WorldWideScience

Sample records for demonstrating program outcomes

  1. Fuel Cell Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Brun

    2006-09-15

    In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance

  2. Performance Demonstration Program Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    To demonstrate compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste characterization program, each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP serves as a quality control check against expected results and provides information about the quality of data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed by an independent organization to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. There are three elements within the PDP: analysis of simulated headspace gases, analysis of solids for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents, and analysis for transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Because the analysis for TRU radionuclides using NDA techniques involves both the counting of drums and standard waste boxes, four PDP plans are required to describe the activities of the three PDP elements. In accordance with these PDP plans, the reviewing and approving authority for PDP results and for the overall program is the CBFO PDP Appointee. The CBFO PDP Appointee is responsible for ensuring the implementation of each of these plans by concurring with the designation of the Program Coordinator and by providing technical oversight and coordination for the program. The Program Coordinator will designate the PDP Manager, who will coordinate the three elements of the PDP. The purpose of this management plan is to identify how the requirements applicable to the PDP are implemented during the management and coordination of PDP activities. The other participants in the program (organizations that perform site implementation and activities under CBFO contracts or interoffice work orders) are not covered under this management plan. Those activities are governed by the organization's quality assurance (QA) program and procedures or as otherwise directed by CBFO.

  3. Morphing images to demonstrate potential surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Grant S

    2010-05-01

    Morphing patient images to offer some demonstration of the intended surgical outcome can support shared expectations between patient and facial plastic surgeon. As part of the preoperative consultation, showing a patient an image that compares their face before surgery with what is planned after surgery can greatly enhance the surgical experience. This article refers to use of Photoshop CS3 for tutorial descriptions but any recent version of Photoshop is sufficiently similar. Among the topics covered are creating a before-and-after, rhinoplasty imaging, face- and brow-lift imaging, and removing wrinkles. Each section presents a step-by-step tutorial with graphic images demonstrating the computer screen and Photoshop tools. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. NASA Technology Demonstrations Missions Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Susan

    2011-01-01

    , more than 70% of the TDM funds will be competitively awarded as a result of yearly calls for proposed flight demonstrators and selected based on possible payoff to NASA, technology maturity, customer interest, cost, and technical risk reduction. This paper will give an overview of the TDM Program s mission and organization, as well as its current status in delivering advanced space technologies that will enable more flexible and robust future missions. It also will provide several examples of missions that fit within these parameters and expected outcomes.

  5. Outcomes Assessment in Dental Hygiene Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Ellen B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 22 dental-hygiene-program directors found that programs routinely and effectively assess student outcomes and use the information for program improvements and to demonstrate accountability. Both policy and faculty/administrative support were deemed important to implementation. Time constraints were a major barrier. Outcomes-assessment…

  6. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    1999-03-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  7. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2002-07-30

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results. Also includes Power Plant Improvement Initiative Projects.

  8. OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S ARSENIC TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides a summary on the Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration Program. The information includes the history and the current status of the demonstration projects on both round 1 and round 2 including some photos of the treatment systems. The presentation m...

  9. Constructing Adverse Outcome Pathways: a Demonstration of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) provides a conceptual framework to evaluate and integrate chemical toxicity and its effects across the levels of biological organization. As such, it is essential to develop a resource-efficient and effective approach to extend molecular initiating events (MIEs) of chemicals to their downstream phenotypes of a greater regulatory relevance. A number of ongoing public phenomics (high throughput phenotyping) efforts have been generating abundant phenotypic data annotated with ontology terms. These phenotypes can be analyzed semantically and linked to MIEs of interest, all in the context of a knowledge base integrated from a variety of ontologies for various species and knowledge domains. In such analyses, two phenotypic profiles (PPs; anchored by genes or diseases) each characterized by multiple ontology terms are compared for their semantic similarities within a common ontology graph, but across boundaries of species and knowledge domains. Taking advantage of publicly available ontologies and software tool kits, we have implemented an OS-Mapping (Ontology-based Semantics Mapping) approach as a Java application, and constructed a network of 19383 PPs as nodes with edges weighed by their pairwise semantic similarity scores. Individual PPs were assembled from public phenomics data. Out of possible 1.87×108 pairwise connections among these nodes, about 71% of them have similarity scores between 0.2 and the maximum possible of 1.0.

  10. Hanford radiochemical site decommissioning demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.C.

    1971-01-01

    A program is proposed for the innovation, development, and demonstration of technologies necessary to decommission the Hanford radiochemical plant area to the extent that the sites can have unrestricted public access. The five tasks selected for development and demonstration of restoration techniques were restoration of a burial ground, decommissioning of a separations plant, restoration of a separations plant waste interim storage tank farm, restoration of a liquid disposal area, and disposal of large contaminated equipment. Process development requirements are tabulated and discussed. A proposed schedule and estimated costs are given

  11. Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Volume I. Demonstration plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The objective of this project is for Babcock Contractors Inc. (BCI) to provide process designs, and gasifier retort design for a fuel gas demonstration plant for Erie Mining Company at Hoyt Lake, Minnesota. The fuel gas produced will be used to supplement natural gas and fuel oil for iron ore pellet induration. The fuel gas demonstration plant will consist of five stirred, two-stage fixed-bed gasifier retorts capable of handling caking and non-caking coals, and provisions for the installation of a sixth retort. The process and unit design has been based on operation with caking coals; however, the retorts have been designed for easy conversion to handle non-caking coals. The demonstration unit has been designed to provide for expansion to a commercial plant (described in Commercial Plant Package) in an economical manner.

  12. Three Mile Island zeolite vitirification demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemens, D.H.; Knowlton, D.E.; Shupe, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    The cleanup of the high-activity-level water at Three Mile Island (TMI) provides an opportunity to further develop waste management technology. Approximately 790,000 gallons of high-activity-level water at TMI's Unit-2 Nuclear Power Station will be decontaminated at the site using the submerged demineralizer system (SDS). In the SDS process, the cesium and strontium in the water are sorbed onto zeolite that is contained within metal liners. The Department of Energy has asked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to take a portion of the zeolite from the SDS process and demonstrate, on a production scale, that this zeolite can be vitrified using the in-can melting process. This paper is a brief overview of the TMI zeolite vitrification program. The first section discusses the formulation of a glass suitable for immobilizing SDS zeolite. The following section describes a feed system that was developed to feed zeolite to the in-can melter. It also describes the in-can melting process and the government owned facilities in which the demonstrations will take place. Finally, the schedule for completing the program activities is outlined

  13. Near-Net Forging Technology Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, I. Keith

    1996-01-01

    Significant advantages in specific mechanical properties, when compared to conventional aluminum (Al) alloys, make aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys attractive candidate materials for use in cryogenic propellant tanks and dry bay structures. However, the cost of Al-Li alloys is typically five times that of 2219 aluminum. If conventional fabrication processes are employed to fabricate launch vehicle structure, the material costs will restrict their utilization. In order to fully exploit the potential cost and performance benefits of Al-Li alloys, it is necessary that near-net manufacturing methods be developed to off-set or reduce raw material costs. Near-net forging is an advanced manufacturing method that uses elevated temperature metal movement (forging) to fabricate a single piece, near-net shape, structure. This process is termed 'near-net' because only a minimal amount of post-forge machining is required. The near-net forging process was developed to reduce the material scrap rate (buy-to-fly ratio) and fabrication costs associated with conventional manufacturing methods. The goal for the near-net forging process, when mature, is to achieve an overall cost reduction of approximately 50 percent compared with conventional manufacturing options for producing structures fabricated from Al-Li alloys. This NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) sponsored program has been a part of a unique government / industry partnership, coordinated to develop and demonstrate near-net forging technology. The objective of this program was to demonstrate scale-up of the near-net forging process. This objective was successfully achieved by fabricating four integrally stiffened, 170- inch diameter by 20-inch tall, Al-Li alloy 2195, Y-ring adapters. Initially, two 2195 Al-Li ingots were converted and back extruded to produce four cylindrical blockers. Conventional ring rolling of the blockers was performed to produce ring preforms, which were then contour ring rolled to produce

  14. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program update 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (also referred to as the CCT Program) is a $6.9 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Technology has a vital role in ensuring that coal can continue to serve U.S. energy interests and enhance opportunities for economic growth and employment while meeting the national committment to a clean and healthy global environment. These technologies are being advanced through the CCT Program. The CCT Program supports three substantive national objectives: ensuring a sustainable environment through technology; enhancing energy efficiency and reliability; providing opportunities for economic growth and employment. The technologies being demonstrated under the CCT Program reduce the emissions of sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, greenhouse gases, hazardous air pollutants, solid and liquid wastes, and other emissions resulting from coal use or conversion to other fuel forms. These emissions reductions are achieved with efficiencies greater than or equal to currently available technologies.

  15. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program) is a $7.14 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Clean coal technologies being demonstrated under the CCT program are creating the technology base that allows the nation to meet its energy and environmental goals efficiently and reliably. The fact that most of the demonstrations are being conducted at commercial scale, in actual user environments, and under conditions typical of commercial operations allows the potential of the technologies to be evaluated in their intended commercial applications. The technologies are categorized into four market sectors: advanced electric power generation systems; environmental control devices; coal processing equipment for clean fuels; and industrial technologies. Sections of this report describe the following: Role of the Program; Program implementation; Funding and costs; The road to commercial realization; Results from completed projects; Results and accomplishments from ongoing projects; and Project fact sheets. Projects include fluidized-bed combustion, integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants, advanced combustion and heat engines, nitrogen oxide control technologies, sulfur dioxide control technologies, combined SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} technologies, coal preparation techniques, mild gasification, and indirect liquefaction. Industrial applications include injection systems for blast furnaces, coke oven gas cleaning systems, power generation from coal/ore reduction, a cyclone combustor with S, N, and ash control, cement kiln flue gas scrubber, and pulse combustion for steam coal gasification.

  16. Executive summary of the Cryofracture demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.; Osborne, D.; Ancho, M.

    1991-09-01

    This report provides an executive summary of the Cryofracture demonstration program performed at Nuclear Remedial Technologies Corporation under contract to EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., for the Department of Energy (DOE). Cryofracture is a size-reducing process whereby objects are frozen whereby objects are frozen to liquid nitrogen temperatures and crushed in a large hydraulic press. Material at the cryogenic temperatures have low ductility and are easily size reduced by fracturing. The main application being investigated for the DOE is for retrieved buried and stored transuranic (TRU) waste. Six 55-gallon drums and six 2 ft x 2 ft x 8 ft boxes containing simulated waste with tracers were subjected to the Cryofracture process. Data was obtained on (a) cool-down time, (b) yield strength of the containers, (c) size distribution of the waste before and after the Cryofracture process, (d) volume reduction of the waste, and (e) sampling of air and surface dusts for spread of tracers to evaluate potential contamination spread. The Cryofracture process was compared to conventional shredders and detailed cost estimates were established for construction of a Cryofracture facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Although cost estimates for conventional shredding are higher for Cryofracture, the potential for fire and explosion during conventional shredding would incur additional costs to preclude these events. These additional costs are unknown and would require considerable research and development. 4 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Clean coal technology demonstration program: Program update 1996-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (known as the CCT Program) reached a significant milestone in 1996 with the completion of 20 of the 39 active projects. The CCT Program is responding to a need to demonstrate and deploy a portfolio of technologies that will assure the U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 297 billion tons could continue to supply the nation`s energy needs economically and in a manner that meets the nation`s environmental objectives. This portfolio of technologies includes environmental control devices that contributed to meeting the accords on transboundary air pollution recommended by the Special Envoys on Acid Rain in 1986. Operational, technical, environmental, and economic performance information and data are now flowing from highly efficient, low-emission, advanced power generation technologies that will enable coal to retain its prominent role into the next millennium. Further, advanced technologies are emerging that will enhance the competitive use of coal in the industrial sector, such as in steelmaking. Coal processing technologies will enable the entire coal resource base to be used while complying with environmental requirements. These technologies are producing products used by utilities and industrial processes. The capability to coproduce products, such as liquid and solid fuels, electricity, and chemicals, is being demonstrated at a commercial scale by projects in the CCT Program. In summary, this portfolio of technologies is satisfying the national need to maintain a multifuel energy mix in which coal is a key component because of its low-cost, availability, and abundant supply within the nation`s borders.

  18. DYMAC demonstration program: Phase I experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustson, R.H.

    1978-02-01

    The DYnamic MAterials Control (DYMAC) project tested a prototype system at the DP Site LASL plutonium facility, which consisted of a computerized accounting system based on material balancing by unit process. Transactions were written to describe the movement of material from one unit process to another. In the DYMAC prototype a specially designed computer program handled transactions that operators entered into the system via a terminal in the processing area. The transactions contained the same information that is used in the present LASL paper accounting system to create an inventory. During a 6-week period the DYMAC system operated in parallel with the paper system. At the end of the period results showed the DYMAC system was able to keep an accurate and timely inventory. Concurrent with testing the transaction-handling program, the project operated several nondestructive assay instruments in a glovebox environment, specifically the electronic balance, solution assay instrument, and thermal-neutron coincidence counter. From the instrument operation logs, project personnel were able to identify operational problems and incorporate design changes in the instrumentation for the new facility

  19. ICU Telemedicine Program Financial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Craig M; Motzkus, Christine; Rincon, Teresa; Cody, Shawn E; Landry, Karen; Irwin, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    ICU telemedicine improves access to high-quality critical care, has substantial costs, and can change financial outcomes. Detailed information about financial outcomes and their trends over time following ICU telemedicine implementation and after the addition of logistic center function has not been published to our knowledge. Primary data were collected for consecutive adult patients of a single academic medical center. We compared clinical and financial outcomes across three groups that differed regarding telemedicine support: a group without ICU telemedicine support (pre-ICU intervention group), a group with ICU telemedicine support (ICU telemedicine group), and an ICU telemedicine group with added logistic center functions and support for quality-care standardization (logistic center group). The primary outcome was annual direct contribution margin defined as aggregated annual case revenue minus annual case direct costs (including operating costs of ICU telemedicine and its related programs). All monetary values were adjusted to 2015 US dollars using Producer Price Index for Health-Care Facilities. Annual case volume increased from 4,752 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to 5,735 (ICU telemedicine) and 6,581 (logistic center). The annual direct contribution margin improved from $7,921,584 (pre-ICU telemedicine) to $37,668,512 (ICU telemedicine) to $60,586,397 (logistic center) due to increased case volume, higher case revenue relative to direct costs, and shorter length of stay. The ability of properly modified ICU telemedicine programs to increase case volume and access to high-quality critical care with improved annual direct contribution margins suggests that there is a financial argument to encourage the wider adoption of ICU telemedicine. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transit Marketing : A Program of Research, Demonstration and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    This report recommends a five-year program of research, demonstration, and communication to improve the effectiveness of marketing practice in the U.S. transit industry. The program is oriented toward the development of improved market research tools...

  1. Spatial Programming for Industrial Robots Through Task Demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Lambrecht; Martin Kleinsorge; Martin Rosenstrauch; Jörg Krüger

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present an intuitive system for the programming of industrial robots using markerless gesture recognition and mobile augmented reality in terms of programming by demonstration. The approach covers gesture-based task definition and adaption by human demonstration, as well as task evaluation through augmented reality. A 3D motion tracking system and a handheld device establish the basis for the presented spatial programming system. In this publication, we present a prototype toward ...

  2. Outcome from 5-year live surgical demonstrations in urinary stone treatment: are outcomes compromised?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legemate, Jaap D.; Zanetti, Stefano P.; Baard, Joyce; Kamphuis, Guido M.; Montanari, Emanuele; Traxer, Olivier; de la Rosette, Jean Jmch

    2017-01-01

    To compare intra- and post-operative outcomes of endourological live surgical demonstrations (LSDs) and routine surgical practice (RSP) for urinary stones. Consecutive ureterorenoscopic (URS) and percutaneous (PNL) urinary stone procedures over a 5-year period were reviewed. Procedures were divided

  3. Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

  4. MAVL wastes containers functional demonstration and associated tests program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templier, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of studies on the MAVL wastes, the CEA develops containers for middle time wastes storage. This program aims to realize a ''B wastes containers'' demonstrator. A demonstrator is a container, parts of a container or samples which must validate the tests. This document presents the state of the study in the following three chapters: functions description, base data and design choices; presentation of the functional demonstrators; demonstration tests description. (A.L.B.)

  5. Age differences in IDA savings outcomes: findings from the American Dream Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Michelle; Sherraden, Michael; Zhang, Lin; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to develop a greater understanding of age differences in savings outcomes within Individual Development Accounts (IDAs). Participant data from the American Dream Demonstration (ADD) are examined for age differences in accumulated net deposits, average monthly net deposits, and deposit frequency. ADDprogram data are examined for savings match rates, monthly savings targets, direct deposit, and hours of financial education offered. Results indicate that, on average, older IDA participants have better savings outcomes than younger participants. Findings from this study suggest that impoverished middleaged and older adults can save if provided an opportunity and incentives. However, success will depend on the characteristics of the programs.

  6. Western hardwoods : value-added research and demonstration program

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. W. Green; W. W. Von Segen; S. A. Willits

    1995-01-01

    Research results from the value-added research and demonstration program for western hardwoods are summarized in this report. The intent of the program was to enhance the economy of the Pacific Northwest by helping local communities and forest industries produce wood products more efficiently. Emphasis was given to value-added products and barriers to increased...

  7. Clean coal technologies: Research, development, and demonstration program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, has structured an integrated program for research, development, and demonstration of clean coal technologies that will enable the nation to use its plentiful domestic coal resources while meeting environmental quality requirements. The program provides the basis for making coal a low-cost, environmentally sound energy choice for electric power generation and fuels production. These programs are briefly described.

  8. Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program 250K Hybrid Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, George; Zoladz, Tom; Arves, Joe; Kearney, Darren; Abel, Terry; Park, O.

    2003-01-01

    The Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program (HPDP) program was formed to mature hybrid propulsion technology to a readiness level sufficient to enable commercialization for various space launch applications. The goal of the HPDP was to develop and test a 250,000 pound vacuum thrust hybrid booster in order to demonstrate hybrid propulsion technology and enable manufacturing of large hybrid boosters for current and future space launch vehicles. The HPDP has successfully conducted four tests of the 250,000 pound thrust hybrid rocket motor at NASA's Stennis Space Center. This paper documents the test series.

  9. Zeolite Vitrification Demonstration Program nonradioactive-process operations summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, G.H.; Knox, C.A.; Goles, R.G.; Ethridge, L.J.; Siemens, D.H.

    1982-09-01

    The Submerged Demineralizer System is a process developed to decontaminate high-activity level water at Three Mile Island by sorbing the activity (primarily Cs and Sr) onto beds of zeolite. Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Zeolite Vitrification Demonstration Program has the responsibility of demonstrating the full-scale vitrification of this zeolite material. The first phase of this program has been to develop a glass formulation and demonstrate the vitrification process with the use of nonradioactive materials. During this phase, four full-scale nonradioactive demonstration runs were completed. The same zeolite mixture being used in the SDS system was loaded with nonradioactive isotopes of Cs and Sr, dried, blended with glass-forming chemicals and fed to a canister in an in-can melter furnace. During each run, the gaseous effluents were sampled. After each run, glass samples were removed and analyzed

  10. Fuel cycle and waste management demonstration in the IFR Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Laidler, J.J.; Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne's National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is the main element in the US advanced reactor development program. A unique fuel cycle and waste process technology is being developed for the IFR. Demonstration of this technology at engineering scale will begin within the next year at the EBR-II test facility complex in Idaho. This paper describes the facility being readied for this demonstration, the process to be employed, the equipment being built, and the waste management approach

  11. Spatial Programming for Industrial Robots through Task Demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Lambrecht

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present an intuitive system for the programming of industrial robots using markerless gesture recognition and mobile augmented reality in terms of programming by demonstration. The approach covers gesture-based task definition and adaption by human demonstration, as well as task evaluation through augmented reality. A 3D motion tracking system and a handheld device establish the basis for the presented spatial programming system. In this publication, we present a prototype toward the programming of an assembly sequence consisting of several pick-and-place tasks. A scene reconstruction provides pose estimation of known objects with the help of the 2D camera of the handheld. Therefore, the programmer is able to define the program through natural bare-hand manipulation of these objects with the help of direct visual feedback in the augmented reality application. The program can be adapted by gestures and transmitted subsequently to an arbitrary industrial robot controller using a unified interface. Finally, we discuss an application of the presented spatial programming approach toward robot-based welding tasks.

  12. Review of the Vortec soil remediation demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patten, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The principal objective of the METC/Vortec program is to develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Vortec CMS in remediating soils contaminated with hazardous materials and/or low levels of radionuclides. To convincingly demonstrate the CMS's capability, a Demonstration Plant will be constructed and operated at a DOE site that has a need for the remediation of contamination soil. The following objectives will be met during the program: (1) establish the glass chemistry requirements to achieve vitrification of contaminated soils found at the selected DOE site; (2) complete the design of a fully integrated soil vitrification demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (3) establish the cost of a fully integrated soil demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (4) construct and operate a fully integrated demonstration plant; (5) analyze all influent and effluent streams to establish the partitioning of contaminants and to demonstrate compliance with all applicable health, safety, and environmental requirements; (6) demonstrate that the CMS technology has the capability to produce a vitrified product that will immobilize the hazardous and radionuclide materials consistent with the needs of the specific DOE waste repositories

  13. The role of a technology demonstration program for future reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorov, A.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive technology demonstration program is seen as an important component of the overall safety case, especially for a novel technology. The objective of such a program is defined as providing objective and auditable evidence that the technology will meet or exceed the relevant requirements. Various aspects of such a program are identified and then discussed in some details in this presentation. We will show how the need for such a program is anchored in fundamental safety principles. Attributes of the program, means of achieving its objective, roles of participants, as well as key steps are all elaborated. It will be argued that to prove a novel technology, the designer will have to combine several activities such as the use of operational experience, prototyping of the technology elements, conduct of experiments and tests under representative conditions, as well as modeling and analysis. Importance of availability of experimental facilities and qualified scientific and technical staff is emphasized. A solid technology demonstration program will facilitate and speed up regulatory evaluations of licensing applications. (author)

  14. The role of a technology demonstration program for future reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viktorov, A. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    A comprehensive technology demonstration program is seen as an important component of the overall safety case, especially for a novel technology. The objective of such a program is defined as providing objective and auditable evidence that the technology will meet or exceed the relevant requirements. Various aspects of such a program are identified and then discussed in some details in this presentation. We will show how the need for such a program is anchored in fundamental safety principles. Attributes of the program, means of achieving its objective, roles of participants, as well as key steps are all elaborated. It will be argued that to prove a novel technology, the designer will have to combine several activities such as the use of operational experience, prototyping of the technology elements, conduct of experiments and tests under representative conditions, as well as modeling and analysis. Importance of availability of experimental facilities and qualified scientific and technical staff is emphasized. A solid technology demonstration program will facilitate and speed up regulatory evaluations of licensing applications. (author)

  15. HTTR demonstration program for nuclear cogeneration of hydrogen and electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Sumita, Junya; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Yan, Xing L.; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Tachibana, Yukio; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency initiated a High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) demonstration program in accordance with recommendations of a task force established by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology according to the Strategic Energy Plan as of April 2014. The demonstration program is designed to complete helium gas turbine and hydrogen production system technologies aiming at commercial plant deployment in 2030s. The program begins with coupling a helium gas turbine in the secondary loop of the HTTR and expands by adding the H 2 plant to a tertiary loop to enable hydrogen cogeneration. Safety standards for coupling the helium gas turbine and H 2 plant to the nuclear reactor will be established through safety review in licensing. A system design and its control method are planned to be validated with a series of test operations using the HTTR-GT/H 2 plant. This paper explains the outline of HTTR demonstration program with a plant concept of the heat application system directed at establishing an HTGR cogeneration system with 950°C reactor outlet temperature for production of power and hydrogen as recommended by the task force. Commercial deployment strategy including a development plan for the helium gas turbine is also presented. (author)

  16. A feasibility demonstration program for superconducting magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filios, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency, as the agent of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Office, has begun a program to build an engineering test model (ETM) of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system. The ETM will serve to demonstrate the feasibility of using SMES technology to meet both SDI and public utility requirements for electric energy storage. SMES technology characteristics are reviewed and related to SDI and electric utility requirements. Program structure and schedule are related to specific objectives, and critical issues are defined

  17. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Plant parameters envelope report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program is the nuclear industry's initiative for piloting the early resolution of siting-related issues before the detailed design proceedings of the combined operating license review. The ESP Demonstration Program consists of three phases. The plant parameters envelopes task is part of Phase 1, which addresses the generic review of applicable federal regulations and develops criteria for safety and environmental assessment of potential sites. The plant parameters envelopes identify parameters that characterize the interface between an ALWR design and a potential site, and quantify the interface through values selected from the Utility Requirements Documents, vendor design information, or engineering assessments. When augmented with site-specific information, the plant parameters envelopes provide sufficient information to allow ESPs to be granted based on individual ALWR design information or enveloping design information for the evolutionary, passive, or generic ALWR plants. This document is expected to become a living document when used by future applicants

  18. An inspection demonstration program/a quality system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, L.D.

    1995-01-01

    Mobil relies on tubular manufacturers to consistently supply OCTG which complies with all material requirements of API Specification 5CT. This paper details the Mobil Inspection Demonstration Program; Mobil's method for qualifying ultrasonic inspection systems for use during Mobil receiving inspections. Additionally, the basic fundamentals of the Mobil quality system and acceptance sampling are presented with an emphasis on tracking short-term and long-term supplier performance

  19. Commercial Cyclone Incinerator Demonstration Program: April-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    The commercial cyclone incinerator program was designed to study the effects of burning low-level waste contaminated with beta and gamma emitters in a cyclone system. The ultimate program goal is the demonstration of a cyclone incinerator at a nuclear power plant. During the past six months, the first program objective, NRC review of the Feasibility Plan, was achieved, and work began on the second objective, Complete Incinerator Feasibility Plan. Potential applications for the cyclone incinerator have been investigated. The feasibility plan for the incinerator system was reviewed with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Following a series of cold checkout burns, implementation of the feasibility plan was begun with the start of laboratory-scale experiments. Inconel 601 is being investigated as a material of construction for the incinerator burn chamber

  20. 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautman, C.A.; Cromer, M.V.; Newman, G.C.; Beiso, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    The 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program, hosted by Fernald Environmental Management Project, was established to investigate technologies that are applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. An important part of this effort was evaluating field-screening tools potentially capable of acquiring high-resolution information on uranium contamination distribution in surface soils. Further-more, the information needed to be obtained in a cost- and time-efficient manner. Seven advanced field-screening technologies were demonstrated at a uranium-contaminated site at Fernald, located 29 kilometers northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The seven technologies tested were: (1) alpha-track detectors, (2) a high-energy beta scintillometer, (3) electret ionization chambers, (4) and (5) two variants of gamma-ray spectrometry, (6) laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and (7) long-range alpha detection. The goals of this field demonstration were to evaluate the capabilities of the detectors and to demonstrate their utility within the US Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration Program. Identical field studies were conducted using four industry-standard characterization tools: (1) a sodium-iodide scintillometer, (2) a low-energy FIDLER scintillometer, (3) a field-portable x-ray fluorescence detector, and (4) standard soil sampling coupled with laboratory analysis. Another important aspect of this program was the application of a cost/risk decision model to guide characterization of the site. This document is a compilation of raw data submitted by the technologies and converted total uranium data from the 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration

  1. 76 FR 60050 - Medicaid Program: Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicaid Program: Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid... Medicaid beneficiaries with disabling and chronic conditions from institutions into the community. The...

  2. Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP

  3. Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program. Final technology performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-02-10

    This document represents the final Regional Demonstration Project Technical Performance Report (TPR) for Pecan Street Inc.’s (Pecan Street) Smart Grid Demonstration Program, DE-OE-0000219. Pecan Street is a 501(c)(3) smart grid/clean energy research and development organization headquartered at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). Pecan Street worked in collaboration with Austin Energy, UT, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the City of Austin, the Austin Chamber of Commerce and selected consultants, contractors, and vendors to take a more detailed look at the energy load of residential and small commercial properties while the power industry is undergoing modernization. The Pecan Street Smart Grid Demonstration Program signed-up over 1,000 participants who are sharing their home or businesses’s electricity consumption data with the project via green button protocols, smart meters, and/or a home energy monitoring system (HEMS). Pecan Street completed the installation of HEMS in 750 homes and 25 commercial properties. The program provided incentives to increase the installed base of roof-top solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, plug-in electric vehicles with Level 2 charging, and smart appliances. Over 200 participants within a one square mile area took advantage of Austin Energy and Pecan Street’s joint PV incentive program and installed roof-top PV as part of this project. Of these homes, 69 purchased or leased an electric vehicle through Pecan Street’s PV rebate program and received a Level 2 charger from Pecan Street. Pecan Street studied the impacts of these technologies along with a variety of consumer behavior interventions, including pricing models, real-time feedback on energy use, incentive programs, and messaging, as well as the corresponding impacts on Austin Energy’s distribution assets.The primary demonstration site was the Mueller community in Austin, Texas. The Mueller development, located less than three miles from the Texas State Capitol

  4. License renewal demonstration program: NRC observations and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prato, R.J.; Kuo, P.T.; Newberry, S.F.

    1996-12-01

    This report summarizes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff's observations and lessons learned from the five License Renewal Demonstration Program (LRDP) site visits performed by the staff from March 25, 1996, through August 16, 1996. The LRDP was a Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) program intended to assess the effectiveness of the guidance provided by NEI 95-10, Revision 0, open-quotes Industry Guideline for Implementing the Requirements of 10 CFR Part 54 - The License Renewal Rule,close quotes to implement the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 54 (10 CFR Part 54), open-quotes Requirements for Renewal of Operating Licenses for Nuclear Power Plants.close quotes In general, NEI 95-10 appeared to contain the basic guidance needed for scoping, screening, identifying aging effects, developing aging management programs, and performing time-limited aging analyses. However, inconsistent implementation of this guidance in some areas was an indication that clarification of existing guidance and/or the inclusion-of some new guidance may be needed for applicants to develop a license renewal program that is consistent with the intent of the rule

  5. Outcome of Minnesota's gambling treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchfield, R; Winters, K C

    2001-01-01

    This study measured the outcome of four state-supported outpatient gambling treatment programs in Minnesota. The programs were developed specifically for the treatment of pathological gamblers and offered multiple modalities of treatment including individual, group, education, twelve-step work, family groups, and financial counseling. The therapeutic orientation was eclectic with an emphasis on the twelve steps of Gamblers Anonymous (GA) and a treatment goal of abstinence. The sample included 348 men and 220 women treated between January 1992 and January 1995. A pretest-posttest design was utilized with multidimensional assessments obtained at intake, discharge, six-months, and twelve-months post-discharge. Variables assessed included a range of clinical and outcome variables. At six month follow-up, 28% reported that they had abstained from gambling during the six months following discharge and an additional 20% had gambled less than once per month. Almost half of the sample (48%) showed clinically significant improvement in gambling frequency at six month follow-up. Outcome variables of gambling frequency, SOGS scores, amount of money gambled, number of friends who gamble, psychosocial problems, and number of financial problems, all showed statistically significant improvements from pretreatment to follow-up. The treatment programs yielded outcome results similar to those reported for alcohol and drug abuse treatment programs.

  6. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for the WIPP Experimental-Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program is designed to ensure that compliance with the Quality Assurance Objective, identified in the Quality Assurance Program Plan for the WIPP Experimental-Waste Characterization Program (QAPP), is achieved. This Program Plan is intended for use by the WPO to assess the laboratory support provided for the characterization of WIPP TRU waste by the storage/generator sites. Phase 0 of the Performance Demonstration Program encompasses the analysis of headspace gas samples for inorganic and organic components. The WPO will ensure the implementation of this plan by designating an independent organization to coordinate and provide technical oversight for the program (Program Coordinator). Initial program support, regarding the technical oversight and coordination functions, shall be provided by the USEPA-ORP. This plan identifies the criteria that will be used for the evaluation of laboratory performance, the responsibilities of the Program Coordinator, and the responsibilities of the participating laboratories. 5 tabs

  7. Low-E Retrofit Demonstration and Educational Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, Thomas D [Birch Point Consulting LLC; Wiehagen, Joseph [Home Innovation Research Labs, Inc.; Drumheller, S Craig [Home Innovation Research Labs, Inc.; Siegel, John [Quanta Technologies Inc.; Stratmoen, Todd [Larson Manufacturing

    2013-11-16

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the capability of low-emissivity (low-E) storm windows / panels and low-E retrofit glazing systems to significantly and cost effectively improve the energy efficiency of both existing residential and commercial buildings. The key outcomes are listed below: RESIDENTIAL CASE STUDIES: (a) A residential case study in two large multifamily apartment buildings in Philadelphia showed a substantial 18-22% reduction in heating energy use and a 9% reduction in cooling energy use by replacing old clear glass storm windows with modern low-E storm windows. Furthermore, the new low-E storm windows reduced the overall apartment air leakage by an average of 10%. (b) Air leakage testing on interior low-E panels installed in a New York City multifamily building over windows with and without AC units showed that the effective leakage area of the windows was reduced by 77-95%. (c) To study the use of low-E storm windows in a warmer mixed climate with a balance of both heating and cooling, 10 older homes near Atlanta with single pane windows were tested with three types of exterior storm windows: clear glass, low-E glass with high solar heat gain, and low-E glass with lower solar heat gain. The storm windows significantly reduced the overall home air leakage by an average of 17%, or 3.7 ACH50. Considerably high variability in the data made it difficult to draw strong conclusions about the overall energy usage, but for heating periods, the low-E storm windows showed approximately 15% heating energy savings, whereas clear storm windows were neutral in performance. For cooling periods, the low-E storm windows showed a wide range of performance from 2% to over 30% cooling energy savings. Overall, the study showed the potential for significantly more energy savings from using low-E glass versus no storm window or clear glass storm windows in warmer mixed climates, but it is difficult to conclusively say whether one type of low-E performed

  8. Development and demonstration program for dynamic nuclear materials control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustson, R.H.; Baron, N.; Ford, R.F.; Ford, W.; Hagen, J.; Li, T.K.; Marshall, R.S.; Reams, V.S.; Severe, W.R.; Shirk, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    A significant portion of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Safeguards Program is directed toward the development and demonstration of dynamic nuclear materials control. The building chosen for the demonstration system is the new Plutonium Processing Facility in Los Alamos, which houses such operations as metal-to-oxide conversion, fuel pellet fabrication, and scrap recovery. A DYnamic MAterials Control (DYMAC) system is currently being installed in the facility as an integral part of the processing operation. DYMAC is structured around interlocking unit-process accounting areas. It relies heavily on nondestructive assay measurements made in the process line to draw dynamic material balances in near real time. In conjunction with the nondestructive assay instrumentation, process operators use interactive terminals to transmit additional accounting and process information to a dedicated computer. The computer verifies and organizes the incoming data, immediately updates the inventory records, monitors material in transit using elapsed time, and alerts the Nuclear Materials Officer in the event that material balances exceed the predetermined action limits. DYMAC is part of the United States safeguards system under control of the facility operator. Because of its advanced features, the system will present a new set of inspection conditions to the IAEA, whose response is the subject of a study being sponsored by the US-IAEA Technical Assistance Program. The central issue is how the IAEA can use the increased capabilities of such a system and still maintain independent verification

  9. Methanol supply issues for alternative fuels demonstration programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teague, J.M.; Koyama, K.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper surveys issues affecting the supply of fuel-grade methanol for the California Energy Commission's alternative fuels demonstration programs and operations by other public agencies such as transit and school districts. Establishing stable and reasonably priced sources of methanol (in particular) and of alternative fuels generally is essential to their demonstration and commercialization. Development both of vehicle technologies and of fuel supply and distribution are complementary and must proceed in parallel. However, the sequence of scaling up supply and distribution is not necessarily smooth; achievement of volume thresholds in demand and through-put of alternative fuels are marked by different kinds of challenges. Four basic conditions should be met in establishing a fuel supply: (1) it must be price competitive with petroleum-based fuels, at least when accounting for environmental and performance benefits; (2) bulk supply must meet volumes required at each phase; necessitating resilience among suppliers and a means of designating priority for high value users; (3) distribution systems must be reliable, comporting with end users' operational schedules; (4) volatility in prices to the end user for the fuel must be minimal. Current and projected fuel volumes appear to be insufficient to induce necessary economies of scale in production and distribution for fuel use. Despite their benefits, existing programs will suffer absent measures to secure economical fuel supplies. One solution is to develop sources that are dedicated to fuel markets and located within the end-use region

  10. Northwest Hazardous Waste Research, Development, and Demonstration Center: Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-02-01

    The Northwest Hazardous Waste Research, Development, and Demonstration Center was created as part of an ongoing federal effort to provide technologies and methods that protect human health and welfare and environment from hazardous wastes. The Center was established by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) to develop and adapt innovative technologies and methods for assessing the impacts of and remediating inactive hazardous and radioactive mixed-waste sites. The Superfund legislation authorized $10 million for Pacific Northwest Laboratory to establish and operate the Center over a 5-year period. Under this legislation, Congress authorized $10 million each to support research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) on hazardous and radioactive mixed-waste problems in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington, including the Hanford Site. In 1987, the Center initiated its RD and D activities and prepared this Program Plan that presents the framework within which the Center will carry out its mission. Section 1.0 describes the Center, its mission, objectives, organization, and relationship to other programs. Section 2.0 describes the Center's RD and D strategy and contains the RD and D objectives, priorities, and process to be used to select specific projects. Section 3.0 contains the Center's FY 1988 operating plan and describes the specific RD and D projects to be carried out and their budgets and schedules. 9 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  11. The RERTR demonstration experiments program at the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehe, D K; King, J S [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan (United States)

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight a major part of the experimental work which is being carried out at the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) in conjunction with the RERTR program. A demonstration experiments program has been developed to: 1) characterize the FNR in sufficient detail to discern and quantify neutronic differences between the high and low enriched cores; 2) provide the theoretical group with measurements to benchmark their calculations. As with any experimental program associated with a reactor, stringent constraints limit the experiments which can be performed. Some experiments are performed routinely on the FNR (such as control rod calibrations), and much data is already available. Unfortunately, the accuracy we demand precludes using much of this earlier data. And in many cases, the requirement of precise (and copious) data has led to either developing new techniques (as in the case of rhodium mapping and neutron diffraction) or to further refinements on existing methods (as in the case of spectral unfolding). Nevertheless, we have tried to stay within the realm of recognized, well-established experimental methods in order to assuage any doubts about measured differences between HEU and LEU core parameters. This paper describes the principal results of the experiments performed so far.

  12. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility's compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement

  13. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility's compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  14. Performance in the WIPP nondestructive assay performance demonstration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, C.J. [Consolidated Technical Services, Inc., Frederick, MD (United States); Connolly, M.J.; Becker, G.K. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Measurement facilities performing nondestructive assay (NDA) of wastes intended for disposal at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are required to demonstrate their ability to meet specific Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). This demonstration is performed, in part, by participation in the NDA Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP is funded and managed by the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) of DOE and is conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It tests the characteristics of precision, system bias and/or total uncertainty through the measurement of variable, blind combinations of simulated waste drums and certified radioactive standards. Each facility must successfully participate in the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP was completed in July 1996 and the second is scheduled for completion by December 1996. Seven sites reported data in cycle 1 for 11 different measurement systems. This paper describes the design and operation of the PDP and provides the performance data from cycle 1. It also describes the preliminary results from cycle 2 and updates the status and future plans for the NDA PDP. 4 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Evolution and outcomes of a quality improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Johan; Herrlin, Bo; Wittlöv, Karin; Øvretveit, John; Brommels, Mats

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcomes and evolution over a five-year period of a Swedish university hospital quality improvement program in light of enduring uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of such programs in healthcare and how best to evaluate it. The paper takes the form of a case study, using data collected as part of the program, including quality indicators from clinical improvement projects and participants' program evaluations. Overall, 58 percent of the program's projects (39/67) demonstrated success. A greater proportion of projects led by female doctors demonstrated success (91 percent, n=11) than projects led by male doctors (51 percent, n=55). Facilitators at the hospital continuously adapted the improvement methods to the local context. A lack of dedicated time for improvement efforts was the participants' biggest difficulty. The dominant benefits included an increased ability to see the "bigger picture" and the improvements achieved for patients and employees. Quality measurement, which is important for conducting and evaluating improvement efforts, was weak with limited reliability. Nevertheless, the present study adds evidence about the effectiveness of healthcare improvement programs. Gender differences in improvement team leadership merit further study. Improvement program evaluation should assess the extent to which improvement methods are locally adapted and applied. This case study reports the outcomes of all improvement projects undertaken in one healthcare organization over a five-year period and provides in-depth insight into an improvement program's changeable nature.

  16. Hazardous Waste Development, Demonstration, and Disposal (HAZWDDD) Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, C.P.; Eisenhower, B.M.; Reeves, M.E.; DePaoli, S.M.; Stinton, L.H.; Harrington, E.H.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the Hazardous Waste Development, Demonstration and Disposal (HAZWDDD) Program Plan is to ensure that the needs for treatment and disposal of all its hazardous and mixed wastes have been identified and planned for. A multifaceted approach to developing and implementing this plan is given, including complete plans for each of the five installations, and an overall integrated plan is also described in this report. The HAZWDDD Plan accomplishes the following: (1) provides background and organizational information; (2) summarizes the 402 hazardous and mixed waste streams from the five installations by grouping them into 13 general waste categories; (3) presents current treatment, storage, and disposal capabilities within Energy Systems; (4) develops a management strategy by outlining critical issues, presents flow sheets describing management schemes for problem waste streams, and builds on the needs identified; (5) outlines specific activities needed to implement the strategy developed; and (6) presents schedule and budget requirements for the next decade. The HAZWDDD Program addresses current and future technical problems and regulatory issues and uncertainties. Because of the nature and magnitude of the problems in hazardous and mixed waste management, substantial funding will be required. 10 refs., 39 figs., 16 tabs

  17. Vertical boreholes in salt - An industrial demonstration program -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Filbert, W.

    2006-01-01

    In order to synchronize and optimize the emplacement technologies used for both categories of waste (vitrified waste and spent fuel) the borehole emplacement technique for consolidated spent fuel was reconsidered in Germany. The appropriate design resulted in a fuel rod canister of the type 'BSK 3'. This BSK 3 steel canister is of the same diameter as the standard HLW-canister which allows the use of a common transfer and handling technique. The canister is tightly sealed by welding and designed to withstand petrostatic pressure. Thermal calculations showed that the emplacement of a BSK 3-canister into a vertical borehole in a salt repository is possible after only about 3 to 7 years after reactor unloading of the fuel assemblies. Thus, the emplacement of BSK 3-canisters allows a complete revision of the schedule of spent fuel disposal concepts and may lead to a considerable reduction of time and costs. Accordingly, a research program was launched in 2004 within the framework of the 6th European Research Program to develop the transport and emplacement components, the functionality and reliability of which are to be tested in a one-year demonstration phase which will commence at the beginning of 2008. (author)

  18. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the Early Site Plan Demonstration Program (ESPDP) is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. This document provides appendices C and D of this report. Appendix C contains data from the licensing and technical reviews; Appendix D contains technology toolkit data sheets

  19. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the Early Site Plan Demonstration Program (ESPDP) is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. This document provides appendices A and B of this report. Appendix A contains a list of regulations, regulatory guidance, and acceptance criteria; Appendix B contains a cross-reference index of siting-related documentation

  20. 34 CFR 426.1 - What is the Cooperative Demonstration Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... What is the Cooperative Demonstration Program? The Cooperative Demonstration Program provides financial...; (b) Projects that are examples of successful cooperation between the private sector and public...

  1. Jersey City energy conservation demonstration program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, R.F.

    1978-08-01

    The Aerospace Corporation, the City Government, and the Board of Education of Jersey City have conducted a group of energy-conservation experiments to explore a number of conservation techniques believed to offer quick payback and to be of wide applicability. Experiments include the updating and/or rehabilitation of the energy-consuming features of old buildings and installation of devices designed to minimize energy losses caused by human error or laxity. Specific examples include: upgrading of the deteriorated and inefficient steam-distribution system of the city hall (originally constructed in 1894); an extensive program of reducing infiltration in an old school building; use of several timing devices in connection with heating, ventilation, and lighting systems to encourage energy-conservation practices; retrofit of school classrooms with high-pressure sodium lamps; and demonstration of practical and cost-effective ways of increasing the efficiency of conventional steam boilers. The report presents: the nature of the selected experiments; technical, human, and organizational factors that proved significant in performing and evaluating the experiments; discussions of observations and lessons learned; and general recommendations for an extended program of energy conservation in local governments. It is emphasized that, in retrofit of existing buildings, the unexpected is commonplace; and the habits and attitudes of building occupants are elements of the system that must always be taken into account. This report shows the benefits of energy saving, cost saving, and added comfort that may be attained by retrofitting old buildings, noting typical complications that arise. The effectiveness of the conservation methods is presented in terms of costs relative to effective payback periods calculated from results of their application in Jersey City.

  2. Montana Integrated Carbon to Liquids (ICTL) Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiato, Rocco A. [Accelergy Corporation, Houston, TX (United States); Sharma, Ramesh [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC); Allen, Mark [Accelergy Corporation, Houston, TX (United States). Integrated Carbon Solutions; Peyton, Brent [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Macur, Richard [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences; Cameron, Jemima [Australian Energy Company Ltd., Hovea (Australia). Australian American Energy Corporation (AAEC)

    2013-12-01

    Integrated carbon-to-liquids technology (ICTL) incorporates three basic processes for the conversion of a wide range of feedstocks to distillate liquid fuels: (1) Direct Microcatalytic Coal Liquefaction (MCL) is coupled with biomass liquefaction via (2) Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation and Isomerization (CHI) of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or trigylceride fatty acids (TGFA) to produce liquid fuels, with process derived (3) CO2 Capture and Utilization (CCU) via algae production and use in BioFertilizer for added terrestrial sequestration of CO2, or as a feedstock for MCL and/or CHI. This novel approach enables synthetic fuels production while simultaneously meeting EISA 2007 Section 526 targets, minimizing land use and water consumption, and providing cost competitive fuels at current day petroleum prices. ICTL was demonstrated with Montana Crow sub-bituminous coal in MCL pilot scale operations at the Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota (EERC), with related pilot scale CHI studies conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center (PARC). Coal-Biomass to Liquid (CBTL) Fuel samples were evaluated at the US Air Force Research Labs (AFRL) in Dayton and greenhouse tests of algae based BioFertilizer conducted at Montana State University (MSU). Econometric modeling studies were also conducted on the use of algae based BioFertilizer in a wheat-camelina crop rotation cycle. We find that the combined operation is not only able to help boost crop yields, but also to provide added crop yields and associated profits from TGFA (from crop production) for use an ICTL plant feedstock. This program demonstrated the overall viability of ICTL in pilot scale operations. Related work on the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a Montana project indicated that CCU could be employed very effectively to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the MCL/CHI process. Plans are currently being made to conduct larger

  3. Technology demonstration of starshade manufacturing for NASA's Exoplanet mission program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasdin, N. J.; Lisman, D.; Shaklan, S.; Thomson, M.; Cady, E.; Martin, S.; Marchen, L.; Vanderbei, R. J.; Macintosh, B.; Rudd, R. E.; Savransky, D.; Mikula, J.; Lynch, D.

    2012-09-01

    It is likely that the coming decade will see the development of a large visible light telescope with enabling technology for imaging exosolar Earthlike planets in the habitable zone of nearby stars. One such technology utilizes an external occulter, a satellite flying far from the telescope and employing a large screen, or starshade, to suppress the incoming starlight suffciently for detecting and characterizing exoplanets. This trades the added complexity of building the precisely shaped starshade and flying it in formation against simplifications in the telescope since extremely precise wavefront control is no longer necessary. In this paper we present the results of our project to design, manufacture, and measure a prototype occulter petal as part of NASA's first Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions program. We describe the mechanical design of the starshade and petal, the precision manufacturing tolerances, and the metrology approach. We demonstrate that the prototype petal meets the requirements and is consistent with a full-size occulter achieving better than 10-10 contrast.

  4. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program update 1991 (as of December 31, 1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (also referred to as the CCT Program) is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of large-scale ''showcase'' facilities built across the country. The program takes the most promising advanced coal-based technologies and moves them into the commercial marketplace through demonstration. These demonstrations are on a scale large enough to generate all the data, from design, construction and operation, that are necessary for the private sector to judge commercial potential and make informed, confident decisions on commercial readiness. The CCT Program has been identified in the National Energy Strategy as major initiative supporting the strategy's overall goals to: increase efficiency of energy use; secure future energy supplies; enhance environmental quality; fortify foundations. The technologies being demonstrated under the CCT Program when commercially available will enable coal to reach its full potential as a source of energy for the nation and the international marketplace. The goal of the program is to furnish the US and international energy marketplaces with a number of advanced, highly efficient, and environmentally acceptable coal-using technologies

  5. NOAA's Undergraduate Scholarship Program Outcomes and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M.; Jabanoski, K.; Christenson, T.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA supports about 115 - 150 undergraduates per year through the Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship and the Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship. These programs provide tuition support and paid summer internships at NOAA to exceptional students majoring in the geosciences. Multiple methods were used to evaluate program outcomes and track the career trajectories, including mining LinkedIn data and conducting evaluation surveys of recipients as well as students who applied but did not receive the award. Results show more than 75% of scholars continued on to graduate school, primarily in a NOAA mission fields. This compared to only 56% of nonrecipients. More than 60% of alumni had at least one professional record, with the most alumni working in private industry, followed by nongovernmental organizations and federal, state and local government. The evaluation identified 77 other scholarship programs applied to by NOAA scholarship recipients. The most commonly reported program was the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) for which 20% of scholars applied and 46% of applications were successful. Other common scholarships included the Goldwater Scholarship (received by 5% of NOAA scholars) and the Udall Scholarship (received by 4% of scholars). In the most recent class of 118 undergraduate scholars, 24% reported having another research experience by the time they arrived for orientation at the end of their sophomore year. These results suggest coordination across scholarship opportunities may be useful to engage and retain students in geoscience fields.

  6. Blue Box Plus Quinte regional recycling demonstration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The Blue Box Plus recycling program was established in September 1990 in the Quinte region of Ontario. The program was intended to develop the necessary operational information so that the existing program could expand to include mixed plastics, corrugated cardboard, and boxboard. Over 33,000 recycling boxes were distributed over an area covering 15 municipalities with a population base of 95,000. The program showed the willingness of the public to participate in recycling, but advertising and promotion of the program were critical for success. Separation of the recycled materials on the collection trucks was found to be a viable approach and more efficient than sorting at the recycling plant. Adding new materials to be recycled could be done efficiently, and operating costs were in line with those for other programs collecting fewer materials. A cooperative market development with industrial players opened up a new and expanding market for boxboard. 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. A Demonstration of the Grrr Graph Rewriting Programming Language

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Peter; Vidal, Natalia

    2000-01-01

    This paper overviews the graph rewriting programming language, Grrr. The serial graph rewriting strategy is detailed, and key elements of the user interface are described. The system is illustrated by a simple example.

  8. FY-94 buried waste integrated demonstration program report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies. These technologies are being integrated to form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM) needs and objectives. This document summarizes previous demonstrations and describes the FY-94 BWID technology development and demonstration activities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD), BWID works with universities and private industry to develop these technologies, which are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. A public participation policy has been established to provide stakeholders with timely and accurate information and meaningful opportunities for involvement in the technology development and demonstration process

  9. Alternate retrieval technology demonstrations program - test report (ARD Environmental, Inc.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglin, E.J.

    1997-07-31

    A prototype vehicle, control system, and waste and water scavenging system were designed and fabricated with essentially the full capabilities of the vehicle system proposed by ARD Environmental. A test tank mockup, including riser and decontamination chamber were designed and fabricated, and approximately 830 cubic feet of six varieties of waste simulants poured. The tests were performed by ARD Environmental personnel at its site in Laurel, Maryland, from 4/22/97 through 5/2/97. The capabilities tested were deployment and retrieval, extended mobility and productivity, the ability to operate the system using video viewing only, retrieval after simulated failure, and retrieval and decontamination. Testing commenced with deployment of the vehicle into the tank. Deployment was accomplished using a crane and auxiliary winch to position the vehicle and lower it through the decontamination chamber, into the 36`` diameter x 6` high riser, and touch down on the waste field in the tank. The initial mobility tests were conducted immediately after deployment, prior to sluicing, as the waste field exhibited the greatest amount of variation at this time. This test demonstrated the ability of the vehicle to maneuver over the simulated waste field, and the ability of the operator to work with only video viewing available. In addition, the ability of the vehicle to right itself after being turned on its side was demonstrated. The production rate was evaluated daily through the testing period by measuring the surface and estimating the amount of material removed. The test demonstrated the ability of the vehicle to reduce the waste surface using 400 psi (nominal) water jets, scavenge water and material from the work area, and move to any location, even in the relatively confined space of the 20` diameter test tank. In addition, the ability to sluice to a remote scavenging module was demonstrated. The failure mode test demonstrated the ability to retrieve a stuck vehicle by pulling

  10. Alternate retrieval technology demonstrations program - test report (ARD Environmental, Inc.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglin, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    A prototype vehicle, control system, and waste and water scavenging system were designed and fabricated with essentially the full capabilities of the vehicle system proposed by ARD Environmental. A test tank mockup, including riser and decontamination chamber were designed and fabricated, and approximately 830 cubic feet of six varieties of waste simulants poured. The tests were performed by ARD Environmental personnel at its site in Laurel, Maryland, from 4/22/97 through 5/2/97. The capabilities tested were deployment and retrieval, extended mobility and productivity, the ability to operate the system using video viewing only, retrieval after simulated failure, and retrieval and decontamination. Testing commenced with deployment of the vehicle into the tank. Deployment was accomplished using a crane and auxiliary winch to position the vehicle and lower it through the decontamination chamber, into the 36'' diameter x 6' high riser, and touch down on the waste field in the tank. The initial mobility tests were conducted immediately after deployment, prior to sluicing, as the waste field exhibited the greatest amount of variation at this time. This test demonstrated the ability of the vehicle to maneuver over the simulated waste field, and the ability of the operator to work with only video viewing available. In addition, the ability of the vehicle to right itself after being turned on its side was demonstrated. The production rate was evaluated daily through the testing period by measuring the surface and estimating the amount of material removed. The test demonstrated the ability of the vehicle to reduce the waste surface using 400 psi (nominal) water jets, scavenge water and material from the work area, and move to any location, even in the relatively confined space of the 20' diameter test tank. In addition, the ability to sluice to a remote scavenging module was demonstrated. The failure mode test demonstrated the ability to retrieve a stuck vehicle by pulling

  11. A demonstration program to evaluate centralized LLW Incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burian, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Dramatic increases in low level waste burial charges in the last five years have spurred interest in achieving higher volume reduction than currently achieved by compaction. Battelle has completed a planning study to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of central site incineration for dry active waste to service several generators within a geographical area. We initiated licensing by the USNRC and Ohio EPA and developed plans, procedures, and estimated costs for licensing, construction, operation, and decommissioning of a central site incinerator. In addition, acceptance criteria were established for incoming waste. Response from the NRC and Ohio EPA indicated that no major obstacles existed toward obtaining licenses. The economic study indicated that a commercial incineration operation lasting 20 years or more was economically advantageous over direct burial of compacted waste, assuming that burial costs continue to escalate at their current rates. However, a 5-year demonstration period was not economically advantageous because of the short period to recover the fixed capital investment

  12. Caterpillar MorElectric DOE Idle Reduction Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Bernardi

    2007-09-30

    This project titled 'Demonstration of the New MorElectric{trademark} Technology as an Idle Reduction Solution' is one of four demonstration projects awarded by the US Department of Energy in 2002. The goal of these demonstration and evaluation projects was to gather objective in-use information on the performance of available idle reduction technologies by characterizing the cost; fuel, maintenance, and engine life savings; payback; and user impressions of various systems and techniques. In brief, the Caterpillar Inc. project involved applying electrically driven accessories for cab comfort during engine-off stops and for reducing fuel consumption during on-highway operation. Caterpillar had equipped and operated five new trucks with the technology in conjunction with International Truck and Engine Corporation and COX Transfer. The most significant result of the project was a demonstrated average idle reduction of 13.8% for the 5 truck MEI fleet over the control fleet. It should be noted that the control fleet trucks were also equipped with an idle reduction device that would start and stop the main engine automatically in order to maintain cab temperature. The control fleet idle usage would have been reduced by 3858 hours over the 2 year period with the MEI system installed, or approximately 2315 gallons of fuel less (calculations assume a fuel consumption of 0.6 gallons per hour for the 13 liter engine at idle). The fuel saved will be significantly larger for higher displacement engines without idle reduction equipment such as the engine auto start/stop device used by COX Transfer. It is common for engines to consume 1.0 gallons per hour which would increase the fuel savings to approximately 1260 gallons per truck per year of typical idling (1800 hours idle/yr).

