precision comparison of the charge-to-mass ratios of the two particles.

  6. Web Based Monitoring in the CMS Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badgett, William [Fermilab; Borrello, Laura [Wisconsin U., Madison; Chakaberia, Irakli [Kansas State U.; Gigi, Dominique [CERN; Jo, Young-Kwon [Korea U.; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio [Fermilab; Maeshima, Kaori [Fermilab; Maruyama, Sho [Fermilab; Patrick, James [Fermilab; Rapsevicius, Valdas [Florida U.; Soha, Aron [Fermilab; Sulmanas, Balys [Fermilab; Wan, Zongru [Korea U.

    2014-09-03

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a large and complex general purpose experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), built and maintained by many collaborators from around the world. Efficient operation of the detector requires widespread and timely access to a broad range of monitoring and status information. To this end the Web Based Monitoring (WBM) system was developed to present data to users located anywhere from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging systems to relational databases. This system provides the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimenters, including data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions, and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user side. This paper describes the WBM system architecture and describes how the system was used during the first major data taking run of the LHC.

  7. Web Based Monitoring in the CMS Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Badgett, William; Chakaberia, Irakli; Gigi, Dominique; Jo, Young-Kwon; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Maeshima, Kaori; Maruyama, Sho; Patrick, James; Rapsevicius, Valdas; Soha, Aron; Sulmanas, Balys; Wan, Zongru

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a large and complex general purpose experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), built and maintained by many collaborators from around the world. Efficient operation of the detector requires widespread and timely access to a broad range of monitoring and status information. To this end the Web Based Monitoring (WBM) system was developed to present data to users located anywhere from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging systems to relational databases. This system provides the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimenters, including data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions, and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user side. This paper describes the WBM system architecture and describes how the system was used during the first major data taking run of the LHC.

  8. Machine learning based global particle indentification algorithms at LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Derkach, Denis; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Rogozhnikov, Aleksei; Ratnikov, Fedor

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of data processing at LHC experiments is the particle identification (PID) algorithm. In LHCb, several different sub-detector systems provide PID information: the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector, the hadronic and electromagnetic calorimeters, and the muon chambers. To improve charged particle identification, several neural networks including a deep architecture and gradient boosting have been applied to data. These new approaches provide higher identification efficiencies than existing implementations for all charged particle types. It is also necessary to achieve a flat dependency between efficiencies and spectator variables such as particle momentum, in order to reduce systematic uncertainties during later stages of data analysis. For this purpose, "flat” algorithms that guarantee the flatness property for efficiencies have also been developed. This talk presents this new approach based on machine learning and its performance.

  9. The Web Based Monitoring Project at the CMS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio [Fermilab; Badgett, William [Fermilab; Behrens, Ulf [DESY; Chakaberia, Irakli [Kansas State U.; Jo, Youngkwon [Korea U.; Maeshima, Kaori; Maruyama, Sho [Fermilab; Patrick, James [Fermilab; Rapsevicius, Valdas [Fermilab; Soha, Aron [Fermilab; Stankevicius, Mantas [Fermilab; Sulmanas, Balys [Fermilab; Toda, Sachiko [Kansas State U.; Wan, Zongru [Kansas State U.

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid is a large a complex general purpose experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), built and maintained by many collaborators from around the world. Efficient operation of the detector requires widespread and timely access to a broad range of monitoring and status information. To the end the Web Based Monitoring (WBM) system was developed to present data to users located anywhere from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging systems to relational databases. This system provides the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimenters, including data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions, and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user’s side. This paper describes the WBM system architecture and describes how the system has been used from the beginning of data taking until now (Run1 and Run 2).

  10. Ion energy recovery experiment based on magnetic electro suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.; Stirling, W.L.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Barber, G.C.; Ponte, N.S.

    1980-05-01

    A proof-of-principle experiment on direct recovery of residual hydrogen ions based on a magnetic electron suppression scheme is described. Ions extracted from a source plasma a few kilovolts above the ground potential (approx. 20 A) are accelerated to 40 keV by a negative potential maintained on a neutralizer gas cell. As the residual ions exit the gas cell, they are deflected from the neutral beam by a magnetic field that also suppresses gas cell electrons and then recovered on a ground-potential surface. Under optimum conditions, a recovery efficiency (the ratio of the net recovered current to the available full-energy ion current) of 80% +- 20% has been obtained. Magnetic suppression of the beam plasma electrons was rather easily achieved; however, handling the fractional-energy ions originating from molecular species (H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/) proved to be extremely important to recovery efficiency.

  11. Demonstration of Compact and Low-Loss Athermal Arrayed-Waveguide Grating Module Based on 2.5%-Δ Silica-Based Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Koichi; Abe, Yukio; Uetsuka, Hisato

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrated a compact and low-loss athermal arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) module utilizing silica-based planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology. Spot-size converters based on a vertical ridge-waveguide taper were integrated with a 2.5%-Δ athermal AWG to reduce the loss at chip-to-fiber interface. Spot-size converters based on a segmented core were formed around resin-filled trenches for athermalization formed in the slab to reduce the diffraction loss at the trenches. A 16-channel athermal AWG module with 100-GHz channel spacing was fabricated. The use of a 2.5%-Δ athermal chip with a single-side fiber array enabled a compact package of the size of 41.6×16.6×4.5 mm3. Athermal characteristics and a small insertion loss of 3.5-3.8 dB were obtained by virtue of low fiber-to-chip coupling loss and athermalization with low excess loss.

  12. A precise clock distribution network for MRPC-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Cao, P.; Shang, L.; An, Q.

    2016-06-01

    In high energy physics experiments, the MRPC (Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber) detectors are widely used recently which can provide higher-resolution measurement for particle identification. However, the application of MRPC detectors leads to a series of challenges in electronics design with large number of front-end electronic channels, especially for distributing clock precisely. To deal with these challenges, this paper presents a universal scheme of clock transmission network for MRPC-based experiments with advantages of both precise clock distribution and global command synchronization. For precise clock distributing, the clock network is designed into a tree architecture with two stages: the first one has a point-to-multipoint long range bidirectional distribution with optical channels and the second one has a fan-out structure with copper link inside readout crates. To guarantee the precision of clock frequency or phase, the r-PTP (reduced Precision Time Protocol) and the DDMTD (digital Dual Mixer Time Difference) methods are used for frequency synthesis, phase measurement and adjustment, which is implemented by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) in real-time. In addition, to synchronize global command execution, based upon this clock distribution network, synchronous signals are coded with clock for transmission. With technique of encoding/decoding and clock data recovery, signals such as global triggers or system control commands, can be distributed to all front-end channels synchronously, which greatly simplifies the system design. The experimental results show that both the clock jitter (RMS) and the clock skew can be less than 100 ps.

