WorldWideScience

Sample records for demonstrating light effects

  1. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  2. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  3. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  4. Experimental demonstration of 360 tunable RF phase shift using slow and fast light effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, Jose;

    2009-01-01

    A microwave photonic phase shifter realizing 360º phase shift over a RF bandwidth of more than 10 GHz is demonstrated using optical filtering assisted slow and fast light effects in a cascaded structure of semiconductor optical amplifiers....

  5. Light and Plants. A Series of Experiments Demonstrating Light Effects on Seed Germination, Plant Growth, and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, R. J.; And Others

    A brief summary of the effects of light on plant germination, growth and development, including photoperiodism and pigment formation, introduces 18 experiments and demonstrations which illustrate aspects of these effects. Detailed procedures for each exercise are given, the expected results outlined, and possible sources of difficulty discussed.…

  6. Music-of-light stethoscope: a demonstration of the photoacoustic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitichev, D. I.; Xia, W.; Hill, E.; Mosse, C. A.; Perkins, T.; Konyn, K.; Ourselin, S.; Desjardins, A. E.; Vercauteren, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a system aimed at demonstrating the photoacoustic (PA) effect for educational purposes. PA imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that requires no contrast agent and has a great potential for spine and brain lesion characterisation, breast cancer and blood flow monitoring notably in the context of fetal surgery. It relies on combining light excitation with ultrasound reception. Our brief was to present and explain PA imaging in a public-friendly way suitable for a variety of ages and backgrounds. We developed a simple, accessible demonstration unit using readily available materials. We used a modulated light emitting diode (LED) torch and an electronic stethoscope. The output of a music player was used for light modulation and the chest piece of the stethoscope covered by a black tape was used as an absorbing target and an enclosed chamber. This demonstration unit was presented to the public at the Bloomsbury Festival On Light in October 2015. Our stall was visited by over 100 people of varying ages. Twenty families returned in-depth evaluation questionnaires, which show that our explanations of the photoacoustic effect were well understood. Their interest in biomedical engineering was increased.

  7. Music-of-Light Stethoscope: A Demonstration of the Photoacoustic Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitichev, D.; Xia, W; Hill, E.; Mosse, C A; Perkins, T.; Konyn, K.; Ourselin, S; Desjardins, A; Vercauteren, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a system aimed at demonstrating the photoacoustic (PA) effect for educational purposes. PA imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that requires no contrast agent and has a great potential for spine and brain lesion characterisation, breast cancer and blood flow monitoring notably in the context of fetal surgery. It relies on combining light excitation with ultrasound reception. Our brief was to present and explain PA imaging in a public-friendly way suitable for a varie...

  8. Experimental demonstration of spinor slow light

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Meng-Jung; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriasov, Viaceslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the developments of slow, stored and stationary light based on the electromagnetically induced transparency effect have attracted a great deal of attention, stimulated by potential applications such as low-light-level nonlinear optics and quantum information manipulation. The previous experiments all dealt with the single-component slow light. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light using a double tripod (DT) atom-light coupling scheme which involves two atomic ground state coherences. We observe the neutrino-type oscillations between the two slow light components controlled by the two-photon detuning. We show that the DT scheme for the light storage behaves like the two outcomes of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer enabling high precision measurements of the frequency detuning. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate a possible application of the DT scheme as quantum memory/rotator for the two-color qubits.

  9. Music-of-Light Stethoscope: A Demonstration of the Photoacoustic Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitichev, D. I.; Xia, W.; Hill, E.; Mosse, C. A.; Perkins, T.; Konyn, K.; Ourselin, S.; Desjardins, A. E.; Vercauteren, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a system aimed at demonstrating the photoacoustic (PA) effect for educational purposes. PA imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that requires no contrast agent and has a great potential for spine and brain lesion characterisation, breast cancer and blood flow monitoring notably in the context of fetal surgery. It relies on…

  10. Experimental demonstration of CW light injection effect in upstream traffic TDM-PON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chow, Chi-Wai; Wu, Yu-Fu; Shih, Fu-Yuan; Chi, Sien

    2010-06-01

    High capacity time-division-multiplexed passive optical network (TDM-PON) is an emerging fiber access network that deploys optical access lines between a carrier's central office (CO) and a customer sites. In this investigation, we demonstrate and analyze the continuous wave (CW) upstream effect in TDM-PONs. Besides, we also propose and design a protection apparatus in each optical network unit (ONU) to avoid a CW upstream traffic in TDM-PONs due to sudden external environment change or ONU failure. When an upstream CW injection occurs in TDM access network, the protection scheme can stop the CW effect within a few ms to maintain the entire data traffic.

  11. Demonstration of tunable microwave photonic notch filters using slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel scheme based on slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers, to implement a microwave photonic notch filter with ~100% fractional tuning range at a microwave frequency of 30 GHz.......We introduce a novel scheme based on slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers, to implement a microwave photonic notch filter with ~100% fractional tuning range at a microwave frequency of 30 GHz....

  12. Demonstration of tunable microwave photonic notch filters using slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Mørk, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel scheme based on slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers, to implement a microwave photonic notch filter with ~100% fractional tuning range at a microwave frequency of 30 GHz.......We introduce a novel scheme based on slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers, to implement a microwave photonic notch filter with ~100% fractional tuning range at a microwave frequency of 30 GHz....

  13. Demonstration of the interaction between two stopped light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsin; Lee, Meng-Jung; Hung, Weilun; Chen, Ying-Cheng; Chen, Yong-Fan; Yu, Ite A

    2012-04-27

    This study reports the first experimental demonstration that two light pulses were made motionless and interacted with each other through a medium. The scheme with motionless light pulses maximizes the interaction time and can achieve a considerable efficiency even below single-photon level. To demonstrate the enhancement of optical nonlinear efficiency, the experiment in this study used the process of one optical pulse switched by another based on the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency. Moving light pulses activate switching at an energy per area of 2 photons per atomic absorption cross section as discussed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4611 (1999)]. This study demonstrates that motionless light pulses can activate switching at 0.56 photons per atomic absorption cross section, and that the light level can be further reduced by increasing the optical density of the medium. The result of this work enters a new regime of low-light physics.

  14. Demonstration of the Interaction between Two Stopped Light Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yi-Hsin; Hung, Weilun; Chen, Ying-Cheng; Chen, Yong-Fan; Yu, Ite A

    2011-01-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration that two light pulses were made motionless and interacted with each other via a medium. The interaction time is, in principle, as long as possible and a considerable efficiency can be achieved even below single-photon level. We utilized the optical process of one photon pulse switched by another based on the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency to demonstrate the enhancement of optical nonlinear efficiency. With moving light pulses, the switching is activated at energy per area of 2 photons per atomic absorption cross section in the best situation as discussed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4611 (1999)]. With motionless light pulses, we demonstrated that the switching is activated at 0.56 photons per atomic absorption cross section and that the light level can be further reduced by increasing the optical density of the medium. Our work enters a new regime of low light physics.

  15. DEMONSTRATION EXPERIMENTS OF LIGHT POLARIZATION IN PHYSICS COURSE

    OpenAIRE

    Brazhkin, Y.; Kalenkov, S.; Nizhegorodov, V.

    2008-01-01

    The article presents layout of experiments for observatiion of polarizing effects on light passage through crossed polarizers. Addition of the third polarizer leads to appearance of light on the screen. Experiment is for cases with a laser light source, reflection of light under the Brewster's angle. Photos of the installations realizing the given effects are resulted.

  16. Bactericidal Effects of 405 nm Light Exposure Demonstrated by Inactivation of Escherichia, Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria, and Mycobacterium Species in Liquid Suspensions and on Exposed Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne E. Murdoch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bactericidal effect of 405 nm light was investigated on taxonomically diverse bacterial pathogens from the genera Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia, Listeria, and Mycobacterium. High-intensity 405 nm light, generated from an array of 405-nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs, was used to inactivate bacteria in liquid suspension and on exposed surfaces. L. monocytogenes was most readily inactivated in suspension, whereas S. enterica was most resistant. In surface exposure tests, L. monocytogenes was more susceptible than Gram-negative enteric bacteria to 405 nm light when exposed on an agar surface but interestingly less susceptible than S. enterica after drying onto PVC and acrylic surfaces. The study findings, that 405 nm light inactivates diverse types of bacteria in liquids and on surfaces, in addition to the safety advantages of this visible (non-UV wavelength light, indicate the potential of this technology for a range of decontamination applications.

  17. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ton, M. K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, E. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gilbride, T. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-10-01

    This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting (SSL) GATEWAY Demonstration Program.

  18. A Simple Demonstration of Absorption Spectra Using Tungsten Holiday Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.

    2009-01-01

    In a previous paper submitted to the Demonstrations section (Birriel 2008, "Astronomy Education Review," 7, 147), I discussed using commercially available incandescent light bulbs for the purpose of demonstrating absorption spectra in the classroom or laboratory. This demonstration solved a long-standing problem that many of astronomy instructors…

  19. SSL Demonstration: Area Lighting, Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area, AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-28

    Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations at the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona. The retrofit was documented to better understand LED technology performance in high-temperature environments. This document is a summary brief of the Phase 1.0 and 1.1 reports previously published on this demonstration.

  20. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit, Yuma Border Patrol, Yuma, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, A. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCullough, J. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations at the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona. The retrofit was documented to better understand LED technology performance in high-temperature environments.

  1. GATEWAY Demonstrations: OLED Lighting in the Offices of Aurora Lighting Design, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    At the offices of Aurora Lighting Design, Inc., in Grayslake, IL, the GATEWAY program conducted its first investigation involving OLED lighting. The project experienced several challenges, but also highlighted a number of promising attributes – which indicate that with continued improvements in efficacy, longevity, size, and flexibility, OLEDs could provide a new tool for creative and effective lighting.

  2. EXAMINATION OF THE FEASIBILITY FOR DEMONSTRATION AND USE OF RADIOLUMINESCENT LIGHTS FOR ALASKAN REMOTE RUNWAY LIGHTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, G.; Perrigo, L.; Leonard, L.; Hegdal, L

    1984-01-01

    This report examines the feasibility of radioluminescent light applications for rural Alaskan airports. The work presented in this report covers four tasks: State of the Art Evaluation of Radioluminescent Lights, Environmental, Radiological, and Regulatory Evaluations, Engineering Evaluations, and Demonstration Plan Development.

  3. GPC light shaper: static and dynamic experimental demonstrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Kopylov, Oleksii; Villangca, Mark Jayson;

    2014-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is an efficient method for generating speckle-free contiguous optical distributions useful in diverse applications such as static beam shaping, optical manipulation and, recently, for excitation in two-photon optogenetics. GPC allows efficient utilization of typical...... shapes that can find use in lightefficient industrial or commercial applications. Using a dynamic spatial light modulator, we also show simple and efficient beam shaping of reconfigurable shapes geared towards materials processing, biophotonics research and other contemporary applications. Our...... Gaussian lasers in such applications using binary-only phase modulation. In this work, we experimentally verify previously derived conditions for photon-efficient light shaping with GPC [Opt. Express 22(5), 5299 (2014)]. We demonstrate a compact implementation of GPC for creating practical illumination...

  4. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku' uipo

    2011-05-06

    . However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

  5. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku' uipo

    2011-05-06

    . However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

  6. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

  7. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Exterior LED Lighting Projects at Princeton University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Evans, WIlliam E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Murphy, Arthur [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Perrin, Tess [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-30

    This report focuses on four exterior solid-state lighting projects that have been completed at Princeton since 2008, when the University adopted a comprehensive sustainability plan. Through these initial projects – which include a parking garage, a pedestrian path, and two parking lot installations – the school’s facilities engineering staff learned important lessons about SSL technology and gained experience in dealing with the rapidly changing landscape of lighting manufacturers and their suppliers.

  8. Demonstration of Light-Matter Micro-Macro Quantum Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranov, Alexey; Lavoie, Jonathan; Strassmann, Peter C.; Sangouard, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael; Bussières, Félix; Gisin, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts microscopic phenomena with undeniable success. Nevertheless, current theoretical and experimental efforts still do not yield conclusive evidence that there is or is not a fundamental limitation on the possibility to observe quantum phenomena at the macroscopic scale. This question prompted several experimental efforts producing quantum superpositions of large quantum states in light or matter. We report on the observation of quantum correlations, revealed using an entanglement witness, between a single photon and an atomic ensemble of billions of ions frozen in a crystal. The matter part of the state involves the superposition of two macroscopically distinguishable solid-state components composed of several tens of atomic excitations. Assuming the insignificance of the time ordering our experiment indirectly shows light-matter micro-macro entanglement. Our approach leverages from quantum memory techniques and could be used in other systems to expand the size of quantum superpositions in matter.

  9. Demonstration of Light-Matter Micro-Macro Quantum Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranov, Alexey; Lavoie, Jonathan; Strassmann, Peter C; Sangouard, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael; Bussières, Félix; Gisin, Nicolas

    2016-05-13

    Quantum mechanics predicts microscopic phenomena with undeniable success. Nevertheless, current theoretical and experimental efforts still do not yield conclusive evidence that there is or is not a fundamental limitation on the possibility to observe quantum phenomena at the macroscopic scale. This question prompted several experimental efforts producing quantum superpositions of large quantum states in light or matter. We report on the observation of quantum correlations, revealed using an entanglement witness, between a single photon and an atomic ensemble of billions of ions frozen in a crystal. The matter part of the state involves the superposition of two macroscopically distinguishable solid-state components composed of several tens of atomic excitations. Assuming the insignificance of the time ordering our experiment indirectly shows light-matter micro-macro entanglement. Our approach leverages from quantum memory techniques and could be used in other systems to expand the size of quantum superpositions in matter.

  10. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Royer, Michael P.; Hadjian, M.; Kauffman, Rick

    2013-06-10

    Nine different streetlighting products were installed on various streets in Kansas City, Missouri during February, 2011, to evaluate their performance relative to the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting. The applications investigated included 100 W, 150 W, 250 W, and 400 W HPS installations. Initial measurements and comparisons included power, illuminance, and luminance; sample illuminance readings have continued at each of the nine locations at roughly 1,000-hour operating intervals since then. All of the LED products consumed less power than their HPS counterparts—with a mean difference of 39% and a range of 31% to 51%—but they also emitted 31% fewer lumens, on average. The net result is just a 15% increase in mean efficacy. Applying the city’s stringent light loss factors to the initial measured data meant that five of the LED products (and two of the HPS luminaires) were predicted to eventually fail to meet the specified mean illuminance over their lifetimes; however, the specified light loss levels are not expected to be reached by the LED products until some distant future date (between 12 and 30 years after installation according to manufacturer specification sheet estimates). The practical value of designing streetlighting systems to meet illumination requirements more than 15 years in the future is questioned. Numerous sources of variation in field measurements are noted throughout the report, particularly seasonal influences such as ambient temperature and foliage that are evident in the time-series illuminance data.

  11. Experimental demonstration of light capsule embracing super-sized darkness inside via super-anti-resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Chao; Han, Tiancheng; Leong, Eunice; Ding, Weiqiang; Yeo, Tat-Soon; Yu, Xia; Teng, Jinghua; Lei, Dang Yuan; Maier, Stefan A; Lukyanchuk, Boris; Zhang, Shuang; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Ijon Tichy lamp allows to focus the macroscopic perfect 3D darkness surrounded by all light in the shined room. The object staying in the darkness is similar to staying in an empty light capsule because light just bypasses it. Its functionality of bending light macroscopically is fascinating, similar in some sense to the transformation-based cloaking effect. Here, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a binary-optical system exhibiting super-anti-resolution (SAR), in which electromagnetic energy flux avoids and bends smoothly around a nearly perfect darkness region. SAR remains an unexplored topic hitherto, in contrast to the super-resolution for realizing high spatial resolution. This novel scheme replies on smearing out the PSF perfectly and thus poses less stringent limitations upon the object size and position since the created nearly-perfect dark (zero-field) area reach 10 orders of magnitude larger than square of wavelength in size. Conceptually, it represents a novel implementation of Ijon Ti...

  12. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia, PA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P.; Tuenge, Jason R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2012-09-01

    For this demonstration assessment, 10 different groups of LED luminaires were installed at three sites in Philadelphia, PA. Each of the three sites represented a different set of conditions, most importantly with regard to the incumbent HPS luminaires, which were nominally 100 W, 150 W, and 250 W. The performance of each product was evaluated based on manufacturer data, illuminance calculations, field measurements of illuminance, and the subjective impressions of both regular and expert observers.

  13. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting, I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, B. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Myer, M. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-08-01

    On the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the GATEWAY program conducted a two-phase demonstration of LED roadway lighting on the main span, which is one of the country's oldest continuously operated exterior LED lighting installations. The Phase I report provides an overview of initial project results including lighting performance, economic performance, and potential energy savings.

  14. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting, I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Phase II Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, B. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, R. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    On the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the GATEWAY program conducted a two-phase demonstration of LED roadway lighting on the main span, which is one of the country's oldest continuously operated exterior LED lighting installations. The Phase II report documents longer-term performance of the LED lighting system that was installed in 2008, and is the first report on the longer-term performance of LED lighting in the field.

  15. Demonstration of a Tunable-Bandwidth White Light Interferometer using Anomalous Dispersion in Atomic Vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Pati, G S; Salit, M; Shahriar, M S

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the 'white-light cavity' has recently generated considerable research interest in the context of gravitational wave detection. Cavity designs are proposed using negative (or anomalous) dispersion in an intracavity medium to make the cavity resonate over a large range of frequencies and still maintain a high cavity build-up. This paper presents the first experimental attempt and demonstration of white-light effect in a meter long ring cavity using an intracavity atomic medium. The medium's negative dispersion is caused by bi-frequency Raman gain in an atomic vapor cell. Although the white light condition was not perfectly achieved and improvements in experimental control are still desirable, significantly broad cavity response over bandwidth greater than 20 MHz has been observed. These devices will have potential applications in new generation laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors.

  16. The Physics behind a Simple Demonstration of the Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Gavin A.

    2014-01-01

    A simple, and popular, demonstration of the greenhouse effect involves a higher temperature being observed in a container with an elevated concentration of CO[subscript 2] inside than in a container with just air enclosed, when subject to direct light. The CO[subscript 2] absorbs outgoing thermal radiation and causes the air inside the container…

  17. Studying the Greenhouse Effect: A Simple Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, G.; Ouzounis, K.

    2000-01-01

    Studies the parameters involved in a presentation of the greenhouse effect and describes a simple demonstration of this effect. Required equipment includes a 100-120 watt lamp, a 250mL beaker, and a thermometer capable of recording 0-750 degrees Celsius together with a small amount of chloroform. (Author/SAH)

  18. Experiments to Demonstrate Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirí

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials are used in many current applications. The purpose of this paper is to explain the basic properties of pyroelectric and piezoelectric effects and demonstrate them in simple experiments. Pyroelectricity is presented on lead zirconium titanate (PZT) ceramics as an electric charge generated by the temperature…

  19. Simple Demonstration of the Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molki, Arman

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose a simple and low-cost experimental set-up through which science educators can demonstrate the Seebeck effect using a thermocouple and an instrumentation amplifier. The experiment can be set up and conducted during a 1-hour laboratory session. (Contains 3 tables and 3 figures.)

  20. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr to a much larger figure nationally. Most of the energy savings in this application is attributable to the instant-restrike capability of LED products and to their high tolerance for frequent on/off switching, used here to separately control either end of the tunnel during daytime hours. Some LED luminaires rival or outperform their high-intensity discharge (HID) counterparts in terms of efficacy, but options are limited, and smaller lumen packages preclude true one-for-one equivalence. However, LED products continue to improve in efficacy and affordability at a rate unmatched by other light source technologies; the estimated simple payback period of eight years (excluding installation costs and maintenance savings) can be expected to improve with time. The proposed revisions to the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting system would require slightly increased controls complexity and significantly increased luminaire types and quantities. In exchange, substantial annual savings (from reduced maintenance and energy use) would be complemented by improved quantity and quality of illumination. Although advanced lighting controls could offer additional savings, it is unclear whether such a system would prove cost-effective; this topic may be explored in future work.

  1. Simulations to demonstrate reduction of the Gordon-Haus effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuse, D

    1992-01-01

    The superposition of spontaneous emission noise on a train of soliton pulses produces a random change of the center frequency of the soliton spectrum that causes a change of the group velocity of individual solitons, which in long-light-wave systems translates into a random jitter of the position of the pulses at the receiver. This phenomenon is known as the Gordon-Haus effect. If uncontrolled, the Gordon-Haus effect sets a definite limit on the permissible data rate or on the length of soliton-based light-wave systems. Recently Kodama and Hasegawa [Opt. Lett. 17, 31 (1992)] have shown that the Gordon-Haus effect can be suppressed by placing filters along the fiber that reduce the frequency jitter and the concomitant group-velocity changes. We demonstrate the reduction of the Gordon-Haus effect by computer simulations.

  2. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    This report documents a solid-state lighting (SSL) technology demonstration at the parking structure of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Headquarters in Washington, DC, in which light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were substituted for the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires and evaluated for relative light quantity and performance. The demonstration results show energy savings of 52% from the initial conversion of HPS to the LED product. These savings were increased to 88% by using occupancy sensor controls that were ultimately set to reduce power to 10% of high state operation after a time delay of 2.5 minutes. Because of the relatively high cost of the LED luminaires at their time of purchase for this project (2010), the simple payback periods were 6.5 years and 4.9 years for retrofit and new construction scenarios, respectively. Staff at DOL Headquarters reported high satisfaction with the operation of the LED product.

  3. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service (NPS) views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other NPS tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr for this tunnel to a much larger figure national

  4. Demonstration of a light-redirecting skylight system at the Palm Springs Chamber of Commerce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E.S.; Beltran, L.O.; Selkowitz, S.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Lau, H.; Ander, G.D. [Southern California Edison, San Dimas, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    As part of a demonstration project to provide a comprehensive energy upgrade to a 294 m{sup 2} (3168 ft{sup 2}) commercial building, an advanced skylight design was developed using optical light control materials and geometry to provide daylight to two adjoining offices. The skylight system was developed using outdoor physical model tests and simulation tools Limited on-site measurements and occupant polls were conducted. Market issues were addressed. The skylight systems were found to improve lighting quality and to control excessive daylight illuminance levels compared to a conventional diffusing bubble skylight. Daylighting principles developed in earlier work for vertical glazing systems (light shelves and light pipes) were shown to be applicable in skylight designs at full-scale.

  5. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O;

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal...

  6. Experimental demonstration of enhanced slow and fast light by forced coherent population oscillations in a SOA

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Perrine; Alouini, Mehdi; de Valicourt, Guilhem; Brenot, \\linebreak Romain; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced slow and fast light by forced coherent population oscillations (CPOs) in a SOA. This approach is shown to rely on the interference between two different contributions. This opens the possibility to conceive a controllable RF phase shifter based on this set-up.

  7. A Demonstration Sample for Poetry Education: Poem under the Light of "Poetics of the Open Work"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afacan, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a demonstration sample for the high school stage under the light of "Poetics of the Open Work" that is considered as a step towards comprehending the qualified poem. In this study, has been built in single group pretest-posttest design. Independent variables are applied to a randomly selected group to…

  8. Demonstration of spot size reduction by focussing amplitude modulated radially polarized light on a photoresist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ushakova, K.; Van den Berg, Q.Y.; Pereira, S.F.; Urbach, H.P.

    2015-01-01

    Spot size reduction is demonstrated by printing focused spots from amplitude-modulated radially polarized light at the wavelength λ = 405 nm on a photoresist. Amplitude modulation is realized by ring illumination and by application of an optimized amplitude distribution function. Amplitude modulatio

  9. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal ...

  10. Demonstration of high-speed multi-user multi-carrier CDMA visible light communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Yuanquan; Wang, Yiguang; Huang, Xingxing; Chi, Nan

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a high-speed multi-user multi-carrier code-division multiple access (MC-CDMA) visible light communication (VLC) system. By employing a commercially available red light emitting diode (LED) and an avalanche photo diode (APD), we achieved a 16-user VLC system enabled by MC-CDMA, pre- and post-equalization, with an overall bit rate of 750 Mb/s over 1.5 m free-space transmission. The measured bit error ratio (BER) of each user is below the 7% pre-forward-error-correction (pre-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  11. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting at the I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, MN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-08-31

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology conducted in 2009 at the recently reconstructed I-35W bridge in Minneapolis, MN. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY Technology Demonstration Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT), Federal Highways Administration (FHWA), and BetaLED™ (a division of Ruud Lighting). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. DOE has implemented a three-year evaluation of the LED luminaires in this installation in order to develop new longitudinal field data on LED performance in a challenging, real-world environment. This document provides information through the initial phase of the I-35W bridge project, up to and including the opening of the bridge to the public and the initial feedback received on the LED lighting installation from bridge users. Initial findings of the evaluation are favorable, with minimum energy savings level of 13% for the LED installation relative to the simulated base case using 250W high-pressure sodium (HPS) fixtures. The LEDs had an average illuminance level of 0.91 foot candles compared to 1.29 fc for the HPS lamps. The LED luminaires cost $38,000 more than HPS lamps, yielding a lengthy payback period, however the bridge contractor had offered to include the LED luminaires as part of the construction package at no additional cost. One potentially significant benefit of the LEDs in this installation is avoiding rolling lane closures on the heavily-traveled interstate bridge for the purpose of relamping the HPS fixtures. Rolling lane closures involve multiple crew members and various maintenance and safety vehicles, diversion of traffic, as well as related administrative tasks (e.g., approvals, scheduling, etc.). Mn/DOT records show an average cost of

  12. Lightness, brightness and transparency: a quarter century of new ideas, captivating demonstrations and unrelenting controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2011-04-13

    The past quarter century has witnessed considerable advances in our understanding of Lightness (perceived reflectance), Brightness (perceived luminance) and perceived Transparency (LBT). This review poses eight major conceptual questions that have engaged researchers during this period, and considers to what extent they have been answered. The questions concern 1. the relationship between lightness, brightness and perceived non-uniform illumination, 2. the brain site for lightness and brightness perception, 3 the effects of context on lightness and brightness, 4. the relationship between brightness and contrast for simple patch-background stimuli, 5. brightness "filling-in", 6. lightness anchoring, 7. the conditions for perceptual transparency, and 8. the perceptual representation of transparency. The discussion of progress on major conceptual questions inevitably requires an evaluation of which approaches to LBT are likely and which are unlikely to bear fruit in the long term, and which issues remain unresolved. It is concluded that the most promising developments in LBT are (a) models of brightness coding based on multi-scale filtering combined with contrast normalization, (b) the idea that the visual system decomposes the image into "layers" of reflectance, illumination and transparency, (c) that an understanding of image statistics is important to an understanding of lightness errors, (d) Whittle's logW metric for contrast-brightness, (e) the idea that "filling-in" is mediated by low spatial frequencies rather than neural spreading, and (f) that there exist multiple cues for identifying non-uniform illumination and transparency. Unresolved issues include how relative lightness values are anchored to produce absolute lightness values, and the perceptual representation of transparency. Bridging the gap between multi-scale filtering and layer decomposition approaches to LBT is a major task for future research.