  13. Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Program, Erie County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiswanger, Robert C. [Daemen College, Amherst, NY (United States)

    2013-02-28

    The purpose of the Daemen Alternative Energy/Geothermal Technologies Demonstration Project is to demonstrate the use of geothermal technology as model for energy and environmental efficiency in heating and cooling older, highly inefficient buildings. The former Marian Library building at Daemen College is a 19,000 square foot building located in the center of campus. Through this project, the building was equipped with geothermal technology and results were disseminated. Gold LEED certification for the building was awarded. 1) How the research adds to the understanding of the area investigated. This project is primarily a demonstration project. Information about the installation is available to other companies, organizations, and higher education institutions that may be interested in using geothermal energy for heating and cooling older buildings. 2) The technical effectiveness and economic feasibility of the methods or techniques investigated or demonstrated. According to the modeling and estimates through Stantec, the energy-efficiency cost savings is estimated at 20%, or $24,000 per year. Over 20 years this represents $480,000 in unrestricted revenue available for College operations. See attached technical assistance report. 3) How the project is otherwise of benefit to the public. The Daemen College Geothermal Technologies Ground Source Heat Pumps project sets a standard for retrofitting older, highly inefficient, energy wasting and environmentally irresponsible buildings that are quite typical of many of the buildings on the campuses of regional colleges and universities. As a model, the project serves as an energy-efficient system with significant environmental advantages. Information about the energy-efficiency measures is available to other colleges and universities, organizations and companies, students, and other interested parties. The installation and renovation provided employment for 120 individuals during the award period. Through the new Center

  14. Defense waste cyclone incinerator demonstration program: April-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingler, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved offgas system is being designed. The new system will improve gas cleaning and will also provide for improved offgas sampling and mass balance data collection. Continuous solid feed burning experiments were delayed pending delivery of shredding equipment. Liquid burning experiments were in progress at fiscal year end. Burn data indicate that the incinerator will work well for combustible liquids. Improved data on incinerator performance will be generated upon completion of system changes and utilization of new sampling and analysis equipment. Mound Facility received advanced guidance from the Transuranic Waste Systems Office that this program will be cancelled in FY-1981 because of reductions in funding levels

  15. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Station design alternatives report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This report provides the results of investigating the basis for including Station Design Alternatives (SDAs) in the regulatory guidance given for nuclear plant environmental reports (ERs), explains approaches or processes for evaluating SDAs at the early site permit (ESP) stage, and applies one of the processes to each of the ten systems or subsystems considered as SDAS. The key objective o this report s to demonstrate an adequate examination of alternatives can be performed without the extensive development f design data. The report discusses the Composite Suitability Approach and the Established Cutoff Approach in evaluating station design alternatives and selects one of these approaches to evaluate alternatives for each of the plant or station that were considered. Four types of ALWRs have been considered due to the availability of extensive plant data: System 80+, AP600, Advanced Boiling Reactor (ABWR), and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). This report demonstrates the feasibility of evaluating station design alternatives when reactor design detail has not been determined, quantitatively compares the potential ental impacts of alternatives, and focuses the ultimate selection of a alternative on cost and applicant-specific factors. The range of alternatives system is deliberately limited to a reasonable number to demonstrate the or to the three most commonly used at operating plants

  16. The Reusable Launch Vehicle Technology Program and the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) technology program is formulated, and the primary objectives of RLV are listed. RLV technology program implementation phases are outlined. X-33 advanced technology demonstrator is described. Program management is addressed.

  17. Photovoltaic test and demonstration project. [residential energy program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Deyo, J. N.

    1976-01-01

    The considered project consists of three subprojects related to applications, device performance and diagnostics, and endurance testing. The objectives of the applications subproject include the determination of the operating characteristics for a variety of photovoltaic conversion systems. A system test facility is being constructed in this connection and a prototype residence experiment is to be conducted. Market demand for solar cells is to be stimulated by demonstrating suitability of solar cells for specific near-term applications. Activities conducted in connection with device performance studies and diagnostics are also discussed along with developments in the area of endurance testing.

  18. 75 FR 82567 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Repeal of the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... Competitiveness Demonstration Program AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD), General Services Administration (GSA... of the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program, to meet the requirements of section 1335... (15 U.S.C. 644 note), the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program. In accordance with the...

  19. 34 CFR 377.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects to Increase Client Choice Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Demonstration Projects to Increase Client... PROJECTS TO INCREASE CLIENT CHOICE PROGRAM General § 377.1 What is the Demonstration Projects to Increase Client Choice Program? The Demonstration Projects to Increase Client Choice Program is designed to...

  20. Defense waste cyclone incinerator demonstration program: October--March 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, L.M.

    1979-01-01

    The cyclone incinerator developed at Mound has proven to be an effective tool for waste volume reduction. During the first half of FY-1979, efforts have been made to increase the versatility of the system. Incinerator development was continued in three areas. Design changes were drafted for the present developmental incinerator to rectify several minor operational deficiencies of the system. Improvements will be limited to redesign unless installation is required to prove design or to permit implementation of other portions of the plan. The applications development portion of the feasibility plan is focused upon expanding the versatility of the incinerator. An improved delivery system was installed for burning various liquids. An improved continuous feed system was installed and will be demonstrated later this year. Late in FY-1979, work will begin on the conceptual design of a production cyclone incinerator which will handle nonrecoverable TRU waste, and which will fully demonstrate the capabilities of the cyclone incinerator system. Data generated in past years and during FY-1979 are being collected to establish cyclone incineration effects on solids, liquids, and gases in the system. Data reflecting equipment life cycles and corrosion have been tabulated. Basic design criteria for a cyclone incinerator system based on developmental work on the incinerator through FY-1979 have been assembled. The portion of the material dealing with batch-type operation of the incinerator will be published later this year

  1. Status of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph Technology Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development, sensing and control of the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraphy (VNC) for exoplanet detection and characterization. The VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be flown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center has an established effort to develop VNC technologies, and an incremental sequence of testbeds to advance this approach and its critical technologies. We will highlight results demonstrating the achievement of our TDEM contrast milestones, and highlight the performance of our wavefront sensing and control concept.

  2. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III

  3. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

  4. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program: environmental permit compliance plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodamer, Jr., James W.; Bocchino, Robert M.

    1979-11-01

    This Environmental Permit Compliance Plan is intended to assist the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division in acquiring the necessary environmental permits for their proposed Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant in a time frame consistent with the construction schedule. Permits included are those required for installation and/or operation of gaseous, liquid and solid waste sources and disposal areas. Only those permits presently established by final regulations are described. The compliance plan describes procedures for obtaining each permit from identified federal, state and local agencies. The information needed for the permit application is presented, and the stepwise procedure to follow when filing the permit application is described. Information given in this plan was obtained by reviewing applicable laws and regulations and from telephone conversations with agency personnel on the federal, state and local levels. This Plan also presents a recommended schedule for beginning the work necessary to obtain the required environmental permits in order to begin dredging operations in October, 1980 and construction of the plant in September, 1981. Activity for several key permits should begin as soon as possible.

  5. Synthesis gas demonstration plant program, Phase I. Site confirmation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    With few reservations, the Baskett, Kentucky site exhibits the necessary characteristics to suggest compatibility with the proposed Synthesis Gas Demonstration Plant Project. An evaluation of a broad range of technical disciplinary criteria in consideration of presently available information indicated generally favorable conditions or, at least, conditions which could be feasibly accommodated in project design. The proximity of the Baskett site to market areas and sources of raw materials as well as a variety of transportation facilities suggests an overall favorable impact on Project economic feasibility. Two aspects of environmental engineering, however, have been identified as areas where the completion or continuation of current studies are required before removing all conditions on site suitability. The first aspect involves the current contradictory status of existing land use and planning ordinances in the site area. Additional investigation of the legality of, and local attitudes toward, these present plans is warranted. Secondly, terrestrial and aquatic surveys of plant and animal life species in the site area must be completed on a seasonal basis to confirm the preliminary conclusion that no exclusionary conditions exist.

  6. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay for the TRU Waste Characterization Program. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests conducted on a regular frequency to evaluate the capability for nondestructive assay of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed with TRU waste characterization systems. Measurement facility performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples according to the criteria set by this Program Plan. Intercomparison between measurement groups of the DOE complex will be achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar or identical blind samples reported by the different measurement facilities. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). As defined for this program, a PDP sample consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. These PDP sample components, once manufactured, will be secured and stored at each participating measurement facility designated and authorized by Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) under secure conditions to protect them from loss, tampering, or accidental damage

  7. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) to comply with the Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC) (DOE/WIPP-02-3122) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (CBFO-94-1012). The PDP serves as a quality control check for data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. The PDP evaluates analyses of simulated headspace gases, constituents of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques.

  8. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  9. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation's energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization's ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization's commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans

  10. Teenage Parent Programs: A Synthesis of the Long-Term Effects of the New Chance Demonstration, Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting Program, and the Teenage Parent Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Robert C.; Cytron, Rachel

    1999-01-01

    Synthesizes the long-term findings of three major evaluations of programs that began in the late 1980s and were designed to improve the self-efficacy of teenage mothers on welfare. Economic outcomes for the mothers improved over time, and the interventions had some positive effects, although they did not affect fertility. (SLD)

  11. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  12. Universal Preschool Programs and Long-Term Child Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Kristiansen, Ida Lykke; Viinholt Nielsen, Bjørn Christian

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review included 25 studies using natural experiments to estimate the effects of universal preschool programs for children aged 0-6 years on child outcomes measured from third grade to adulthood. Studies comparing preschool with parental, family, or other informal modes of care...... alternative types of universal preschool programs in terms of long-term outcomes....

  13. Regulatory analysis of the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program has been developed to identify, demonstrate, test, and evaluate technologies that will provide alternatives to the current underground storage tank remediation program. The UST-ID Program is a national program that consists of five participating US Department of Energy (DOE) sites where technologies can be developed an ultimately demonstrated. Once these technologies are demonstrated, the UST-ID Program will transfer the developed technology system to industry (governmental or industrial) for application or back to Research and Development for further evaluation and modification, as necessary. In order to ensure that the UST-ID Program proceeds without interruption, it will be necessary to identify regulatory requirements along with associated permitting and notification requirements early in the technology development process. This document serves as a baseline for identifying certain federal and state regulatory requirements that may impact the UST-ID Program and the demonstration of any identified technologies

  14. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE Carlsbad Field Office

    2001-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for nondestructive assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests to evaluate the capability for NDA of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements obtained from NDA systems used to characterize the radiological constituents of TRU waste. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC; DOE 1999a) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE 1999b). The WAC requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAC. The WAC contains technical and quality requirements for acceptable NDA. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC for the NDA PDP. Measurement facilities demonstrate acceptable performance by the successful testing of simulated waste containers according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Comparison among DOE measurement groups and commercial assay services is achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar simulated waste containers reported by the different measurement facilities. These tests are used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established quality assurance objectives (QAO's). Measurement facilities must analyze the simulated waste containers using the same procedures used for normal waste characterization activities. For the drummed waste PDP, a simulated waste container consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. These PDP sample components are distributed to the participating measurement facilities that have been designated and authorized by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO). The NDA Drum PDP materials are stored at these sites under secure conditions to

  15. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) is a test program designed to yield data on measurement system capability to characterize drummed transuranic (TRU) waste generated throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The tests are conducted periodically and provide a mechanism for the independent and objective assessment of NDA system performance and capability relative to the radiological characterization objectives and criteria of the Office of Characterization and Transportation (OCT). The primary documents requiring an NDA PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC), which requires annual characterization facility participation in the PDP, and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD). This NDA PDP implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC. Measurement facilities must demonstrate acceptable radiological characterization performance through measurement of test samples comprised of pre-specified PDP matrix drum/radioactive source configurations. Measurement facilities are required to analyze the NDA PDP drum samples using the same procedures approved and implemented for routine operational waste characterization activities. The test samples provide an independent means to assess NDA measurement system performance and compliance per criteria delineated in the NDA PDP Plan. General inter-comparison of NDA measurement system performance among DOE measurement facilities and commercial NDA services can also be evaluated using measurement results on similar NDA PDP test samples. A PDP test sample consists of a 55-gallon matrix drum containing a waste matrix type representative of a particular category of the DOE waste inventory and nuclear material standards of known radionuclide and isotopic composition typical of DOE radioactive material. The PDP sample components are made available to participating measurement facilities as designated by the

  16. Demonstration of a software design and statistical analysis methodology with application to patient outcomes data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Charles; Conners, Steve; Warren, Christopher; Miller, Robert; Court, Laurence; Popple, Richard

    2013-11-01

    With emergence of clinical outcomes databases as tools utilized routinely within institutions, comes need for software tools to support automated statistical analysis of these large data sets and intrainstitutional exchange from independent federated databases to support data pooling. In this paper, the authors present a design approach and analysis methodology that addresses both issues. A software application was constructed to automate analysis of patient outcomes data using a wide range of statistical metrics, by combining use of C#.Net and R code. The accuracy and speed of the code was evaluated using benchmark data sets. The approach provides data needed to evaluate combinations of statistical measurements for ability to identify patterns of interest in the data. Through application of the tools to a benchmark data set for dose-response threshold and to SBRT lung data sets, an algorithm was developed that uses receiver operator characteristic curves to identify a threshold value and combines use of contingency tables, Fisher exact tests, Welch t-tests, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to filter the large data set to identify values demonstrating dose-response. Kullback-Leibler divergences were used to provide additional confirmation. The work demonstrates the viability of the design approach and the software tool for analysis of large data sets.

  17. Lessons from international experience for China's microgrid demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romankiewicz, John; Marnay, Chris; Zhou, Nan; Qu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Microgrids can provide an avenue for increasing the amount of distributed generation (DG) and delivery of electricity, where control is more dispersed and quality of service is locally tailored to end-use requirements, with applications from military bases to campuses to commercial office buildings. Many studies have been done to date on microgrid technology and operations, but fewer studies exist on demonstration programs and commercial microgrid development. As China prepares to launch the largest microgrid demonstration program in the world, we review progress made by demonstration programs across Europe, Asia, and the Americas as well as microgrid benefits and barriers. Through case studies, we highlight the difference in experience for microgrids developed under the auspices of a government-sponsored demonstration program versus those that were commercially developed. Lastly, we provide recommendations oriented towards creating a successful microgrid demonstration program. - Highlights: • We discuss major microgrid demonstration programs in the U.S., E.U., and Asia. • We identify barriers faced by microgrids to date and propose policy solutions. • Two detailed case studies of government sponsored microgrid demonstrations are provided. • We outline eight recommendations for microgrid demonstration programs, with a focus on China's upcoming program

  18. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Boxed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for nondestructive assay (NDA) consists of a series of tests to evaluate the capability for NDA of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each test is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements obtained from NDA systems used to characterize the radiological constituents of TRU waste. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC; DOE 1999a) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE 1999b). The WAC requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAC. The WAC contains technical and quality requirements for acceptable NDA. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and applicable requirements of the WAC for the NDA PDP for boxed waste assay systems. Measurement facilities demonstrate acceptable performance by the successful testing of simulated waste containers according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Comparison among DOE measurement groups and commercial assay services is achieved by comparing the results of measurements on similar simulated waste containers reported by the different measurement facilities. These tests are used as an independent means to assess the performance of measurement groups regarding compliance with established quality assurance objectives (QAO's). Measurement facilities must analyze the simulated waste containers using the same procedures used for normal waste characterization activities. For the boxed waste PDP, a simulated waste container consists of a modified standard waste box (SWB) emplaced with radioactive standards and fabricated matrix inserts. An SWB is a waste box with ends designed specifically to fit the TRUPACT-II shipping container. SWB's will be used to package a substantial volume of the TRU waste for disposal. These PDP sample components

  19. Dry cask storage: a Vepco/DOE/EPRI cooperative demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    In response to a Department of Energy (DOE) Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement Proposal, Virginia Electric and Power Company (Vepco) proposed to participate in a spent fuel storage demonstration program utilizing the dry cask storage technology. This proposed program includes dry cask storage at Vepco's Surry Nuclear Power Station and research and development activities at a DOE site in support of the licensed program at Surry. Phase I of Vepco's two-phase program involves a demonstration of the licensed dry cask storage of spent fuel in an inert atmosphere at the Surry Power Station site. Phase II of Vepco's proposed program will involve the demonstration of storing unconsolidated and consolidated spent fuel in dry casks filled only with air. This phase of the program will involve DOE site testing similar to Phase I and is expected to require an additional (fourth) cask to demonstrate storage of unconsolidated spent fuel in air-filled casks

  20. Overview of the U.S. inspection capability demonstration program for CRDM penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, M.; Whitaker, D.; Ammirato, F.; Pathania, R.

    1994-01-01

    The US PWR Owners have developed a coordinated program to demonstrate the effectiveness of procedures for inspection of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzle penetrations. The purpose of the inspections is to detect inside surface Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). Reactor vessel manufacturers, PWR Owners Groups, and EPRI are participating in this cooperative program. Flaw detection, sizing, and location capability will be assessed in the program using realistic full-scale mockups containing intentional defects. The program is expected to be completed by January 1, 1994 and be available for qualification work at that time. The demonstration program is scheduled to become operational in 1993 to support 1994 and future inspections

  1. Glucocorticoids and fetal programming part 1: Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisiadis, Vasilis G; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Fetal development is a critical period for shaping the lifelong health of an individual. However, the fetus is susceptible to internal and external stimuli that can lead to adverse long-term health consequences. Glucocorticoids are an important developmental switch, driving changes in gene regulation that are necessary for normal growth and maturation. The fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is particularly susceptible to long-term programming by glucocorticoids; these effects can persist throughout the life of an organism. Dysfunction of the HPA axis as a result of fetal programming has been associated with impaired brain growth, altered behaviour and increased susceptibility to chronic disease (such as metabolic and cardiovascular disease). Moreover, the effects of glucocorticoid-mediated programming are evident in subsequent generations, and transmission of these changes can occur through both maternal and paternal lineages.

  2. Subjective Outcome Evaluation of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Secondary 2 Program: Views of the Program Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 196 secondary schools participated in the Secondary 2 Program of the Full Implementation Phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes. After completion of the Tier 1 Program, 30,731 students responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form A to assess their perceptions of the program, instructors, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Based on the consolidated reports submitted by the schools to the funding body, the research team aggregated the consolidated data to form a “reconstructed” overall profile on the perceptions of the program participants. Findings demonstrated that high proportions of the respondents had positive perceptions of the program and the instructors, and roughly four-fifths of the respondents regarded the program as beneficial to them. Correlation analyses showed that perceived program and instructor characteristics were positively associated with perceived benefits of the program.

  3. Assessment of residency program outcomes via alumni surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüer, Sonja; Aebi, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    One trend in medical education is outcomes-oriented training. Outcomes usually refer to individuals' acquisition of competencies, for example, during training in residency programs. However, little is known about outcomes of these programs. In order to fill this gap, human resource (HR) data were analyzed and alumni of a pediatric residency program were surveyed at the Department of Pediatrics, Bern University Hospital, Switzerland. Residency program outcomes (demographics, career choices, part-time or full-time work status, competencies, feedback) were assessed through in-house HR databases, publicly available data on the Internet (physician directory and practice homepages), and 2 alumni surveys (S1, S2). In all, 109 alumni met the inclusion criteria. Retention rate at the hospital was low (14%). Forty-six alumni (42%) in private practice were eligible for alumni surveys. Response rates were 87% (S1) and 61% (S2). Time intervals between 2 career decisions (selecting specialty of pediatrics vs selecting setting of private practice) varied widely (late-training decision to enter private practice). Mean employment level in private practice was 60% (range 20%-100%). Most valued rotation was emergency medicine; most desired competencies in future colleagues were the ability to work in a team, proficiency in pediatrics, and working economically. A broadened view on outcomes - beyond individuals' competency acquisition - provides informative insights into a training program, can allow for informed program updates, and guide future program development.

  4. Primary prevention research: a preliminary review of program outcome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaps, E; Churgin, S; Palley, C S; Takata, B; Cohen, A Y

    1980-07-01

    This article reviews 35 drug abuse prevention program evaluations employing drug-specific outcome measures. Many of these evaluations assessed the effects of "new generation" prevention strategies: affective, peer-oriented, and multidimensional approaches. Only 14 studies evaluated purely informational programs. Evaluations were analyzed to ascertain (1) characteristics of the programs under study, (2) characteristics of the research designs, and (3) patterns among findings. This review provides some evidence that the newer prevention strategies may produce more positive and fewer negative outcomes than did older drug information approaches. Over 70% of the programs using the newer strategies produced some positive effects; only 29% showed negative effects. In contrast, 46% of informational programs showed positive effects; 46% showed negative effects. These findings must be approached with great caution, since the research was frequently scientifically inadequate, and since rigor of research was negatively correlated with intensity and duration of program services.

  5. Evaluation of the Health Rocks! Program: The Association of Youth Engagement with Program Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This evaluation research examined the relationship between program process and program outcome, specifically, youth engagement in the national 4-H Council Health Rocks! program and their program outcomes.  Based on program evaluation surveys completed after the program by participants, youths’ engagement in the program was associated with their gains in knowledge and skills about substance use, and personal assets related to avoiding risks.  When youth participants find a program interesting, are actively engaged in the program, and find the program staff friendly, they benefit more from the program.  Findings underscore the importance of engaging curriculum and friendly staff to the success of extension or afterschool youth programs. The evaluation method may offer an example of balancing rigor of evaluation design and feasibility of implementing an evaluation.

  6. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) transuranic performance demonstration program sample packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccoy, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Transuranic Performance Demonstration Program (TPDP) sample packaging is used to transport highway route controlled quantities of weapons grade (WG) plutonium samples from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) to the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility and back. The purpose of these shipments is to test the nondestructive assay equipment in the WRAP facility as part of the Nondestructive Waste Assay PDP. The PDP is part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) National TRU Program managed by the U. S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office, Carlsbad, New Mexico. Details of this program are found in CAO-94-1045, Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay for the TRU Waste Characterization Program (CAO 1994); INEL-96/0129, Design of Benign Matrix Drums for the Non-Destructive Assay Performance Demonstration Program for the National TRU Program (INEL 1996a); and INEL-96/0245, Design of Phase 1 Radioactive Working Reference Materials for the Nondestructive Assay Performance Demonstration Program for the National TRU Program (INEL 1996b). Other program documentation is maintained by the national TRU program and each DOE site participating in the program. This safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the TRU PDP sample packaging meets the onsite transportation safety requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for an onsite Transportation Hazard Indicator (THI) 2 packaging. This SARP, however, does not include evaluation of any operations within the PFP or WRAP facilities, including handling, maintenance, storage, or operating requirements, except as they apply directly to transportation between the gate of PFP and the gate of the WRAP facility. All other activities are subject to the requirements of the facility safety analysis reports (FSAR) of the PFP or WRAP facility and requirements of the PDP

  7. SELENIUM TREATMENT/REMOVAL ALTERNATIVES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ACTIVITY III, PROJECT 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is the final report for EPA's Mine WAste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 20--Selenium Treatment/Removal Alternatives Demonstration project. Selenium contamination originates from many sources including mining operations, mineral processing, abandoned...

  8. National fuel cell bus program : proterra fuel cell hybrid bus report, Columbia demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the experience and early results from a fuel cell bus demonstration funded by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) under the National Fuel Cell Bus Program. A team led by the Center for Transportation and the Environment an...

  9. 20 CFR 416.250 - Experimental, pilot, and demonstration projects in the SSI program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... administration of the SSI program. These projects will test the advantages of altering certain requirements... demonstration project will have a termination date (up to 10 years from the start of the project). [48 FR 7576...

  10. Smart Columbus : Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) for Smart Columbus Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-16

    The Smart City Demonstration Program is intended to improve access through expanded mobility options in major job centers, enhance visitor experience by better connecting visitors to transportation options, stimulate regional economic prosperity and ...

  11. Status of the tangentially fired LIMB Demonstration Program at Yorktown Unit No. 2: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.P.; Gogineni, M.R.; Koucky, R.W.; Gootzait, E.; Lachapelle, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, Inc., under EPA sponsorship, is conducting a program to demonstrate furnace sorbent injection on a tangentially fired, coal-burning utility boiler, Virginia Power's 180 MW(e) Yorktown Unit No. 2. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate significant reductions in sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ) while minimizing any negative impacts on boiler performance. Engineering and procurement activities and baseline testing have been completed. Construction and installation of the sorbent injection and low-NO x equipment is nearly complete. An 8-month demonstration of furnace sorbent injection plus flue gas humidification will be conducted in 1992. Details of the sorbent injection concept to be tested at Yorktown, results of baseline testing, overall demonstration program organization and schedule, and preliminary plans for the 8-month demonstration test are discussed in the paper

  12. Teacher and Principal Survey Results in the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

    The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program was conducted to assess the costs and benefits of combinations of school-based preventive dental care procedures. The program involved almost 30,000 elementary school children from 10 sites across the country. Classroom procedures, such as weekly fluoride mouthrinse, were administered or…

  13. EVALUATION OF OXYGEN-ENRICHED MSW/SEWAGE SLUDGE CO-INCINERATION DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report provides an evaluation of a two-phased demonstration program conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation Program, and the results thereof, of a recently developed method of sewage sludge managemen...

  14. Cost of Treatment Procedures in the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foch, Craig B.; And Others

    The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program (NPDDP) delivered five different regimens of school based preventive dental care to groups of children in 10 American cities between 1977 and 1981. All clinical techniques employed had previously been demonstrated to be both safe and effective in clinical trials. The purpose of the NPDDP was…

  15. Japanese HTTR program for demonstration of high temperature applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, T.; Hada, K.; Shiozawa, S.

    1997-01-01

    Construction works of the HTTR started in March 1991 in order to establish and upgrade the HTGR technology basis, to carry out innovative basic researches on high temperature engineering and to demonstrate high temperature heat utilization and application of nuclear heat. This report describes the demonstration program of high temperature heat utilization and application. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  16. 76 FR 12073 - Extension of Web-Based TRICARE Assistance Program Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... licensure (e.g., spouse abuse). Participant confidentiality is protected, as no medical record entry is made. Calls per month to the TRIAP line since the demonstration was extended and an aggressive marketing...

  17. Evaluating Outcomes of High Fidelity Simulation Curriculum in a Community College Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlea, Gregory Richard

    2017-01-01

    This study took place at a Wake Technical Community College, a multi-campus institution in Raleigh, North Carolina. An evaluation of the return on investment in high fidelity simulation used by an associate degree of nursing program was conducted with valid and reliable instruments. The study demonstrated that comparable student outcomes are…

  18. Assessment of residency program outcomes via alumni surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lüer S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sonja Lüer, Christoph Aebi Department of Pediatrics, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland Background: One trend in medical education is outcomes-oriented training. Outcomes usually refer to individuals’ acquisition of competencies, for example, during training in residency programs. However, little is known about outcomes of these programs. In order to fill this gap, human resource (HR data were analyzed and alumni of a pediatric residency program were surveyed at the Department of Pediatrics, Bern University Hospital, Switzerland.Methods: Residency program outcomes (demographics, career choices, part-time or full-time work status, competencies, feedback were assessed through in-house HR databases, publicly available data on the Internet (physician directory and practice homepages, and 2 alumni surveys (S1, S2. Results: In all, 109 alumni met the inclusion criteria. Retention rate at the hospital was low (14%. Forty-six alumni (42% in private practice were eligible for alumni surveys. Response rates were 87% (S1 and 61% (S2. Time intervals between 2 career decisions (selecting specialty of pediatrics vs selecting setting of private practice varied widely (late-training decision to enter private practice. Mean employment level in private practice was 60% (range 20%–100%. Most valued rotation was emergency medicine; most desired competencies in future colleagues were the ability to work in a team, proficiency in pediatrics, and working economically.Conclusion: A broadened view on outcomes – beyond individuals’ competency acquisition – provides informative insights into a training program, can allow for informed program updates, and guide future program development. Keywords: medical education, career choice, pediatrics, private practice

  19. Improving utility conservation programs: outcomes, interventions, and evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condelli, L; Archer, D; Aronson, E; Curbow, B; McLeod, B; Pettigrew, T F; White, L T; Yates, S

    1984-06-01

    Four major California utility companies have active energy conservation programs mandated by the State's Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). These companies evaluate their programs and send reports of the evaluations to the CPUC. A review of 213 of these reports revealed a marketing research approach toward promoting conservation. Advertising and informational campaigns characterize most programs, and attitudes and self-reported behavior were the major outcome measures. This approach is shown to be ineffective. Suggestions for improvement include: (1) the use of actual energy consumption as the primary outcome measure in evaluating conservation programs; (2) the abandonment of conventional advertising, and the use of it only for the promotion of ''hard'' interventions; (3) increased use of social diffusion methods to disseminate information; (4) the design of more effective educational material by incorporating cognitive social psychological principles; and (5) the utilization of ''hard'' interventions that have a direct, verifiable link to conservation.

  20. Evaluating employee assistance programs. A review of methods, outcomes, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, J M; Rightmyer, J F

    1982-01-01

    Renewed interest in assisting troubled employees has led to an upsurge in the development of employee assistance programs, coupled with demands for demonstrable effectiveness. This review examines the nature and scope of these programs, their administrative and methodological context, and the types and outcomes of evaluation studies conducted thus far. Proposals for improving future investigations through a number of different approaches and strategies are then made.

  1. Outcomes of a National Environmental Edutainment Program in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    We present results of the first longitudinal evaluation of a nation-wide environmental edutainment program. There has recently been rapid growth in curricula on the environment and climate change, yet few reach large and diverse audiences, and fewer still are evaluated. These results are from high schools participating in the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) program. ACE is a 3 year-old program that has reached 1.2 million students with an edutainment presentation incorporating music, multi-media, animation, and documentary footage (www.acespace.org). A projected 850 schools across 23 states will see the presentation this year; 6% of schools (3 classes each) are randomly selected to be evaluated. The data described here were collected in Fall 2011 from 1,270 students in 21 schools; the full evaluation will be complete in May 2012. The sample is ethnically and socio-economically diverse — 29% are white, and 46% receive free/reduced lunches (a proxy for socio-economic status). Outcome measures included a test of climate knowledge and intentions to take (and to ask others to take) climate-related actions. The analyses examined direct effects of the ACE program on climate knowledge and intentions, as well as the moderating effects of student gender and age on learning. Before the ACE presentation, boys had significantly higher knowledge scores than girls (54% vs. 48% correct, respectively, p < .001). Afterward, boys and girls both had significantly higher knowledge scores (64% and 63% correct, respectively) and no longer differed from each other in this respect. Before the presentation, girls expressed significantly greater intentions to take climate-related actions than did boys. Afterward, intentions increased significantly in both groups, but the gap between girls and boys remained. The gap-closing pattern was somewhat different for the moderating variable of age. Before the presentation, knowledge and intentions were significantly higher among older students

  2. Advancing the US Department of Energy's Technologies through the Underground Storage Tank: Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of the Underground Storage Tank -- Integrated Demonstration Program is the demonstration and continued development of technologies suitable for the remediation of waste stored in underground storage tanks. The Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration Program is the most complex of the integrated demonstration programs established under the management of the Office of Technology Development. The Program has the following five participating sites: Oak Ridge, Idaho, Fernald, Savannah River, and Hanford. Activities included within the Underground Storage Tank -- Integrated Demonstration are (1) characterizating radioactive and hazardous waste constituents, (2) determining the need and methodology for improving the stability of the waste form, (3) determining the performance requirements, (4) demonstrating barrier performance by instrumented field tests, natural analog studies, and modeling, (5) determining the need and method for destroying and stabilizing hazardous waste constituents, (6) developing and evaluating methods for retrieving, processing (pretreatment and treatment), and storing the waste on an interim basis, and (7) defining and evaluating waste packages, transportation options, and ultimate closure techniques including site restoration. The eventual objective is the transfer of new technologies as a system to full-scale remediation at the US Department of Energy complexes and sites in the private sector

  3. Outcomes From an Enhanced Recovery Program for Laparoscopic Gastric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong-Chong, Nathalie; Kehlet, Henrik; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the outcomes from an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program for laparoscopic gastric surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective study of patients undergoing elective laparoscopic gastric resection in an ERAS protocol at a single institution between 2008 and...

  4. Linking Experiences and Outcomes within a Postsecondary Leadership Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Kellie; McKim, Aaron J.; Velez, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the leadership development outcomes associated with specific experiences in a one-year, intensive leadership development program at a large northwest research university. Students highlighted three programmatic experiences for their effectiveness: (a) faculty mentoring, (b) participation in a weekly seminar, and (c)…

  5. Student Assistance Program Outcomes for Students at Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Virginia Sue; Kern, John, III; Brent, David A.; Thurkettle, Mary Ann; Puskar, Kathryn R.; Sekula, L. Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Pennsylvania's response to adolescent suicide is its Student Assistance Program (SAP). SAP has been funded for 27 years although no statewide outcome studies using case-level data have been conducted. This study used logistic regression to examine drug-/alcohol-related behaviors and suspensions of suicidal students who participated in SAP. Of the…

  6. Waste immobilization demonstration program for the Hanford Site's Mixed Waste Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbank, D.A.; Weingardt, K.M.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility, Module 2A> waste immobilization demonstration program, focusing on the cooperation between Hanford Site, commercial, and international participants. Important highlights of the development and demonstration activities is discussed from the standpoint of findings that have had significant from the standpoint of findings that have had significant impact on the evolution of the facility design. A brief description of the future direction of the program is presented, with emphasis on the key aspects of the technologies that call for further detailed investigation

  7. Status of the Virginia Power/DOE Cooperative Cask Testing/Demonstration Program: A video presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Creer, J.M.; Collantes, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is documentation of a video presentation and provides a brief summary of the Virginia power/US Department of Energy Cooperative Cask Testing/Demonstration Program. The program consists of two phases. The first phase has been completed and involved the unlicensed performance testing (heat transfer and shielding) of three metal spent fuel storage casks at the federally owned Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The second phase is ongoing and consists of licensed demonstrations of standard casks from two different vendors and of one or two enhanced capacity casks. 6 refs., 1 tab

  8. JOYO modification program for demonstration tests of FBR innovative technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimi, H.; Hachiya, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A plan is under way at PNC to modify the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The project is called MARK-III (MK-III) program. The purpose of MK-III is to expand the function of JOYO, and to make it possible to receive demonstration tests of new or high level technologies for FBR development. The MK-III program consists of two main modifications: conversion to a highly efficient irradiation facility; and a modification for demonstration testing of new technologies and concepts that have a high potential to reduce FBR plant construction cost, to evaluate plant reliability and to improve plant safety. These modifications are scheduled to start in 1991

  9. Weaving the native web: using social network analysis to demonstrate the value of a minority career development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Dedra; Dick, Rhonda Wiegman

    2011-06-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native scientists are consistently among the most underrepresented minority groups in health research. The authors used social network analysis (SNA) to evaluate the Native Investigator Development Program (NIDP), a career development program for junior Native researchers established as a collaboration between the University of Washington and the University of Colorado Denver. The study focused on 29 trainees and mentors who participated in the NIDP. Data were collected on manuscripts and grant proposals produced by participants from 1998 to 2007. Information on authorship of manuscripts and collaborations on grant applications was used to conduct social network analyses with three measures of centrality and one measure of network reach. Both visual and quantitative analyses were performed. Participants in the NIDP collaborated on 106 manuscripts and 83 grant applications. Although three highly connected individuals, with critical and central roles in the program, accounted for much of the richness of the network, both current core faculty and "graduates" of the program were heavily involved in collaborations on manuscripts and grants. This study's innovative application of SNA demonstrates that collaborative relationships can be an important outcome of career development programs for minority investigators and that an analysis of these relationships can provide a more complete assessment of the value of such programs.

  10. Office of Technology Development Program for Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation. FY 1993 Program Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    DOE has set a goal to clean up its complex and to bring all sites into compliance with applicable environmental regulations. This initiative is slated for completion by the year 2019. Four years ago there was no coordinated plan for identifying or cleaning these contaminated sites. Since 1989, DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has invested time, money, and manpower to establish a wide range of programs to meet this immense challenge. DOE is responsible for waste management and clean up of more than 100 contaminated installations in 36 states and territories. This includes 3,700 sites: over 26,000 acres, with hazardous or radioactive contaminated surface or groundwater, soil, or structures; over 26,000 acres requiring remediation, with the number growing as new sites are defined; 500 surplus facilities awaiting decontamination and decommissioning and approximately 5,000 peripheral properties (residences, businesses) that have soil contaminated with uranium tailings.

  11. A summary of the environmental restoration program retrieval demonstration project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuary, J.

    1991-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the Environmental Restoration Program's Retrieval Demonstration Project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This project developed concepts for demonstrating facilities and equipment for the retrieval of buried transuranic mixed waste at the INEL. Included is a brief assessment of the viability, cost effectiveness, and safety of retrieval based on the developed concept. Changes made in Revision 1 reflect editorial changes only. 31 refs., 1 fig

  12. Electric and hybrid vehicle self-certification and verification procedures: Market Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-03-01

    The process by which a manufacturer of an electric or hybrid vehicle certifies that his vehicle meets the DOE Performance Standards for Demonstration is described. Such certification is required for any vehicles to be purchased under the Market Demonstration Program. It also explains the verification testing process followed by DOE for testing to verify compliance. Finally, the document outlines manufacturer responsibilities and presents procedures for recertification of vehicles that have failed verification testing.

  13. Regulatory requirements of the integrated technology demonstration program, Savannah River Site (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergren, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    The integrated demonstration program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) involves demonstration, testing and evaluation of new characterization, monitoring, drilling and remediation technologies for soils and groundwater impacted by organic solvent contamination. The regulatory success of the demonstration program has developed as a result of open communications between the regulators and the technical teams involved. This open dialogue is an attempt to allow timely completion of applied environmental restoration demonstrations while meeting all applicable regulatory requirements. Simultaneous processing of multiple regulatory documents (satisfying RCRA, CERCLA, NEPA and various state regulations) has streamlined the overall permitting process. Public involvement is achieved as various regulatory documents are advertised for public comment consistent with the site's community relations plan. The SRS integrated demonstration has been permitted and endorsed by regulatory agencies, including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. EPA headquarters and regional offices are involved in DOE's integrated Demonstration Program. This relationship allows for rapid regulatory acceptance while reducing federal funding and time requirements. (author)

  14. Retrospective analysis of outcomes from two intensive comprehensive aphasia programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Carol; Wozniak, Linda; Kostopoulos, Ellina

    2013-01-01

    Positive outcomes from intensive therapy for individuals with aphasia have been reported in the literature. Little is known about the characteristics of individuals who attend intensive comprehensive aphasia programs (ICAPs) and what factors may predict who makes clinically significant changes when attending such programs. Demographic data on participants from 6 ICAPs showed that individuals who attend these programs spanned the entire age range (from adolescence to late adulthood), but they generally tended to be middle-aged and predominantly male. Analysis of outcome data from 2 of these ICAPs found that age and gender were not significant predictors of improved outcome on measures of language ability or functional communication. However, time post onset was related to clinical improvement in functional communication as measured by the Communication Activities of Daily Living, second edition (CADL-2). In addition, for one sample, initial severity of aphasia was related to outcome on the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised, such that individuals with more severe aphasia tended to show greater recovery compared to those with mild aphasia. Initial severity of aphasia also was highly correlated with changes in CADL-2 scores. These results suggest that adults of all ages with aphasia in either the acute or chronic phase of recovery can continue to show positive improvements in language ability and functional communication with intensive treatment.

  15. A Comparison of Types of Robot Control for Programming by Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Kerstin; Kirstein, Franziska; Jensen, Lars Christian

    2016-01-01

    Programming by Demonstration (PbD) is an efficient way for non-experts to teach new skills to a robot. PbD can be carried out in different ways, for instance, by kinesthetic guidance, teleoperation or by using external controls. In this paper, we compare these three ways of controlling a robot in...

  16. 75 FR 56946 - Medicaid Program; Review and Approval Process for Section 1115 Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 431 [CMS-2325-P] RIN 0938-AQ46 Medicaid Program; Review and Approval Process for Section 1115 Demonstrations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This...

  17. A Cost Analysis Plan for the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foch, Craig B.

    The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Project (NPDDP) delivers school-based preventive dental care to approximately 14,000 children in ten United States cities. The program, begun in 1976, is to be conducted over a six and one-half year period. The costing definitions and allocation rules to be used in the project are the principal…

  18. Demonstrating the value of a social science research program to a natural resource management agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela J. Jakes; John F. Dwyer; Deborah S. Carr

    1998-01-01

    With ever tightening resources to address an increased number of diverse and complex issues, it has become common for scientists and managers to be called upon to demonstrate the value of their programs. In the spring of 1995, social scientists at the USDA Forest Service North Central Forest Experiment Station we so called upon. This paper discusses an effort to...

  19. Competing definitions: a public policy analysis of the federal recreational fee demonstration program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. E. More

    2003-01-01

    Problem definition theory specifies that however controls the definition of a problem is in a unique position to control debate over the issue, influence others, and determine the problem's place on the agenda. This paper uses a rhetorical analysis and a questionnaire survey of congressional aides to examine the federal Recreational Fee Demonstration Program....

  20. Evaluation of a rural demonstration program to increase seat belt use in the Great Lakes Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Six States in the Great Lakes Region (Region 5) participated in a Rural Demonstration Program to increase seat belt : use in rural areas and among high-risk occupants, such as young males and occupants of pickup trucks. These : efforts, which include...

  1. Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Plan for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, S.

    1994-05-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. This document describes the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality requirements for conducting BWID activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Topics discussed in this report, as they apply to BWID operations, include Federal, State of Idaho, and Environmental Protection Agency regulations, Health and Safety Plans, Quality Program Plans, Data Quality Objectives, and training and job hazard analysis. Finally, a discussion is given on CERCLA criteria and System and Performance audits as they apply to the BWID Program

  2. Intertechnology Corporation proposed test and evaluation plan, commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-09-01

    This report has three major parts. The first of these derives the requirements for the Test and Evaluation plan from the System Level Plan which is summarized in Section II. The second part contains the proposed plan to fill these requirements and includes hardware and software recommendations as well as procedures and management considerations. Primary emphasis has been given to the remote site because this is the area in which the commercial part of the demonstration is most unique. Finally, some pre-demonstration activities are described. The pilot program is intended to resolve a number of issues which arose in the course of the T and E plan. These relate to choice of scan frequencies, compression algorithms, etc. It is also intended to confirm performance and cost effectiveness of the site data collection package. The base line measurements of attitudes, etc. provide a reference mark against which one can measure the non-technical effectiveness of the demonstration program. (WDM)

  3. Broadband demonstrations of true-time delay using linear sideband chirped programming and optical coherent transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reibel, R.R.; Barber, Z.W.; Fischer, J.A.; Tian, M.; Babbitt, W.R.

    2004-01-01

    Linear sideband chirped (LSC) programming is introduced as a means of configuring spatial-spectral holographic gratings for optical coherent transient processors. Similar to linear frequency chirped programming, LSC programming allows the use of broadband integrated electro-optic phase modulators to produce chirps instead of using elaborate broadband chirped lasers. This approach has several advantages including the ability to use a stabilized laser for the optical carrier as well as stable, reproducible chirped optical signals when the modulator is driven digitally. Using LSC programming, we experimentally demonstrate broadband true-time delay as a proof of principle for the optical control of phased array radars. Here both cw phase modulated and binary phase shift keyed probe signals are true-time delayed with bandwidths of 1 GHz and delay resolutions better than 60 ps

  4. Hydrocarbon upgrading demonstration program (HUDP): an investment in the future of the oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Plessis, Duke; Isaacs, Eddy [AI-EES (Canada); Hill, Rich; McPhee, Anne; Keesom, Bill; Arnold, Ed [Jacobs Consultancy (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Alberta Innovates Energy and Environment Solutions (AIEES), the technology arm of the Alberta Government in terms of energy and the environment, has initiated the hydrocarbon upgrading demonstration program (HUDP). Since lighter products have a better market value, this program aims to develop technologies for upgrading heavy oil into light, transportable fuel. The program also aims to improve SAGD efficiency while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. To do so, the gaps between typical and ideal operations were identified and quantified, life cycle analyses were performed, current studies were reviewed and future issues and opportunities were assessed. With the HUDP program, AIEES is supporting the industry through investment and technology support to develop innovative technologies which will improve margins and the sustainability of oil sands operations.

  5. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R

    2012-04-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants' ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed.

  6. Demonstrating biodiversity offset policy outcomes using the classic "trading in a pit market" classroom game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Strange, Niels

    2017-01-01

    , and subsequently, the provision of full ecological compensation measures elsewhere by the associated developer, e. g., habitat restoration. The objective is no net loss of biodiversity overall. Here, we develop an offset experiment in the style of a classic economic game (‘trading in a pit market’), which can...... the experiment, with and without a hypothetical biodiversity offset policy in place, revealed some key principles around offsetting which have been noted in real world policy outcomes....

  7. DOE's Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration Program accelerating the implementation of innovative technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hightower, M.

    1995-01-01

    A program to help accelerate the adoption and implementation of new and innovative remediation technologies has been initiated by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program Office (EM40). Developed as a Public-Private Partnership program in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Technology Innovation Office (TIO) and coordinated by Sandia National Laboratories, the Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program attempts to reduce many of the classic barriers to the use of new technologies by involving government, industry, and regulatory agencies in the assessment, implementation, and validation of innovative technologies. In this program, DOE facilities work cooperatively with EPA, industry, national laboratories, and state and federal regulatory agencies to establish remediation demonstrations using applicable innovative technologies at their sites. Selected innovative technologies are used to remediate small, one to two acre, sites to generate the full-scale and real-world operating, treatment performance, and cost data needed to validate these technologies and gain acceptance by industry and regulatory agencies, thus accelerating their use nationwide. Each ITRD project developed at a DOE site is designed to address a typical soil or groundwater contamination issue facing both DOE and industry. This includes sites with volatile organic compound (VOC), semi-VOC, heavy metal, explosive residue, and complex or multiple constituent contamination. Projects are presently underway at three DOE facilities, while additional projects are under consideration for initiation in FY96 at several additional DOE sites. A brief overview of the ITRD Program, program plans, and the status and progress of existing ITRD projects are reviewed in this paper

  8. Pregnancy outcome of threatened abortion with demonstrable fetal cardiac activity: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongsong, T; Srisomboon, J; Wanapirak, C; Sirichotiyakul, S; Pongsatha, S; Polsrisuthikul, T

    1995-08-01

    Pregnancy with visible fetal heart beat complicated by first trimester threatened abortion had significant increased risk of subsequent spontaneous abortion compared with normal pregnancy. To compare pregnancy outcomes in cases complicated by first trimester threatened abortion with those that were not. Prospective cohort study of 255 cases of first trimester threatened abortions but with visible heart beat and 265 other normal pregnancies. Spontaneous abortion rates of 5.5% (with relative abortal risk of 2.91) was found for study group, compared to 1.88% for controls (p abortion rate than those without.

  9. The outcome after head injury in patients with radiologically demonstrated brain contusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, P.K.; Tysnes, O.B.

    1993-01-01

    The early and late outcome was evaluated in head injury patients who presented brain contusion(s) on the cranial CT scan and in patients hospitalized for concussion. There was a high degree of concurrence between mortality and CT findings. Late complaints were common among cases of concussion of the brain. However, the frequency of impaired memory and concentration, speech problems, paresis and epileptic seizures was increased in cases where the CT scan showed brain contusion. Adaptive and social functioning was most impaired in cases with multifocal contusions in both hemispheres. 16 refs., 5 tabs

  10. VANTAGE 5 PWR fuel assembly demonstration program at Virgil C. Summer nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, D.C.; Orr, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    VANTAGE 5 is an improved PWR fuel product designed and manufactured by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The VANTAGE 5 fuel design features integral fuel burnable absorbers, intermediate flow mixer grids, axial blankets, high burnup capability, and a reconstitutable top nozzle. A demonstration program for this fuel design commenced in late 1984 in cycle 2 of the Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station. Objectives for VANTAGE 5 fuel are reduced fuel cycle costs, better core operating margins, and increased design and operating flexibility. Inspections of the VANTAGE 5 demonstration assemblies are planned at each refueling outage

  11. Rio Grande Erosion Potential Demonstration - Report for the National Border Technology Program; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JEPSEN, RICHARD A.; ROBERTS, JESSE D.; LANGFORD, RICHARD; GAILANI, JOSEPH

    2001-01-01

    This demonstration project is a collaboration among DOE, Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Texas, El Paso (UTEP), the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC), and the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Sandia deployed and demonstrated a field measurement technology that enables the determination of erosion and transport potential of sediments in the Rio Grande. The technology deployed was the Mobile High Shear Stress Flume. This unique device was developed by Sandia's Carlsbad Programs for the USACE and has been used extensively in collaborative efforts on near shore and river systems throughout the United States. Since surface water quantity and quality along with human health is an important part of the National Border Technology Program, technologies that aid in characterizing, managing, and protecting this valuable resource from possible contamination sources is imperative

  12. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Plant parameters envelope report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    The Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program is the nuclear industry`s initiative for piloting the early resolution of siting-related issues before the detailed design proceedings of the combined operating license review. The ESP Demonstration Program consists of three phases. The plant parameters envelopes task is part of Phase 1, which addresses the generic review of applicable federal regulations and develops criteria for safety and environmental assessment of potential sites. The plant parameters envelopes identify parameters that characterize the interface between an ALWR design and a potential site, and quantify the interface through values selected from the Utility Requirements Documents, vendor design information, or engineering assessments. When augmented with site-specific information, the plant parameters envelopes provide sufficient information to allow ESPs to be granted based on individual ALWR design information or enveloping design information for the evolutionary, passive, or generic ALWR plants. This document is expected to become a living document when used by future applicants.

  13. A Demonstration of Evidence-Based Action Research Using Information Dashboard in Introductory Programming Education

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuzawa , Yoshiaki; Tanaka , Yoshiki; Kitani , Tomoya; Sakai , Sanshiro

    2017-01-01

    Part 3: Computer Science Education and Its Future Focus and Development; International audience; In this paper, we demonstrated an evidence-based action research in an introductory programming class with the use of an information dashboard which provides coding metrics to visualize students’ engagement of their assignments. The information dashboard was designed for teachers to improve their classroom teaching using the same coding metrics which was verified in our previous research [9]. The ...

  14. City of Las Vegas Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-12-31

    The City of Las Vegas was awarded Department of Energy (DOE) project funding in 2009, for the City of Las Vegas Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Demonstration Program. This project allowed the City of Las Vegas to purchase electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and associated electric vehicle charging infrastructure. The City anticipated the electric vehicles having lower overall operating costs and emissions similar to traditional and hybrid vehicles.

  15. Demonstration of an Integrated Pest Management Program for Wheat in Tajikistan

    OpenAIRE

    Landis, Douglas A.; Saidov, Nurali; Jaliov, Anvar; El Bouhssini, Mustapha; Kennelly, Megan; Bahlai, Christie; Landis, Joy N.; Maredia, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is an important food security crop in central Asia but frequently suffers severe damage and yield losses from insect pests, pathogens, and weeds. With funding from the United States Agency for International Development, a team of scientists from three U.S. land-grant universities in collaboration with the International Center for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas and local institutions implemented an integrated pest management (IPM) demonstration program in three regions of Tajikistan ...

  16. Implementation status of performance demonstration program for steam generator tubing analysts in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Lee, Hee Jong; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Nam, Min Woo; Hong, Sung Yull

    2013-01-01

    Some essential components in nuclear power plants are periodically inspected using non destructive examinations, for example ultrasonic, eddy current and radiographic examinations, in order to determine their integrity. These components include nuclear power plant items such as vessels, containments, piping systems, pumps, valves, tubes and core support structure. Steam generator tubes have an important safety role because they constitute one of the primary barriers between the radioactive and non radioactive sides of the nuclear power plant. There is potential that if a tube bursts while a plant is operating, radioactivity from the primary coolant system could escape directly to the atmosphere. Therefore, in service inspections are critical in maintaining steam generator tube integrity. In general, the eddy current testing is widely used for the inspection of steam generator tubes due tube integrity. In general, the eddy current testing is widely used for the inspection of steam generator tubes due to its high inspection speed and flaw detectability on non magnetic tubes. However, it is not easy to analyze correctly eddy current signals because they are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the performance of eddy current data analysts for steam generator tubing should be demonstrated comprehensively. In Korea, the performance of steam generator tubing analysts has been demonstrated using the Qualified Data Analyst program. This paper describes the performance demonstration program for steam generator tubing analysts and its implementation results in Korea. The pass rate of domestic analysts for this program was 71.4%

  17. Hazardous Waste Development, Demonstration, and Disposal (HAZWDDD) program plan: Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, C.P.; Eisenhower, B.M.; Reeves, M.E.; DePaoli, S.M.; Stinton, L.H.; Harrington, E.H.