  13. Toy Demonstrator's "VISIT" Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Phyllis

    The role of the toy demonstrator in a home-based, mother-involved intervention effort (Verbal Interaction Project) is presented in this handbook for staff members. It is believed that the prerequisites for functioning in the toy demonstrator's role are a sense of responsibility, patience with the children and their mothers, and willingness to be…

  14. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  15. A Comparative Study of Competency-Based Courses Demonstrating a Potential Measure of Course Quality and Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jackie; Dias, Laura Portolese; Schedler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    While competency-based education is growing, standardized tools for evaluating the unique characteristics of course design in this domain are still under development. This preliminary research study evaluated the effectiveness of a rubric developed for assessing course design of competency-based courses in an undergraduate Information Technology…

  16. A Comparative Study of Competency-Based Courses Demonstrating a Potential Measure of Course Quality and Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jackie; Dias, Laura Portolese; Schedler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    While competency-based education is growing, standardized tools for evaluating the unique characteristics of course design in this domain are still under development. This preliminary research study evaluated the effectiveness of a rubric developed for assessing course design of competency-based courses in an undergraduate Information Technology…

  17. Results from a multi aperture Fizeau interferometer ground testbed: demonstrator for a future space-based interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccichet, Nicola; Caillat, Amandine; Rakotonimbahy, Eddy; Dohlen, Kjetil; Savini, Giorgio; Marcos, Michel

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the European FP7-FISICA (Far Infrared Space Interferometer Critical Assessment) program, we developed a miniaturized version of the hyper-telescope to demonstrate multi-aperture interferometry on ground. This setup would be ultimately integrated into a CubeSat platform, therefore providing the first real demonstrator of a multi aperture Fizeau interferometer in space. In this paper, we describe the optical design of the ground testbed and the data processing pipeline implemented to reconstruct the object image from interferometric data. As a scientific application, we measured the Sun diameter by fitting a limb-darkening model to our data. Finally, we present the design of a CubeSat platform carrying this miniature Fizeau interferometer, which could be used to monitor the Sun diameter over a long in-orbit period.

  18. An MCMC-based waveform analysis with p-type point contact detectors in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Benjamin; MAJORANA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Statistical signal processing can be a powerful tool for extracting as much information as possible from raw data. By fitting data to a physical model of signal generation on an event-by-event basis, it can be used to perform precise event reconstruction and enable efficient background rejection. Searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay must achieve extremely low backgrounds to reach sensitivities required for discovery, and so can benefit greatly from this analysis technique. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR has implemented a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) signal processing algorithm to fit waveforms from p-type point contact (PPC) germanium detectors. After a machine learning step to tune detector fields and electronics response parameters, the MCMC algorithm is able to reconstruct the time, energy and position of interactions within the PPC detector. The parameters estimated with this method will find many applications within the DEMONSTRATOR physics program, including background identification and rejection. This will prove important as the DEMONSTRATOR aims to reach its background goal of < 3 counts/tonne/yr in the region of interest. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  19. Rocket to Creativity: A Field Experience in Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon F. Dole

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of a field experience in problem-based (PBL and project-based learning (PjBL on pre-service and in-service teachers’ conceptions of experiential learning. In our study, participants had been enrolled in a hybrid class that included an online component in which they learned about PBL and PjBL and an experiential component in which they facilitated PBL and PjBL with children in grades 1-9 during a one-week field experience on a university campus. The goal of the field experience is for teachers to change their practice from didactic to inquiry and to promote critical and creative thinking in their students. We used a case study method that involved data derived from six different sources: online structured interviews, follow-up telephone interviews, discussion board posts, reflections, course feedback, and observations. The main theme that emerged from the data analysis was the critical role the field experience played in applying theory to practice. Sub-themes included understanding the process of implementing PBL and PjBL, mastering the logistics of PBL and PjBL, becoming facilitators, and collaborating with partners. Results showed that the field experience gave the teachers the “courage” to experiment with a student-centered methodology.

  20. (U) Implementation and demonstration of a time-resolved pyrometry/spectroscopy capability in shock compression experiments on metal oxide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Peter Marvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lang, Jr., John Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scharff, Robert Jason [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Temperature is notably the most difficult quantity to measure in shock compression experiments; however, it is critical for accurately constraining theoretical or tabular equations of state. Until now, the temperature achieved during the shock loading of porous materials could only be calculated. The technique presented in this report measures, for the first time, the shocked temperature of porous systems.

  1. Classroom Assessment in Web-Based Instructional Environment: Instructors' Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liang

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available While a great deal has been written on the advantage and benefits of online teaching, little is known on how..assessment is implemented in online classrooms to monitor and inform performance and progress. The..purpose of this study is to investigate the dynamics of WebCT classroom assessment by analyzing the..perceptions and experience of the instructors. Grounded theory method was employed to generate a - process..theory- . The study included 10 faculties who taught WebCT classes, and 216 students in the College of..Education in an urban university in the Mid west. Interviews and classroom observations were undertaken..on line. The findings indicated that, performance-based assessment, writing skills, interactive assessment..and learner autonomy were major assessment aspects to inform teaching and enhance learning. If one of..the major roles of online instruction is to increase self-directed learning, as part of the pedagogical..mechanism, web-based classroom assessment should be designed and practiced to impact learner autonomy.

  2. In silico design of targeted SRM-based experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahnsen Sven

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selected reaction monitoring (SRM-based proteomics approaches enable highly sensitive and reproducible assays for profiling of thousands of peptides in one experiment. The development of such assays involves the determination of retention time, detectability and fragmentation properties of peptides, followed by an optimal selection of transitions. If those properties have to be identified experimentally, the assay development becomes a time-consuming task. We introduce a computational framework for the optimal selection of transitions for a given set of proteins based on their sequence information alone or in conjunction with already existing transition databases. The presented method enables the rapid and fully automated initial development of assays for targeted proteomics. We introduce the relevant methods, report and discuss a step-wise and generic protocol and we also show that we can reach an ad hoc coverage of 80 % of the targeted proteins. The presented algorithmic procedure is implemented in the open-source software package OpenMS/TOPP.