  13. Visible optical radiation generates bactericidal effect applicable for inactivation of health care associated germs demonstrated by inactivation of E. coli and B. subtilis using 405-nm and 460-nm light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönes, Katharina; Stangl, Felix; Sift, Michael; Hessling, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The Ulm University of Applied Sciences is investigating a technique using visible optical radiation (405 nm and 460 nm) to inactivate health-hazardous bacteria in water. A conceivable application could be point-of-use disinfection implementations in developing countries for safe drinking water supply. Another possible application field could be to provide sterile water in medical institutions like hospitals or dental surgeries where contaminated pipework or long-term disuse often results in higher germ concentrations. Optical radiation for disinfection is presently mostly used in UV wavelength ranges but the possibility of bacterial inactivation with visible light was so far generally disregarded. One of the advantages of visible light is, that instead of mercury arc lamps, light emitting diodes could be used, which are commercially available and therefore cost-efficient concerning the visible light spectrum. Furthermore they inherit a considerable longer life span than UV-C LEDs and are non-hazardous in contrast to mercury arc lamps. Above all there are specific germs, like Bacillus subtilis, which show an inactivation resistance to UV-C wavelengths. Due to the totally different deactivation mechanism even higher disinfection rates are reached, compared to Escherichia coli as a standard laboratory germ. By 460 nm a reduction of three log-levels appeared with Bacillus subtilis and a half log-level with Escherichia coli both at a dose of about 300 J/cm². By the more efficient wavelength of 405 nm four and a half log-levels are reached with Bacillus subtilis and one and a half log-level with Escherichia coli also both at a dose of about 300 J/cm². In addition the employed optical setup, which delivered a homogeneous illumination and skirts the need of a stirring technique to compensate irregularities, was an important improvement compared to previous published setups. Evaluated by optical simulation in ZEMAX® the designed optical element provided proven

  14. Experimental demonstration of singular-optical colouring of regularly scattered white light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O.V.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Maksimyak, P.P.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental interference modelling of the effects of colouring of a beam traversing a light-scattering medium is presented. It is shown that the result of colouring of the beam at the output of the medium depends on the magnitudes of the phase delays of the singly forward scattered partial signals....... The colouring mechanism has for the first time experimentally been illustrated for a forward propagating beam through a light-scattering medium. This is showed in video-fragments of the interferograms recorded within the zero interference fringe with a gradual change of the path difference of the interfering...

  15. The photonic wheel: demonstration of a state of light with purely transverse angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Banzer, Peter; Aiello, Andrea; Marquardt, Christoph; Lindlein, Norbert; Bauer, Thomas; Leuchs, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    The concept of angular momentum is ubiquitous to many areas of physics. In classical mechanics, a system may possess an angular momentum which can be either transverse (e.g., in a spinning wheel) or longitudinal (e.g., for a fluidic vortex) to the direction of motion. Photons, however, are well-known to exhibit intrinsic angular momentum which is longitudinal only: the spin angular momentum defining the beam polarization and the orbital angular momentum associated with a spiraling phase front. Here we show that it is possible to generate a novel state of light that contains purely transverse angular momentum, the analogue of a spinning mechanical wheel. We use an optical nano-probing technique to experimentally demonstrate its occurrence in our setup. Such a state of light can provide additional rotational degree of freedom in optical tweezers and optical manipulation.

  16. Demonstrating an additional law of relativistic velocities based on squeezed light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Da-Bao; Li Yan; Zhang Fu-Lin; Chen Jing-Ling

    2012-01-01

    The special relativity is the foundation for many branches of modern physics,of which the theoretical results are far beyond our daily experience and hard to realized in kinematic experiments.However,its outcomes could be demonstrated by making use of the convenient substitute,i.e.,the squeezed light in the present paper.The squeezed light is very important in the field of quantum optics,and the corresponding transformation can be regarded as the coherent state of SU(1,1).In this paper,the connection between the squeezed operator and the Lorentz boost is built under certain conditions.Furthermore,the additional law of relativistic velocities and the angle of the Wigner rotation are deduced as well.

  17. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

    2012-06-29

    A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areas—vehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks—or would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires

  18. Demonstration of simultaneous experiments using thin crystal multiplexing at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y; Alonso-Mori, R; Barends, T R M; Blank, V D; Botha, S; Chollet, M; Damiani, D S; Doak, R B; Glownia, J M; Koglin, J M; Lemke, H T; Messerschmidt, M; Nass, K; Nelson, S; Schlichting, I; Shoeman, R L; Shvyd'ko, Yu V; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Stoupin, S; Terentyev, S; Williams, G J; Zhu, D; Robert, A; Boutet, S

    2015-05-01

    Multiplexing of the Linac Coherent Light Source beam was demonstrated for hard X-rays by spectral division using a near-perfect diamond thin-crystal monochromator operating in the Bragg geometry. The wavefront and coherence properties of both the reflected and transmitted beams were well preserved, thus allowing simultaneous measurements at two separate instruments. In this report, the structure determination of a prototypical protein was performed using serial femtosecond crystallography simultaneously with a femtosecond time-resolved XANES studies of photoexcited spin transition dynamics in an iron spin-crossover system. The results of both experiments using the multiplexed beams are similar to those obtained separately, using a dedicated beam, with no significant differences in quality.

  19. Experimental demonstration of quantum digital signatures using phase-encoded coherent states of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Patrick J; Collins, Robert J; Dunjko, Vedran; Andersson, Erika; Jeffers, John; Buller, Gerald S

    2012-01-01

    Digital signatures are frequently used in data transfer to prevent impersonation, repudiation and message tampering. Currently used classical digital signature schemes rely on public key encryption techniques, where the complexity of so-called 'one-way' mathematical functions is used to provide security over sufficiently long timescales. No mathematical proofs are known for the long-term security of such techniques. Quantum digital signatures offer a means of sending a message, which cannot be forged or repudiated, with security verified by information-theoretical limits and quantum mechanics. Here we demonstrate an experimental system, which distributes quantum signatures from one sender to two receivers and enables message sending ensured against forging and repudiation. Additionally, we analyse the security of the system in some typical scenarios. Our system is based on the interference of phase-encoded coherent states of light and our implementation utilizes polarization-maintaining optical fibre and photons with a wavelength of 850 nm.

  20. Demonstration of the greenhouse effect for elementary school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, Jelena

    2014-05-01

    The school where I work is part of the "Step by step towards the sustainable development school" project. Project activities are partly directed towards the popularization of science. As a physics teacher, I have had the opportunity to engage in designing interactive workshops, aiming to introduce younger students to simple experiments which illustrate different natural phenomena, and also in organization, preparation and implementation of school and city science festival (in 2012 and 2013). Numerous displays, workshops and experiments served to introduce a large number of visitors to different topics in the area of science and technology. One of the subjects of forthcoming science festival, planned for May of 2014, is the climate change. To that effect, eight grade students will hold a demonstration and explanation of the greenhouse effect. Although the terms greenhouse effect and global warming are widely used in media, most of the elementary school students in Serbia have poor understanding of the underlying scientific concepts. The experiment with analysis and discussion will first be implemented in one eight-grade class (14 years of age). After that, a group of students from this class will present their newly-acquired knowledge to their peers and younger students at the science fair. Activity objectives: • Explain how atmosphere affects the surface temperature of Earth • Conduct an experiment to demonstrate the greenhouse effect • Analyze the consequences of climate changes Experiment description: Take two empty, transparent containers and add a layer of garden soil. Use cardboard or similar material to make housings for the thermometers. Hang them in the containers, so that they don't touch the soil. Cover one container with a glass panel, and leave the other one open. Place identical incandescent light bulbs at the same distance above each container. Turn the light bulbs on. The students should mark the thermometer readings every 2 minutes, for 20

  1. Cost effectiveness of new roadway lighting systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate and adequate lighting at select locations on roadways is essential for roadway safety. As the lighting technologies advance, many types of new lighting devices have been developed for roadway lightings. The most promising new lighting technologies for roadway lighting include light emitting diode, induction, plasma, and metal halide lighting systems. A study was conducted to compare the new systems with the conventional high pressure sodium systems that are currently used on the Indiana roadway systems. In this study, the engineering issues, were analyzed such as illuminance, color rendering, power usage, cost effectiveness, and approval procedures for new roadway lighting systems. This paper, however, presents only the study findings related to cost effectiveness of the evaluated roadway lighting systems. Illustrated in this paper are the main features of the roadway lighting systems under evaluations, installations of the new lighting systems, measurements of power consumptions, and life cycle cost analyses of the lighting systems. Through this study, experience and knowledge have been obtained on the installations, power measurements, and cost effectiveness of the new types of the roadway lighting devices. The actual power values of various luminaires were obtained by measuring the electric current with a multi-meter. It was found that the differences between the rated and measured power values could be significant. The results of the life cycle cost analysis indicate that the lower life cycle costs of some of the alternative lighting devices are attributed to their relatively lower electricity usages and longer lamp/emitter replacement cycles.

  2. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Post-Top Lighting at Central Park in New York City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.; Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2012-09-30

    A review of five post-top light-emitting diode (LED) pedestrian luminaires installed in New York City's Central Park for possible replacement to the existing metal halide post-top luminaire. This report reviews the energy savings potential and lighting delivered by the LED post-top luminaires.

  3. Geometric spin Hall effect of light with inhomogeneous polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Yi, Xunong

    2017-01-01

    The spin Hall effect of light originates from spin-orbit interaction of light, which manifests two types of geometric phases. In this paper, we report the observation of a geometric spin Hall effect by generating a light beam with inhomogeneous polarization distribution. Unlike the previously reported geometric spin Hall effect observed in a tilted beam-detector system, which is believed to result from an effective spin-redirection Berry geometric phase, the geometric spin Hall effect demonstrated here is attributed to an effective, spatially varying Pancharatnam-Berry geometric phase generated by the inhomogeneous polarization geometry. Our further experiments show that the geometric spin Hall effect can be tuned by tailoring the polarization geometry of light, demonstrating the spin states of photons can be steered with a great flexibility.

  4. Qualification and Demonstration Program for SSCL Lighting Systems In Park and Highway Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Osborne

    2005-06-30

    Meadow River Enterprises, Inc. (MRE) received a DOE cooperative agreement award in March of 2002 to develop Qualification and Demonstration Program for SSCL Lighting Systems in Parks and Highway Applications. (The SSCL lighting technology is the same technology that was developed under a DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC26-99FT40631.) This project spanned a period of 39 months and ended in June of 2005. Participates in the funding of this project included the US Department of Energy, Rahall Transportation Institute, West Virginia State Parks System, and Meadow River Enterprises, Inc. The total program costs totaled $850,000. The federal contribution to the program totaled $150,000 which represented 17.6% of the total costs. The SSCL is a rugged electroluminescent lamp and was designed for outdoor applications. However, since this is a new technology, there have never been any housing or solar packages assemble for its use in these outdoor applications. The purpose of this program was to develop several types of encasements and solar packages, then evaluate their performances over time. At the end of observations, a conclusion would be reached as to the methodology of encasement and solar package requirements. In addition this project was to evaluate the viability of this application for the SSCL product. In addition this project was to evaluate the feasibility of etching the top conductive layer of the SSCL panel to permit only the needed area to be illuminated; this would reduce the power requirements of a sign. All primary development objectives have been achieved.

  5. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Tuning Hospital Lighting: Evaluating Tunable LED Lighting at the Swedish Hospital Behavioral Health Unit in Seattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Andrea [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Clark, Edward [ZGF Architects LLP, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-08-23

    The GATEWAY program evaluated a tunable LED lighting system installed in the new Swedish Medical Behavioral Health Unit in Seattle that incorporates color-tunable luminaires in common areas, and uses advanced controls for dimming and color tuning, with the goal of providing a better environment for staff and patients. The report reviews the design of the tunable lighting system, summarizes two sets of measurements, and discusses the circadian, energy, and commissioning implications as well as lessons learned from the project.

  6. Shooting Fish in a Barrel: A Demonstration of the Refraction of Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trikosko, Walter

    2014-01-01

    This is not a treatise on optics or the index of refraction. It is merely a demonstration that will surprise and engage many of your students. We have all put a pencil in a beaker of water and observed how it appears to bend. Not so much fun or engaging, is it? Why not illustrate this optical effect by taking your students spearfishing?…

  7. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  8. Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit: Yuma Border Patrol, Yuma Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Andrea M.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2014-12-30

    The Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area is a high flux lighting application in a high temperature environment, presenting a formidable challenge for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This retrofit is an Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE project under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program. If high flux LED technology performs well in a region with high ambient temperature and solar radiation, it can perform well in most outdoor environments. The design process for the Yuma retrofit has already provided valuable knowledge to CBP and DOE. The LED lighting system selected for the retrofit is expected to reduce energy consumption 69% compared to the incumbent quartz metal halide (QMH) lighting system. If the LED lighting system is installed, GATEWAY will continue to document and disseminate information regarding the installation and long-term performance so that others may also gain valuable knowledge from the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area lighting retrofit.

  9. Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit: Yuma Border Patrol, Yuma Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCullough, Jeffrey J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area is a high flux lighting application in a high temperature environment, presenting a formidable challenge for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This retrofit is an Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE project under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program. If high flux LED technology performs well in a region with high ambient temperature and solar radiation, it can perform well in most outdoor environments. The design process for the Yuma retrofit has already provided valuable knowledge to CBP and DOE. The LED lighting system selected for the retrofit is expected to reduce energy consumption 69% compared to the incumbent quartz metal halide (QMH) lighting system. If the LED lighting system is installed, GATEWAY will continue to document and disseminate information regarding the installation and long-term performance so that others may also gain valuable knowledge from the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area lighting retrofit.

  10. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at Intercontinental Hotel in San Francisco, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Curry, Ku' Uipo J.

    2010-11-01

    This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology. The DOE GATEWAY Demonstration Program focuses on providing a source of independent, third-party data for use in decision-making by lighting users and professionals; this data should be considered in combination with other information relevant to the particular site and application under examination. Each GATEWAY Demonstration compares SSL products against the incumbent technologies used in that location. Depending on available information and circumstances, the SSL product may also be compared to alternate lighting technologies. Though products demonstrated in the GATEWAY program have been prescreened and tested to verify their actual performance, DOE does not endorse any commercial product or in any way guarantee that users will achieve the same results through use of these products.

  11. Demonstration of atomic frequency comb memory for light with spin-wave storage

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We present a light-storage experiment in a praseodymium-doped crystal where the light is mapped onto an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb. After absorption of the light the optical excitation is converted into a spin-wave excitation by a control pulse. A second control pulse reads the memory (on-demand) by reconverting the spin-wave excitation to an optical one, where the comb structure causes a photon-echo type rephasing of the dipole moments a...

  12. Experimental demonstration of illusion optics with ``external cloaking'' effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Guochang; Li, Fang; Fang, Guangyou

    2011-08-01

    A metamaterial "illusion optics" with "complementary medium" and "restoring medium" is designed by using inductor-capacitor (L-C) network medium. The unprecedented effects of "external cloaking" and "transforming one object to appear as another" are demonstrated experimentally. We also demonstrate that the non-resonant nature of the L-C network decreases the sensitivity of the "external cloaking" effect to the variation of the frequency and results in an acceptable bandwidth of the whole device.

  13. Demonstration of atomic frequency comb memory for light with spin-wave storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, Mikael; Usmani, Imam; Amari, Atia; Lauritzen, Björn; Walther, Andreas; Simon, Christoph; Sangouard, Nicolas; Minár, Jirí; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas; Kröll, Stefan

    2010-01-29

    We present a light-storage experiment in a praseodymium-doped crystal where the light is mapped onto an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb. After absorption of the light, the optical excitation is converted into a spin-wave excitation by a control pulse. A second control pulse reads the memory (on-demand) by reconverting the spin-wave excitation to an optical one, where the comb structure causes a photon-echo-type rephasing of the dipole moments and directional retrieval of the light. This combination of photon-echo and spin-wave storage allows us to store submicrosecond (450 ns) pulses for up to 20 mus. The scheme has a high potential for storing multiple temporal modes in the single-photon regime, which is an important resource for future long-distance quantum communication based on quantum repeaters.

  14. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at the Lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in the lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) headquarters building in Portland, Oregon. The project involved a simple retrofit of 32 track lights used to illuminate historical black-and-white photos and printed color posters from the 1930s and 1940s. BPA is a federal power marketing agency in the Northwestern United States, and selected this prominent location to demonstrate energy efficient light-emitting diode (LED) retrofit options that not only can reduce the electric bill for their customers but also provide attractive alternatives to conventional products, in this case accent lighting for BPA's historical artwork.

  15. Quantum spin Hall effect and topological insulators for light

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y

    2015-01-01

    We show that free-space light has intrinsic quantum spin-Hall effect (QSHE) properties. These are characterized by a non-zero topological spin Chern number, and manifest themselves as evanescent modes of Maxwell equations. The recently discovered transverse spin of evanescent modes demonstrates spin-momentum locking stemming from the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in Maxwell equations. As a result, any interface between free space and a medium supporting surface modes exhibits QSHE of light with opposite transverse spins propagating in opposite directions. In particular, we find that usual isotropic metals with surface plasmon-polariton modes represent natural 3D topological insulators for light. Several recent experiments have demonstrated transverse spin-momentum locking and spin-controlled unidirectional propagation of light at various interfaces with evanescent waves. Our results show that all these experiments can be interpreted as observations of the QSHE of light.

  16. Plan for Demonstration of Online Monitoring for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Online Monitoring Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdy S. Tawfik; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck

    2011-09-01

    Condition based online monitoring technologies and development of diagnostic and prognostic methodologies have drawn tremendous interest in the nuclear industry. It has become important to identify and resolve problems with structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to ensure plant safety, efficiency, and immunity to accidents in the aging fleet of reactors. The Machine Condition Monitoring (MCM) test bed at INL will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness to advancement in online monitoring, sensors, diagnostic and prognostic technologies on a pilot-scale plant that mimics the hydraulics of a nuclear plant. As part of this research project, INL will research available prognostics architectures and their suitability for deployment in a nuclear power plant. In addition, INL will provide recommendation to improve the existing diagnostic and prognostic architectures based on the experimental analysis performed on the MCM test bed.

  17. Centrifugal photovoltaic and photogalvanic effects driven by structured light

    CERN Document Server

    Wätzel, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Much efforts are devoted to material structuring in a quest to enhance the photovoltaic effect. We show that structuring light in a way it transfers orbital angular momentum to semiconductor-based rings results in a steady charge accumulation at the outer boundaries that be utilized for the generation of an open circuit voltage or a photogalvanic (bulk photovoltaic) type current. This effect which stems both from structuring light and matter (confinement potentials), can be magnified even at fixed moderate intensities, by increasing the orbital angular momentum of light which strengthens the effective centrifugal potential that repels the charge outwards. Based on a full numerical time propagation of the carriers wave functions in the presence of light pulses we demonstrate how the charge buildup leads to a useable voltage or directed photocurrent whose amplitudes and directions are controllable by the light pulse parameters.

  18. Centrifugal photovoltaic and photogalvanic effects driven by structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätzel, J; Berakdar, J

    2016-02-22

    Much efforts are devoted to material structuring in a quest to enhance the photovoltaic effect. We show that structuring light in a way it transfers orbital angular momentum to semiconductor-based rings results in a steady charge accumulation at the outer boundaries that can be utilized for the generation of an open circuit voltage or a photogalvanic (bulk photovoltaic) type current. This effect which stems both from structuring light and matter confinement potentials, can be magnified even at fixed moderate intensities, by increasing the orbital angular momentum of light which strengthens the effective centrifugal potential that repels the charge outwards. Based on a full numerical time propagation of the carriers wave functions in the presence of light pulses we demonstrate how the charge buildup leads to a useable voltage or directed photocurrent whose amplitudes and directions are controllable by the light pulse parameters.

  19. A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate the Peltier Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougal, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the Peltier, or thermoelectric effect, which provides a way of cooling a system by coupling it thermally to the junction of two materials suitably chosen, shaped, and connected to a d.c. current. Describes an apparatus which simply and inexpensively demonstrates this effect. (MLH)

  20. Investigation and Demonstration of High Speed Full-Optical Hybrid FSO/Fiber Communication System under Light Sand Storm Condition

    KAUST Repository

    Esmail, Maged Abdullah

    2016-12-19

    In contrast to traditional free space optical (FSO) systems, the new generation is aimed to be transparent to optical fiber where protocols, high signal bandwidths, and high data rates over fiber are all maintained. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a high speed outdoor full-optical FSO communication system over 100 m link. We first describe the design of our transmitter, which consists of a comb generator and a flexible multiformat transmitter. Our measurements are performed in arid desert area under a light dust storm. In this environment, we use a 12 subcarrier comb generator, each of which is modulated by a quadrature-amplitude modulation (QAM) signal. We achieved a 1.08 Tbps error free data rate with 3.6 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency. We place long optical fiber rolls in the transmitter side and the receiver side to mimic real FSO deployments. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of receiver misalignment in outdoor conditions and the effect of background noise. We find that full-optical FSO system is sensitive to the misalignment effect. However, the background noise has negligible effect. Finally, we find that solar heating of the transceiver causes collimator deviation, which requires using a cooling unit or auto tracking system.

  1. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Philadelphia International Airport Apron Lighting: LED System Performance in a Trial Installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-30

    This report documents a trial installation of LED apron lighting that replaced the existing high-pressure sodium luminaires at Philadelphia International Airport. Such high-mast applications remain challenging for LED technology, and the lessons learned from this project may help facility managers and LED product manufacturers better meet those challenges.

  2. GATEWAY Demonstrations: OLED Lighting in the Offices of DeJoy, Knauf & Blood, LLP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-07-24

    At the offices of the accounting firm of DeJoy, Knauf & Blood, LLP in Rochester, NY, the GATEWAY program evaluated a new lighting system that incorporates a number of different OLED luminaires. Evaluation of the OLED products included efficacy performance, field measurements of panel color, flicker measurements, and staff feedback.

  3. Experimental demonstration of sub-Fourier structures in time--frequency measurement of light pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Praxmeyer, L; Radzewicz, C; Wodkiewicz, K; Praxmeyer, Ludmila; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Radzewicz, Czeslaw; Wodkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental data of the frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements of light pulses revealing interference features corresponding to sub-Planck structures in phase space. For superpositions of pulses a small, sub-Fourier shift in the carrier frequency leads to a state orthogonal to the initial one, although in the representation of standard time--frequency distributions these states seem to have a non-vanishing overlap.

  4. nLight Demonstrates World Record Output Power at 1470nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Diode Laser Bar Outputs 88W CW in Eyesafe Wavelength Range nLight, a leading manufacturer of high-power semiconductor lasers, today announced that it has achieved a new world record for output power from a single 1-cm InP diode laser bar. The 50 percent fill factor bar produced 88W continuous-wave (CW) power at1470 nm. The bar was mounted on the company's commercially available CascadesTM microchannel water-cooled package.

  5. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical

  6. Effect of LED light quality on in vitro shoot proliferation and growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of LED light quality on in vitro shoot proliferation and growth of vanilla ( Vanilla ... light emitting diode (LED) has been demonstrated to be an artificial flexible ... on Murashige and Skoog basal medium without plant growth regulators.

  7. The Mercury-Drag Effect, a Demonstration of Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D. H.; Teese, R. B

    1969-01-01

    The mercury-drag effect is demonstrated when mercury vapor diffuses through nitrogen gas at low pressure, passing through tubes of different radii to liquid nitrogen-cooled cold traps. The pressure changes of the nitrogen gas on the mercury-deficient side of the cold traps are observed and compared with theoretical and experimental valves from the…

  8. Laser device for special light effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Jerzy K.; Niesterowicz, Andrzej

    1995-03-01

    A system for laser beam deflection and its particular application described in this paper can be treated as a technical aid for contemporary art and visual enhancement of electronic music equipment. The device for special art effects produced by `Optocyfronika' was ordered by disco-clubs. The equipment was designed to enhance light effects with images obtained by means of laser light. One of the results of this work is the device for drawing of simple images by means of the laser beam.

  9. Lattice effects in the light actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, A.C.; Cort, B.; Roberts, J.A.; Bennett, B.I.; Brun, T.O.; Dreele, R.B. von [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Richardson, J.W. Jr. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The light actinides show a variety of lattice effects that do not normally appear in other regions of the periodic table. The article will cover the crystal structures of the light actinides, their atomic volumes, their thermal expansion behavior, and their elastic behavior as reflected in recent thermal vibration measurements made by neutron diffraction. A discussion of the melting points will be given in terms of the thermal vibration measurements. Pressure effects will be only briefly indicated.

  10. Potential biological and ecological effects of flickering artificial light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Inger

    Full Text Available Organisms have evolved under stable natural lighting regimes, employing cues from these to govern key ecological processes. However, the extent and density of artificial lighting within the environment has increased recently, causing widespread alteration of these regimes. Indeed, night-time electric lighting is known significantly to disrupt phenology, behaviour, and reproductive success, and thence community composition and ecosystem functioning. Until now, most attention has focussed on effects of the occurrence, timing, and spectral composition of artificial lighting. Little considered is that many types of lamp do not produce a constant stream of light but a series of pulses. This flickering light has been shown to have detrimental effects in humans and other species. Whether a species is likely to be affected will largely be determined by its visual temporal resolution, measured as the critical fusion frequency. That is the frequency at which a series of light pulses are perceived as a constant stream. Here we use the largest collation to date of critical fusion frequencies, across a broad range of taxa, to demonstrate that a significant proportion of species can detect such flicker in widely used lamps. Flickering artificial light thus has marked potential to produce ecological effects that have not previously been considered.

  11. Manufacture, integration and demonstration of polymer solar cells in a lamp for the Lighting Africa initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Damgaard Nielsen, Torben; Fyenbo, Jan

    2010-01-01

    . The discrete components were white light LEDs, a blocking diode, a lithium ion battery, vias and button contacts in two adjacent corners. The completed lamp has outside dimensions of 22.5 × 30.5 cm, a weight of 50 g and a very flat outline. The battery and components were the thickest elements and measured ... mm. A hole with a ring was punched in one corner to enable mechanical fixation or tying. The lamp has two states. In the charging state it has a completely flat outline and will charge the battery when illuminated from either side while the front side illumination is preferable. When used as a lamp...... two adjacent corners are joined via button contacts whereby the device can stand on a horizontal surface and the circuit is closed such that the battery discharges through the LEDs that illuminate the surface in front of the lamp. Several different lamps were prepared using the same solar cell...