    1989-02-01

    The Hazardous Waste Development, Demonstration, and Disposal (HAZWDDD) Program Plan provides a strategy for management of hazardous and mixed wastes generated by the five Department of Energy (DOE) installations managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). This integrated corporate plan is based on the individual installation plans, which identify waste streams, facility capabilities, problem wastes, future needs, and funding needs. Using this information, the corporate plan identifies common concerns and technology/facility needs over the next 10 years. The overall objective of this corporate plan is to ensure that treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) needs for all hazardous and mixed wastes generated by Energy Systems installations have been identified and planned for. Specific objectives of the program plan are to (1) identify all hazardous and mixed waste streams; (2) identify hazardous and mixed waste TSD requirements; (3) identify any unresolved technical issues preventing implementation of the strategy; (4) develop schedules for studies, demonstrations, and facilities to resolve the issues; and (5) define the interfaces with the Low-Level Waste Disposal Development and Demonstration (LLWDDD) Program. 10 refs., 7 figs

  18. Implementation status of performance demonstration program for steam generator tubing analysts in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Lee, Hee Jong; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Nam, Min Woo [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Yull [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Some essential components in nuclear power plants are periodically inspected using non destructive examinations, for example ultrasonic, eddy current and radiographic examinations, in order to determine their integrity. These components include nuclear power plant items such as vessels, containments, piping systems, pumps, valves, tubes and core support structure. Steam generator tubes have an important safety role because they constitute one of the primary barriers between the radioactive and non radioactive sides of the nuclear power plant. There is potential that if a tube bursts while a plant is operating, radioactivity from the primary coolant system could escape directly to the atmosphere. Therefore, in service inspections are critical in maintaining steam generator tube integrity. In general, the eddy current testing is widely used for the inspection of steam generator tubes due tube integrity. In general, the eddy current testing is widely used for the inspection of steam generator tubes due to its high inspection speed and flaw detectability on non magnetic tubes. However, it is not easy to analyze correctly eddy current signals because they are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the performance of eddy current data analysts for steam generator tubing should be demonstrated comprehensively. In Korea, the performance of steam generator tubing analysts has been demonstrated using the Qualified Data Analyst program. This paper describes the performance demonstration program for steam generator tubing analysts and its implementation results in Korea. The pass rate of domestic analysts for this program was 71.4%.

  19. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-03-01

    This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

  20. Wallerian degeneration demonstrated by MRI and functional outcome in patients suffering from supratentorial cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirotani, Toshiki; Takahara, Takashi; Arimoto, Hirohiko; Inohara, Masashi; Ono, Kenichiro; Shimizu, Akira [Self-Defense Force Central Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    An early diagnosis of the outcome of patients with cerebrovascular disease is important for selecting the optimal treatment strategy. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prognosis of Wallerian degeneration on MRI in stroke patients with hemiparesis. The subjects consisted of 87 stroke patients, 50 hemorrhagic patients and 37 ischemic patients, who were evaluated by MRI at 1 to 6,275 days after stroke onset. Among the 36 patients who were evaluated by consecutive MRI, 161 films were obtained and analyzed. Wallerian degeneration was diagnosed when a small prolonged T2 lesion was seen in the corticospinal tract of the brainstem on at least two contiguous slices. The atrophic rate of the midbrain was calculated as: (the area of the unaffected side of the midbrain - the area of the affected side of the midbrain)/2 x (the area of the unaffected side of the midbrain). The patients' ability to perform the activities of daily living was scored by the Barthel index (BI). Wallerian degeneration in the ipsilateral brainstem was seen for two to three months in 32 cases (37%) and in 58 films (36%) and disappeared about 3 years after the onset of stroke. Wallerian degeneration correlated with the BI scores from 2 to 6 months after stroke (p<0.05), although no relationship was observed at 7 months or later. From 2 to 6 months after stroke, the shrinkage of the midbrain on MRI correlated with the BI scores (p<0.001), although no relationship was observed at 7 months or later. It was therefore both Wallerian degeneration and a shrunken midbrain observed on MRIs, evaluated from 2 to 6 months after stroke were thus suggested to indicate a poor outcome in such patients. (author)

  1. Program management plan for the conduct of a research, development, and demonstration program for improving the safety of nuclear powerplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    Congress passed Public Law 96-567, Nuclear Safety Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1980, (hereafter referred to as the Act) to provide for an accelerated and coordinated program of light water reactor safety research, development, and demonstration to be carried out by the Department of Energy. In order to assure that this program would be compatible with the needs of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated its response to Section 4 of the Act by conducting individual information gathering meetings with NRC and a wide cross section of the nuclear industry. The Department received recommendations on needs of what type of activities would and would not be appropriate for the Department to assist in satisfying these needs. Based on the evaluation of these inputs, it is concluded that the Department's ongoing Light Water Reactor (LWR) safety program is responsive to the Act. Specifically, the Department's ongoing program includes tasks in the areas of regulatory assessment, risk assessment, fission product source term, and emergency preparedness as well as providing technical assistance to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) to improve training of nuclear power personnel. These were among the very high priority efforts that were identified as necessary and appropriate for support by the Department

  2. The science experience: The relationship between an inquiry-based science program and student outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poderoso, Charie

    Science education reforms in U.S. schools emphasize the importance of students' construction of knowledge through inquiry. Organizations such as the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Research Council (NRC), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) have demonstrated a commitment to searching for solutions and renewed efforts to improve science education. One suggestion for science education reform in U.S. schools was a transition from traditional didactic, textbook-based to inquiry-based instructional programs. While inquiry has shown evidence for improved student learning in science, what is needed is empirical evidence of those inquiry-based practices that affect student outcomes in a local context. This study explores the relationship between instructional programs and curricular changes affecting student outcomes in the Santa Ana Unified District (SAUSD): It provides evidence related to achievement and attitudes. SAUSD employs two approaches to teaching in the middle school science classrooms: traditional and inquiry-based approaches. The Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Reform (LASER) program is an inquiry-based science program that utilizes resources for implementation of the University of California Berkeley's Lawrence Hall of Science Education for Public Understanding Program (SEPUP) to support inquiry-based teaching and learning. Findings in this study provide empirical support related to outcomes of seventh-grade students, N = 328, in the LASER and traditional science programs in SAUSD.

  3. 1982 environmental-monitoring program report for the West Valley Demonstration Project site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This report is prepared and submitted in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5484.1 and presents environmental monitoring program data collected at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) site from February 26, 1982, through December 31, 1982. The WVDP objective is to solidify approximately 600,000 gallons of high-level liquid radioactive waste stored at the former Nuclear Fuel Services reprocessing facility at West Valley, New York. Nuclear Fuel Services conducted an environmental monitoring program in accordance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements which were appropriate for shutdown maintenance operations conducted at the site. That program was embraced by West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNS) at the time of transition (February 26, 1982) and will be modified to provide a comprehensive monitoring program in preparation for waste solidification operations scheduled for startup in June 1988. As such, the data presented in this report is considered preoperational in nature in accordance with DOE Order 5484.1, Chapter III, Paragraph 1. The environmental monitoring program planned for the operating phase of the project will be fully implemented by fiscal year 1985 and will provide at least two years of preoperational data prior to startup

  4. Demonstrating a small utility approach to demand-side program implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The US DOE awarded a grant to the Burlington Electric Department (B.E.D.) to test a demand-side management (DSM) demonstration program designed to quickly save a significant amount of power with little disruption to the utility's customers or its normal operations. B.E.D. is a small municipal utility located in northern Vermont, with a lengthy history of successful DSM involvement. In our grant application, we proposed to develop a replicable program and approach to DSM that might be useful to other small utilities and to write a report to enable such replication. We believe that this DSM program and/or individual program components are replicable. This report is designed to allow other utilities interested in DSM to replicate this program or specific program design features to meet their DSM goals. We also wanted to use the opportunity of this grant to test the waters of residential heating fuel-switching. We hoped to test the application of one fuel-switching technology, and to benefit from the lessons learned in developing a full-scale DSM program for this end- use. To this end the pilot effort has been very successful. In the pilot pressure we installed direct-vent gas fired space heaters sized as supplemental heating units in 44 residences heated solely by electric resistance heat. We installed the gas space heating units at no cost to the owners or residents. We surveyed participating customers. The results of those surveys are included in this report and preliminary estimates of winter peak capacity load reductions are also noted in this report.

  5. Demonstrating a small utility approach to demand-side program implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The US DOE awarded a grant to the Burlington Electric Department (B.E.D.) to test a demand-side management (DSM) demonstration program designed to quickly save a significant amount of power with little disruption to the utility's customers or its normal operations. B.E.D. is a small municipal utility located in northern Vermont, with a lengthy history of successful DSM involvement. In our grant application, we proposed to develop a replicable program and approach to DSM that might be useful to other small utilities and to write a report to enable such replication. We believe that this DSM program and/or individual program components are replicable. This report is designed to allow other utilities interested in DSM to replicate this program or specific program design features to meet their DSM goals. We also wanted to use the opportunity of this grant to test the waters of residential heating fuel-switching. We hoped to test the application of one fuel-switching technology, and to benefit from the lessons learned in developing a full-scale DSM program for this end- use. To this end the pilot effort has been very successful. In the pilot pressure we installed direct-vent gas fired space heaters sized as supplemental heating units in 44 residences heated solely by electric resistance heat. We installed the gas space heating units at no cost to the owners or residents. We surveyed participating customers. The results of those surveys are included in this report and preliminary estimates of winter peak capacity load reductions are also noted in this report

  6. Workforce and graduate school outcomes of NOAA's Educational Partnership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, T.; Kaplan, M.

    2017-12-01

    Underrepresented groups, including Black, Hispanic, Native American, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Island professionals remain underrepresented in STEM fields generally, and in the ocean and atmospheric sciences specifically. NOAA has tried to address this disparity through a number of initiatives under the Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP MSI) which currently has two components: four Cooperative Science Centers (CSCs) aligned with NOAA's mission areas; and an Undergraduate Scholarship Program (USP), both established in 2001. In order to determine the outcomes for the program participants and the impacts of these programs on degree completions and on the workforce, the EPP MSI undertook a multi-pronged effort to identify career and education achievements for 80% of the approximately 1750 EPP MSI alumni, 75% of whom are from underrepresented groups. This was accomplished through 1) searching online resources (e.g. professional web pages, LinkedIn, etc.), 2) personal communication with program-associated faculty, 3) National Student Clearinghouse, 4) a survey of former scholars conducted by Insight Policy Research, and 5) self-reporting though NOAA's Voluntary Alumni Update System. Results show that 60% of CSC alumni currently hold an advanced degree in a STEM field with another 8% currently working toward one. 66% of EPP Undergraduate Scholars go to graduate school. 72% of CSC and USP alumni are currently employed in or pursuing a graduate degree in a NOAA-related* field. More than 70 CSC graduates currently work for NOAA as contractors or federal employees while more than 240 work for other government agencies. More than 400 are employed in the private sector. Of more than 225 PhD graduates, 66 have completed or currently hold post-doctoral positions in NOAA mission fields; 71 have held faculty positions at major universities. However, one challenge is retaining diverse STEM talent within the Geosciences in light

  7. Relational conflict and outcomes from an online divorce education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Sarah; Becher, Emily H; McCann, Ellie; McGuire, Jenifer; Powell, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    The impact of conflict on co-parenting outcomes of divorce education programs is not widely explored in the literature despite the prevalence of conflict in divorce. This study used outcome data from a sample of participants (N=272) who took the online Parents Forever™ course between 2012 and 2014. Participants were asked questions about positive and negative co-parenting behaviors as well their levels of conflict before and after the divorce or separation. There was on average a slight increase in conflict from post to follow-up (M=-0.397, SD=1.54). Simple linear regression analyses indicated that change in conflict explained a significant proportion of the variance in positive co-parenting scores, R 2 =0.07, F(1, 270)=19.98, pimpacts co-parenting behaviors targeted in the Parents Forever ™ course. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Documenting Program Outcomes of Relationship Education with Incarcerated Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Taylor Harcourt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined program outcomes for an understudied population of Relationship Education (RE participants: incarcerated men and women. In addition to relationship functioning, we examined a number of individual and parenting outcomes which had not previously been explored. In a sample of 453 adult inmates, we found improvements in (a trust, (b confidence in the relationship, (c intimacy, (d individual empowerment, (e conflict management, (f help-seeking attitudes, (g self-esteem, (h depression, (i global life stress, (j faulty relationship beliefs, and (k parenting efficacy. Tests of moderation by gender and race indicated minimal differences in change patterns between groups; however, we found a significant time by gender interaction on intimacy and a time by race interaction on parenting efficacy. Implications for research and practice are presented

  9. The relationship of fluidized bed technology to the U.S. Clean Coal Technology demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weth, G.; Geffken, J.; Huber, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Fluidized Bed Combustion projects (both AFBCs and PFBCs) have a prominent role in the US DOE Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. This program has the successful commercialization of these technologies as its primary objective and this is the basic criterion for government funding and participation in the development and demonstration of the technologies. Under the CCT program the US DOE is actively involved in the development and operation of three Fluidized Bed Technology projects, NUCLA, TIDD, and SPORN, and is in the negotiation stage on others, Dairyland, Nichols and Tallahassee. All of these projects, along with the operating information on fluidized beds in the industrial sector, will provide a basis for evaluating future utilization of Fluidized Bed Technology in the market place. Impacting upon further utilization will be the time-frame and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This paper presents the results of a study to ascertain the commercial readiness of Fluidized Bed Technology to meet the emissions and time-frame requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Specifically addressed are: Commercialization criteria/factors which candidate and/or existing CCTs must achieve in order to gain market acceptance. The status of Fluidized Bed Technology in achieving these commercialization criteria for market acceptance (industrial and utility) consistent with the time frame of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Recommendations of commercialization criteria for future fluidized bed CCT demonstration projects

  10. Rutgers Young Horse Teaching and Research Program: undergraduate student outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Sarah L

    2012-12-01

    Equine teaching and research programs are popular but expensive components of most land grant universities. External funding for equine research, however, is limited and restricts undergraduate research opportunities that enhance student learning. In 1999, a novel undergraduate teaching and research program was initiated at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. A unique aspect of this program was the use of young horses generally considered "at risk" and in need of rescue but of relatively low value. The media interest in such horses was utilized to advantage to obtain funding for the program. The use of horses from pregnant mare urine (PMU) ranches and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) mustangs held the risks of attracting negative publicity, potential of injury while training previously unhandled young horses, and uncertainty regarding re-sale value; however, none of these concerns were realized. For 12 years the Young Horse Teaching and Research Program received extensive positive press and provided invaluable learning opportunities for students. Over 500 students, at least 80 of which were minorities, participated in not only horse management and training but also research, event planning, public outreach, fund-raising, and website development. Public and industry support provided program sustainability with only basic University infrastructural support despite severe economic downturns. Student research projects generated 25 research abstracts presented at national and international meetings and 14 honors theses. Over 100 students went on to veterinary school or other higher education programs, and more than 100 others pursued equine- or science-related careers. Laudatory popular press articles were published in a wide variety of breed/discipline journals and in local and regional newspapers each year. Taking the risk of using "at risk" horses yielded positive outcomes for all, especially the undergraduate students.

  11. Active vibration control testing of the SPICES program: final demonstration article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, James P.; Jacobs, Jack H.

    1996-05-01

    The Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures (SPICES) Program is a partnership program sponsored by the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The mission of the program is to develop cost effective material processing and synthesis technologies to enable new products employing active vibration suppression and control devices to be brought to market. The two year program came to fruition in 1995 through the fabrication of the final smart components and testing of an active plate combined with two trapezoidal rails, forming an active mount. Testing of the SPICES combined active mount took place at McDonnell Douglas facilities in St. Louis, MO, in October-December 1995. Approximately 15 dB reduction in overall response of a motor mounted on the active structure was achieved. Further details and results of the SPICES combined active mount demonstration testing are outlined. Results of numerous damping and control strategies that were developed and employed in the testing are presented, as well as aspects of the design and fabrication of the SPICES active mount components.

  12. Design of benign matrix drums for the non-destructive assay performance demonstration program for the National TRU Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.K.

    1996-09-01

    Regulatory compliance programs associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) require the collection of waste characterization data of known quality to support repository performance assessment, permitting, and associated activities. Blind audit samples, referred to as PDP (performance demonstration program) samples, are devices used in the NDA PDP program to acquire waste NDA system performance data per defined measurement routines. As defined under the current NDA PDP Program Plan, a PDP sample consists of a DOT 17C 55-gallon PDP matrix drum configured with insertable radioactive standards, working reference materials (WRMs). The particular manner in which the matrix drum and PDP standard(s) are combined is a function of the waste NDA system performance test objectives of a given cycle. The scope of this document is confined to the design of the PDP drum radioactive standard internal support structure, the matrix type and the as installed configuration. The term benign is used to designate a matrix possessing properties which are nominally non-interfering to waste NDA measurement techniques. Measurement interference sources are technique specific but include attributes such as: high matrix density, heterogeneous matrix distributions, matrix compositions containing high moderator/high Z element concentrations, etc. To the extent practicable the matrix drum design should not unduly bias one NDA modality over another due to the manner in which the matrix drum configuration manifests itself to the measurement system. To this end the PDP matrix drum configuration and composition detailed below is driven primarily by the intent to minimize the incorporation of matrix attributes known to interfere with fundamental waste NDA modalities, i.e. neutron and gamma based techniques

  13. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A program is proposed for the ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a radioisotope nuclear heated dynamic power system for use on space missions beginning in the 1980's. This type of electrical power system is based upon and combines two aerospace technologies currently under intense development; namely, the MHW isotope heat source and the closed Brayton cycle gas turbine. This power system represents the next generation of reliable, efficient economic electrical power equipment for space, and will be capable of providing 0.5 to 2.0 kW of electric power to a wide variety of spacecraft for earth orbital and interplanetary missions. The immediate design will be based upon the requirements for the Air Force SURVSATCOM mission. The proposal is presented in three volumes plus an Executive Summary. This volume describes the tasks in the technical program.

  14. NASA Applied Sciences Program. Overview Presentation; Discovering and Demonstrating Innovative and Practical Applications of Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Goal 1: Enhance Applications Research Advance the use of NASA Earth science in policy making, resource management and planning, and disaster response. Key Actions: Identify priority needs, conduct applied research to generate innovative applications, and support projects that demonstrate uses of NASA Earth science. Goal 2: Increase Collaboration Establish a flexible program structure to meet diverse partner needs and applications objectives. Key Actions: Pursue partnerships to leverage resources and risks and extend the program s reach and impact. Goal 3:Accelerate Applications Ensure that NASA s flight missions plan for and support applications goals in conjunction with their science goals, starting with mission planning and extending through the mission life cycle. Key Actions: Enable identification of applications early in satellite mission lifecycle and facilitate effective ways to integrate end-user needs into satellite mission planning

  15. General Electric Company proposed test and evaluation plan, commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-04-01

    The general requirements and methods for instrumenting, testing, and evaluating solar HVAC systems forming a part of ERDA's ''Commercial Demonstration Program'' commensurate with ERDA 23A and the Proposed Management Plan 75SDS4270 are defined. Design requirements are specified for the performance of components and subsystems comprising the instrumentation and data gathering system, as well as the support functions required to perform the diagnostic measurements, collection and processing of data, and documentation of reports on solar HVAC system performance, including economic and societal evaluations.

  16. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for RCRA Constituent Analysis of Solidified Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents distributes test samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals in solid matrices. Each distribution of test samples is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department. The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the RCRA PDP. Participating laboratories demonstrate acceptable performance by successfully analyzing single-blind performance evaluation samples (subsequently referred to as PDP samples) according to the criteria established in this plan. PDP samples are used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). The concentrations of analytes in the PDP samples address levels of regulatory concern and encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in waste characterization samples. The WIPP requires analyses of homogeneous solid wastes to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples. Participating laboratories must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for WIPP samples.

  17. Performance demonstration program plan for RCRA constituent analysis of solidified wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    Performance Demonstration Programs (PDPS) are designed to help ensure compliance with the Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The PDPs are intended for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) to assess and approve the laboratories and other measurement facilities supplying services for the characterization of WIPP TRU waste. The PDPs may also be used by CAO in qualifying laboratories proposing to supply additional analytical services that are required for other than waste characterization, such as WIPP site operations. The purpose of this PDP is to test laboratory performance for the analysis of solidified waste samples for TRU waste characterization. This performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated, solidified TRU waste according to the criteria established in this plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will address levels of regulatory concern and will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization samples. Analyses that are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in the PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples for the balance of this document

  18. Thirteen years and counting: Outcomes of a concurrent ASN/BSN enrollment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heglund, Stephen; Simmons, Jessica; Wink, Diane; D'Meza Leuner, Jean

    In their 2011 report, The Future of Nursing, the Institute of Medicine called for 80% of the nursing workforce to be comprised of baccalaureate prepared Registered Nurses by the year 2020. One suggested approach to achieve this goal is the creation of programs that allow students to progress through associate and baccalaureate nursing preparation simultaneously. This paper describes the University of Central Florida's 13-year experience after implementing a Concurrent Enrollment Program. Development and structure of the program, advisement and curriculum details, facilitators and barriers are described. Data on National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses pass rates, completion rates, comparison with traditional RN-BSN students, and progression to graduate school are also included. The Concurrent Program model described here between a specific university and state college partners, demonstrated positive outcomes that support achievement of the Institute of Medicine's goals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical

  20. A home-based individualized information communication technology training program for older adults: a demonstration of effectiveness and value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthanat, Sajay; Vroman, Kerryellen G; Lysack, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness and value of a home-based information communication technology (ICT) training program for older adults. Thirteen older adults were provided in-home ICT training by graduate occupational therapy students using an iPad. The breadth and frequency of ICT use, perspectives on technology, and perceived independence were recorded at baseline, during the 3-month training and at follow-up, along with an end-of-study questionnaire. Non-parametric Friedman analysis was conducted to verify trends in the outcome measures. The qualitative data were examined by content analysis. Participants' breadth of ICT activities showed a significant trend across 6 months. Leisure accounted for the significant increase, while health management and social connections activities increased modestly. A positive trend in participants' perspectives on technology was evident along with a marginal increase in perceived independence. Participants' perspectives were thematically categorized as technology experiences, interactions with coach, training approach, and specific activities. As reflection of the training program's value, 12 of the 13 participants took ownership of the iPad at the end of the study. Building capacity of older adults to utilize the multifaceted potential of ICT is critical in addressing declines in health, impending disabilities, and social isolation. Implications for Rehabilitation A one-on-one home-based individualized information communication technology (ICT) training program for older adults could result in a progressive increase in the breadth of online activities carried out by them. Specifically, the increase in their usage of ICT could be expected in leisure-based online activities. Individualized training programs designed based on needs, priorities, and learning style of older adults could have a positive impact on their technological perspectives and intrinsic motivation to adopt ICT.

  1. Subsurface Planar Vitrification Treatment of Problematic TRU Wastes: Status of a Technology Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, M.K.; Nowack, B.R.; Thompson, L.E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a status of the In Situ Transuranic Waste Delineation and Removal Project in which the GeoMelt R Subsurface Planar Vitrification TM (SPV TM ) process is being evaluated for the in situ treatment of burial sites containing remote handled mixed transuranic (TRU) waste. The GeoMelt R SPV TM process was invented and patented by Geosafe Corporation. AMEC holds the exclusive worldwide license to use this technology. The current project is part of a three-phase demonstration program to evaluate the effectiveness of the GeoMelt R SPV TM process to treat waste contained in vertical pipe units (VPUs) and caissons that were used for the disposal of remote handled transuranic wastes located at Hanford's 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds. This project is being performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for use at the Hanford site and other DOE installations. The Phase I evaluation determined that removal and treatment of the 618-10/11 VPUs are beyond what can be safely accomplished using conventional excavation methods. Accordingly, a careful stepwise non-intrusive delineation approach and treatment using the GeoMelt R SPV TM technology, followed by removal, characterization, and disposal of the resulting inert vitrified mass was identified as the preferred alternative. Phase II of the project, which started in July 2004, included a full-scale non-radioactive demonstration of AMEC's GeoMelt R SPV TM process on a mock VPU configured to match the actual VPUs. The non-radioactive demonstration (completed in May 2005) was performed to confirm the approach and design before proceeding to a radioactive ('hot') demonstration on an actual VPU. This demonstration took approximately 130 hours, processed the entire mock VPU, and resulted in a vitrified monolith weighing an estimated 90 tonnes. [1] Plans for a radioactive demonstration on an actual VPU are being developed for CY 2006. In addition to demonstrating GeoMelt R SPV TM , delineation techniques are being

  2. Demonstration of an Integrated Pest Management Program for Wheat in Tajikistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Douglas A.; Saidov, Nurali; Jaliov, Anvar; El Bouhssini, Mustapha; Kennelly, Megan; Bahlai, Christie; Landis, Joy N.; Maredia, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is an important food security crop in central Asia but frequently suffers severe damage and yield losses from insect pests, pathogens, and weeds. With funding from the United States Agency for International Development, a team of scientists from three U.S. land-grant universities in collaboration with the International Center for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas and local institutions implemented an integrated pest management (IPM) demonstration program in three regions of Tajikistan from 2011 to 2014. An IPM package was developed and demonstrated in farmer fields using a combination of crop and pest management techniques including cultural practices, host plant resistance, biological control, and chemical approaches. The results from four years of demonstration/research indicated that the IPM package plots almost universally had lower pest abundance and damage and higher yields and were more profitable than the farmer practice plots. Wheat stripe rust infestation ranged from 30% to over 80% in farmer practice plots, while generally remaining below 10% in the IPM package plots. Overall yield varied among sites and years but was always at least 30% to as much as 69% greater in IPM package plots. More than 1,500 local farmers—40% women—were trained through farmer field schools and field days held at the IPM demonstration sites. In addition, students from local agricultural universities participated in on-site data collection. The IPM information generated by the project was widely disseminated to stakeholders through peer-reviewed scientific publications, bulletins and pamphlets in local languages, and via Tajik national television. PMID:28446990

  3. 34 CFR 425.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic Learning Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Demonstration Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic Learning Program? 425.1 Section 425.1 Education Regulations of the Offices... EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM General...

  4. 48 CFR 52.219-19 - Small Business Concern Representation for the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Representation for the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program. 52.219-19 Section 52.219-19 Federal... Representation for the Small Business Competitiveness Demonstration Program. As prescribed in 19.1008(a), insert the following provision: Small Business Concern Representation for the Small Business Competitiveness...

  5. Business process modeling for the Virginia Department of Transportation : a demonstration with the integrated six-year improvement program and the statewide transportation improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This effort demonstrates business process modeling to describe the integration of particular planning and programming activities of a state highway agency. The motivations to document planning and programming activities are that: (i) resources for co...

  6. Business process modeling for the Virginia Department of Transportation : a demonstration with the integrated six-year improvement program and the statewide transportation improvement program : executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This effort demonstrates business process modeling to describe the integration of particular planning and programming activities of a state highway agency. The motivations to document planning and programming activities are that: (i) resources for co...

  7. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  8. Occupational Safety and Health Program at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. M. Calderon

    1999-01-01

    The West Valley Nuclear Services Co. LLC (WVNS) is committed to provide a safe, clean, working environment for employees, and to implement U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements affecting worker safety. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Occupational Safety and Health Program is designed to protect the safety, health, and well-being of WVDP employees by identifying, evaluating, and controlling biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the work place. Hazards are controlled within the requirements set forth in the reference section at the end of this report. It is the intent of the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program to assure that each employee is provided with a safe and healthy work environment. This report shows the logical path toward ensuring employee safety in planning work at the WVDP. In general, planning work to be performed safely includes: combining requirements from specific programs such as occupational safety, industrial hygiene, radiological control, nuclear safety, fire safety, environmental protection, etc.; including WVDP employees in the safety decision-making processes; pre-planning using safety support re-sources; and integrating the safety processes into the work instructions. Safety management principles help to define the path forward for the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program. Roles, responsibilities, and authority of personnel stem from these ideals. WVNS and its subcontractors are guided by the following fundamental safety management principles: ''Protection of the environment, workers, and the public is the highest priority. The safety and well-being of our employees, the public, and the environment must never be compromised in the aggressive pursuit of results and accomplishment of work product. A graded approach to environment, safety, and health in design, construction, operation, maintenance, and deactivation is incorporated to ensure the protection of the workers, the public, and the environment

  9. The Comfortable Cafeteria Program for Promoting Student Participation and Enjoyment: An Outcome Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyk, Susan; Demirjian, Louise; Horvath, Frances; Doxsey, Lauri

    A mixed-methods design was used to explore the outcomes of a 6-wk, occupational therapist-led Comfortable Cafeteria program designed to build cafeteria supervisors' and students' capacity to create a positive mealtime environment so that all students can successfully participate in and enjoy a healthy meal and socialization with peers. Students whose scores were in the low and mid-range at the outset had statistically significant improvements in pretest-posttest visual analog scale ratings of participation and enjoyment. Cafeteria supervisors demonstrated statistically significant improvements in their perceptions of knowledge and skills to supervise and to encourage healthy eating. Qualitative findings add further insight into the program, suggesting that students learned prosocial values (e.g., being kind, helping others), supervisors actively encouraged positive social interaction, and occupational therapists enjoyed implementing the program and recognized positive supervisor and student changes as a result of integrating services in the cafeteria. Copyright © 2018 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  10. HOME VISIT QUALITY VARIATIONS IN TWO EARLY HEAD START PROGRAMS IN RELATION TO PARENTING AND CHILD VOCABULARY OUTCOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggman, Lori A; Cook, Gina A; Innocenti, Mark S; Jump Norman, Vonda; Boyce, Lisa K; Christiansen, Katie; Peterson, Carla A

    2016-05-01

    Home-visiting programs aiming to improve early child development have demonstrated positive outcomes, but processes within home visits to individual families are rarely documented. We examined family-level variations in the home-visiting process (N = 71) from extant video recordings of home visits in two Early Head Start programs, using an observational measure of research-based quality indicators of home-visiting practices and family engagement, the Home Visit Rating Scales (HOVRS). HOVRS scores, showing good interrater agreement and internal consistency, were significantly associated with parent- and staff-reported positive characteristics of home visiting as well as with parenting and child language outcomes tested at program exit. When home-visiting processes were higher quality during the program, home visit content was more focused on child development, families were more involved in the overall program, and most important, scores on measures of the parenting environment and children's vocabulary were higher at the end of the program. Results showed that home visit quality was indirectly associated with child language outcomes through parenting outcomes. Observation ratings of home visit quality could be useful for guiding program improvement, supporting professional development, and increasing our understanding of the links between home-visiting processes and outcomes. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  11. Outcomes In Two Massachusetts Hospital Systems Give Reason For Optimism About Communication-And-Resolution Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Michelle M; Kachalia, Allen; Roche, Stephanie; Niel, Melinda Van; Buchsbaum, Lisa; Dodson, Suzanne; Folcarelli, Patricia; Benjamin, Evan M; Sands, Kenneth E

    2017-10-01

    Through communication-and-resolution programs, hospitals and liability insurers communicate with patients when adverse events occur; investigate and explain what happened; and, where appropriate, apologize and proactively offer compensation. Using data recorded by program staff members and from surveys of involved clinicians, we examined case outcomes of a program used by two academic medical centers and two of their community hospitals in Massachusetts in the period 2013-15. The hospitals demonstrated good adherence to the program protocol. Ninety-one percent of the program events did not meet compensation eligibility criteria, and those events that did were not costly to resolve (the median payment was $75,000). Only 5 percent of events led to malpractice claims or lawsuits. Clinicians were supportive of the program but desired better communication about it from staff members. Our findings suggest that communication-and-resolution programs will not lead to higher liability costs when hospitals adhere to their commitment to offer compensation proactively. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  12. Financial performance among adult day centers: results of a national demonstration program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifler, B V; Henry, R S; Rushing, J; Yates, M K; Cox, N J; Bradham, D D; McFarlane, M

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the financial performance (defined as percent of total expenses covered by net operating revenue) of 16 adult day centers participating in a national demonstration program on day services for people with dementia, including examination of possible predictors of financial performance. Participating sites submitted quarterly financial and utilization reports to the National Program Office. Descriptive statistics summarize the factors believed to influence financial performance. Sites averaged meeting 35% of expenses from self-pay and 29% from government (mainly Medicaid) revenue, totaling 64% of all (cash plus in-kind) expenses met by operating revenue. Examination of center characteristics suggests that factors related to meeting consumer needs, such as being open a full day (i.e., 7:30 am to 6:00 pm) rather than shorter hours, and providing transportation, may be related to improved utilization and, thus, improved financial performance. Higher fees were not related to lower enrollment, census, or revenue. Adult day centers are able to achieve financial viability through a combination of operating (i.e., fee-for-service) and non-operating revenue. Operating revenue is enhanced by placing emphasis on consumer responsiveness, such as being open a full day. Because higher fees were not related to lower utilization, centers should set fees to reflect actual costs. The figure of 64% of expenses met by operating revenue is conservative inasmuch as sites included in-kind revenue as expenses in their budgeting calculations, and percent of cash expenses met by operating revenue would be higher (approximately 75% for this group of centers).

  13. Swiss national MD-PhD-program: an outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnle, Katrin; Winkler, David T; Meier-Abt, Peter J

    2009-09-19

    This study aims at a first evaluation of the outcome of the Swiss national MD-PhD program during the last 16 years. One hundred and twenty six former and current students in the Swiss national MD-PhD program were surveyed via a Web-based questionnaire in September 2007. Twenty-four questions assessed information regarding participant demographics, information on the PhD thesis and publication activity, current positions and research activity, as well as participant's opinions, attitudes and career goals. Eighty questionnaires were received from 126 MD-PhD students and graduates (63.5% response rate). The responders consisted of present students (36%), former graduates (56%), and dropouts (8%). The percentage of women in the program was 23%, and the average duration of the program was 4.2 +/- 1.4 years. Research interests were predominantly in the fields of neuroscience, immunology, molecular biology and cancer research. A considerable portion of the MD-PhD graduates had an excellent publication record stemming from their PhD research work, and 89% were planning to continue a research-orientated career. Over 50% of those MD-PhD graduates completing their thesis before 2002 had already reached an assistant or full professor position at the time of the survey. Nearly all participants considered the MD-PhD training helpful to their career and high quality standards were assigned to the acquired practical and intellectual skills. However, criticism was expressed concerning the general mentoring and the career related mentoring. Moreover, general mentoring and career related mentoring were significantly less well perceived in research groups employing more than seven PhD students at the same time. The MD-PhD students and graduates surveyed were satisfied with their education and most of them continued a research-orientated career. Regarding the overall positive evaluation, this study supports the view that MD-PhD graduates are well qualified for a successful career in

  14. The Avahan Transition: Effects of Transition Readiness on Program Institutionalization and Sustained Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Ozawa

    Full Text Available With declines in development assistance for health and growing interest in country ownership, donors are increasingly faced with the task of transitioning health programs to local actors towards a path to sustainability. Yet there is little available guidance on how to measure and evaluate the success of a transition and its subsequent effects. This study assesses the transition of the Avahan HIV/AIDS prevention program in India to investigate how preparations for transition affected continuation of program activities post-transition.Two rounds of two surveys were conducted and supplemented by data from government and Avahan Computerized Management Information Systems (CMIS. Exploratory factor analysis was used to develop two measures: 1 transition readiness pre-transition, and 2 institutionalization (i.e. integration of initial program systems into organizational procedures and behaviors post-transition. A fixed effects model was built to examine changes in key program delivery outcomes over time. An ordinary least square regression was used to assess the relationship between transition readiness and sustainability of service outcomes both directly, and indirectly through institutionalization.Transition readiness data revealed 3 factors (capacity, alignment and communication, on a 15-item scale with adequate internal consistency (alpha 0.73. Institutionalization was modeled as a unidimensional construct, and a 12-item scale demonstrated moderate internal consistency (alpha 0.60. Coverage of key populations and condom distribution were sustained compared to pre-transition levels (p<0.01. Transition readiness, but not institutionalization, predicted sustained outcomes post-transition. Transition readiness did not necessarily lead to institutionalization of key program elements one year after transition.Greater preparedness prior to transition is important to achieve better service delivery outcomes post-transition. This paper illustrates a

  15. Achievements of the French laser uranium enrichment program and final demonstrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, G.

    2006-01-01

    The research on Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (SILVA in French) started in France during the seventies at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) through basic experiments on uranium spectroscopy and evaporation. The program gained momentum rapidly with the decision in 1985 to focus on SILVA while decreasing the research on chemical exchange process, centrifugation and laser molecular route. Similar orientations were taken during the same period in the US and in Japan. The French need in uranium enrichment service, around 5 MSWU (million Separation Work Units) for 45 electronuclear reactors in 1985, was fulfilled by gaseous diffusion in EURODIF (multinational consortium). But the expected increase in the international need, especially in Asia, and the high cost of the energy power supply necessary for gaseous diffusion were the main reasons to search for a very efficient and selective new generation enrichment process like SILVA. The scientific demonstration of the SILVA process was completed in the mid 1990's with grams of separated uranium at both the requested industrial enriched and tail assays simultaneously. However, in the late 90's, some technical difficulties appeared in the scaling up of the process to produce kilograms of enriched uranium. In 1998 a scientific peer review defined some general goals and improvements to be performed, partly reached on the Pelleas facility in Saclay, two years later. In parallel the centrifugation technology made important progress (in Europe, URENCO consortium and in Japan) related to the emergence of high performance carbon fibers. In September 2000, a French ministerial nuclear committee chose the centrifugation as the reference industrial technology to substitute for gaseous diffusion in 2010-2015: SILVA was not enough mature and competitive to be developed at an industrial scale within such a delay. In order to save properly the knowledge and to account for potential future uses, the committee settled on a

  16. Photovoltaic Power System and Power Distribution Demonstration for the Desert RATS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony; Jakupca, Ian; Mintz, Toby; Herlacher, Mike; Hussey, Sam

    2012-01-01

    A stand alone, mobile photovoltaic power system along with a cable deployment system was designed and constructed to take part in the Desert Research And Technology Studies (RATS) lunar surface human interaction evaluation program at Cinder Lake, Arizona. The power system consisted of a photovoltaic array/battery system. It is capable of providing 1 kW of electrical power. The system outputs were 48 V DC, 110 V AC, and 220 V AC. A cable reel with 200 m of power cable was used to provide power from the trailer to a remote location. The cable reel was installed on a small trailer. The reel was powered to provide low to no tension deployment of the cable. The cable was connected to the 220 V AC output of the power system trailer. The power was then converted back to 110 V AC on the cable deployment trailer for use at the remote site. The Scout lunar rover demonstration vehicle was used to tow the cable trailer and deploy the power cable. This deployment was performed under a number of operational scenarios, manned operation, remote operation and tele-robotically. Once deployed, the cable was used to provide power, from the power system trailer, to run various operational tasks at the remote location.

  17. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1, Demonstration tests: Volume 1, Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.; Shipway, G.D.; Glozman, V.

    1987-08-01

    This report describes tests performed in Phase I of the NRC Component Fragility Research Program. The purpose of these tests was to demonstrate procedures for characterizing the seismic fragility of a selected component, investigating how various parameters affect fragility, and finally using test data to develop practical fragility descriptions suitable for application in probabilistic risk assessments. A three-column motor control center housing motor controllers of various types and sizes as well as relays of different types and manufacturers was subjected to seismic input motions up to 2.5g zero period acceleration. To investigate the effect of base flexibility on the structural behavior of the MCC and on the functional behavior of the electrical devices, multiple tests were performed on each of four mounting configurations: four bolts per column with top bracking, four bolts per column with no top brace, four bolts per column with internal diagonal bracking, and two bolts per column with no top or internal bracking. Device fragility was characterized by contact chatter correlated to local in-cabinet response at the device location. Seismic capacities were developed for each device on the basis of local input motion required to cause chatter; these results were then applied to develop probabilistic fragility curves for each type of device, including estimates of the ''high-confidence low probability of failure'' capacity of each

  18. Development and pilot demonstration program of a waste minimization plan at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.W.; Wentz, C.A.; Thuot, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    In response to US Department of Energy directives, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed a waste minimization plan aimed at reducing the amount of wastes at this national research and development laboratory. Activities at ANL are primarily research- oriented and as such affect the amount and type of source reduction that can be achieved at this facility. The objective of ANL's waste minimization program is to cost-effectively reduce all types of wastes, including hazardous, mixed, radioactive, and nonhazardous wastes. The ANL Waste Minimization Plan uses a waste minimization audit as a systematic procedure to determine opportunities to reduce or eliminate waste. To facilitate these audits, a computerized bar-coding procedure is being implemented at ANL to track hazardous wastes from where they are generated to their ultimate disposal. This paper describes the development of the ANL Waste Minimization Plan and a pilot demonstration of the how the ANL Plan audited the hazardous waste generated within a selected divisions of ANL. It includes quantitative data on the generation and disposal of hazardous waste at ANL and describes potential ways to minimize hazardous wastes. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs

  19. Uranium removal from soils: An overview from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, C.W.; Brainard, J.R.; York, D.A.; Chaiko, D.J.; Matthern, G.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated approach to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils is being conducted by four of the US Department of Energy national laboratories. In this approach, managed through the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, these laboratories are developing processes that selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil's physicochemical characteristics or generating waste that is difficult to manage or dispose of. These processes include traditional uranium extractions that use carbonate as well as some nontraditional extraction techniques that use citric acid and complex organic chelating agents such as naturally occurring microbial siderophores. A bench-scale engineering design for heap leaching; a process that uses carbonate leaching media shows that >90% of the uranium can be removed from the Fernald soils. Other work involves amending soils with cultures of sulfur and ferrous oxidizing microbes or cultures of fungi whose role is to generate mycorrhiza that excrete strong complexers for uranium. Aqueous biphasic extraction, a physical separation technology, is also being evaluated because of its ability to segregate fine particulate, a fundamental requirement for soils containing high levels of silt and clay. Interactions among participating scientists have produced some significant progress not only in evaluating the feasibility of uranium removal but also in understanding some important technical aspects of the task

  20. Periowave demonstrates bactericidal activity against periopathogens and leads to improved clinical outcomes in the treatment of adult periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Cale N.; Andersen, Roger; Loebel, Nicolas G.

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis affects half of the U.S. population over 50, and is the leading cause of tooth loss after 35. It is believed to be caused by growth of complex bacterial biofilms on the tooth surface below the gumline. Photodynamic therapy, a technology used commonly in antitumor applications, has more recently been shown to exhibit antimicrobial efficacy. We have demonstrated eradication of the periopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro using PeriowaveTM; a commercial photodisinfection system. In addition, several clinical studies have now demonstrated the efficacy of this treatment. A pilot study in the U.S. showed that 68% of patients treated with PeriowaveTM adjunctively to scaling and root planing (SRP) showed clinical attachment level increase of >1 mm, as opposed to 30% with SRP alone. In a subsequent larger study, a second PeriowaveTM treatment 6 weeks after initial treatment led to pocket depth improvements of >1.5 mm in 89% of patients. Finally, in the most recent multicenter, randomized, examiner-blinded study conducted on 121 subjects in Canada, PeriowaveTM treatment produced highly significant gains in attachment level (0.88 mm vs. 0.57 mm; p=0.003) and pocket depth (0.87 mm vs. 0.63 mm; p=0.01) as compared to SRP alone. In summary, PeriowaveTM demonstrated strong bactericidal activity against known periopathogens, and treatment of periodontitis using this system produced significantly better clinical outcomes than SRP alone. This, along with the absence of any adverse events in patients treated to date demonstrates that PDT is a safe and effective treatment for adult chronic periodontitis.

  1. The utility of the FIM+FAM for assessing traumatic brain injury day program outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Ronald T; Wright, Greg; Wallace, Tracey; Newman, Sary; Dennis, Leanne

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the FIM+FAM as a primary outcome measure for traumatic brain injury (TBI) comprehensive day programs. Retrospective data analysis. Single center, TBI comprehensive day program facility. A demographically and regionally diverse sample of 105 persons with moderate or severe TBI admitted to the Shepherd Pathways comprehensive TBI day rehabilitation program. Functional Independence Measure + Functional Assessment Measure (FIM+FAM). Twenty-eight percent or fewer of participants reached ceiling effects on 25 of the 30 FIM+FAM items at day program admission with only 2% of clients rated above ceiling score levels on the FIM+FAM total score. The criteria of Guyatt et al showed that 20 of the 30 FIM+FAM items showed clinically meaningful improvements in 60% or more of clients. On average, clients with TBI improved over 27 points on the FIM+FAM total score. Fifteen of 30 items showed ceiling effects of 33% or less at discharge where only 25% of clients exceeded the FIM+FAM total score ceiling threshold. Discharge FIM+FAM motor scale was a very good predictor of the need for additional single service physical therapy. However, reaching ceiling rating on the FIM+FAM cognitive scale demonstrated poor specificity (0.28) and negative predictive power (0.42) for the need for additional speech/cognitive therapy services. The FIM+FAM demonstrated utility as an outcome measure for TBI comprehensive day program treatment in the current milieu. Future research is required to replicate and extend the current findings.

  2. Radar Cross Section (RCS) Certification for Static and Dynamic RCS Measurement Facilities. Volume 2: DOD RCS Demonstration Program Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    ...) 46 Test Group, in cooperation with the RCC/SMSG Radar Committee, the demonstration program described herein was entirely successful and should lay the groundwork for similar technical or laboratory...

  3. Effectiveness of a publicly-funded demonstration program to promote management of dryland salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, M J; Measham, T G; Batchelor, G; George, R; Kingwell, R; Hosking, K

    2009-07-01

    Community and catchment-based approaches to salinity management continue to attract interest in Australia. In one such approach, Catchment Demonstration Initiative (CDI) projects were established by the Western Australian (WA) Government in 2000 for targeted investment in large-scale catchment-based demonstrations of integrated salinity management practices. The aim was to promote a process for technically-informed salinity management by landholders. This paper offers an evaluation of the effectiveness of one CDI project in the central wheatbelt of WA, covering issues including: its role in fostering adoption of salinity management options, the role of research and the technical requirements for design and implementation of on-ground works, the role of monitoring and evaluation, the identification and measurement of public and private benefits, comparison and identification of the place and value of plant-based and engineering-based options, reliance on social processes and impacts of constraints on capacity, management of governance and administration requirements and an appreciation of the value of group-based approaches. A number of factors may reduce the effectiveness of CDI-type approaches in facilitating landholder action to address salinity, many of these are socially-based. Such approaches can create considerable demands on landholders, can be expensive (because of the planning and accountability required) on the basis of dollars per hectare impacted, and can be difficult to garner ownership from all involved. An additional problem could be that few community groups would have the capacity to run such programs and disseminate the new knowledge so that the CDI-type projects can impact outside the focus catchment. In common with many publicly-funded approaches to salinity, we found that direct benefits on public assets are smaller than planned and that results from science-based requirements of monitoring and evaluation have long lead times, causing farmers

  4. The Public Debate about the Recreation Fee Demonstration Program on the U.S. Nation Forests1

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; David P. Fan

    2000-01-01

    The Recreation Fee Demonstration Program (RFDP) is a pilot program authorized by Congress in 1996. The RFDP allows the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, and the United States Department of the Interior Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Fish and Wildlife Service to experiment with new or increased fees at up to 100 recreation sites per agency....

  5. An outcome study of an inpatient treatment program for pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A M; Taber, J I; McCormick, R A; Ramirez, L F

    1984-08-01

    In 1972 the Brecksville Unit of the Cleveland Veterans Administration Medical Center began the first inpatient treatment program for pathological gambling in the United States. The 30-day, highly structured gambling treatment program aims for abstinence from gambling, reduction of the urge to gamble, and restoration of a maximum level of social functioning. The authors report the results of a preliminary outcome study of 60 former patients who completed a survey form rating various aspects of their lives one year postdischarge. Fifty-five percent of the respondents reported complete abstinence from gambling since discharge. Chi-square analyses demonstrated significant relationships between abstinence from gambling and improved interpersonal relationships, better financial status, decreased depression, and participation in professional aftercare and Gamblers Anonymous. The authors believe that their initial results support the contention that pathological gambling is a treatable disorder.

  6. 75 FR 27808 - Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program-Demonstration Project of Small Area Fair Market Rents in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... Voucher Program--Demonstration Project of Small Area Fair Market Rents in Certain Metropolitan Areas for.... ACTION: Notice of Demonstration Project of Small Area Fair Market Rents (FMRs) in Selected Metropolitan... topics related to small area FMRs, including how these small areas should be defined. Small area FMRs...

  7. SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS, BAY CITY, MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SITE Program funded a field demonstration to evaluate the Eco Logic Gas-Phase Chemical Reduction Process developed by ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (ELI), Ontario, Canada. The Demonstration took place at the Middleground Landfill in Bay City, Michigan using landfill wa...

  8. Housing Programs for Homeless Individuals With Mental Illness: Effects on Housing and Mental Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benston, Elizabeth A

    2015-08-01

    This systematic review analyzed the best available research in the United States on permanent supportive housing programs for homeless individuals with mental illness and the effect of these programs on housing status and mental health. It updates older and broader reviews that included weaker studies or those that did not analyze permanent housing as an input and housing and mental health as primary outcomes. The literature search (1980-2013) yielded 14 studies (randomized controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies). The studies found that a majority of participants placed in experimental housing programs with case management support remained in housing for at least one year or experienced more days housed than homeless relative to a comparison group. Although this finding is in line with previous literature reviews on permanent supportive housing, this analysis found limitations in each of the 14 reviewed studies, such as attrition, selection and response bias, imprecise definitions and implementation of housing programs, and a lack of appropriate controls. Only three of the reviewed studies reported using a housing fidelity assessment tool to test whether the housing intervention was faithful to theoretical standards, and conceptions and implementation of housing varied widely across studies, threatening internal and external validity. Pitfalls in the best available studies on permanent supportive housing programs in the United States limit the ability of research to inform the policy goal of ending chronic homelessness and demonstrate a need for further experimental research upon which to make funding and policy decisions, especially in light of prioritized federal funds.

  9. Using System Dynamics as an Evaluation Tool: Experience from a Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Kimberly A.; Deegan, Michael; Carman, Joanne G.

    2008-01-01

    Evaluators are often faced with many challenges in the design and implementation of a program's evaluation. Because programs are entangled in complex networks of structures and stakeholders, they can be challenging to understand, and they often pose issues of competing and conflicting goals. However, by using a systems mapping approach to…

  10. Reliability program plan for the Isotope Brayton Ground Demonstration System (phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The reliability and quality assurance organizational relationships, the methods to be used, the tasks to be completed, and the documentation to be published are presented. The total program is intended to provide the necessary reliability and quality assurance associated with the design, fabrication, and testing of the GDS. It is consistent with the general objectives of the ERDA Quality Assurance (QA) program requirements document ''SNS-1'' dated April 1972 and reliability program requirements document ''SNS-2'' dated 17 June 1974 but has been specifically modified for the GDS with the intent of establishing background data for the subsequent Phase II effort

  11. Branding MBA Programs: The Use of Target Market Desired Outcomes for Effective Brand Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Louise A.; Nadeau, John

    2010-01-01

    Branding is about delivering on desired outcomes. The importance of positioning program offerings on the basis of outcomes sought in the education market is illustrated in this study of choice of an MBA program by prospective students. MBA fair attendees were surveyed and multiple methods were employed to determine the importance of desired…

  12. Evaluating and Enhancing Outcomes Assessment Quality in Higher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kenneth; Goodwin, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Accreditation is a mark of distinction indicating that an institution has met high standards set by the profession, and an increasingly important feature of the accreditation process in higher education is "outcomes assessment." This article presents two rubrics for evaluating the quality of an institution's outcomes assessment system. One rubric…

  13. 77 FR 11677 - Medicaid Program; Review and Approval Process for Section 1115 Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 431 Department of the Treasury 31 CFR Part 33 Department of Health and Human Services 45 CFR Part 155 Medicaid Program; Review and Approval Process for... Regulations#0;#0; [[Page 11678

  14. Demonstrating and Communicating Research Impact. Preparing NIOSH Programs for External Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    and Communicating Research Impact Type Program NIOSH cross-sector (continued) Traumatic Injury Work Organization and Stress-Related Disorders Worklife ...tools, such as italics, bolded text, dashed lines, and colors, can be used to indicate subtle differences. However, finding the balance between the... balancing the potential value and risk of individual programs within a portfolio against an explicitly defined set of goals. There are several methods

  15. Demonstration of SLUMIS: a clinical database and management information system for a multi organ transplant program.

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, M.; Bennett, T.; Garvin, P.; Manuel, F.; Williams, M.; Langreder, S.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the rapid evolution of the heart, heart/lung, liver, kidney and kidney/pancreas transplant programs at our institution, and because of a lack of an existing comprehensive database, we were required to develop a computerized management information system capable of supporting both clinical and research requirements of a multifaceted transplant program. SLUMIS (ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY MULTI-ORGAN INFORMATION SYSTEM) was developed for the following reasons: 1) to comply with the reportin...

  16. Commercialization strategy for the Department of Energy's Solar Buildings Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Efforts reported include: conducting a survey of existing commercial demonstration projects, categorizing these projects, determining criteria for evaluating the feasibility of continuing/aborting demonstration projects, and applying the criteria and making recommendations for which projects to continue and abort. It is recommended to refurbish 114 of the projects examined and to abandon 41. (LEW)

  17. Integrated Worker Health Protection and Promotion Programs: Overview and Perspectives on Health and Economic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe integrated worker health protection and promotion (IWHPP) program characteristics, to discuss the rationale for integration of OSH and WHP programs, and to summarize what is known about the impact of these programs on health and economic outcomes. Methods A descriptive assessment of the current state of the IWHPP field and a review of studies on the effectiveness of IWHPP programs on health and economic outcomes. Results Sufficient evidence of effectiveness was found for IWHPP programs when health outcomes are considered. Impact on productivity-related outcomes is considered promising, but inconclusive, whereas insufficient evidence was found for health care expenditures. Conclusions Existing evidence supports an integrated approach in terms of health outcomes but will benefit significantly from research designed to support the business case for employers of various company sizes and industry types. PMID:24284747

  18. The Clean Coal Technology Program 100 MWe demonstration of gas suspension absorption for flue gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.E.; Hedenhag, J.G. [AirPol Inc., Teterboro, NJ (United States); Marchant, S.K.; Pukanic, G.W. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Norwood, V.M.; Burnett, T.A. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    AirPol Inc., with the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) under a Cooperative Agreement with the United States Department of Energy, installed and tested a 10 MWe Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Demonstration system at TVA`s Shawnee Fossil Plant near Paducah, Kentucky. This low-cost retrofit project demonstrated that the GSA system can remove more than 90% of the sulfur dioxide from high-sulfur coal-fired flue gas, while achieving a relatively high utilization of reagent lime. This paper presents a detailed technical description of the Clean Coal Technology demonstration project. Test results and data analysis from the preliminary testing, factorial tests, air toxics texts, 28-day continuous demonstration run of GSA/electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and 14-day continuous demonstration run of GSA/pulse jet baghouse (PJBH) are also discussed within this paper.