  3. 加强课堂演示实验提高学习化学的兴趣%Improving Students' Interest in Learning Chemistry through Strengthening Class Demonstrative Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    In classroom teaching, teachers can cultivate stu-dents'interest in chemistry learning through classroom demon-stration experiment. Classroom demonstration experiment can enhance visual effect of demonstration experiment, enhance ex-perimental interest, strengthen the enlightenment of experiment, give full play to the exemplary role of demonstrating experiment, and show the art of experiment, so it can mobilize students' learning initiative and enthusiasm and cultivate students' learning interest in chemistry.%  本文从课堂教学中,教师通过课堂演示实验的教学来培养学生学习化学的兴趣。课堂演示实验从增强演示实验的直观效果,增强实验的趣味性,加强实验的启发性,充分发挥演示实验的示范作用,展现演示实验的艺术美五个方面调动学生的学习主动性和积极性,培养学生学习化学的兴趣。

  4. TVA coal-gasification commercial demonstration plant project. Volume 5. Plant based on Koppers-Totzek gasifier. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    This volume presents a technical description of a coal gasification plant, based on Koppers-Totzek gasifiers, producing a medium Btu fuel gas product. Foster Wheeler carried out a conceptual design and cost estimate of a nominal 20,000 TPSD plant based on TVA design criteria and information supplied by Krupp-Koppers concerning the Koppers-Totzek coal gasification process. Technical description of the design is given in this volume.

  5. Serious games experiment toward agent-based simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Anne; Labiosa, William

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the potential for serious games to be used as a scientifically based decision-support product that supports the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) mission--to provide integrated, unbiased scientific information that can make a substantial contribution to societal well-being for a wide variety of complex environmental challenges. Serious or pedagogical games are an engaging way to educate decisionmakers and stakeholders about environmental challenges that are usefully informed by natural and social scientific information and knowledge and can be designed to promote interactive learning and exploration in the face of large uncertainties, divergent values, and complex situations. We developed two serious games that use challenging environmental-planning issues to demonstrate and investigate the potential contributions of serious games to inform regional-planning decisions. Delta Skelta is a game emulating long-term integrated environmental planning in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, that incorporates natural hazards (flooding and earthquakes) and consequences for California water supplies amidst conflicting water interests. Age of Ecology is a game that simulates interactions between economic and ecologic processes, as well as natural hazards while implementing agent-based modeling. The content of these games spans the USGS science mission areas related to water, ecosystems, natural hazards, land use, and climate change. We describe the games, reflect on design and informational aspects, and comment on their potential usefulness. During the process of developing these games, we identified various design trade-offs involving factual information, strategic thinking, game-winning criteria, elements of fun, number and type of players, time horizon, and uncertainty. We evaluate the two games in terms of accomplishments and limitations. Overall, we demonstrated the potential for these games to usefully represent scientific information

  6. Evaluation of battery converters based on 4. 8-MW fuel cell demonstrator inverter. Final report. [Contains brief glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    Electrical power conditioning is a critical element in the development of advanced electrochemical energy storage systems. This program evaluates the use of existing self-commutated converter technology (as developed by the Power Systems Division of United Technologies for the 4.8-MW Fuel Cell Demonstrator) with modification for use in battery energy storage systems. The program consists of three parts: evaluation of the cost and performance of a self-commutated converter modified to maintain production commonality between battery and fuel cell power conditioners, demonstration of the principal characteristics required for the battery application in MW-scale hardware, and investigation of the technical requirements of operation isolated from the utility system. A power-conditioning system consisting of a self-commutated converter augmented with a phase-controlled rectifier was selected and a preliminary design, prepared. A principal factor in this selection was production commonality with the fuel cell inverter system. Additional types of augmentation, and the use of a self-commutated converter system without augmentation, were also considered. A survey of advanced battery manufacturers was used to establish the dc interface characteristics. The principal characteristics of self-commutated converter operation required for battery application were demonstrated with the aid of an available 0.5-MW development system. A survey of five REA and municipal utilities and three A and E firms was conducted to determine technical requirements for operation in a mode isolated from the utility. Definitive requirements for this application were not established because of the limited scope of this study. 63 figures, 37 tables.

  7. Evaluation of battery converters based on 4. 8-MW fuel cell demonstrator inverter. Final report. [Contains brief glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    Electrical power conditioning is a critical element in the development of advanced electrochemical energy storage systems. This program evaluates the use of existing self-commutated converter technology (as developed by the Power Systems Division of United Technologies for the 4.8-MW Fuel Cell Demonstrator) with modification for use in battery energy storage systems. The program consists of three parts: evaluation of the cost and performance of a self-commutated converter modified to maintain production commonality between battery and fuel cell power conditioners, demonstration of the principal characteristics required for the battery application in MW-scale hardware, and investigation of the technical requirements of operation isolated from the utility system. A power-conditioning system consisting of a self-commutated converter augmented with a phase-controlled rectifier was selected and a preliminary design, prepared. A principal factor in this selection was production commonality with the fuel cell inverter system. Additional types of augmentation, and the use of a self-commutated converter system without augmentation, were also considered. A survey of advanced battery manufacturers was used to establish the dc interface characteristics. The principal characteristics of self-commutated converter operation required for battery application were demonstrated with the aid of an available 0.5-MW development system. A survey of five REA and municipal utilities and three A and E firms was conducted to determine technical requirements for operation in a mode isolated from the utility. Definitive requirements for this application were not established because of the limited scope of this study. 63 figures, 37 tables.

  8. Processes governing arsenic retardation on Pleistocene sediments: Adsorption experiments and model-based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Bhasker; Neidhardt, Harald; Berg, Michael; Siade, Adam; Prommer, Henning

    2017-05-01

    In many countries of south/south-east Asia, reliance on Pleistocene aquifers for the supply of low-arsenic groundwater has created the risk of inducing migration of high-arsenic groundwater from adjacent Holocene aquifers. Adsorption of arsenic onto mineral surfaces of Pleistocene sediments is an effective attenuation mechanism. However, little is known about the sorption under anoxic conditions, in particular the behavior of arsenite. We report the results of anoxic batch experiments investigating arsenite (1-25 µmol/L) adsorption onto Pleistocene sediments under a range of field-relevant conditions. The sorption of arsenite was nonlinear and decreased with increasing phosphate concentrations (3-60 µmol/L) while pH (range 6-8) had no effect on total arsenic sorption. To simulate the sorption experiments, we developed surface complexation models of varying complexity. The simulated concentrations of arsenite, arsenate, and phosphate were in good agreement for the isotherm and phosphate experiments while secondary geochemical processes affected the pH experiments. For the latter, the model-based analysis suggests that the formation of solution complexes between organic buffers and Mn(II) ions promoted the oxidation of arsenite involving naturally occurring Mn-oxides. Upscaling the batch experiment model to a reactive transport model for Pleistocene aquifers demonstrates strong arsenic retardation and could have useful implications in the management of arsenic-free Pleistocene aquifers.

  9. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Neutrinos are among nature`s fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called {open_quotes}mixing.{close_quotes} The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary.