  12. Demonstration of Alternative Fuel, Light and Heavy Duty Vehicles in State and Municipal Vehicle Fleets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, John H.; Polubiatko, Peter; Tucchio, Michael A.

    2002-02-06

    This project involved the purchase of two Compressed Natural Gas School Buses and two electric Ford Rangers to demonstrate their viability in a municipal setting. Operational and maintenance data were collected for analysis. In addition, an educational component was undertaken with middle school children. The children observed and calculated how electric vehicles could minimize pollutants through comparison to conventionally powered vehicles.

  13. Localization of light on a cone: theoretical evidence and experimental demonstration for an optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Sumetsky, M

    2010-01-01

    High Q-factor localized conical modes are discovered theoretically and demonstrated experimentally in an optical fiber. The theory of these modes provides a means for exceptionally accurate local characterization of the optical fiber nonuniformity and a new paradigm in the field of high Q-factor resonators.

  14. [The effect of polarized light on fibrinolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, S V

    2004-01-01

    In experiments in vitro on a man, cat and rat thrombocyte-free plasma it was determined that the polarized light over 5 cm distance from the object (6 min exposure) causes the inhibition of fibrinolytic activity of euglobulin fraction. It was shown that the fibrinolytic inhibition under the influence of the polarized light is connected with its antiplasmin effect. The importance of the fibrinolytic reaction for the course of inflammation process and tissue regeneration after injury and the role of therapy with polarized light in these reactions is discussed.

  15. El Día de la Luz II (The Day of Light II): optics demonstration for high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya K., S.; Mathew, Manoj; Volpe, Giorgio; Takayama, Osamu; Valencia, Alejandra

    2009-06-01

    Photonics is an upcoming field that offers immense possibilities in frontier science, technology, and industry. The topic needs to be introduced among the young students to motivate their interest and passion for light. However, the potential of optics and photonics as a very exciting part of science is not always fully explored in high school education. With the motivation to contribute an initiative along these lines, a two-hour program was developed and successfully implemented at ICFO-The institute of photonics sciences. Further recent efforts were directed towards the improvement of this program which resulted in the advanced version. This improved version focuses on explaining the ray and wave nature of light, as well as the demonstration of the conservation of energy in relation to optics. The event was organized and the demonstrations were carried out by ICFO PhD students enrolled in the ICFO Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE student chapters.

  16. Experimental demonstration of subdiffraction light confinement using all-dielectric CMOS-compatible metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Khavasi, Amin; Lu, Zeqin; Bojko, Richard

    2016-01-01

    A recent computational result suggests that the diffraction limit can be overcome by all-dielectric metamaterials (S. Jahani et. al., Optica 1, 96 (2014)). This substantially decreases crosstalk between dielectric waveguides paving the way for high density photonic circuits. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, on an standard silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform, that using a simple metamaterial between two silicon strip waveguides results in about 10-fold increase in coupling length. The proposed structure may lead to significant reduction of size of devices in silicon photonics.

  17. Real time demonstration of high bitrate quantum random number generation with coherent laser light

    CERN Document Server

    Symul, T; Lam, P K; 10.1063/1.3597793

    2011-01-01

    We present a random number generation scheme that uses broadband measurements of the vacuum field contained in the radio-frequency sidebands of a single-mode laser. Even though the measurements may contain technical noise, we show that suitable algorithms can transform the digitized photocurrents into a string of random numbers that can be made arbitrarily correlated with a subset of the quantum fluctuations (high quantum correlation regime) or arbitrarily immune to environmental fluctuations (high environmental immunity). We demonstrate up to 2 Gbps of real time random number generation that were verified using standard randomness tests.

  18. Observational learning of a baseball-pitch: the effect of different model demonstrations

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorbani, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to investigate the effects of observing different model demonstrations inclusive video, stick-figure and point-light models on observational learning of a Baseball pitch. 41 young adults performed 5 pretest trials, three blocks of 10 acquisition trials, and two retention tests of 5 trials in 10 min and one week after the last acquisition block. Kinematic pattern, movement form, and movement time of overall movement and movement phases were measured as depen...

  19. Science and fun in a Magic Show of Light from optical demonstrations on an overhead projector for elementary school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lones, Joe J.; Maltseva, Nadezhda K.; Peterson, Kurt N.

    2007-06-01

    We seek methods of stimulating young school children to develop an interest in science and engineering through a natural curiosity for the reaction of light. Science learning now begins fully at middle school. Reading skills develop with activity at home and progress through the elementary school curriculum, and in a like manner, a curious interest in science also should begin at that stage of life. Within the ranks of educators, knowledge of optical science needs to be presented to elementary school students in an entertaining manner. One such program used by the authors is Doug Goodman's Optics Demonstrations With the Overhead Projector, co-published by and available from OSA (Optical Society of America) and SPIE-The International Society of Optical Engineering. These demonstrations have found their way into middle and high schools; however, as a special approach, the authors have presented selected Goodman demonstrations as a "Magic Show of Light" to elementary schools. Both students and faculty have found the show most entertaining! If optical knowledge is utilized to stimulate science learning in the coming generation at elementary school level, there's a good chance we can sow some fertile seeds of advancement for all future segments of the workforce. Students can enjoy what they are doing while building a foundation for contributing gainfully to society in any profession. We need to explore expanding exposure of the "Magic Show of Light" to elementary schools.

  20. An effective theory on the light shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjad, Aqil

    We describe work on the construction of an effective field theory on a spherical light shell. The motivation arises from classical electromagnetism: If a collision produces charged particles with zero net charge emerging simultaneously from a point and instantaneously accelerating to the speed of light, then the electromagnetic fields due to these charges lie entirely on a spherical shell expanding at the speed of light. We show that this also applies to classical color radiation from high-energy collisions that produce colored particles. Specifically, the color fields produced in such a process are associated with a non-linear sigma-model on the 2D light shell with specific symmetry-breaking terms. The quantum version of such a picture exhibits asymptotic freedom and should therefore be a useful starting point for a light-shell effective theory for QCD. We start in the simplified context of zero-flavor scalar quantum electrodynamics. Our effective theory has 3 major ingredients: breaking down the fields into soft and hard sectors with the large energy of the hard fields in the radial direction scaled out, a special gauge called light-shell gauge in which the picture simplifies, and a gauge-invariant source defined on a spherical light shell having infinitesimal radius. We match the fields between the effective theory and the full theory, meaning zero-flavor scalar QED. This allows us to compute the amplitude for the production of any number of scalars from the gauge-invariant source. We then find the tree-level amplitude for the emission of a photon using our effective theory and show that our result agrees with the full theory. To calculate loop effects in our effective theory, we need the photon propagator in light-shell gauge. We derive this propagator and use it to calculate the 1-loop correction to the amplitude for the production of a scalar and anti-scalar pair arising from virtual photon effects. This reduces to a pair of purely angular integrals in the

  1. Experimental demonstration of topological effects in bianisotropic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Khanikaev, Alexander B; Filonov, Dmitry S; Smirnova, Daria A; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-03-03

    Existence of robust edge states at interfaces of topologically dissimilar systems is one of the most fascinating manifestations of a novel nontrivial state of matter, a topological insulator. Such nontrivial states were originally predicted and discovered in condensed matter physics, but they find their counterparts in other fields of physics, including the physics of classical waves and electromagnetism. Here, we present the first experimental realization of a topological insulator for electromagnetic waves based on engineered bianisotropic metamaterials. By employing the near-field scanning technique, we demonstrate experimentally the topologically robust propagation of electromagnetic waves around sharp corners without backscattering effects.

  2. Illuminating the Pecking Order in Off-Grid Lighting: A Demonstration of LED Lighting for Saving Energy in the Poultry Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Mills, Evan

    2010-11-06

    The Lumina Project and Lighting Africa conducted a full-scale field test involving a switch from kerosene to solar-LED lighting for commercial broiler chicken production at an off-grid farm in Kenya. The test achieved lower operating costs, produced substantially more light, improved the working environment, and had no adverse effect on yields. A strategy using conventional solar-fluorescent lighting also achieved comparable yields, but entailed a six-fold higher capital cost and significantly higher recurring battery replacement costs. Thanks to higher energy and optical efficiencies, the LED system provided approximately twice the illumination to the chicken-production area and yet drew less than half the power.At the study farm, 3000 chickens were grown in each of three identical houses under kerosene, fluorescent, and LED lighting configurations. Under baseline conditions, a yearly expenditure of 1,200 USD is required to illuminate the three houses with kerosene. The LED system eliminates this fuel use and expense with a corresponding simple payback time of 1.5 years, while the solar-fluorescent system has a payback time of 9.3 years. The corresponding reduction in fuel expenditure in both cases represents a 15percent increase in after-tax net income (revenues minus expenses) across the entire business operation. The differential cost-effectiveness between the LED and fluorescent systems would be substantially greater if the fluorescent system were upsized to provide the same light as the LED system. Providing light with the fluorescent or LED systems is also far more economical than connecting to the grid in this case. The estimated grid-connection cost at this facility is 1.7 million Kenya Schillings (approximately 21,250 USD), which is nearly six-times the cost of the fluorescent system and 35-times the cost of the LED system.The LED system also confers various non-energy benefits. The relative uniformity of LED lighting, compared to the fluorescent or

  3. On the nature of quiescent light curves demonstrated by WZ Sge stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kononov, D A; Puzin, V B; Kozhevnikov, V P; Sytov, A Yu; Lyaptsev, A P

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations of the cataclysmic variable star (hereafter CVs) V455 Andromedae, belonging to the WZ Sge sub-class, in quiescence. Using the spectroscopic data we computed time-resolved Doppler tomograms of the system demonstrating its behavior at different orbital phases. In the tomograms one can see the periodic brightening of different regions within one orbital cycle. We interpret this brightening as being due to the interaction of four phase-locked shock waves in the disk with a specific internal precessing density wave that develops inside the disk, because of the tidal influence of the secondary star, and this density wave propagates up to the disk's outer regions. When the outer part of the density wave in its precessional motion reaches a shock wave the local density grows, which amplifies the shock (by increasing $\\rho V^{2}/2$). This results in an additional energy release in the shock and can be observed as a brightening. Analysis ...

  4. The Mozart effect may only be demonstrable in nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, A; Esgate, A

    2002-12-01

    The "Mozart effect" is the tendency to score higher on spatiotemporal IQ subscales following exposure to complex music such as Mozart's Sonata K.448. This phenomenon was investigated in 20 musicians and 20 nonmusicians. The trion model predicts increased synchrony between musical and spatiotemporal centres in the right cerebral hemisphere. Since increased left-hemispheric involvement in music processing occurs as a result of music training, predictions deriving from the possibility of increased synchrony with left-hemispheric areas in musicians were tested. These included improved performance on language as well as spatiotemporal tasks. Spatiotemporal, synonym generation, and rhyming word generation tasks were employed as was the Mozart Sonata K.448. A Mozart effect was demonstrated on the spatiotemporal task, and the facilitatory effect of exposure to Mozart was greater for the nonmusician group. This finding adds to the robustness of the Mozart effect since novel tasks were used. No Mozart effect was found for either group on the verbal tasks, although the musicians scored higher on rhyming word generation. This new finding adds to the number of nonmusical tasks apparently showing long-term benefits from music training. However, no systematic link was found between performance on any task and number of years spent in music training. The failure to induce a Mozart effect in the musician group on verbal tasks, as well as that group's limited facilitation on spatiotemporal tasks, may be associated with either a ceiling effect due to the long-term effects of music training or from methodological factors. Both possibilities are discussed.

  5. Observation of the geometric spin Hall effect of light

    CERN Document Server

    Korger, Jan; Chille, Vanessa; Banzer, Peter; Wittmann, Christoffer; Lindlein, Norbert; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    The spin Hall effect of light (SHEL) is the photonic analogue of spin Hall effects occurring for charge carriers in solid-state systems. A prime example of this intriguing phenomenon occurs when a light beam refracts at an air-glass interface. It amounts to a polarization-dependent displacement perpendicular to the plane of incidence. At optical wavelengths, this shift is about a few tens of nanometres. Recently, it was predicted that a light beam projected onto an oblique plane can undergo a significantly larger displacement. This effect, named geometric SHEL, is a consequence of spin-orbit coupling and is largely independent from the physical implementation of the projection. Here, we experimentally demonstrate this novel phenomenon by observing an optical beam transmitted across an oblique polarizer. The spatial intensity distribution of the transmitted beam depends on the incident state of polarization and its centroid undergoes a positional displacement exceeding one wavelength. This novel type of spin-o...

  6. Effects of light wavelength and coherence in structured light sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Kevin; Ramamurthy, Rajesh; Zhai, Zirong; Han, Jie; Yang, Dongmin

    2016-05-01

    Structured light methods are used by many commercial products on the market today. Many such systems using white light projectors while many line gages use standard red laser diodes. However, in recent years there has been much claimed about using blue light, polarized light and partially coherent systems to obtain better performance. Unlike interferometers, moving from red to blue light for a system using only geometric shape information does not gain an automatic advantage from the shorter wavelength. The sensitivity metric does not have a wavelength component to it. But there are other factors that can improve gage performance. The ability to measure some feature is also a function of other parameters such as signal to noise ratio, reflectivity variations, and depth-of-field over which a clear pattern can be seen. This paper will explore the theoretical and experimental data relating to what works and what can be expected from variations on the old methods.

  7. Holographic Heavy-Light Chiral Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2016-01-01

    We propose a variant of the $D4$-$D8$ construction to describe the low energy effective theory of heavy-light mesons, interacting with the lowest lying pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The heavy degrees of freedom are identified with the $D8_L$-$D8_H$ string low energy modes, and are approximated near the world volume of $N_f-1$ light $D8_L$ branes, by fundamental vector field valued in $U(N_f-1)$. The effective action follows from the reduction of the bulk D-brane Born-Infeld (DBI) and Chern-Simons (CS) actions, and is shown to exhibit both chiral and heavy-quark symmetry. The action interpolates continuously between the $U(N_f)$ case with massless mesons, and the $U(N_f-1)$ case with heavy-light mesons. The heavy-light meson radial spectrum is Regge-like. The one-pion and two-pion couplings to the heavy-light multiplets are evaluated. The partial widths for the charged decays $G\\rightarrow H+\\pi$ are shown to be comparable to the recently reported full widths for both the charm and bottom mesons.

  8. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, S; Bernard, C; DeTar, C; Freeland, E; Foley, J; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Li, R; Osborn, J; Sugar, R L; Torok, A; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2015-01-01

    For some time, the MILC Collaboration has been studying electromagnetic effects on light mesons. These calculations use fully dynamical QCD, but only quenched photons, which suffices to NLO in XPT. That is, the sea quarks are electrically neutral, while the valence quarks carry charge. For the photons we use the non-compact formalism. We have new results with lattice spacing as small as 0.045 fm and a large range of volumes. We consider how well chiral perturbation theory describes these results and the implications for light quark masses

  9. Demonstration of Complementary Ternary Graphene Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Ji; Kim, So-Young; Noh, Jinwoo; Shim, Chang Hoo; Jung, Ukjin; Lee, Sang Kyung; Chang, Kyoung Eun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun

    2016-12-01

    Strong demand for power reduction in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices calls for novel devices and architectures. Since ternary logic architecture can perform the same function as binary logic architecture with a much lower device density and higher information density, a switch device suitable for the ternary logic has been pursued for several decades. However, a single device that satisfies all the requirements for ternary logic architecture has not been demonstrated. We demonstrated a ternary graphene field-effect transistor (TGFET), showing three discrete current states in one device. The ternary function was achieved by introducing a metal strip to the middle of graphene channel, which created an N-P-N or P-N-P doping pattern depending on the work function of the metal. In addition, a standard ternary inverter working at room temperature has been achieved by modulating the work function of the metal in a graphene channel. The feasibility of a ternary inverter indicates that a general ternary logic architecture can be realized using complementary TGFETs. This breakthrough will provide a key stepping-stone for an extreme-low-power computing technology.

  10. Experimental demonstration of the time reversal Aharonov-Casher effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsten, Tobias; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Sekine, Yoshiaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    2006-11-10

    We demonstrate the time reversal Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect in small arrays of mesoscopic semiconductor rings. By using an electrostatic gate we can control the spin precession rate and follow the AC phase over several interference periods. We show that we control the precession rate in two different gate voltage ranges; in the lower range the gate voltage dependence is strong and linear and in the higher range the dependence in almost an order of magnitude weaker. We also see the second harmonic of the AC interference, oscillating with half the period. We finally map the AC phase to the spin-orbit interaction parameter alpha and find it is consistent with Shubnikov-de Haas analysis.

  11. effect of light curing unit characteristics on light intensity output ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-09

    Sep 9, 2013 ... Objective: To determine the characteristics of light curing units (LCUs) in dental clinics in Nairobi and ... generation which has dogged the new generation of. LEDs without ..... Knezevic A, Tarle Z, Meniga A, Sutalo J, Pichler G.

  12. The effects of light-emitting diode lighting on greenhouse plant growth and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Olle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present the light emitting diode (LED technology for greenhouse plant lighting and to give an overview about LED light effects on photosynthetic indices, growth, yield and nutritional value in green vegetables and tomato, cucumber, sweet pepper transplants. The sole LED lighting, applied in closed growth chambers, as well as combinations of LED wavelengths with conventional light sources, fluorescent and high pressure sodium lamp light, and natural illumination in greenhouses are overviewed. Red and blue light are basal in the lighting spectra for green vegetables and tomato, cucumber, and pepper transplants; far red light, important for photomorphogenetic processes in plants also results in growth promotion. However, theoretically unprofitable spectral parts as green or yellow also have significant physiological effects on investigated plants. Presented results disclose the variability of light spectral effects on different plant species and different physiological indices.

  13. LIFAC demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2. Final report, Volume 1 - public design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report discusses the demonstration of LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s (RP&L) Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North American (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and several other organizations including the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Final Report Volume 1: Public Design is to consolidate, for public use, all design and cost information regarding the LIFAC Desulfurization Facility at the completion of construction and startup.

  14. Building Twilight "Light Sensors" to Study the Effects of Light Pollution on Fireflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thancharoen, Anchana; Branham, Marc A.; Lloyd, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Light pollution negatively affects many nocturnal organisms. We outline two experiments that can be conducted by students to examine the effects of light pollution on firefly behavior. Inexpensive electronic light sensors, which are easy to construct and calibrate, are used to sample light levels along transects in spaces where fireflies are…

  15. LIFAC Demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 Volume II: Project Performance and Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-04-01

    The C1ean Coal Technology (CCT) Program has been recognized in the National Energy Strategy as a major initiative whereby coal will be able to reach its full potential as a source of energy for the nation and the international marketplace. Attainment of this goal depends upon the development of highly efficient, environmentally sound, competitive coal utilization technologies responsive to diverse energy markets and varied consumer needs. The CCT Program is an effort jointly funded by government and industry whereby the most promising of the advanced coal-based technologies are being moved into the marketplace through demonstration. The CCT Program is being implemented through a total of five competitive solicitations. LIFAC North America, a joint venture partnership of ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., and Tampella Power Corporation, is currently demonstrating the LIFAC flue gas desulfurization technology developed by Tampella Power. This technology provides sulfur dioxide emission control for power plants, especially existing facilities with tight space limitations. Sulfur dioxide emissions are expected to be reduced by up to 85% by using limestone as a sorbent. The LIFAC technology is being demonstrated at Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, a 60-MW coal-fired power plant owned and operated by Richmond Power and Light (RP&L) and located in Richmond, Indiana. The Whitewater plant consumes high-sulfur coals, with sulfur contents ranging from 2.0-2.9 $ZO. The project, co-funded by LIFAC North America and DOE, is being conducted with the participation of Richmond Power and Light, the State of Indiana, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Black Beauty Coal Company. The project has a total cost of $21.4 million and a duration of 48 months from the preliminary design phase through the testing program.

  16. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-09

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  17. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    2011-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  18. Recombination Effects on Supernovae Light-Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfriend, Tomer; Sari, Re'em

    2014-01-01

    Supernovae of type IIP are marked by the long plateau seen in their optical light curves. The plateau is believed to be the result of a recombination wave that propagates through the outflowing massive hydrogen envelope. Here, we analytically investigate the transition from a fully ionized envelope to a partially recombined one and its effects on the SN light curve. The motivation is to establish the underlying processes which dominate the evolution at late times when recombination takes place in the envelope, yet early enough so that $^{56}$Ni decay is a negligible source of energy. We assume a simple, yet adequate, hydrodynamic profile of the envelope and study the mechanisms which dominate the energy emission and the observed temperature. We consider the diffusion of photons through the envelope while analyzing the ionization fraction and the coupling between radiation and gas. We find that once recombination starts, the observed temperature decreases slowly in time. However, in a typical red supergiant (R...

  19. Experimental Demonstration of Effective Medium Approximation Breakdown in Deeply Subwavelength All-Dielectric Multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Malureanu, Radu; Jensen, Flemming; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the effect of anomalous breakdown of the effective medium approximation in all-dielectric deeply subwavelength thickness ($d \\sim\\lambda/160-\\lambda/30$) multilayers, as recently predicted theoretically [H.H. Sheinfux et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 243901 (2014)]. Multilayer stacks are composed of alternating alumina and titania layers fabricated using atomic layer deposition. For light incident on such multilayers at angles near the total internal reflection we observe pronounced differences in the reflectance spectra for structures with 10-nm versus 20-nm thick layers, as well as for structures with different layers ordering, contrary to the predictions of the effective medium approximation. The reflectance difference can reach values up to 0.5, owing to the chosen geometrical configuration with an additional resonator layer employed for the enhancement of the effect. Our results are important for the development of new high-precision multilayer ellipsometry methods and schemes,...

  20. Illuminating the Effects of Dynamic Lighting on Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Mott

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Light is universally understood as essential to the human condition. Yet light quality varies substantially in nature and in controlled environments leading to questions of which artificial light characteristics facilitate maximum learning. Recent research has examined lighting variables of color temperature, and illumination for affecting sleep, mood, focus, motivation, concentration, and work and school performance. This has resulted in artificial light systems intended to support human beings in their actualization through dynamic lighting technology allowing for different lighting conditions per task. A total of 84 third graders were exposed to either focus (6000K-100fc average maintained or normal lighting. Focus lighting led to a higher percentage increase in oral reading fluency performance (36% than did control lighting (17%. No lighting effects were found for motivation or concentration, possibly attributable to the younger age level of respondents as compared with European studies. These findings illuminate the need for further research on artificial light and learning.

  1. Effective Lagrangians and Light Gravitino Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Luty, M A; Luty, Markus A.; Ponton, Eduardo

    1998-01-01

    We construct the low-energy effective lagrangian for supersymmetry breaking models with a light gravitino. Our effective lagrangian is written in terms of the spin-1/2 Goldstino (the longitudinal component of the gravitino) transforming under a non-linear realization of supersymmetry. The Goldstino is derivatively coupled. We use this lagrangian to place bounds on the supersymmetry breaking scale \\sqrt{F} from Goldstino phenomenology. The most stringent bounds come from the coupling of a single photon to Goldstino pairs. For gauge-mediated models, this coupling arises at one loop in the effective lagrangian, and supernova cooling allows \\sqrt{F} > 610 GeV or \\sqrt{F} 140 GeV for tan\\beta = 2.

  2. The difference of the PDT's effects between interstitial lighting and continuous lighting in low oxygen density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiumin; Li, Yingxin; Liu, Tiegen; Xu, Tao

    2008-02-01

    Tumor oxygen depletion plays an important role in the process of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). The paper focuses on the improvement of the lighting mode to carry out this cancer therapy more effectively in low oxygen content. The effect of interstitial lighting was compared with that of continuous lighting in different oxygen density measured with a homemade device in PDT. 90 mice were divided into 3 groups: the contrast group, the continuous lighting group and the interstitial lighting group. The initial oxygen content was measured with a homemade device before the treatment. To examine the different effects, both the interstitial lighting and the continuous lighting have the same fluent rates (30mW/cm2, 32.4J/ cm2). The continuous lighting lasted 18 minutes while the interstitial lighting lasted 36 minutes with 1 second's idle time and 1 second's effective time of each pulse. The result shows that the volume of tumor doubling duration in interstitial lighting group is longer in the condition of low initial oxygen content. Thus with low initial oxygen content, the interstitial lighting is more effective than the continuous lighting during PDT.

  3. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Tuning the Light in Senior Care: Evaluating a Trial LED Lighting System at the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Samla, Connie [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bisbee, Dave [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The GATEWAY program documented the performance of tunable-white LED lighting systems installed in several spaces within the ACC Care Center, a senior-care facility in Sacramento, CA. The project results included energy savings and improved lighting quality, as well as other possible health-related benefits that may have been attributable, at least in part, to the lighting changes.

  4. Damaging effects of visible light. Comprehensive progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Research progress is reported on studies of retinal light damage. A myriad of variables effect the production of light damage. These include age, prior light history, body temperature, vitamin A status, intensity, wavelength and duration of light. The intensity-duration function and the age function have been studied in detail in rats. Studies have been begun on the wavelength variable. (ACR)

  5. Circadian and wake-dependent effects on the pupil light reflex in response to narrow-bandwidth light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Mirjam; Léon, Lorette; Crippa, Sylvain V; Kawasaki, Aki

    2012-07-03

    Nonvisual light-dependent functions in humans are conveyed mainly by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, which express melanopsin as photopigment. We aimed to identify the effects of circadian phase and sleepiness across 24 hours on various aspects of the pupil response to light stimulation. We tested 10 healthy adults hourly in two 12-hour sessions covering a 24-hour period. Pupil responses to narrow bandwidth red (635 ± 18 nm) and blue (463 ± 24 nm) light (duration of 1 and 30 seconds) at equal photon fluxes were recorded, and correlated with salivary melatonin concentrations at the same circadian phases and to subjective sleepiness ratings. The magnitude of pupil constriction was determined from minimal pupil size. The post-stimulus pupil response was assessed from the pupil size at 6 seconds following light offset, the area within the redilation curve, and the exponential rate of redilation. Among the measured parameters, the pupil size 6 seconds after light offset correlated with melatonin concentrations (P light stimulation correlated with subjective sleepiness (P light as a marker of intrinsic melanopsin activity demonstrated a circadian modulation. In contrast, the effect of sleepiness was more apparent in the cone contribution to the pupil response. Thus, pupillary responsiveness to light is under influence of the endogenous circadian clock and subjective sleepiness.