  19. An Intentional Approach to Achieving Learning Outcomes during a Youth Leadership Residential Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Green

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The High Desert Leadership Retreat (HDLR is an annual four-day youth conference which incorporates positive youth development practices to build life skills and increase youth leadership capacity. There are numerous examples in youth development literature of program models and associated outcomes. However, few studies have articulated which aspects of a conference contribute to the achievement of learning outcomes. By utilizing proven program evaluation methods, the achievement of learning outcomes was measured during both formal and informal conference sessions.

  20. Demonstration of advanced combustion NO(sub X) control techniques for a wall-fired boiler. Project performance summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2001-01-01

    The project represents a landmark assessment of the potential of low-NO(sub x) burners, advanced overtire air, and neural-network control systems to reduce NO(sub x) emissions within the bounds of acceptable dry-bottom, wall-fired boiler performance. Such boilers were targeted under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). Testing provided valuable input to the Environmental Protection Agency ruling issued in March 1994, which set NO(sub x) emission limits for ''Group 1'' wall-fired boilers at 0.5 lb/10(sup 6) Btu to be met by January 1996. The resultant comprehensive database served to assist utilities in effectively implementing CAAA compliance. The project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. Five nationally competed solicitations sought cost-shared partnerships with industry to accelerate commercialization of the most advanced coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The Program, valued at over$5 billion, has leveraged federal funding twofold through the resultant partnerships encompassing utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. This project was one of 16 selected in May 1988 from 55 proposals submitted in response to the Program's second solicitation. Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation's (FWEC) advanced overfire air (AOFA), low-NO(sub x) burners (LNB), and LNB/AOFA on wall-fired boiler NO(sub x) emissions and other combustion parameters. SCS also evaluated the effectiveness of an advanced on-line optimization system, the Generic NO(sub x) Control Intelligent System (GNOCIS). Over a six-year period, SCS carried out testing at Georgia Power Company's 500-MWe Plant Hammond Unit 4 in Coosa, Georgia. Tests proceeded in a logical sequence using rigorous statistical analyses to

  1. Endovascular treatment outcomes using the Stroke Triage Education, Procedure Standardization, and Technology (STEPS-T) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ameer E; Sanchez, Christina; Johnson, Angela N

    2018-02-01

    Background "Door to treatment" time affects outcomes of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients undergoing endovascular treatment (EVT). However, the correlation between staff education and accessible technology with stroke outcomes has not been demonstrated. Objective The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the five-year impact of the Stroke Triage Education, Procedure Standardization, and Technology (STEPS-T) program on time-to-treat and clinical outcomes. Methods The study analyzed a prospectively maintained database of AIS patients who benefited from EVT through implementation of STEPS-T. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and modified Rankin Score at three months were analyzed. Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) scale was used to grade pre- and post-procedure angiographic recanalization. Using electronic hemodynamic recording, stepwise workflow times were collected for door time (T D ), entering angiography suite (T A ), groin puncture (T G ), first DSA (T DSA ), microcatheter placement (T M ), and final recanalization (T R ). Median intervention time (T A to T R ) and recanalization time (T G to T R ) were compared through Year 1 to Year 5. Results A total of 230 individuals (age 74 ± 12, between 30 to 95) were enrolled. Median intervention and recanalization times were significantly reduced, from 121 minutes to 52 minutes and from 83 minutes to 36 minutes respectively from Year 1 to Year 5, ( p < 0.001). Across the study period, annual recruitment went up from 12 to 66 patients, and modified Rankin Score between 0 and 2 increased from 36% to 59% ( p = 0.024). Conclusions STEPS-T improved time-to-treat in patients undergoing mechanical thrombectomy for AIS. During the observation period, clinical outcomes significantly improved.

  2. Green energy education programs and demonstrations at the Kortright Centre for Conservation. Paper no. IGEC-1-047

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, A.

    2005-01-01

    In Ontario, when both professionals and non-professionals want to learn about sustainable technologies and practices they usually end up at the Kortright Centre For Conservation. Kortright has one of the largest educational programs in Canada dedicated to informing and inspiring people from all walks of life to think and act more sustainably. Our goals are to inform, to demonstrate and to promote green energy solutions. To these ends, Kortright has designed a number of successful programs for students and adults that provide both theoretical and hands on learning opportunities. Each year thousands of people trek to Kortright to participate in adult workshops and curriculum-based school programs. This paper and presentation will reveal some of the unique demonstrations and programming used by Kortright to motivate people to adopt more sustainable lifestyles. (author)

  3. Studies and research concerning BNFP: process monitoring and process surveillance demonstration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kight, H R

    1979-11-01

    Computerized methods of monitoring process functions and alarming off-standard conditions were implemented and demonstrated during the FY 1979 Uranium Run. In addition, prototype applications of instruments for the purpose of tamper indication and surveillance were tested.

  4. 20 CFR 404.1599 - Work incentive experiments and rehabilitation demonstration projects in the disability program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the advantages and disadvantages of altering certain limitations and conditions that apply to title II... years from the start of the experiment or demonstration project). [48 FR 7575, Feb. 23, 1983, as amended...

  5. 75 FR 14582 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services-Special Demonstration Programs-Model...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services--Special... of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of proposed... for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services proposes a priority under the Special Demonstration...

  6. Demonstrating the reliability of transdiagnostic mHealth Routine Outcome Monitoring in mental health services using experience sampling technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone J W Verhagen

    Full Text Available Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM should provide a dynamic, within-treatment forward feedback loop to guide individual treatment decisions across diagnostic categories. It has been suggested that the Experience Sampling Method (ESM, capturing the film of daily life adaptive processes, offers a flexible, personalised and transdiagnostic feedback system for monitoring and adapting treatment strategies. This is the first study that uses an ESM application (the PsyMate™ as a routine mobile-ROM (mROM tool in an ambulatory mental health setting.To demonstrate adequate psychometric properties of the PsyMate™ app assessing both symptom severity levels as well as daily life functioning.In a transdiagnostic sample of 64 outpatients, an mROM protocol (ESM for 6 days, at 10 semi-random moments a day and a standard ROM instrument (HADS were administered at baseline and at three-month follow-up. We measured positive affect (PA, negative affect (NA, quality of sleep, positive social interaction, activity-related stress, tiredness, and feeling unwell.Subjects completed 53% of the measurements at baseline (N = 64 and 48% at follow-up (N = 29. Factor analysis and subsequent reliability analysis of PA and NA confirmed the two constructs. Significant and meaningful correlations were found between PA, NA and HADS scores (ranging from r = .4 to r = .7. Multilevel analyses yielded significant change scores for all measures.The ESM-based, transdiagnostic mROM tool can be used reliably in clinical settings: it shows adequate psychometric properties, as well as concurrent validity and sensitivity to change over time with respect to relevant ROM constructs. Person-tailored items can be added. In addition, mROM offers added value over standard symptom-based ROM, as it provides information on adaptive functioning in the daily environment of patients.

  7. Quality of life predicts outcome in a heart failure disease management program.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Loughlin, Christina

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic heart failure (HF) is associated with a poor Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). HRQoL has been shown to be a predictor of HF outcomes however, variability in the study designs make it difficult to apply these findings to a clinical setting. The aim of this study was to establish if HRQoL is a predictor of long-term mortality and morbidity in HF patients followed-up in a disease management program (DMP) and if a HRQoL instrument could be applied to aid in identifying high-risk patients within a clinical context. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of HF patients attending a DMP with 18+\\/-9 months follow-up. Clinical and biochemical parameters were recorded on discharge from index HF admission and HRQoL measures were recorded at 2 weeks post index admission. RESULTS: 225 patients were enrolled into the study (mean age=69+\\/-12 years, male=61%, and 78%=systolic HF). In multivariable analysis, all dimensions of HRQoL (measured by the Minnesota Living with HF Questionnaire) were independent predictors of both mortality and readmissions particularly in patients <80 years. A significant interaction between HRQoL and age (Total((HRQoL))age: p<0.001) indicated that the association of HRQoL with outcomes diminished as age increased. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that HRQoL is a predictor of outcome in HF patients managed in a DMP. Younger patients (<65 years) with a Total HRQoL score of > or =50 are at high risk of an adverse outcome. In older patients > or =80 years HRQoL is not useful in predicting outcome.

  8. Assessment of Student Outcomes in Undergraduate Health Information Administration Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Jody

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to a) determine what assessment methods are being used in undergraduate health information administration programs to assess student learning and the usefulness of those methods, b) determine to what extent programs have incorporated good student learning assessment practices. Programs use a variety of assessment tools to measure student learning; the most useful include assessments by the professional practice supervisor, course tests, assignments, presentati...

  9. Impact of a quality improvement program on care and outcomes for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Charles J; Forbes, Peter; Horvitz, Lisa; Peterson, Laura E; Wypij, David; Heinrich, Patricia

    2005-05-01

    To test a quality improvement intervention, a learning collaborative based on the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Breakthrough Series methodology, specifically intended to improve care and outcomes for patients with childhood asthma. Randomized trial in primary care practices. Practices in greater Boston, Mass, and greater Detroit, Mich. Forty-three practices, with 13 878 pediatric patients with asthma, randomized to intervention and control groups. Intervention Participation in a learning collaborative project based on the Breakthrough Series methodology of continuous quality improvement. Change from baseline in the proportion of children with persistent asthma who received appropriate medication therapy for asthma, and in the proportion of children whose parent received a written management plan for their child's asthma, as determined by telephone interviews with parents of 631 children. After adjusting for state, practice size, child age, sex, and within-practice clustering, no overall effect of the intervention was found. This methodologically rigorous assessment of a widely used quality improvement technique did not demonstrate a significant effect on processes or outcomes of care for children with asthma. Potential deficiencies in program implementation, project duration, sample selection, and data sources preclude making the general inference that this type of improvement program is ineffective. Additional rigorous studies should be undertaken under more optimal settings to assess the efficacy of this method for improving care.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Reading Programs: A Demonstration with Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Fiona M.; Kieffer, Michael J.; Shand, Robert; Pan, Yilin; Cheng, Henan; Levin, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the value of cost-effectiveness analysis for evaluation and decision making with respect to educational programs and discuss its application to early reading interventions. We describe the conditions for a rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis and illustrate the challenges of applying the method in practice, providing examples of programs…

  11. Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

    2011-12-13

    The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

  12. Toyota/Skyline Technical Education Network. Cooperative Demonstration Program. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyline Coll., San Bruno, CA.

    A joint project was conducted between Toyota Motor Sales and Skyline College (in the San Francisco, California, area) to create an automotive technician training program that would serve the needs of working adults. During the project, a model high technology curriculum suitable for adults was developed, the quality of instruction available for…

  13. System safety program plan for the Isotope Brayton Ground Demonstration System (phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The safety engineering effort to be undertaken in achieving an acceptable level of safety in the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) development program is discussed. The safety organizational relationships, the methods to be used, the tasks to be completed, and the documentation to be published are described. The plan will be updated periodically as the need arises

  14. A Peer-Assisted Learning Program and Its Effect on Student Skill Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, W. David; Volberding, Jennifer; Vardiman, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of an intentional Peer-Assisted Learning (PAL) program on peer-tutors and peer-tutees for performance on specific psychomotor skills. Design and Setting: Randomized, pretest-posttest experimental design. Participants: Undergraduate students (N = 69, 42 females and 27 males, all participants were 18 to 22 years old,…

  15. Demonstration of the Trauma Nurses Talk Tough seat belt diversion program in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Trauma Nurses Talk Tough is a seat belt diversion program originally developed at the Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland, Oregon, in 1988. Attendance at the course is a condition for a one-time dismissal of a seat belt citation without fine or court...

  16. Master of Engineering Energy Systems Engineering Program: Smart Campus Energy Systems Demonstration DE-SC0005523

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, Martha [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Coulter, John [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2014-09-25

    Program Purpose and Position: The mission of the Master of Engineering in Energy Systems Engineering program is to invigorate the pipeline of new engineering graduates interested in energy oriented careers and thus produce a new generation of technical leaders for the energy and power industries. Over the next decade, nearly 50% of the skilled workers and technical leaders in the gas and electric utility industries will retire -- a much larger void than the current available and qualified professionals could fill [CEWD, 2012 survey]. The Masters of Engineering in Energy System Engineering program provides an opportunity for cross-discipline education for graduates interested in a career in the energy industry. It focuses on electric power and the challenges and opportunities to develop a sustainable, reliable and resilient system that meets human needs in an increasingly sustainable manner through the use of environmentally sound energy resources and delivery. Both graduates and employers benefit from a well-trained professional workforce that is ready to hit the road running and be immediately productive in meeting these challenges, through this innovative and unique program.

  17. A pragmatic comparison of two diabetes education programs in improving type 2 diabetes mellitus outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, Katherine; Liddy, Clare

    2014-03-28

    Although it is clear that education programs constitute key elements of improved diabetes management, uncertainty exists regarding the optimal method of delivering that education. In addition to the lack of consensus regarding the most appropriate delivery methods for these programs, there is a paucity of research which evaluates these methods in terms of specific clinical outcomes. This pragmatic study compares the effectiveness of two distinct diabetes education programs in improving clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting. The two diabetes education classes (n = 80 enrolled) retrospectively evaluated were 'the ABC's of Diabetes' (one 2-hour didactic teaching session) and 'Conversation Maps' (3 highly interactive weekly classes, 6 hours in total). Eligible participants (n = 32) had their charts reviewed and outcome measures (i.e., glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c), low density lipoprotein (LDL), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and weight) recorded 1 year prior to and 6 months following the class. Pre- and post-class outcome measures were compared. A trend towards lower HbA1c was observed after completion of both classes, with an average reduction of 0.2%, and 0.6% after 6 months in the 'ABC's of Diabetes' class and 'Conversation Maps' class respectively. A significant decrease in weight was observed 6 months after the 'ABC's of Diabetes' class (p = 0.028), and in LDL after the 'Conversation Maps' class (p = 0.049). Patients with HbA1c ≥ 8% showed a drop of 1.1% in HbA1c 3 months after either class (p = 0.004). No significant difference in outcomes was found between the two diabetes education classes assessed. There was a trend towards improved glycemic control after both classes, and patients with high HbA1c levels demonstrated statistically significant improvements. This indicates that shorter sessions using didactic teaching methods may be equally

  18. RDandD Programme 2010. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste; Fud-program 2010. Program foer forskning, utveckling och demonstration av metoder foer hantering och slutfoervaring av kaernavfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-15

    The RD and D programme 2010 gives an account of SKB's plans for research, development and demonstration during the period 2011-2016. SKB's activities are divided into two main areas - the programme for Low and Intermediate Level Waste (the Loma program) and the Nuclear Fuel Program. The RD and D Programme 2010 consists of five parts: Part I: Overall Plan, Part II: Loma program, Part III: Nuclear Fuel Program, Part IV: Research on analysis of long-term safety, Part V: Social Science Research. The 2007 RD and D programme was focused primarily on technology development to realize the final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The actions described were aimed at increasing awareness of long-term safety and to obtain technical data for application under the Nuclear Activities Act for the final repository for spent fuel and under the Environmental Code of the repository system. Many important results from these efforts are reported in this program. An overall account of the results will be given in the Licensing application in early 2011. The authorities' review of RD and D programme in 2007 and completion of the program called for clarification of plans and programs for the final repository for short-lived radioactive waste, SFR, and the final repository for waste, SFL. This RD and D program describes these plans in a more detailed way

  19. Evaluation of waste treatment technologies by LLWDDD [Low-Level Waste Disposal Development and Demonstration] Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennerly, J.M.; Williams, L.C.; Dole, L.R.; Genung, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Waste treatments are divided into four categories: (1) volume reduction; (2) conditioning to improve waste form performance; (3) segregation to achieve waste reduction; and (4) separation to remove radioactive (or hazardous) constituents. Two waste treatment demonstrations are described. In the first, volume reduction by mechanical means was achieved during the supercompaction of 300 55-gal drums of solid waste at ORNL. In the second demonstration, conditioning of waste through immobilization and packaging to improve the performance of the waste form is being evaluated. The final section of this paper describes potential scenarios for the management of uranium-contaminated wastes at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge and emphasizes where demonstrations of treatment technology will be needed to implement the scenarios. Separation and thermal treatment are identified as the principal means for treating these wastes. 15 figs

  20. Fast programming of peg-in-hole actions by human demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yang; Lin, Linglong; Song, Y. T.

    2014-01-01

    Peg-in-Hole actions play an important role in industrial assembly. In this paper, we present a system which performs such actions after learning by human demonstration. Strategies for getting robust human-demonstrated PiH trajectories are investigated, and a number of PiH experiments are conducte...... to verify the performance of the proposed approach. The results show that our approach leads to a high PiH success rate and allows the robot to fine-tune the PiH trajectories to achieve faster performance....

  1. POSTERS FOR WORKSHOP ON EPA’S ARSENIC REMOVAL DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM: RESULTS AND LESSONS LEARNED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Workshop included posters on 21 different arsenic demonstration projects. Each poster included information on raw water quality, cost of the system, a schematic of the layout of the system and several graphs and tables on the performance of the system for the removal of arsen...

  2. 76 FR 67154 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... to eight legacy Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory (STRL) Personnel Management Demonstration (demo) Project Plans resulting from section 1107(c) of the National Defense Authorization Act... flexibilities, modifying demo project plans, or executing Federal Register Notices has identified some areas for...

  3. A Process and Outcome Evaluation of Police Working with Youth Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Anderson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A process and outcome evaluation of 10 Police Working with Youth Programs was conducted. Process results indicated that the core components of the programs were consistent with those identified in previous literature as characteristic of quality youth development programs. Outcome results indicated that youth participants reported significantly improved attitudes toward police and social support received from significant, non-familial adults. Two subgroups of youth, most notably minority youth and younger participants in lower grade levels, reported positive changes in their capacity to resist peer pressures. Minority youth reported positive changes in their sense of mastery over stressful life situations. Relationships between core program components and youth outcomes also were examined. Implications of the findings and future process and outcome evaluations of youth programs are discussed.

  4. Children's Kindergarten Outcomes and Program Quality in the North Carolina Pre-Kindergarten Program: 2013-2014 Statewide Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen S.; Schaaf, Jennifer M.; Hildebrandt, Lisa M.; Pan, Yi; Warnaar, Bethany L.

    2015-01-01

    The 2013-2014 North Carolina Pre-Kindergarten (NC Pre-K) Evaluation study was designed to examine the longitudinal outcomes through kindergarten for children who attended the Pre-K program, along with comparisons to previous cohorts of program attendees. A sample of 561 children was included in the study, with data gathered at the beginning and…

  5. A Demonstration Training Program for Potential School Dropouts. A Service Station Training School for Dropout-Prone Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull, Marvin H.; Moore, Richard O.

    One phase of the curriculum demonstration program sponsored jointly by the Quincy Public Schools and Southern Illinois University is the Service Station Training School described within this report. The Service Station Training School was one of several sheltered work stations which were developed to provide preemployment experiences and training…

  6. European demonstration program on the effect-based and chemical identification and monitoring of organic pollutants in European surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tousova, Zuzana; Oswald, Peter; Slobodnik, Jaroslav; Blaha, Ludek; Muz, Melis; Hu, Meng; Brack, Werner; Krauss, Martin; Di Paolo, Carolina; Tarcai, Zsolt; Seiler, Thomas Benjamin; Hollert, Henner; Koprivica, Sanja; Ahel, Marijan; Schollée, Jennifer E.; Hollender, Juliane; Suter, Marc J.F.; Hidasi, Anita O.; Schirmer, Kristin; Sonavane, Manoj; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Creusot, Nicolas; Brion, Francois; Froment, Jean; Almeida, Ana Catarina; Thomas, Kevin; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Tufi, Sara; Ouyang, Xiyu; Leonards, Pim; Lamoree, Marja; Torrens, Victoria Osorio; Kolkman, Annemieke; Schriks, Merijn; Spirhanzlova, Petra; Tindall, Andrew; Schulze, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Growing concern about the adverse environmental and human health effects of a wide range of micropollutants requires the development of novel tools and approaches to enable holistic monitoring of their occurrence, fate and effects in the aquatic environment. A European-wide demonstration program

  7. Costs of Arsenic Removal Technologies for Small Water Systems: U.S. EPA Arsenic Removal Technology Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Arsenic Rule Implementation Research Program, between July 2003 and July 2011, the U.S. environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted 50 full-scale demonstration projects on treatment systems removing arsenic from drinking water in 26 states throughout the U.S. ...

  8. The Recreational Fee Demonstration Program on the national forests: and updated analysis of public attitudes and beliefs, 1996-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; David P. Fan

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes trends in favorable and unfavorable attitudes toward the Recreational Fee Demonstration Program (RFDP) in the national forests, updating an earlier study using computer content analysis of the public debate. About 65 percent of the attitudes toward the RFDP were favorable, comparable to the findings of survey research.

  9. Reliability of instruments in a cooperative, multisite study: employment intervention demonstration program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyers, M P; McHugo, G J; Cook, J A; Razzano, L A; Drake, R E; Mueser, K T

    2001-09-01

    Reliability of well-known instruments was examined in 202 people with severe mental illness participating in a multisite vocational study. We examined interrater reliability of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the PANSS, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36), and the Quality of Life Interview. Most scales had good levels of reliability, with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient alphas above .70. However, the SF-36 scales were generally less stable over time, particularly Social Functioning (ICC = .55). Test-retest reliability was lower among less educated respondents and among ethnic minorities. We recommend close monitoring of psychometric issues in future multisite studies.

  10. Overview about the fuel cell bus demonstration programs CUTE, ECTOS and STEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltenbacher, M.; Fischer, M.; Eyerer, P.; Binder, M.; Schuckert, M.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The paper will give an overview about the CUTE, ECTOS and STEP projects. The aim of the projects is to develop and demonstrate a emission-free and low-noise transport system, including the accompanying energy infrastructure, which has great potential for reducing the global greenhouse effect according to the Kyoto protocol, improving the quality of the atmosphere and life in densely populated areas and conserving fossil resources. For this purpose the application of the innovative hydrogen-based fuel cell technology is established by using fuel cell powered buses in an urban environment together with novel hydrogen production and support systems as part of a European Union wide demonstration scheme. The project demonstrates also to European Society the availability of the FC technology as a safe and reliable transportation technology. The major objectives are as follows: Demonstration of more than 20 fuel cell powered regular service buses over a period of two years in several European inner city areas to illustrate the different operating conditions to be found in Europe; Design, construction and operation of the necessary infrastructure for hydrogen production, including the required refuelling stations; Collection of findings concerning the construction and operating behaviour of hydrogen production for mobile use, and exchange of experiences including bus operation under differing conditions among the numerous participating companies; and, the research work of IKP and PE comprises the ecological analysis of the entire life cycle and comparison with conventional alternatives (diesel driven buses, CNG-buses). It also includes the economical analysis of the hydrogen infrastructure. First experiences from CUTE and ECTOS were presented. (author)

  11. Mixed Waste Focus Area alternative oxidation technologies development and demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borduin, L.C.; Fewell, T.; Gombert, D.; Priebe, S.

    1998-01-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) is currently supporting the development and demonstration of several alternative oxidation technology (AOT) processes for treatment of combustible mixed low-level wastes. The impetus for this support derives from regulatory and political hurdles frequently encountered by traditional thermal techniques, primarily incinerators. AOTs have been defined as technologies that destroy organic material without using open-flame reactions. Whether thermal or nonthermal, the processes have the potential advantages of relatively low-volume gaseous emissions, generation of few or no dioxin/furan compounds, and operation at low enough temperatures that metals (except mercury) and most radionuclides are not volatilized. Technology development and demonstration are needed to confirm and realize the potential of AOTs and to compare them on an equal basis with their fully demonstrated thermal counterparts. AOTs include both thermal and nonthermal processes that oxidize organic wastes but operate under significantly different physical and chemical conditions than incinerators. Nonthermal processes currently being studied include Delphi DETOX and acid digestion at the Savannah River Site, and direct chemical oxidation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. All three technologies are at advanced stages of development or are entering the demonstration phase. Nonflame thermal processes include catalytic chemical oxidation, which is being developed and deployed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and team reforming, a commercial process being supported by Department of Energy. Related technologies include two low-flow, secondary oxidation processes (Phoenix and Thermatrix units) that have been tested at MSE, Inc., in Butte, Montana. Although testing is complete on some AOT technologies, most require additional support to complete some or all of the identified development objectives. Brief descriptions, status, and planned paths forward for each

  12. The Weight Management Dietetics Practice Group collecting outcomes mentoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The is a newsletter article for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), Weight Management Dietetics Practice Group (WM DPG). The article presents the ‘Collecting Outcomes Mentoring Program’ for 2017 that is managed by the Research Section of the WM DPG. Dietitians in the WM DGP are provided wi...

  13. The DEVELOP National Program's Strategy for Communicating Applied Science Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ross, K. W.; Crepps, G.; Favors, J.; Kelley, C.; Miller, T. N.; Allsbrook, K. N.; Rogers, L.; Ruiz, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's DEVELOP National Program conducts rapid feasibility projects that enable the future workforce and current decision makers to collaborate and build capacity to use Earth science data to enhance environmental management and policy. The program communicates its results and applications to a broad spectrum of audiences through a variety of methods: "virtual poster sessions" that engage the general public through short project videos and interactive dialogue periods, a "Campus Ambassador Corps" that communicates about the program and its projects to academia, scientific and policy conference presentations, community engagement activities and end-of-project presentations, project "hand-offs" providing results and tools to project partners, traditional publications (both gray literature and peer-reviewed), an interactive website project gallery, targeted brochures, and through multiple social media venues and campaigns. This presentation will describe the various methods employed by DEVELOP to communicate the program's scientific outputs, target audiences, general statistics, community response and best practices.

  14. Possible stakeholder concerns regarding volatile organic compound in arid soils integrated demonstration technologies not evaluated in the stakeholder involvement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds in Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) supported the demonstration of a number of innovative technologies, not all of which were evaluated in the integrated demonstration's stakeholder involvement program. These technologies have been organized into two categories and the first category ranked in order of priority according to interest in the evaluation of the technology. The purpose of this report is to present issues stakeholders would likely raise concerning each of the technologies in light of commentary, insights, data requirements, concerns, and recommendations offered during the VOC-Arid ID's three-year stakeholder involvement, technology evaluation program. A secondary purpose is to provide a closeout status for each of the technologies associated with the VOC-Arid ID. This report concludes with a summary of concerns and requirements that stakeholders have for all innovative technologies

  15. The Effects of a Demonstration School Program on Nuclear Energy for Elementary School Students in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, EunOk; Lee, Seung Koo; Choi, Yoon Seok

    2016-01-01

    Advancing nuclear energy and radiation technology to drive the country forward should be based on the understanding and acceptance of the public. Korea has provided numerous types of information to increase public acceptance of nuclear energy, but it has been difficult to change adults’ perceptions and increase their acceptance of nuclear energy. As a result, social costs are rising. After a pilot program of 13 classes on understanding nuclear energy and radiation offered to elementary school students, who were expected to easily change their perceptions and to experience a relatively greater educational effect, this study analyzed changes to knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding nuclear energy. In addition, this program was the first curriculum of its kind used as a step to lay the groundwork for offering it nationally in the free semester system. Therefore, the study analyzed its appropriateness to educational purposes. A lack of research and practice on communication strategies could be responsible for the situation in Korea of low support for nuclear energy because Korea does not have public understanding even though it is a nuclear energy exporter. If Korea implemented strategic communications from this point, such efforts could reduce unnecessary social costs

  16. The Effects of a Demonstration School Program on Nuclear Energy for Elementary School Students in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, EunOk; Lee, Seung Koo; Choi, Yoon Seok [Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Advancing nuclear energy and radiation technology to drive the country forward should be based on the understanding and acceptance of the public. Korea has provided numerous types of information to increase public acceptance of nuclear energy, but it has been difficult to change adults’ perceptions and increase their acceptance of nuclear energy. As a result, social costs are rising. After a pilot program of 13 classes on understanding nuclear energy and radiation offered to elementary school students, who were expected to easily change their perceptions and to experience a relatively greater educational effect, this study analyzed changes to knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding nuclear energy. In addition, this program was the first curriculum of its kind used as a step to lay the groundwork for offering it nationally in the free semester system. Therefore, the study analyzed its appropriateness to educational purposes. A lack of research and practice on communication strategies could be responsible for the situation in Korea of low support for nuclear energy because Korea does not have public understanding even though it is a nuclear energy exporter. If Korea implemented strategic communications from this point, such efforts could reduce unnecessary social costs.

  17. Water Hammer Simulations of MMH Propellant - New Capability Demonstration of the Generalized Fluid Flow Simulation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Z.; Ramachandran, N.; Majumdar, A.

    2017-01-01

    Fluid Transient analysis is important for the design of spacecraft propulsion system to ensure structural stability of the system in the event of sudden closing or opening of the valve. Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), a general purpose flow network code developed at NASA/MSFC is capable of simulating pressure surge due to sudden opening or closing of valve when thermodynamic properties of real fluid are available for the entire range of simulation. Specifically GFSSP needs an accurate representation of pressure-density relationship in order to predict pressure surge during a fluid transient. Unfortunately, the available thermodynamic property programs such as REFPROP, GASP or GASPAK does not provide the thermodynamic properties of Monomethylhydrazine (MMH). This paper will illustrate the process used for building a customized table of properties of state variables from available properties and speed of sound that is required by GFSSP for simulation. Good agreement was found between the simulations and measured data. This method can be adopted for modeling flow networks and systems with other fluids whose properties are not known in detail in order to obtain general technical insight. Rigorous code validation of this approach will be done and reported at a future date.

  18. Measuring the Effectiveness of the Apparel Advanced Manufacturing Demonstration Program. Appendices B-E

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-30

    reh~exide Cen ter Georgia Institute of Technolo Southern Collge of Tecbnolog’ I eogiaiecn I OEMC INS=I~f No. 6 ’AMTC~’ I#. Save Money By Repairing Air...with a company’s physical and apparel industry, the architecture should be developed first. human resources I l. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing I I...demonstration center, ex. ence Technology - grants to de- Research projects in the physics , pected to -open In mid or late velop an automated antenna

  19. Recovery Act - LADWP Smart Grid Regional Demonstration Program Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Sungly [Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, CA (United States); Vohra, Surendra [Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, CA (United States); Abdelshehid, Emil [Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, CA (United States); Szucs, David G. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2016-09-30

    LADWP collaborated with its project partners to carry out this demonstration in the designated areas to include two university campuses – the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and the University of Southern California (USC) – surrounding neighborhoods, City of Los Angeles facilities, and LADWP power system test labs. The last project partner, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) was responsible for the cyber security aspects of the project. The program’s use cases provided insightful information to understand triggers for customers, distributors, and generators to adapt their behavior which aid in reducing system demands and costs, increasing energy efficiency, and increasing grid reliability.

  20. Clinical capabilities of graduates of an outcomes-based integrated medical program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicluna Helen A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The University of New South Wales (UNSW Faculty of Medicine replaced its old content-based curriculum with an innovative new 6-year undergraduate entry outcomes-based integrated program in 2004. This paper is an initial evaluation of the perceived and assessed clinical capabilities of recent graduates of the new outcomes-based integrated medical program compared to benchmarks from traditional content-based or process-based programs. Method Self-perceived capability in a range of clinical tasks and assessment of medical education as preparation for hospital practice were evaluated in recent graduates after 3 months working as junior doctors. Responses of the 2009 graduates of the UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated medical education program were compared to those of the 2007 graduates of UNSW’s previous content-based program, to published data from other Australian medical schools, and to hospital-based supervisor evaluations of their clinical competence. Results Three months into internship, graduates from UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated program rated themselves to have good clinical and procedural skills, with ratings that indicated significantly greater capability than graduates of the previous UNSW content-based program. New program graduates rated themselves significantly more prepared for hospital practice in the confidence (reflective practice, prevention (social aspects of health, interpersonal skills (communication, and collaboration (teamwork subscales than old program students, and significantly better or equivalent to published benchmarks of graduates from other Australian medical schools. Clinical supervisors rated new program graduates highly capable for teamwork, reflective practice and communication. Conclusions Medical students from an outcomes-based integrated program graduate with excellent self-rated and supervisor-evaluated capabilities in a range of clinically-relevant outcomes. The program

  1. Office of Technology Development Program for Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    DOE has set a goal to clean up its complex and to bring all sites into compliance with applicable environmental regulations. This initiative is slated for completion by the year 2019. Four years ago there was no coordinated plan for identifying or cleaning these contaminated sites. Since 1989, DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has invested time, money, and manpower to establish a wide range of programs to meet this immense challenge. DOE is responsible for waste management and clean up of more than 100 contaminated installations in 36 states and territories. This includes 3,700 sites: over 26,000 acres, with hazardous or radioactive contaminated surface or groundwater, soil, or structures; over 26,000 acres requiring remediation, with the number growing as new sites are defined; 500 surplus facilities awaiting decontamination and decommissioning and approximately 5,000 peripheral properties (residences, businesses) that have soil contaminated with uranium tailings

  2. Positive demonstration of initiatives under the voluntary climate change challenge program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, J.; Hare, M.

    1997-01-01

    Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions that have built up over a century is a long-term challenge which requires long-term, sustainable solutions. The solutions include the increasing need for Canadians to use less carbon intensive fuels, such as natural gas. There are no economically and socially acceptable quick fixes that will produce dramatic results on a large scale. The endorsement of the Voluntary Climate Change Challenge and Registry Program (VCR) by the Canadian Gas Association (CGA), and subsequent approval of the Memorandum of Understanding, are indicative of commitments by the Association and its member companies to environmentally responsible actions and measures to ensure efficient energy usage. While CGA and members continue to reduce emissions, it must be recognized that significant progress will take time. Given the benefits of a long-term sustainable approach, the Voluntary Challenge represents the most logical way to proceed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from Canadian sources without causing severe economic dislocation. (au) 26 refs

  3. Outcomes of a career planning and development program for registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Linda McGillis; Waddell, Janice; Donner, Gail; Wheeler, Mary M

    2004-01-01

    The impact of a career planning and development program (CPDP) for registered nurses (RNs) on nurse and system outcomes was examined. The CPDP was effective as participants were able to create a career vision and individualized career plan.

  4. Waste management technology development and demonstration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Paul D.; Colombo, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Two thermoplastic processes for improved treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes were developed from bench scale through technology demonstration: polyethylene encapsulation and modified sulfur cement encapsulation. The steps required to bring technologies from the research and development stage through full scale implementation are described. Both systems result in durable waste forms that meet current Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory criteria and provide significant improvements over conventional solidification systems such as hydraulic cement. For example, the polyethylene process can encapsulate up to 70 wt pct. nitrate salt, compared with a maximum of about 20 wt pct. for the best hydraulic cement formulation. Modified sulfur cement waste forms containing as much as 43 wt pct. incinerator fly ash were formulated, whereas the maximum quantity of this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt pct.

  5. Technical and administrative approach for the West Valley Demonstration Project Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsom, P.C.; Roberts, C.J.; Yuchien Yuan; Marchetti, S.

    1987-06-01

    The principal objective of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is to vitrify the 2.2 million liters of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC). This simple statement of purpose, however, does not convey a sense of the complexity of the undertaking. The vitrification task is not only complex in and of itself, but requires a myriad of other activities to be accomplished on an intricate and fast paced schedule in order to support it. The West Valley Demonstration Project Act (P.L 96-368), U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE-5481.1A, Idaho Operations Office Order ID-5481.1 and standard nuclear industry practice all require that proposed systems and operations involving hazards not routinely encountered by the general public be analyzed to identify potential hazards and consequences, and to assure that reasonable measures are taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate these potential consequences. Virtually every substantive aspect of the WVDP involves hazards beyond those routinely encountered and accepted by the general public. In order to assure the safety of the public and the workers at the WVDP, a system of hazard identification, categorization, analysis and review has been established. In parallel with this system, a procedure for developing the minimum design specifications and quality assurance requirements has been developed for Project systems, components, and structures which play a role in the safety of a specific major facility or the overall Project. 29 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  6. EPA program to demonstrate mitigation measures for indoor radon: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henschel, D.B.; Scott, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    EPA has installed radon mitigation techniques in 18 concrete block basement homes in the Reading Prong region of eastern Pennsylvania. Three alternative active soil ventilation approaches were tested: suction on the void network within the concrete block basement walls; suction on the footing drain tile system; and suction on the aggregate underneath the concrete slab. The initial 18 mitigation installations were designed to demonstrate techniques which would have low to moderate installation and operating costs. Where effective closure of major openings in the block walls is possible, suction on the wall voids has proved to be extremely effective, able to reduce homes having very high radon Working Levels (up to 7 WL) to 0.02 WL and less. However, where inaccessible major openings are concealed within the wall, it is more difficult and/or more expensive to develop adequate suction on the void network, and performance is reduced. Testing is continuing to demonstrate the steps required to achieve high performance with wall suction in homes with such difficult-to close walls. Drain tile suction can be very effective where the drain tiles completely surround the home; drain tile suction is the least expensive and most aesthetic of the active soil ventilation approaches, but appears susceptible to spikes in radon levels when the basement is depressurized. Sub-slab suction as tested in this study - with one or two individual suction points in the slab - does not appear adequate to ensure sustained high levels of reduction on block wall basement homes; it appears to effectively treat slab-related soil gas entry routes so long as a uniform layer of aggregate is present, but it does not appear to effectively treat the wall-related entry routes. Closure of major openings might have improved sub-slab suction performance. 5 figures, 3 tables

  7. Identification of sites for the low-level waste disposal development and demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, D.W.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the results of site selection studies for potential low-level radioactive waste disposal sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Summaries of the site selection procedures used and results of previous site selection studies on the ORR are included. This report includes recommendations of sites for demonstration of shallow land burial using engineered trench designs and demonstration of above-grade disposal using design concepts similar to those used in tumulus disposal. The site selection study, like its predecessor (ORNL/TM-9717, Use of DOE Site Selection Criteria for Screening Low-Level Waste Disposal Sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation), involved application of exclusionary site screening criteria to the region of interest to eliminate unacceptable areas from consideration. Also like the previous study, the region of interest for this study was limited to the Oak Ridge Department of Energy Reservation. Reconnaissance-level environmental data were used in the study, and field inspections of candidate sites were made to verify the available reconnaissance data. Five candidate sites, all underlain by Knox dolomite residuum and bedrock, were identified for possible development of shallow land burial facilities. Of the five candidate sites, the West Chestnut site was judged to be best suited for deployment of the shallow land burial technology. Three candidate sites, all underlain by the Conasauga Group in Bear Creek Valley, were identified for possible development of above-grade disposal technologies. Of the three sites identified, the Central Bear Creek Valley site lying between State Route 95 and Gum Hollow Road was ranked most favorable for deployment of the above-grade disposal technology

  8. Long-term outcomes of an urban farming internship program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy Falxa Sonti; Lindsay Campbell; Michelle Johnson; S. Daftary-Steel

    2016-01-01

    Long-term impacts of an urban farming youth internship were evaluated in Brooklyn, New York. Alumni surveyed 1 to 9 years after program completion were enrolled in college or graduate school at higher rates than their peers and reported connections to the environment and healthy eating. Participants reported learning job skills through the internship, including farming...

  9. Early Exposure to Research: Outcomes of the ASTER Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffard, Phyllis Baudoin; Golkowska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel structure for providing a high-impact, first year experience for science students. ASTER (Access to Science Through Experience in Research) is an extracurricular certification program designed to introduce our students to the research culture via seminar attendance, journal clubs, book clubs, and lab visits.…

  10. Long-Term Outcomes of an Urban Farming Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonti, Nancy Falxa; Campbell, Lindsay K.; Johnson, Michelle L.; Daftary-Steel, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Long-term impacts of an urban farming youth internship were evaluated in Brooklyn, New York. Alumni surveyed 1 to 9 years after program completion were enrolled in college or graduate school at higher rates than their peers and reported connections to the environment and healthy eating. Participants reported learning job skills through the…

  11. Implementation and Clinical Outcomes of an Employer-Sponsored, Pharmacist-Provided Medication Therapy Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theising, Katie M; Fritschle, Traci L; Scholfield, Angelina M; Hicks, Emily L; Schymik, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Our objective was to describe the implementation and clinical outcomes of an employer-sponsored, pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) program for health plan beneficiaries with diabetes mellitus and/or hypertension. We conducted a single-center retrospective medical record review. The setting was a Pharmacy MTM Clinic at a self-insured health system consisting of six hospitals and several ancillary facilities. A total of 161 health plan beneficiaries with diabetes identified during annual wellness screenings for the health plan in 2012 and 225 health plan beneficiaries with diabetes and/or hypertension identified during annual wellness screenings for the health plan in 2013 were referred to the MTM clinic based on specific criteria. In 2012 the health system expanded its existing wellness program by implementing a voluntary diabetes care program for health plan beneficiaries with uncontrolled diabetes (hemoglobin A(1c) [A1C] 7% or higher); a similar program was added for hypertension for the 2013 plan year. All participants' A1C and blood pressure results were tracked from the date of their wellness screening through the end of the plan year. The pharmacists involved had the capability to directly implement drug regimen changes according to hospital protocol or provide recommendations to the physician, as specified by the referring physician. For the 2012-2013 plan year, the mean difference in A1C from baseline to program completion was -0.38% (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.58 to -0.18%, p<0.05). For beneficiaries with a baseline A1C of 7% or higher, the mean difference was -0.69% (95% CI -0.99 to -0.39%, p<0.05). For the 2013-2014 plan year, the mean difference in A1C from baseline to program completion was -0.62% (95% CI -0.81 to -0.44%, p<0.05). In that year, the mean difference in A1C for beneficiaries with A1C 7% or higher was -0.97% (95% CI -1.23 to -0.72%, p<0.05). For those referred for hypertension, a mean difference of -13 mm Hg (95

  12. 77 FR 48995 - Draft National Toxicology Program (NTP) Monograph on Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... Program (NTP) Monograph on Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes Associated With Cancer... the panel completes its peer review of the draft monograph. Topic: Peer review of the draft NTP Monograph on Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes Associated with Cancer Chemotherapy Use during...

  13. Multiple Measures of Outcome in Assessing a Prison-Based Drug Treatment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Michael L.; Hall, Elizabeth A.; Wexler, Harry K.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluations of prison-based drug treatment programs typically focus on one or two dichotomous outcome variables related to recidivism. In contrast, this paper uses multiple measures of outcomes related to crime and drug use to examine the impact of prison treatment. Crime variables included self-report data of time to first illegal activity,…

  14. Effectiveness of a Multilevel Workplace Health Promotion Program on Vitality, Health, and Work-Related Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, I.J.M.; Snoijer, M.; Kok, B.P. de; Vlisteren, J. van; Hofstetter, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a workplace health promotion program on employees’ vitality, health, and work-related outcomes, and exploring the influence of organizational support and the supervisors’ role on these outcomes. Methods: The 5-month intervention included activities at

  15. Child and Parental Outcomes Following Involvement in a Preventive Intervention: Efficacy of the PACE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begle, Angela Moreland; Dumas, Jean E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether engagement (i.e., attendance and quality of participation) in the Parenting our Children to Excellence (PACE) program predicted positive child and parent outcomes. PACE in an 8-week preventive intervention aimed at parents of preschool children. The study investigated the relation of engagement to outcomes in an…

  16. Pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research degree-granting PhD programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slejko, Julia F; Libby, Anne M; Nair, Kavita V; Valuck, Robert J; Campbell, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is missing on showcasing current practices of degree programs specific to the field of pharmaceutical outcomes research. To measure current practices of pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research PhD programs in the United States and synthesize recommendations for improving the success of programs and prospective students. A 23-question online survey instrument was created and distributed to 32 program directors identified in the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research educational directory. Descriptive statistics summarized both the program characteristics (including observed and desired number of faculty and students) and training recommendations (traits of program and student success). Of 30 eligible programs that conferred a PhD in pharmacoeconomics, pharmaceutical outcomes research, or a related field, 16 respondents (53%) completed the survey. Seventy-five percent of respondents were located in a school of pharmacy. The average observed number of faculty (7.5) and students (11.5) was lower than the average desired numbers (8.1) and (14.7), respectively. Reputation of faculty research and a collaborative environment with other disciplines were rated highest for a program's success. Faculty's mentoring experience and reputation and student funding opportunities were rated highest for prospective students' success. Existing and emerging programs as well as prospective students can use these findings to further their chances of success. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of a geriatrician-led hip fracture program: improvements in clinical and economic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Lisa N; DiPiero, Albert R; Homer, Louis D

    2009-01-01

    The hip fracture service (HFS) is an interdisciplinary, geriatrician-led program instituted to improve the care of frail elderly people who present to the hospital with acute hip fracture. The HFS pilot project used existing hospital personnel and facilities and initiated new practices, including set protocols, preprinted orders, and standardized assessments, to achieve and evaluate patient triage and care and hospital cost savings. Outcome measures for 91 patients with acute hip fracture consecutively admitted to the HFS were compared with those of 72 historical controls managed under standard care in the prior year. Analysis demonstrated better outcomes in terms of length of stay (6.1+/-2.4 days for standard care, 4.6+/-1.1 days for the HFS; Pvs 50.5% of HFS patients; Pmodel showed a reduction in total costs, resulting in a gain in net income, from a deficit of $908+/-4,977 (95% confidence interval (CI)=-$2,078-261) per patient in the standard group to a gain of $1,047+/-2,718 (95% CI=$481-1,613) per patient in the HFS group (Pcost effectiveness of managing elderly patients with hip fracture. Although the results must be interpreted with caution because of the pre-post design, this pilot study provides a model of care for further hypothesis generation and more rigorous testing into the quality and financial benefits of a geriatrics-led care process.

  18. Experimental and analytical study for demonstration program on shielding of casks for high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, K.; Nakazawa, M.; Hattorl, S.; Ozaki, S.; Tamaki, H.; Kadotani, H.; Ishizuka, T.; Ishikawa, S.

    1993-01-01

    The following remarks were obtained from the experiment and the DOT 3.5 and the MCNP analyses on the gamma ray and the neutron dose equivalent rates in the cask of interest. 1. The cask has thinner neutron shielding parts around the trunnions. Significant neutrons streaming around the trunnion parts was observed which was also cleared by the MCNP analysis for the 252 Cf source experiment. Accordingly, detailed neutron streaming calculations are required to evaluate the dose levels around the trunnions when loading the vitrified high-level wastes. 2. The room-scattered obstructive neutrons, mainly originating from the neutrons penetrating around the trunnions, at the top and the bottom of the cask are reduced significantly by preparing the water tank at the top and the water layer at the bottom. Therefore, a more accurate experiment is to be carried out in the future shielding experiment especially for neutrons. However, because the water tank and the layer do not exist in the actual high-level wastes transport cask, the experiment without the water tank and layer are not dispensable to demonstrate the transport conditions of the actual cask, too. 3. The gamma-ray and the neutron dose equivalent rate distributions obtained from the DOT 3.5 and the MCNP calculations, respectively, agreed closely with the measured values in the cask areas of interest. Accordingly, the DOT 3.5 code and the MCNP code with the NESX estimator can be employed not only for the shielding analysis of the future experiments, but also for making a safety analysis report of high-level wastes transport casks. (J.P.N.)

  19. Program Evaluation of Outcomes Based Orthotic and Prosthetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    with the Pediatric Orthopedic group, Physical & Occupational Therapy department, Cast Room and Authorization offices at Children’s Hospital. • Guest...Syphylis Neurotrophic Joint. b. Colles fracture . c. Hemangioma. d. Hemivertebra. 49. The TLSO: Anterior Control is commonly recommended for...lecturer at Mesa College, San Diego, CA, for the Physical Therapy Assistant program; topics of discussion were “Pre mity Orthotics”. Certified

  20. Physical studies of transmutation scenarios. The Muse program with the Masurca facility: a step towards an hybrid demonstrator?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Leconte, Ph.; Doubre, H.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Carbonnier, J.L.; Chawla, R.; Bernard, H.

    2002-01-01

    The Muse research program, which started in 1995, is a contribution to the development of a dedicated subcritical accelerator driven system (ADS) for the transmutation of minor actinides produced by conventional nuclear power plants. The Muse experiments aim at making a parametric study of different reactor core compositions with different subcritical levels and supplied by different sources in order to demonstrate that the measurement techniques and the calculation charts established for critical FBRs remain valid with an hybrid system. The 4. phase of the Muse program concerns the design, realization and installation of the Genepi (generator of intense pulse neutrons) deutons accelerator at the Masurca facility of Cadarache (France) for the understanding of the neutronic behaviour of an ADS, the definition of a reference calculation scheme, and the development of specific experimental techniques for dynamical measurements. This document brings together the presentations (transparencies) given at the SFEN technical meeting of May 30, 2002 about the Muse program. (J.S.)

  1. Evaluation of low-level radioactive waste characterization and classification programs of the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taie, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is preparing to upgrade their low-level radioactive waste (LLW) characterization and classification program. This thesis describes a survey study of three other DOE sites conducted in support of this effort. The LLW characterization/classification programs of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory were critically evaluated. The evaluation was accomplished through tours of each site facility and personnel interviews. Comparative evaluation of the individual characterization/classification programs suggests the WVDP should purchase a real-time radiography unit and a passive/active neutron detection system, make additional mechanical modifications to the segmented gamma spectroscopy assay system, provide a separate building to house characterization equipment and perform assays away from waste storage, develop and document a new LLW characterization/classification methodology, and make use of the supercompactor owned by WVDP

  2. U.S. Army-Baylor University Health Care Administration Program: evidenced-based outcomes in the military health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangelsdorff, A David; Rogers, Jody; Finstuen, Kenn; Pryor, Rene

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to assess the impact of an educational program on the Military Health System on some of the evidence-based educational outcomes for the Individual (student) and the Society (all Army Medical Treatment Facilities). The U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA program provides a unique opportunity to assess the impact of an educational program on the Military Health System (MHS). Since the majority of the graduate students are military officers who serve in military medical treatment facilities (MTFs), tracking their career progression allows assessing the value added of the U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA experience from 1951 to 2001 (n = 2234). The context of Society outcomes includes all the Army MTFs where U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA graduates execute their leadership skills. During the time from 1994 to 2001, all of the Army MTFs in the MHS (n = 38) were examined by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). In a similar but shorter time frame (1997-2001), DoD patient satisfaction assessments were conducted. The Individual outcomes (career advancement, increase in status, higher professional association membership) demonstrate that the selection criteria used for program admission appear to be successful. The Society outcomes showed higher JCAHO scores and satisfied consumers in Army facilities with Baylor graduates as the Deputy Commander for Administration (DCA). Continued internal program assessments (curriculum reviews) and external reviews (Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration accreditations of 5 years in 1987, 8 years in 1993 and 7 years in 2001, and 7 ACHE student chapter awards) attest to the strengths of the U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA program. Educating the MHS shareholders (patients, beneficiaries, professional and support staff, senior leaders) and leveraging technology to. share best practices for all administrators (including non-Baylor graduates) will

  3. Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes: A Multi-Site Study of Male and Female Prison Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissier, Bernadette; Motivans, Mark; Rounds-Bryant, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined whether there were program differences with respect to post-release outcomes in 20 federal in-prison substance abuse programs which used a cognitive-behavioral treatment approach. Recidivism and post-release drug use were examined for a sample of 1,343 individuals--1,065 men and 278 women. Discrete time proportional…

  4. The influence of perceived characteristics of management development programs on employee outcomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardts, J.C.A.; van der Velde, M.E.G.; Maurer, T.

    2010-01-01

    Employees’ perceptions of Management Development (MD) programs is the topic of this study. The purpose is to examine the influence of three important perceived characteristics of MD programs on relevant MD outcomes. The MD characteristics are: availability of role models, perceived control, and

  5. Pygmalion in the Program: The Role of Teenage Peer Mentors' Attitudes in Shaping Their Mentees' Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Michael J.; Davidson, Alice J.; Rhodes, Jean E.; Herrera, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Cross-age peer mentoring programs, in which teenagers mentor younger children, have proliferated in recent years, yet there is disagreement about the effectiveness of such programs. This study tested whether teen mentors' attitudes about children interact with their mentees' characteristics to moderate outcomes of cross-age peer mentoring. The…

  6. An analysis of the procedural components of supported employment programs associated with employment outcomes.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonnell, J; Nofs, D; Hardman, M; Chambless, C

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the relation between the procedural components of supported employment programs and employment outcomes for 120 individuals with disabilities. These individuals were involved in supported employment programs established through the Utah Supported Employment Project. The results suggest that successful implementation of supported employment services led to ongoing employment of study participants in community work sites, increased wages, and ongoing opportunities for worker...

  7. Process and Outcome Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Matthew B.; Betts, Donna J.; Blausey, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Program evaluation offers an opportunity for improving the implementation and impact of art therapy. This article describes a process and outcomes evaluation of an art therapy program within the mental health services unit of a community-based organization for people living with HIV/AIDS. The aims were to assess utilization patterns and program…

  8. Computer programs of information processing of nuclear physical methods as a demonstration material in studying nuclear physics and numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateev, A. B.; Filippov, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    The principle possibility of using computer program Univem MS for Mössbauer spectra fitting as a demonstration material at studying such disciplines as atomic and nuclear physics and numerical methods by students is shown in the article. This program is associated with nuclear-physical parameters such as isomer (or chemical) shift of nuclear energy level, interaction of nuclear quadrupole moment with electric field and of magnetic moment with surrounded magnetic field. The basic processing algorithm in such programs is the Least Square Method. The deviation of values of experimental points on spectra from the value of theoretical dependence is defined on concrete examples. This value is characterized in numerical methods as mean square deviation. The shape of theoretical lines in the program is defined by Gaussian and Lorentzian distributions. The visualization of the studied material on atomic and nuclear physics can be improved by similar programs of the Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence Analyzer or X-ray diffraction analysis.