  10. Demonstration of a visual cell-based assay for screening glucose transporter 4 translocation modulators in real time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maleppillil Vavachan Vijayakumar; Amrendra Kumar Ajay; Manoj Kumar Bhat

    2010-12-01

    Insulin-stimulated translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to cell membrane leading to glucose uptake is the rate-limiting step in diabetes. It is also a defined target of antidiabetic drug research. Existing GLUT4 translocation assays are based on time-consuming immunoassays and are hampered by assay variability and low sensitivity. We describe a real-time, visual, cell-based qualitative GLUT4 translocation assay using CHO-HIRc-myc-GLUT4eGFP cells that stably express myc- and eGFP-tagged GLUT4 in addition to human insulin receptor (HIRc). GLUT4 translocation is visualized by live cell imaging based on GFP fluorescence by employing a cooled charge-coupled device camera attached to a fluorescent microscope. This video imaging method and further quantitative analysis of GLUT4 on the cell membrane provide rapid and foolproof visual evidence that this method is suitable for screening GLUT4 translocation modulators.

  11. Technical bases and guidance for the use of composite soil sampling for demonstrating compliance with radiological release criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitkus, Timothy J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-04-24

    This guidance provides information on methodologies and the technical bases that licensees should consider for incorporating composite sampling strategies into final status survey (FSS) plans. In addition, this guidance also includes appropriate uses of composite sampling for generating the data for other decommissioning site investigations such as characterization or other preliminary site investigations.

  12. Demonstration of a TODGA based Extraction Process for the Partitioning of Minor Actinides from a PUREX Raffinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, D.; Christiansen, B.; Glatz, J.P.; Malmbeck, R.; Serrano-Purroy, D. [Commiss European Communities, Joint Res Ctr, Inst Transuranium Elements, D-76125 Karlsruhe, (Germany); Modolo, G. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Energy Res Safety Res and Reactor Technol, D-52425 Julich, (Germany); Sorel, Ch. [Commissariat Energie Atom Valrho CEA, DRCP SCPS, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Magnusson, D. [Chalmers, Dept Chem and Biol Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Efficient recovery of minor actinides (MA) from genuine PUREX raffinate has been successfully demonstrated by the TODGA + TBP extractant mixture dissolved in an industrial aliphatic solvent TPH. The process was carried out in centrifugal contactors using an optimized flow-sheet involving a total of 32 stages, divided into 4 stages for extraction, 12 stages for scrubbing and 16 stages for back-extraction. Very high feed decontamination factors were obtained (Am, Cm 40 000) and the recovery of these elements was higher than 99.99%. Of the non-lanthanide fission products only Y and a small part of Ru were co-separated into the product fraction together with the lanthanides and the MA. (authors)

  13. Parameterization-based tracking for the P2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, Iurii [Institut fuer Kernphysik and PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: P2-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The P2 experiment at the new MESA accelerator in Mainz aims to determine the weak mixing angle by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. To achieve an unprecedented precision an order of 10{sup 11} scattered electrons per second have to be acquired. %within the acceptance. Whereas the tracking system is not required to operate at such high rates, every attempt is made to achieve as high rate capability as possible. The P2 tracking system will consist of four planes of high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS). With the present preliminary design one expects about 150 signal electron tracks and 20000 background hits (from bremsstrahlung photons) per plane in every 50 ns readout frame at the full rate. In order to cope with this extreme combinatorial background in on-line mode, a parameterization-based tracking is considered as a possible solution. The idea is to transform the hit positions into a set of weakly correlated quantities, and to find simple (e.g. polynomial) functions of these quantities, that would give the required characteristics of the track (e.g. momentum). The parameters of the functions are determined from a sample of high-quality tracks, taken either from a simulation, or reconstructed in a conventional way from a sample of low-rate data.

  14. Survey of Branch Support Methods Demonstrates Accuracy, Power, and Robustness of Fast Likelihood-based Approximation Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimova, Maria; Gil, Manuel; Dufayard, Jean-François; Dessimoz, Christophe; Gascuel, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference and evaluating support for inferred relationships is at the core of many studies testing evolutionary hypotheses. Despite the popularity of nonparametric bootstrap frequencies and Bayesian posterior probabilities, the interpretation of these measures of tree branch support remains a source of discussion. Furthermore, both methods are computationally expensive and become prohibitive for large data sets. Recent fast approximate likelihood-based measures of branch supports (approximate likelihood ratio test [aLRT] and Shimodaira–Hasegawa [SH]-aLRT) provide a compelling alternative to these slower conventional methods, offering not only speed advantages but also excellent levels of accuracy and power. Here we propose an additional method: a Bayesian-like transformation of aLRT (aBayes). Considering both probabilistic and frequentist frameworks, we compare the performance of the three fast likelihood-based methods with the standard bootstrap (SBS), the Bayesian approach, and the recently introduced rapid bootstrap. Our simulations and real data analyses show that with moderate model violations, all tests are sufficiently accurate, but aLRT and aBayes offer the highest statistical power and are very fast. With severe model violations aLRT, aBayes and Bayesian posteriors can produce elevated false-positive rates. With data sets for which such violation can be detected, we recommend using SH-aLRT, the nonparametric version of aLRT based on a procedure similar to the Shimodaira–Hasegawa tree selection. In general, the SBS seems to be excessively conservative and is much slower than our approximate likelihood-based methods. PMID:21540409

  15. Constraint-based modeling of heterologous pathways: application and experimental demonstration for overproduction of fatty acids in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Kuhn; Donoghue, Neil; Kim, Min Kyung; Lun, Desmond S

    2014-10-01

    Constraint-based modeling has been shown, in many instances, to be useful for metabolic engineering by allowing the prediction of the metabolic phenotype resulting from genetic manipulations. But the basic premise of constraint-based modeling-that of applying constraints to preclude certain behaviors-only makes sense for certain genetic manipulations (such as knockouts and knockdowns). In particular, when genes (such as those associated with a heterologous pathway) are introduced under artificial control, it is unclear how to predict the correct behavior. In this paper, we introduce a modeling method that we call proportional flux forcing (PFF) to model artificially induced enzymatic genes. The model modifications introduced by PFF can be transformed into a set of simple mass balance constraints, which allows computational methods for strain optimization based on flux balance analysis (FBA) to be utilized. We applied PFF to the metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli (E. coli) for free fatty acid (FFA) production-a metabolic engineering problem that has attracted significant attention because FFAs are a precursor to liquid transportation fuels such as biodiesel and biogasoline. We show that PFF used in conjunction with FBA-based computational strain optimization methods can yield non-obvious genetic manipulation strategies that significantly increase FFA production in E. coli. The two mutant strains constructed and successfully tested in this work had peak fatty acid (FA) yields of 0.050 g FA/g carbon source (17.4% theoretical yield) and 0.035 g FA/g carbon source (12.3% theoretical yield) when they were grown using a mixed carbon source of glucose and casamino acids in a ratio of 2-to-1. These yields represent increases of 5.4- and 3.8-fold, respectively, over the baseline strain.