  6. Have complementary therapies demonstrated effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Llanio Comella, Nagore; Fernández Matilla, Meritxell; Castellano Cuesta, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has improved thanks to the use of highly effective drugs. However, patients usually require long term therapy, which is not free of side effects. Therefore RA patients often demand complementary medicine, they seek additional sources of relief and/or less side effects. In fact 30-60% of rheumatic patients use some form of complementary medicine. Therefore, from conventional medicine, if we want to optimally treat our patients facilitating communication with them we must know the most commonly used complementary medicines. The aim of this review is to assess, based on published scientific research, what complementary therapies commonly used by patients with RA are effective and safe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  7. Light-Emitting Diodes with Hierarchical and Multifunctional Surface Structures for High Light Extraction and an Antifouling Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Young-Chul; Park, Jung Su; Kim, Joon Heon; Myoung, NoSoung; Yim, Sang-Youp; Jeong, Sehee; Lim, Wantae; Kim, Sung-Tae; Park, Seong-Ju

    2016-01-13

    Bioinspired hierarchical structures on the surface of vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) are demonstrated by combining a self-assembled dip-coating process and nanopatterning transfer method using thermal release tape. This versatile surface structure can efficiently reduce the total internal reflection and add functions, such as superhydrophobicity and high oleophobicity, to achieve an antifouling effect for VLEDs.

  8. Demonstrating Effectiveness of Antibiotics Against Known Bacteria Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Lois M.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures are described for showing the effectiveness of antibiotics (penicillin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) against a nonpathogenic bacteria strain (Bacillus cereus). Methods are outlined for preparing nutrient agar, sterilizing tubes, pouring agar plates, preparing antibiotic discs, and transferring antibiotic discs to agar plates. (CS)

  9. Demonstrating Effectiveness of Antibiotics Against Known Bacteria Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Lois M.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures are described for showing the effectiveness of antibiotics (penicillin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) against a nonpathogenic bacteria strain (Bacillus cereus). Methods are outlined for preparing nutrient agar, sterilizing tubes, pouring agar plates, preparing antibiotic discs, and transferring antibiotic discs to agar plates. (CS)

  10. Effects of Visible Light on Cultured Bovine Trabecular Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜发纲; 郝风芹; 魏厚仁; 许德胜

    2004-01-01

    To explore the biological effects of light on trabecular cells, cultured bovine trabecular cells were exposed to visible light of different wavelength with different energy. Cellular morphology, structure, proliferation, and phagocytosis were observed. The cells showed no remarkable changes when the energy was low. When the exposure energy reached 1. 12 mW/cm2 , the cytoplasm showed a rough appearance, and cell proliferation and phagocytosis decreased. This phototoxicity was strong with white light (compound chromatic light), moderate with violet light or yellow light, and mild with red light.

  11. Fast and effective: intense pulse light photodynamic inactivation of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Tim; Spannberger, Franz; Regensburger, Johannes; Felgenträger, Ariane; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the photodynamic toxicity of TMPyP (5, 10, 15, 20-Tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-porphyrin tetra p-toluenesulfonate) in combination with short pulses (ms) of an intense pulse light source within 10 s against Bacillus atrophaeus, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Escherichia coli, major pathogens in food industry and in health care, respectively. Bacteria were incubated with a photoactive dye (TMPyP) that is subsequently irradiated with visible light flashes of 100 ms to induce oxidative damage immediately by generation of reactive oxygen species like singlet oxygen. A photodynamic killing efficacy of up to 6 log(10) (>99.9999%) was achieved within a total treatment time of 10 s using a concentration range of 1-100 μmol TMPyP and multiple light flashes of 100 ms (from 20 J cm(-2) up to 80 J cm(-2)). Both incubation of bacteria with TMPyP alone or application of light flashes only did not have any negative effect on bacteria survival. Here we could demonstrate for the first time that the combination of TMPyP as the respective photosensitizer and a light flash of 100 ms of an intense pulsed light source is enough to generate sufficient amounts of reactive oxygen species to kill these pathogens within a few seconds. Increasing antibiotic resistance requires fast and efficient new approaches to kill bacteria, therefore the photodynamic process seems to be a promising tool for disinfection of horizontal surfaces in industry and clinical purposes where savings in time is a critical point to achieve efficient inactivation of microorganisms.

  12. Slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers for applications in microwave photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi

    This thesis analyzes semiconductor optical amplifiers based slow and fast light effects with particular focus on the applications in microwave photonics. We conceive novel ideas and demonstrate a great enhancement of light slow down. Furthermore, by cascading several slow light stages, >360 degree...... microwave phase shifts over a bandwidth of several tens of gigahertz are achieved. These also satisfy the basic requirements of microwave photonic systems. As an application demonstration, a tunable microwave notch filter is realized, where slow light based phase shifters provide 100% fractional tuning over...

  13. Light-front analysis of the Casimir effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chabysheva, Sophia S

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between conducting plates at rest in an inertial frame is usually computed in equal-time quantization, the natural choice for the given boundary conditions. We show that the well-known result obtained in this way can also be obtained in light-front quantization. This differs from a light-front analysis where the plates are at "rest" in an infinite momentum frame, rather than an inertial frame; in that case, as shown by Lenz and Steinbacher, the result does not agree with the standard result. As is usually done, the analysis is simplified by working with a scalar field and periodic boundary conditions, in place of the complexity of quantum electrodynamics. The two key ingredients are a careful implementation of the boundary conditions, following the work of Almeida et al. on oblique light-front coordinates, and computation of the ordinary energy density, rather than the light-front energy density. The analysis demonstrates that the physics of the effect is independent of the coordinate choice...

  14. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

    2010-06-29

    A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

  15. Slow-light effects in photonic crystal membrane lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted.......In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted....

  16. Effect of inhomogeneity of light from light curing units on the surface hardness of composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Fujii, Koichi; Takahashi, Hideo; Ban, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of output light from different types of light curing units, and their effects on polymerization of light-activated composite resin. Three quartz-tungsten-halogen lamps, one plasma arc lamp, and one LED light curing unit were used. Intensity distribution of light emitted from the light guide tip was measured at 1.0-mm intervals across the guide tip. Distribution of Knoop hardness number on the surface of resin irradiated with the light curing units was also measured. For all units, inhomogeneous distribution of light intensity across the guide tip was observed. Minimum light intensity values were 19-80% of the maximum values. In terms of surface hardness, inhomogeneous distribution was also observed for the materials irradiated with the tested units. Minimum values were 53-92% of the maximum values. Our results indicated that markedly inhomogeneous light emitted from light curing unit could result in inhomogeneous polymerization in some areas of the restoration below the light guide tip.

  17. Can light make us bright? Effects of light on cognition and sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi; Gordijn, Marijke C. M.; Cajochen, Christian; VanDongen, HPA; Kerkhof, GA

    2011-01-01

    Light elicits robust nonvisual effects on numerous physiological and behavioral variables, such as the human sleep-wake cycle and cognitive performance. Light effects crucially rely on properties such as dose, duration, timing, and wavelength. Recently, the use of methods such as fMRI to assess

  18. Public lighting : the effectiveness for road transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    When daylight is absent, the acquisition of normal visual information is not possible. Road traffic of the nature we are accustomed to today is not possible either: some sort of artificial light is indispensable. This artificial light is, therefore, a road traffic requirement: without artificial

  19. Colour and Light Effects on Students' Achievement, Behavior and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, H.

    A quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design was used to investigate the effects of full-spectrum light, prescribed color and light/color combinations, ultra-violet light, and electromagnetic radiation in an elementary school environment. Four schools in the Wetaskiwin School District, Alberta, were involved in the study; three served…

  20. Cover Your Cough! A Short and Simple Activity to Demonstrate the Antimicrobial Effect of Desiccation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Cook Easterwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Many undergraduate microbiology laboratory manuals include exercises demonstrating the antimicrobial effects of physical agents, such as UV light and heat, and chemical agents, such as disinfectants and antibiotics (3, 4. There is, however, a lack of exercises examining the effects of desiccation on bacterial growth and survival. This particular form of antimicrobial control is especially relevant today with an increased emphasis on coughing and sneezing into one’s sleeve or a tissue, where microbes will not contaminate hands and will eventually desiccate and die (2. Desiccation can have bacteriostatic or bactericidal effects depending on the species, the material on which the organism has desiccated, and the length of time. The absence of water can damage many cellular components, including enzymes, nucleic acids, and cell membranes (1. However, many prokaryotes have some degree of resistance to desiccation, with Escherichia coli surviving around 24 hours and Bacillus species surviving upwards of 300 years, though these numbers can vary due to a number of confounding factors (5. Some of these factors include the method by which desiccation occurred, whether desiccation occurred in a natural or laboratory situation, and the species itself (5. To address the effects of desiccation on bacterial growth and survival, a short, simple exercise was developed. By inoculating various materials with bacterial cultures and allowing them to air-dry for 24 hours, students can visualize the effects of desiccation by analyzing the growth, or lack thereof, when organisms are transferred to nutrient agar plates. This exercise has been used in a health professions microbiology course as well as a microbiology course for biology and biochemistry majors. It is short enough to be conducted during a standard lecture period or during a longer laboratory period in conjunction with other experiments demonstrating the effectiveness of physical agents on microbial

  1. Simultaneous slow and fast light involving Faraday effect

    CERN Document Server

    Macke, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study the linear transmission of linearly polarized light pulses in an ensemble of cold atoms submitted to a static magnetic field parallel to the direction of propagation. The carrier frequency of the incident pulses coincides with a resonance frequency of the atoms in absence of magnetic field and the light transmitted in presence of magnetic field is examined in the polarizations parallel and perpendicular to that of the incident pulses. We give explicit analytic expressions of the transfer functions of the system for both polarizations. We demonstrate that slow light can be observed in a polarization whereas fast light is simultaneously observed in the perpendicular polarization. Moreover we point out that, due to the polarization post-selection, the system is not necessarily minimum-phase-shift. Slow light can then be obtained in situations where an irrelevant application of the Kramers-Kronig relations leads to expect fast light. When the incident light is step-modulated, we finally sho...

  2. Effects of light intensity on photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms in apple under progressive drought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ping; BAI Tuan-hui; WANG Xiao-qian; MA Feng-wang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of light intensity on photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms under progressive drought were studied on apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) Fuji. The potted trees were exposed to drought stress for 12 days and different light conditions (100, 60 and 25% sunlight). During the progressive drought, the relative water content (RWC) in leaf declined and was faster in full light than in 60 and 25% sunlight. However, the decrease in the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs) and Rubisco activity were slower under 100% sunlight condition than other light conditions. After the 6 days of drought, the maximum PSII quantum yield (Fv/Fm), the capacity of electrons move beyond QA- (1-Vj) and electron move from intersystem to PSI acceptor side (1-VI)/(1-VJ) decreased, with greater decline extent in brighter light. While RWCs were 〉75%, the variations in different light intensities of Gs and Rubisco activity at identical RWC, suggested the direct effects of light. While the little difference in the state of photosynthetic electron transport chain among tested light intensities indicates the results of faster water loss rate of light. Our results also demonstrated that the enhancement the de-epoxidations of xanthophyll cycle, activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) were directly regulated by light intensity. While the higher photorespiration rate (Pr) under stronger light condition was mainly caused by faster water loss rate of light.

  3. Effects of light intensity on photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms in apple under progressive drought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ping; BAI Tuan-hui; WANG Xiao-qian; MA Feng-wang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of light intensity on photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms under progressive drought were studied on apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) Fuji. The potted trees were exposed to drought stress for 12 days and different light conditions (100, 60 and 25%sunlight). During the progressive drought, the relative water content (RWC) in leaf declined and was faster in ful light than in 60 and 25%sunlight. However, the decrease in the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs) and Rubisco activity were slower under 100%sunlight condition than other light conditions. After the 6 days of drought, the maximum PSII quantum yield (Fv/Fm), the capacity of electrons move beyond QA−(1–VJ) and electron move from intersystem to PSI acceptor side (1–VI)/(1–VJ) decreased, with greater decline extent in brighter light. While RWCs were>75%, the variations in different light intensities of Gs and Rubisco activity at identical RWC, suggested the direct effects of light. While the little difference in the state of photosynthetic electron transport chain among tested light intensities indicates the results of faster water loss rate of light. Our results also demonstrated that the enhancement the de-epoxidations of xanthophyl cycle, activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) were directly regulated by light intensity. While the higher photorespiration rate (Pr) under stronger light condition was mainly caused by faster water loss rate of light.

  4. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  5. Exploiting Collective Effects to Direct Light Absorption in Natural and Artificial Light-Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Christopher

    Photosynthesis---the conversion of sunlight to chemical energy---is fundamental for supporting life on our planet. Despite its importance, the physical principles that underpin the primary steps of photosynthesis, from photon absorption to electronic charge separation, remain to be understood in full. Electronic coherence within tightly-packed light-harvesting (LH) units or within individual reaction centers (RCs) has been recognized as an important ingredient for a complete understanding of the excitation energy transfer (EET) dynamics. However, the electronic coherence across units---RC and LH or LH and LH---has been consistently neglected as it does not play a significant role during these relatively slow transfer processes. Here, we turn our attention to the absorption process, which, as we will show, has a much shorter built-in timescale. We demonstrate that the---often overlooked---spatially extended but short-lived excitonic delocalization plays a relevant role in general photosynthetic systems. Most strikingly, we find that absorption intensity is, quite generally, redistributed from LH units to the RC, increasing the number of excitations which can effect charge separation without further transfer steps. A biomemetic nano-system is proposed which is predicted to funnel excitation to the RC-analogue, and hence is the first step towards exploiting these new design principles for efficient artificial light-harvesting.

  6. Nonreciprocal light transmission based on the thermal radiative effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2015-01-01

    Nonreciprocal light transmission is critical in building optical isolations and circulations in optical communication systems. Achieving high optical isolation and broad bandwidth with CMOS-compatibility are still difficult in silicon nano-photonics. Here we first experimentally demonstrate that ...

  7. Modelling the effect of supplementary lighting on production and light utilisation efficiency of greenhouse crops.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de J.C.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of supplementary lighting (SL) on dry matter production of greenhouse crops is predictable with ALSIM, a new crop growth model based on SUCROS87. The light utilization efficiency (LUE), defined as daily dry matter production divided by the daily photosynthetic photon flux is a parameter f

  8. The linear and nonlinear optical effects of white light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI XinYuan; LIU SiMin; GUO Ru; LU Yi; GAO YuanMei; LIU ZhaoHong; HUANG ChunFu; ZHANG XiaoHua; ZHU Nan; XU JingJun

    2009-01-01

    An overview of our research group's experimental and theoretical developments is provided on the linear and nonlinear optical effects of white light since 2003. Their work includes the experimental researches on the white light one-dimensional photovoltaic dark spatial solitons and the waveguides and directional couplers induced by them, the circular and elliptic white-light dark spatial solitons and the white-light photorefractive phase masks, two-dimensional white-light photonic lattices and the applications of the white-light dark spatial solitons in the digital image transmission field, the interaction between the two-dimensional white-light dark spatial solitons to enhance or to improve the correlateddegree of the white light through the interaction between the white-light beam and coherent dark spatial solitons, the interaction between the one-or two-dimensional white-light dark spatial solitons and the two-dimensional white-light photonic lattices, respectively. We also numerically simulate the interaction between two or more partially incoherent bright spatial solitons and the white bright spatial soliton pairs in the saturated logarithmic nonlinear medium. We have observed experimentally for the first time,the modulation instability of the coherent light and white light, respectively, in self-defocusing medium and so on.

  9. The linear and nonlinear optical effects of white light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    An overview of our research group’s experimental and theoretical developments is provided on the linear and nonlinear optical effects of white light since 2003. Their work includes the experimental researches on the white light one-dimensional photovoltaic dark spatial solitons and the waveguides and directional couplers induced by them, the circular and elliptic white-light dark spatial solitons and the white-light photorefractive phase masks, two-dimensional white-light photonic lattices and the applications of the white-light dark spatial solitons in the digital image transmission field, the interaction between the two-dimensional white-light dark spatial solitons to enhance or to improve the correlated degree of the white light through the interaction between the white-light beam and coherent dark spatial solitons, the interaction between the one- or two-dimensional white-light dark spatial solitons and the two-dimensional white-light photonic lattices, respectively. We also numerically simulate the interaction between two or more partially incoherent bright spatial solitons and the white bright spatial soliton pairs in the saturated logarithmic nonlinear medium. We have observed experimentally for the first time, the modulation instability of the coherent light and white light, respectively, in self-defocusing medium and so on.

  10. The Casimir Effect on the Light-Cone

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, F

    2003-01-01

    The Casimir effect is investigated in light-cone quantization. It is shown that for spacelike separation of the walls enclosing the system the standard result for the pressure exerted on the walls is obtained. For walls separated in light-cone space direction no regularization of the quantum fluctuations exists which would yield a finite pressure. The origin of this failure and its implications for other vacuum properties are discussed by analyzing the Casimir effect as seen from a moving observer approaching the speed of light. The possibility for calculation of thermodynamic quantities in light-cone quantization via the Casimir effect is pointed out.

  11. Effect of linear polarized near-infrared light irradiation and light exercise on muscle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shinichi; Aoki, Hiroki; Uchida, Yuu; Yamaji, Shunsuke

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of active warm-up by local muscle light exercise and passive warm-up by polarized light irradiation on skin and muscle temperatures and forearm muscle performance (muscle strength, power, endurance, and controlled force-exertion). Ten healthy males performed various grip tests before and after active (local muscle light exercise) and passive (linear polarized near-infrared light irradiation) warm-ups. An active warm-up involved intermittent gripping exercise (contraction: 1 second and relaxation: 1 second) for 10 minutes using a sponge. A passive warm-up consisted of polarized light irradiation to the forearm (superficial digital flexor) for 10 minutes (irradiation: 5 seconds and rest: 1 second). Skin and muscle temperatures were measured during both warm-ups. Skin and muscle temperatures increased significantly after 5 minutes of local muscle light exercise and after 10 minutes of polarized light irradiation. Temperatures were significantly higher after 6 minutes of local muscle light exercise than after 6 minutes of polarized light irradiation. There were no significant differences of muscle strength, power, and controlled force-exertion before and after either warm-up. Average force outputs in all conditions significantly decreased with exertion time, and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds they were higher in both warm-up conditions than in the non-warm-up condition. In conclusion, both warm-ups may contribute to improve muscle endurance performance in the decreasing force phase.

  12. Conquering the Pumpkin Effect: A Lighting Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Gary B.

    1993-01-01

    Turning off all the interior and exterior lighting when school buildings are closed saves money. In a small Illinois school district, nearly $14,000 were saved in electrical expenditures for six buildings. Another Illinois district currently has 19 of its 32 buildings blacked out at night and saves over $150,000 annually. Vandalism and loitering…

  13. Infrared light gated MoS₂ field effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huajing; Lin, Ziyuan; Wang, Xinsheng; Tang, Chun-Yin; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Fan; Chai, Yang; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; Chan, H L W; Dai, Ji-Yan

    2015-12-14

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) as a promising 2D material has attracted extensive attentions due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties. In this work, we demonstrate an infrared (IR) light gated MoS₂ transistor through a device composed of MoS₂ monolayer and a ferroelectric single crystal Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O₃-PbTiO₃ (PMN-PT). With a monolayer MoS₂ onto the top surface of (111) PMN-PT crystal, the drain current of MoS₂ channel can be modulated with infrared illumination and this modulation process is reversible. Thus, the transistor can work as a new kind of IR photodetector with a high IR responsivity of 114%/Wcm⁻². The IR response of MoS₂ transistor is attributed to the polarization change of PMN-PT single crystal induced by the pyroelectric effect which results in a field effect. Our result promises the application of MoS₂ 2D material in infrared optoelectronic devices. Combining with the intrinsic photocurrent feature of MoS₂ in the visible range, the MoS₂ on ferroelectric single crystal may be sensitive to a broadband wavelength of light.

  14. Demonstrations of Wave Optics (Interference and Diffraction of Light) for Large Audiences Using a Laser and a Multimedia Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new technique for performing most well-known demonstrations of wave optics. Demonstrations which are normally very hard to show to more than a few people can be presented easily to very large audiences with excellent visibility for everyone. The proposed setup is easy to put together and use and can be very useful for…

  15. Effect of gravomagnetism on the trajectory of light ray

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabortya, Sarani

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown by various authors that gravo magnetic field can produce lensing effect. The effect of such a gravitational body with magnetic monopole on the trajectory of light ray is discussed in this paper. The light deflection angle has been calculated in the present works, considering upto fourth order terms. Schwarzschild light deflection angle can be obtained from this expression, by setting magnetism equals to zero. However, for a hypothetical massless, magnetic monopole the light deflection angle does not reduce to zero.

  16. Effect of tin etiopurpurin and light on the canine prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Steven H.; Keck, Rick W.; Doiron, Daniel R.

    1995-03-01

    A series of experiments was undertaken to determine the effects of the combination of light and the tissue photosensitizer, tin etiopurpurin, on the canine prostate. Mongrel dogs were injected intravenously with 1.0 mg/kg of photosensitizer twenty-four hours prior to light delivery. Laser light, 660 nm, was administered either transurethrally or interstitially and tissue effects were assessed by histopathologic examination. Both techniques of light delivery resulted in hemorrhagic necrosis of the surrounding tissue. Photodynamic therapy may offer a novel approach to the treatment of both benign and malignant diseases of the prostate.

  17. Effectiveness of pulsed ultraviolet-light treatment for bacterial inactivation on agar surface and liquid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saïd, Noura Elmnasser; Federighi, Michel; Bakhrouf, Amina; Orange, Nicole

    2010-11-01

    In the present study, the efficiency of a broad-spectrum pulsed ultraviolet (UV)-light for the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, L. monocytogenes CNL 895807, and Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37 populations as agar seeded or suspended cells was investigated. The bacterial populations were treated by pulsed UV-light at different number of pulses (1 to 3), dose of energy (162, 243, or 324 J), and distance from the strobe (4, 9, or 12 cm). After pulsed UV-light treatment, the bacterial reduction was determined by standard plate count. The results showed that there was a significant reduction of population along with an increase of light energy and number of pulses. Decreasing the distance between the Petri dishes and the xenon lamp demonstrated an increase in bacterial reduction. Decontamination efficacy decreased significantly with the increase in level of contamination. This study demonstrates that pulsed UV-light can be used as an effective sterilizing method for the bacteria.

  18. A comparison of blue light and caffeine effects on cognitive function and alertness in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Martyn Beaven

    Full Text Available The alerting effects of both caffeine and short wavelength (blue light have been consistently reported. The ability of blue light to enhance alertness and cognitive function via non-image forming neuropathways have been suggested as a non-pharmacological countermeasure for drowsiness across a range of occupational settings. Here we compare and contrast the alerting and psychomotor effects of 240 mg of caffeine and a 1-h dose of ~40 lx blue light in a non-athletic population. Twenty-one healthy subjects performed a computer-based psychomotor vigilance test before and after each of four randomly assigned trial conditions performed on different days: white light/placebo; white light/240 mg caffeine; blue light/placebo; blue light/240 mg caffeine. The Karolinska Sleepiness Scale was used to assess subjective measures of alertness. Both the caffeine only and blue light only conditions enhanced accuracy in a visual reaction test requiring a decision and an additive effect was observed with respect to the fastest reaction times. However, in a test of executive function, where a distraction was included, caffeine exerted a negative effect on accuracy. Furthermore, the blue light only condition consistently outperformed caffeine when both congruent and incongruent distractions were presented. The visual reactions in the absence of a decision or distraction were also enhanced in the blue light only condition and this effect was most prominent in the blue-eyed participants. Overall, blue light and caffeine demonstrated distinct effects on aspects of psychomotor function and have the potential to positively influence a range of settings where cognitive function and alertness are important. Specifically, despite the widespread use of caffeine in competitive sporting environments, the possible impact of blue light has received no research attention.

  19. A comparison of blue light and caffeine effects on cognitive function and alertness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, C Martyn; Ekström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The alerting effects of both caffeine and short wavelength (blue) light have been consistently reported. The ability of blue light to enhance alertness and cognitive function via non-image forming neuropathways have been suggested as a non-pharmacological countermeasure for drowsiness across a range of occupational settings. Here we compare and contrast the alerting and psychomotor effects of 240 mg of caffeine and a 1-h dose of ~40 lx blue light in a non-athletic population. Twenty-one healthy subjects performed a computer-based psychomotor vigilance test before and after each of four randomly assigned trial conditions performed on different days: white light/placebo; white light/240 mg caffeine; blue light/placebo; blue light/240 mg caffeine. The Karolinska Sleepiness Scale was used to assess subjective measures of alertness. Both the caffeine only and blue light only conditions enhanced accuracy in a visual reaction test requiring a decision and an additive effect was observed with respect to the fastest reaction times. However, in a test of executive function, where a distraction was included, caffeine exerted a negative effect on accuracy. Furthermore, the blue light only condition consistently outperformed caffeine when both congruent and incongruent distractions were presented. The visual reactions in the absence of a decision or distraction were also enhanced in the blue light only condition and this effect was most prominent in the blue-eyed participants. Overall, blue light and caffeine demonstrated distinct effects on aspects of psychomotor function and have the potential to positively influence a range of settings where cognitive function and alertness are important. Specifically, despite the widespread use of caffeine in competitive sporting environments, the possible impact of blue light has received no research attention.

  20. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    The display market is presently dominated by the active matrix liquid crystal display (LCD). However, the active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display is argued to become the successor to the LCD, and is already beginning its way into the market, mainly in small size displays. But, for AMOLED technology to become comparable in market share to LCD, larger size displays must become available at a competitive price with their LCD counterparts. A major issue preventing low-cost large AMOLED displays is the thin-film transistor (TFT) technology. Unlike the voltage driven LCD, the OLEDs in the AMOLED display are current driven. Because of this, the mature amorphous silicon TFT backplane technology used in the LCD must be upgraded to a material possessing a higher mobility. Polycrystalline silicon and transparent oxide TFT technologies are being considered to fill this need. But these technologies bring with them significant manufacturing complexity and cost concerns. Carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) offer a unique solution to this problem (now known as the AMOLED backplane problem). The CN-VFET allows the use of organic semiconductors to be used for the semiconductor layer. Organics are known for their low-cost large area processing compatibility. Although the mobility of the best organics is only comparable to that of amorphous silicon, the CN-VFET makes up for this by orienting the channel vertically, as opposed to horizontally (like in conventional TFTs). This allows the CN-VFET to achieve sub-micron channel lengths without expensive high resolution patterning. Additionally, because the CN-VFET can be easily converted into a light emitting transistor (called the carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic light emitting transistor---CN-VOLET) by essentially stacking an OLED on top of the CN-VFET, more potential benefits can be realized. These potential benefits include, increased aperture ratio, increased OLED

  1. Magnetic field effect in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedermeier, Ulrich

    2009-12-14

    furthermore emphasized by measurements of the OMR effect under illumination with infrared light as well as by theoretical considerations in the scope of the electron-hole pair concept. Finally, it is demonstrated that the enhancement of the OMR values achieved in OLED devices after electrical or optical conditioning can largely be reversed by appropriate annealing. This suggests that the conditioning procedures do not cause a permanent degradation of the OLEDs. Hence, it is speculated that morphological modifications inside the emission layer of the devices might be a possible explanation for the observed consequences of device conditioning. (orig.)