  9. Treating Childhood Malnutrition in Rural Haiti: Program Outcomes and Obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, C Nicholas; Dansereau, Emily; Habib, Anand R; Davies, Mary; Ware, Samuel; Kornetsky, Kenneth

    Haiti has the worst malnutrition rate in the Western hemisphere. In October 2010, a cholera epidemic erupted and spread rapidly throughout the country, straining Haiti's already fragile health infrastructure across all levels of care. This study reviews data from an outpatient therapeutic feeding program (OTP) for acute childhood malnutrition at a clinic in rural Haiti with a focus on the effect of the 2010 cholera epidemic on program operations. A retrospective chart review was conducted for the complete set of patients who were enrolled in the OTP from its inception in March 2009 through January 2014. A total of 187 charts were retrieved representing 176 unique patients, of whom 5 were currently enrolled in care. At admission, 96 (51.3%) met criteria for severe acute malnutrition, 88 (47.1%) met criteria for moderate acute malnutrition, and 3 (1.6%) did not meet criteria for acute malnutrition. Of the 182 completed charts, 119 (65.4%) reached their target weight (≥-1 weight-for-height z-score) by discharge (ie, were "cured"), 43 (23.6%) defaulted, 11 (6.0%) were discharged prematurely, 8 (4.4%) died, and 1 (0.5%) was hospitalized. A total of 11 patients (6.3%) who were initially admitted relapsed after discharge and were later readmitted. Data from 170 complete records (93.4%) were included in a multivariate logistic regression. Severe (vs moderate) acute malnutrition was negatively associated with likelihood of being cured when controlling for other patient- and care-related factors (OR = 0.261, P = .002). Average cholera burden was negatively correlated with likelihood of OTP treatment cure when controlling for patient- and care-related variables (OR = 0.859, P = .002) but was insignificant when controlling for year. Results from the study have been used to inform a restructuring of the clinic's acute malnutrition program toward a more community-centered model of management, the context and implications of which are discussed in relation to the existing

  10. A systematic review of the effectiveness of simulation-based education on satisfaction and learning outcomes in nurse practitioner programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jessie N; Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Godfrey, Christina; Lukewich, Julia

    2016-11-01

    High-fidelity simulation (HFS) is becoming an integral component in healthcare education programs. There is considerable evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of HFS on satisfaction and learning outcomes within undergraduate nursing programs; however, there are few studies that have investigated its use and effectiveness within nurse practitioner (NP) programs. To synthesize the best available evidence about the effectiveness of HFS within NP education programs worldwide. The specific review question was: what is the effect of HFS on learner satisfaction, knowledge, attitudes, and skill performance in NP education? Joanna Briggs Institute systematic review methodology was utilized. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Epistemonikos, PROSPERO, HealthSTAR, AMED, Cochrane, Global Health and PsycINFO. Studies were included if they were quantitative in nature and reported on any aspect HFS within a NP program. Ten studies were included in the review. All studies were conducted in the United States and published between 2007 and 2014. Outcomes explored included: knowledge, attitudes, skills and satisfaction. The majority of studies compared HFS to online learning or traditional classroom lecture. Most study scenarios featured high acuity, low frequency events within acute care settings; only two studies utilized scenarios simulated within primary care. There is limited evidence supporting the use of HFS within NP programs. In general, HFS increases students' knowledge and confidence, and students are more satisfied with simulation-based teaching in comparison to other methods. Future studies should explore the effectiveness of simulation training within NP programs in reducing the theory to practice gap, and evaluate knowledge retention, transferability to real patient situations, and impact of simulation on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A framework for monitoring social process and outcomes in environmental programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    When environmental programs frame their activities as being in the service of human wellbeing, social variables need to be integrated into monitoring and evaluation (M&E) frameworks. This article draws upon ecosystem services theory to develop a framework to guide the M&E of collaborative environmental programs with anticipated social benefits. The framework has six components: program need, program activities, pathway process variables, moderating process variables, outcomes, and program value. Needs are defined in terms of ecosystem services, as well as other human needs that must be addressed to achieve outcomes. The pathway variable relates to the development of natural resource governance capacity in the target community. Moderating processes can be externalities such as the inherent capacity of the natural system to service ecosystem needs, local demand for natural resources, policy or socio-economic drivers. Internal program-specific processes relate to program service delivery, targeting and participant responsiveness. Ecological outcomes are expressed in terms of changes in landscape structure and function, which in turn influence ecosystem service provision. Social benefits derived from the program are expressed in terms of the value of the eco-social service to user-specified goals. The article provides suggestions from the literature for identifying indicators and measures for components and component variables, and concludes with an example of how the framework was used to inform the M&E of an adaptive co-management program in western Kenya. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A

    2015-12-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy-Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4-5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (pimprovement in asthma knowledge and reasoning over students enrolled in the non-academic program. Knowledge advantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C. Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A.

    2018-01-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy—Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4–5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (pasthma knowledge and reasoning over students enrolled in the non-academic program. Knowledge advantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma. PMID:26296595

  14. Barriers to Implementing the ACGME Outcome Project: A Systematic Review of Program Director Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mohammad U; Diaz Voss Varela, David A; Stewart, Charles M; Laeeq, Kulsoom; Yenokyan, Gayane; Francis, Howard W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2012-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) introduced the Outcome Project in July 2001 to improve the quality of resident education through competency-based learning. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine and explore the perceptions of program directors regarding challenges to implementing the ACGME Outcome Project. We used the PubMed and Web of Science databases and bibliographies for English-language articles published between January 1, 2001, and February 17, 2012. Studies were included if they described program directors' opinions on (1) barriers encountered when attempting to implement ACGME competency-based education, and (2) assessment methods that each residency program was using to implement competency-based education. Articles meeting the inclusion criteria were screened by 2 researchers. The grading criterion was created by the authors and used to assess the quality of each study. The survey-based data reported the opinions of 1076 program directors. Barriers that were encountered include: (1) lack of time; (2) lack of faculty support; (3) resistance of residents to the Outcome Project; (4) insufficient funding; (5) perceived low priority for the Outcome Project; (6) inadequate salary incentive; and (7) inadequate knowledge of the competencies. Of the 6 competencies, those pertaining to patient care and medical knowledge received the most responses from program directors and were given highest priority. The reviewed literature revealed that time and financial constraints were the most important barriers encountered when implementing the ACGME Outcome Project.

  15. Environment, safety and health, management and organization compliance assessment, West Valley Demonstration Program, West Valley, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    An Environment, Safety and Health ''Tiger Team'' Assessment was conducted at the West Valley Demonstration Project. The Tiger Team was chartered to conduct an onsite, independent assessment of WVDP's environment, safety and health (ES ampersand H) programs to assure compliance with applicable Federal and State laws, regulations, and standards, and Department of Energy Orders. The objective is to provide to the Secretary of Energy the following information: current ES ampersand H compliance status of each facility; specific noncompliance items; ''root causes'' for noncompliance items; evaluation of the adequacy of ES ampersand H organization and resources (DOE and contractor) and needed modifications; and where warranted, recommendations for addressing identified problem areas

  16. Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair: Residency Teaching Program and Outcome Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Fabio; Mota-Moya, Pau; Munday, Andrew; Romy, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair has been shown to offer less pain, shorter postoperative hospital stay and earlier return to work when compared to open surgery. Our institution routinely performs TEP procedures for patients with primary or recurrent inguinal hernias. The aim of this study was to show that supervised senior residents can safely perform TEP repairs in a teaching setting. All consecutive patients treated for inguinal hernias by laparoscopic approach from October 2008 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed from a prospective database. A total of 219 TEP repairs were performed on 171 patients: 123 unilateral and 48 bilateral. The mean patient age was 51.6 years with a standard deviation (SD) of ± 15.9. Supervised senior residents performed 171 (78 %) and staff surgeons 48 (22 %) TEP repairs, respectively. Thirty-day morbidity included cases of inguinal paresthesias (0.4 %, n = 1), umbilical hematomas (0.9 %, n = 2), superficial wound infections (0.9 %, n = 2), scrotal hematomas (2.7 %, n = 6), postoperative urinary retentions (2.7 %, n = 6), chronic pain syndromes (5 %, n = 11) and postoperative seromas (6.7 %, n = 14). Overall, complication rates were 18.7 % for staff surgeons and 19.3 % for residents (p = 0.83). For staff surgeons and residents, mean operative times for unilateral hernia repairs were 65 min (SD ± 18.9) and 77.6 min (SD ± 29.8) (p = 0.043), respectively, while mean operative times for bilateral repairs were 115 min (SD ± 40.1) and 103.6 (SD ± 25.9) (p = 0.05). TEP repair is a safe procedure when performed by supervised senior surgical trainees. Teaching of TEP should be routinely included in general surgery residency programs.

  17. SEAMIST trademark in-situ instrumentation and vapor sampling system applications in the Sandia Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, W.E.; Dunn, S.D.; Cremer, S.C.; Williams, C.

    1994-01-01

    The SEAMIST trademark inverting membrane deployment system has been used successfully at the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) for multipoint vapor sampling/pressure measurement/permeability measurement/sensor integration demonstrations and borehole lining. Several instruments were deployed inside the SEAMIST trademark lined boreholes to detect metals, radionuclides, moisture, and geologic variations. The liner protected the instruments from contamination, maintained support of the uncased borehole wall, and sealed the total borehole from air circulation. The current activities have included the installation of three multipoint vapor sampling systems and sensor integration systems in 100-foot-deep vertical boreholes. A long term pressure monitoring program has recorded barometric pressure effects at depth with relatively high spatial resolution. The SEAMIST trademark system has been integrated with a variety of hydrologic and chemical sensors for in-situ measurements, demonstrating its versatility as an instrument deployment system which allows easy emplacement and removal. Standard SEAMIST trademark vapor sampling systems were also integrated with state-of-the-art VOC analysis technologies (automated GC, UV laser fluorometer). The results and status of these demonstration tests are presented

  18. Effects of interruptible load program on equilibrium outcomes of electricity markets with wind power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Xuena; Zhang, Shaohua; Li, Xue [Shanghai Univ. (China). Key Lab. of Power Station Automation Technology

    2013-07-01

    High wind power penetration presents a lot of challenges to the flexibility and reliability of power system operation. In this environment, various demand response (DR) programs have got much attention. As an effective measure of demand response programs, interruptible load (IL) programs have been widely used in electricity markets. This paper addresses the problem of impacts of the IL programs on the equilibrium outcomes of electricity wholesale markets with wind power. A Cournot equilibrium model of wholesale markets with wind power is presented, in which IL programs is included by a market demand model. The introduction of the IL programs leads to a non-smooth equilibrium problem. To solve this equilibrium problem, a novel solution method is proposed. Numerical examples show that IL programs can lower market price and its volatility significantly, facilitate the integration of wind power.

  19. A school-based human papillomavirus vaccination program in barretos, Brazil: final results of a demonstrative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Humberto Tavares Guerreiro Fregnani

    Full Text Available The implementation of a public HPV vaccination program in several developing countries, especially in Latin America, is a great challenge for health care specialists.To evaluate the uptake and the three-dose completion rates of a school-based HPV vaccination program in Barretos (Brazil.THE STUDY INCLUDED GIRLS WHO WERE ENROLLED IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS AND WHO REGULARLY ATTENDED THE SIXTH AND SEVENTH GRADES OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (MEAN AGE: 11.9 years. A meeting with the parents or guardians occurred approximately one week before the vaccination in order to explain the project and clarify the doubts. The quadrivalent vaccine was administered using the same schedule as in the product package (0-2-6 months. The school visits for regular vaccination occurred on previously scheduled dates. The vaccine was also made available at Barretos Cancer Hospital for the girls who could not be vaccinated on the day when the team visited the school.Among the potential candidates for vaccination (n = 1,574, the parents or guardians of 1,513 girls (96.1% responded to the invitation to participate in the study. A total of 1,389 parents or guardians agreed to participate in the program (acceptance rate = 91.8%. The main reason for refusing to participate in the vaccination program was fear of adverse events. The vaccine uptake rates for the first, second, and third doses were 87.5%, 86.3% and 85.0%, respectively. The three-dose completion rate was 97.2%.This demonstrative study achieved high rates of vaccination uptake and completion of three vaccine doses in children 10-16 years old from Brazil. The feasibility and success of an HPV vaccination program for adolescents in a developing country may depend on the integration between the public health and schooling systems.

  20. In the wake of structural adjustment programs: Exploring the relationship between domestic policies and health outcomes in Argentina and Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Helen C

    2006-01-01

    The implementation of structural adjustment programs (SAPs) in developing countries has been followed by a marked reduction in their progress on economic growth, health outcomes, and social indicators. Comprehensive and contextualized explorations of the effects of SAPs are needed to assist health and social policy-makers in better determining responses to such programs that continue to dominate global trade, aid and debt cancellation negotiations. A comparative case study of Argentina and Uruguay was developed exploring the effects of SAPs on health. Using a framework developed to analyze the relationship between globalization and health, changes in domestic policies resulting from SAPs and the corresponding economic, social and health outcomes of the countries were explored. In general, SAPs were implemented with greater severity and speed in Argentina than in Uruguay, with the greatest differences occurring over the 1980s. The more gradual and modest reforms implemented in Uruguay were associated with better economic, social and health outcomes. Findings support those of previous studies demonstrating that countries that have maintained more dynamic public social and health programming while applying SAPs have been better able to protect the health of the most vulnerable sectors of society.

  1. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Jalali, Rakesh; Goswami, Savita; Nair, Vimoj; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Epari, Sridhar; Sarin, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children ≥5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5–14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56–70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16–58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  2. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jalali, Rakesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Goswami, Savita [Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Nair, Vimoj [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Moiyadi, Aliasgar [Division of Neuro-Surgery, Department of Surgical Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Epari, Sridhar [Department of Pathology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Sarin, Rajiv [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children {>=}5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5-14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56-70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16-58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  3. Long-term outcomes from Healthy Eating and Exercise Lifestyle Program for overweight people with heart disease and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Muaddi; Gallagher, Robyn; Kirkness, Ann; Sibbritt, David; Tofler, Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    The benefits of exercise and weight reduction for overweight or obese people with coronary heart disease and/or diabetes mellitus are well recognised. The Healthy Eating and Exercise Lifestyle Program demonstrated these outcomes at 4 months, but longer-term outcomes are not yet reported. To determine whether positive weight, body mass index, waist and exercise duration outcomes were sustained in the long term (12 months) and to identify the independent predictors of these outcomes at 4 and 12 months. Longitudinal design, combining data of all Healthy Eating and Exercise Lifestyle Program participants (intervention and wait-list control, n = 134). Participants had a body mass index between 27 and 39 kg/m(2) and had completed cardiac rehabilitation and/or diabetes education programmes. Healthy Eating and Exercise Lifestyle Program intervention included an active phase of two 1-hour group-based supervised structured exercise sessions every week for 4 months and four 90-minute group information and support sessions. The maintenance phase included one 90-minute group-based booster information session and three 15-minute goal-focused telephone follow-up calls over 8 months. Participants had statistically significant reductions from baseline in weight, body mass index and waist circumference and improvements in exercise duration and capacity at 4 and 12 months. Time, self-efficacy, depressive symptoms and male gender were independent predictors for body mass index, waist and/or exercise duration (p Healthy Eating and Exercise Lifestyle Program was an effective programme to achieve and sustain weight loss and increase exercise participation over 1 year. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  4. Waste management system functional requirements for Interim Waste Management Facilities (IWMFs) and technology demonstrations, LLWDDD [Low-Level Disposal Development and Demonstration] Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to build upon the preceding decisions and body of information to prepare draft system functional requirements for each classification of waste disposal currently proposed for Low-Level Waste Disposal Development Demonstration (LLWDDD) projects. Functional requirements identify specific information and data needs necessary to satisfy engineering design criteria/objectives for Interim Waste Management Facilities. This draft will suppor the alternatives evaluation process and will continue to evolve as strategy is implemented, regulatory limits are established, technical and economic uncertainties are resolved, and waste management plans are being implemented. This document will become the planning basis for the new generation of solid LLW management facilities on new sites on the Reservation. Eighteen (18) general system requirements are identified which are applicable to all four Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal classifications. Each classification of LLW disposal is individually addressed with respect ot waste characteristics, site considerations, facility operations, facility closure/post-closure, intruder barriers, institutional control, and performance monitoring requirements. Three initial LLW disposal sites have been proposed as locations on the ORR for the first demonstrations

  5. Long-term outcomes of the New Jersey nurse faculty preparation program scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerolamo, Angela M; Conroy, Kara; Roemer, Grace; Holmes, Aline; Salmond, Susan; Polakowski, Jennifer

    Rising concerns over the capacity of nursing education to prepare enough nurses to meet population demand have received national attention. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation implemented the New Jersey Nursing Initiative Faculty Preparation Program to address nursing workforce issues in New Jersey. This paper describes program and scholar outcomes and provides recommendations for nurse faculty development. This descriptive study uses data from scholar surveys and interviews with grantees. Findings suggest that a faculty preparation program that targets doctoral students and includes financial support, socialization to the faculty role, and formal education courses produces graduates who maintain a career in nursing education for up to three years after program completion. However, most master's-level students who also received formal preparation in nursing education were employed in clinical practice. Program developers must carefully consider the design of programs that integrate faculty preparation and advanced clinical training for master's-level students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 07051 Working Group Outcomes -- Programming Paradigms for the Web: Web Programming and Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, Richard; Thiemann, Peter; Wadler, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Participants in the seminar broke into groups on ``Patterns and Paradigms'' for web programming, ``Web Services,'' ``Data on the Web,'' ``Software Engineering'' and ``Security.'' Here we give the raw notes recorded during these sessions.

  7. Classroom Practices and Academic Outcomes in Urban Afterschool Programs: Alleviating Social-Behavioral Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Hwang, Sophia H. J.; Kieffer, Michael J.; Yates, Miranda

    2018-01-01

    Given the potential of afterschool programs to support youth in urban, low-income communities, we examined the role of afterschool classroom ecology in the academic outcomes of Latino and African American youth with and without social-behavioral risk. Using multireporter methods and multilevel analysis, we find that positive classroom ecology…

  8. Effectiveness of physical activity programs at worksites with respect to work-related outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proper, K.I.; Staal, B.J.; Hildebrandt, V.H.; Beek, A.J. van der; Mechelen, W. van

    2002-01-01

    This paper systematically reviews the literature on the effectiveness of physical activity programs at worksites with respect to work-related outcomes. A computerized literature search, a reference search, and a manual search of personal databases were performed using the following inclusion

  9. The Effects of Incentives on Families' Long-Term Outcome in a Parenting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Nina; Jensen-Doss, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    To examine the impact of paying for participation in a preventive parenting program on treatment outcomes, 197 families with preschool-aged children were randomized to paid or unpaid conditions. Although both groups improved on nearly all measures, paid families showed less improvement on 3 of 10 variables, including father-reported child…

  10. Identifying Barriers in Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review: A Grounded Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to identify the typical barriers encountered by faculty and administrators when implementing outcomes-based assessment program review. An analysis of interviews with faculty and administrators at nine institutions revealed a theory that faculty and administrators' promotion, tenure (if applicable),…

  11. Questioning the Use of Outcome Measures to Evaluate Principal Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Ed; Hollingworth, Liz

    2018-01-01

    Policymakers are proposing the use of outcome measures as indicators of effective principal preparation programs. The three most common metrics recommended are: (1) graduates' effectiveness in improving student achievement test scores, (2) graduate job placement rates, and (3) principal job retention once employed. This article explores the use of…

  12. Predicting Employment Outcomes for Consumers in Community College Short-Term Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, K. Brigid; Benz, Michael R.; Yovanoff, Paul; Kato, Mary McGrath; Lindstrom, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Postsecondary education has been linked to improved access to employment opportunities for individuals with and without disabilities. The purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with increased employment outcomes for Vocational Rehabilitation consumers enrolled in community college short term occupational skill training programs.…

  13. Motivation and Outcomes for University Students in a Restorative Justice Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher Dahl, Meghan; Meagher, Peter; Vander Velde, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    A restorative justice program (RJP) was developed at a large university in the housing student conduct office. Students accused of misconduct who participated in a restorative justice (RJ) conference completed surveys regarding their motivations and perceived outcomes. Results showed that students who were motivated to make reparations to others…

  14. Evaluating the Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Process in Undergraduate Parks and Recreation Academic Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Craig M.; Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are increasingly being held more accountable for assessing student learning both in and out of their classrooms along with reporting results to their stakeholders. The purpose of this study, which examined assessment of student learning outcomes in undergraduate park and recreation academic programs, was two-fold:…

  15. Short-term outcomes of a back school program for chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodselmans, AP; Jaegers, SM; Goeken, LN; Göeken, L.N.

    Objective: To assess the short-term outcome of a back school program for patients suffering from chronic, nonspecific low back pain (LBP). Design: Quasi-experimental cohort study with a waiting list control group. Setting: Dutch rehabilitation department. Participants: Experimental group (n = 14)

  16. Adherence and delivery: Implementation quality and program outcomes for the 7th grade keepin’ it REAL program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Graham, John W.; Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L.; Krieger, Janice L.; Shin, Young Ju

    2014-01-01

    Poor implementation quality (IQ) is known to reduce program effects making it important to consider IQ for evaluation and dissemination of prevention programs. However, less is known about the ways specific implementation variables relate to outcomes. In this study, two versions of the keepin’ it REAL, 7th grade drug prevention intervention were implemented in 78 classrooms in 25 schools in rural districts in Pennsylvania and Ohio. IQ was measured through observational coding of 276 videos. IQ variables included adherence to the curriculum, teacher engagement (attentiveness, enthusiasm, seriousness, clarity, positivity), student engagement (attention, participation), and a global rating of teacher delivery quality. Factor analysis showed that teacher engagement, student engagement, and delivery quality formed one factor, which was labeled delivery. A second factor was adherence to the curriculum. Self-report student surveys measured substance use, norms (beliefs about prevalence and acceptability of use), and efficacy (beliefs about one’s ability to refuse substance offers) at two waves (pretest, immediate posttest). Mixed model regression analysis which accounted for missing data and controlled for pretest levels examined implementation quality’s effects on individual level outcomes, statistically controlling for cluster level effects. Results show that when implemented well, students show positive outcomes compared to students receiving a poorly implemented program. Delivery significantly influenced substance use and norms, but not efficacy. Adherence marginally significantly predicted use and significantly predicted norms, but not efficacy. Findings underscore the importance of comprehensively measuring and accounting for IQ, particularly delivery, when evaluating prevention interventions. PMID:24442403

  17. Pilot demonstrations of arsenic treatment technologies in U.S. Department of Energy Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, Randy L.; Aragon, Alicia R.; Siegal Malcolm D.; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    The Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program is a multi-year program funded by a congressional appropriation through the Department of Energy. The program is designed to move technologies from benchscale tests to field demonstrations. It will enable water utilities, particularly those serving small, rural communities and Indian tribes, to implement the most cost-effective solutions to their arsenic treatment needs. As part of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, Sandia National Laboratories is carrying out field demonstration testing of innovative technologies that have the potential to substantially reduce the costs associated with arsenic removal from drinking water. The scope for this work includes: (1) Selection of sites and identification of technologies for pilot demonstrations; (2) Laboratory studies to develop rapid small-scale test methods; and (3) Pilot-scale studies at community sites involving side-by-side tests of innovative technologies. The goal of site selection is to identify sites that allow examination of treatment processes and systems under conditions that are relevant to different geochemical settings throughout the country. A number of candidate sites have been identified through reviews of groundwater quality databases, conference proceedings and discussions with state and local officials. These include sites in New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Michigan, and California. Candidate technologies for the pilot tests are being reviewed through vendor forums, proof-of-principle benchscale studies managed by the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF) and the WERC design contest. The review considers as many potential technologies as possible and screens out unsuitable ones by considering data from past performance testing, expected costs, complexity of operation and maturity of the technology. The pilot test configurations will depend on the site-specific conditions such as access, power availability

  18. Extended burnup demonstration: reactor fuel program. Pre-irradiation characterization and summary of pre-program poolside examinations. Big Rock Point extended burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exarhos, C.A.; Van Swam, L.F.; Wahlquist, F.P.

    1981-12-01

    This report is a resource document characterizing the 64 fuel rods being irradiated at the Big Rock Point reactor as part of the Extended Burnup Demonstration being sponsored jointly by the US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities. The program entails extending the exposure of standard BWR fuel to a discharge average of 38,000 MWD/MTU to demonstrate the feasibility of operating fuel of standard design to levels significantly above current limits. The fabrication characteristics of the Big Rock Point EBD fuel are presented along with measurement of rod length, rod diameter, pellet stack height, and fuel rod withdrawal force taken at poolside at burnups up to 26,200 MWD/MTU. A review of the fuel examination data indicates no performance characteristics which might restrict the continued irradiation of the fuel

  19. FY 1994 program summary: Office of Technology Development, Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, formerly the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), was established in November 1989 as the first step toward correcting contamination problems resulting from nearly 50 years of nuclear weapons production and fuel processing activities. EM consolidates several DOE organizations previously responsible for the handling, treatment, and disposition of radioactive and hazardous waste. Within EM, the Office of Technology Development (OTD/EM-50) is responsible for developing technologies to meet DOE`s goal for environmental restoration. OTD manages an aggressive national program of applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) for environmental cleanup, waste management, and related technologies. The program is designed to resolve major technical issues, to rapidly advanced beyond current technologies for environmental restoration and waste management operations, and to expedite compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. This report summarizes Fiscal Year 1994 (FY94) programmatic information, accomplishments, and planned activities relevant to the individual activities within OTD`s RDDT and E.

  20. FY 1994 program summary: Office of Technology Development, Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, formerly the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), was established in November 1989 as the first step toward correcting contamination problems resulting from nearly 50 years of nuclear weapons production and fuel processing activities. EM consolidates several DOE organizations previously responsible for the handling, treatment, and disposition of radioactive and hazardous waste. Within EM, the Office of Technology Development (OTD/EM-50) is responsible for developing technologies to meet DOE's goal for environmental restoration. OTD manages an aggressive national program of applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) for environmental cleanup, waste management, and related technologies. The program is designed to resolve major technical issues, to rapidly advanced beyond current technologies for environmental restoration and waste management operations, and to expedite compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. This report summarizes Fiscal Year 1994 (FY94) programmatic information, accomplishments, and planned activities relevant to the individual activities within OTD's RDDT and E

  1. Characteristics and Outcomes of Female Infertility Treatment Programs Using Traditional Medicine in Korea: A Multisite Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Han; Jang, Soobin; Lee, Ju Ah; Go, Ho-Yeon; Jung, Jeeyoun; Park, Sunju; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2018-03-22

    Infertility has long been recognized as a treatable disease, and complementary and alternative medicine treatments, such as acupuncture and moxibustion, have been used in Korea and China. This study describes female infertility treatment programs that used traditional Korean medicine (TKM) and were conducted by local governments in Korea and evaluates its effectiveness and safety. The authors officially requested related information from the report of the infertility treatment programs and related sources from 2006 to 2016 from the Health & Welfare Ministry of Korea and the Association of Korean Medicine (AKOM). Additional information was obtained from six Korean databases. Data including basic information about the programs, participant information, interventions, and outcomes were abstracted. A total of 9 reports, including multiple years of data from 6 programs (total 13 programs), were identified. In these 13 programs, a total of 1023 female subjects participated, and 205 of the 887 subjects who completed the program reported a successful pregnancy, indicating a 23.1% pregnancy rate. The programs lasted 3-9 months, and interventional elements, such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, fumigation, and massage, were identified. Significant adverse effects were not reported. This study suggests that infertility treatment programs with TKM interventions exhibited a positive effect on pregnancy in females with infertility. Thus, the infertility treatment programs with TKM interventions are expected to be useful and might serve as the primary treatment before assisted reproduction techniques.

  2. Special delivery: an analysis of mHealth in maternal and newborn health programs and their outcomes around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrat, Tigest; Kachnowski, Stan

    2012-07-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) encompasses the use of mobile telecommunication and multimedia into increasingly mobile and wireless health care delivery systems and has the potential to improve tens of thousands of lives each year. The ubiquity and penetration of mobile phones presents the opportunity to leverage mHealth for maternal and newborn care, particularly in under-resourced health ecosystems. Moreover, the slow progress and funding constraints in attaining the Millennium Development Goals for child and maternal health encourage harnessing innovative measures, such as mHealth, to address these public health priorities. This literature review provides a schematic overview of the outcomes, barriers, and strategies of integrating mHealth to improve prenatal and neonatal health outcomes. Six electronic databases were methodically searched using predetermined search terms. Retrieved articles were then categorized according to themes identified in previous studies. A total of 34 articles and reports contributed to the findings with information about the use and limitations of mHealth for prenatal and neonatal healthcare access and delivery. Health systems have implemented mHealth programs to facilitate emergency medical responses, point-of-care support, health promotion and data collection. However, the policy infrastructure for funding, coordinating and guiding the sustainable adoption of prenatal and neonatal mHealth services remains under-developed. The integration of mobile health for prenatal and newborn health services has demonstrated positive outcomes, but the sustainability and scalability of operations requires further feedback from and evaluation of ongoing programs.

  3. Effectiveness of a Multilevel Workplace Health Promotion Program on Vitality, Health, and Work-Related Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Ingrid J M; Snoijer, Mirjam; de Kok, Brenda P H; van Vilsteren, Jeroen; Hofstetter, Hedwig

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the effectiveness of a workplace health promotion program on employees' vitality, health, and work-related outcomes, and exploring the influence of organizational support and the supervisors' role on these outcomes. The 5-month intervention included activities at management, team, and individual level targeting self-management to perform healthy behaviors: a kick-off session, vitality training sessions, workshops, individual coaching, and intervision. Outcome measures were collected using questionnaires, health checks, and sickness absence data at baseline, after the intervention and at 10 months follow-up. For analysis linear and generalized mixed models were used. Vitality, work performance, sickness absence, and self-management significantly improved. Good organizational support and involved supervisors were significantly associated with lower sickness absence. Including all organizational levels and focusing on increasing self-management provided promising results for improving vitality, health, and work-related outcomes.

  4. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation

  5. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-24

    In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation.

  6. The RESTORE program of restorative justice for sex crimes: vision, process, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Mary P

    2014-06-01

    The article reports empirical evaluation of RESTORE, a restorative justice (RJ) conferencing program adapted to prosecutor-referred adult misdemeanor and felony sexual assaults. RESTORE conferences included voluntary enrollment, preparation, and a face-to-face meeting where primary and secondary victims voice impacts, and responsible persons acknowledge their acts and together develop a re-dress plan that is supervised for 1 year. Process data included referral and consent rates, participant characteristics, observational ratings of conferences compared with program design, services delivered, and safety monitoring. Outcome evaluation used 22 cases to assess (a) pre-post reasons for choosing RESTORE, (b) preparation and conference experiences, (c) overall program and justice satisfaction, and (d) completion rates. This is the first peer-reviewed quantitative evaluation of RJ conferencing for adult sexual assault. Although the data have limitations, the results support cautious optimism regarding feasibility, safety, and satisfactory outcomes. They help envision how conferencing could expand and individualize justice options for sexual assault.

  7. Evaluation of Outcomes Associated with a Leisure-time Activity Program for Disadvantaged Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita Bester

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The SLEAK (Skills, Learning and Educational Activities for Kids program was established in 2008 as a joint partnership between a community leader and the Division of Occupational Therapy Stellenbosch University. The vision of the SLEAK program is to create a sustainable, non-profit, leisure-time activity program for the youth (10-13 years of age of the community in order to curb drug and gangster-related activities and to foster healthy work-related skills in the youth to make them responsible and productive members of their community. The SLEAK program was evaluated in its entirety and this article will focus on the results for the outcomes set for the children in the SLEAK program. The results indicated that although it is still a rather small project, it seems as if the project is effective in what it set out to achieve and that it could serve as a pilot for starting projects in similar communities.

  8. The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey program: Overview, context, and near-term prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Nancy A

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1996, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS initiated the development of the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS. It is the first national survey to measure the quality of life and functional health status of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in managed care. The program seeks to gather valid and reliable health status data in Medicare managed care for use in quality improvement activities, public reporting, plan accountability and improving health outcomes based on competition. The context that led to the development of the HOS was formed by the convergence of the following factors: 1 a recognized need to monitor the performance of managed care plans, 2 technical expertise and advancement in the areas of quality measurement and health outcomes assessment, 3 the existence of a tested functional health status assessment tool (SF-36®1, which was valid for an elderly population, 4 CMS leadership, and 5 political interest in quality improvement. Since 1998, there have been six baseline surveys and four follow up surveys. CMS, working with its partners, performs the following tasks as part of the HOS program: 1 Supports the technical/scientific development of the HOS measure, 2 Certifies survey vendors, 3 Collects Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set(HEDIS®2 HOS data, 4 Cleans, scores, and disseminates annual rounds of HOS data, public use files and reports to CMS, Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs, Medicare+Choice Organizations (M+COs, and other stakeholders, 5 Trains M+COs and QIOs in the use of functional status measures and best practices for improving care, 6 Provides technical assistance to CMS, QIOs, M+COs and other data users, and 7 Conducts analyses using HOS data to support CMS and HHS priorities. CMS has recently sponsored an evaluation of the HOS program, which will provide the information necessary to enhance the future administration of the program. Information collected to date reveals that the

  9. The Regional Asthma Disease Management Program (RADMP) for low income underserved children in rural western North Carolina: a National Asthma Control Initiative Demonstration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, Melinda S; Yeatts, Karin B; Russell, Donald W; Trees, Amy S; Sutherland, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of low-income children with asthma living in rural western North Carolina have suboptimal asthma management. To address the needs of these underserved children, we developed and implemented the Regional Asthma Disease Management Program (RADMP); RADMP was selected as one of 13 demonstration projects for the National Asthma Control Initiative (NACI). This observational intervention was conducted from 2009 to 2011 in 20 rural counties and the Eastern Band Cherokee Indian Reservation in western North Carolina. Community and individual intervention components included asthma education in-services and environmental assessments/remediation. The individual intervention also included clinical assessment and management. Environmental remediation was conducted in 13 childcare facilities and 50 homes; over 259 administrative staff received asthma education. Fifty children with mild to severe persistent asthma were followed for up to 2 years; 76% were enrolled in Medicaid. From 12-month pre-intervention to 12-month post-intervention, the total number of asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits decreased from 158 to 4 and hospital admissions from 62 to 1 (p < 0.0001). From baseline to intervention completion, lung function FVC, FEV1, FEF 25-75 increased by 7.2%, 13.2% and 21.1%, respectively (all p < 0.001), and average school absences dropped from 17 to 8.8 days. Healthcare cost avoided 12 months post-intervention were approximately $882,021. The RADMP program resulted in decreased ED visits, hospitalizations, school absences and improved lung function and eNO. This was the first NACI demonstration project to show substantial improvements in healthcare utilization and clinical outcomes among rural asthmatic children.

  10. The Chicago Parent Program: Comparing 1-Year Outcomes for African American and Latino Parents of Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenstein, Susan M.; Gross, Deborah; Fogg, Louis; Ridge, Alison; Garvey, Christine; Julion, Wrenetha; Tucker, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Data were merged from two prevention randomized trials testing 1-year outcomes of a parenting skills program, the Chicago Parent Program (CPP), and comparing its effects for African-American (n=291) versus Latino (n=213) parents and their preschool children. Compared to controls, intervention parents had improved self-efficacy, used less corporal punishment and more consistent discipline, and demonstrated more positive parenting. Intervention children had greater reductions in behavior problems based on parent-report, teacher-report, and observation. Although improvements from CPP were evident for parents in both racial/ethnic groups, Latino parents reported greater improvements in their children’s behavior and in parenting self-efficacy but exhibited greater decreases in praise. Findings support the efficacy of the CPP for African American and Latino parents and young children from low-income urban communities. PMID:22622598

  11. Impact of cooking and home food preparation interventions among adults: outcomes and implications for future programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicks, Marla; Trofholz, Amanda C.; Stang, Jamie S; Laska, Melissa N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cooking programs are growing in popularity; however an extensive review has not examined overall impact. Therefore, this study reviewed previous research on cooking/home food preparation interventions and diet and health-related outcomes among adults and identified implications for practice and research. Design Literature review and descriptive summative method. Main outcome measures Dietary intake, knowledge/skills, cooking attitudes and self-efficacy/confidence, health outcomes. Analysis Articles evaluating effectiveness of interventions that included cooking/home food preparation as the primary aim (January 1980 through December 2011) were identified via OVID MEDLINE, Agricola and Web of Science databases. Studies grouped according to design and outcomes were reviewed for validity using an established coding system. Results were summarized for several outcome categories. Results Of 28 studies identified, 12 included a control group with six as non-randomized and six as randomized controlled trials. Evaluation was done post-intervention for five studies, pre- and post-intervention for 23 and beyond post-intervention for 15. Qualitative and quantitative measures suggested a positive influence on main outcomes. However, non-rigorous study designs, varying study populations, and use of non-validated assessment tools limited stronger conclusions. Conclusions and Implications Well-designed studies are needed that rigorously evaluate long-term impact on cooking behavior, dietary intake, obesity and other health outcomes. PMID:24703245

  12. Program description for the program Demonstration program for electric vehicles 2011-2015; Programbeskrivning foer programmet Demonstrationsprogram foer elfordon 2011-2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-04-15

    The program's efforts aim at, firstly, from a user perspective identify and possibly eliminate barriers for large-scale introduction of electric vehicles on the Swedish market. Through various research activities based in the real environment experience may be drawn from both vehicle use and different types of behavior. Infrastructure tests on a sufficient scale give the combined effect of real-life test environments for the combination of vehicles and charging environments as well as a base for experiences of softer issues around electric vehicles. Precisely these behavioral experiences are difficult to reach via the related but more technically focused programs such as, FFI (Vehicle strategic research and innovation) and Energy efficient road vehicles. Several systems for electrification of vehicles exist today, and further initiatives for solutions are on the way. It is therefore very important to examine which systems give the highest total energy efficiency. It is also relevant for these different systems in a real environment to explore the potentials and difficulties that may arise in larger implementations

  13. An Analysis of the Relationship Between the Professionalism of Defense Acquisition Program Managers and Program Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    concerns with profitability (Bartel, 2000; Phillips, 1996) or by HR specialists’ concerns to justify their budgets ( Geber , 1996; Institute of...Program, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. Geber , B. (1996). Does training make a difference? Prove it! Training, 32(3), 27–34. General Accounting

  14. The Longitudinal Elderly Person Shadowing Program: Outcomes from an Interprofessional Senior Partner Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basran, Jenny F. S.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Walker, Doreen; MacLeod, Peggy; Allen, Bev; D'Eon, Marcel; McKague, Meredith; Chopin, Nicola S.; Trinder, Krista

    2012-01-01

    The University of Saskatchewan's Longitudinal Elderly Person Shadowing (LEPS) is an interprofessional senior mentors program (SMP) where teams of undergraduate students in their first year of medicine, pharmacy, and physiotherapy; 2nd year of nutrition; 3rd year nursing; and 4th year social work partner with community-dwelling older adults.…

  15. [Electronic fetal monitoring and management of adverse outcomes: how to perform and improve a training program for clinicians?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secourgeon, J-F

    2012-10-01

    Electronic fetal monitoring during labor is the most commonly used method to evaluate the fetal status, but it remains exposed to some criticism. By comparison with intermittent auscultation and in the light of the results of the great studies in the last 30 years, it may be accused its failure to improve the neonatal outcome and its responsibility in the increase on operative deliveries. Actually, the electronic fetal monitoring is a tool whose effectiveness is linked to the accuracy of the analysis developed by the clinician. Studies on assessment of the tracing interpretation indicate that there is always a lack of quality, which may be improved through training programs. It also reveals the benefit of the fetal blood sampling to reduce operative deliveries and the generalization of this method, in addition to electronic fetal monitoring, is recommended by referral agencies. More generally, the continuous monitoring is only a part of the patient safety strategy in the labour ward and we are currently observing, in some European countries and in the United States, the development of training programs concerning the management of the adverse outcomes in obstetrics. The good performances related to the quality of care are demonstrated by the findings of the studies performed in the centers that have implemented an active training policy. In France, the professionals directly involved in the field of the perinatology should benefit from such educational programs that could be organized within the care networks under the authority of referral agencies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E.; Hopkins, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. Objective We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. Methods From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Results Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P medicine. Conclusions Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation. PMID:26692969

  17. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E; Hopkins, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P Pediatrics examination was comparable to that for pediatrics residents. Since accreditation, a larger number of residents are choosing careers in hospital medicine. Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation.

  18. Developing a blended learning program for nursing and midwifery students in Iran: Process and preliminary outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari, Mitra; Negarandeh, Reza; Eybpoosh, Sana

    2013-01-01

    Background: We aimed to develop and evaluate outcomes of a blended learning (BL) program for educating nursing and midwifery students of Tehran university of medical sciences (Tehran, Iran). Materials and Methods: This was a participatory action research project. After designing BL website, providing technological infrastructures, and holding preparatory workshops, 22 blended courses were designed. BL method was implemented for one semester. Students’ grade point average, participation with courses, and opinion about educational methods, and instructors’ attitude and opinion about educational methods were assessed. Results: Most students (n = 181; 72.1%) and 17 instructors (28.3%) consented to participate in the study. Students’ grade point average and participation was significantly higher in BL rather than in face-to-face method (P students preferred BL method and felt more independent in this method. However, they complained about lack of easy access to Internet and weakness in computer skills. Instructors admired the flexibility and incentives that had been provided in the program. However, some of them complained about the time-consuming nature of BL course design. Conclusion: The program showed positive effect on students’ learning outcomes and participation. The strengths and weaknesses of the program should be considered for development of next phase of the project. Lessons learned in this phase might be helpful for decision makers who tend to develop similar programs in Iran. Motivational and communicational issues and users’ IT skills should be addressed in every BL program. PMID:23983723

  19. Business Professional Doctoral Programs: Student Motivations, Educational Process, and Graduate Career Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis J. Grabowski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The emerging body of research on business professional doctoral programs has focused primarily on the programs’ composition and management, offering limited insight into students’ motivations and the impact the degree has on graduates and their careers. However, understanding these student motivations and career impacts is valuable for several reasons. In addition to helping future candidates assess various programs and the business professional doctoral degree itself, it can help enrolled students maximize their academic experience and help administrators improve these programs so that they better meet students’ personal and professional expectations. To bridge this research gap, this study pursued a mixed-methods approach to glean insights into why people pursue professional doctorates in business, the ultimate personal and professional outcomes of students, and the educational process producing those outcomes. The study revealed that most students entered these programs with a desire for personal or professional transformation, including the possibility of entering academia or a new industry. Moreover, the vast majority of program graduates believed they had experienced such a transformation, often in both professional and personal ways. Further, while important to personal growth, alumni perceived that certain program elements—such as the student networks they created and non-research related coursework—had little to no effect upon their career and viewed their research and the research process as far more important to their professional development. Based upon these findings, the researchers propose a comprehensive process model to explain the personal and professional factors and outcomes for graduates of business professional doctoral programs. They also suggest practical steps that students and administrators can take to improve the business professional doctoral educational experience.

  20. A novel and cost-effective monitoring approach for outcomes in an Australian biodiversity conservation incentive program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Lindenmayer

    Full Text Available We report on the design and implementation of ecological monitoring for an Australian biodiversity conservation incentive scheme - the Environmental Stewardship Program. The Program uses competitive auctions to contract individual land managers for up to 15 years to conserve matters of National Environmental Significance (with an initial priority on nationally threatened ecological communities. The ecological monitoring was explicitly aligned with the Program's policy objective and desired outcomes and was applied to the Program's initial Project which targeted the critically endangered White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland ecological community in south eastern Australia. These woodlands have been reduced to <3% of their original extent and persist mostly as small remnants of variable condition on private farmland. We established monitoring sites on 153 farms located over 172,232 sq km. On each farm we established a monitoring site within the woodland patch funded for management and, wherever possible, a matched control site. The monitoring has entailed gathering data on vegetation condition, reptiles and birds. We also gathered data on the costs of experimental design, site establishment, field survey, and data analysis. The costs of monitoring are approximately 8.5% of the Program's investment in the first four years and hence are in broad accord with the general rule of thumb that 5-10% of a program's funding should be invested in monitoring. Once initial monitoring and site benchmarking are completed we propose to implement a novel rotating sampling approach that will maintain scientific integrity while achieving an annual cost-efficiency of up to 23%. We discuss useful lessons relevant to other monitoring programs where there is a need to provide managers with reliable early evidence of program effectiveness and to demonstrate opportunities for cost-efficiencies.

  1. Impact of a workplace physical activity tracking program on biometric health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiani; Abraham, Jean M; Dowd, Bryan; Higuera, Lucas F; Nyman, John A

    2017-12-01

    Wellness programs are a popular strategy utilized by large U.S. employers. As mobile health applications and wearable tracking devices increase in prevalence, many employers now offer physical activity tracking applications. This longitudinal study evaluates the impact of engagement with a web-based, physical activity tracking program on changes in individuals' biometric outcomes in an employer population. The study population includes active employees and adult dependents continuously enrolled in an eligible health plan and who have completed at least two biometric screenings (n=36,882 person-years with 11,436 unique persons) between 2011 and 2014. Using difference-in-differences (DID) regression, we estimate the effect of participation in the physical activity tracking application on BMI, total cholesterol, and blood pressure. Participation was significantly associated with a reduction of 0.275 in BMI in the post-period, relative to the comparison group, representing a 1% change from baseline BMI. The program did not have a statistically significant impact on cholesterol or blood pressure. Sensitivity checks revealed slightly larger BMI reductions among participants with higher intensity of tracking activity and in the period following the employer's shift to an outcomes-based incentive design. Results are broadly consistent with the existing literature on changes in biometric outcomes from workplace initiatives promoting increased physical activity. Employers should have modest expectations about the potential health benefits of such programs, given current designs and implementation in real-world settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

    1994-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT ampersand E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A OE D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT ampersand E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A OE D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris

  3. Program Use and Outcome Change in a Web-Based Trauma Intervention: Individual and Social Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyun; Wang, Jianping; Maercker, Andreas

    2016-09-09

    Insight into user adherence to Web-based intervention programs and into its relationship to intervention effect is needed. The objective of this study was to examine use of a Web-based self-help intervention program, the Chinese version of My Trauma Recovery (CMTR), among Chinese traumatized individuals, and to investigate the relationship between program use and user characteristics before the intervention and change in outcomes after the intervention and at 3-months' follow-up. The sample consisted of 56 urban survivors of different trauma types and 90 rural survivors of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake, who used the CMTR in 1 month on their own or guided by volunteers in a counseling center. Predictors were demographics (sex, age, highest education, marital status, and annual family income), health problems (trauma duration, posttraumatic symptoms, and depression), psychological factors (coping self-efficacy), and social factors (social functioning impairment and social support). Program use was assessed by general program usage (eg, number of visiting days) and program adherence (eg, webpages completed in modules). Outcome measures were the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS), Symptom Checklist 90-Depression (SCL-D), Trauma Coping Self-Efficacy scale (CSE), Crisis Support Scale (CSS), and Social Functioning Impairment questionnaire (SFI) adopted from the CMTR. (1) Program use: rural participants had a larger total number of visiting days (F1,144=40.50, Psocial factors at pretest. (3) Program use and outcomes change: in general, use of the triggers and self-talk modules showed a consistent positive association with improvement in PDS, SCL-D, SFI, and CSE. The relaxation module was associated with positive change in PDS, but with negative change in CSS and SFI. The professional help module was associated with positive change in SCL-D, but its use on the first day was associated with negative change in CSS and CSE. The unhelpful coping module was associated with

  4. Outcomes in a Community-Based Intensive Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Comparison with Hospital-Based and Academic Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenberg, Charles; Silva, Edna; Young, M Jean; Gilles, Greg

    2018-04-13

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a community-based intensive cardiac rehabilitation program could produce positive changes in risk factor profile and outcomes in an at-risk population. Participants seeking either primary or secondary coronary artery disease prevention voluntarily enrolled in the 12-week intensive cardiac rehabilitation program. Data were obtained at baseline and 6-12 months after completion of the program. A total of 142 individuals, mean age 69 years, completed the Heart Series between 2012 and 2016. Follow-up data were available in 105 participants (74%). Participants showed statistically significant improvements in mean weight (165 to 162 lbs, P = .0005), body mass index (26 to 25 kg/m 2 , P = .001), systolic blood pressure (126 to 122 mm Hg, P = .01), diastolic blood pressure (73 to 70 mm Hg, P = .0005), total cholesterol (175 to 168 mg/dL, P = .03), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (100 to 93 mg/dL, P = .005), LDL-C/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio (1.8 to 1.6, P = .005), and cholesterol/HDL-C ratio (3.2 to 3.0, P = .003). Changes in HDL-C, triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose did not reach statistical significance, but all trended in favorable directions. Adverse cardiovascular disease outcomes were rare (one stent placement, no deaths). A total of 105 participants completed our 12-week community-based intensive cardiac rehabilitation program and showed significant positive changes in several measures of cardiac risk, with only 1 adverse event. These results compare favorably with those of hospital-based and academic institutional programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcomes at 18 Months From a Community Health Worker and Peer Leader Diabetes Self-Management Program for Latino Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Michael S; Kieffer, Edith C; Sinco, Brandy; Piatt, Gretchen; Palmisano, Gloria; Hawkins, Jaclynn; Lebron, Alana; Espitia, Nicolaus; Tang, Tricia; Funnell, Martha; Heisler, Michele

    2018-04-27

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a community health worker (CHW) diabetes self-management education (DSME) program, followed by two different approaches to maintain improvements in HbA 1c and other clinical and patient-centered outcomes over 18 months. The study randomized 222 Latino adults with type 2 diabetes and poor glycemic control from a federally qualified health center to 1 ) a CHW-led, 6-month DSME program or 2 ) enhanced usual care (EUC). After the 6-month program, participants randomized to the CHW-led DSME were further randomized to 1 ) 12 months of CHW-delivered monthly telephone outreach (CHW-only) or 2 ) 12 months of weekly group sessions delivered by peer leaders (PLs) with telephone outreach to those unable to attend (CHW+PL). The primary outcome was HbA 1c . Secondary outcomes were blood pressure, lipid levels, diabetes distress, depressive symptoms, understanding of diabetes self-management, and diabetes social support. Assessments were conducted at baseline and at 6, 12, and 18 months. Participants in the CHW intervention at the 6-month follow-up had greater decreases in HbA 1c (-0.45; 95% CI -0.87, -0.03; P diabetes distress (-0.3; 95% CI -0.6, -0.03; P diabetes distress at 12 and 18 months. CHW+PL participants also had significantly fewer depressive symptoms at 18 months compared with EUC (-2.2; 95% CI -4.1, -0.3; P diabetes social support and in understanding of diabetes self-management at 6 months relative to EUC, but these intervention effects were not sustained at 18 months. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a 6-month CHW intervention on key diabetes outcomes and of a volunteer PL program in sustaining key achieved gains. These are scalable models for health care centers in low-resource settings for achieving and maintaining improvements in key diabetes outcomes. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  6. The Labor Market Outcomes of Two Forms of Cross-Border Higher Education Degree Programs between Malaysia and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Yoshiko; Yuki, Takako

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the labor market outcomes of two different forms of cross-border higher education degree programs (i.e., study abroad vs. twinning) between Malaysia and Japan. Based on a new graduate survey, it examines whether there are differences in the labor market outcomes between the two programs and what other factors have significant…

  7. Impact of cooking and home food preparation interventions among adults: outcomes and implications for future programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicks, Marla; Trofholz, Amanda C; Stang, Jamie S; Laska, Melissa N

    2014-01-01

    Cooking programs are growing in popularity; however, an extensive review has not examined their overall impact. Therefore, this study reviewed previous research on cooking/home food preparation interventions and diet and health-related outcomes among adults and identified implications for practice and research. Literature review and descriptive summative method. Dietary intake, knowledge/skills, cooking attitudes and self-efficacy/confidence, health outcomes. Articles evaluating the effectiveness of interventions that included cooking/home food preparation as the primary aim (January, 1980 through December, 2011) were identified via Ovid MEDLINE, Agricola, and Web of Science databases. Studies grouped according to design and outcomes were reviewed for validity using an established coding system. Results were summarized for several outcome categories. Of 28 studies identified, 12 included a control group with 6 as nonrandomized and 6 as randomized controlled trials. Evaluation was done postintervention for 5 studies, pre- and postintervention for 23, and beyond postintervention for 15. Qualitative and quantitative measures suggested a positive influence on main outcomes. However, nonrigorous study designs, varying study populations, and the use of nonvalidated assessment tools limited stronger conclusions. Well-designed studies are needed that rigorously evaluate long-term impact on cooking behavior, dietary intake, obesity and other health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiovascular risk outcome and program evaluation of a cluster randomised controlled trial of a community-based, lay peer led program for people with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Riddell

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2013 Global Burden of Disease Study demonstrated the increasing burden of diabetes and the challenge it poses to the health systems of all countries. The chronic and complex nature of diabetes requires active self-management by patients in addition to clinical management in order to achieve optimal glycaemic control and appropriate use of available clinical services. This study is an evaluation of a “real world” peer support program aimed at improving the control and management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM in Australia. Methods The trial used a randomised cluster design with a peer support intervention and routine care control arms and 12-month follow up. Participants in both arms received a standardised session of self-management education at baseline. The intervention program comprised monthly community-based group meetings over 12 months led by trained peer supporters and active encouragement to use primary health care and other community resources and supports related to diabetes. Clinical, behavioural and other measures were collected at baseline, 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome was the predicted 5 year cardiovascular disease risk using the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS Risk Equation at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included clinical measures, quality of life, measures of support, psychosocial functioning and lifestyle measures. Results Eleven of 12 planned groups were successfully implemented in the intervention arm. Both the usual care and the intervention arms demonstrated a small reduction in 5 year UKPDS risk and the mean values for biochemical and anthropometric outcomes were close to target at 12 months. There were some small positive changes in self-management behaviours. Conclusions The positive changes in self-management behaviours among intervention participants were not sufficient to reduce cardiovascular risk, possibly because approximately half of the study participants

  9. Long-term effects of a 12-week exercise training program on clinical outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshelboim, Baruch; Oliveira, Jose; Fox, Benjamin Daniel; Soreck, Yafit; Fruchter, Oren; Kramer, Mordechai Reuven

    2015-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, devastating, lung disease, with few therapeutic options. Data are limited with respect to the long-term effect of exercise training (ET) in IPF. This study sought to evaluate the long-term effects of a 12-week ET program on clinical outcomes in IPF patients. Thirty-four IPF patients were randomly allocated to ET or control groups. ET group participated in a 12-week supervised exercise program, while the control group continued with regular medical treatment alone. Exercise capacity, 30 s-chair-stand test for leg strength, dyspnea, and Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) for quality of life (QOL) were assessed at baseline and re-evaluated at 11 months from baseline. In addition, at 30-month time point from baseline, the impact of the 12-week intervention was analyzed with respect to survival and cardio-respiratory-related hospitalizations. Thirty-two patients completed the 12-week intervention and 28 patients (14 in each group) were re-evaluated. At 11-month follow-up, no significant differences between the groups and time effect were demonstrated for most outcomes. ET group showed preserved values at the baseline level while the control group showed a trend of deterioration. Only the 30 s-chair-stand test (mean difference 3 stands, p = 0.01) and SGRQ (mean difference -6 units, p = 0.037) were significantly different between the groups. At 30 months, the survival analysis showed three deaths, eight hospitalizations occurred in the control group versus one death, one lung transplantation and seven hospitalizations in the ET group, with no significant differences between groups. At 11-month follow-up, the 12-week ET program showed clinical outcomes were preserved at baseline levels with some maintenance of improvements in leg strength and QOL in the ET group. The control group showed a trend of deterioration in the outcomes. At 30 months, the 12-week ET program did not show benefits in prognosis although

  10. Soils, surficial geology, and geomorphology of the Bear Creek Valley Low-Level Waste Disposal Development and Demonstration Program site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietzke, D.A.; Lee, S.Y.; Lambert, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    An intensive soil survey was conducted on the proposed Low-Level Waste Disposal Development and Demonstration Program site (LLWDDD) in Bear Creek Valley. Soils on the site were related to the underlying residuum and to the surficial colluvium and alluvium. Within any particular geologic formation, soils were subdivided based mostly on the degree of weathering, as reflected by saprolite weathering and morphologic features of the soils. Degree of weathering was related both to slope shape and gradient and to the joint-fracture system. Erosion classes were also used to make further subdivisions of any particular soil. Deep pits were dug in each of the major Conasauga Group formations (Pumpkin Valley, Rogersville, Maryville, and Nolichucky) for soil and saprolite characterization. Because of the widespread presence of alluvium and colluvium, which are potential sources of fill and final cover material, pits and trenches were dug to characterize the properties of these soils and to try to understand the past geomorphic history of the site. The results of the soil survey investigation indicated that the deeply weathered Pumpkin Valley residuum has good potential for the construction of tumuli or other types of belowground or aboveground burial of prepackaged compacted waste. 11 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Report for the ASC CSSE L2 Milestone (4873) - Demonstration of Local Failure Local Recovery Resilient Programming Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael Allen; Teranishi, Keita

    2014-06-01

    Recovery from process loss during the execution of a distributed memory parallel application is presently achieved by restarting the program, typically from a checkpoint file. Future computer system trends indicate that the size of data to checkpoint, the lack of improvement in parallel file system performance and the increase in process failure rates will lead to situations where checkpoint restart becomes infeasible. In this report we describe and prototype the use of a new application level resilient computing model that manages persistent storage of local state for each process such that, if a process fails, recovery can be performed locally without requiring access to a global checkpoint file. LFLR provides application developers with an ability to recover locally and continue application execution when a process is lost. This report discusses what features are required from the hardware, OS and runtime layers, and what approaches application developers might use in the design of future codes, including a demonstration of LFLR-enabled MiniFE code from the Matenvo mini-application suite.