  16. Experience of pico/micro hydro based power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, S.S. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Although India has approximately 150,000 megawatts of hydro potential, only a small portion is tapped. There is also significant untapped hydro potential in many developing countries such as Nepal, Bhutan, Vietnam, Indonesia and regions in South America and Africa. Small-scale hydroelectric power systems with capacities of up to a few megawatts are eco-friendly and sustainable. They can be classified based on unit sizes as pico (u pto 10 kilowatts), micro (10-100 kilowatts) and mini (100 kilowatts to a few megawatts) hydro systems. Mini hydro systems are always grid connected while micro can be either grid connected or off grid. Pico is always off grid. In India, there are thousands of favorable sites in this range that should be tapped for distributed power generation to electrify local communities. This need is reflected by the global emphasis on distributed power generation as well as the Government of India's policy to promote this type of power generation. A working stand alone pico-hydro power generating system has been successfully installed in 5 sites in Karnataka. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate the technical, managerial and economic feasibility of setting up small hydro projects in remote hilly areas of Karnataka, India and its positive environmental impact. The presentation discussed the site selection criteria; installed sites of pico hydro; system description; parts of the system; the electric load controller; types of electronic load controllers; and a description of the unit and control scheme. tabs., figs.

  17. An inquiry-based approach to the Franck-Hertz experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persano Adorno, Dominique; Pizzolato, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    The practice of scientists and engineers is today exerted within interdisciplinary contexts, placed at the intersections of different research fields, including nanoscale science. The development of the required competences is based on an effective science and engineering instruction, which should be able to drive the students towards a deeper understanding of quantum mechanics fundamental concepts and, at the same time, strengthen their reasoning skills and transversal abilities. In this study we report the results of an inquiry-driven learning path experienced by a sample of 12 electronic engineering undergraduates engaged to perform the Franck-Hertz experiment. Before being involved in this experimental activity, the students received a traditional lecture-based instruction on the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics, but their answers to an open-ended questionnaire, administered at the beginning of the inquiry activity, demonstrated that the acquired knowledge was characterized by a strictly theoretical vision of quantum science, basically in terms of an artificial mathematical framework having very poor connections with the real world. The Franck Hertz experiment was introduced to the students by starting from the problem of finding an experimental confirmation of the Bohr's postulates asserting that atoms can absorb energy only in quantum portions. The whole activity has been videotaped and this allowed us to deeply analyse the student perception's change about the main concepts of quantum mechanics. We have found that the active participation to this learning experience favored the building of cognitive links among student theoretical perceptions of quantum mechanics and their vision of quantum phenomena, within an everyday context of knowledge. Furthermore, our findings confirm the benefits of integrating traditional lecture-based instruction on quantum mechanics with learning experiences driven by inquiry-based teaching strategies.

  18. Experimental demonstration of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering game based on the all-versus-nothing proof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Xu, Jin-Shi; Ye, Xiang-Jun; Wu, Yu-Chun; Chen, Jing-Ling; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2014-10-03

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering, a generalization of the original concept of "steering" proposed by Schrödinger, describes the ability of one system to nonlocally affect another system's states through local measurements. Some experimental efforts to test EPR steering in terms of inequalities have been made, which usually require many measurement settings. Analogy to the "all-versus-nothing" (AVN) proof of Bell's theorem without inequalities, testing steerability without inequalities would be more strong and require less resources. Moreover, the practical meaning of steering implies that it should also be possible to store the state information on the side to be steered, a result that has not yet been experimentally demonstrated. Using a recent AVN criterion for two-qubit entangled states, we experimentally implement a practical steering game using quantum memory. Furthermore, we develop a theoretical method to deal with the noise and finite measurement statistics within the AVN framework and apply it to analyze the experimental data. Our results clearly show the facilitation of the AVN criterion for testing steerability and provide a particularly strong perspective for understanding EPR steering.

  19. Demonstrating Martian Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pirkola, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    The surface gravity on Mars is smaller than the surface gravity on Earth, resulting in longer falling times. This effect can be simulated on Earth by taking advantage of air resistance and buoyancy, which cause low density objects to fall slowly enough to approximate objects falling on the surface of Mars. We describe a computer simulation based on an experiment that approximates Martian gravity, and verify our numerical results by performing the experiment.

  20. Results and experience of an aquifer thermal energy storage for heating and cooling of an office building and a demonstration center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bael, Johan van; Desmedt, Johan; Vanhoudt, Dirk [Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek (VITO), Mol (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) was introduced in the Belgian market since 1995. Until now over 10 installations with a thermal power of more than 300 kW cooling are installed. One of the first projects consists of the integration of ATES with a nominal power of 570 kWh in an existing office building and a new built demonstration center (3,000 m{sup 2}) for new lighting systems. The ATES system exists of a doublet: a cold and a warm well. The groundwater flow between the wells amounts to 90 m{sup 3}/h in the cooling modus and 45 m{sup 3}/h in the heating modus. The ATES system delivers the complete cooling demand of both buildings and a part of the heating demand. A gas fired boiler delivers the remaining heat demand. The project was funded by the Flemish Government in the Program of the Flemish Energy Demonstration Projects. The research institute VITO monitored the project during an evaluation period of three years. The energy flows (cooling and heating delivered to both buildings), the groundwater flow, the groundwater temperatures, the electricity consumption of the ATES and the gas consumption of the boiler were measured and stored every 30 minutes. This paper provides an overview of the monitoring results. (orig.)

  1. Theoretical demonstration of Brillouin lasing effect in racetrack resonators based on germanium waveguides in the mid-infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2016-01-15

    In this Letter, we present a theoretical investigation of integrated racetrack Brillouin lasers based on germanium waveguides that are buried in silicon nitride and operate at a wavelength of 4 μm. General design equations in a steady-state regime have been carried out to determine the threshold power and the emitted Stokes power as a function of the resonance mismatch and coupling factor. The pulling effect as induced by the Brillouin gain dispersion and the pushing effects originated by SPM and XPM effects have been accurately investigated to predict the lasing frequency.