  2. The spin Hall effect of light in moving medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hehe; Li, Xinzhong; Wang, Jingge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spin Hall effect of light in moving inhomogeneous medium using the Gordon metric and the Maxwell’s equations in the gravitational field. Light experiences a moving medium as a gravitational field by means of the Gordon metric. It is shown that the spin Hall effect of light is modified by the motion of medium, and the deflection of the ray trajectory is dependent on the polarization and the motion of the medium. It is interesting that there is no coupling of the spin angular momentum of light and the effective gravitational field when the medium is moving along the direction of the gradient ∇n(r). The results provide a potential method for controlling the spin Hall effect of light in medium.

  3. Effect of light irradiation by light emitting diode on colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Noriko; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kurita, Nobuhiro; Sato, Hirohiko; Iwata, Takashi; Higashijima, Jun; Chikakiyo, Motoya; Nishi, Masaaki; Kashihara, Hideya; Takasu, Chie; Eto, Shohei; Takahashi, Akira; Akutagawa, Masatake; Emoto, Takahiro

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of irradiation from light emitting diodes (LED) for wound healing, anti-inflammation and anticancer therapies. However, little is known about the effects of visible light in colon cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological response (including gene expression changes) of human colon cancer cells to different wavelengths of LED irradiation. Human colon cancer cells (HT29 or HCT116) were seeded onto laboratory dishes that were then put on LED irradiation equipment with a 465 nm-, 525 nm-, or 635 nm-LED. Irradiation at 15 or 30 mW was performed 10 min/day, each day for 5 days. The cell counting kit8 was then used to measure cell viability. Apoptosis and expression of several mRNAs (caspase, MAPK and autophagy pathway) in HT29 cultures irradiated with 465 nm LED were evaluated via AnnexinV/PI and RT-PCR, respectively. Viability of HT29 and HCT116 cells was lower in 465 nm-LED irradiated cultures than in control cultures, but viability of HT29 cells did not differ between control cultures and 525 nm-LED or 635 nm-LED irradiated cultures. Moreover, the expression of FAS, caspase-3, capase-8, and JUK were significantly higher in 465 nm-LED irradiated cultures than in control cultures, and expression of ERK1/2 and LC3 was lower in blue-irradiated cells. LED irradiation at 465 nm inhibited the proliferation of HT29 cells and of HCT116 cells. Notably, LED irradiation at 465 nm promoted apoptosis inHT29 cultures via the extrinsic apoptosis pathway and the MAPK pathway. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Considerations for lighting in the built environment: non-visual effects of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, A.R. [School of Earth Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester(United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Light is defined as that part of the electromagnetic spectrum (about 380-780 nm) that gives rise to a visual sensation. Lighting in buildings, whether through use of daylight or by artificial means, is designed primarily for the visual needs of the occupants and their expected tasks within a given space. However, solar radiation, and, depending on spectral output of the source, artificial radiation, has other effects on human physiology and behaviour. Blue light affects the circadian rhythm, mood and behaviour; at shorter wavelengths in the ultraviolet (UV) the detriments of photo aging and sunburn are balanced by the benefits of Vitamin D synthesis. (author)

  5. Encapsulation effects on carbonaceous aerosol light absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Onasch, T.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-03-15

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds (plumes containing soot byproducts from automobiles, biomass burning, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal-fired power plants) will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve insights into the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated, and denuded conditions were conducted. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007). In addition to examining nascent BC—to provide a baseline measurement—encapsulation with varying thicknesses of either dioctyl sebacate (DOS) or sulfuric acid was conducted to glean insights into the interplay between particle mixing state and optical properties. Additionally, some experiments were carried out where BC was coated and then denuded. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a

  6. Nutrition in the spotlight: metabolic effects of environmental light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, Ruth I; Stenvers, Dirk J; Kalsbeek, Andries; Bisschop, Peter H; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2016-11-01

    Use of artificial light resulted in relative independence from the natural light-dark (LD) cycle, allowing human subjects to shift the timing of food intake and work to convenient times. However, the increase in artificial light exposure parallels the increase in obesity prevalence. Light is the dominant Zeitgeber for the central circadian clock, which resides within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus, and coordinates daily rhythm in feeding behaviour and metabolism. Eating during inappropriate light conditions may result in metabolic disease via changes in the biological clock. In this review, we describe the physiological role of light in the circadian timing system and explore the interaction between the circadian timing system and metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss the acute and chronic effects of artificial light exposure on food intake and energy metabolism in animals and human subjects. We propose that living in synchrony with the natural daily LD cycle promotes metabolic health and increased exposure to artificial light at inappropriate times of day has adverse effects on metabolism, feeding behaviour and body weight regulation. Reducing the negative side effects of the extensive use of artificial light in human subjects might be useful in the prevention of metabolic disease.

  7. Motion Induced by Light: Photokinetic Effects in the Rayleigh Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffner, David B; Grier, David G

    2015-01-01

    Structured beams of light can move small objects in surprising ways. Particularly striking examples include observations of polarization-dependent forces acting on optically isotropic objects and tractor beams that can pull objects opposite to the direction of the light's propagation. Here we develop a theoretical framework in which these effects vanish at the leading order of light scattering theory. Exotic optical forces emerge instead from interference between different orders of multipole scattering. These effects create a rich variety of ways to manipulate small objects with light, so-called photokinetic effects. Applying this formalism to the particular case of Bessel beams offers useful insights into the nature of tractor beams and the interplay between spin and orbital angular momentum in vector beams of light, including a manifestation of orbital-to-spin conversion.

  8. Demonstration of long-distance hazard-free wearable EEG monitoring system using mobile phone visible light communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachim, Vega Pradana; Jiang, Yubing; Lee, Hyeon-Seok; Chung, Wan-Young

    2017-01-23

    A wearable electroencephalogram (EEG) is a small mobile device used for long-term brain monitoring systems. Applications of these systems include fatigue monitoring, mental/emotional monitoring, and brain-computer interfaces. However, the usage of wireless wearable EEG systems is limited due to the risks posed by the wireless RF communication radiation in a long-term exposure to the human brain. A novel microwave radiation-free system was developed by integrating visible light communication technology into a wearable EEG device. In this work, we investigated the system's performance in transmitting EEG data at different illuminance level and proposed an algorithm that functions at low illuminance levels for increased transmission distance. Using a 30 Hz smartphone camera, the proposed system was able to transmit 2.4 kbps of error-free EEG data up to 4 meter, which is equal to ~300 lux using an aspheric focus lens.

  9. Demonstration of fiber pulsed light source at 1.6 μm with adjustable pulse duration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Feng; Lei Zhang; Xiaoming Liu

    2007-01-01

    A novel practical 1.66-μm pulse light source with adjustable pulse duration is proposed. A 2.5-km Raman fiber is placed into a ring type Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser (Q-EDFL), serving as both delay line fiber and Raman gain medium so that in addition to the wavelength shifted to 1.6μm, the pulse duration and the buildup time can be relatively extended. By properly controlling the fall edge of the acousto-optic switch (AOS), the pulse duration of 30-345 ns for ~ 770-Hz repetition frequency with power of 1-1.6 W is achieved.

  10. Quantum noise memory effect of multiple scattered light

    CERN Document Server

    Lodahl, P

    2005-01-01

    We investigate frequency correlations in multiple scattered light that are present in the quantum fluctuations. The memory effect for quantum and classical noise is compared, and found to have markedly different frequency scaling, which was confirmed in a recent experiment. Furthermore, novel mesoscopic correlations are predicted that depend on the photon statistics of the incoming light.

  11. Safety effects of permanent running lights for bicycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens Chr. Overgaard; Andersen, T.; Lahrmann, Harry

    2013-01-01

    3845 cyclists was carried out in Odense, Denmark in order to examine, if permanent running lights mounted to bicycles would improve traffic safety for cyclists. The permanent running lights were mounted to 1845 bicycles and the accident rate was recorded through 12 months for this treatment group...... and 2000 other bicyclists, the latter serving as a control group without bicycle running lights. The safety effect of the running lights is analysed by comparing incidence rates – number of bicycle accidents recorded per man-month – for the treatment group and the control group. The incidence rate......, including all recorded bicycle accidents with personal injury to the participating cyclist, is 19% lower for cyclists with permanent running lights mounted; indicating that the permanent bicycle running light significantly improves traffic safety for cyclists. The study shows that use of permanent bicycle...

  12. Effects of weather conditions, light conditions, and road lighting on vehicle speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägerbrand, Annika K; Sjöbergh, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Light conditions are known to affect the number of vehicle accidents and fatalities but the relationship between light conditions and vehicle speed is not fully understood. This study examined whether vehicle speed on roads is higher in daylight and under road lighting than in darkness, and determined the combined effects of light conditions, posted speed limit and weather conditions on driving speed. The vehicle speed of passenger cars in different light conditions (daylight, twilight, darkness, artificial light) and different weather conditions (clear weather, rain, snow) was determined using traffic and weather data collected on an hourly basis for approximately 2 years (1 September 2012-31 May 2014) at 25 locations in Sweden (17 with road lighting and eight without). In total, the data included almost 60 million vehicle passes. The data were cleaned by removing June, July, and August, which have different traffic patterns than the rest of the year. Only data from the periods 10:00 A.M.-04:00 P.M. and 06:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. were used, to remove traffic during rush hour and at night. Multivariate adaptive regression splines was used to evaluate the overall influence of independent variables on vehicle speed and nonparametric statistical testing was applied to test for speed differences between dark-daylight, dark-twilight, and twilight-daylight, on roads with and without road lighting. The results show that vehicle speed in general depends on several independent variables. Analyses of vehicle speed and speed differences between daylight, twilight and darkness, with and without road lighting, did not reveal any differences attributable to light conditions. However, vehicle speed decreased due to rain or snow and the decrease was higher on roads without road lighting than on roads with lighting. These results suggest that the strong association between traffic accidents and darkness or low light conditions could be explained by drivers failing to adjust their

  13. Robust photonic differentiator employing slow light effect in photonic crystal waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Siqi; Cheng, Ziwei; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2017-01-01

    A robust photonic DIFF exploiting the slow light effect in a photonic crystal waveguide is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Input Gaussian pulses with full-width halfmaximums ranging from 2.7 ps to 81.4 ps can be accurately differentiated.......A robust photonic DIFF exploiting the slow light effect in a photonic crystal waveguide is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Input Gaussian pulses with full-width halfmaximums ranging from 2.7 ps to 81.4 ps can be accurately differentiated....

  14. The Fort McMurray Demonstration Project in Social Marketing: no demonstrable effect on already falling injury rates following intensive community and workplace intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Tee L; Deb, Pooja; Bertera, Robert; Ford, Lynda

    2009-10-01

    The Fort McMurray Demonstration Project in Social Marketing attempted to achieve mutually reinforcing effects from thematically coordinated educational and awareness efforts in the community as a whole and in the workplace and the inclusion of occupational safety within the framework of a community health promotion project. The study community was Fort McMurray, a small, industrial city in northern Alberta. The Mistahiai Health Region, several hundred kilometers to the west and also dominated by one city, Grande Prairie, served as the reference community. The intervention was based on media and events staged at public events, with supporting educational activities in schools and the community. It relied heavily on community-based partners and volunteers. Data on healthcare utilization of selected preventable injuries were obtained from Alberta Health for the time period 1990-1996 for the Regional Health Authorities of Northern Lights, where the only large population centre is Fort McMurray, and Mistahia. Age-adjusted aggregate injury rates were analyzed for evidence of an effect of the intervention. Severity was measured by proxy, using the number of diagnostic claims submitted for reimbursement for medical services in a given year. The communities differed in age-specific injury rates, with Fort McMurray showing higher rates for residents aged less than 55. Young adults and older adolescents showed higher levels of severity. Injury rates fell substantially and at similar rates in both communities over the five-year period. However, in both communities injury rates were already falling before the intervention in Fort McMurray began and continued to fall at about the same rate, slowing toward the end of the period. No evidence was found for an effect of the Project or for acceleration of the reduction in injury frequency in the intervention area. Over the period, fewer medical services were delivered in office settings and more in emergency rooms, in both

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  16. [Effect of Light Color Temperature on Human Concentration and Creativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitbrecht, W U; Bärwolff, H; Lischke, A; Jünger, S

    2015-06-01

    Light has different biological effects depending on the color temperature and intensity. This may be the reason for its differing effects. We investigated the influence of color temperature (3000 K, 4500 K, 6000 K) under constant high intensity (1000 Lux) on concentration and creativity of 50 students and employees of the Cologne University of Applied Sciences, Campus Gummersbach (age: 30.9 +/- 10.8y.). As test method we used d2-bq-test, creativity test (mean of the number of ideas on 5 themes), word test and logic test. In addition, test subjects were asked to evaluate their impression of light by means of a questionnaire. To exclude the circadian influence and learning effects on the result, we performed tests at the same time of the day using a random order of color temperature. We found that creativity was better under warm light (3000 K) than under colder light (4500 K, 6000 K). Concentration was best under cold light (6000 K). Under the same light intensity conditions, subjects judged blue light (6000 K) to be brighter than red light (3000 K).

  17. Effect of Aspect Ratio on the Light Output of Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Pauwels, Kristof; Gundacker, S.; Knapitsch, A.; Lecoq, P.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the geometry of the scintillators is presented in this paper. We focus on the effect of narrowing down the section of crystals that have a given length. The light output of a set of crystals with very similar scintillating properties but different geometries measured with several coupling/wrapping configurations is provided. We observe that crystals shaped in thin rods have a lower light output as compared to bulk or sliced crystals. The effect of unpolishing the crystal faces is also investigated, and it is shown that highest light outputs are not necessarily obtained with crystals having all faces polished. Simulation results based on a realistic model of the crystal that implements light scattering on the crystal edges are in agreement with the experimental data. Fine-tuning of this model would allow us to further explore the details of light propagation in scintillators and would be highly valuable to fast timing detection and highly granular detectors.

  18. The Effectiveness of Light Shelf in Tropical Urban Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binarti, Floriberta; Dewi, Sinta

    2016-12-01

    Light shelf was developed to create uniform indoor illuminance. However, in hot climates the unshaded clerestory above the shelf transmits high solar heat gain. In dense urban context, these advantages and disadvantages might vary regarding the context and position of the fenestration. This study employed an integrated energy simulation software to investigate the effectiveness of light shelf application in a tropical urban context in terms of building energy consumption. Radiance and EnergyPlus based simulations performed the effects of urban canyon aspect ratio and external surface albedo on the daylighting performances, space cooling load, as well as the lighting energy consumption of the building equipped with lightshelves in 2 humid tropical cities. Comparison of the energy performances of 3 fenestration systems, i.e. fenestration without any shading device, with overhangs, and with light shelves, yielded some recommendations concerning the best application of light shelf on the certain floor levels and aspect ratio of the urban context.

  19. White LEDs as broad spectrum light sources for spectrophotometry: demonstration in the visible spectrum range in a diode-array spectrophotometric detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Tomasz; Breadmore, Michael C; Macka, Mirek

    2010-11-01

    Although traditional lamps, such as deuterium lamps, are suitable for bench-top instrumentation, their compatibility with the requirements of modern miniaturized instrumentation is limited. This study investigates the option of utilizing solid-state light source technology, namely white LEDs, as a broad band spectrum source for spectrophotometry. Several white light LEDs of both RGB and white phosphorus have been characterized in terms of their emission spectra and energy output and a white phosphorus Luxeon LED was then chosen for demonstration as a light source for visible-spectrum spectrophotometry conducted in CE. The Luxeon LED was fixed onto the base of a dismounted deuterium (D(2) ) lamp so that the light-emitting spot was geometrically positioned exactly where the light-emitting spot of the original D(2) lamp is placed. In this manner, the detector of a commercial CE instrument equipped with a DAD was not modified in any way. As the detector hardware and electronics remained the same, the change of the deuterium lamp for the Luxeon white LED allowed a direct comparison of their performances. Several anionic dyes as model analytes with absorption maxima between 450 and 600 nm were separated by CE in an electrolyte of 0.01 mol/L sodium tetraborate. The absorbance baseline noise as the key parameter was 5 × lower for the white LED lamp, showing clearly superior performance to the deuterium lamp in the available, i.e. visible part of the spectrum.

  20. Hall Effect Thruster for High Power Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop a flight version of a high power Hall Effect thruster. While numerous high power Hall Effect thrusters have been demonstrated in the...

  1. The role of light in mediating the effects of ocean acidification on coral calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufault, Aaron M; Ninokawa, Aaron; Bramanti, Lorenzo; Cumbo, Vivian R; Fan, Tung-Yung; Edmunds, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    We tested the effect of light and PCO2 on the calcification and survival of Pocillopora damicornis recruits settled from larvae released in southern Taiwan. In March 2011, recruits were incubated at 31, 41, 70, 122 and 226 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) under ambient (493 μatm) and high PCO2 (878 μatm). After 5 days, calcification was measured gravimetrically and survivorship estimated as the number of living recruits. Calcification was affected by the interaction of PCO2 with light, and at 493 μatm PCO2 the response to light intensity resembled a positive parabola. At 878 μatm PCO2, the effect of light on calcification differed from that observed at 493 μatm PCO2, with the result that there were large differences in calcification between 493 μatm and 878 μatm PCO2 at intermediate light intensities (ca. 70 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), but similar rates of calcification at the highest and lowest light intensities. Survivorship was affected by light and PCO2, and was highest at 122 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) in both PCO2 treatments, but was unrelated to calcification. In June 2012 the experiment was repeated, and again the results suggested that exposure to high PCO2 decreased calcification of P. damicornis recruits at intermediate light intensities, but not at lower or higher intensities. Together, our findings demonstrate that the effect of PCO2 on coral recruits can be light dependent, with inhibitory effects of high PCO2 on calcification at intermediate light intensities that disappear at both higher and lower light intensities.

  2. Fibre Optical Parametric Amplification in Defect Bragg Fibres with Zero Dispersion Slow Light Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Li; ZHANG Wei; HUANG Yi-Dong; PENG Jiang-De; ZHAO Hong; YANG Ke-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Nonfinearity enhancement by slow light effect and strong light confinement in defect Bragg fibres is demonstrated and analysed in applications of fibre optical parametric amplifiers. Broadband low group velocity and zero dispersion as well as the strong light confinement by band gap enhances the nonlinear coefficient up to more than one order than the conventional high nonlinear fibres.Moreover,the zero dispersion wavelength of coupled core mode can be designed arbitrarily,under which the phase-matching bandwidth of the nonlinear process can be extended.

  3. Causality effects on accelerating light pulses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaminer, Ido; Lumer, Yaakov; Segev, Mordechai; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2011-01-01

    .... We explore the effects of causality, and find that, whereas decelerating pulses can asymptotically reach zero group velocity, pulses that accelerate towards infinite group velocity inevitably break...

  4. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  5. Stellar cooling bounds on new light particles: including plasma effects

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Strong constraints on the coupling of new light particles to the Standard Model (SM) arise from their production in the hot cores of stars, and the effects of this on stellar cooling. The large electron density in stellar cores significantly modifies the in-medium propagation of SM states. For new light particles which have an effective in-medium mixing with the photon, such plasma effects can result in parametrically different production rates to those obtained from a naive calculation. Taking these previously-neglected contributions into account, we make updated estimates for the stellar cooling bounds on a number of light new particle candidates. In particular, we improve the bounds on light (m < keV) scalars coupling to electrons or nucleons by up to 3 orders of magnitude in the coupling squared, significantly revise the supernova cooling bounds on dark photon couplings, and qualitatively change the mass dependence of stellar bounds on new vectors.

  6. Geometric Spin Hall Effect of Light at Polarizing Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Korger, Jan; Gabriel, Christian; Banzer, Peter; Kolb, Tobias; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    The geometric Spin Hall Effect of Light (geometric SHEL) amounts to a polarization-dependent positional shift when a light beam is observed from a reference frame tilted with respect to its direction of propagation. Motivated by this intriguing phenomenon, the energy density of the light beam is decomposed into its Cartesian components in the tilted reference frame. This illustrates the occurrence of the characteristic shift and the significance of the effective response function of the detector. We introduce the concept of a tilted polarizing interface and provide a scheme for its experimental implementation. A light beam passing through such an interface undergoes a shift resembling the original geometric SHEL in a tilted reference frame. This displacement is generated at the polarizer and its occurrence does not depend on the properties of the detection system. We give explicit results for this novel type of geometric SHEL and show that at grazing incidence this effect amounts to a displacement of multiple...

  7. Large Fizeau's light-dragging effect in a moving electromagnetically induced transparent medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Pei-Chen; Chan, Wei Sheng; Kosen, Sandoko; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most influential experiments on the development of modern macroscopic theory from Newtonian mechanics to Einstein's special theory of relativity, the phenomenon of light dragging in a moving medium has been discussed and observed extensively in different types of systems. To have a significant dragging effect, the long duration of light travelling in the medium is preferred. Here we demonstrate a light-dragging experiment in an electromagnetically induced transparent cold atomic ensemble and enhance the dragging effect by at least three orders of magnitude compared with the previous experiments. With a large enhancement of the dragging effect, we realize an atom-based velocimeter that has a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the velocity width of the atomic medium used. Such a demonstration could pave the way for motional sensing using the collective state of atoms in a room temperature vapour cell or solid state material.

  8. Large Fizeau's light-dragging effect in a moving electromagnetically induced transparent medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Pei-Chen; Huang, Chang; Chan, Wei Sheng; Kosen, Sandoko; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2016-10-01

    As one of the most influential experiments on the development of modern macroscopic theory from Newtonian mechanics to Einstein's special theory of relativity, the phenomenon of light dragging in a moving medium has been discussed and observed extensively in different types of systems. To have a significant dragging effect, the long duration of light travelling in the medium is preferred. Here we demonstrate a light-dragging experiment in an electromagnetically induced transparent cold atomic ensemble and enhance the dragging effect by at least three orders of magnitude compared with the previous experiments. With a large enhancement of the dragging effect, we realize an atom-based velocimeter that has a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the velocity width of the atomic medium used. Such a demonstration could pave the way for motional sensing using the collective state of atoms in a room temperature vapour cell or solid state material.

  9. Large Fizeau's light-dragging effect in a moving electromagnetically induced transparent medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Pei-Chen; Huang, Chang; Chan, Wei Sheng; Kosen, Sandoko; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2016-10-03

    As one of the most influential experiments on the development of modern macroscopic theory from Newtonian mechanics to Einstein's special theory of relativity, the phenomenon of light dragging in a moving medium has been discussed and observed extensively in different types of systems. To have a significant dragging effect, the long duration of light travelling in the medium is preferred. Here we demonstrate a light-dragging experiment in an electromagnetically induced transparent cold atomic ensemble and enhance the dragging effect by at least three orders of magnitude compared with the previous experiments. With a large enhancement of the dragging effect, we realize an atom-based velocimeter that has a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the velocity width of the atomic medium used. Such a demonstration could pave the way for motional sensing using the collective state of atoms in a room temperature vapour cell or solid state material.

  10. Effects of Light Intensity and Color on the Biomass, Extracellular Red Pigment, and Citrinin Production of Monascus ruber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liling; Dai, Yang; Chen, Wanping; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2016-12-21

    Light is a crucial environmental signal for fungi. In this work, the effects of different light intensities and colors on biomass, Monascus pigments (MPs) and citrinin production of Monascus ruber M7 were investigated. We have demonstrated that low intensity of blue light (500 lx) decreased Monascus biomass, increased MPs accumulation via upregulation of MpigA, MpigB, and MpigJ genes expression, but had no significant influence on citrinin production. High intensity of blue light (1500 lx) decreased citrinin accumulation but had no significant influence on biomass and MPs production after 14 days cultivation. Low intensity of green light (500 lx) stimulated citrinin production via upregulation of pksCT, mrl1, mrl2, and ctnA genes expression. One putative red light photoreceptor and two putative green light photoreceptors were identified in M. ruber M7. These observations will not only guide the practical production of Monascus but also contribute to our understanding light effects on Monascus.

  11. Effects of colored light-emitting diode illumination on behavior and performance of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber-Eicher, B; Suter, A; Spring-Stähli, P

    2013-04-01

    The best method for lighting poultry houses has been an issue for many decades, generating much interest in any new systems that become available. Poultry farmers are now increasingly using colored LED (light-emitting diodes) to illuminate hen houses (e.g., in Germany, Austria, the Netherlands, and England). In Switzerland all newly installed systems are now equipped with LED, preferably green ones. The LED give monochromatic light from different wavelengths and have several advantages over conventional illuminants, including high energy efficiency, long life, high reliability, and low maintenance costs. The following study examines the effects of illumination with white, red, and green LED on behavior and production parameters of laying hens. Light intensities in the 3 treatments were adjusted to be perceived by hens as equal. Twenty-four groups of 25 laying hens were kept in identical compartments (5.0 × 3.3 m) equipped with a litter area, raised perches, feed and drinking facilities, and nest boxes. Initially, they were kept under white LED for a 2-wk adaptation period. For the next 4 wk, 8 randomly chosen compartments were lit with red LED (640 nm) and 8 others with green LED (520 nm). Behavior was monitored during the last 2 wk of the trial. Additionally weight gain, feed consumption, onset of lay, and laying performance were recorded. The results showed minor effects of green light on explorative behavior, whereas red light reduced aggressiveness compared with white light. The accelerating effect of red light on sexual development of laying hens was confirmed, and the trial demonstrated that this effect was due to the specific wavelength and not the intensity of light. However, an additional effect of light intensity may exist and should not be excluded.