  12. Environmental considerations for inclusion in program opportunity notices, requests for proposals, and environmental reports: fossil energy demonstration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salk, M.S.; Baird, J.N.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Berry, L.G.; Roop, R.D.; Sanders, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    This document was prepared for the Department of Energy, Division of Coal Conversion, for use in developing Program Opportunity Notices (PON), Requests for Proposals (RFP), and Environmental Reports (ER). Environmental considerations to be addressed by Offerors and Contractors are divided into three parts that correspond to the separate stages of project development: (1) the Offeror's response to the PON or RFP; (2) the Contractor's performance of baseline data collection and environmental impact assessment that results in an Environmental Report (ER) for use by DOE in the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS); and (3) the Contractor's continuance of environmental monitoring and assessment during construction and operation. Environmental analysis and environmental protection are an integral part of the Offeror's or Contractor's performance under contract to DOE. Consideration should be given to the health and socioeconomic status of man as well as to the physical and biological environment. The Offeror's or Contractor's consideration of and commitment to avoiding adverse environmental impacts must be demonstrated at every stage of the process from planning through construction and operation.

  13. Implementation and Outcomes of a Comprehensive Type 2 Diabetes Program in Rural Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, David; Mux, Sandy; Martinez, Boris; García, Pablo; Douglas, Kate; Goldberg, Vera; Lopez, Waleska; Rohloff, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The burden of chronic, non-communicable diseases such as diabetes is growing rapidly in low- and middle-income countries. Implementing management programs for diabetes and other chronic diseases for underserved populations is thus a critical global health priority. However, there is a notable dearth of shared programmatic and outcomes data from diabetes treatment programs in these settings. We describe our experiences as a non-governmental organization designing and implementing a type 2 diabetes program serving Maya indigenous people in rural Guatemala. We detail the practical challenges and solutions we have developed to build and sustain diabetes programming in this setting. We conduct a retrospective chart review from our electronic medical record to evaluate our program's performance. We generate a cohort profile, assess cross-sectional indicators using a framework adapted from the literature, and report on clinical longitudinal outcomes. A total of 142 patients were identified for the chart review. The cohort showed a decrease in hemoglobin A1C from a mean of 9.2% to 8.1% over an average of 2.1 years of follow-up (p Guatemala.

  14. Developmental cascade effects of the New Beginnings Program on adolescent adaptation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Darya Bonds; Wolchik, Sharlene A; Winslow, Emily; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N; Millsap, Roger E

    2010-11-01

    Using data from a 6-year longitudinal follow-up sample of 240 youth who participated in a randomized experimental trial of a preventive intervention for divorced families with children ages 9-12, the current study tested alternative cascading pathways by which the intervention decreased symptoms of internalizing disorders, symptoms of externalizing disorders, substance use, and risky sexual behavior and increased self-esteem and academic performance in mid- to late adolescence (15-19 years old). It was hypothesized that the impact of the program on adolescent adaptation outcomes would be explained by progressive associations between program-induced changes in parenting and youth adaptation outcomes. The results supported a cascading model of program effects in which the program was related to increased mother-child relationship quality that was related to subsequent decreases in child internalizing problems, which then was related to subsequent increases in self-esteem and decreases in symptoms of internalizing disorders in adolescence. The results were also consistent with a model in which the program increased maternal effective discipline that was related to decreased child externalizing problems, which was related to subsequent decreases in symptoms of externalizing disorders, less substance use, and better academic performance in adolescence. There were no significant differences in the model based on level of baseline risk or adolescent gender. These results provide support for a cascading pathways model of child and adolescent development.

  15. Spiritual transcendence as a predictor of psychosocial outcome from an outpatient substance abuse program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedmont, Ralph L

    2004-09-01

    Does the Spiritual Transcendence Scale (STS; R. L. Piedmont, 1999) predict psychosocial outcomes from an outpatient substance abuse program? Self-report data on symptoms, personality, and coping resources were obtained for 73 consecutive admissions (57 men and 16 women; ages 19-66 years) at intake and again from the 56 (47 men and 9 women) who completed treatment. Controlling for relevant demographic variables, pretreatment STS scores were significantly related to self-ratings at posttreatment. The STS predicted treatment outcomes over and above the contribution of the five-factor model of personality. Significant partial correlations between pretreatment STS scores and therapist ratings of treatment outcome were also obtained. Spiritual Transcendence, especially the facets of Universality and Connectedness, appears to play a significant role in substance abuse recovery. (c) 2004 APA

  16. Differences among nursing homes in outcomes of a safe resident handling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Alicia; Gore, Rebecca; Buchholz, Bryan; Punnett, Laura

    2012-01-01

    A large nursing home corporation implemented a safe resident handling program (SRHP) in 2004-2007. We evaluated its efficacy over a 2-year period by examining differences among 5 centers in program outcomes and potential predictors of those differences. We observed nursing assistants (NAs), recording activities and body postures at 60-second intervals on personal digital assistants at baseline and at 3-month, 12-month, and 24-month follow-ups. The two outcomes computed were change in equipment use during resident handling and change in a physical workload index that estimated spinal loading due to body postures and handled loads. Potential explanatory factors were extracted from post-observation interviews, investigator surveys of the workforce, from administrative data, and employee satisfaction surveys. The facility with the most positive outcome measures was associated with many positive changes in explanatory factors and the facility with the fewest positive outcome measures experienced negative changes in the same factors. These findings suggest greater SRHP benefits where there was lower NA turnover and agency staffing; less time pressure; and better teamwork, staff communication, and supervisory support. © 2012 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  17. Faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Jeff; Shachar, Mickey

    2008-01-01

    This research study investigated the relationship between faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership and the effects of moderating demographic and institutional characteristics. Data for this study were collected utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire Form 5X and the self-designed Demographic and Institution Questionnaire. The study working sample included 184 graduate occupational therapy faculty members from 98 (65%) of all accredited academic occupational therapy programs in the United States for the 2005-06 academic year. Major findings from the study indicate that, in general, transformational leadership had a significant (p leadership outcomes whereas transactional leadership had a significant (p leadership attribute (although belonging to the transactional leadership construct) was found to be a positive predictor of leadership outcomes. Demographic and institutional characteristics did not have a significant (p > 0.01) influence on perceived leadership styles and leadership outcomes. The results of this research show that the most effective occupational therapy leaders in academia have been found to be those who adopt and utilize a full range of leadership styles that combine both transformational and transactional contingent reward leadership styles and suggest common effectiveness for other allied health fields.

  18. An Experimental Trial of Adaptive Programming in Drug Court: Outcomes at 6, 12 and 18 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Harron, Ashley

    2014-06-01

    Test whether an adaptive program improves outcomes in drug court by adjusting the schedule of court hearings and clinical case-management sessions pursuant to a priori performance criteria. Consenting participants in a misdemeanor drug court were randomly assigned to the adaptive program (n = 62) or to a baseline-matching condition (n = 63) in which they attended court hearings based on the results of a criminal risk assessment. Outcome measures were re-arrest rates at 18 months post-entry to the drug court and urine drug test results and structured interview results at 6 and 12 months post-entry. Although previously published analyses revealed significantly fewer positive drug tests for participants in the adaptive condition during the first 18 weeks of drug court, current analyses indicate the effects converged during the ensuing year. Between-group differences in new arrest rates, urine drug test results and self-reported psychosocial problems were small and non-statistically significant at 6, 12 and 18 months post-entry. A non-significant trend (p = .10) suggests there may have been a small residual impact (Cramer's ν = .15) on new misdemeanor arrests after 18 months. Adaptive programming shows promise for enhancing short-term outcomes in drug courts; however, additional efforts are needed to extend the effects beyond the first 4 to 6 months of enrollment.

  19. Urban partnership agreement and congestion reduction demonstration programs : lessons learned on congestion pricing from the Seattle and Atlanta household travel behavior surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents lessons learned from household traveler surveys administered in Seattle and Atlanta as part of the evaluation of the Urban Partnership Agreement and Congestion Reduction Demonstration Programs. The surveys use a two-stage panel su...

  20. Communicating Program Outcomes to Encourage Policymaker Support for Evidence-Based State Tobacco Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M. Schmidt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use, the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., can be reduced through state-level tobacco prevention and cessation programs. In the absence of research about how to communicate the need for these programs to policymakers, this qualitative study aimed to understand the motivations and priorities of policymakers in North Carolina, a state that enacted a strong tobacco control program from 2003–2011, but drastically reduced funding in recent years. Six former legislators (three Democrats, three Republicans and three lobbyists for health organizations were interviewed about their attitudes towards tobacco use, support of state-funded programs, and reactions to two policy briefs. Five themes emerged: (1 high awareness of tobacco-related health concerns but limited awareness of program impacts and funding, (2 the primacy of economic concerns in making policy decisions, (3 ideological differences in views of the state’s role in tobacco control, (4 the impact of lobbyist and constituent in-person appeals, and (5 the utility of concise, contextualized data. These findings suggest that building relationships with policymakers to communicate ongoing program outcomes, emphasizing economic data, and developing a constituent advocacy group would be valuable to encourage continued support of state tobacco control programs.

  1. Communicating program outcomes to encourage policymaker support for evidence-based state tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Allison M; Ranney, Leah M; Goldstein, Adam O

    2014-12-04

    Tobacco use, the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., can be reduced through state-level tobacco prevention and cessation programs. In the absence of research about how to communicate the need for these programs to policymakers, this qualitative study aimed to understand the motivations and priorities of policymakers in North Carolina, a state that enacted a strong tobacco control program from 2003-2011, but drastically reduced funding in recent years. Six former legislators (three Democrats, three Republicans) and three lobbyists for health organizations were interviewed about their attitudes towards tobacco use, support of state-funded programs, and reactions to two policy briefs. Five themes emerged: (1) high awareness of tobacco-related health concerns but limited awareness of program impacts and funding, (2) the primacy of economic concerns in making policy decisions, (3) ideological differences in views of the state's role in tobacco control, (4) the impact of lobbyist and constituent in-person appeals, and (5) the utility of concise, contextualized data. These findings suggest that building relationships with policymakers to communicate ongoing program outcomes, emphasizing economic data, and developing a constituent advocacy group would be valuable to encourage continued support of state tobacco control programs.

  2. Initiation of a Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision Program at an Academic Training Program: Evaluating Patient Safety and Quality Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maykel, Justin A; Phatak, Uma R; Suwanabol, Pasithorn A; Schlussel, Andrew T; Davids, Jennifer S; Sturrock, Paul R; Alavi, Karim

    2017-12-01

    Short-term results have shown that transanal total mesorectal excision is safe and effective for patients with mid to low rectal cancers. Transanal total mesorectal excision is considered technically challenging; thus, adoption has been limited to a few academic centers in the United States. The aim of this study is to describe outcomes after the initiation of a transanal total mesorectal excision program in the setting of an academic colorectal training program. This is a single-center retrospective review of consecutive patients who underwent transanal total mesorectal excision from December 2014 to August 2016. This study was conducted at an academic center with a colorectal residency program. Patients with benign and malignant diseases were selected. All transanal total mesorectal excisions were performed with abdominal and perineal teams working simultaneously. The primary outcomes measured were pathologic quality, length of hospital stay, 30-day morbidity, and 30-day mortality. There were 40 patients (24 male). The median age was 55 years (interquartile range, 46.7-63.4) with a median BMI of 29 kg/m (interquartile range, 24.6-32.4). The primary indication was cancer (n = 30), and tumor height from the anal verge ranged from 0.5 to 15 cm. Eighty percent (n = 24) of the patients who had rectal cancer received preoperative chemoradiation. The most common procedures were low anterior resection (67.5%), total proctocolectomy (15%), and abdominoperineal resection (12.5%). Median operative time was 380 minutes (interquartile range, 306-454.4), with no change over time. For patients with malignancy, the mesorectum was complete or nearly complete in 100% of the specimens. A median of 14 lymph nodes (interquartile range, 12-17) were harvested, and 100% of the rectal cancer specimens achieved R0 status. Median length of stay was 4.5 days (interquartile range, 4-7), and there were 6 readmissions (15%). There were no deaths or intraoperative complications. This study

  3. Outcome evaluation of a community center-based program for mothers at high psychosocial risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, María José; Máiquez, María Luisa; Correa, Ana Delia; Martín, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez, Guacimara

    2006-09-01

    This study reported the outcome evaluation of the "Apoyo Personal y Familiar" (APF) program for poorly-educated mothers from multi-problem families, showing inadequate behavior with their children. APF is a community-based multi-site program delivered through weekly group meetings in municipal resource centers. A total of 340 mothers referred by the municipal social services of Tenerife, Spain were assessed; 185 mothers participated in the APF program that lasted 8 months, and 155 mothers were in the control group. Pre-post test comparisons for the intervention group and post-test comparisons with the control group on self-rating measures of maternal beliefs, personal agency and child-rearing practices were performed. Multivariate tests, t tests and effect sizes (ES) were calculated to determine the program effectiveness on the outcome measures. Mothers' support of nurturist and nativist beliefs and the reported use of Neglect-permissive and Coercive practices significantly decreased after program completion whereas the reported use of Inductive practices significantly increased. Increases in self-efficacy, internal control and role difficulty were also significant in relation to those of the control group. The program was especially effective for older mothers, with fewer children, living in a two-parent family, in urban areas and with either low or medium educational levels. The program was very effective in changing the mothers' perceived competences and modestly effective in changing their beliefs about child development and education and reported child-rearing practices. Changes in personal agency are very important for at-risk parents who feel helpless and with no control over their lives.

  4. Residential energy efficiency retrofits: How program design affects participation and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoicka, Christina E.; Parker, Paul; Andrey, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Better methods of characterizing and addressing heterogeneity in preferences and decision making are needed to stimulate reductions in household greenhouse gas emissions. Four residential energy efficiency programs were delivered consecutively in the Region of Waterloo, Canada, between 1999 and 2011, and each offered a unique combination of information, financial reward structure, and price. A natural quasi-experimental intervention design was employed to assess differences in outcomes across these program structures. Participation at the initial (evaluation by an energy advisor) and follow-up (verification of retrofit) stages, and the material characteristics (e.g., energy performance) were measured and compared between the groups of houses included in each program at each stage. The programs appealed to people with different types of material concerns; each phase of the program was associated with houses with a different mix of material characteristics and depths of recommended and achieved changes. While a performance-based reward attracted fewer houses at each stage than a larger list-based reward, older houses with poorer energy performance were included at each stage. The findings support experimentation with program designs to target sub-populations of housing stock; future program designs should experiment more carefully and with larger performance-based rewards and test parallels with potential carbon market structures. - Highlights: • Multi-program data over 12 years detailing residential energy retrofits. • Natural experimental intervention research design for program evaluation. • Number and attributes of participating households differed by program design. • Financial rewards attracted more participants to the verification stage. • Performance-based incentives have the largest potential for energy savings

  5. A review of characteristics and outcomes of Australia's undergraduate medical education rural immersion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Belinda G; McGrail, Matthew R; Russell, Deborah; Chambers, Helen; Major, Laura

    2018-01-31

    A key strategy for increasing the supply of rural doctors is rurally located medical education. In 2000, Australia introduced a national policy to increase rural immersion for undergraduate medical students. This study aims to describe the characteristics and outcomes of the rural immersion programs that were implemented in Australian medical schools. Information about 19 immersion programs was sourced in 2016 via the grey and published literature. A scoping review of the published peer-reviewed studies via Ovid MEDLINE and Informit (2000-2016) and direct journal searching included studies that focused on outcomes of undergraduate rural immersion in Australian medical schools from 2000 to 2016. Programs varied widely by selection criteria and program design, offering between 1- and 6-year immersion. Based on 26 studies from 10 medical schools, rural immersion was positively associated with rural practice in the first postgraduate year (internship) and early career (first 10 years post-qualifying). Having a rural background increased the effects of rural immersion. Evidence suggested that longer duration of immersion also increases the uptake of rural work, including by metropolitan-background students, though overall there was limited evidence about the influence of different program designs. Most evidence was based on relatively weak, predominantly cross-sectional research designs and single-institution studies. Many had flaws including small sample sizes, studying internship outcomes only, inadequately controlling for confounding variables, not using metropolitan-trained controls and providing limited justification as to the postgraduate stage at which rural practice outcomes were measured. Australia's immersion programs are moderately associated with an increased rural supply of early career doctors although metropolitan-trained students contribute equal numbers to overall rural workforce capacity. More research is needed about the influence of student interest

  6. Outcomes and Pharmacoeconomic Analysis of a Home Intravenous Antibiotic Infusion Program in Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruh, Christine A; Parameswaran, Ganapathi I; Wojciechowski, Amy L; Mergenhagen, Kari A

    2015-11-01

    The use of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) programs has become more frequent because of benefits in costs with equivalent clinical outcomes compared with inpatient care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of our program. A modified pharmacoeconomic analysis was performed to compare costs of our program with hospital or rehabilitation facility care. This was a retrospective chart review of 96 courses of OPAT between April 1, 2011, and July 31, 2013. Clinical failures were defined as readmission or death due to worsening infection or readmission secondary to adverse drug event (ADE) to antibiotic therapy. This does not include those patients readmitted for reasons not associated with OPAT therapy, including comorbidities or elective procedures. Baseline characteristics and program-specific data were analyzed. Statistically significant variables were built into a multivariate logistic regression model to determine predictors of failure. A pharmacoeconomic analysis was performed with the use of billing records. Of the total episodes evaluated, 17 (17.71%) clinically failed therapy, and 79 (82.29%) were considered a success. In the multivariate analysis, number of laboratory draws (P = 0.02) and occurrence of drug reaction were significant in the final model, P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively. The presence an adverse drug reaction increases the odds of failure (OR = 10.10; 95% CI, 2.69-44.90). Compared with inpatient or rehabilitation care, the cost savings was $6,932,552.03 or $2,649,870.68, respectively. In our study, patients tolerated OPAT well, with a low number of failures due to ADE. The clinical outcomes and cost savings of our program indicate that OPAT can be a viable alternative to long-term inpatient antimicrobial therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Characteristics and Outcomes of an Innovative Train-in-Place Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-McKenzie, Judith; Emmett, Edward A

    2017-10-01

    Physicians who make a midcareer specialty change may find their options for formal training are limited. Here, we describe a train-in-place program, with measureable outcomes, created to train midcareer physicians who desire formal training in occupational medicine. We evaluated educational outcomes from a novel residency program for midcareer physicians seeking formal training and board certification in occupational medicine. Physicians train in place at selected clinical training sites where they practice, and participate in 18 visits to the primary training site over a 2-year period. Program components include competency-based training structured around rotations, mentored projects, and periodic auditing visits to train-in-site locations by program faculty. Main outcome measures are achievement of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Occupational Medicine Milestones, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine competencies, performance on the American College of Preventive Medicine examinations, diversity in selection, placement of graduates, and the number of graduates who remain in the field. Since inception of this program in 1997, there have been 109 graduates who comprise 7.2% of new American Board of Preventive Medicine diplomates over the past decade. Graduates scored competitively on the certifying examination, achieved all milestones, expressed satisfaction with training, and are geographically dispersed, representing every US region. Most practice outside the 25 largest standard metropolitan statistical areas. More than 95% have remained in the field. Training in place is an effective approach to provide midcareer physicians seeking comprehensive skills and board certification in occupational medicine formal training, and may be adaptable to other specialties.

  8. Implementation and Outcomes of a Comprehensive Type 2 Diabetes Program in Rural Guatemala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Flood

    Full Text Available The burden of chronic, non-communicable diseases such as diabetes is growing rapidly in low- and middle-income countries. Implementing management programs for diabetes and other chronic diseases for underserved populations is thus a critical global health priority. However, there is a notable dearth of shared programmatic and outcomes data from diabetes treatment programs in these settings.We describe our experiences as a non-governmental organization designing and implementing a type 2 diabetes program serving Maya indigenous people in rural Guatemala. We detail the practical challenges and solutions we have developed to build and sustain diabetes programming in this setting.We conduct a retrospective chart review from our electronic medical record to evaluate our program's performance. We generate a cohort profile, assess cross-sectional indicators using a framework adapted from the literature, and report on clinical longitudinal outcomes.A total of 142 patients were identified for the chart review. The cohort showed a decrease in hemoglobin A1C from a mean of 9.2% to 8.1% over an average of 2.1 years of follow-up (p <0.001. The proportions of patients meeting glycemic targets were 53% for hemoglobin A1C < 8% and 32% for the stricter target of hemoglobin A1C < 7%.We first offer programmatic experiences to address a gap in resources relating to the practical issues of designing and implementing global diabetes management interventions. We then present clinical data suggesting that favorable diabetes outcomes can be attained in poor areas of rural Guatemala.

  9. Factors affecting the impact of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice, student outcomes & efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Ingvarson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This report examines effects of structural and process features of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice and efficacy. It is based on four recent (2002-2003 studies undertaken through the Australian Government Quality Teacher Programme, designed to enhance teacher quality. The total data set for the survey study includes 3,250 teachers who had participated in eighty individual professional development1 activities within these studies. Teachers were surveyed at least three months after participating in an activity, which provided them with the opportunity to gauge the impact of programs on their practice. To investigate factors affecting impact, a theoretical model was developed based on recent research into the characteristics of effective professional development and tested using blockwise regression analysis. The model included contextual factors (e.g., school support, structural features of programs (e.g. ,length, process features (e.g., emphasis on content; active learning; examination of student work; feedback; follow-up, a mediating variable (level of professional community generated, and four outcome measures (knowledge; practice; student learning and efficacy. Consistent significant direct effects were found across the four studies for the impact of content focus, active learning, and follow-up on knowledge and professional community. Feedback was rarely incorporated into program design. Impact on efficacy was strongly related to the perceived impact of activities on teachers' practice and student learning outcomes.

  10. Participation in a National Lifestyle Change Program is associated with improved diabetes Control outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sandra L; Staimez, Lisa R; Safo, Sandra; Long, Qi; Rhee, Mary K; Cunningham, Solveig A; Olson, Darin E; Tomolo, Anne M; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Narayan, Venkat K M; Phillips, Lawrence S

    2017-09-01

    Clinical trials show lifestyle change programs are beneficial, yet large-scale, successful translation of these programs is scarce. We investigated the association between participation in the largest U.S. lifestyle change program, MOVE!, and diabetes control outcomes. This longitudinal, retrospective cohort study used Veterans Health Administration databases of patients with diabetes who participated in MOVE! between 2005 and 2012, or met eligibility criteria (BMI ≥25kg/m 2 ) but did not participate. Main outcomes were diabetic eye disease, renal disease, and medication intensification. There were 400,170 eligible patients with diabetes, including 87,366 (22%) MOVE! Included patients were 96% male, 77% white, with mean age 58years and BMI 34kg/m 2 . Controlling for baseline measurements and age, race, sex, BMI, and antidiabetes medications, MOVE! participants had lower body weight (-0.6kg), random plasma glucose (-2.8mg/dL), and HbA1c (-0.1%) at 12months compared to nonparticipants (each plifestyle change programs in U.S. health systems may improve health among the growing patient population with diabetes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. An intervention to improve program implementation: findings from a two-year cluster randomized trial of Assets-Getting To Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that communities have not always been able to implement evidence-based prevention programs with quality and achieve outcomes demonstrated by prevention science. Implementation support interventions are needed to bridge this gap between science and practice. The purpose of this article is to present two-year outcomes from an evaluation of the Assets Getting To Outcomes (AGTO) intervention in 12 Maine communities engaged in promoting Developmental Assets, a positive youth development approach to prevention. AGTO is an implementation support intervention that consists of: a manual of text and tools; face-to-face training, and onsite technical assistance, focused on activities shown to be associated with obtaining positive results across any prevention program. Methods This study uses a nested and cross-sectional, cluster randomized controlled design. Participants were coalition members and program staff from 12 communities in Maine. Each coalition nominated up to five prevention programs to participate. At random, six coalitions and their respective 30 programs received the two-year AGTO intervention and the other six maintained routine operations. The study assessed prevention practitioner capacity (efficacy and behaviors), practitioner exposure to and use of AGTO, practitioner perceptions of AGTO, and prevention program performance. Capacity of coalition members and performance of their programs were compared between the two groups across the baseline, one-, and two-year time points. Results We found no significant differences between AGTO and control group’s prevention capacity. However, within the AGTO group, significant differences were found between those with greater exposure to and use of AGTO. Programs that received the highest number of technical assistance hours showed the most program improvement. Conclusions This study is the first of its kind to show that use of an implementation support intervention-AGTO -yielded

  12. A Preliminary Outcome Study of an Outpatient Treatment Program for Gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Sheldon; And Others

    The Gamblers Treatment Clinic (GTC) opened in 1982 as a New York State Office of Mental Health Demonstration Program. The basic premise of the GTC is that excessive gambling is a disorder of impulse control. Treatment, conducted in the community in a time-limited fashion, attempts to uncover the underlying dynamics that precipitate disorders of…

  13. Beyond the RCT: Integrating Rigor and Relevance to Evaluate the Outcomes of Domestic Violence Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lisa A.; Epstein, Deborah; Sullivan, Cris M.

    2018-01-01

    Programs for domestic violence (DV) victims and their families have grown exponentially over the last four decades. The evidence demonstrating the extent of their effectiveness, however, often has been criticized as stemming from studies lacking scientific rigor. A core reason for this critique is the widespread belief that credible evidence can…

  14. Do cultural differences influence batterer intervention program outcomes? A studywith Spanish and Latin American offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Vargas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed, first, if there were any differences in attitudes towards partner violence (i.e., perceivedseverity, victim blaming, and acceptability, responsibility attributions, sexism, and risk of recidivismbetween Latin American immigrants and Spanish offenders convicted of intimate-partner violence at thebeginning of a batterer intervention program. Second, differences in the batterer intervention programoutcomes between Spanish and Latin American offenders were explored. The sample consisted of 278batterers (211 Spanish and 67 Latin American who participated in a community-based battererintervention program. Results showed significant differences between Spanish and Latin Americanoffenders in perceived severity, victim blaming, violence against women acceptability, and benevolentsexism. Regarding batterer intervention program outcomes, results showed that despite initial differencesbetween Spanish and Latin American offenders, both groups benefit equally from the intervention.

  15. Outcomes and provider perspectives on geriatric care by a nurse practitioner-led community paramedicine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Rebecca E; Vejar, Maria; Parnes, Bennett; Mulder, Joy; Daddato, Andrea; Matlock, Daniel D; Lum, Hillary D

    2018-05-03

    This study explores the use of a nurse practitioner-led paramedicine program for acute, home-based care of geriatric patients. This case series describes patients, outcomes, and geriatric primary care provider perspectives related to use of this independent paramedicine program. There were 40 patient visits from August 2016-May 2017. We reviewed patient demographics, medical conditions, healthcare utilization, and communication processes and used semi-structured interviews and content analysis to explore staff perspectives. The most commonly treated diagnoses were respiratory conditions, urinary tract infections, and gastrointestinal concerns. Two patients required an immediate transfer to a higher level of care. Six patients had emergency department visits and five patients were hospitalized within two weeks. Geriatric providers identified three themes including: potential benefits to geriatric patients, importance of enhanced care coordination and communication, and considerations for the specific role of nurse practitioner-led community paramedicine programs for geriatric patient care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Comparison of Five-Year Outcome of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Triple-Vessel Coronary Artery Disease (from the Coronary Revascularization Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto PCI/CABG Registry Cohort-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Hiroki; Morimoto, Takeshi; Furukawa, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Tazaki, Junichi; Sakata, Ryuzo; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Hanyu, Michiya; Shimamoto, Mitsuomi; Nishiwaki, Noboru; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Kimura, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    Studies evaluating long-term (≥5 years) outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using drug-eluting stents compared with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with triple-vessel coronary artery disease (TVD) are still limited. We identified 2,978 patients with TVD (PCI: n = 1,824, CABG: n = 1,154) of 15,939 patients with first coronary revascularization enrolled in the Coronary Revascularization Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto PCI/CABG Registry Cohort-2. The primary outcome measure in the present analysis was a composite of death, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke. Median follow-up duration for the surviving patients was 1,973 days (interquartile range 1,700 to 2,244). The cumulative 5-year incidence of death/MI/stroke was significantly higher in the PCI group than in the CABG group (28.2% vs 24.0%, log-rank p = 0.006). After adjusting for confounders, the excess risk of PCI relative to CABG for death/MI/stroke remained significant (hazard ratio [HR] 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13 to 1.68, p = 0.002). The excess risks of PCI relative to CABG for all-cause death, MI, and any coronary revascularization were also significant (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.74, p = 0.006; HR 2.81, 95% CI 1.69 to 4.66, p PCI and CABG groups (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61 to 1.26, p = 0.48). There were no interactions for the primary outcome measure between the mode of revascularization (PCI or CABG) and the subgroup factors such as age, diabetes, and Synergy Between PCI With Taxus and Cardiac Surgery score. In conclusion, CABG compared with PCI was associated with better long-term outcome in patients with TVD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Outcomes associated with a structured prenatal counseling program for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Mary Veronica; Bender, Christina; Townsend, Kathryn E; Hamilton, Emily F

    2012-08-01

    We examined outcomes that were associated with a novel program to identify patients who are at high risk for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. The program included a checklist of key risk factors and a multifactorial algorithm to estimate risk of shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. We examined rates of cesarean delivery and shoulder dystocia in 8767 deliveries by clinicians who were enrolled in the program and in 11,958 patients of clinicians with no access to the program. Key risk factors were identified in 1071 of 8767 mothers (12.2%), of whom 40 of 8767 women (0.46%) had results in the high-risk category. The rate of primary cesarean delivery rate was stable (21.2-20.8%; P = .57). Shoulder dystocia rates fell by 56.8% (1.74-0.75%; P = .002). The rates of shoulder dystocia and cesarean birth showed no changes in the group with no access to the program. With the introduction of this program, overall shoulder dystocia rates fell by more than one-half with no increase in the primary cesarean delivery rate. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Outcomes from a postgraduate biomedical technology innovation training program: the first 12 years of Stanford Biodesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Todd J; Kurihara, Christine Q; Camarillo, David B; Pietzsch, Jan B; Gorodsky, Julian; Zenios, Stefanos A; Doshi, Rajiv; Shen, Christopher; Kumar, Uday N; Mairal, Anurag; Watkins, Jay; Popp, Richard L; Wang, Paul J; Makower, Josh; Krummel, Thomas M; Yock, Paul G

    2013-09-01

    The Stanford Biodesign Program began in 2001 with a mission of helping to train leaders in biomedical technology innovation. A key feature of the program is a full-time postgraduate fellowship where multidisciplinary teams undergo a process of sourcing clinical needs, inventing solutions and planning for implementation of a business strategy. The program places a priority on needs identification, a formal process of selecting, researching and characterizing needs before beginning the process of inventing. Fellows and students from the program have gone on to careers that emphasize technology innovation across industry and academia. Biodesign trainees have started 26 companies within the program that have raised over $200 million and led to the creation of over 500 new jobs. More importantly, although most of these technologies are still at a very early stage, several projects have received regulatory approval and so far more than 150,000 patients have been treated by technologies invented by our trainees. This paper reviews the initial outcomes of the program and discusses lessons learned and future directions in terms of training priorities.

  19. Fewer study participants needed to demonstrate superior antidepressant efficacy when using the Hamilton melancholia subscale (HAM-D6) as outcome measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Bech, Per; Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica

    2016-01-01

    participants per group would be required to detect a statistically significant difference between EPO and placebo when using the HAM-D6 as outcome measure, whereas the required group size for HAM-D17 would be 146 participants. Limitations The EPO RCT was not originally designed to investigate the research...... placebo-controlled trial (RCT) testing the effect of erythropoietin (EPO) as augmentation therapy in patients with treatment-resistant depression.  Methods We assessed the scalability (Mokken analysis of unidimensionality), responsiveness (item responsiveness analysis) and ability to show drug......-placebo separation (estimation of sample size needed to detect statistically significant difference between EPO and placebo) of the HAM-D6 and the HAM-D17.  Results The HAM-D6 demonstrated higher scalability, higher responsiveness, and better drug-placebo separation compared to the HAM-D17. As a consequence, only 39...

  20. Office of Technology Development's Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This document presents brief summaries of waste management, remedial action, decommissioning/decontamination, and waste processing programs and issues currently being developed at Department of Energy Facilities

  1. Office of Technology Development`s Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This document presents brief summaries of waste management, remedial action, decommissioning/decontamination, and waste processing programs and issues currently being developed at Department of Energy Facilities.

  2. Outcomes and cost comparisons after introducing a robotics program for endometrial cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Vaknin, Zvi; Ramana-Kumar, Agnihotram V; Halliday, Darron; Franco, Eduardo L; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of introducing a robotic program on cost and patient outcome. This was a prospective evaluation of clinical outcome and cost after introducing a robotics program for the treatment of endometrial cancer and a retrospective comparison to the entire historical cohort. Consecutive patients with endometrial cancer who underwent robotic surgery (n=143) were compared with all consecutive patients who underwent surgery (n=160) before robotics. The rate of minimally invasive surgery increased from 17% performed by laparoscopy to 98% performed by robotics in 2 years. The patient characteristics were comparable in both eras, except for a higher body mass index in the robotics era (median 29.8 compared with 27.6; Probotics had longer operating times (233 compared with 206 minutes), but fewer adverse events (13% compared with 42%; Probotics compared with the historical group (Can$7,644 compared with Can$10,368 [Canadian dollars]; Psurgery, the short-term recurrence rate appeared lower in the robotics group compared with the historic cohort (11 recurrences compared with 19 recurrences; Probotics for endometrial cancer surgery increased the proportion of patients benefitting from minimally invasive surgery, improved short-term outcomes, and resulted in lower hospital costs. II.

  3. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Monthly, quarterly and annual progress report, December 1978 and Calender Year 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    A new pilot plant program developed by DOE and the team members, was started on September 20, 1978. Pilot plant success was achieved in obtaining an ash balanced condition for several days with ash agglomeration with a pure coal feed. This was the objective of the first three months of the approved program.

  4. Effects of a tailor-made exercise program on exercise adherence and health outcomes in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a mixed-methods pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Fung-Kam Iris; Lee, Tze-Fan Diana; So, Winnie Kwok-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that exercise intervention was effective in symptoms control of knee osteoarthritis (OA) but poor intervention adherence reduced the exercise effect. It has been suspected that the design of exercise intervention mainly from the health care professionals' perspective could not address the patients' barriers to exercise. Therefore, a tailor-made exercise program which incorporated the patient's perspective in the design was developed and ready for evaluation. This pilot study estimated the effects of a tailor-made exercise program on exercise adherence and health outcomes, and explored the participants' perception and experience of the program. The intervention of this study was a 4-week community-based group exercise program, which required the participants to attend a 1-hour session each week. Thirty-four older people with knee OA were recruited to the program. Mixed-methods study design was used to estimate the effects of this program and explore the participants' perception and experience of the program. Exercise adherence and performance in return-demonstration of the exercise were assessed at 12 weeks after the program. Disease-specific health status (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index), general health status (12-item Short Form of the Medical Outcome Study Questionnaire), knee range of motion, muscle strength, and endurance of the lower extremities (Timed-Stands Test) were measured at the beginning of the program and 12 weeks after. Six participants were interviewed individually on the 12th week. Thirty-three participants (75.0±7.3 years) completed the one-group pretest and post-test study. The participants' exercise adherence was 91.4%±14.54%, and their correct performance in return-demonstration was 76.7%±21.75%. Most of the participants' health outcomes significantly improved at posttests except the 12-item Short Form of the Medical Outcome Study Questionnaire physical health summary score. The

  5. Using adaptive processes and adverse outcome pathways to develop meaningful, robust, and actionable environmental monitoring programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciszewski, Tim J; Munkittrick, Kelly R; Scrimgeour, Garry J; Dubé, Monique G; Wrona, Fred J; Hazewinkel, Rod R

    2017-09-01

    The primary goals of environmental monitoring are to indicate whether unexpected changes related to development are occurring in the physical, chemical, and biological attributes of ecosystems and to inform meaningful management intervention. Although achieving these objectives is conceptually simple, varying scientific and social challenges often result in their breakdown. Conceptualizing, designing, and operating programs that better delineate monitoring, management, and risk assessment processes supported by hypothesis-driven approaches, strong inference, and adverse outcome pathways can overcome many of the challenges. Generally, a robust monitoring program is characterized by hypothesis-driven questions associated with potential adverse outcomes and feedback loops informed by data. Specifically, key and basic features are predictions of future observations (triggers) and mechanisms to respond to success or failure of those predictions (tiers). The adaptive processes accelerate or decelerate the effort to highlight and overcome ignorance while preventing the potentially unnecessary escalation of unguided monitoring and management. The deployment of the mutually reinforcing components can allow for more meaningful and actionable monitoring programs that better associate activities with consequences. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:877-891. © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  6. Case file audit of Lidcombe program outcomes in a student-led stuttering clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Julia; Swift, Michelle C; Wagnitz, Bianca

    2017-04-01

    The current study aimed to benchmark clinical outcomes for preschool-aged clients (2;0-5;11 years old) that attended a student-led clinic and undertook the Lidcombe Program. A case file audit was undertaken for all preschool clients who attended the clinic between February 2008 and February 2013 and commenced the Lidcombe Program. Clients were grouped according to Stage 1 completion. A mixed ANOVA was used to test for differences between the groups in initial and final percentage syllables stuttered (%SS). Associations between case variable factors and treatment duration were investigated using Pearson correlations. Clients who completed Stage 1 had final %SS and severity rating (SR) scores comparable to the literature; however, the median Stage 1 duration was greater. Over half of the clients (57%) withdrew prior to completing Stage 1. These clients had a significantly higher %SS at final treatment session than their completing peers. Initial %SS and SR scores were the only case variables associated with treatment duration. Students can achieve the same short-term treatment outcomes for children who stutter using the Lidcombe Program as the current published literature; however, treatment duration is greater and may impact completion. Implications of this for clinical education are discussed.

  7. Physical activity and nutrition behavioural outcomes of a home-based intervention program for seniors: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Linda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This intervention aimed to ascertain whether a low-cost, accessible, physical activity and nutrition program could improve physical activity and nutrition behaviours of insufficiently active 60–70 year olds residing in Perth, Australia. Methods A 6-month home-based randomised controlled trial was conducted on 478 older adults (intervention, n = 248; control, n = 230 of low to medium socioeconomic status. Both intervention and control groups completed postal questionnaires at baseline and post-program, but only the intervention participants received project materials. A modified fat and fibre questionnaire measured nutritional behaviours, whereas physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Generalised estimating equation models were used to assess the repeated outcomes over both time points. Results The final sample consisted of 176 intervention participants and 199 controls (response rate 78.5% with complete data. After controlling for demographic and other confounding factors, the intervention group demonstrated increased participation in strength exercise (p Conclusions A minimal contact, low-cost and home-based physical activity program can positively influence seniors’ physical activity and nutrition behaviours. Trial registration anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12609000735257

  8. Transitioning a bachelor of science in nursing program to blended learning: Successes, challenges & outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Laurie; Pintz, Christine

    2017-09-01

    To help address the challenges of providing undergraduate nursing education in an accelerated time frame, the Teaching and Transforming through Technology (T3) project was funded to transition a second-degree ABSN program to a blended learning format. The project has explored the use of blended learning to: enable flexible solutions to support teaching goals and address course challenges; provide students with new types of independent learning activities outside of the traditional classroom; increase opportunities for active learning in the classroom; and improve students' digital literacy and lifelong learning skills. Program evaluation included quality reviews of the redesigned courses, surveys of student perceptions, pre- and post-program assessment of students' digital literacy and interviews with faculty about their experiences with the new teaching methods. Adopting an established quality framework to guide course design and evaluation for quality contributed to the efficient and effective development of a high-quality undergraduate blended nursing program. Program outcomes and lessons learned are presented to inform future teaching innovation and research related to blended learning in undergraduate nursing education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. DOD Residential Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Demonstration Program. Volume 2. Summary of Fiscal Year 2001-2003 Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    produced many of the Beatles 1970s recordings. This facility was selected to host the UK PEM demonstration project from a selection of four potential sites...funded the Department of Defense (DOD) Residential PEM Demonstration Project to demonstrate domestically-produced, residential Proton Exchange Membrane...PEM) fuel cells at DOD Facilities. The objectives were to: (1) assess PEM fuel cells’ role in supporting sustainability at military installations

  10. Perinatal programming of childhood asthma: early fetal size, growth trajectory during infancy, and childhood asthma outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The "fetal origins hypothesis" or concept of "developmental programming" suggests that faltering fetal growth and subsequent catch-up growth are implicated in the aetiology of cardiovascular disease. Associations between reduced birth weight, rapid postnatal weight gain, and asthma suggest that there are fetal origins to respiratory disease. The present paper first summarises the literature relating birth weight and post natal growth trajectories to asthma outcomes. Second, issues regarding the interpretation of antenatal fetal ultrasound measurements are discussed. Finally, recent reports linking antenatal measurement and growth trajectory to early childhood asthma outcomes are discussed. Understanding the nature and timing of factors which influence antenatal growth may give important insight into the antecedents of early-onset asthma with implications for interventions.

  11. Incidence and outcome of surgical procedures after coronary artery bypass grafting compared with those after percutaneous coronary intervention: a report from the Coronary Revascularization Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto PCI/CABG Registry Cohort-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokushige, Akihiro; Shiomi, Hiroki; Morimoto, Takeshi; Ono, Koh; Furukawa, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Kadota, Kazushige; Ando, Kenji; Shizuta, Satoshi; Tada, Tomohisa; Tazaki, Junichi; Kato, Yoshihiro; Hayano, Mamoru; Abe, Mitsuru; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Mitsudo, Kazuaki; Nobuyoshi, Masakiyo; Kita, Toru; Imoto, Yutaka; Sakata, Ryuzo; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Hanyu, Michiya; Shimamoto, Mitsuomi; Nishiwaki, Noboru; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Kimura, Takeshi

    2014-08-01

    Noncardiac surgery after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been reported to be carrying high risk for both ischemic and bleeding complications. However, there has been no report comparing the incidence and outcomes of surgical procedures after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with those after PCI. Among 14 383 patients undergoing first coronary revascularization (PCI, n=12 207; CABG, n=2176) enrolled in the Coronary Revascularization Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto (CREDO-Kyoto) PCI/CABG Registry Cohort-2, surgical procedures were performed more frequently after CABG (n=560) than after PCI (n=2398; cumulative 3-year incidence: 27% versus 22%; unadjusted PPCI groups (cumulative incidence: 3.1% versus 3.2%; unadjusted P=0.9; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-1.89; P=0.9). The risk for the primary bleeding outcome measure (moderate or severe bleeding by Global Utilization of Streptokinase and Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Occluded Coronary Arteries classification) was lower in the CABG groups than in the PCI group (cumulative incidence: 1.3% versus 2.6%; unadjusted P=0.07; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.87; P=0.02). There were no interactions between the timing of surgery and the types of coronary revascularization (CABG/PCI) for both ischemic and bleeding outcomes. Surgical procedures were performed significantly more frequently after CABG than after PCI, particularly PCI were associated with similar risk for ischemic events and lower risk for bleeding events, regardless of the timing after coronary revascularization. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Evaluating outcomes of patients lost to follow-up in a large comprehensive care treatment program in western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachlis, B; Ochieng, D; Geng, E; Rotich, E; Ochieng, V; Maritim, B; Ndege, S; Naanyu, V; Martin, J; Keter, A; Ayuo, P; Diero, L; Nyambura, M; Braitstein, P

    2014-01-01

    Background The Academic Model Providing Access To Healthcare (AMPATH) program provides comprehensive HIV care and treatment services. Approximately 30% of patients have become lost to follow-up (LTFU). We sought to actively trace and identify outcomes for a sample of these patients. Methods LTFU was defined as missing a scheduled visit by ≥ 3 months. A randomly selected sample of 17% of patients identified as LTFU between January 2009 and June 2011 was generated, with sample stratification on age, antiretroviral therapy (ART) status at last visit, and facility. Chart reviews were conducted followed by active tracing. Tracing was completed by trained HIV-positive outreach workers July 2011 to February 2012. Outcomes were compared between adults and children and by ART status. Results Of 14,811 LTFU patients, 2,540 were randomly selected for tracing (2,179 adults, 1,071 on ART). The chart reviews indicated that 326 (12.8%) patients were not actually LTFU. Outcomes for 71% of sampled patients were determined including 85% of those physically traced. Of those with known outcomes, 21% had died while 29% had disengaged from care for various reasons. The remaining patients had moved away (n=458, 25%) or were still receiving HIV care (n=443 total, 25%). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of a large scale sampling-based approach. A significant proportion of patients were found not to be LTFU and further, high numbers of patients who were LTFU could not be located. Over a quarter of patients disengaged from care for various reasons including access challenges and familial influences. PMID:25692336

  13. DOD Business Systems Modernization: Key Navy Programs' Compliance with DOD's Federated Business Enterprise Architecture Needs to be Adequately Demonstrated

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hite, Randolph C; Lakhmani, Neela; Barkakati, Nabajyoti; Doherty, Neil; Glover, Nancy; Longcore, Emily; Holland, Michael; Le, Anh; Leiling, Josh; McCracken, Lee; Srikanth, Sushmita

    2008-01-01

    .... In particular, the programs BEA compliance assessments did not: * Include all relevant architecture products, such as products that specify the technical standards needed to promote interoperability among related systems...

  14. Office of Technology Development's Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents brief summaries of programs being investigated at USDOE sites for waste processing, remedial action, underground storage tank remediation, and robotic applications in waste management

  15. Redesigning a clinical mentoring program for improved outcomes in the clinical training of clerks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Der Lin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mentorship has been noted as critical to medical students adapting to clinical training in the medical workplace. A lack of infrastructure in a mentoring program might deter relationship building between mentors and mentees. This study assessed the effect of a redesigned clinical mentoring program from the perspective of clerks. The objective was to assess the benefits of the redesigned program and identify potential improvements. Methods: A redesigned clinical mentoring program was launched in a medical center according to previous theoretical and practical studies on clinical training workplaces, including the elements of mentor qualifications, positive and active enhancers for mentor–mentee relationship building, the timing of mentoring performance evaluation, and financial and professional incentives. A four-wave web survey was conducted, comprising one evaluation of the former mentoring program and three evaluations of the redesigned clinical mentoring program. Sixty-four fifth-year medical students in clerkships who responded to the first wave and to at least two of the three following waves were included in the study. A structured and validated questionnaire encompassing 15 items on mentor performance and the personal characteristics of the clerks was used. Mixed linear models were developed for repeated measurements and to adjust for personal characteristics. Results: The results revealed that the redesigned mentoring program improved the mentors’ performance over time for most evaluated items regarding professional development and personal support provided to the mentees. Conclusions: Our findings serve as an improved framework for the role of the institution and demonstrate how institutional policies, programs, and structures can shape a clinical mentoring program. We recommend the adoption of mentorship schemes for other cohorts of medical students and for different learning and training stages involved in becoming a

  16. Redesigning a clinical mentoring program for improved outcomes in the clinical training of clerks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Der; Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lee, Cheng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mentorship has been noted as critical to medical students adapting to clinical training in the medical workplace. A lack of infrastructure in a mentoring program might deter relationship building between mentors and mentees. This study assessed the effect of a redesigned clinical mentoring program from the perspective of clerks. The objective was to assess the benefits of the redesigned program and identify potential improvements. Methods A redesigned clinical mentoring program was launched in a medical center according to previous theoretical and practical studies on clinical training workplaces, including the elements of mentor qualifications, positive and active enhancers for mentor–mentee relationship building, the timing of mentoring performance evaluation, and financial and professional incentives. A four-wave web survey was conducted, comprising one evaluation of the former mentoring program and three evaluations of the redesigned clinical mentoring program. Sixty-four fifth-year medical students in clerkships who responded to the first wave and to at least two of the three following waves were included in the study. A structured and validated questionnaire encompassing 15 items on mentor performance and the personal characteristics of the clerks was used. Mixed linear models were developed for repeated measurements and to adjust for personal characteristics. Results The results revealed that the redesigned mentoring program improved the mentors’ performance over time for most evaluated items regarding professional development and personal support provided to the mentees. Conclusions Our findings serve as an improved framework for the role of the institution and demonstrate how institutional policies, programs, and structures can shape a clinical mentoring program. We recommend the adoption of mentorship schemes for other cohorts of medical students and for different learning and training stages involved in becoming a physician. PMID

  17. Evaluating Student Success and Outcomes in the Scripps Institution of Oceanography REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranes, J. L.; Kohne, L.

    2013-12-01

    The NSF foundation-wide REU program exists to help attract and retain a diverse pool of talented undergraduate students in STEM fields. These goals are particularly relevant in earth and marine sciences because relatively few minority students traditionally seek careers in these fields and only account for an extremely small percentage of Ph.D. degrees earned. The Scripps Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) REU program is a 10-week summer program currently in its third year of funding. The SURF program invites 10-15 undergraduate students from across the country to Scripps to participate in high quality collaborative research with Scripps faculty and researchers. Program components also include research seminars, career and graduate school preparation, GRE-prep courses, field trips and social activities. The project's goal, broadly, is to increase the participation of underrepresented minorities in marine science and related disciplines at a national level. Our program includes a comprehensive evaluation and assessment plan to help us understand the impact of this REU experience on the student participant. Our assessment consists of paired pre- and post-survey questions to estimate student growth in the following areas as related to earth and marine sciences: (1) increased knowledge and skills (2) increased confidence in ability to conduct research (3) improved attitudes and interest in the field and (4) more ambitious career goals. Assessment results from the last two cohorts have helped refine our recruitment and selection strategies. In the first year of our program, we focused almost exclusively on recruiting underrepresented minority students; over of the participants represented ethic groups considered to be underrepresented in STEM fields. However, participants did not demonstrate overall significant pre/post gains in any of the goal areas, mostly because pre-survey scores indicated that the students were already very strong in all goal areas. In years

  18. Research and Teaching: Computational Methods in General Chemistry--Perceptions of Programming, Prior Experience, and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lindsay B.; Chiu, Jennie L.; Grisham, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how integrating computational tools into a general chemistry laboratory course can influence student perceptions of programming and investigates relationships among student perceptions, prior experience, and student outcomes.

  19. Impact of an intensive dynamic exercise program on oxidative stress and on the outcome in patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal F Soliman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Twelve weeks of intensive dynamic exercise program should be recommended to patients with FM as it was effective in decreasing the oxidative stress parameters, increasing the antioxidant parameters, and improving the clinical outcome of this disease.

  20. [Effects of integrated disease management program on the outcome of patients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hui-hua; Shi, Hao-ying; Jin, Wei; Zhu, Ya-juan; Huang, Dai-ni; Yan, Yi-wen; Zhu, Feng; Li, Hong-li; Liu, Jian; Liu, Shao-wen

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility and efficacy on the outcome of patients with heart failure of integrated disease management program with heart failure clinic, patient education and telephone follow-up. A total of 145 hospitalized patients with chronic heart failure and LVEF ≤ 45% or patients with LVEF > 45% and NT-proBNP > 1500 ng/L were divided into conventional group (n = 71) and interventional group (n = 74). Patients were followed for 10 to 12 months. Baseline clinical characteristics, LVEF and dose of evidence-based medicine were similar between the 2 groups. During follow-up, the NYHA functional class was higher in conventional group than interventional group (3.2 ± 0.5 vs 1.4 ± 0.5, P management program with heart failure clinic, patient education and telephone follow-up can improve patient compliance to heart failure treatment, improve cardiac function and reduce cardiovascular event rate.