  2. Demonstration of quantum dot SOA-based colorless ONU transmitter for symmetric 40 Gb/s TWDM PON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Chang, Qingjiang; Gao, Zhensen; Ye, Chenhui; Xiao, Simiao; Huang, Xiaoan; Hu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Kaibin

    2016-02-01

    Detailed numerical investigation of self-seeded colorless ONU transmitter using quantum dot (QD) SOA as the intensity modulator for symmetric 40 Gb/s TWDM-PON has been developed. It is shown that the QD SOA-based intensity modulator is able to support 10 Gb/s OOK upstream signal transmission with an optical extinction ratio of over 10 dB. Chromatic dispersion compensation free of 20 km passive transmission has been achieved for error free reception. Moreover, the system performance and power budget have been analyzed and discussed for different transmission distance and split ratio.

  3. Practice and Thinking on High-yield Demonstration Base Construction of Sesame%芝麻高产示范基地建设的实践与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高桐梅; 卫双玲; 吴寅; 朱松涛; 张海洋

    2015-01-01

    At present,the demonstration base of agricultural scientific research mainly relies on the pro-jects in China,which has many problems such as the discontinuity of funding,unsteadiness of agriculture science and technology personnel,poor driving effect of demonstration. Based on the construction of sesa-me high-yield demonstration base of Henan Academy of Agricultural Sciences,the paper introduced the measures of constructing the sesame high-yield demonstration base with regard to the formation of scientif-ic and technological innovations,demonstration base mode,and demonstration effect. Five models of dem-onstration base construction were presented,including the self construction model of scientific research unit,the model of government + research unit + new agricultural management body,the model of research unit + agricultural specialty cooperative organization,the model of research unit + enterprise + new agricul-tural management body,the model of government + research unit + peasant households. This paper also an-alyzed and summarized the experience of demonstration base establishment,and proposed some sugges-tions for the demonstration base construction of agricultural science and technology achievements in future.%目前我国农业科研示范基地的建设主要以项目为依托,存在经费支持度连续性不强、科技人员不稳定、示范推广带动效应差等诸多问题。为此,以河南省农业科学院芝麻高产示范基地建设为例,从科技创新成果形成、示范基地建设模式等方面介绍了芝麻高产示范基地建设的举措,形成了科研单位自建模式、政府+科研单位+新型农业经营主体模式、科研单位+农业专业合作社模式、科研单位+企业+新型农业经营主体模式、政府+科研单位+农户模式等5套示范基地建设模式。分析并总结了示范基地建设的经验,并对今后农业科技创新成果的示范基地建设提出了建议。

  4. A New Handheld Device for the Detection of Falsified Medicines: Demonstration on Falsified Artemisinin-Based Therapies from the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin K; Kaur, Harparkash; Allan, Elizabeth Louise; Lozama, Anthony; Bell, David

    2017-02-20

    Poor-quality medicines are a major problem for health-care systems in resource-poor settings as identifying falsified medicines requires a complex laboratory infrastructure such as a Medicines Quality Control Laboratory. We report here an evaluation of a low-cost, handheld near-infrared spectrometer (NIRS) device by analyzing a library of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) medicines to determine its usefulness as a drug-screening tool. The "SCiO" research prototype device was used to collect NIR spectra of a library of ACT and artesunate monotherapy medicine samples previously collected in Bioko Island and Equatorial Guinea and Kintampo, Ghana. The quality of these samples had been categorized as falsified, substandard, and quality assured based on the amount of stated active pharmaceutical ingredients detected using high-performance liquid chromatography photodiode array. Numerical analyses were performed on the NIR spectra to assess the usefulness of NIR to identify falsified and substandard medicines. The NIRS device was successful at detecting falsified medicines in all cases where the library contained both quality assured and falsified medicines of the same stated brand of medicines. The NIRS device was successful at identifying substandard amounts of artesunate but not amodiaquine in the ACT samples (N = 15) of artesunate-amodiaquine. This work reveals that this low-cost, portable NIRS device is promising for screening ACTs for falsified samples and could enable widespread drug screening at all points of the health system.

  5. Prospective demonstration of brain plasticity after intensive abacus-based mental calculation training: An fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. L.; Wu, T. H.; Cheng, M. C.; Huang, Y. H.; Sheu, C. Y.; Hsieh, J. C.; Lee, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    Abacus-based mental calculation is a unique Chinese culture. The abacus experts can perform complex computations mentally with exceptionally fast speed and high accuracy. However, the neural bases of computation processing are not yet clearly known. This study used a BOLD contrast 3T fMRI system to explore the brain activation differences between abacus experts and non-expert subjects. All the acquired data were analyzed using SPM99 software. From the results, different ways of performing calculations between the two groups were seen. The experts tended to adopt efficient visuospatial/visuomotor strategy (bilateral parietal/frontal network) to process and retrieve all the intermediate and final results on the virtual abacus during calculation. By contrast, coordination of several networks (verbal, visuospatial processing and executive function) was required in the normal group to carry out arithmetic operations. Furthermore, more involvement of the visuomotor imagery processing (right dorsal premotor area) for imagining bead manipulation and low level use of the executive function (frontal-subcortical area) for launching the relatively time-consuming sequentially organized process was noted in the abacus expert group than in the non-expert group. We suggest that these findings may explain why abacus experts can reveal the exceptional computational skills compared to non-experts after intensive training.

  6. Prospective demonstration of brain plasticity after intensive abacus-based mental calculation training: An fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.L. [Faculty of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wu, T.H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Section 1, Chien-Kuo N. Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Cheng, M.C. [Faculty of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y.H. [Faculty of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Sheu, C.Y. [Department of Radiology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 92, Section 2, Chungshan North Road, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, J.C. [Integrated Brain Research Unit, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 201, Section 2, Shih-Pai Road, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Lee, J.S. [Faculty of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw

    2006-12-20

    Abacus-based mental calculation is a unique Chinese culture. The abacus experts can perform complex computations mentally with exceptionally fast speed and high accuracy. However, the neural bases of computation processing are not yet clearly known. This study used a BOLD contrast 3T fMRI system to explore the brain activation differences between abacus experts and non-expert subjects. All the acquired data were analyzed using SPM99 software. From the results, different ways of performing calculations between the two groups were seen. The experts tended to adopt efficient visuospatial/visuomotor strategy (bilateral parietal/frontal network) to process and retrieve all the intermediate and final results on the virtual abacus during calculation. By contrast, coordination of several networks (verbal, visuospatial processing and executive function) was required in the normal group to carry out arithmetic operations. Furthermore, more involvement of the visuomotor imagery processing (right dorsal premotor area) for imagining bead manipulation and low level use of the executive function (frontal-subcortical area) for launching the relatively time-consuming sequentially organized process was noted in the abacus expert group than in the non-expert group. We suggest that these findings may explain why abacus experts can reveal the exceptional computational skills compared to non-experts after intensive training.