  12. Effects of monochromatic light on quality properties and antioxidation of meat in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Y Y; Liu, W J; Wang, Z X; Chen, Y X

    2011-11-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that blue monochromatic light was better to promote the growth and development of broilers than red light. However, consumer research suggests that the eating quality of the meat is more important. The present study was, therefore, designed to further evaluate the effects of various monochromatic lights on the muscle growth and quality properties and antioxidation of meat. A total of 288 newly hatched Arbor Acre male broilers were exposed to blue light (BL), green light (GL), red light (RL), and white light (WL) by a light-emitting diode system for 49 d, respectively. Results showed that the broilers reared under BL significantly increased BW and carcass yield as compared with RL, WL, and GL (P 0.05). Compared with RL, the muscles of breast and thigh in GL and BL had higher pH, water-holding capacity, and protein content, whereas cooking loss, lightness value, shear value, and fat content were lower (P 0.05). These results suggest that BL better improves meat quality of Arbor Acre broilers by elevating antioxidative capacity than does RL.

  13. Effect of coagulation on laser light distribution in myocardial tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Ramtin; Sheth, Devang; Motamedi, Massoud

    1991-05-01

    The changes in total reflection and transmission of porcine myocardium due to thermal coagulation were measured during tissue heating in a temperature-controlled water bath, at different temperature ranging between 54 degree(s)-63 degree(s)C. At 633 nm, the measurements yield a picture of continuous decrease in transmission and a peak with a subsequent fall (approximately 10% from the peak) in reflection measurements of the tissue during coagulation process. Utilizing these measurements and an inverse solution to the radiative transfer equation, the optical properties of tissue, absorption, (mu)a, and effective scattering, (mu)s=(mu)s(1-g) were calculated. A one-dimensional diffusion approximation was used to demonstrate the effects of thermally induced changes in the optical properties of tissue on light distribution in tissue. The pattern of changes in (mu)a and (mu)s seem to indicate that several simultaneous rate processes may be responsible for tissue coagulation. A postulate is put forward to use one such rate process to characterize threshold thermal damage to porcine myocardium and the accompanying protein denaturation.

  14. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Light Interception and Light Extinction Coefficient in Different Wheat Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Samadiyan

    2016-07-01

    amount of a third off chemical fertilizer of urea, 46 % Nitrogen was given to the plant and two third by the end of clawing the plot. In the period of growing in order to control brushes 2, 4, D herbicide and Fenitrothion insecticidal was used for countering the louse pest and other insects. In the laboratory, leaf area was measured using scanner and 4.Image 0.2 software program. To determine changes of growth indices, regression relations were used. Total dry matter, leaf area index, net assimilation rate, crop growth rate, light interception extinction were measured. Results and Discussion The results showed that the effects of N fertilizilation were significant on the maximum leaf area index, total dry matter and light interception percent were related to Pishtaz cultivar and 150 kg N ha-1 fertilizer treatment significantly resulted Maximum light interception percent, net assimilation rate, with other treatments. Effects of cultivar were significant on maximum light absorption. The Maximum absorption of light, crop growth rate, total dry matter was related to Pishtaz. The interaction between nitrogen and the harvest index was significant at the five percent level. The evidence showed that higher light interception in plants, is associated with the higher performance of plant. The increase of light interception promote the biological and economic performance. Conclusions The results showed that application of 150 kg nitrogen per hectare, with the highest level of leaf area index and higher light absorption caused higher extinction coefficient of light in the canopy. Nitrogen fertilizer consumption increased light absorption by leaves, therefore the light extinction coefficient consuming more nitrogen in the plant community. The Maximum absorption of light, crop growth rate, total dry matter was related to pishtaz. Scale of light extinction coefficient for fertilizer treatment control, 50, 100, 150 kg ha-1, was 0.4675, 0.4794, 0.4858 and 0.495, respectively and for

  15. EFFECTS OF LIGHT WAVELENGTHS AND COHERENCE ON BASIDIOSPORES GERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Poyedinok

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of light wavelengths and coherence on basidiospore germination of Agaricus bisporus, Flammulina velutipes, Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma lucidum, Hericium erinaceus, Lentinus edodes and Pleurotus ostreatus have been studied. Short-term low-intensity irradiation by coherent (laser light wavelength 488.0 nm and 632.8 nm at doses 45 and 230 mJ/cm2 has significantly increased the number of germinated basidiospores. It has established that there are differences in the photosensitivity not only between species but also between strains. Spores irradiation by 514.5 nm light has been either neutral or inhibitory. A comparative analysis of basidiospores sensitivity to laser and LED light has also been conducted. To stimulate germination of basidiospores and growth of monokaryons the most suitable solution was to use red coherent and incoherent light of 632.8 nm and 660,0 nm for A. bisporus, G. applanatum and P. ostreatus, red and blue coherent light of 632.8 nm and 488,0 nm for F. velutipes, and both red and blue laser and LED light G. lucidum and H. erinaceus and for L. edodes. No essential difference of a continuous wave mode and intermittent mode light effect at the same doses and wavelength on spore germination were revealed. Light influence has reduced germination time and formation of aerial mycelium on agar medium as compared to the original value and increased the growth rate of monosporous isolates. Characterization of basidiospores photosensitivity and development of environmentally friendly stimulating methods of their germination is important for creating highly effective technologies of mushrooms selection and cultivation.

  16. Effect of pulsed light on structure and immunoreactivity of gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panozzo, Agnese; Manzocco, Lara; Lippe, Giovanna; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The effect of pulsed light (from 1.75 to 26.25Jcm(-2)) on selected properties of wheat gluten powder and aqueous suspension (absorbance, particle size and microstructure, free sulfhydryl content, protein fractions, protein electrophoretic mobility and immunoreactivity) was investigated. Gluten photoreactivity was strongly affected by hydration. While minor photo-induced structure modifications were observed in gluten powder, pulsed light induced the development of browning and promoted partial depolymerisation of hydrated gluten proteins by disulphide exchange. These changes were associated with a significant decrease in immunoreactivity, suggesting that pulsed light could be exploited to efficiently modify structure and thus functionality of gluten.

  17. Widely tunable microwave photonic notch filter based on slow and fast light effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Mørk, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    A continuously tunable microwave photonic notch filter at around 30 GHz is experimentally demonstrated and 100% fractional tuning over 360 range is achieved without changing the shape of the spectral response. The tuning mechanism is based on the use of slow and fast light effects in semiconductor...

  18. Effects of cellular fine structure on scattered light pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Caigen; Capjack, Clarence E

    2006-06-01

    Biological cells are complex in both morphological and biochemical structure. The effects of cellular fine structure on light scattered from cells are studied by employing a three-dimensional code named AETHER which solves the full set of Maxwell equations by using the finite-difference time-domain method. It is shown that changes in cellular fine structure can cause significant changes in the scattered light pattern over particular scattering angles. These changes potentially provide the possibility for distinguishability of cellular intrastructures. The effects that features of different intrastructure have on scattered light are discussed from the viewpoint of diagnosing cellular fine structure. Finally, we discuss scattered light patterns for lymphocyte-like cells and basophil-like cells.

  19. Synergetic Effect between Lighting Efficiency Enhancement and Building Energy Reduction Using Alternative Thermal Operating System of Indoor LED Lighting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byung-Lip Ahn; Ji-Woo Park; Seunghwan Yoo; Jonghun Kim; Hakgeun Jeong; Seung-Bok Leigh; Cheol-Yong Jang

    2015-01-01

      We investigated the synergetic effect between light-emitting diode (LED) lighting efficiency and building energy savings in heating and cooling using an alternative thermal operating system (ATOS...

  20. The effects of light on man and other mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The present article describes the best-studied extravisual effects of visible and ultraviolet light on humans and other mammals. It also considers the possible biological consequences to man of living in artificially lighted environments that differ significantly from the milieu in which he evolved. Cumulative evidence favors the beneficial influences of sunlight: vitamin D activation, plasma bilirubin elimination, inhibition of pineal melatonin synthesis, etc.

  1. Pulsing blue light through closed eyelids: effects on acute melatonin suppression and phase shifting of dim light melatonin onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro, Barbara Plitnick, Mark S Rea Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA Abstract: Circadian rhythm disturbances parallel the increased prevalence of sleep disorders in older adults. Light therapies that specifically target regulation of the circadian system in principle could be used to treat sleep disorders in this population. Current recommendations for light treatment require the patients to sit in front of a bright light box for at least 1 hour daily, perhaps limiting their willingness to comply. Light applied through closed eyelids during sleep might not only be efficacious for changing circadian phase but also lead to better compliance because patients would receive light treatment while sleeping. Reported here are the results of two studies investigating the impact of a train of 480 nm (blue light pulses presented to the retina through closed eyelids on melatonin suppression (laboratory study and on delaying circadian phase (field study. Both studies employed a sleep mask that provided narrowband blue light pulses of 2-second duration every 30 seconds from arrays of light-emitting diodes. The results of the laboratory study demonstrated that the blue light pulses significantly suppressed melatonin by an amount similar to that previously shown in the same protocol at half the frequency (ie, one 2-second pulse every minute for 1 hour. The results of the field study demonstrated that blue light pulses given early in the sleep episode significantly delayed circadian phase in older adults; these results are the first to demonstrate the efficacy and practicality of light treatment by a sleep mask aimed at adjusting circadian phase in a home setting. Keywords: circadian phase, dim light melatonin onset, light through closed eyelids, blue light, sleep

  2. Dopamine and light: effects on facial emotion recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Elizabeth; Tippler, Maria; Coupland, Nicholas J; Benkelfat, Chawki; Boivin, Diane B; Aan Het Rot, Marije; Leyton, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Bright light can affect mood states and social behaviours. Here, we tested potential interacting effects of light and dopamine on facial emotion recognition. Participants were 32 women with subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder tested in either a bright (3000 lux) or dim light (10 lux) environment. Each participant completed two test days, one following the ingestion of a phenylalanine/tyrosine-deficient mixture and one with a nutritionally balanced control mixture, both administered double blind in a randomised order. Approximately four hours post-ingestion participants completed a self-report measure of mood followed by a facial emotion recognition task. All testing took place between November and March when seasonal symptoms would be present. Following acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD), compared to the nutritionally balanced control mixture, participants in the dim light condition were more accurate at recognising sad faces, less likely to misclassify them, and faster at responding to them, effects that were independent of changes in mood. Effects of APTD on responses to sad faces in the bright light group were less consistent. There were no APTD effects on responses to other emotions, with one exception: a significant light × mixture interaction was seen for the reaction time to fear, but the pattern of effect was not predicted a priori or seen on other measures. Together, the results suggest that the processing of sad emotional stimuli might be greater when dopamine transmission is low. Bright light exposure, used for the treatment of both seasonal and non-seasonal mood disorders, might produce some of its benefits by preventing this effect.

  3. Finding science is fun in a 'Magic Show of Light' from Optical Demonstrations on an Overhead Projector for elementary school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lones, Joe J.; Maltseva, Nadezhda K.; Peterson, Kurt N.

    2007-09-01

    We seek methods of stimulating young school children to develop an interest in science and engineering through a natural curiosity for the reaction of light. Science learning now begins fully at middle school. Reading skills develop with activity at home and progress through the elementary school curriculum, and in a like manner, a curious interest in science also should begin at that stage of life. Within the ranks of educators, knowledge of optical science needs to be presented to elementary school students in an entertaining manner. One such program used by the authors is Doug Goodman's Optics Demonstrations With the Overhead Projector, co-published by and available from OSA (Optical Society of America) and SPIE-The International Society of Optical Engineering. These demonstrations have been presented in middle and high schools; however, as a special approach, the authors have developed selected Goodman demonstrations as a "Magic Show of Light" for elementary schools. Teachers in the U.S. are overloaded with classroom instruction specifically targeted at improving reading and math scores on the Standard Achievement Test (SAT); therefore, science is getting "short changed" in the education system. For the sake of our future, industry volunteers must come forward to promote interest in science beginning with K-6.

  4. Effect of light emission on polymerization of luting resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Indirect esthetic restorations have recently gained popularity, and choosing suitable cement is"nan important concern in this regard. A wide variety of resin cements with different curing models:"n(chemical, light, dual, have been introduced to the profession, and among them the dual systems are"nclaimed to be able to continue polymerization after stopping the light. In order to study and compare the"npolymerization process of different curing systems, this research was performed."nThe present study measured the degree of conversion (DC of three types of resin cements: a self cured,"na light cured and a dual cured cement. The samples were prepared as follows:"n1-The self cured samples were made according to the manufacturer."n2-The light cured samples were exposed to the curing light for 60 seconds, through a 2 mm thick wafer"nof porcelain."n3- The dual cured samples were divided into 2 groups. The first was lighted similar to the light cured"nsamples, and the second did not receive any light."nThe degree of polymerization was measured by FTIR at time levels of 5, 10,20,30,45,60 minutes and 24"nhours post mixing. The infrared spectrum of the samples were recorded and degree of conversion were"ndetermined. The results demonstrated an increase in mean DC of all groups at post mixing time, but this"nwas significant only in the lighted dual cured cement (PO.05. The light cure resin showed high DC at"nthe base line time (5min. At the end of 60 minutes, the self cure resin had the most DC. The unlighted"ndual cement had a very low DC and didn't improve in polymerization during the post mixing controls."nThe lighted dual cement had a significant improve in curing at post mixing times, and it was"nsignificantly different from unlighted dual cement. So the dual cure cement needs to receive sufficient"nlight energy to initiate the curing process and the chemical component of this cement could not improve"nthe DC completely."nAfter 24 hours migration

  5. Nanomechanical effects of light unveil photons momentum in medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Chaudhary, Komal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2017-01-01

    Precision measurement on momentum transfer between light and fluid interface has many implications including resolving the intriguing nature of photons momentum in a medium. For example, the existence of Abraham pressure of light under specific experimental configuration and the predictions of Chau-Amperian formalism of optical momentum for TE and TM polarizations remain untested. Here, we quantitatively and cleanly measure nanomehanical dynamics of water surface excited by radiation pressure of a laser beam. We systematically scanned wide range of experimental parameters including long exposure times, angle of incidence, spot size and laser polarization, and used two independent pump-probe techniques to validate a nano- bump on the water surface under all the tested conditions, in quantitative agreement with the Minkowski’s momentum of light. With careful experiments, we demonstrate advantages and limitations of nanometer resolved optical probing techniques and narrow down actual manifestation of optical momentum in a medium. PMID:28198468

  6. Nanomechanical effects of light unveil photons momentum in medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Chaudhary, Komal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2017-02-01

    Precision measurement on momentum transfer between light and fluid interface has many implications including resolving the intriguing nature of photons momentum in a medium. For example, the existence of Abraham pressure of light under specific experimental configuration and the predictions of Chau-Amperian formalism of optical momentum for TE and TM polarizations remain untested. Here, we quantitatively and cleanly measure nanomehanical dynamics of water surface excited by radiation pressure of a laser beam. We systematically scanned wide range of experimental parameters including long exposure times, angle of incidence, spot size and laser polarization, and used two independent pump-probe techniques to validate a nano- bump on the water surface under all the tested conditions, in quantitative agreement with the Minkowski’s momentum of light. With careful experiments, we demonstrate advantages and limitations of nanometer resolved optical probing techniques and narrow down actual manifestation of optical momentum in a medium.

  7. Effect of Light on Flavonoids Biosynthesis in Red Rice Rdh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Lei; DONG Bao-cheng; YANG Xiao-ji; HUANG Cheng-bin; WANG Xu-dong; WU Xian-jun

    2009-01-01

    The effect of light on flavonoids biosynthesis in red rice Rdh was studied.The panicles of red rice Rdh produced colorless caryopses after darkness treatment;and these colorless caryopses displayed bright-red after vanillin treatment,but did not display red color after light inducing for 15 days,suggesting that red rice Rdh could produce leucoanthocyanidin,but could not produce polyproanthocyanidins in darkness.Histological study revealed that the aleurone layers of Rdh colorless caryopses displayed bright-red after vanillin assay,but the pericarp and seed coat layers did not display color change,which indicated that the aleurone layers could accumulate precursors of polyproanthocyanidins in darkness,but the pericarp and seed coat could not.Additionally,color ofRdh caryopses changed from green in immaturity to red in maturity,and the green caryopses changed color from green to red gradually indoor for 7 days after harvest,suggesting that leucoanthocyanidins could synthesize polyproanthocyanidins.It was concluded that light was necessary for red pigment biosynthesis in red rice Rdh,leucoanthocyanidins biosyntheses in the aleurone layers did not need light,leucoanthocyanidins biosynthesis in pericarp and seed coat needed light inducing,the effect of leucoanthocyanidin biosynthesis in Rdh to light had tissue specificity.

  8. Photoregulation of Anthocyanin Synthesis : VIII. Effect of Light Pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, A L

    1984-06-01

    A comparative study of the spectral sensitivity of anthocyanin production in dark-grown and light-pretreated systems was carried out in Brassica oleracea L., Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., Secale cereale L. and Spirodela polyrrhiza L. Light pretreatments bring about an enhancement of the inductive, red-far red reversible response in all systems, a decrease of the continuous irradiation response in cabbage, rye, and tomato seedlings, and an enhancement of the continuous irradiation response in cabbage leaf disks. Light pretreatments also bring about a marked change in the spectral sensitivity of the continuous irradiation response. The different effect of light pretreatments on the photosensitivity of the response to short and long wavelength irradiations suggests that two photoreceptors, phytochrome and cryptochrome, may be involved in the photoregulation of anthocyanin production.

  9. Effects of Traffic Lights on CA Traffic Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SuweiFENG; GuoqingGU

    1997-01-01

    Cellular automaton traffic models can include various factors in traffic system with simple regulations and the corresponding computations and simulations are rather convenient and effective.In this paper,the Biham-Middleton-Levine model(briefly saying the BML model)is improved by removing its limitation of synchronized change of traffic lights.In new model,the traffic light at each crossing could arbitrarily change its starting time and tempo of variation and hence the model could more realistically describe the influence of traffic lights on the performance of traffic systems.The cases of traffic light with unsynchronized starting time and different tempo of variation are simulated in this paper.

  10. Algorithm to illustrate context using dynamic lighting effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Roshy M.; Balasubramanian, T.

    2007-09-01

    With the invention of Ultra-Bright LED, solid state lighting has come to something which is much more efficient and energy saving when compared to conventional incandescent or fluorescent lighting. With the use of proper driver electronics now a days it is possible to install solid state lighting systems with the cost same as that of any other lighting technology. This paper is a part of the research project we are doing in our lab, which deals with using ultra bright LEDs of different colors for lighting applications. The driver electronics are made in such a way that, the color and brightness of the lights will change according to context. For instance, if one of the users is reading a story or listening to music in a Personal Computer or in a hand held device such as a PDA, the lighting systems and the HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air-conditioning) systems will change dramatically according to the content of the story or the music. The vulnerability of solid-state lighting helps to accomplish such an effect. Such a type of system will help the reader to feel the story mentally and physically as well. We developed complete driver electronics for the system using multiple microcomputers and a full software suite which uses complex algorithms to decode the context from text or music and synchronize it to lighting and HVAC information. The paper also presents some case-study statistics which shows the advantage of using the system to teach kindergarten children, deaf and dumb children and for language learning classes.

  11. Does bright light have an anxiolytic effect? - an open trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kripke Daniel F

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this open trial was to examine the influence of acute bright light exposure on anxiety in older and young adults. Methods This study was ancillary to a complex 5-day laboratory experiment testing phase-responses to light at all times of the day. On 3 consecutive days, participants were exposed to bright light (3,000 lux for 3 hours. The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Form Y1 was administered 5 minutes before and 20 minutes after each treatment. Mean state anxiety before and after treatment were analyzed by age, sex, and time ANOVA. To avoid floor effects, only participants with baseline STAI levels of ≥ 25 were included. Results A significant anxiolytic effect of bright light was found for the mean data, as well as for each of the three days. No significant main effect of age, sex, or interaction of these factors with STAI change were found. Conclusion The results show consistent and significant (albeit modest anxiolytic effects following acute bright light exposure in low anxiety adults. Further randomized, controlled trials in clinically anxious individuals are needed.

  12. Photodynamic effect of light-emitting diode light on cell growth inhibition induced by methylene blue

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lílian S Peloi; Rafael R S Soares; Carlos E G Biondo; Vagner R Souza; Noboru Hioka; Elza Kimura

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to propose the use of red light-emitting diode (LED) as an alternative light source for methylene blue (MB) photosensitizing effect in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Its effectiveness was tested against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 26923), Escherichia coli (ATCC 26922), Candida albicans (ATCC 90028) and Artemia salina. The maximum absorption of the LED lamps was at a wavelength of 663 nm, at intensities of 2, 4, 6 and 12 J.cm–2 for 10, 20, 30 and 60 min of exposure, respectively. Assays with and without LED exposure were carried out in plates containing MB at concentrations of 7 to 140.8 M for microorganisms and 13.35 to 668.5 M for microorganisms or microcrustaceans. The LED exposure induced more than 93.05%, 93.7% and 93.33% of growth inhibition for concentrations of 42.2 M for S. aureus (D-value=12.05 min) and 35.2 M for E. coli (D-value=11.51 min) and C. albicans (D-value=12.18 min), respectively after 20 min of exposure. LED exposure for 1 h increased the cytotoxic effect of MB against A. salina from 27% to 75%. Red LED is a promising light device for PDT that can effectively inhibit bacteria, yeast and microcrustacean growth.

  13. Observation of the geometric spin Hall effect of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korger, Jan; Aiello, Andrea; Chille, Vanessa; Banzer, Peter; Wittmann, Christoffer; Lindlein, Norbert; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-03-21

    The spin Hall effect of light (SHEL) is the photonic analogue of the spin Hall effect occurring for charge carriers in solid-state systems. This intriguing phenomenon manifests itself when a light beam refracts at an air-glass interface (conventional SHEL) or when it is projected onto an oblique plane, the latter effect being known as the geometric SHEL. It amounts to a polarization-dependent displacement perpendicular to the plane of incidence. In this work, we experimentally investigate the geometric SHEL for a light beam transmitted across an oblique polarizer. We find that the spatial intensity distribution of the transmitted beam depends on the incident state of polarization and its centroid undergoes a positional displacement exceeding one wavelength. This novel phenomenon is virtually independent from the material properties of the polarizer and, thus, reveals universal features of spin-orbit coupling.

  14. Time Effectiveness of Ultraviolet C Light (UVC Emitted by Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs in Reducing Stethoscope Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Messina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Today it is well demonstrated that stethoscopes can be as contaminated as hands, which are a recognized source of Health-Care Associated Infections (HCAIs. Ultraviolet C (UVC light has proven disinfection capacity and the innovative UVC technology of Light Emitting Diode (LED shows several potential benefits. To verify whether the use of UVC LEDs is effective and reliable in stethoscope membrane disinfection after prolonged use, a pre-post intervention study was conducted. A total of 1668 five-minute cycles were performed on two UVC LEDs to simulate their use; thereafter, their disinfection capacity was tested on stethoscope membranes used on a previously auscultated volunteer. Then, a further 1249 cycles were run and finally the LEDs were tested to assess performance in reducing experimental contamination by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli on the stethoscope membrane. Baseline volunteer contamination identified 104 Colony Forming Units (CFUs while treated Petri dishes had 12 and 15 CFUs (p < 0.001. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.001 were also found relating to the reduction of specific bacteria: in particular, after treatment no CFU were observed for S. aureus and E. coli. UVC LEDs demonstrated the capacity to maintain high levels of disinfection after more than 240 h of use and they were effective against common microorganisms that are causative agents of HCAIs.

  15. Time Effectiveness of Ultraviolet C Light (UVC) Emitted by Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in Reducing Stethoscope Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Gabriele; Fattorini, Mattia; Nante, Nicola; Rosadini, Daniele; Serafini, Andrea; Tani, Marco; Cevenini, Gabriele

    2016-09-23

    Today it is well demonstrated that stethoscopes can be as contaminated as hands, which are a recognized source of Health-Care Associated Infections (HCAIs). Ultraviolet C (UVC) light has proven disinfection capacity and the innovative UVC technology of Light Emitting Diode (LED) shows several potential benefits. To verify whether the use of UVC LEDs is effective and reliable in stethoscope membrane disinfection after prolonged use, a pre-post intervention study was conducted. A total of 1668 five-minute cycles were performed on two UVC LEDs to simulate their use; thereafter, their disinfection capacity was tested on stethoscope membranes used on a previously auscultated volunteer. Then, a further 1249 cycles were run and finally the LEDs were tested to assess performance in reducing experimental contamination by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli on the stethoscope membrane. Baseline volunteer contamination identified 104 Colony Forming Units (CFUs) while treated Petri dishes had 12 and 15 CFUs (p LEDs demonstrated the capacity to maintain high levels of disinfection after more than 240 h of use and they were effective against common microorganisms that are causative agents of HCAIs.

  16. Time Effectiveness of Ultraviolet C Light (UVC) Emitted by Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in Reducing Stethoscope Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Gabriele; Fattorini, Mattia; Nante, Nicola; Rosadini, Daniele; Serafini, Andrea; Tani, Marco; Cevenini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Today it is well demonstrated that stethoscopes can be as contaminated as hands, which are a recognized source of Health-Care Associated Infections (HCAIs). Ultraviolet C (UVC) light has proven disinfection capacity and the innovative UVC technology of Light Emitting Diode (LED) shows several potential benefits. To verify whether the use of UVC LEDs is effective and reliable in stethoscope membrane disinfection after prolonged use, a pre-post intervention study was conducted. A total of 1668 five-minute cycles were performed on two UVC LEDs to simulate their use; thereafter, their disinfection capacity was tested on stethoscope membranes used on a previously auscultated volunteer. Then, a further 1249 cycles were run and finally the LEDs were tested to assess performance in reducing experimental contamination by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli on the stethoscope membrane. Baseline volunteer contamination identified 104 Colony Forming Units (CFUs) while treated Petri dishes had 12 and 15 CFUs (p < 0.001). Statistically significant differences (p < 0.001) were also found relating to the reduction of specific bacteria: in particular, after treatment no CFU were observed for S. aureus and E. coli. UVC LEDs demonstrated the capacity to maintain high levels of disinfection after more than 240 h of use and they were effective against common microorganisms that are causative agents of HCAIs. PMID:27669273

  17. Experimental Effective Intensity of Steady and Flashing Light Emitting Diodes for Aircraft Anti-Collision Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Human Factors Division, (ANG-C1). The authors of this paper acknowledge the support of Dr. Yoshi Ohno of the National Institute of Standards and...and analytically ( Ohno & Couzin, 2002) for use with LEDs. In addition, other models have been proposed as alternatives for measuring the effective...intensity of a pulsed light source such as the Allard method (Allard, 1876) and the form-factor method (Schmidt-Clausen, 1968). Ohno and Couzin (2002

  18. Stretched Lens Array (SLA) for Collection and Conversion of Infrared Laser Light: 45% Efficiency Demonstrated for Near-Term 800 W/kg Space Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Mark; Howell, Joe; Fikes, John; Fork, Richard; Phillips, Dane; Aiken, Dan; McDanal, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    For the past 2% years, our team has been developing a unique photovoltaic concentrator array for collection and conversion of infrared laser light. This laser-receiving array has evolved from the solar-receiving Stretched Lens Array (SLA). The laser-receiving version of SLA is being developed for space power applications when or where sunlight is not available (e.g., the eternally dark lunar polar craters). The laser-receiving SLA can efficiently collect and convert beamed laser power from orbiting spacecraft or other sources (e.g., solar-powered lasers on the permanently illuminated ridges of lunar polar craters). A dual-use version of SLA can produce power from sunlight during sunlit portions of the mission, and from beamed laser light during dark portions of the mission. SLA minimizes the cost and mass of photovoltaic cells by using gossamer-like Fresnel lenses to capture and focus incoming light (solar or laser) by a factor of 8.5X, thereby providing a cost-effective, ultra-light space power system.