  1. "Transcend": initial outcomes from a posttraumatic stress disorder/substance abuse treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, B; Padin-Rivera, E; Kowaliw, S

    2001-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive treatment program for combat veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance abuse (SA). Outcome data are presented on 46 male patients who completed treatment between 1996 and 1998. The treatment approach, defined by a detailed manual, integrates elements of cognitive-behavioral skills training, constructivist theory approaches, SA relapse prevention strategies, and peer social support into a group-focused program. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) were used to assess treatment effectiveness at discharge and 6- and 12-month follow-up. Significant symptom changes revealed on CAPS and ASI scores at discharge and follow-up are analyzed. Discussion focuses on hypotheses regarding treatment effectiveness, study limitations, and suggestions for further research.

  2. Engaging Stakeholders in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Regarding School-Based Sealant Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Milgrom, Peter; Gillette, Jane

    2018-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use qualitative methods to describe the key lessons learned during the stakeholder engagement stage of planning a randomized clinical trial comparing outcomes of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) as an alternative to pit-and-fissure sealants in a school-based delivery system. Methods: Eighteen caregivers and community-based stakeholders with involvement in the school-based sealant program Sealants for Smiles from the state of Montana, were recruited for this qualitative study. United States (U.S.) Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) methodology standards were used to develop two semi-structured interview guides consisting of 6 questions. One interview guide was used for telephone interviews with caregivers and the second was used for a stakeholder focus group. Content analytic methods were used to analyze the data. Results: All participants believed that a study comparing SDF and sealants was clinically relevant. Non-caregiver stakeholders agreed with the proposed primary outcome of the study (caries prevention) whereas caregivers also emphasized the importance of child-centered outcomes such as minimizing dental anxiety associated with dental care. Stakeholders described potential concerns associated with SDF such as staining and perceptions of safety and discussed ways to address these concerns through community engagement, appropriate framing of the study, proper consent procedures, and ongoing safety monitoring during the trial. Finally, stakeholders suggested dissemination strategies such as direct communication of findings through professional organizations and encouraging insurance plans to incentivize SDF use by reimbursing dental providers. Conclusions: Involving key stakeholders in early planning is essential in developing patient-centered research questions, outcomes measures, study protocols, and dissemination plans for oral health research involving a school-based delivery system. Copyright © 2018

  3. Dark Skies Awareness Programs for the International Year of Astronomy: Involvement, Outcomes and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2010-01-01

    The preservation of dark skies is a growing global concern, yet it is one of the easiest environmental problems people can address on local levels. For this reason, the goal of the IYA Dark Skies Awareness Cornerstone Project is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs. These programs provide resources on light pollution for new technologies like a presence in Second Life and podcasts, for local thematic events at national parks and observatory open houses, for international thematic events like International Dark Skies Week and Earth Hour, for a program in the arts like an international photo contest, for global citizen-science programs that measure night sky brightness worldwide, and for educational materials like a kit with a light shielding demonstration. These programs have been successfully used around the world during IYA to raise awareness of the effects of light pollution on public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy. The presentation will provide an update, take a look ahead at the project's sustainability, and describe how people can be involved in the future. Information about the programs is at www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  4. Outcome of cooperative program between JAEA and US DOE on decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Taro; Shiraishi, Kunio; Tachibana, Mitsuo; Ishigami, Tsutomu

    2009-07-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA: the former Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been collecting wide variety of information on decommissioning nuclear facilities by the cooperative program with US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1988. In the course of the cooperation, the cooperative program has continued under the newly established specific memorandum in the field of decontamination and decommissioning nuclear facilities since 2001 on the framework agreement of USDOE and JAERI. On the other hand, the US DOE environmental management program, which was initiated in 1989, has developed resulting in achievement of dismantlement and decontamination and cleanup of nuclear facilities mainly used for Manhattan project and demonstration of various technologies developed for this program. In the cooperative activities, information on decommissioning activities including innovated technology developments has been exchanged with CP-5 and Mound plant as designated main facilities of DOE, and with JRR-2 and the reprocessing test facility of JAERI. The experiences and technologies applied in the environmental management program are expected to contribute to planning and implementing decommissioning nuclear facilities in JAEA. This report describes the summary of the information on decommissioning activities and technology development and deployment of the environmental management program in DOE obtained through the cooperation under the specific memorandum agreement. (author)

  5. Short-term outcomes of a program developed to inculcate research essentials in undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Devi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Participation in research during undergraduate studies may increase students′ interest in research and inculcate research essentials in them. Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the mentored student project (MSP program. Settings and Design: In the MSP program, students in groups (n = 3 to 5 undertook a research project, wrote a scholarly report, and presented the work as a poster presentation with the help of a faculty mentor. To begin with, the logic model of the program was developed to identify short-term outcomes of the program on students, mentors, and the institution. A quasi-experimental design was used to measure the outcomes. Materials and Methods: A mixed method evaluation was done using a newly-developed questionnaire to assess the impact of the MSP on students′ attitude, a multiple-choice question (MCQs test to find out the impact on students′ knowledge and grading of students′ project reports and posters along with a survey to check the impact on skills. Students′ satisfaction regarding the program and mentors′ perceptions were collected using questionnaires. Evidence for validity was collected for all the instruments used for the evaluation. Statistical Analysis: Non-parametric tests were used to analyze data. Based on the scores, project reports and posters were graded into A (>70% marks, B (60-69% marks, and C (<59% marks categories. The number of MSPs that resulted in publications, conference presentation and departmental collaborations were taken as impact on the institution. Results: Students′ response rate was 91.5%. The students′ attitudes regarding research changed positively (P = 0.036 and score in the MCQ test improved (P < 0.001 after undertaking MSP. Majority of project reports and posters were of grade A category. The majority of the items related to skills gained and satisfaction had a median score of 4. The MSPs resulted in inter-departmental and inter

  6. History and Outcomes of 50 Years of Physician-Scientist Training in Medical Scientist Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Clifford V; Akabas, Myles H; Andersen, Olaf S

    2017-10-01

    Physician-scientists are needed to continue the great pace of recent biomedical research and translate scientific findings to clinical applications. MD-PhD programs represent one approach to train physician-scientists. MD-PhD training started in the 1950s and expanded greatly with the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP), launched in 1964 by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) at the National Institutes of Health. MD-PhD training has been influenced by substantial changes in medical education, science, and clinical fields since its inception. In 2014, NIGMS held a 50th Anniversary MSTP Symposium highlighting the program and assessing its outcomes. In 2016, there were over 90 active MD-PhD programs in the United States, of which 45 were MSTP supported, with a total of 988 trainee slots. Over 10,000 students have received MSTP support since 1964. The authors present data for the demographic characteristics and outcomes for 9,683 MSTP trainees from 1975-2014. The integration of MD and PhD training has allowed trainees to develop a rigorous foundation in research in concert with clinical training. MSTP graduates have had relative success in obtaining research grants and have become prominent leaders in many biomedical research fields. Many challenges remain, however, including the need to maintain rigorous scientific components in evolving medical curricula, to enhance research-oriented residency and fellowship opportunities in a widening scope of fields targeted by MSTP graduates, to achieve greater racial diversity and gender balance in the physician-scientist workforce, and to sustain subsequent research activities of physician-scientists.

  7. FitKids360: Design, Conduct, and Outcomes of a Stage 2 Pediatric Obesity Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M. Tucker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes FitKids360, a stage 2 pediatric weight management program. FitKids360 is a physician-referred, multicomponent, low-cost healthy lifestyle program for overweight and obese youth 5–16 years of age and their families. FitKids360 provides an evidence-based approach to the treatment of pediatric overweight by targeting patients’ physical activity, screen time, and dietary behaviors using a family-centered approach. The intervention begins with a two-hour orientation and assessment period followed by six weekly sessions. Assessments include lifestyle behaviors, anthropometry, and the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity (FNPA survey, which screens for obesogenic risk factors in the home environment. Outcomes are presented from 258 patients who completed one of 33 FitKids360 classes. After completing FitKids360, patients increased moderate to vigorous physical activity by 14 minutes (P=0.019, reduced screen time by 44 minutes (P<0.001, and improved key dietary behaviors. Overall, FNPA scores increased by 9% (P<0.001 and 69% of patients with “high risk” FNPA scores at baseline dropped below the “high risk” range by followup. Patients also lowered BMIs (P=0.011 and age- and sex-adjusted BMI z-scores (P<0.001 after completing the 7-week program. We hope this report will be useful to medical and public health professionals seeking to develop stage 2 pediatric obesity programs.

  8. Competent Parents, Protected Children: Outcomes Evaluation of the "Viviendo en Familia" Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Gómez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available "Viviendo en Familia" is a program aimed at strengthening a positive and well-treating parenting, which addresses situations of child abuse, neglect and domestic violence, from the ecosystem approach of Family Resilience. The study evaluated the program results in 543 cases treated between January 2008 and July 2010; using pre-post intervention measurements with the North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, NCFAS (Valencia and Gómez, 2010. All child protection indicators showed a statistically significant improvement (p less than .001, except couple violence, with greater outcomes in emotional abuse and parental neglect. In NCFAS global dimensions (environment, parental competencies, family interactions, family safety and child well-being, there was a significant shift (p less than .001 to the range of strength. Of the 31 variables evaluated, families averaged 5.9 moderate/serious problems at admission, decreasing to 2.2 at discharge (p less than .001. Of the cases that completed the intervention, the cumulative rate of relapse to SENAME network programs was 3.4% at 6 months, 4.7% at 12 months and 6.5% at 18 months follow up. We obtained higher levels of achievement based on the degree of staff´s fidelity to the program design, being a challenge to consider.

  9. Effect of Process Changes in Surgical Training on Quantitative Outcomes From Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietl, Charles A; Russell, John C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the literature on process changes in surgical training programs and to evaluate their effect on the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Core Competencies, American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) scores, and American Board of Surgery (ABS) certification. A literature search was obtained from MEDLINE via PubMed.gov, ScienceDirect.com, Google Scholar on all peer-reviewed studies published since 2003 using the following search queries: surgery residency training, surgical education, competency-based surgical education, ACGME core competencies, ABSITE scores, and ABS pass rate. Our initial search list included 990 articles on surgery residency training models, 539 on competency-based surgical education, 78 on ABSITE scores, and 33 on ABS pass rate. Overall, 31 articles met inclusion criteria based on their effect on ACGME Core Competencies, ABSITE scores, and ABS certification. Systematic review showed that 5/31, 19/31, and 6/31 articles on process changes in surgical training programs had a positive effect on patient care, medical knowledge, and ABSITE scores, respectively. ABS certification was not analyzed. The other ACGME core competencies were addressed in only 6 studies. Several publications on process changes in surgical training programs have shown a positive effect on patient care, medical knowledge, and ABSITE scores. However, the effect on ABS certification, and other quantitative outcomes from residency programs, have not been addressed. Studies on education strategies showing evidence that residency program objectives are being achieved are still needed. This article addresses the 6 ACGME Core Competencies. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Nationally Scaled Telebehavioral Health Program for Chronic Pain: Characteristics, Goals, and Psychological Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochari-Greenberger, Heidi; Peters, Aimee; Vue, Lee; Pande, Reena L

    2017-08-01

    Millions of U.S. adults suffer from chronic pain with a high prevalence of comorbid mental health issues. Telehealth-delivered behavioral therapy for chronic pain has been evaluated in the research setting. The purpose of this study was 1) to describe a nationally scaled, standardized, telebehavioral therapy program for patients with chronic pain and behavioral comorbidities, and 2) evaluate characteristics, goals, and psychosocial outcomes among program participants. This was mixed-methods retrospective cohort analysis among consecutive program graduates (mean age 53y; 24% male). The 8-week program was delivered by a licensed therapist and a behavior coach through telephone/secure video and tailored to each participant's behavioral health needs and goals. Participant chief complaints, behavioral goals, and mood triggers were abstracted by deidentified clinical record review using structured qualitative research methods. Depression, anxiety, and stress symptom data were collected at baseline and program graduation using the validated Depression Anxiety Stress Scales 21. Back pain (42%) and hip/leg/knee pain (28%) comprised the most common chief complaints. Pain management (44%) and weight loss (43%) were the most frequently cited goals. At baseline, approximately half of participants had elevated depression (59%), anxiety (54%), and/or stress (48%) scores. Triggers for depressed, anxious, or stressed mood included severe pain (47%), health concerns (46%), and interpersonal relationship challenges (45%). At graduation, significant improvement in median depression (-54%), anxiety (-50%), and stress (-33%) symptom scores was observed among those with non-normal baseline values (p health program for chronic pain experienced significant improvement in depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms and shared several complaints, goals, and mood triggers.

  11. Treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. Program for encapsulation, deep geologic deposition and research, development and demonstration; Kaernkraftavfallets behandling och slutfoervaring. Program foer inkapsling, geologisk djupfoervaring samt forskning, utveckling och demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Programs for RD and D concerning disposal of radioactive waste are presented. Main topics include: Design, testing and manufacture of canisters for the spent fuels; Design of equipment for deposition of waste canisters; Material and process for backfilling rock caverns; Evaluation of accuracy and validation of methods for safety analyses; Development of methods for defining scenarios for the safety analyses. 471 refs, 67 figs, 21 tabs.

  12. Exploring Outcomes to Consider in Economic Evaluations of Health Promotion Programs : What Broader Non-Health Outcomes Matter Most?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benning, Tim M; Alayli-Goebbels, Adrienne F G; Aarts, Marie-Jeanne; Stolk, Elly; de Wit, G Ardine; Prenger, Rilana; Braakman-Jansen, Louise M A; Evers, Silvia M A A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention is increasing on the consideration of broader non-health outcomes in economic evaluations. It is unknown which non-health outcomes are valued as most relevant in the context of health promotion. The present study fills this gap by investigating the relative importance of

  13. Exploring Outcomes to Consider in Economic Evaluations of Health Promotion Programs: What Broader Non-Health Outcomes Matter Most?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benning, Tim M.; Alayli-Goebbels, Adrienne F.G.; Aarts, Marie-Jeanne; Stolk, Elly; de Wit, G. Ardine; Prenger, Hendrikje Cornelia; Braakman-Jansen, Louise Marie Antoinette; Evers, Silvia M.A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Attention is increasing on the consideration of broader non-health outcomes in economic evaluations. It is unknown which non-health outcomes are valued as most relevant in the context of health promotion. The present study fills this gap by investigating the relative importance of

  14. Career outcomes of nondesignated preliminary general surgery residents at an academic surgical program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rima; Mullen, John T

    2013-01-01

    There remains a debate as to whether nondesignated preliminary (NDP) positions in surgery ultimately translate into successful surgical careers for those who pursue them. We sought to identify the success with which our NDP residents were able to transition to their desired career and what, if any, factors contributed to their success. The records of all NDP residents accepted into the Massachusetts General Hospital General Surgery Residency Program from 1995 to 2010 were examined and long-term follow-up was completed. Thirty-four NDP residents were identified, including 26.5% US graduates and 73.5% international medical graduates. At the end of the initial preliminary year, 30 (88%) got placed in a postgraduate residency program, whereas 4 (12%) pursued other career paths. Of those who got placed, 25 (83%) attained surgical residency positions, including 17 (57%) who continued as preliminary residents at our institution and 8 (27%) who got placed in categorical surgical positions at other programs. After multiple preliminary years, 15 of 17 achieved a categorical position, of which, 93% were in surgical fields. Overall, 64.7% of all entering NDP residents eventually went on to have careers in general surgery (50%) or surgical subspecialties (14.7%), and 24 of 34 (71%) fulfilled their desired career goals. No factor predicted success. From 1995 to 2012 there have been 15 midlevel (11 postgraduate year 4) vacancies in our program, 4 of which were filled by preliminary residents, 2 from our program and 2 from elsewhere. All have gone on to board certifications and careers in surgery. More than 70% of NDP residents in our program successfully transitioned to their desired career paths, many achieving categorical surgical positions and academic surgical careers, thus demonstrating the benefit of this track to both residency programs and trainees. © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A systematic review of the effectiveness of stroke self-management programs for improving function and participation outcomes: self-management programs for stroke survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, G.; Packer, T.L.; Villeneuve, M.; Audulv, A.; Versnel, J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: A systematic review of stroke self-management programs was conducted to: (i) identify how many and what self-management support strategies were included in stroke self-management interventions and (ii) describe whether self-management programs effectively improved outcomes, focusing

  16. String Music Educators' Perceptions of the Impact of New String Programs on Student Outcomes, School Music Programs, and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Robert; Russell, Joshua A.; Hamann, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of newly initiated string programs on teachers, schools, districts, communities, and existing music program administration and students. Research questions pertained to (a) locations, student access, and instructional offerings; (b) educators; and (c) perceived impact on student outcomes. Data…

  17. A legislative program to plan energy strategies for the 21st century and to demonstrate the role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKlveen, J.W.; Blitz, P.

    1989-01-01

    In April 1989, the State Legislative Leaders Foundation and Arizona State University presented a national program, Energy Strategies for the 21st Century. Participants included state legislative leaders and key committee chairs from across the nation. The purpose of this program was to give legislative leaders an opportunity to examine and discuss many of the critical issues that will shape future energy policy. The participants were actively involved in developing realistic energy strategies. The scenarios had to use available and realistic future energy technologies. Their solutions were required to be both economically and environmentally compatible and acceptable to their constituents

  18. Improved Birth Weight for Black Infants: Outcomes of a Healthy Start Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Ruth; James, Arthur; Charoth, Remitha M.; del Carmen Sweezy, Luz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined whether participation in Healthy Babies Healthy Start (HBHS), a maternal health program emphasizing racial equity and delivering services through case management home visitation, was associated with improved birth outcomes for Black women relative to White women. Methods. We used a matched-comparison posttest-only design in which we selected the comparison group using propensity score matching. Study data were generated through secondary analysis of Michigan state- and Kalamazoo County–level birth certificate records for 2008 to 2010. We completed statistical analyses, stratified by race, using a repeated-measures generalized linear model. Results. Despite their smoking rate being double that of their matched counterparts, Black HBHS participants delivered higher birth-weight infants than did Black nonparticipants (P = .05). White HBHS participants had significantly more prenatal care than did White nonparticipants, but they had similar birth outcomes (P = .7 for birth weight; P = .55 for gestation). Conclusions. HBHS participation is associated with increased birth weights among Black women but not among White women, suggesting differential program gains for Black women. PMID:24354844

  19. God imagery and affective outcomes in a spiritually integrative inpatient program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Joseph M; Foster, Joshua D; Abernethy, Alexis D; Witvliet, Charlotte V O; Root Luna, Lindsey M; Putman, Katharine M; Schnitker, Sarah A; VanHarn, Karl; Carter, Janet

    2017-08-01

    Religion and/or spirituality (R/S) can play a vital, multifaceted role in mental health. While beliefs about God represent the core of many psychiatric patients' meaning systems, research has not examined how internalized images of the divine might contribute to outcomes in treatment programs/settings that emphasize multicultural sensitivity with R/S. Drawing on a combination of qualitative and quantitative information with a religiously heterogeneous sample of 241 adults who completed a spiritually integrative inpatient program over a two-year period, this study tested direct/indirect associations between imagery of how God views oneself, religious comforts and strains, and affective outcomes (positive and negative). When accounting for patients' demographic and religious backgrounds, structural equation modeling results revealed: (1) overall effects for God imagery at pre-treatment on post-treatment levels of both positive and negative affect; and (2) religious comforts and strains fully mediated these links. Secondary analyses also revealed that patients' generally experienced reductions in negative emotion in God imagery over the course of their admission. These findings support attachment models of the R/S-mental health link and suggest that religious comforts and strains represent distinct pathways to positive and negative domains of affect for psychiatric patients with varying experiences of God. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure, Processes, and Retrospective Outcomes From an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Edna M; Worrall, Linda; Cherney, Leora R

    2015-11-01

    This study describes the structure, processes, and outcomes of an intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP). The aim was to identify treatment gains and determine if outcomes were significantly different between participants grouped according to severity and type of aphasia, and time postonset. Data from 74 first-time ICAP participants were analyzed. Pre- and posttreatment scores on the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised and other impairment and participation measures were compared using paired t tests. Analyses of variance were used to compare outcomes related to aphasia severity (severe, moderate, and mild aphasia), aphasia type (fluent, nonfluent), and chronicity (0-6 months postonset, 7-12 months postonset, and 12+ months postonset). Participants made significant changes on all impairment and participation measures. Large effect sizes were noted for one participation and three impairment measures. Medium effect sizes were noted for one impairment and three participation measures. There was no significant difference among groups on any factor. ICAPs can have a significant effect on the language impairment and participation of people with aphasia, but further research is required to determine if the effect is comparable to other types of service delivery.

  1. Neurolinguistic programming: a systematic review of the effects on health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturt, Jackie; Ali, Saima; Robertson, Wendy; Metcalfe, David; Grove, Amy; Bourne, Claire; Bridle, Chris

    2012-11-01

    Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) in health care has captured the interest of doctors, healthcare professionals, and managers. To evaluate the effects of NLP on health-related outcomes. Systematic review of experimental studies. The following data sources were searched: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, ASSIA, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Knowledge, CENTRAL, NLP specialist databases, reference lists, review articles, and NLP professional associations, training providers, and research groups. Searches revealed 1459 titles from which 10 experimental studies were included. Five studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and five were pre-post studies. Targeted health conditions were anxiety disorders, weight maintenance, morning sickness, substance misuse, and claustrophobia during MRI scanning. NLP interventions were mainly delivered across 4-20 sessions although three were single session. Eighteen outcomes were reported and the RCT sample sizes ranged from 22 to 106. Four RCTs reported no significant between group differences with the fifth finding in favour of the NLP arm (F = 8.114, P<0.001). Three RCTs and five pre-post studies reported within group improvements. Risk of bias across all studies was high or uncertain. There is little evidence that NLP interventions improve health-related outcomes. This conclusion reflects the limited quantity and quality of NLP research, rather than robust evidence of no effect. There is currently insufficient evidence to support the allocation of NHS resources to NLP activities outside of research purposes.

  2. Accreditation of Medical Education Programs: Moving From Student Outcomes to Continuous Quality Improvement Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Danielle; Tekian, Ara

    2018-03-01

    Accreditation of undergraduate medical education programs aims to ensure the quality of medical education and promote quality improvement, with the ultimate goal of providing optimal patient care. Direct linkages between accreditation and education quality are, however, difficult to establish. The literature examining the impact of accreditation predominantly focuses on student outcomes, such as performances on national examinations. However, student outcomes present challenges with regard to data availability, comparability, and contamination.The true impact of accreditation may well rest in its ability to promote continuous quality improvement (CQI) within medical education programs. The conceptual model grounding this paper suggests accreditation leads medical schools to commit resources to and engage in self-assessment activities that represent best practices of CQI, leading to the development within schools of a culture of CQI. In line with this model, measures of the impact of accreditation on medical schools need to include CQI-related markers. The CQI orientation of organizations can be measured using validated instruments from the business and management fields. Repeated determinations of medical schools' CQI orientation at various points throughout their accreditation cycles could provide additional evidence of the impact of accreditation on medical education. Strong CQI orientation should lead to high-quality medical education and would serve as a proxy marker for the quality of graduates and possibly for the quality of care they provide.It is time to move away from a focus on student outcomes as measures of the impact of accreditation and embrace additional markers, such as indicators of organizational CQI orientation.

  3. Use of net present value analysis to evaluate a publicly funded biomass-to-ethanol research, development, and demonstration program and valuate expected private sector participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, N D; Yancey, M A

    1998-01-01

    One of the functions of government is to invest tax dollars in programs, projects, and properties that will result in greater public benefit than would have resulted from leaving the tax dollars in the private sector or using them to pay off the public debt. This paper describes the use of Net Present Value (NPV) as an approach to analyze and select investment opportunities for government money in public research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) programs and to evaluate potential private sector participation in the programs. This approach is then applied to a specific biomass-to-ethanol opportunity in California.

  4. A Novel and Cost-Effective Monitoring Approach for Outcomes in an Australian Biodiversity Conservation Incentive Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, David B.; Zammit, Charles; Attwood, Simon J.; Burns, Emma; Shepherd, Claire L.; Kay, Geoff; Wood, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    We report on the design and implementation of ecological monitoring for an Australian biodiversity conservation incentive scheme – the Environmental Stewardship Program. The Program uses competitive auctions to contract individual land managers for up to 15 years to conserve matters of National Environmental Significance (with an initial priority on nationally threatened ecological communities). The ecological monitoring was explicitly aligned with the Program’s policy objective and desired outcomes and was applied to the Program’s initial Project which targeted the critically endangered White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland ecological community in south eastern Australia. These woodlands have been reduced to <3% of their original extent and persist mostly as small remnants of variable condition on private farmland. We established monitoring sites on 153 farms located over 172,232 sq km. On each farm we established a monitoring site within the woodland patch funded for management and, wherever possible, a matched control site. The monitoring has entailed gathering data on vegetation condition, reptiles and birds. We also gathered data on the costs of experimental design, site establishment, field survey, and data analysis. The costs of monitoring are approximately 8.5% of the Program’s investment in the first four years and hence are in broad accord with the general rule of thumb that 5–10% of a program’s funding should be invested in monitoring. Once initial monitoring and site benchmarking are completed we propose to implement a novel rotating sampling approach that will maintain scientific integrity while achieving an annual cost-efficiency of up to 23%. We discuss useful lessons relevant to other monitoring programs where there is a need to provide managers with reliable early evidence of program effectiveness and to demonstrate opportunities for cost-efficiencies. PMID:23236399

  5. A 5-day dialectical behavior therapy partial hospital program for women with borderline personality disorder: predictors of outcome from a 3-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shirley; Johnson, Jennifer; Costello, Ellen; Simpson, Elizabeth B

    2009-05-01

    This study describes naturalistic 3-month follow-up after discharge from a 5-day partial hospitalization dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD). We also examined individual BPD criteria as predictors of treatment response. Fifty women diagnosed with BPD were consecutively recruited from a partial hospital DBT program, 47 of whom (94%) completed all assessments including baseline (prior to discharge) and 3-months post-discharge assessments. Most continued with some combination of individual psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, and all had the option of continuing with weekly DBT skills classes. Baseline scores were compared to 3-month scores using paired two-tailed non-parametric (sign) tests. Regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of outcome. Depression, hopelessness, anger expression, dissociation, and general psychopathology scores significantly decreased over the 3-month follow-up interval, although scores on several measures remained in the clinical range. Those who endorsed emptiness, impulsivity, and relationship disturbance demonstrated improvement on a number of outcomes, while those who endorsed identity disturbance and fear of abandonment had less improvement on some outcomes. These findings illustrate (1) that improvement occurred over a 3-month interval on a number of measures in patients receiving treatment as usual following discharge from a partial hospitalization program, and (2) that BPD is a complex, heterogeneous disorder for which there is no single pathognomonic criterion, so that each criterion should be considered individually in determining its potential effect on treatment outcomes.

  6. Educational outcomes of a medical physicist program over the past 10 years in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Karasawa, Kumiko; Sumida, Iori; Arimura, Hidetaka; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Kabuki, Shigeto; Monzen, Hajime; Nishio, Teiji; Shirato, Hiroki; Yamada, Syogo

    2017-01-01

    The promotion plan for the Platform of Human Resource Development for Cancer (Ganpro) was initiated by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan in 2007, establishing a curriculum for medical physicists. In this study, we surveyed the educational outcomes of the medical physicist program over the past 10 years since the initiation of Ganpro. The Japan Society of Medical Physics mailing list was used to announce this survey. The questionnaire was created by members of the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification, and was intended for the collection of information regarding the characteristics and career paths of medical physics students. Students who participated in the medical physics program from 2007 to 2016 were enrolled. Thirty-one universities (17 accredited and 14 non-accredited) were represented in the survey. In total, 491, 105 and 6 students were enrolled in the Master's, Doctorate and Residency programs, respectively. Most students held a Bachelor's degree in radiological technology (Master's program, 87%; Doctorate program, 72%). A large number of students with a Master's degree worked as radiological technologists (67%), whereas only 9% (n = 32) worked as medical physicists. In contrast, 53% (n = 28) of the students with a Doctorate degree worked as medical physicists. In total, 602 students (from 31 universities) completed the survey. Overall, although the number of the graduates who worked as medical physicists was small, this number increased annually. It thus seems that medical institutions in Japan are recognizing the necessity of licensed medical physicists in the radiotherapy community.

  7. Randomized Trial of the Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity (ARC) Organizational Intervention for Improving Youth Outcomes in Community Mental Health Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisson, Charles; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Green, Philip; Williams, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of the study was to assess whether the Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity (ARC) organizational intervention improved youth outcomes in community based mental health programs. The second objective was to assess whether programs with more improved organizational social contexts following the 18-month ARC…

  8. Learning Program for Enhancing Visual Literacy for Non-Design Students Using a CMS to Share Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Taeko; Watanabe, Takashi; Otani, Toshio; Masuzawa, Toshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a basic learning program for enhancing visual literacy using an original Web content management system (Web CMS) to share students' outcomes in class as a blog post. It seeks to reinforce students' understanding and awareness of the design of visual content. The learning program described in this research focuses on to address…

  9. Effects of a Tablet-Based Home Practice Program With Telepractice on Treatment Outcomes in Chronic Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Jacquie; Liu, Anna; Stokes, Polly

    2018-05-17

    The aim of this study was to determine if a tablet-based home practice program with weekly telepractice support could enable long-term maintenance of recent treatment gains and foster new language gains in poststroke aphasia. In a pre-post group study of home practice outcomes, 21 individuals with chronic aphasia were examined before and after a 6-month home practice phase and again at follow-up 4 months later. The main outcome measure studied was change in naming previously treated or untreated, practiced or unpracticed pictures of objects and actions. Individualized home practice programs were created in iBooks Author with semantic, phonemic, and orthographic cueing in pictures, words, and videos in order to facilitate naming of previously treated or untreated pictures. Home practice was effective for all participants with severity moderating treatment effects, such that individuals with the most severe aphasia made and maintained fewer gains. There was a negative relationship between the amount of training required for iPad proficiency and improvements on practiced and unpracticed pictures and a positive relationship between practice compliance and same improvements. Unsupervised home practice with weekly video teleconferencing support is effective. This study demonstrates that even individuals with chronic severe aphasia, including those with no prior smart device or even computer experience, can attain independent proficiency to continue practicing and improving their language skills beyond therapy discharge. This could represent a low-cost therapy option for individuals without insurance coverage and/or those for whom mobility is an obstacle to obtaining traditional aphasia therapy.

  10. Preliminary test results from a free-piston Stirling engine technology demonstration program to support advanced radioisotope space power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Maurice A.; Qiu Songgang; Augenblick, Jack E.

    2000-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling engines offer a relatively mature, proven, long-life technology that is well-suited for advanced, high-efficiency radioisotope space power systems. Contracts from DOE and NASA are being conducted by Stirling Technology Company (STC) for the purpose of demonstrating the Stirling technology in a configuration and power level that is representative of an eventual space power system. The long-term objective is to develop a power system with an efficiency exceeding 20% that can function with a high degree of reliability for up to 15 years on deep space missions. The current technology demonstration convertors (TDC's) are completing shakedown testing and have recently demonstrated performance levels that are virtually identical to projections made during the preliminary design phase. This paper describes preliminary test results for power output, efficiency, and vibration levels. These early results demonstrate the ability of the free-piston Stirling technology to exceed objectives by approximately quadrupling the efficiency of conventional radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's)

  11. Preliminary test results from a free-piston Stirling engine technology demonstration program to support advanced radioisotope space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Maurice A.; Qiu, Songgang; Augenblick, Jack E.

    2000-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling engines offer a relatively mature, proven, long-life technology that is well-suited for advanced, high-efficiency radioisotope space power systems. Contracts from DOE and NASA are being conducted by Stirling Technology Company (STC) for the purpose of demonstrating the Stirling technology in a configuration and power level that is representative of an eventual space power system. The long-term objective is to develop a power system with an efficiency exceeding 20% that can function with a high degree of reliability for up to 15 years on deep space missions. The current technology demonstration convertors (TDC's) are completing shakedown testing and have recently demonstrated performance levels that are virtually identical to projections made during the preliminary design phase. This paper describes preliminary test results for power output, efficiency, and vibration levels. These early results demonstrate the ability of the free-piston Stirling technology to exceed objectives by approximately quadrupling the efficiency of conventional radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's). .

  12. Prescription drug monitoring program data tracking of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in integrated dual diagnosis care involving injectable naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Ayesha; Whiteman, Aaron; Bell, Richard L; Greene, Marion S; Engleman, Eric A; Chambers, R Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Fourfold increases in opioid prescribing and dispensations over 2 decades in the U.S. has paralleled increases in opioid addictions and overdoses, requiring new preventative, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. This study examines Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) tracking as a novel measure of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in a university-affiliated integrated mental health-addiction treatment clinic. Repeated measure parametrics examined PDMP and urine drug screening (UDS) data before and after first injection for all patients (N = 68) who received at least one long-acting naltrexone injection (380 mg/IM) according to diagnostic groupings of having either (i) alcohol (control); (ii) opioid; or (iii) combined alcohol and opioid use disorders. There were no group differences post-injection in treatment days, injections delivered, or treatment service encounters. UDS and PDMP measures of opioid exposures were greater in opioid compared to alcohol-only patients. Post-first injection, UDS's positive for opioids declined (p opioid prescriptions (p Opioid patients without alcohol disorders showed the best outcomes with 50% to 80% reductions in PDMP-measures of opioids, down to levels of alcohol-only patients. This study shows PDMP utility for measuring opioid addiction treatment outcomes, supporting the routine use of PDMPs in clinical and research settings. These findings demonstrate that opioid addiction in patients with complex addictions and mental illnesses comorbidities can show effective treatment responses as measured by PDMP tracking of decreases in opioid prescriptions to those patients. (Am J Addict 2016;25:557-564). © 2016 The Authors. The American Journal on Addictions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP).

  13. Construction of Engineering Education Program based on the Alumni's Evaluation of the Educational Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takehiko; Nishizawa, Hitoshi

    The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering in Toyota National College of Technology has put great emphasis on fundamental subjects, such as “electrical and electronic circuit" and “electromagnetism" more than 40 years. On the other hand, several issues of our college were clarified by the alumni's evaluation of the educational outcome in 2002. The most serious issue was low achievement of English and Social education. The alumni of all generation are dissatisfied with their low skill in English communication. As a part of the educational reforms, our department has constructed a new engineering education program focusing on fundamental ability. We introduced many problem-based-learning experiments and the compulsory subjects such as “English communication for electrical engineers" and “Engineering Ethics" into this program. Great educative results are obtained by these improvements. As a typical example, the scores of all 2nd grade students of advanced engineering course in TOEIC tests became 450 points or more. Our program has been authorized by JABEE since 2004.

  14. Long-term student outcomes of the Integrated Nutrition and Physical Activity Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Jini; Romaniello, Catherine; Crane, Lori; Scarbro, Sharon; Belansky, Elaine; Marshall, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    To examine the long-term effects of the Integrated Nutrition and Physical Activity Program (INPAP), a school-based nutrition education program. Quasi-experimental design comparing intervention and comparison cohorts at 3-6 years after delivery of the INPAP intervention on nutrition- and physical activity-related outcomes. This study was conducted in 1 school district in a low-income rural county of ∼15,000 residents in south-central Colorado. In second grade, intervention and comparison cohorts included 173 (fall 2000) and 190 (fall 1999) students, respectively. Approximately 60% of these students completed assessments in eighth grade. INPAP is an experiential school-based nutrition education program, grounded in social cognitive theory and Piaget's cognitive development theory and adapted for use in a rural setting. Nutrition and physical activity knowledge, self-efficacy, attitudes and behaviors, body mass index. Wilcoxon signed rank test, chi-square test for proportions, and t test for means. Long-term effects were observed in nutrition-related knowledge and attitudes but not self-efficacy or behavior change. The effects that did occur were attenuated over time. This study found that INPAP implemented in elementary school had limited lasting effects by the end of middle school, a time when students have increased autonomy to make food choices. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of school organizational characteristics on the outcomes of a school health promotion program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, K W; Baranowski, T; Baranowski, J; Hebert, D; deMoor, C; Hearn, M D; Resnicow, K

    1999-11-01

    Researchers assessed the possible moderating effects of school organizational characteristics (school climate, school health, and job satisfaction) on outcomes of a teacher health behavior change program. Thirty-two public schools were matched and randomly assigned either to treatment or control conditions. Organizational, dietary, and physiologic data were collected from third to fifth grade teachers over three years. Treatment schools received a teacher wellness program for two years. Psychometrics of most organizational scales achieved acceptable levels of reliability. Mixed model analyses were conducted to test for moderating effects. Treatment schools with high organizational climate and health scores reported higher fruit and juice and vegetable consumption at Year 2 compared with intervention schools with low scores. Treatment schools with high job satisfaction scores reported higher fruit and juice and lower-fat food consumption at Year 3 compared with intervention schools with low scores. These measures may be used as a tool to assess the environment in which school health promotion programs are presented. Future interventions may need to be tailored to the organizational characteristics of schools.

  16. Implementation and outcomes of a zero tolerance of bullying and harassment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Marion; Austin, Michelle

    2011-02-01

    This case study describes the implementation of a zero tolerance of bullying and harassment program and its outcomes in an ACT hospital. The significance of bullying and harassment within this hospital workplace and its impact became apparent in the 2005 employee satisfaction survey. The results showed low staff satisfaction, a relatively high occurrence of perceived bullying and harassment in the workplace, and a low level of trust by staff in the management of bullying and harassment issues in comparison to the health sector norms. A bullying and harassment program was therefore put in place led by the hospital's Organisational Development Unit and a zero-tolerance approach towards bullying and harassment was adopted and embraced by the leadership group. After nearly 3 years the program has had a positive impact, including contributing to an overall increase in staff satisfaction and improvements in the bullying and harassment section of the latest employee satisfaction survey. Additional initiatives have been implemented and improved employee satisfaction results are expected in 2010-11.

  17. France-Japan collaboration on the severe accident studies for ASTRID. Outcomes and future work program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serre, F.; Bertrand, F.; Bachrata, A.; Marie, N.; Kubo, Shigenobu; Kamiyama, Kenji; Carluec, B.; Farges, B.; Koyama, K.

    2017-01-01

    The ASTRID reactor (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) is a technological demonstrator of GenIV sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) designed by the CEA with its industrial partners, with very high levels of requirements. In the ASTRID project, the safety objectives are first to prevent the core melting, in particular by the development of an innovative core (named CFV core) with low void worth and complementary safety prevention devices, and second, to enhance the reactor resistance to severe accidents by design. In order to mitigate the consequences of hypothetical core melting situations, specific provisions (mitigation devices) are added to the core and to the reactor. To meet these ASTRID objectives, a large R and D program was launched in the Severe Accident domain by the CEA, with collaboration of AREVA NP, JAEA, MFBR and MHI organizations, in the frame of the France-Japan ASTRID and SFRs collaboration agreement. This R and D program covers exchanges on severe accident conditions to be studied for the SFR safety cases, the methodology to study these situations, ASTRID severe accident simulations, the comparison and understanding of the ASTRID and JSFR reactor behavior under these situations, the development and adaptation of simulation tools, and, despite an already large existing experimental database, a complementary experimental program to improve the knowledge and reduce the uncertainties. This paper will present the collaboration work performed on the Severe Accidents studies. (author)

  18. Outcomes and impact of HIV prevention, ART and TB programs in Swaziland--early evidence from public health triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Cari; Mndzebele, Sibongile; Hlophe, Thabo; Garcia Calleja, Jesus Maria; Korenromp, Eline L; Stoneburner, Rand; Pervilhac, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Swaziland's severe HIV epidemic inspired an early national response since the late 1980s, and regular reporting of program outcomes since the onset of a national antiretroviral treatment (ART) program in 2004. We assessed effectiveness outcomes and mortality trends in relation to ART, HIV testing and counseling (HTC), tuberculosis (TB) and prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). Data triangulated include intervention coverage and outcomes according to program registries (2001-2010), hospital admissions and deaths disaggregated by age and sex (2001-2010) and population mortality estimates from the 1997 and 2007 censuses and the 2007 demographic and health survey. By 2010, ART reached 70% of the estimated number of people living with HIV/AIDS with CD4impact to specific interventions (versus natural epidemic dynamics) will require additional data from future household surveys, and improved routine (program, surveillance, and hospital) data at district level.

  19. Bystander programs addressing sexual violence on college campuses: A systematic review and meta-analysis of program outcomes and delivery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N; Krauss, Alison; Vu, Nicole L; Banyard, Victoria L; McDonald, Renee

    2018-02-06

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the effectiveness of bystander programs that address sexual violence on college campuses. Program effects on student attitudes/beliefs and bystander behavior were examined. Durability of program outcomes and the influence of program-delivery methods (e.g., facilitator-led programs vs. video, online or poster campaign programs) and program-parameters (e.g., program length) were also evaluated. Twenty-four studies met criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis, and 207 separate results from these studies were coded. Students who participated in a bystander program, compared to those who had not, had more pro-social attitudes/beliefs about sexual violence and intervening to prevent it, and engaged in more bystander behavior. Program effects diminished over time, but meaningful changes persisted for at least three months following program delivery. Longer programs had greater effects than shorter programs on attitudes/beliefs. Bystander programs can be a valuable addition to colleges' violence prevention efforts.

  20. Program management plan for development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts associated with Oak Ridge Reservation's Land Disposal Restrictions Federal Facility Compliance Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, T.B.

    1994-04-01

    This program management plan covers the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all the waste listed in Appendix B of the ORR's LDR/FFCA as well as any new wastes which meet Appendix B criteria. To successfully identify a treatment method, at least a proof-of-principle level of understanding must be obtained: that is, the candidate processes must be demonstrated as effective in treating the wastes to the LDR; however, an optimized process is not required. Where applicable and deemed necessary and where the budgets will support them, pilot-scale demonstrations will be pursued. The overall strategy being adopted in this program will be composed of the following activities: Scoping of the study; characterization; development and screening of alternatives; treatability investigations; and detailed analysis of alternatives

  1. Rel8: demonstrating the feasibility of delivering an 8-week social skills program in a public mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauchope, Bronwyn; Terlich, Alissa; Lee, Stuart

    2016-06-01

    As community mental health services integrate recovery-oriented practices, treatments that focus on skills development and social integration are desirable. This study aimed to examine the feasibility of implementing "Rel8", an 8-week social skills training group adapted to suit a public community mental health setting. A retrospective audit was conducted of quantitative and qualitative data from four groups run between 2011 and 2013. Pre- and post-group measures were collected, assessing self-rated friendships and confidence with social skills and clinician-rated social skill performance. Qualitative feedback about group participation was also collected through use of a developed questionnaire. Analysis revealed significant improvements in participants' confidence with their social skills following group participation, with a trend also found for improved social skill performance. "Rel8", an adapted 8-week social skills training group, is a feasible program in the context of community mental health services. The program added to the recovery-centred practice of the community mental health service while also adding to the diversity of clinician skills for psychosocial-oriented practice. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  2. Skin cancer has a large impact on our public hospitals but prevention programs continue to demonstrate strong economic credentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Sophy T F; Carter, Rob; Heward, Sue; Sinclair, Craig

    2017-08-01

    While skin cancer is still the most common cancer in Australia, important information gaps remain. This paper addresses two gaps: i) the cost impact on public hospitals; and ii) an up-to-date assessment of economic credentials for prevention. A prevalence-based cost approach was undertaken in public hospitals in Victoria. Costs were estimated for inpatient admissions, using State service statistics, and outpatient services based on attendance at three hospitals in 2012-13. Cost-effectiveness for prevention was estimated from 'observed vs expected' analysis, together with program expenditure data. Combining inpatient and outpatient costs, total annual costs for Victoria were $48 million to $56 million. The SunSmart program is estimated to have prevented more than 43,000 skin cancers between 1988 and 2010, a net cost saving of $92 million. Skin cancer treatment in public hospitals ($9.20∼$10.39 per head/year) was 30-times current public funding in skin cancer prevention ($0.37 per head/year). At about $50 million per year for hospitals in Victoria alone, the cost burden of a largely preventable disease is substantial. Skin cancer prevention remains highly cost-effective, yet underfunded. Implications for public health: Increased funding for skin cancer prevention must be kept high on the public health agenda. Hospitals would also benefit from being able to redirect resources to non-preventable conditions. © 2017 The Authors.

  3. One-Year Outcomes of an Integrated Multiple Sclerosis Disease Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, Marti; Forrester, Sara H; Arnold, Beth; Palazzo, Lorella; Zhu, Weiwei; Yoon, Paul; Scearce, Tim

    2018-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with high total health care cost, the majority of which is attributable to medications. Patients with MS are less likely to experience relapses, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations when they are adherent to disease-modifying treatments. Disease management programs are hypothesized to improve medication adherence thereby improving clinical and economic outcomes. To evaluate the clinical and economic effects of a specialty pharmacy and chronic disease management program for patients with MS from a health plan perspective. This study was a retrospective analysis using prescription drug claims, medical claims, and electronic medical record information (2013-2015) 1 year before and after enrollment in the disease management program for members with 24 months of continuous health plan coverage. Medication adherence was calculated using proportion of days covered (PDC). Relapse rate was defined as an MS outpatient visit associated with a corticosteroid dispense within 7 days of the visit or an MS hospitalization. Disease progression was assessed using the Modified Expanded Disability Status Scale (mEDSS). Resource use included outpatient visits, ED visits, and hospitalizations. Cost information was collected as health plan-paid amount and was reported in 2013 U.S. dollars. The analysis included 377 patients (mean age 55 years, 76.4% female). After enrollment in the program, 78.7% of the study group had a PDC of ≥ 0.80 compared with 70.0% before enrollment (P management for patients with MS can increase the proportion of patients adherent to medication. The increase in health plan spend on MS medications is not offset by savings in health care resource utilization. This study was funded by Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute and Kaiser Permanente Washington Pharmacy Administration. The authors have no disclosures to report.

  4. Outcomes of senior reach gatekeeper referrals: comparison of the Spokane gatekeeper program, Colorado Senior Reach, and Mid-Kansas Senior Outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, David A; Rodgers, Vicki K; Strong, Don

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes of older adults referred for care management and mental health services through the senior reach gatekeeper model of case finding were examined in this study and compared with the Spokane gatekeeper model Colorado Senior Reach and the Mid-Kansas Senior Outreach (MKSO) programs are the two Senior Reach Gatekeeper programs modeled after the Spokane program, employing the same community education and gatekeeper model and with mental health treatment for elderly adults in need of support. The three mature programs were compared on seniors served isolation, and depression ratings. Nontraditional community gatekeepers were trained and referred seniors in need. Findings indicate that individuals served by the two Senior Reach Gatekeeper programs demonstrated significant improvements. Isolation indicators such as social isolation decreased and depression symptoms and suicide ideation also decreased. These findings for two Senior Reach Gatekeeper programs demonstrate that the gatekeeper approach to training community partners worked in referring at-risk seniors in need in meeting their needs, and in having a positive impact on their lives.

  5. Four-year treatment outcomes of adult patients enrolled in Mozambique's rapidly expanding antiretroviral therapy program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Auld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Mozambique during 2004-2007 numbers of adult patients (≥15 years old enrolled on antiretroviral therapy (ART increased about 16-fold, from 60 kg, WHO stage IV (AHR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-2.4, reference group WHO stage I/II, lack of co-trimoxazole prescription (AHR 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, and later calendar year of ART initiation (AHR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8. Rates of immunologic treatment failure and regimen-switch were 14.0 and 0.6 events per 100-patient years, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: ART initiation at earlier disease stages and scale-up of co-trimoxazole among ART patients could improve outcomes. Research to determine reasons for low regimen-switch rates and increasing rates of attrition during program expansion is needed.

  6. Early outcomes for rectal cancer surgery in the republic of ireland following a national centralization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, John P; Coffey, J Calvin; Boyle, Emily; Keane, Frank; McNamara, Deborah A

    2013-10-01

    Following a national audit of rectal cancer management in 2007, a national centralization program in the Republic of Ireland was initiated. In 2010, a prospective evaluation of rectal cancer treatment and early outcomes was conducted. A total of 29 colorectal surgeons in 14 centers prospectively collated data on all patients with rectal cancer who underwent curative surgery in 2010. Data were available on 447 patients who underwent proctectomy with curative intent for rectal cancer in 2010; 23.7 % of patients underwent abdominoperineal excision. The median number of lymph nodes identified was 12. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.1 %. Compared with 2007, there was a reduction in positive circumferential margin rate (15.8 vs 4.5 %, P rectal cancer. Patients undergoing rectal cancer surgery in hospitals following a national centralization initiative received high-quality surgery. Significant heterogeneity exists in radiotherapy administration, and evidence-based guidelines should be developed and implemented.

  7. An outcome evaluation of a prison-based life-skills program: the power of people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Valerie A; Duwe, Grant

    2015-04-01

    The Power of People (PoP) is a personal leadership development course that was originally developed in a non-correctional setting and now serves as a prison-based life skills course. This study examined PoP's effect on four different types of recidivism: rearrest, reconviction, reincarceration, and technical violation revocation. The results of the analyses revealed that PoP does not have a significant effect on any of the four measures of recidivism. Following established principles of effective correctional treatment, we make several recommendations that could improve PoP's effectiveness on recidivism outcomes. Overall, this study provides guidance on how to make programs not originally designed for correctional systems into effective recidivism-reducing tools. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Lithium-ion Battery Demonstration for the 2007 NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William; Baldwin, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Electrochemistry Branch designed and produced five lithium-ion battery packs for demonstration in a portable life support system (PLSS) on spacesuit simulators. The experimental batteries incorporated advanced, NASA-developed electrolytes and included internal protection against over-current, over-discharge and over-temperature. The 500-gram batteries were designed to deliver a constant power of 38 watts over 103 minutes of discharge time (130 Wh/kg). Battery design details are described and field and laboratory test results are summarized.

  9. Comprehensive long-term management program for asthma: effect on outcomes in adult African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, T M; Abou-Shala, N; Heilker, G M; Arheart, K L; Portner, T S; Self, T H

    1996-06-01

    To determine if a comprehensive long-term management program, emphasizing inhaled corticosteroids and patient education, would improve outcomes in adult African-American asthmatics a nonrandomized control trial with a 2-year intervention was performed in a university-based clinic. Inclusion criteria consisted of (> or = 5) emergency department (ED) visits or hospitalizations (> or = 2) during the previous 2 years. Intervention patients were volunteers; a comparable control group was identified via chart review at hospitals within the same area and time period as the intervention patients. Individualized doses of beclomethasone with a spacer, inhaled albuterol "as needed," and crisis prednisone were the primary therapies. Environmental control, peak flow monitoring, and a partnership with the patient were emphasized. Detailed patient education was an integral part of management. Control patients received usual care from local physicians. ED visits and hospitalizations for 2 years before and 2 years during the intervention period were compared. Quality of life (QOL) measurements were made at baseline and every 6 months in the intervention group. Study group (n = 21) had a significant reduction in ED visits (2.3 +/- 0.2 pre-intervention versus 0.6 +/- 0.2 post-intervention; P = 0.0001). Control group (n = 18) did not have a significant change in ED visits during the 2-year post-intervention period (2.6 +/- 0.2 pre-intervention versus 2.0 +/- 0.2 post-intervention; P = 0.11). Both groups had significant reductions in hospitalizations, but the study group had a greater reduction. Sixty-two percent of study patients had complete elimination of ED visits and hospitalizations, whereas no control patients had total elimination of the need for institutional acute care. QOL in the study patients revealed significant improvements for most parameters. A comprehensive long-term management program emphasizing inhaled corticosteroids combined with other state-of-the-art management

  10. Summer Treatment Program for Preschoolers with Externalizing Behavior Problems: a Preliminary Examination of Parenting Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Paulo A; Ros, Rosmary; Hart, Katie C; Slavec, Janine

    2017-11-07

    Within an at-risk sample of preschoolers with externalizing behavior problems (EBP), the current study examined the initial promise of a multimodal intervention, the Summer Treatment Program for Pre-Kindergarteners (STP-PreK), in improving parenting outcomes. Using an open trial design, 154 parents and their preschool children (73% male; M age  = 5.06 years; 82% Hispanic/Latino background) with at-risk or clinically elevated levels of EBP (57% of which were referred by schools or mental health/medical professionals) completed a baseline and post-treatment assessment. A subsample of 90 families completed a follow-up assessment approximately 6 to 9 months after treatment completion. Parental measures of parenting stress and discipline strategies were collected across all three assessments. Observational data were also collected across all assessments during a 5-min standardized child-led play situation and a 5-min parent-led clean up task. The parenting component of the STP-PreK included a School Readiness Parenting Program (SRPP) of which the behavioral management component was implemented via a Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) adaptation (8 weekly group sessions with 15-20 parents in each group, lack of requirement of "mastery" criteria). All parenting outcomes (both ratings and observed) significantly improved after the intervention (Cohen's d mean effect size across measures 0.89) with all effects being maintained at the 6-9 month follow-up. These findings highlight the initial promise of our SRPP's PCIT adaptation in targeting multiple aspects of parenting while yielding comparable parenting skills acquisition compared to traditional individual PCIT.