  7. Weight-Related Goal Setting in a Telephone-Based Preventive Health-Coaching Program: Demonstration of Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Gale, Joanne; McGill, Bronwyn; Bauman, Adrian; Hebden, Lana; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Maxwell, Michelle; Phongsavan, Philayrath

    2016-08-02

    This study investigated whether participants in a 6-month telephone-based coaching program, who set physical activity, nutrition, and weight loss goals had better outcomes in these domains. Quasi-experimental design. The Australian Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service (GHS), a free population-wide telephone health-coaching service that includes goal setting as a key component of its coaching program. Consenting GHS coaching participants who had completed coaching between February 2009 and December 2012 (n = 4108). At baseline, participants select a goal for the coaching program, and sociodemographic variables are collected. Self-reported weight, height, waist circumference, physical activity, and nutrition-related behaviors are assessed at baseline and 6 months. Descriptive analysis was performed on key sociodemographic variables, and the relationship between goal type and change in health outcomes was assessed using a series of linear mixed models that modeled change from baseline to 6 months. Participants who set goals in relation to weight management and physical activity achieved better results in these areas than those who set alternate goals, losing more than those who set alternate goals (1.5 kg and 0.9 cm in waist circumference) and increasing walking per week (40 minutes), respectively. There was no difference in food-related outcomes for those that set nutrition-related goals. Goal setting for weight management and increasing physical activity in the overweight and obese population, undertaken in a telephone-based coaching program, can be effective. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Emotional experience improves with age : Evidence based on over 10 years of experience sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carstensen, L.L.; Turan, B.; Scheibe, S.; Ram, N.; Ersner-Hershfield, H.; Samanez-Larkin, G.R.; Brooks, K.P.; Nesselroade, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N =

  9. Fuzzy Tier-based User Experience Prediction Scheme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmed A A Gad-ElRab; Kamal A ElDahshan; Mahmoud Embabi

    2015-01-01

    Building professional and efficient systems by using user experience became one of the important research activities that focus on the interactions between products, applications, designers, and users...

  10. Status of the Majorana Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuesta, C.; Buuck, M.; Detwiler, J. A.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Leon, J.; Robertson, R. G. H. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Abgrall, N.; Bradley, A. W.; Chan, Y.-D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Arnquist, I. J.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Bertrand, F. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); and others

    2015-10-28

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an ultra-low background, modular, HPGe detector array with a mass of 44-kg (29 kg {sup 76}Ge and 15 kg {sup nat}Ge) to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. The next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double beta decay searches will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is envisioned to demonstrate a path forward to achieve a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value of 2039 keV. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR follows a modular implementation to be easily scalable to the next generation experiment. First, the prototype module was assembled; it has been continuously taking data from July 2014 to June 2015. Second, Module 1 with more than half of the total enriched detectors and some natural detectors has been assembled and it is being commissioned. Finally, the assembly of Module 2, which will complete MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, is already in progress.

  11. Status of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, C; Arnquist, I J; Avignone, F T; Baldenegro-Barrera, C X; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Bradley, A W; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Buuck, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Chu, P -H; Detwiler, J A; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilliss, T; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Jasinski, B R; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Massarczyk, R; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Shanks, B; Shirchenko, M; Snyder, N; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhitnikov, I

    2015-01-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, an ultra-low background, modular, HPGe detector array with a mass of 44-kg (29 kg 76Ge and 15 kg natGe) to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Ge-76. The next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double beta decay searches will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is envisioned to demonstrate a path forward to achieve a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value of 2039 keV. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR follows a modular implementation to be easily scalable to the next generation experiment. First, the prototype module was assembled; it has been continuously taking data from July 2014 to June 2015. Second, Module 1 with more than half of the total enriched detectors and some natural detectors has been assembled and it is being commissioned. Finally, the assembly of Module 2, which will complete MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, ...

  12. Experimental demonstration of a digital maximum likelihood based feedforward carrier recovery scheme for phase-modulated radio-over-fibre links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Zibar, Darko; Yu, Xianbin

    2008-01-01

    Maximum likelihood based feedforward RF carrier synchronization scheme is proposed for a coherently detected phase-modulated radio-over-fiber link. Error-free demodulation of 100 Mbit/s QPSK modulated signal is experimentally demonstrated after 25 km of fiber transmission.......Maximum likelihood based feedforward RF carrier synchronization scheme is proposed for a coherently detected phase-modulated radio-over-fiber link. Error-free demodulation of 100 Mbit/s QPSK modulated signal is experimentally demonstrated after 25 km of fiber transmission....

  13. The Majorana Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Aguayo, E; Hoppe, E W; Keillor, M E; Kephart, J D; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Merriman, J; Orrell, J L; Overman, N R; Avignone, F T; Back, H O; Combs, D C; Leviner, L E; Young, A R; Barabash, A S; Konovalov, S I; Vanyushin, I; Yumatov, V; Bergevin, M; Chan, Y-D; Detwiler, J A; Loach, J C; Martin, R D; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Vetter, K; Bertrand, F E; Cooper, R J; Radford, D C; Varner, R L; Yu, C -H; Boswell, M; Elliott, S R; Gehman, V M; Hime, A; Kidd, M F; LaRoque, B H; Rielage, K; Ronquest, M C; Steele, D; Brudanin, V; Egorov, V; Gusey, K; Kochetov, O; Shirchenko, M; Timkin, V; Yakushev, E; Busch, M; Esterline, J; Tornow, W; Christofferson, C D; Horton, M; Howard, S; Sobolev, V; Collar, J I; Fields, N; Creswick, R J; Doe, P J; Johnson, R A; Knecht, A; Leon, J; Marino, M G; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G; Wolfe, B A; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Hazama, R; Nomachi, M; Shima, T; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Giovanetti, G K; Green, M P; Henning, R; Howe, M A; MacMullin, S; Phillips, D G; Snavely, K J; Strain, J; Vorren, K; Guiseppe, V E; Keller, C; Mei, D -M; Perumpilly, G; Thomas, K; Zhang, C; Hallin, A L; Keeter, K J; Mizouni, L; Wilkerson, J F

    2011-01-01

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program including background reduction techniques is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% in 76Ge is given.