  19. Protective effect of light emitting diode phototherapy on fluorescent light induced retinal damage in Wistar strain albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed Basha, A; Mathangi, D C; Shyamala, R; Ramesh Rao, K

    2014-09-01

    Artificial light at night alters retinal physiology. Several studies have shown that light emitting diode phototherapy protects the retina from the damaging effects of acute light exposure. The aim of this study has been to elucidate the protective effects of 670 nm LED light on retinal damage induced by chronic fluorescent light in Wistar rats. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups: group 1 were control (CL), group 2, 3 and 4 were exposed to fluorescent light (FL), LED preexposure+fluorescent light exposure (LL) and only LED light exposure (OL) respectively. All animals were maintained in their specific exposure regime for 30 days. Fluorescent light of 1800 lx was exposed between 8 pm to 8 am. Rats were exposed to therapeutic LED light of 670 nm of 9 J/cm2 at 25 mW/cm2 for 6 min duration. Histopathological changes in the retina were studied. Animals of the FL group showed a significant reduction in the outer nuclear layer thickness and cell count in addition to the total thickness of the retina. LL group which were exposed to 670 nm LED prior to exposure to fluorescent light showed a significant decrease in the degree of damage. 670 nm LED light preexposure is protective to retinal cells against fluorescent light-induced damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durović, Aleksandar; Marić, Dragan; Brdareski, Zorica; Jevtić, Miodrag; Durdević, Slavisa

    2008-12-01

    Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E) were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C). A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80 +/- 19.18; C: 22,97 +/- 25,47; p = 0.0005), rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90 +/- 2.48; C: 8.6 +/- 1.05; p = 0.0005) and total PUSH score (E: 7.35 +/- 3.17; C: 11.85 +/- 2.35; p = 0,0003). The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  1. The effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Neglecting polarized light as an adjuvant therapy for pressure ulcers and methodology distinctions in the trials engaging polarized light are the reasons for many dilemmas and contradictions. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of polarized light therapy in pressure ulcer healing. Methods. This prospective randomized single-blind study involved 40 patients with stage I-III of pressure ulcer. The patients in the experimental group (E were subjected, besides polarized light therapy, to standard wound cleaning and dressing. Standard wound cleaning and dressing were the only treatment used in the control group (C. A polarized light source was a Bioptron lamp. Polarized light therapy was applied for six min daily, five times a week, four weeks. The Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH was used in the assessment of outcome. Statistic analysis included Mann Whitney Test, Fisher Exact Test, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Results. There were significant differences between the groups at the end of the treatment regarding the surface of pressure ulcer (E: 10.80±19.18; C: 22,97±25,47; p = 0.0005, rank of pressure ulcer (E: 5.90±2.48; C: 8.6±1.05; p = 0.0005 and total PUSH score (E: 7.35±3.17; C: 11.85±2.35; p = 0,0003. The patients in the experimental group had significantly better values of the parameters monitored than the patients in the control group. Conclusion. After a four-week polarized light therapy 20 patients with stage I-III ulcer had significant improvement in pressure ulcer healing, so it could be useful to apply polarized light in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  2. The Effects of Improper Lighting on Professional Astronomical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Patat, F

    2010-01-01

    Europe and a number of countries in the world are investing significant amounts of public money to operate and maintain large, ground-based astronomical facilities. Even larger projects are under development to observe the faintest and most remote astrophysical sources in the universe. As of today, on the planet there are very few sites that satisfy all the demanding criteria for such sensitive and expensive equipment, including a low level of light pollution. Because of the uncontrolled growth of incorrect illumination, even these protected and usually remote sites are at risk. Although the reasons for intelligent lighting reside in energy saving and environmental effects, the impact on scientific research cannot be neglected or underestimated, because of its high cultural value for the progress of the whole mankind. After setting the stage, in this paper I review the effects of improper lighting on professional optical and near-UV astronomical data, and discuss the possible solutions to both preserve the ni...

  3. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusai Baroudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system. Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching.

  4. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Stason

    Full Text Available Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or head.The demonstration was conducted in 2005-2007 in selected counties of Illinois, Iowa, and Virginia and the entire states of Maine and New Mexico. Medicare claims were compiled for the preceding year and two demonstration years for the demonstration areas and matched comparison areas. The impact of the demonstration was analyzed through multivariate regression analysis with a difference-in-difference framework.Expanded coverage increased Medicare expenditures by $50 million or 28.5% in users of chiropractic services and by $114 million or 10.4% in all patients treated for NMS conditions in demonstration areas during the two-year period. Results varied widely among demonstration areas ranging from increased costs per user of $485 in Northern Illinois and Chicago counties to decreases in costs per user of $59 in New Mexico and $178 in Scott County, Iowa.The demonstration did not assess possible decreases in costs to other insurers, out-of-pocket payments by patients, the need for and costs of pain medications, or longer term clinical benefits such as avoidance of orthopedic surgical procedures beyond the two-year period of the demonstration. It is possible that other payers or beneficiaries saved money during the demonstration while costs to Medicare were increased.

  5. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stason, William B; Ritter, Grant A; Martin, Timothy; Prottas, Jeffrey; Tompkins, Christopher; Shepard, Donald S

    2016-01-01

    Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or head. The demonstration was conducted in 2005-2007 in selected counties of Illinois, Iowa, and Virginia and the entire states of Maine and New Mexico. Medicare claims were compiled for the preceding year and two demonstration years for the demonstration areas and matched comparison areas. The impact of the demonstration was analyzed through multivariate regression analysis with a difference-in-difference framework. Expanded coverage increased Medicare expenditures by $50 million or 28.5% in users of chiropractic services and by $114 million or 10.4% in all patients treated for NMS conditions in demonstration areas during the two-year period. Results varied widely among demonstration areas ranging from increased costs per user of $485 in Northern Illinois and Chicago counties to decreases in costs per user of $59 in New Mexico and $178 in Scott County, Iowa. The demonstration did not assess possible decreases in costs to other insurers, out-of-pocket payments by patients, the need for and costs of pain medications, or longer term clinical benefits such as avoidance of orthopedic surgical procedures beyond the two-year period of the demonstration. It is possible that other payers or beneficiaries saved money during the demonstration while costs to Medicare were increased.

  6. Light Quark Mass Effects in Bottom Quark Mass Determinations

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, A. H.

    2001-01-01

    Recent results for charm quark mass effects in perturbative bottom quark mass determinations from $\\Upsilon$ mesons are reviewed. The connection between the behavior of light quark mass corrections and the infrared sensitivity of some bottom quark mass definitions is examined in some detail.

  7. THE EFFECT OF LIGHT, TEMPERATURE AND DESICCATION ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    wheat and barley varieties, Celekcia KN11 which were sown under various environmental ... physiological process taking place in a living organism, .... Table 1: The effect of light on Poly A++ mRNA yield from winter and spring wheat at 20 0C.

  8. On acceleration dependence of Doppler effect in light

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay M Wagh

    2013-09-01

    Using only the geometric relationships of suitable locations, we analyse Doppler effect in light to show how the acceleration of the source also contributes to the Doppler shift. We further propose that an experiment be performed using cyclotron-type devices to determine the acceleration dependence of the Doppler shift.

  9. Light scattering of PMMA latex particles in benzene: structural effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, E.A.; Vrij, A.

    1979-01-01

    Intra- and interparticle structural effects were studied in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) latex dispersions in a nonpolar solvent with the technique of light scattering. The required transparency of the dispersions was attained by a close matching of the refractive index of PMMA and solvent, for whi

  10. Effects of motorway lighting on workload and driving behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogema, J.H.; Veltman, J.A.; Hof, A. van 't

    2004-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management needs knowledge in the area of workload in car driving. This paper describes a study in which the effects of traffic volume, road lighting, and a cognitively loading secondary task on driving behaviour and workload were investigated.

  11. Effects of motorway lighting on workload and driving behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogema, J.H.; Veltman, J.A.; Hof, A. van 't

    2005-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management needs knowledge in the area of workload in car driving. This paper describes a study in which the effects of traffic volume, road lighting, and a cognitively loading secondary task on driving behaviour and workload were investigated.

  12. Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjuan; Ji, Cheng; Xiang, Yong; Kang, Xiangning; Shen, Bo; Yu, Tongjun

    2016-05-16

    Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency (LEE) in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated in this paper. A united picture is presented to describe polarized light's emission and propagation processes. It is found that the electron-hole recombinations in AlGaN multiple quantum wells produce three kinds of angularly distributed polarized emissions and propagation process can change their intensity distributions. By investigation the change of angular distributions in 277nm and 215nm LEDs, this work reveals that LEE can be significantly enhanced by modulating the angular distributions of polarized light of DUV LEDs.

  13. Spin Hall effect of light in metallic reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Hermosa, N; Aiello, A; Woerdman, J P

    2011-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the Spin Hall Effect of Light (SHEL) on an air-metal interface. The SHEL is a polarization-dependent out-of-plane shift on the reflected beam. For the case of metallic reflection with a linearly polarized incident light, both the spatial and angular variants of the shift are observed and are maximum for -45\\cdot/45\\cdot polarization, but zero for pure s- and p-polarization. For an incoming beam with circular polarization states however, only the spatial out-of-plane shift is present.

  14. Effect of pyrophosphate on the light scatter in KDP crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Pyrophosphate doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal was grown from aqueous solution by the temperature lowering method. Light scatter in KDP crystal was detected with the ultramicroscopic method. The light scatter in KDP crystal was aggravated when pyrophosphate was doped into the growth solution, which was distributed ununiformly in prism and pyramidal sectors of KDP crystal. Different effects of pyrophosphate on prism and pyramidal sectors of KDP crystal can explain this case. The transmission in this crystal was measured, showing that pyrophosphate affects the transmission evidently.

  15. Effects of light exposure on the TL dating of pottery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Bleaching experiments on Chinese pottery fine grains were conducted under sunlight and laboratory light conditions. It is found that the thermoluminescence (TL) at high temperatures can be bleached significantly, but no effects were observed on TL signals used for the pre-dose dating technique. It is concluded that the pre-dose dating technique can be applied to samples even after light exposures. Pottery samples of Tang Dynasty and New Stone Age were studied. Modifications to routine pre-dose dating technique are proposed with adding preheat procedures and using saturation exponential fitting for the sensitivity change data. The modified technique can extend the dating range to New Stone Age.

  16. Effects of Bright Light Treatment on Psychomotor Speed in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Paavo Tulppo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A recent study suggests that transcranial brain targeted light treatment via ear canals may have physiological effects on brain function studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI techniques in humans. We tested the hypothesis that bright light treatment could improve psychomotor speed in professional ice hockey players. Methods: Psychomotor speed tests with audio and visual warning signals were administered to a Finnish National Ice Hockey League team before and after 24 days of transcranial bright light or sham treatment. The treatments were given during seasonal darkness in the Oulu region (latitude 65 degrees north when the strain on the players was also very high (10 matches during 24 days. A daily 12-min dose of bright light or sham (n = 11 for both treatment was given every morning between 8–12 am at home with a transcranial bright light device. Mean reaction time and motor time were analyzed separately for both psychomotor tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adjusted for age was performed. Results: Time x group interaction for motor time with a visual warning signal was p = 0.024 after adjustment for age. In Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, motor time with a visual warning signal decreased in the bright light treatment group from 127 ± 43 to 94 ± 26 ms (p = 0.024 but did not change significantly in the sham group 121 ± 23 vs. 110 ± 32 ms (p = 0.308. Reaction time with a visual signal did not change in either group. Reaction or motor time with an audio warning signal did not change in either the treatment or sham group. Conclusion: Psychomotor speed, particularly motor time with a visual warning signal, improves after transcranial bright light treatment in professional ice-hockey players during the competition season in the dark time of the year.

  17. Effects of blue light on pigment biosynthesis of Monascus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Xue, Chunmao; Chen, Mianhua; Wu, Shufen; Li, Zhenjing; Wang, Changlu

    2016-04-01

    The influence of different illumination levels of blue light on the growth and intracellular pigment yields of Monascus strain M9 was investigated. Compared with darkness, constant exposure to blue light of 100 lux reduced the yields of six pigments, namely, rubropunctatamine (RUM), monascorubramine (MOM), rubropunctatin (RUN), monascorubrin (MON), monascin (MS), and ankaflavin (AK). However, exposure to varying levels of blue light had different effects on pigment production. Exposure to 100 lux of blue light once for 30 min/day and to 100 lux of blue light once and twice for 15 min/day could enhance RUM, MOM, MS, and AK production and reduce RUN and MON compared with non-exposure. Exposure to 100 lux twice for 30 min/day and to 200 lux once for 45 min/day decreased the RUM, MOM, MS, and AK yields and increased the RUN and MON. Meanwhile, the expression levels of pigment biosynthetic genes were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. Results indicated that gene MpPKS5, mppR1, mppA, mppB, mmpC, mppD, MpFasA, MpFasB, and mppF were positively correlated with the yields of RUN and MON, whereas mppE and mppR2 were associated with RUM, MOM, MS, and AK production.

  18. Circadian-effect engineering of solid-state lighting spectra for beneficial and tunable lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qi; Shan, Qifeng; Lam, Hien; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-09-05

    Optimization of solid-state lighting spectra is performed to achieve beneficial and tunable circadian effects. First, the minimum spectral circadian action factor (CAF) of 2700 K white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is studied for applications where biologically active illumination is undesirable. It is found that white-LEDs based on (i) RGB chips, (ii) blue & red chips plus green phosphor, and (iii) blue chip plus green & red phosphors are the corresponding minimum-CAF solutions at color-rendering index (CRI) requirements of 80, 90, and 95, respectively. Second, maximum CAF tunability of LED clusters is studied for dynamic daylighting applications. A dichromatic phosphor-converted blue-centered LED, a dichromatic phosphor-converted green-centered LED, and a monochromatic red LED are grouped to obtain white spectra between 2700 K and 6500 K. A maximum CAF tunability of 3.25 times is achieved with CRI above 90 and luminous efficacy of radiation of 313 - 373 lm/W. We show that our approaches have advantages over previously reported solutions on system simplicity, minimum achievable CAF value, CAF tunability range, and light source efficacy.

  19. Effect of polarized light emitting diode irradiation on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kaoru; Ikeda, Kazuo; Tomita, Katsuro

    2009-11-01

    We propose a new phototherapy using polarized light from light emitting diode (LED). The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of polarized LED irradiation on wound healing. Five groups were classified: control (C), unpolarized (U), linearly polarized (L), right circularly polarized (RC), and left circularly polarized (LC) LED irradiation. In vitro study, fibroblast cell cultures were irradiated, and cellular proliferation was evaluated with a WST-8 assay. In vivo study, full-thickness skin defect of 20 mm diameter was created on the dorsal side of rats. The ratio of the residual wound area was measured, and expression of type 1 and type 3 procollagen mRNA in granulation tissue was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method. The cellular proliferation rates of group RC and L were significantly higher than other groups. The ratio of the residual wound area of group RC and L was significantly reduced than group C and U. Expression of type 1 procollagen mRNA in group RC was found to be significantly increased about 1.5-fold in comparison with the group C. There were no significant differences for type 3 procollagen. The right circularly polarized light and linearly polarized light promoted the process of wound healing by increasing the proliferation of fibroblasts, and the right circularly polarized light increased the expression of type 1 procollagen mRNA. The effectiveness of right circularly polarized light suggests that some optical active material, which has a circular dichroic spectrum, takes part in a biochemical reaction.

  20. The effects of riboflavin and ultraviolet light on keratocytes cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covre, Joyce L; Cristovam, Priscila C; Loureiro, Renata R; Hazarbassanov, Rossen M; Campos, Mauro; Sato, Élcio H; Gomes, José Álvaro P

    2016-01-01

    To culture quiescent human keratocytes and evaluate the effects of ultraviolet light and riboflavin on human corneal keratocytes in vitro. Keratocytes were obtained from remaining corneoscleral ring donor corneas previously used in corneal transplant surgeries and cultured in DMEM/F12 with 2% FBS until confluence. Characterization of cultured cells was performed by immunofluorescence analysis for anti-cytokeratin-3, anti-Thy-1, anti-α-smooth muscle actin, and anti-lumican. Immunofluorescence was performed before and after treatment of cultured cells with either ultraviolet light or riboflavin. Corneal stromal cells were covered with collagen (200 µL or 500 µL) and 0.1% riboflavin, and then exposed to ultraviolet light at 370 nm for 30 minutes. After 24 hours, cytotoxicity was determined using MTT colorimetric assays, whereas cell viability was assessed using Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide. Cell cultures achieved confluence in approximately 20 days. Expression of the lumican was high, whereas no expression of CK3, Thy-1, and α-SMA was observed. After crosslinking, MTT colorimetric assays demonstrated a low toxicity rate, whereas Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide staining demonstrated a low rate of apoptosis and necrosis, respectively, in all collagen-treatment groups. Keratocytes can be successfully cultured in vitro and characterized by immunofluorescence using lumican. MTT colorimetric assays, and Hoechst 33342, and propidium iodide staining demonstrated a higher rate of cell death in cells cultured without collagen, indicating collagen protects keratocytes from the cytotoxic effects of ultraviolet light.

  1. Disruptive effects of light pollution on sleep in free-living birds: Season and/or light intensity-dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Thomas; Sun, Jiachen; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2017-09-01

    Light pollution or artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing anthropogenic environmental pollutant posing an important potential threat for wildlife. Evidence of its effects on animal physiology and behaviour is accumulating. However, in order to effectively mitigate light pollution it is important to determine which factors contribute to the severity of effects of ALAN. In this experimental study we explored whether there are seasonal-dependent effects of ALAN on sleep in free-living great tits (Parus major), an important model species. Additionally, we looked at whether light intensity determined the severity of effects of ALAN on sleep. We therefore exposed animals to artificial light inside the nest box (3lx) in December (winter) and February (pre-breeding season). Results from February were compared with the results from a previous study in February, using a lower light intensity (1.6lx). We found little evidence for a season-dependent response. Effects of ALAN hardly differed between high and low light intensity. ALAN disrupted sleep with as main effect a decrease in sleep duration (≈-40min) as animals woke up earlier (≈-24min). However, compared to a natural dark situation sleep onset was delayed by high but not by low light intensity of ALAN. Our study underlines earlier found disruptive effects of ALAN on sleep of free-living animals. While we found no conclusive evidence for seasonal or light intensity-dependent effects of ALAN, additional experimental work using lower light intensities might show such differences. Examining potential management options is crucial in mitigating disruptive effects of light pollution, which will be an important focus for future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antileishmanial effect of silver nanoparticles and their enhanced antiparasitic activity under ultraviolet light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Bagirova, Malahat; Ustundag, Cem B; Kaya, Cengiz; Kaya, Figen; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a protozoan vector-borne disease and is one of the biggest health problems of the world. Antileishmanial drugs have disadvantages such as toxicity and the recent development of resistance. One of the best-known mechanisms of the antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) is the production of reactive oxygen species to which Leishmania parasites are very sensitive. So far no information about the effects of Ag-NPs on Leishmania tropica parasites, the causative agent of leishmaniasis, exists in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ag-NPs on biological parameters of L. tropica such as morphology, metabolic activity, proliferation, infectivity, and survival in host cells, in vitro. Consequently, parasite morphology and infectivity were impaired in comparison with the control. Also, enhanced effects of Ag-NPs were demonstrated on the morphology and infectivity of parasites under ultraviolet (UV) light. Ag-NPs demonstrated significant antileishmanial effects by inhibiting the proliferation and metabolic activity of promastigotes by 1.5- to threefold, respectively, in the dark, and 2- to 6.5-fold, respectively, under UV light. Of note, Ag-NPs inhibited the survival of amastigotes in host cells, and this effect was more significant in the presence of UV light. Thus, for the first time the antileishmanial effects of Ag-NPs on L. tropica parasites were demonstrated along with the enhanced antimicrobial activity of Ag-NPs under UV light. Determination of the antileishmanial effects of Ag-NPs is very important for the further development of new compounds containing nanoparticles in leishmaniasis treatment. PMID:22114501

  3. Antileishmanial effect of silver nanoparticles and their enhanced antiparasitic activity under ultraviolet light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahverdiyev AM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Adil M Allahverdiyev1, Emrah Sefik Abamor1, Malahat Bagirova1, Cem B Ustundag2, Cengiz Kaya2, Figen Kaya2, Miriam Rafailovich3 1Department of Bioengineering; 2Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, Esenler, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA Abstract: Leishmaniasis is a protozoan vector-borne disease and is one of the biggest health problems of the world. Antileishmanial drugs have disadvantages such as toxicity and the recent development of resistance. One of the best-known mechanisms of the antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs is the production of reactive oxygen species to which Leishmania parasites are very sensitive. So far no information about the effects of Ag-NPs on Leishmania tropica parasites, the causative agent of leishmaniasis, exists in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ag-NPs on biological parameters of L. tropica such as morphology, metabolic activity, proliferation, infectivity, and survival in host cells, in vitro. Consequently, parasite morphology and infectivity were impaired in comparison with the control. Also, enhanced effects of Ag-NPs were demonstrated on the morphology and infectivity of parasites under ultraviolet (UV light. Ag-NPs demonstrated significant antileishmanial effects by inhibiting the proliferation and metabolic activity of promastigotes by 1.5- to threefold, respectively, in the dark, and 2- to 6.5-fold, respectively, under UV light. Of note, Ag-NPs inhibited the survival of amastigotes in host cells, and this effect was more significant in the presence of UV light. Thus, for the first time the antileishmanial effects of Ag-NPs on L. tropica parasites were demonstrated along with the enhanced antimicrobial activity of Ag-NPs under UV light. Determination of the antileishmanial effects of Ag-NPs is very important for the further

  4. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    Stason, William B.; Ritter, Grant A.; Timothy Martin; Jeffrey Prottas; Christopher Tompkins; Donald S Shepard

    2016-01-01

    Background Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or ...

  5. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    Stason, William B.; Grant A Ritter; Timothy Martin; Jeffrey Prottas; Christopher Tompkins; Shepard, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or ...

  6. The Effect of Group Works and Demonstrative Experiments Based on Conceptual Change Approach: Photosynthesis and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Ayse Sert; Diken, Emine Hatun; Darcin, Emine Selcen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of group works and demonstration experiments based on conceptual change approach in the elimination of misconception about the subject of photosynthesis and respiration in plants in pre-service science teachers. This study was conducted with 78 pre-service science teachers including…

  7. The Effect of Group Works and Demonstrative Experiments Based on Conceptual Change Approach: Photosynthesis and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Ayse Sert; Diken, Emine Hatun; Darcin, Emine Selcen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of group works and demonstration experiments based on conceptual change approach in the elimination of misconception about the subject of photosynthesis and respiration in plants in pre-service science teachers. This study was conducted with 78 pre-service science teachers including…

  8. 76 FR 10038 - Determination That a Demonstration Needle Exchange Program Would be Effective in Reducing Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Determination That a Demonstration Needle Exchange Program Would be Effective in Reducing... agent for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. This determination reflects the scientific evidence supporting the important public health benefit of SSPs, and is necessary to meet the statutory...

  9. Synergetic Effect between Lighting Efficiency Enhancement and Building Energy Reduction Using Alternative Thermal Operating System of Indoor LED Lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Lip Ahn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the synergetic effect between light-emitting diode (LED lighting efficiency and building energy savings in heating and cooling using an alternative thermal operating system (ATOS of indoor LED lighting integrated with the ventilation system of a building as an active cooling device. The heat generated from LED lighting and the indoor lighting illuminance were experimentally determined. The indoor heat gains in cooling and heating periods were determined using measurement data; the annual energy savings of an office building in heating and cooling were calculated through simulation. The LED lighting illuminance increased by approximately 40% and the lighting contribution for indoor heat gain was 7.8% in summer, while 69.8% in winter with the ATOS. Consequently, the annual total energy use of the office building could be reduced by 5.9%; the energy use in cooling and heating was reduced by 18.4% and 3.3%, respectively.

  10. Combined effects of inorganic carbon and light on Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel (Prymnesiophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. W. de Baar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae is an ecologically dominating phytoplankton species in many areas around the world. It plays an important role in both the global sulfur and carbon cycles, by the production of dimethylsulfide (DMS and the drawdown of inorganic carbon. Phaeocystis globosa has a polymorphic life cycle and is considered to be a harmful algal bloom (HAB forming species. All these aspects make this an interesting species to study the effects of increasing carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations, due to anthropogenic carbon emissions. Here, the combined effects of three different dissolved carbon dioxide concentrations (CO2(aq (low: 4 μmol kg−1, intermediate: 6–10 μmol kg−1 and high CO2(aq: 21–24 μmol kg−1 and two different light intensities (low light, suboptimal: 80 μmol photons m−2 s−1 and high light, light saturated: 240 μmol photons m−2 s−1 are reported. The experiments demonstrated that the specific growth rate of P. globosa in the high light cultures decreased with increasing CO2(aq from 1.4 to 1.1 d−1 in the low and high CO2 cultures, respectively. Concurrently, the photosynthetic efficiency (FV/FM increased with increasing CO2(aq from 0.56 to 0.66. The different light conditions affected photosynthetic efficiency and cellular chlorophyll a concentrations, both of which were lower in the high light cultures as compared to the low light cultures. These results suggest that in future inorganic carbon enriched oceans, P. globosa will become less competitive and feedback mechanisms to global change may decrease in strength.