  11. Neighborhood characteristics and lifestyle intervention outcomes: Results from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luohua; Chang, Jenny; Beals, Janette; Bullock, Ann; Manson, Spero M

    2018-06-01

    Growing evidence reveals various neighborhood conditions are associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It is unknown, however, whether the effectiveness of diabetes prevention interventions is also influenced by neighborhood characteristics. The purpose of the current study is to examine the impact of neighborhood characteristics on the outcomes of a lifestyle intervention to prevent diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Year 2000 US Census Tract data were linked with those from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Diabetes Prevention Program (SDPI-DP), an evidence-based lifestyle intervention implemented in 36 AI/AN grantee sites across the US. A total of 3394 participants started the intervention between 01/01/2006 and 07/31/2009 and were followed by 07/31/2016. In 2016-2017, data analyses were conducted to evaluate the relationships of neighborhood characteristics with intervention outcomes, controlling for individual level socioeconomic status. AI/ANs from sites located in neighborhoods with higher median household income had 38% lower risk of developing diabetes than those from sites with lower neighborhood income (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.47-0.90). Further, those from sites with higher neighborhood concentrations of AI/ANs achieved less BMI reduction and physical activity increase. Meanwhile, participants from sites with higher neighborhood level of vehicle occupancy made more improvement in BMI and diet. Lifestyle intervention effectiveness was not optimal when the intervention was implemented at sites with disadvantaged neighborhood characteristics. Meaningful improvements in socioeconomic and other neighborhood disadvantages of vulnerable populations could be important in stemming the global epidemic of diabetes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Willow Park II Community Center. Design report for the passive solar commercial buildings design assistance and demonstration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-15

    The design process for a passive solar community center in Texas is documented. Weather data are given. Energy analysis for early drawings is performed using the ENERGYLOOK program and the results shown graphically. Energy consumption and cost data are given. The design evolution is then traced and the performance of alternative designs compared. Design indicators for best strategies and concepts are discussed and the final design is presented. Energy consumption and cost are given, along with incremental passive solar design costs. A schematic review meeting report and life cycle value tables are included. Overviews, unavailable information, incremental passive design costs, performance comparison of alternatives, and architectural compatibility are discussed for each step in the design process. (LEW)

  13. Twin pregnancy: the impact of the Higgins Nutrition Intervention Program on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dubois, S

    1991-06-01

    Perinatal outcomes were compared between 354 twins treated with the Higgins Nutrition Intervention Program and 686 untreated twins. After differing distributions of key confounding variables were adjusted for, the twins in the intervention group weighed an average of 80 g more (P less than 0.06) than the nonintervention twins; their low-birth-weight rate was 25% lower (P less than 0.05) and their very-low-birth-weight rate was almost 50% lower (P less than 0.05). Although the rate of preterm delivery was 30% lower in the intervention group (P less than 0.05), the rates of intrauterine growth retardation were similar in the two groups. Fetal mortality was slightly higher (14 vs 12 per 1000, NS), but early neonatal mortality was fivefold lower (3 vs 19 per 1000, P less than 0.06) in the intervention group. Maternal morbidity was significantly lower (P less than 0.05) in the intervention group. There was a trend towards lower infant morbidity in the intervention group. These results suggest that nutritional intervention can significantly improve twin-pregnancy outcome.

  14. Neurolinguistic programming: a systematic review of the effects on health outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturt, Jackie; Ali, Saima; Robertson, Wendy; Metcalfe, David; Grove, Amy; Bourne, Claire; Bridle, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) in health care has captured the interest of doctors, healthcare professionals, and managers. Aim To evaluate the effects of NLP on health-related outcomes. Design and setting Systematic review of experimental studies. Method The following data sources were searched: MEDLINE®, PsycINFO, ASSIA, AMED, CINAHL®, Web of Knowledge, CENTRAL, NLP specialist databases, reference lists, review articles, and NLP professional associations, training providers, and research groups. Results Searches revealed 1459 titles from which 10 experimental studies were included. Five studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and five were pre-post studies. Targeted health conditions were anxiety disorders, weight maintenance, morning sickness, substance misuse, and claustrophobia during MRI scanning. NLP interventions were mainly delivered across 4–20 sessions although three were single session. Eighteen outcomes were reported and the RCT sample sizes ranged from 22 to 106. Four RCTs reported no significant between group differences with the fifth finding in favour of the NLP arm (F = 8.114, Peffect. There is currently insufficient evidence to support the allocation of NHS resources to NLP activities outside of research purposes. PMID:23211179

  15. Parenting programs during adolescence: Outcomes from universal and targeted interventions offered in real-world settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredsson, Elin K; Thorvaldsson, Valgeir; Axberg, Ulf; Broberg, Anders G

    2018-04-26

    The aim of this naturalistic study was to explore short and long-term outcomes of five different group-based parenting programs offered to parents of 10 to 17-year-olds. Three hundred and fifteen parents (277 mothers and 38 fathers) who had enrolled in a parenting program (universal: Active Parenting, COPE; Connect; targeted: COMET; Leadership training for parents of teenagers [LFT]) answered questionnaires at three measurement waves (baseline, post-measurement, and one-year follow-up). The questions concerned parenting style, parental mental health, family climate and adolescent mental health. Results revealed small to moderate changes in almost all outcome variables and in all parenting programs. Overall, parents in COMET reported the largest short and long-term changes. No substantial differences in change were seen between the other programs. The results support the general effectiveness of parenting programs for parents of adolescents. © 2018 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Office of Technology Development FY 1993 program summary: Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes significant FY93 programmatic information and accomplishments relevant to the individual activities within the Office of Technology Development Program for Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT ampersand E). A brief discussion of the mission of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Technology Development is presented. An overview is presented of the major problem areas confronting DOE. These problem areas include: groundwater and soils cleanup; waste retrieval and processing; and pollution prevention. The organizational elements within EM are highlighted. An EM-50 Funding Summary for FY92 and FY93 is also provided. RDDT ampersand E programs are discussed and their key problem areas are summarized. Three salient program-formulating concepts are explained. They are: Integrated Demonstrations, Integrated Programs, and the technology window of opportunity. Detailed information for each of the programs within RDDT ampersand E is presented and includes a fact sheet, a list of technical task plans and an accomplishments and objectives section

  17. Office of Technology Development FY 1993 program summary: Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes significant FY93 programmatic information and accomplishments relevant to the individual activities within the Office of Technology Development Program for Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E). A brief discussion of the mission of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Technology Development is presented. An overview is presented of the major problem areas confronting DOE. These problem areas include: groundwater and soils cleanup; waste retrieval and processing; and pollution prevention. The organizational elements within EM are highlighted. An EM-50 Funding Summary for FY92 and FY93 is also provided. RDDT&E programs are discussed and their key problem areas are summarized. Three salient program-formulating concepts are explained. They are: Integrated Demonstrations, Integrated Programs, and the technology window of opportunity. Detailed information for each of the programs within RDDT&E is presented and includes a fact sheet, a list of technical task plans and an accomplishments and objectives section.

  18. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration-Plant Program. Volume II. The environment (Deliverable No. 27). [Baseline environmental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    The proposed site of the Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant (IFGDP) is located on a small peninsula extending eastward into Lake McKeller from the south shore. The peninsula is located west-southwest of the City of Memphis near the confluence of Lake McKeller and the Mississippi River. The environmental setting of this site and the region around this site is reported in terms of physical, biological, and human descriptions. Within the physical description, this report divides the environmental setting into sections on physiography, geology, hydrology, water quality, climatology, air quality, and ambient noise. The biological description is divided into sections on aquatic and terrestrial ecology. Finally, the human environment description is reported in sections on land use, demography, socioeconomics, culture, and visual features. This section concludes with a discussion of physical environmental constraints.

  19. Defining an outcomes management program for definitive irradiation of prostate cancer: preliminary considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seltzer, Jonathan; Valicenti, Richard K.; Dlutowski, Mark; Corn, Benjamin W.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: The advent of managed medical care presents challenges to health care providers who strive to maintain a high quality of patient care at a reasonable cost. The goals of clinical guidelines and paths are to improve the quality of patient care by using outcomes to redefine the path and to eliminate ineffective steps in the clinical algorithm. The purpose of the current endeavor was to systematically develop a clinical pathway for the radiation therapy of prostate cancer which can serve as 1) a measurement tool of operational variables such as cost and utilization, 2) a treatment tool to measure satisfaction and toxicity, 3) a research framework from which questions of efficacy can be investigated. METHODS: An initial path was constructed by the physicians based on recommendations from consensus conference of the Patterns of Care Study (PCS), and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). The program was initiated by a core group of 2 attending radiation oncologists, a radiation physicist, a clinical nurse specialist, a dosimetrist, a simulation technologist, a treatment technologist, and a medical social worker. These data served as a baseline from which clinical pathway development could begin using the method of Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) as described by Berwick (New Engl J Med 320: 53, 1989). Following the creation of a draft path, the document was circulated to other staff members of the team. Simultaneously, the Clinical Financial Management System (Transition Systems Incorporated, Boston, MA) was applied to departmental and institutional records to determine treatment patterns, utilization, toxicity, and cost for prostate cancer patients irradiated between July 1, 1995 and December 31, 1995. The aforementioned staff team as well as a seven person patient group were queried by a CQI facilitator to identify process and quality factors to be included in the clinical path. RESULTS: During the period of study, 51 patients were definitively

  20. Quality assurance plan for placement of cold-cap grout, demonstration vault, Hanford Grout Vault Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, P.T.; Wakeley, L.D.; Ernzen, J.J.; Walley, D.M.

    1992-08-01

    During FY 91, the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout to be used as a cold cap, a nonradioactive layer, between the solidified waste and the cover blocks of a demonstration waste disposal vault at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Facility. This document recommends requirements for a quality assurance (QA) plan for field mixing and placing of the cold-cap grout during final closure of the demonstration vault. Preplacement activities emphasize selection and testing of materials that will match the performance of materials used in the WES grout. Materials sources and applicable American Society of Testing and Materials, American Concrete Institute, and American Petroleum Institute specifications and requirements are provided. Archiving of physical samples of materials is essential, in addition to careful maintenance of test reports and laboratory data. Full-scale field trial mixing and a detailed preconstruction conference are recommended. Placement activities focus on production and placement of a grout that remains sufficiently constant throughout all batches and meets performance requirements. QA activities must be coordinated between the batch plant and delivery site. Recommended sampling during placement includes cylinders cast for subsequent tests of compressive strength and for nondestructive evaluation and prisms cast for monitoring volume stability. A minimum of two lifts is recommended. Postplacement activities include long-term monitoring of the properties of grout specimens cast during placement. Minimum testing of cylinders includes pulse velocity, fundamental frequency, and unconfined compressive strength. Monitoring characteristics of the microstructure also are recommended. The QA plan should designate an organization to have responsibility for maintaining complete records, reports, and archived samples, including details of deviations from plans written before field placement.

  1. An analysis of the use of Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) scores within one professional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavalia, Linda S; Prabhu, Sunil; Chung, Eunice; Robinson, Daniel C

    The Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) is a recent assessment requirement for US pharmacy professional programs. This study analyses PCOA scores for uses described in the 2016 Standards with data from one professional program. PCOA data were analyzed for two consecutive classes (n=215) of pharmacy students at the end of their didactic curriculum to explore relationships among PCOA scores, grade point average (GPA), and North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX) scores utilizing regression analyses. Decisions about student learning based on PCOA scores and GPA indicated remediation would have been prescribed for approximately 7% of students. In comparison, NAPLEX scores revealed a 1% failure rate among the study sample. Relationships between PCOA scores and GPA (r=0.47) and NAPLEX (r=0.51) were moderate to large, respectively. GPA explained a larger portion of unique variance (14%) than PCOA (8%) in NAPLEX scores. In this sample of students, academic decisions would have varied depending upon the learning assessment, which is consistent with a moderate correlation between GPA and PCOA scores. Although PCOA scores correlate with GPA and NAPLEX, PCOA scores explained a smaller portion of unique variance in NAPLEX scores than GPA. The ongoing establishment of validity evidence of PCOA scores is important for meaningful interpretation of scores for the intended uses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Metformin, Lifestyle Intervention, and Cognition in the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchsinger, José A; Ma, Yong; Christophi, Costas A; Florez, Hermes; Golden, Sherita H; Hazuda, Helen; Crandall, Jill; Venditti, Elizabeth; Watson, Karol; Jeffries, Susan; Manly, Jennifer J; Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier

    2017-07-01

    We examined the association of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) intervention arms (lifestyle intervention, metformin, and placebo) with cognition in the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS). We also examined metformin use, incident type 2 diabetes, and glycemia as exposures. The DPP lasted 2.8 years, followed by a 13-month bridge to DPPOS. Cognition was assessed in DPPOS years 8 and 10 (12 and 14 years after randomization) with the Spanish English Verbal Learning Test (SEVLT), letter fluency and animal fluency tests, Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), and a composite cognitive score. A total of 2,280 participants (749 lifestyle, 776 metformin, and 755 placebo) aged 63.1 ± 10.7 years underwent cognitive assessments; 67.7% women, 54.6% non-Hispanic white, 20.7% non-Hispanic black, 14.6% Hispanic, 5.5% American Indian, and 4.6% Asian; 26.6% were homozygous or heterozygous for APOE-ε4. At the time of cognitive assessment, type 2 diabetes was higher in the placebo group (57.9%; P cognition across intervention arms. Type 2 diabetes was not related to cognition, but higher glycated hemoglobin at year 8 was related to worse cognition after confounder adjustment. Cumulative metformin exposure was not related to cognition. Exposure to intensive lifestyle intervention or metformin was not related to cognition among DPPOS participants. Higher glycemia was related to worse cognitive performance. Metformin seemed cognitively safe among DPPOS participants. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. New Technology Demonstration Program - Results of an Attempted Field Test of Multi-Layer Light Polarizing Panels in an Office Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2001-06-14

    An assessment of the potential energy savings associated with the use of multi-layer light polarizing panels in an office space was initiated as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) in 1997. This project was intended to provide information on the effectiveness and application of this technology that could help federal energy managers and other interested individuals determine whether this technology had benefits for their occupied spaces. The use of an actual working office area provided the capability of evaluating the technology's effectiveness in the real world.

  4. EPA's landfill methane outreach program: demonstration of the new E-PLUS economic evaluation model: future trends and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, T.; Paleyanda, P.; Forbes, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    Landfills contain most of the municipal solid waste (MSW) generated in the United States. As this landfilled MSW decomposes, it produces landfill gas (LFG), containing approximately 50% methane, 43-47% carbon dioxide, and 3-7% non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs). Federal regulations require affected landfills to collect and combust their LFG emissions in order to destroy NMOCs, as they are important precursors to local smog. Since 1994, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP) has been working to promote LFG-to-energy as a cost-effective way to reduce emissions of methane - a potent greenhouse gas. The LMOP's latest tool is ''E-PLUS'', Windows-compatible software that can be used to screen potential LFG-to-energy projects. E-PLUS, the Energy Project Landfill Gas Utilization Software, is capable of evaluating the economic feasibility of two energy recovery technologies based on potential LFG emissions estimates. This paper provides an overview of E-PLUS and describes its features and functions in detail. (author)

  5. Estimating impacts of a breakfast in the classroom program on school outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Djang, Holly Carmichael; Halmo, Megan M; Dolan, Peter R; Economos, Christina D

    2015-01-01

    Short-term impacts of breakfast consumption on diet quality and cognitive functioning have been reported, but more evidence is needed to draw causal inferences about long-term impacts of school breakfast on indicators of school engagement and academic achievement. To estimate the impact of a Breakfast in the Classroom (BIC) program on School Breakfast Program participation, school attendance, and academic achievement. This quasi-experimental study included a sample of 446 public elementary schools from a large, urban US school district that served predominantly low-income, racial/ethnic minority students. A total of 257 schools (57.6%) implemented a BIC program during the 2012-2013 academic year, whereas 189 (42.4%) did not. School- and grade-level data from 2012-2013 and grade-level achievement data from the prior year were collected from school district records across the elementary schools. Hypotheses that a BIC program would improve school breakfast participation at the school level, school attendance at the grade level (kindergarten through sixth grade), and academic achievement at the grade level (second through sixth grades) were tested using propensity score weights to adjust for demographic differences between the BIC and non-BIC schools. The BIC program was linked with increased breakfast participation during the academic year (F10,414=136.90, Pperforming attendance analyses in the subset of grade levels for which achievement data were available, results were mostly consistent, although there was a group × time interaction (F10,1891=1.94, P=.04) such that differences between least squares means in the BIC vs non-BIC groups did not reach statistical significance at every month. There were no group differences in standardized test performance in math (57.9% in the BIC group vs 57.4% in the non-BIC group; F1,1890=0.41, P=.52) or reading (44.9% in the BIC group vs 44.7% in the non-BIC group; F1,1890=0.15, P=.70). Findings add to the evidence that BIC can

  6. Postoperative outcomes in bariatric surgical patients participating in an insurance-mandated preoperative weight management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andrew; Hutcheon, Deborah A; Hale, Allyson; Ewing, Joseph A; Miller, Megan; Scott, John D

    2018-02-02

    Many insurance companies require patient participation in a medically supervised weight management program (WMP) before offering approval for bariatric surgery. Clinical data surrounding benefits of participation are limited. To evaluate the relationship between preoperative insurance-mandated WMP participation and postoperative outcomes in bariatric surgery patients. Regional referral center and teaching hospital. A retrospective review of patients who underwent vertical sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass between January 2014 and January 2016 was performed. Patients (N = 354) were divided into 2 cohorts and analyzed according to presence (n = 266) or absence (n = 88) of an insurance-mandated WMP requirement. Primary endpoints included rate of follow-up and percent of excess weight loss (%EWL) at postoperative months 1, 3, 6, and 12. All patients, regardless of the insurance-mandated WMP requirement, followed a program-directed preoperative diet. The majority of patients with an insurance-mandated WMP requirement had private insurance (63.9%). Both patient groups experienced a similar proportion of readmissions and reoperations, rate of follow-up, and %EWL at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months (P = NS). Median operative duration and hospital length of stay were also similar between groups. Linear regression analysis revealed no significant improvement in %EWL at 12 months in the yes-WMP group. These data show that patients who participate in an insurance-mandated WMP in addition to completing a program-directed preoperative diet experience no significant benefit to rate of readmission, reoperation, follow-up, or %EWL up to 12 months postoperation. Our findings suggest that undergoing bariatric surgery without completing an insurance-mandated WMP is safe and effective. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The educational impact of the Specialty Care Access Network-Extension of Community Healthcare Outcomes program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgia, Reena J; Mullan, Patricia B; McCurdy, Heather; Sales, Anne; Moseley, Richard H; Su, Grace L

    2014-11-01

    With the aging hepatitis C cohort and increasing prevalence of fatty liver disease, the burden on primary care providers (PCPs) to care for patients with liver disease is growing. In response, the Veterans Administration implemented initiatives for primary care-specialty referral to increase PCP competency in complex disease management. The Specialty Care Access Network-Extension of Community Healthcare Outcomes (SCAN-ECHO) program initiative was designed to transfer subspecialty knowledge to PCPs through case-based distance learning combined with real-time consultation. There is limited information regarding the initiative's ability to engage PCPs to learn and influence their practice. We surveyed PCPs to determine the factors that led to their participation in this program and the educational impact of participation. Of 51 potential participants, 24 responded to an anonymous survey. More than 75% of respondents participated more than one time in a SCAN-ECHO clinic. Providers were motivated to participate by a desire to learn more about liver disease, to apply the knowledge gained to future patients, and to save their patients time traveling to another center for specialty consultation. Seventy-one percent responded that the didactic component and case-based discussion were equally important. It is important that participation changed clinical practice: 75% of providers indicated they had personally discussed the information they learned from the case presentations with their colleague(s), and 42% indicated they helped a colleague care for their patient with the knowledge learned during discussions of other participants' cases. This study shows that the SCAN-ECHO videoconferencing program between PCPs and specialists can educate providers in the delivery of specialty care from a distance and potentially improve healthcare delivery.

  8. Renewable energy for America`s cities: Advanced Community Energy Systems Proposed Research, Development and Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleason, T.C.J.

    1993-01-01

    The first purpose of this paper is to describe ACES technologies and their potential impact on the environment, the US energy supply system and economy. The second purpose is to recommend an R,D&D program to the US Department of Energy which has as its goal the rapid development of the most promising of the new technologies. ACES supply thermal energy to groups of buildings, communities and cities in the form of hot or chilled water for building space heating, domestic hot water or air conditioning. The energy is supplied via a network of insulated, underground pipes linking central sources of supply with buildings. ACES, by definition, employ very high energy efficiency conversion technologies such as cogeneration, heat pumps, and heat activated chillers. These systems also use renewable energy sources such as solar energy, winter cold, wind, and surface and subsurface warm and cold waters. ACES compose a new generation of community-scale building heating and air conditioning supply technologies. These new systems can effect a rapid and economical conversion of existing cities to energy supply by very efficient energy conversion systems and renewable energy systems. ACES technologies are the most promising near term means by which cities can make the transition from our present damaging dependence on fossil fuel supply systems to an economically and environmentally sustainable reliance on very high efficiency and renewable energy supply systems. When fully developed to serve an urban area, ACES will constitute a new utility system which can attain a level of energy efficiency, economy and reliance on renewable energy sources not possible with currently available energy supply systems.

  9. Renewable energy for America's cities: Advanced Community Energy Systems Proposed Research, Development and Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleason, T.C.J.

    1993-01-01

    The first purpose of this paper is to describe ACES technologies and their potential impact on the environment, the US energy supply system and economy. The second purpose is to recommend an R,D D program to the US Department of Energy which has as its goal the rapid development of the most promising of the new technologies. ACES supply thermal energy to groups of buildings, communities and cities in the form of hot or chilled water for building space heating, domestic hot water or air conditioning. The energy is supplied via a network of insulated, underground pipes linking central sources of supply with buildings. ACES, by definition, employ very high energy efficiency conversion technologies such as cogeneration, heat pumps, and heat activated chillers. These systems also use renewable energy sources such as solar energy, winter cold, wind, and surface and subsurface warm and cold waters. ACES compose a new generation of community-scale building heating and air conditioning supply technologies. These new systems can effect a rapid and economical conversion of existing cities to energy supply by very efficient energy conversion systems and renewable energy systems. ACES technologies are the most promising near term means by which cities can make the transition from our present damaging dependence on fossil fuel supply systems to an economically and environmentally sustainable reliance on very high efficiency and renewable energy supply systems. When fully developed to serve an urban area, ACES will constitute a new utility system which can attain a level of energy efficiency, economy and reliance on renewable energy sources not possible with currently available energy supply systems.

  10. Thyroid function and autoimmunity in Danish pregnant women after an iodine fortification program and associations with obstetric outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Boas, Malene; Hilsted, Linda

    2015-01-01

    the iodine implementation, there has been an increase in thyroid autoimmunity in the background population. This study investigates the thyroid status of pregnant Danish women following the iodine fortification program, and a possible association with preterm delivery. DESIGN: Historical cohort study of 1278...... randomly selected pregnant Danish women attending the national Down's syndrome screening program. METHODS: The main outcome measures were thyroid status according to laboratory- and gestational-age-specific reference intervals, and association with risk of abnormal obstetric outcome. Antibody...... of the Danish iodine fortification program, the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in Danish pregnant women is high - even higher by use of pre-established reference intervals from international consensus guidelines. However, no associations were found with abnormal obstetric outcome. Large...

  11. Demonstration project on epilepsy in Brazil: outcome assessment Projeto demonstrativo em epilepsia no Brasil: avaliação do desfecho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li M. Li

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the outcome of patients with epilepsy treated at primary care health units under the framework of the demonstration project on epilepsy in Brazil, part of the WHO/ILAE/IBE Global Campaign Against Epilepsy. METHOD: We assessed the outcome of patients treated at four primary health units. The staff of the health units underwent information training in epilepsy. The outcome assessment was based on: 1 reduction of seizure frequency, 2 subjective perception from the patient’s and the physician’s point of view, 3 reduction of absenteeism, 4 social integration (school and work, and 5 sense of independence. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients (93 women - 51% with a mean age of 38 (range from 2 to 86 years were studied. The mean follow-up was 26 months (range from 1 to 38 months, 11 patients had follow-up of less than 12 months. Seizure frequency was assessed based on a score system, ranging from 0 (no seizure in the previous 24 months to 7 (>10 seizure/day. The baseline median seizure-frequency score was 3 (one to three seizures per month. At the end of the study the median seizure-frequency score was 1 (one to three seizures per year. The patients’ and relatives’ opinions were that in the majority (59% the health status had improved a lot, some (19% had improved a little, 20% experienced no change and in 2% the health status was worse. With regard to absenteeism, social integration and sense of independence, there were some modest improvements only. DISCUSSION: The development of a model of epilepsy treatment at primary health level based on the existing health system, with strategic measures centred on the health care providers and the community, has proved to be effective providing important reductions in seizure frequency, as well as in general well being. This model can be applied nationwide, as the key elements already exist provided that strategic measures are put forward in accordance with local health providers and

  12. Structures, processes and outcomes of the Aussie Heart Guide Program: A nurse mentor supported, home based cardiac rehabilitation program for rural patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohmader, Terence J; Lin, Frances; Chaboyer, Wendy P

    2018-03-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation has a number of benefits for patients, yet participation in it is sub-optimal, especially in regional Australia. Innovative models of cardiac rehabilitation are needed to improve participation. Providing nurse mentors to support patients transitioning from hospital to home represents a new model of service delivery in Australia. To explore the impact of a home-based cardiac rehabilitation program in assisting patients to recover from Acute Coronary Syndrome and meeting the expectations of nurse mentors delivering the program. This case study was underpinned by the structure, process and outcomes model and occurred in three Australian hospitals 2008-2011. Thirteen patients recovering from acute coronary syndrome were interviewed by telephone and seven nurse mentors completed a survey after completing the program. Mentor perceptions concerning the structures of the home-based CR program included the timely recruitment of patients, mentor training to operationalise the program, commitment to development of the mentor role, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills about cognitive behavioural therapy and patient centred care. Processes included the therapeutic relationship between mentors and patients, suitability of the program and the promotion of healthier lifestyle behaviours. Outcomes identified that patients were satisfied with the program's audiovisual resources, and the level of support and guidance provided by their nurse mentors. Mentors believed that the program was easy to use in terms of its delivery. Patients believed the program assisted their recovery and were satisfied with the information, guidance and support received from mentors. There were positive signs that the program influenced patients' decisions to change unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Outcomes highlighted both rewards and barriers associated with mentoring patients in their homes by telephone. Experience gained from developing a therapeutic relationship with

  13. Agronomic and economic potential of sweet sorghum and Kenaf: Preliminary results of the California Industrial Crops Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, S.D.; Jenkins, B.M.; Brink, D.L.; Merriman, M.M.; Mouser, B.; Campbell, M.L.; Frate, C.; Schmierer, J.

    1992-01-01

    Sweet sorghum is proving to have excellent potential as a biomass energy crop for the production of fuel alcohol and/or electricity. Its advantages include high biomass and fermentables production per unit area of land, relatively low input requirements, and good suitability to a variety of California growing conditions. Average biomass yield for twelve projects involving nine growers, and eight cultivars was 7.6 bone dry tons per acre (bdt/ac) (17 t/ha) at an average cost of production of $58/bdt ($64/t), ready for harvest. With an ethanol yield of 89 gal/bdt (371 L/t), feed stock costs would be about $0.65/gal ($0.17/L). Improved crop yields at reduced costs can be expected in the future. Kenaf is a potential paper pulp and fiber feed stock which produces a long bast fiber and a short- fiber core material. About 30% of the stem material is long fiber, and the remaining 70% is short fiber. The current cost of production, given demonstration project yields of 4 bdt/ac (9t/ha) is about $222/bdt ($245/t), and available higher-value uses command prices of $300/bdt ($330/t) for long fiber for cordage and $160/bdt ($175/t) for core material as poultry litter, precluding its use directly as an energy feed stock. However, reusing the poultry litter core material for energy production may be economically feasible. This material may be obtained for about $15/bdt ($17/t), and with an ethanol yield of 34 ga/bdt (142 L/t), feed stock cost may be about $0.44/gal ($0.12/L)

  14. Evaluation of the proposed pilot groundwater pump and treat demonstration for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodenstein, G.W.; Bonczek, R.R.; Early, T.O.; Hale, T.B.; Huff, D.D.; Nickelson, M.D.; Rightmire, C.T.

    1992-11-01

    This report contains the evaluation and recommendations of a Groundwater Corrective Actions Review Team. The primary goal is to evaluate the technical merit of and the need to implement a proposed groundwater pump-and-treat demonstration project for the Northwest contaminant plume at Paducah, Kentucky. A key distinction recognized by the review team is that the proposed project is intended to be a full-scale hydraulic containment of contaminants migrating from the sources of the plume, not plume remediation. The key questions incorporated into this plan are whether (1) dense, nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLS) are present in the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA) at the source of the plume and (2) {sup 99}Tc removal must be included as part of any groundwater treatment process. The first question cannot be answered until the contaminant sources are better defined; the second question requires further risk assessment and/or a policy decision by DOE. Technical evaluation by the review team suggests that the recommended course of action be to modify the proposed work plan to include accurate identification of the sources of contaminants and vertical distribution of contaminants within the Northwest plume before a decision is made on the preferred source-control option. If DNAPLs are not present in the RGA, removal or containment of the sources is recommended. If DNAPLs are present, then hydraulic containment will be required. Finally, the review team recognizes that it is necessary to initiate a more comprehensive analysis of sitewide remediation needs to create links between action taken for the Northwest plume and action taken for other contamination sites at PGPD.

  15. An Exploratory Investigation of the Assessment Practices of Selected Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business--Accredited Business Programs and Linkages with General Education Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitullo, Elizabeth; Jones, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This research study investigated the assessment practices of five different undergraduate business programs. It examines the learning outcomes required for the business programs and their linkages with general education outcomes. Specific assessment methods, the results from assessments, and how business program faculty use assessment findings to…

  16. Outcome of Congenitally Hypothyroid Screening Program in Isfahan: Iran From Prevention to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Hashemipour

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Early and proper treatment is crucial to prevent neuropsychologic deficits in congenital hypothyroidism (CH. Considering the high prevalence of CH in Isfahan, the aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of treatment in CH patients.Methods: In this study CH neonates diagnosed during screening program in Isfahan from May 2002 to September 2009 were studied. Frequent visits were performed to CH patients to monitor and follow their treatments. Quality of treatment was assessed by evaluating mean age of treatment initiation and mean TSH and T4 levels before and after treatment and during the first and second years according to their normal reference ranges.Results: Of 225,224 screened neonates, 536 were diagnosed as CH patients. The prevalence of CH was 1/420 live births. Mean age at starting treatment was 22.9  13.2 days. In 93.7% of patients, treatment was begun before the 45th day of life. In the first measurement after initiating the treatment, T4 and TSH were not in their acceptable range in 3.9% and 9.8% of CH patients, respec-tively. Mean T4 and TSH reached to normal range during the treatment period. T4 reached the normal range earlier than TSH.Conclusions: The mean age of treatment initiation was in acceptable range but the findings suggest that both early and high-dose treatments are crucial for optimal treatment, especially in patients with severe CH. Further studies are needed to determine the outcome of treatment specially regarding to different etiologies of CH.

  17. Outcomes Associated with In-Center Nocturnal Hemodialysis from a Large Multicenter Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiling; Lester, Keith; Ofsthun, Norma; Lazarus, J. Michael; Hakim, Raymond M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate epidemiology and outcomes of a large in-center nocturnal hemodialysis (INHD) program. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This case-control study compared patients who were on thrice-weekly INHD from 56 Fresenius Medical Care, North America facilities with conventional hemodialysis patients from 244 facilities within the surrounding geographic area. All INHD cases and conventional hemodialysis control subjects who were active as of January 1, 2007, were followed until December 31, 2007, for evaluation of mortality and hospitalization. Results: As of January 1, 2007, 655 patients had been on INHD for 51 ± 73 d. Patients were younger, there were more male and black patients, and vintage was longer, but they had less diabetes compared with 15,334 control subjects. Unadjusted hazard ratio was 0.59 for mortality and 0.76 for hospitalization. After adjustment for case mix and access type, only hospitalization remained significant. Fewer INHD patients were hospitalized (48 versus 59%) with a normalized rate of 9.6 versus 13.5 hospital days per patient-year. INHD patients had greater interdialytic weight gains but lower BP. At baseline, hemoglobin values were similar, whereas albumin and phosphorus values favored INHD. Mean equilibrated Kt/V was higher in INHD patients related to longer treatment time, despite lower blood and dialysate flow rates. Conclusions: Patients who were on INHD exhibited excellent quality indicators, with better survival and lower hospitalization rates. The relative contributions of patient selection versus effect of therapy on outcomes remain to be elucidated in prospective clinical trials. PMID:19965529

  18. Outcomes of Concurrent Operations: Results From the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jason B; Berian, Julia R; Ban, Kristen A; Liu, Yaoming; Cohen, Mark E; Angelos, Peter; Matthews, Jeffrey B; Hoyt, David B; Hall, Bruce L; Ko, Clifford Y

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether concurrently performed operations are associated with an increased risk for adverse events. Concurrent operations occur when a surgeon is simultaneously responsible for critical portions of 2 or more operations. How this practice affects patient outcomes is unknown. Using American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data from 2014 to 2015, operations were considered concurrent if they overlapped by ≥60 minutes or in their entirety. Propensity-score-matched cohorts were constructed to compare death or serious morbidity (DSM), unplanned reoperation, and unplanned readmission in concurrent versus non-concurrent operations. Multilevel hierarchical regression was used to account for the clustered nature of the data while controlling for procedure and case mix. There were 1430 (32.3%) surgeons from 390 (77.7%) hospitals who performed 12,010 (2.3%) concurrent operations. Plastic surgery (n = 393 [13.7%]), otolaryngology (n = 470 [11.2%]), and neurosurgery (n = 2067 [8.4%]) were specialties with the highest proportion of concurrent operations. Spine procedures were the most frequent concurrent procedures overall (n = 2059/12,010 [17.1%]). Unadjusted rates of DSM (9.0% vs 7.1%; P < 0.001), reoperation (3.6% vs 2.7%; P < 0.001), and readmission (6.9% vs 5.1%; P < 0.001) were greater in the concurrent operation cohort versus the non-concurrent. After propensity score matching and risk-adjustment, there was no significant association of concurrence with DSM (odds ratio [OR] 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-1.21), reoperation (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.96-1.40), or readmission (OR 1.14; 95% CI 0.99-1.29). In these analyses, concurrent operations were not detected to increase the risk for adverse outcomes. These results do not lessen the need for further studies, continuous self-regulation and proactive disclosure to patients.

  19. Outcomes of a natural rubber latex control program in an Ontario teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlo, S M; Easty, A; Eubanks, K; Parsons, C R; Min, F; Juvet, S; Liss, G M

    2001-10-01

    Allergy to natural rubber latex (NRL) has been frequently reported in health care workers. However, there is little published evidence of the outcome of hospital intervention programs to reduce exposure and detect cases of sensitization early. This study assesses the effects of intervention to reduce NRL allergy in an Ontario teaching hospital with approximately 8000 employees. A retrospective review assessed annual numbers of employees visiting the occupational health clinic, allergy clinic, or both for manifestations of NRL allergy compared with the timing of introduction of intervention strategies, such as worker education, voluntary medical surveillance, and hospital conversion to low-protein, powder-free NRL gloves. The number of workers identified with NRL allergy rose annually, from 1 in 1988 to 6 in 1993. When worker education and voluntary medical surveillance were introduced in 1994, a further 25 workers were identified. Nonsterile gloves were changed to low-protein, powder-free NRL gloves in 1995: Diagnoses fell to 8 workers that year, and 2 of the 3 nurses who had been off work because of asthma-anaphylaxis were able to return to work with personal avoidance of NRL products. With a change to lower protein, powder-free NRL sterile gloves in 1997, allergy diagnoses fell to 3, and only 1 new case was identified subsequently up to May 1999. No increased glove costs were incurred as a result of consolidated glove purchases. This program to reduce NRL allergy in employees was effectively achieved without additional glove costs while reducing expenses from time off work and workers' compensation claims.

  20. Application of Adverse Outcome Pathways to U.S. EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Patience; Noyes, Pamela D; Casey, Warren M; Dix, David J

    2017-09-01

    The U.S. EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) screens and tests environmental chemicals for potential effects in estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone pathways, and it is one of the only regulatory programs designed around chemical mode of action. This review describes the EDSP's use of adverse outcome pathway (AOP) and toxicity pathway frameworks to organize and integrate diverse biological data for evaluating the endocrine activity of chemicals. Using these frameworks helps to establish biologically plausible links between endocrine mechanisms and apical responses when those end points are not measured in the same assay. Pathway frameworks can facilitate a weight of evidence determination of a chemical's potential endocrine activity, identify data gaps, aid study design, direct assay development, and guide testing strategies. Pathway frameworks also can be used to evaluate the performance of computational approaches as alternatives for low-throughput and animal-based assays and predict downstream key events. In cases where computational methods can be validated based on performance, they may be considered as alternatives to specific assays or end points. A variety of biological systems affect apical end points used in regulatory risk assessments, and without mechanistic data, an endocrine mode of action cannot be determined. Because the EDSP was designed to consider mode of action, toxicity pathway and AOP concepts are a natural fit. Pathway frameworks have diverse applications to endocrine screening and testing. An estrogen pathway example is presented, and similar approaches are being used to evaluate alternative methods and develop predictive models for androgen and thyroid pathways. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1304.

  1. Clinical Outcomes of a Pharmacy-Led Blood Factor Stewardship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueg, Anne O; Lowe, Christopher; Kiel, Patrick J

    To report the results of a pharmacist-directed blood factor stewardship program targeting off-label utilization designed to limit use to established organizational guidelines in high-risk populations. Prospective evaluation of recombinant factor VIIa and prothrombin complex concentrate orders beginning June 2013 through May 2014 and a matched retrospective cohort from June 2012 to May 2013. Matched cohorts were evaluated for 28-day mortality, change in international normalized ratio (INR), adverse events, concurrent blood product use, and cost savings. Forty-two orders for blood factor were ordered between June 2013 and May 2014, 70 orders in the year before (N = 112). Twenty eight-day mortality was not different between the cohorts: 53.9% versus 50% (P = 0.77). Blood factor use with underlying liver failure and active bleeding was strongly associated with 28-day mortality: odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 2.9 (1.5-7.14) and 2.91 (0.01-2.91), respectively. Blood products dispensed increased over the year with plasma products the most significant (1 vs. 4 P = 0.004). All other clinical outcomes were nonsignificant. An annual cost savings of $375,539 was achieved, primarily through a significant reduction in recombinant factor VIIa and avoidance in high-risk patients. Use of off-label blood factors can be controlled through a pharmacist-led stewardship program. Twenty eight-day mortality was not different between the 2 cohorts; however, identification of risk factors for death associated with blood factor use allows for restriction in high-risk populations, creates a discussion of futile care, and yields cost savings.

  2. Keeping the "continuous" in continuous quality improvement: exploring perceived outcomes of CQI program use in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Bishop, Andrea C; Duggan, Kellie; Reid, Carolyn; Mahaffey, Thomas; MacKinnon, Neil J; Mahaffey, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    Given the significant potential of continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs in enhancing overall levels of patient safety, community pharmacies in North America are under increasing pressure to have a formal and documented CQI program in place. However, while such initiatives may seem great on paper, in practice the outcomes of such programs to community pharmacy practice remain unclear. To explore the perceived outcomes identified by community pharmacies that adopted and actively used a standardized (i.e., common across pharmacies) CQI program for at least 1 year and to develop a framework for how such outcomes were achieved. A multi-site study of SafetyNET-Rx, a standardized and technologically sophisticated (e.g., online reporting of medication errors to a national database) CQI program, involving community pharmacies in Nova Scotia, Canada, was performed. During the summer and fall of 2011, 22 interviews were conducted with the CQI facilitators in 12 Nova Scotia community pharmacies; equally split between independent/banners and corporate chains. Of the CQI facilitators, 14 were pharmacists, while the remaining eight were pharmacy technicians. Thematic analysis following the procedures presented by Braun and Clarke was adopted to identify and explore the major outcomes. Results of the thematic analysis highlighted a number of perceived outcomes from the use of a standardized CQI program in community pharmacies, specifically: (1) perceived reduction in the number of medication errors that were occurring in the pharmacy, (2) increased awareness/confidence of individual actions related to dispensing, (3) increased understanding of the dispensing and related processes/workflow, (4) increased openness to talking about medication errors among pharmacy staff, and (5) quality and safety becoming more entrenched in the workflow (e.g., staff is more aware of their roles and responsibilities in patient safety and confident that the dispensing processes are safe and

  3. Employee and family assistance video counseling program: a post launch retrospective comparison with in-person counseling outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veder, Barbara; Pope, Stan; Mani, Michèle; Beaudoin, Kelly; Ritchie, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Access to technologically mediated information and services under the umbrella of mental and physical health has become increasingly available to clients via Internet modalities, according to a recent study. In May 2010, video counseling was added to the counseling services offered through the Employee and Family Assistance Program at Shepell·fgi as a pilot project with a full operational launch in September 2011. The objective of this study was to conduct a retrospective post launch examination of the video counseling service through an analysis of the reported clinical outcomes of video and in-person counseling modalities. A chronological sample of 68 video counseling (VC) cases and 68 in-person (IP) cases were collected from a pool of client clinical files closed in 2012. To minimize the variables impacting the study and maintain as much clinical continuity as possible, the IP and the VC clients must have attended clinical sessions with any one of six counselors who provided both the VC and the IP services. The study compared the two counseling modalities along the following data points (see glossary of terms): (1) client demographic profiles (eg, age, gender, whether the sessions involved individuals or conjoint sessions with couples or families, etc), (2) presenting issue, (3) average session hours, (4) client rating of session helpfulness, (5) rates of goal completion, (6) client withdrawal rates, (7) no show and late cancellation rates, and (8) pre/post client self-assessment. Specific to VC, we examined client geographic location. Data analysis demonstrates that the VC and the IP showed a similar representation of presenting issues with nearly identical outcomes for client ratings of session helpfulness, rates of goal completion, pre/post client self-assessment, average session duration, and client geographic location. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of withdrawal from counseling, no shows, and late cancellations between

  4. Models of psychological service provision under Australia's Better Outcomes in Mental Health Care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkis, Jane; Burgess, Philip; Kohn, Fay; Morley, Belinda; Blashki, Grant; Naccarella, Lucio

    2006-08-01

    The Access to Allied Psychological Services component of Australia's Better Outcomes in Mental Health Care program enables eligible general practitioners to refer consumers to allied health professionals for affordable, evidence-based mental health care, via 108 projects conducted by Divisions of General Practice. The current study profiled the models of service delivery across these projects, and examined whether particular models were associated with differential levels of access to services. We found: 76% of projects were retaining their allied health professionals under contract, 28% via direct employment, and 7% some other way; Allied health professionals were providing services from GPs' rooms in 63% of projects, from their own rooms in 63%, from a third location in 42%; and The referral mechanism of choice was direct referral in 51% of projects, a voucher system in 27%, a brokerage system in 24%, and a register system in 25%. Many of these models were being used in combination. No model was predictive of differential levels of access, suggesting that the approach of adapting models to the local context is proving successful.

  5. Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velásquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes associated with 1…

  6. An Examination of the Relationship between Outcomes Assessment and Accreditation in Community College-Based Health Information Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakos, Margaret Helen Gallo

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM) Board of Commissioner and Panel of Accreditation Reviewer understanding of what constitutes student learning outcomes and an effective program evaluation plan with that of campus-based health information technology (HIT) program…

  7. Aligning Needs, Expectations, and Learning Outcomes to Sustain Self-Efficacy through Transfer Learning Community Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptien, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter addresses strengths and difficulties encountered in implementing transfer learning community models and how efficacy is supported through transfer learning community programming. Transfer programming best practices and recommendations for program improvements are presented.

  8. Integral Ramjet Booster Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    vibration loads before motor firing at -65, +70, and +1650F, (2) The chambers are fabricated from roll and welded ( TIG ) L-605 sheet that is cold...Typical Integral Booster Internal Configuration Keyhole Grain Pressure and Thrust Versus Time (+700F, Sea Level) Keyhole Grain Pressure and...Thrust Versus Time (+1650F, Sea Level) Keyhole Grain Pressure and Thrust Versus Time (-65^, Sea Level) Radial-Slot Grain Design Radial-Slot Grain

  9. Clinical outcomes of a diabetes education program for patients with diabetes mellitus in the Micronesian community in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mok Thoong

    2016-01-01

    Hawaii has diverse population made up of a cultural mix of different races. Due to different cultural and social influences and language barrier, many of the under-served population who migrated to Hawaii and having diabetes mellitus may be susceptible to long-term complications due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia and medication nonadherence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a diabetes education program on the clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus in the Micronesian community of Hawaii. This study included patients over age 18 years, with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The diabetes education program was customized for its weekly classes to fit to the under-served population. Data were collected on participants on the 1(st) day and then 6 months after attending the education program. Data on primary and secondary endpoints were collected and analyzed. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, fasting blood glucose, and triglyceride levels of participants fell significantly from baseline after attending the diabetes education program for 6 months. No significant changes were observed in other secondary outcomes during the study time period. Based on our findings, the diabetes education program that was tailored to the Micronesian population was successful in achieving glycemic goals, enhancing medication adherence, improving clinical outcomes, and also preventing long-term complications among its participants.

  10. Outcomes of a telemonitoring-based program (telEPOC in frequently hospitalized COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban C

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cristóbal Esteban,1,2 Javier Moraza,1 Milagros Iriberri,3 Urko Aguirre,2,4 Begoña Goiria,5 José M Quintana,2,4 Myriam Aburto,1 Alberto Capelastegui1 1Pneumology Department, Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital, Galdakao, 2Red de Investigación en Servicios Sanitarios y Enfermedades Crónicas (REDISSEC, Bilbao, 3Pneumology Department, Cruces Hospital, Barakaldo, 4Research Unit, Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital, Galdakao, 5Primary Care Unit, Barrualde Integrated Healthcare Organisation (OSI-Barrualde, Spain Background: The increasing prevalence of chronic diseases requires changes in health care delivery. In COPD, telemedicine appears to be a useful tool. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy (in improving health care-resource use and clinical outcomes of a telemonitoring-based program (telEPOC in COPD patients with frequent hospitalizations. Materials and methods: We conducted a nonrandomized observational study in an intervention cohort of 119 patients (Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital and a control cohort of 78 patients (Cruces Hospital, followed up for 2 years (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02528370. The inclusion criteria were two or more hospital admissions in the previous year or three or more admissions in the previous 2 years. The intervention group received telemonitoring plus education and controls usual care. Results: Most participants were men (13% women, and the sample had a mean age of 70 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 45%, Charlson comorbidity index score of 3.5, and BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity index score of 4.1. In multivariate analysis, the intervention was independently related to lower rates of hospital admission (odds ratio [OR] 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27–0.54; P<0.0001, emergency department attendance (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35–0.92; P<0.02, and 30-day readmission (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.29–0.74; P<0.001, as well as cumulative length of stay (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0

  11. Research Problems in Data Curation: Outcomes from the Data Curation Education in Research Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, C. L.; Mayernik, M. S.; Weber, N.; Baker, K. S.; Kelly, K.; Marlino, M. R.; Thompson, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The need for data curation is being recognized in numerous institutional settings as national research funding agencies extend data archiving mandates to cover more types of research grants. Data curation, however, is not only a practical challenge. It presents many conceptual and theoretical challenges that must be investigated to design appropriate technical systems, social practices and institutions, policies, and services. This presentation reports on outcomes from an investigation of research problems in data curation conducted as part of the Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC) program. DCERC is developing a new model for educating data professionals to contribute to scientific research. The program is organized around foundational courses and field experiences in research and data centers for both master's and doctoral students. The initiative is led by the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in collaboration with the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee, and library and data professionals at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). At the doctoral level DCERC is educating future faculty and researchers in data curation and establishing a research agenda to advance the field. The doctoral seminar, Research Problems in Data Curation, was developed and taught in 2012 by the DCERC principal investigator and two doctoral fellows at the University of Illinois. It was designed to define the problem space of data curation, examine relevant concepts and theories related to both technical and social perspectives, and articulate research questions that are either unexplored or under theorized in the current literature. There was a particular emphasis on the Earth and environmental sciences, with guest speakers brought in from NCAR, National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Through the assignments, students

  12. Implementation and operational research: evaluating outcomes of patients lost to follow-up in a large comprehensive care treatment program in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachlis, Beth; Ochieng, Daniel; Geng, Elvin; Rotich, Elyne; Ochieng, Vincent; Maritim, Beryl; Ndege, Samson; Naanyu, Violet; Martin, Jeffrey N; Keter, Alfred; Ayuo, Paul; Diero, Lameck; Nyambura, Monicah; Braitstein, Paula

    2015-04-01

    Academic Model Providing Access To Healthcare (AMPATH) program provides comprehensive HIV care and treatment services. Approximately, 30% of patients have become lost to follow-up (LTFU). We sought to actively trace and identify outcomes for a sample of these patients. LTFU was defined as missing a scheduled visit by ≥3 months. A randomly selected sample of 17% of patients identified as LTFU between January 2009 and June 2011 was generated, with sample stratification on age, antiretroviral therapy (ART) status at last visit, and facility. Chart reviews were conducted followed by active tracing. Tracing was completed by trained HIV-positive outreach workers July 2011 to February 2012. Outcomes were compared between adults and children and by ART status. Of 14,811 LTFU patients, 2540 were randomly selected for tracing (2179 adults, 1071 on ART). The chart reviews indicated that 326 (12.8%) patients were not actually LTFU. Outcomes for 71% of sampled patients were determined including 85% of those physically traced. Of those with known outcomes, 21% had died, whereas 29% had disengaged from care for various reasons. The remaining patients had moved away (n = 458, 25%) or were still receiving HIV care (n = 443 total, 25%). Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale sampling-based approach. A significant proportion of patients were found not to be LTFU, and further, high numbers of patients who were LTFU could not be located. Over a quarter of patients disengaged from care for various reasons including access challenges and familial influences.

  13. Development and application of course-embedded assessment system for program outcome evaluation in the Korean nursing education: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jee Won; Seo, Eun Ji; You, Mi-Ae; Song, Ju-Eun

    2016-03-01

    Program outcome evaluation is important because it is an indicator for good quality of education. Course-embedded assessment is one of the program outcome evaluation methods. However, it is rarely used in Korean nursing education. The study purpose was to develop and apply preliminarily a course-embedded assessment system to evaluate one program outcome and to share our experiences. This was a methodological study to develop and apply the course-embedded assessment system based on the theoretical framework in one nursing program in South Korea. Scores for 77 students generated from the three practicum courses were used. The course-embedded assessment system was developed following the six steps suggested by Han's model as follows. 1) One program outcome in the undergraduate program, "nursing process application ability", was selected and 2) the three clinical practicum courses related to the selected program outcome were identified. 3) Evaluation tools including rubric and items were selected for outcome measurement and 4) performance criterion, the educational goal level for the program, was established. 5) Program outcome was actually evaluated using the rubric and evaluation items in the three practicum courses and 6) the obtained scores were analyzed to identify the achievement rate, which was compared with the performance criterion. Achievement rates for the selected program outcome in adult, maternity, and pediatric nursing practicum were 98.7%, 100%, and 66.2% in the case report and 100% for all three in the clinical practice, and 100%, 100%, and 87% respectively for the conference. These are considered as satisfactory levels when compared with the performance criterion of "at least 60% or more". Course-embedded assessment can be used as an effective and economic method to evaluate the program outcome without running an integrative course additionally. Further studies to develop course-embedded assessment systems for other program outcomes in nursing

  14. Main outcomes from in situ thermo-hydro-mechanical experiments programme to demonstrate feasibility of radioactive high-level waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Armand

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of radioactive waste disposal, an underground research laboratory (URL is a facility in which experiments are conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a radioactive waste disposal facility within a geological formation. The Meuse/Haute-Marne URL is a site-specific facility planned to study the feasibility of a radioactive waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx claystone. The thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM behaviour of the host rock is significant for the design of the underground nuclear waste disposal facility and for its long-term safety. The French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra has begun a research programme aiming to demonstrate the relevancy of the French high-level waste (HLW concept. This paper presents the programme implemented from small-scale (small diameter boreholes to full-scale demonstration experiments to study the THM effects of the thermal transient on the COx claystone and the strategy implemented in this new programme to demonstrate and optimise current disposal facility components for HLW. It shows that the French high-level waste concept is feasible and working in the COx claystone. It also exhibits that, as for other plastic clay or claystone, heating-induced pore pressure increases and that the THM behaviour is anisotropic.

  15. Health Mentor-Reported Outcomes and Perceptions of Student Team Performance in a Longitudinal Interprofessional Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umland, Elena; Collins, Lauren; Baronner, Ashley; Lim, Edwin; Giordano, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The need to evaluate the impact of interprofessional education (IPE) on learner outcomes is clear, but assessment of IPE's impact on patient health and well-being is lacking. This mixed-methods study evaluated perspectives of community volunteers, health mentors (HMs) who have at least one chronic condition, who participated in an IPE curriculum. In May 2014, 93 HMs concluding the Health Mentors Program completed a survey evaluating their student teams according to the Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies' four domains and program impact on health/wellbeing using a 4-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree; 4=strongly agree). The average response to statements regarding the four domains of values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, communication, and teamwork statements were all >3.0. HMs rated program satisfaction on a 10-point scale (1=least satisfied, 10=most satisfied) and answered open-ended outcome questions. The average program satisfaction score was 9.13±1.43; increased motivation to make and maintain healthy behaviors was reported. In a follow-up focus group with 10 mentors, high satisfaction levels from working with interprofessional student teams were reported, and substantial improvements in managing health conditions and improving overall health status were relayed. Further studies will determine if the patient-reported outcomes of the mentors correlate with objective health measures.

  16. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  19. English Learners with Disabilities in High School: Population Characteristics, Transition Programs, and Postschool Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Audrey; Murray, Angela; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics, transition education, and postschool outcomes of English learners with disabilities (ELSWDs), despite that English learners are a rapidly growing group of U.S. students with consistently poor outcomes. This study examines a nationally representative sample of ELSWDs through a secondary analysis of the…

  20. Improving asthma-related health outcomes among low-income, multiethnic, school-aged children: results of a demonstration project that combined continuous quality improvement and community health worker strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Patrick; Porter, Patricia G; Lob, Sibylle H; Boer, Jennifer Holloman; Rocha, David A; Adelson, Joel W

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve asthma-related health outcomes in an ethnically and geographically disparate population of economically disadvantaged school-aged children by using a team-based approach using continuous quality improvement and community health workers. A demonstration project was conducted with 7 community clinics treating approximately 3000 children with asthma 5 to 18 years of age. The overall clinic population with asthma was assessed for care-process changes through random cross-sectional chart reviews at baseline and 24 months (N = 560). A subset of patients with either moderate or severe persistent asthma or poorly controlled asthma (N = 405) was followed longitudinally for specific asthma-related clinical outcomes, satisfaction with care, and confidence managing asthma by family interview at baseline and at 12 or 24 months. Patient-centered and care-process outcomes included patient/parent assessment of quality of care and confidence in self-management, asthma action plan review, and documentation of guideline-based indicators of quality of care. Direct clinical outcomes included daytime and nighttime symptoms, use of rescue medications, acute care and emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and missed school days. Each clinic site's degree of adherence to the intervention model was evaluated and ranked to examine the correlation between model adherence and outcomes. Cross-sectional data showed clinic-wide improvements in the documentation of asthma severity, review of action plans, health services use, and asthma symptoms. At follow-up in the longitudinal sample, fewer patients reported acute visits, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, frequent daytime and nighttime symptoms, and missed school days compared with baseline. More patients reported excellent or very good quality of care and confidence in asthma self-management. Linear regression analysis of the clinical sites' model adherence ranks against site