  14. The Majorana Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Combs, Dustin C.; Leviner, L.; Young, A.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Konovalov, S.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, Vladimir; Bergevin, M.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Detwiler, Jason A.; Loach, J. C.; Martin, R. D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Vetter, Kai; Bertrand, F.; Cooper, R. J.; Radford, D. C.; Varner, R. L.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Boswell, M.; Elliott, S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Hime, Andrew; Kidd, M. F.; LaRoque, B. H.; Rielage, Keith; Ronquest, M. C.; Steele, David; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Gusey, K.; Kochetov, Oleg; Shirchenko, M.; Timkin, V.; Yakushev, E.; Busch, Matthew; Esterline, James H.; Tornow, Werner; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Horton, Mark; Howard, S.; Sobolev, V.; Collar, J. I.; Fields, N.; Creswick, R.; Doe, Peter J.; Johnson, R. A.; Knecht, A.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Marino, Michael G.; Miller, M. L.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Wolfe, B. A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Hazama, R.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Shima, T.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Henning, Reyco; Howe, M. A.; MacMullin, S.; Phillips, D.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Strain, J.; Vorren, Kris R.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Keller, C.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Thomas, K.; Zhang, C.; Hallin, A. L.; Keeter, K.; Mizouni, Leila; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2011-09-03

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program, including background reduction techniques, is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% to 76Ge is given.

  15. Demonstration of Raman-based, dispersion-managed VCSEL technology for fibre-to-the-hut application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotich Kipnoo, E. K.; Kiboi Boiyo, D.; Isoe, G. M.; Chabata, T. V.; Gamatham, R. R. G.; Leitch, A. W. R.; Gibbon, T. B.

    2017-03-01

    For the first time, we experimentally investigate the use of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) in the fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) flavour for Africa, known as fibre-to-the-hut. Fibre-to-the-hut is a VCSEL based passive optical network technology designed and optimized for African continent. VCSELs have attracted attention in optical communication due to its vast advantages; low power consumption, relatively cheap costs among others. A 4.25 Gb/s uncooled VCSEL is used in a dispersion managed, Raman assisted network achieving beyond 100 km of error free transmission suited for FTTHut scenario. Energy-efficient high performance VCSEL is modulated using a 27-1 PRBS pattern and the signal transmitted on a G.655 fibre utilizing the minimum attenuation window.

  16. Dataset demonstrating the modeling of a high performance Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorber based thin film photovoltaic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaduzzaman, Md; Bahar, Ali Newaz; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maksudur Rahman

    2017-04-01

    The physical data of the semiconductor materials used in the design of a CIGS absorber based thin film photovoltaic cell have been presented in this data article. Besides, the values of the contact parameter and operating conditions of the cell have been reported. Furthermore, by conducting the simulation with data corresponding to the device structure: soda-lime glass (SLG) substrate/Mo back-contact/CIGS absorber/CdS buffer/intrinsic ZnO/Al-doped ZnO window/Al-grid front-contact, the solar cell performance parameters such as open circuit voltage [Formula: see text], short circuit current density [Formula: see text], fill factor [Formula: see text], efficiency [Formula: see text], and collection efficiency [Formula: see text] have been analyzed.

  17. Dataset demonstrating the modeling of a high performance Cu(In,GaSe2 absorber based thin film photovoltaic cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Asaduzzaman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The physical data of the semiconductor materials used in the design of a CIGS absorber based thin film photovoltaic cell have been presented in this data article. Besides, the values of the contact parameter and operating conditions of the cell have been reported. Furthermore, by conducting the simulation with data corresponding to the device structure: soda-lime glass (SLG substrate/Mo back-contact/CIGS absorber/CdS buffer/intrinsic ZnO/Al-doped ZnO window/Al-grid front-contact, the solar cell performance parameters such as open circuit voltage (Voc, short circuit current density Jsc, fill factor (FF, efficiency (η, and collection efficiency ηc have been analyzed.

  18. Demonstration of solar-blind Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N-based heterojunction phototransistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lingxia; Tang, Shaoji; Liu, Changshan; Li, Bin; Wu, Hualong; Wang, Hailong [School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Wu, Zhisheng [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Jiang, Hao, E-mail: stsjiang@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Microelectronics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-12-07

    Al{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}N/Al{sub 0.65}Ga{sub 0.35}N heterojunction phototransistors have been fabricated from the epi-structure grown by low-pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition on c-plane sapphire substrates. P-type conductivity of the AlGaN base layer was realized by using indium surfactant-assisted Mg-delta doping method. Regrowth technique was used to suppress the Mg memory effect on the n-type emitter. The fabricated devices with a 150-μm-diameter active area exhibited a bandpass spectral response between 235 and 285 nm. Dark current was measured to be less than 10 pA for bias voltages below 2.0 V. A high optical gain of 1.9 × 10{sup 3} was obtained at 6 V bias.

  19. Use of Metallopeptide Based Mimics Demonstrates That the Metalloprotein Nitrile Hydratase Requires Two Oxidized Cysteinates for Catalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.; Callan, P; Amie, J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) are non-heme Fe{sup III} or non-corrin Co{sup III} containing metalloenzymes that possess an N{sub 2}S{sub 3} ligand environment with nitrogen donors derived from amidates and sulfur donors derived from cysteinates. A closely related enzyme is thiocyanate hydrolase (SCNase), which possesses a nearly identical active-site coordination environment as CoNHase. These enzymes are redox inactive and perform hydrolytic reactions; SCNase hydrolyzes thiocyanate anions while NHase converts nitriles into amides. Herein an active CoNHase metallopeptide mimic, [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] (NHase-m1 = AcNH-CCDLP-CGVYD-PA-COOH), that contains Co{sup III} in a similar N{sub 2}S{sub 3} coordination environment as CoNHase is reported. [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] was characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Co-S: 2.21 {angstrom}; Co-N: 1.93 {angstrom}), vibrational, and optical spectroscopies. We find that [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] will perform the catalytic conversion of acrylonitrile into acrylamide with up to 58 turnovers observed after 18 h at 25 C (pH 8.0). FTIR data used in concert with calculated vibrational data (mPWPW91/aug-cc-TZVPP) demonstrates that the active form of [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] has a ligated SO{sub 2} (? = 1091 cm{sup -1}) moiety and a ligated protonated SO(H) (? = 928 cm{sup -1}) moiety; when only one oxygenated cysteinate ligand (i.e., a mono-SO{sub 2} coordination motif) or the bis-SO{sub 2} coordination motif are found within [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] no catalytic activity is observed. Calculations of the thermodynamics of ligand exchange (B3LYP/aug-cc-TZVPP) suggest that the reason for this is that the SO{sub 2}/SO(H) equatorial ligand motif promotes both water dissociation from the Co{sup III}-center and nitrile coordination to the Co{sup III}-center. In contrast, the under- or overoxidized motifs will either strongly favor a five coordinate Co

  20. Microcomputer-Based Digital Signal Processing Laboratory Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinari, Jr., Rocco; Rao, S. Sathyanarayan

    1985-01-01

    Describes a system (Apple II microcomputer interfaced to flexible, custom-designed digital hardware) which can provide: (1) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) computation on real-time data with a video display of spectrum; (2) frequency synthesis experiments using the inverse FFT; and (3) real-time digital filtering experiments. (JN)