  11. Effect of light trapping in an amorphous silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iftiquar, S.M., E-mail: iftiquar@skku.edu [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Juyeon; Park, Hyeongsik [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaehyun; Shin, Chonghoon [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinjoo [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Junhee [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Bong, Sungjae [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunbo [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin, E-mail: yi@yurim.skku.ac.kr [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    Light trapping in amorphous silicon based solar cell has been investigated theoretically. The substrate for these cells can be textured, including pyramidally textured c-Si wafer, to improve capture of incident light. A thin silver layer, deposited on the substrate of an n–i–p cell, ultimately goes at the back of the cell structure and can act a back reflector to improve light trapping. The two physical solar cells we investigated had open circuit voltages (V{sub oc}) of 0.87, 0.90 V, short circuit current densities (J{sub sc}) of 14.2, 15.36 mA/cm{sup 2} respectively. The first cell was investigated for the effect on its performance while having and not having light trapping scheme (LT), when thickness of the active layer (d{sub i}) was changed in the range of 100 nm to 800 nm. In both the approaches, for having or not having LT, the short circuit current density increases with d{sub i} while the V{sub oc} and fill factor, decreases steadily. However, maximum cell efficiency can be obtained when d{sub i} = 400 nm, and hence it was considered optimized thickness of the active layer, that was used for further investigation. With the introduction of light trapping to the second cell, it shows a further enhancement in J{sub sc} and red response of the external quantum efficiency to 16.6 mA/cm{sup 2} and by 11.1% respectively. Considering multiple passages of light inside the cell, we obtained an improvement in cell efficiency from 9.7% to 10.6%. - Highlights: • A theoretical analysis of light trapping in p–i–n and n–i–p type solar cells • J{sub sc} increases and V{sub oc} decreases with the increase in i-layer thickness. • Observed optimized thickness of i-layer as 400 nm • J{sub sc} improved from 15.4 mA/cm{sup 2} to 16.6 mA/cm{sup 2} due to the light trapping. • Efficiency (η) improved from 9.7% to 10.6% due to better red response of the EQE.

  12. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part I: Experimental apparatus and observations of vitrification, crystallization, and photoelasticity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Justin S G; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    Cryomacroscopy is an effective means to observe physical events affecting cryopreservation success in large-size specimens. The current study aims at integrating polarized-light in the study of large-size cryopreservation, using the scanning cryomacroscope as a development platform. Results of this study demonstrate polarized light as a visualization enhancement means, including the following effects: contaminants in the CPA solution, crystallization, fracture formation, thermal contraction, and solute precipitation. In addition, photoelasticity effects are used to demonstrate the development of residual stresses and the potential for stress relaxation above the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, this study suggests that the ability to periodically switch between non-polarized light and polarized light is an essential feature of investigation. When using polarized light for example, a dark region may represent a free-of-stress and free-of-crystals material, or fully crystallized material, which may potentially experience mechanical stress; switching to a non-polarized light would help to distinguish between the different cases. The analysis of thermo-mechanical stress in cryopreservation is essentially based on four key elements: identification of physical events, knowledge of physical properties, thermal analysis of the specimen, and description of the mechanical behavior of the cryopreserved material (also known as the constitutive law). With the above knowledge, one can investigate the conditions to preserve structural integrity. While the current study aims at identification of physical events, critical knowledge on physical properties and mechanical behavior has already been developed in previous studies. The companion manuscript (Part II) aims at providing means for thermal analysis in the specimen, which will serve as the basis for a multi-scale analysis of thermo-mechanical stress in large-size specimens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Controlling the optical spin Hall effect with light

    CERN Document Server

    Lafont, O; Lewandowski, P; Kwong, N H; Chan, K P; Babilon, M; Leung, P T; Galopin, E; Lemaitre, A; Tignon, J; Schumacher, S; Baudin, E; Binder, R

    2016-01-01

    The optical spin Hall effect (OSHE) is a transport phenomenon of exciton polaritons in semiconductor microcavities, caused by the polaritonic spin-orbit interaction, that leads to the formation of spin textures. In the semiconductor cavity, the physical basis of the spin orbit coupling is an effective magnetic field caused by the splitting of transverse-electric and transverse-magnetic (TE-TM) modes. The spin textures can be observed in the near field (local spin distribution of polaritons), and as light polarization patterns in the more readily observable far field. For future applications in spinoptronic devices, a simple and robust control mechanism, which establishes a one-to-one correspondence between stationary incident light intensity and far-field polarization pattern, is needed. We present such a control scheme, which is made possible by a specific double-microcavity design.

  14. Spin effects in the pion holographic light-front wavefunction

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmady, Mohammad; Sandapen, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    We account for dynamical spin effects in the holographic light-front wavefunction of the pion in order to predict its mean charge radius, decay constant, spacelike electromagnetic form factor, twist-2 Distribution Amplitude and the photon-to-pion transition form factor. Using a universal fundamental AdS/QCD scale of 523 MeV and a constituent quark mass of 330 MeV, we find a remarkable improvement in describing all observables.

  15. Light modulators and deflectors based on polariton effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of constructing light modulators and deflectors based on polariton effects is considered. The polariton is a mixed complex consisting of a superposition of a one-photon state and a crystal excitation state. By influencing the crystal excitation state by means of external fields, t......, and temperature gradients are shown with orders of magnitude of deflections computed. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  16. Revelation of the Technological Versatility of the Eu(TTA)3Phen Complex by Demonstrating Energy Harvesting, Ultraviolet Light Detection, Temperature Sensing, and Laser Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Praveen Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Rai, Shyam Bahadur; Ullrich, Bruno

    2015-08-26

    We synthesized the Eu(TTA)3Phen complex and present herein a detailed study of its photophysics. The investigations encompass samples dispersed in poly(vinyl alcohol) and in ethanol in order to explore the versatile applicability of these lanthanide-based materials. Details upon the interaction between Eu, TTA, and the Phen ligands are revealed by Fourier transform infrared and UV-visible absorption, complemented by steady state and temporally resolved emission studies, which provide evidence of an efficient energy transfer from the organic ligands to the central Eu(3+) ion. The material produces efficient emission even under sunlight exposure, a feature pointing toward suitability for luminescent solar concentrators and UV light sensing, which is demonstrated for intensities as low as 200 nW/cm(2). The paper further promotes the complex's capability to be used as luminescence-based temperature sensor demonstrated by the considerable emission intensity changes of ∼4.0% per K in the temperature range of 50-305 K and ∼7% per K in the temeperature range 305-340 K. Finally, increasing the optical excitation causes both spontaneous emission amplification and emission peak narrowing in the Eu(TTA)3Phen complex dispersed in poly(vinyl alcohol) - features indicative of stimulated emission. These findings in conjunction with the fairly large stimulated emission cross-section of 4.29 × 10(-20) cm(2) demonstrate that the Eu(TTA)3Phen complex dispersed in poly(vinyl alcohol) could be a very promising material choice for lanthanide-polymer based laser architectures.

  17. Effects of combined ketamine/xylazine anesthesia on light induced retinal degeneration in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Arango-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To explore the effect of ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on light-induced retinal degeneration in rats. METHODS: Rats were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine (100 and 5 mg, respectively for 1 h, followed by a recovery phase of 2 h before exposure to 16,000 lux of environmental illumination for 2 h. Functional assessment by electroretinography (ERG and morphological assessment by in vivo imaging (optical coherence tomography, histology (hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry (GFAP and rhodopsin staining were performed at baseline (ERG, 36 h, 7 d and 14 d post-treatment. Non-anesthetized animals treated with light damage served as controls. RESULTS: Ketamine-xylazine pre-treatment preserved retinal function and protected against light-induced retinal degeneration. In vivo retinal imaging demonstrated a significant increase of outer nuclear layer (ONL thickness in the non-anesthetized group at 36 h (p0.05, indicating a stabilizing and/or protective effect with regard to phototoxicity. Histology confirmed light-induced photoreceptor cell death and Müller cells gliosis in non-anesthetized rats, especially in the superior hemiretina, while ketamine-xylazine treated rats showed reduced photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL staining: p<0.001 after 7 d, thicker ONL and longer IS/OS. Fourteen days after light damage, a reduction of standard flash induced a-wave amplitudes and a-wave slopes (p = 0.01 and significant alterations in parameters of the scotopic sensitivity function (e.g. Vmax of the Naka Rushton fit p = 0.03 were observed in non-treated vs. ketamine-xylazine treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that pre-treatment with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia protects retinas against light damage, reducing photoreceptor cell death. These data support the notion that anesthesia with ketamine-xylazine provides neuroprotective effects in light-induced cell damage.

  18. Effects of Combined Ketamine/Xylazine Anesthesia on Light Induced Retinal Degeneration in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolz, Sylvia; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Willmann, Gabriel; Zhour, Ahmad; Zrenner, Eberhart; Fischer, M. Dominik; Gekeler, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the effect of ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on light-induced retinal degeneration in rats. Methods Rats were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine (100 and 5 mg, respectively) for 1 h, followed by a recovery phase of 2 h before exposure to 16,000 lux of environmental illumination for 2 h. Functional assessment by electroretinography (ERG) and morphological assessment by in vivo imaging (optical coherence tomography), histology (hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL assay) and immunohistochemistry (GFAP and rhodopsin staining) were performed at baseline (ERG), 36 h, 7 d and 14 d post-treatment. Non-anesthetized animals treated with light damage served as controls. Results Ketamine-xylazine pre-treatment preserved retinal function and protected against light-induced retinal degeneration. In vivo retinal imaging demonstrated a significant increase of outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness in the non-anesthetized group at 36 h (p0.05), indicating a stabilizing and/or protective effect with regard to phototoxicity. Histology confirmed light-induced photoreceptor cell death and Müller cells gliosis in non-anesthetized rats, especially in the superior hemiretina, while ketamine-xylazine treated rats showed reduced photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL staining: p<0.001 after 7 d), thicker ONL and longer IS/OS. Fourteen days after light damage, a reduction of standard flash induced a-wave amplitudes and a-wave slopes (p = 0.01) and significant alterations in parameters of the scotopic sensitivity function (e.g. Vmax of the Naka Rushton fit p = 0.03) were observed in non-treated vs. ketamine-xylazine treated animals. Conclusions Our results suggest that pre-treatment with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia protects retinas against light damage, reducing photoreceptor cell death. These data support the notion that anesthesia with ketamine-xylazine provides neuroprotective effects in light-induced cell damage. PMID:22558200

  19. Photonic effects in microstructured conjugated polymer films and light emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Matterson, B J

    2002-01-01

    metal layers that are used as electrodes in the LED does not adversely affect the electrical properties of the LED. It is demonstrated that grating in the LED is able to substantially increase the light emission without using extra electrical power. The emission spectra from LEDs are observed to vary with angle, and exhibit considerable polarization. This thesis reports an investigation into the photonic effects caused by wavelength scale microstructure patterned onto films of conjugated polymers. The efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) made from conjugated polymers is limited in part by the trapping of light into waveguide modes caused by the high refractive index of these materials. Waveguide modes in films of poly(p,-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) and poly(2-methoxy, 5-(2'ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) are analysed and the refractive index of these materials is calculated. The photoluminescence of conjugated polymer films that have been spun onto textured substrates is analysed. It is fou...

  20. Effects of light quality on somatic embryogenesis in Araujia sericifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torné, Josep M.; Moysset, Luisa; Santos, Mireya; Simón, Esther

    2001-03-01

    The effects of photoperiod, light quality and end-of-day (EOD) phytochrome photoconversion on somatic embryogenesis (SE) of Araujia sericifera petals have been studied. Petals from immature flowers were cultured under 8- and 16-h photoperiods using Gro-lux fluorescent lamps. The photon fluence rate was 90-100 µmol m-2 s-1 and the red (R):far-red (FR) ratio was 98. R, FR, R followed by FR (R-FR) and FR followed by R (FR-R) light treatments were applied for 3 weeks at the end of the photoperiods. In a set of experiments, DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) or methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), both inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, were added to the culture medium in order to study the involvement of polyamine metabolism. The level of SE was the same in long (LD) and short (SD) days. Thus, the light effect was accomplished after 8 h. All EOD treatments that decreased the Pfr level inhibited SE when applied after SD, but not after LD. The FR-R treatment after LD caused an additional stimulatory effect on SE, even in the presence of polyamine inhibitors. DFMA inhibited SE in both SD and LD, but MGBG did not modify SE in either SD or LD. The R, FR and R-FR treatments did not alter the level of SE when applied after LD in the presence of DFMA or MGBG. However, these treatments decreased SE after SD when the medium contained polyamine inhibitors. Our results suggest that Gro-lux lamps, which produce an extremely high R:FR ratio, promote SE in A. sericifera and a timing response to phytochrome photoconversion during photoperiodic induction. Thus, our data corroborate the involvement of phytochromes and polyamines in SE in A. sericifera, which responded as a light-dominant long-day plant.

  1. Origin of light scattering variations of a latent flaw through light scattering measurement with applied stress effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Yoshitaro; Terasaki, Nao; Sakai, Kazufumi; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2016-11-01

    The stress-induced light scattering method (SILSM) was proposed for inspecting surface to detect polishing induced latent flaws. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of the light scattering intensity variation of latent flaws using SILSM, we have investigated stress effect of light scattering intensities using polarized light system and calculated the reflectance and the retardation using Jones matrix. As the results, we evaluated the change in the birefringence around a tip of a latent flaw between before and after stress were applied.

  2. The effects of blue-enriched light treatment compared to standard light treatment in seasonal affective disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, M. C. M.; 't Mannetje, D.; Meesters, Y.

    Background: One of the most frequently investigated hypotheses of the pathophysiology underlying Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a disturbance of circadian rhythms. Since the circadian system as well as other non-visual effects is especially sensitive to blue light, a new light therapy device

  3. Experimental canine distemper infection as a means of demonstrating latent effects of subacute lead intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.J.; McLeod, S.

    1976-01-01

    Observations on the response of the body to experimental infection with distemper virus in dogs previously dosed subacutely with lead have demonstrated a latent effect of lead on several body systems. Effects which indicated a relationship to earlier treatment with lead included evidence for stimulation of haemoglobin synthesis, changes to red blood cells resulting in increased destruction, increased vulnerability of the parenchymatous cells of the liver to damage, reduction in the weight of the skeleton and thyroid, an increase in weight of the thymus and brain and histopathological changes in the thymus. 21 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  4. Effects of light propagation in middle intensity atmospheric turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiubua YUAN; Dexiu HUANG; Bangxu LI

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an experimental study of the effects of light propagation through atmospheric turbulence.Free space optical communication is a line-of-sight technology that transmits a modulated beam of visible light through the atmosphere for broadband communication.The fundamental limitations of free space optical communications arise from the environment through which it propagates.However these systems are vulnerable to atmospheric turbulence, such as attenuation and scintillation, Scintillation is due to the air index variation under the temperature effects.These factors cause an attenuated receiver signal and lead to higher bit error rate (BER).An experiment of laser propagation was carried out to characterize the light intensity through turbulent air in the laboratory environment.The experimental results agree with the calculation based on Rytov for the case of weak to intermediate turbulence.Also, we show the characteristics of irradiance scintillation, intensity distribution and atmospheric turbulence strength.By means of laboratory simulated turbulence, the turbulence box is constructed with the following measurements: 0.5 m wide, 2m long and 0.5m high.The simulation box consists of three electric heaters and is well described for understanding the experimental set up.The fans and heaters are used to increase the homogeneity of turbulence and to create different scintillation indices.The received intensity scintillation and atmosphere turbulence strength were obtained and the variation of refractive index, with its corresponding structure parameter, is calculated from the experimental results.

  5. Chiral effective theory with a light scalar and lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, J., E-mail: joan.soto@ub.edu [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Talavera, P., E-mail: pere.talavera@icc.ub.edu [Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Comte Urgell 187, E-08036 Barcelona (Spain); Tarrus, J., E-mail: tarrus@ecm.ub.es [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-01-21

    We extend the usual chiral perturbation theory framework ({chi}PT) to allow the inclusion of a light dynamical isosinglet scalar. Using lattice QCD results, and a few phenomenological inputs, we explore the parameter space of the effective theory. We discuss the S-wave pion-pion scattering lengths, extract the average value of the two light quark masses and evaluate the impact of the dynamical singlet field in the low-energy constants l{sup Macron }{sub 1}, l{sup Macron }{sub 3} and l{sup Macron }{sub 4} of {chi}PT. We also show how to extract the mass and width of the sigma resonance from chiral extrapolations of lattice QCD data.

  6. Infrared light irradiation diminishes effective charge transfer in slow sodium channel gating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhova, Vera B.; Bagraev, Nikolai T.; Klyachkin, Leonid E.; Malyarenko, Anna M.; Romanov, Vladimir V.; Krylov, Boris V.

    2001-02-01

    Effects of infrared light irradiation (IR) on cultured dorsal root ganglia cells were studied by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The IR field is demonstrated to diminish the effective charge transfer in the activation system from 6.2 +-0.6 to 4.5 +-0.4 in units of electron charge per e-fold change in membrane potential. The effects was blocked with ouabain. Our data is the first indication that sodium pump might be the molecular sensor of infrared irradiation in animal kingdom.

  7. Inhibitory effect of ketamine on lighting amygdala of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiguo Zhang; Bin Yang; Jing Zhang; Feng Zhang; Wang Yue

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ketamine is a noncompetitive antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor. Some researchers suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor is closely related to epileptic attack.OBJECTIVE: To observe inhibitory effect of ketamine on lighting amygdala of rats and analyze pathway of anti-lighting.DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING: Department of Pharmacology and Department of Management, Pharmacological College of Taishan Medical College; Department of Pharmacology, Medical College of Qingdao University.MATERIALS: Sixty adult female Wistar rats, of clean grade, weighing 180-200 g, were provided by Animal Center of Qingdao Institute of Drug Control. Ketamine hydrochloride was provided by the First Pharmacological Factory of the First Biochemical Pharmacology Company of Shanghai, and nicardipine, an antagonist of calcium ions, was provided by Sigma Company.METHODS: The experiment was completed in the Department of Pharmacology, Medical College of Qingdao University from March to November 2004. ① Model establishing: After anesthesia, left and right amygdalas were inserted with double electrodes. The top was separated about 0.25 mm, and the other end was welded with a micro-plug, respectively. Electrode and micro-plug were fixed with dental base acrylic resin powder at the surface of cranium. Two weeks after recovery, right amygdala was stimulated with constant current once a day. According to Racine technique, attacking intensity was divided into 5 grades: grade I:closing eyes, a little tingling of beards and twitching face; grade Ⅱ: nodding, chewing accompanying with twitching face; grade Ⅲ: raising one of a forelimb and clonus; grade Ⅳ: standing accompanying with bilateral forelimbs; grade Ⅴ: standing accompanying with falling down. Rats with grades Ⅳ and Ⅴ were used to establish secondarily generalized epilepsy. If 3 successive attacks of grade Ⅴ were observed, the lighting was to be successful. ② Effect of

  8. Effect of LED photobiomodulation on fluorescent light induced changes in cellular ATPases and Cytochrome c oxidase activity in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Ahamed Basha; C, Mathangi D; R, Shyamala

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescent light exposure at night alters cellular enzyme activities resulting in health defects. Studies have demonstrated that light emitting diode photobiomodulation enhances cellular enzyme activities. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of fluorescent light induced changes in cellular enzymes and to assess the protective role of pre exposure to 670 nm LED in rat model. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into 10 groups of 6 animals each based on duration of exposure (1, 15, and 30 days) and exposure regimen (cage control, exposure to fluorescent light [1800 lx], LED preexposure followed by fluorescent light exposure and only LED exposure). Na(+)-K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and cytochrome c oxidase of the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle were assayed. Animals of the fluorescent light exposure group showed a significant reduction in Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and Ca(2+) ATPase activities in 1 and 15 days and their increase in animals of 30-day group in most of the regions studied. Cytochrome c oxidase showed increase in their level at all the time points assessed in most of the tissues. LED light preexposure showed a significant enhancement in the degree of increase in the enzyme activities in almost all the tissues and at all the time points assessed. This study demonstrates the protective effect of 670 nm LED pre exposure on cellular enzymes against fluorescent light induced change.

  9. Demonstration of a time-resolved x-ray scattering instrument utilizing the full-repetition rate of x-ray pulses at the Pohang Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Wonhyuk; Eom, Intae; Landahl, Eric C.; Lee, Sooheyong; Yu, Chung-Jong

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development of a new experimental instrument for time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) at the Pohang Light Source (PLS-II). It operates with a photon energy ranging from 5 to 18 keV. It is equipped with an amplified Ti:sappahire femtosecond laser, optical diagnostics, and laser beam delivery for pump-probe experiments. A high-speed single-element detector and high trigger-rate oscilloscope are used for rapid data acquisition. While this instrument is capable of measuring sub-nanosecond dynamics using standard laser pump/x-ray probe techniques, it also takes advantage of the dense 500 MHz standard fill pattern in the PLS-II storage ring to efficiently record nano-to-micro-second dynamics simultaneously. We demonstrate this capability by measuring both the (fast) impulsive strain and (slower) thermal recovery dynamics of a crystalline InSb sample following intense ultrafast laser excitation. Exploiting the full repetition rate of the storage ring results in a significant improvement in data collection rates compared to conventional bunch-tagging methods.

  10. Effectiveness Of UVC Lights Irradiation To Improve Energy Saving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer A. Bilal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available HVAC Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning is the largest consumer of energy in commercial and industrial buildings. HVAC systems account for an approximated 50 of energy use in buildings. The sources of contamination and odour comes from the growth of bacteria mold and fungus that accumulate and develop on wet surfaces of HVAC coils and drain pans causing respiratory infection cough tight chest and wheezing. Besides the effects on human health Fungal contamination that adheres to the fins of cooling coil of air handling unit AHU cause a significant increase in pressure drop across the coil and decrease in heat exchange efficiency which Leeds to loss of cooling capacity and additional energy use. To prevent the fungal and microorganism growth on the cooling coil and drain pan of HVAC systems many studies conducted but not all these solutions were sufficient to remove microbial organism from the HVAC 100 . The UV-C light options through a process known as UVGI Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation is a technology showed a significant impact to produce clean air and improve indoor air quality 16. UVGI lights produce short wavelength light kills microorganisms including viruses bacteria mold and many other fungi by disrupting their DNA. The effectiveness of UVGI installed inside HVAC systems depends on many factors and the application Methods in HVAC systems. A few studies showed whether the use of UVGI results in energy saving. The objective of this study is to find the effect of fungal growth on the cooling coil surface by using field measurements at actual operating conditions of heat transfer and air flow for a non-irradiated coil in comparison to irradiated coil .Hence evaluate if there would be an enthalpy change at the coil and document the effectiveness of UVGI coil cleaning on restoring cooling capacity and save energy.

  11. Generalized demonstration of Ramo's theorem with space charge and polarization effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Louis-André; Julien, Manuel

    2008-12-01

    Ramo's theorem provides a convenient way of simulating the currents induced through the electrodes of a radiation detector by the movement of charge carriers. The concept of weighting potential or of weighting field is the key ingredient in the calculation of the induced currents. A new demonstration of the theorem, based on energy balance, is provided that explicitly takes into account the effect of material polarization. It is shown that Ramo's theorem is valid in an arbitrary linear material and that polarization charges at interfaces between different materials or in the bulk of inhomogeneous materials must be included in calculating the weighting potentials. The use of our definition of weighting potential is also demonstrated for non-linear materials. The present proof is thus more generally valid than previous ones.

  12. Non-visual effects of light on melatonin, alertness and cognitive performance: can blue-enriched light keep us alert?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Laxhmi Chellappa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Light exposure can cascade numerous effects on the human circadian process via the non-imaging forming system, whose spectral relevance is highest in the short-wavelength range. Here we investigated if commercially available compact fluorescent lamps with different colour temperatures can impact on alertness and cognitive performance. METHODS: Sixteen healthy young men were studied in a balanced cross-over design with light exposure of 3 different light settings (compact fluorescent lamps with light of 40 lux at 6500K and at 2500K and incandescent lamps of 40 lux at 3000K during 2 h in the evening. RESULTS: Exposure to light at 6500K induced greater melatonin suppression, together with enhanced subjective alertness, well-being and visual comfort. With respect to cognitive performance, light at 6500K led to significantly faster reaction times in tasks associated with sustained attention (Psychomotor Vigilance and GO/NOGO Task, but not in tasks associated with executive function (Paced Visual Serial Addition Task. This cognitive improvement was strongly related with attenuated salivary melatonin levels, particularly for the light condition at 6500K. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the sensitivity of the human alerting and cognitive response to polychromatic light at levels as low as 40 lux, is blue-shifted relative to the three-cone visual photopic system. Thus, the selection of commercially available compact fluorescent lights with different colour temperatures significantly impacts on circadian physiology and cognitive performance at home and in the workplace.

  13. Band gap characterization and slow light effects in periodic and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghdoudi, J.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Kanzari, M.; Rezig, B.

    2008-04-01

    Slow light offers many opportunities for photonic devices by increasing the effective interaction length of imposed refractive index changes. The slow wave effect in photonic crystals is based on their unique dispersive properties and thus entirely dielectric in nature. In this work we demonstrate an interesting opportunity to decrease drastically the group velocity of light in one-dimensional photonic crystals constructed form materials with large dielectric constant without dispersion). We use numerical analysis to study the photonic properties of periodic (Bragg mirror) and quasiperiodic one dimensional photonic crystals realized to engineer slow light effects. Various geometries of the photonic pattern have been characterized and their photonic band-gap structure analyzed. Indeed, one dimensional quasi periodic photonic multilayer structure based on Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and Cantor sequences were studied. Quasiperiodic structures have a rich and highly fragmented reflectivity spectrum with many sharp resonant peaks that could be exploited in a microcavity system. A comparison of group velocity through periodic and quasiperiodic photonic crystals was discussed in the context of slow light propagation. The velocity control of pulses in materials is one of the promising applications of photonic crystals. The material systems used for the numerical analysis are TiO II/SiO II and Te/SiO II which have a refractive index contrast of approximately 1.59 and 3.17 respectively. The proposed structures were modelled using the Transfer Matrix Method.

  14. Qualifying lighting remodelling in a Hungarian city based on light pollution effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolláth, Z.; Dömény, A.; Kolláth, K.; Nagy, B.

    2016-09-01

    The public lighting system has been remodelled in several Hungarian cities. In some cases the majority of the old luminaries were fitted with high pressure sodium lamps and they were replaced with white LED lighting with a typical correlated colour temperature of about 4500 K. Therefore, these remodelling works provide a testbed for methods in measurements and modelling. We measured the luminance of the light domes of selected cities by DSLR photometry before and after the remodelling. Thanks to the full cut off design of the new lighting fixtures we obtained a slight decrease even in the blue part of the sky dome spectra of a tested city. However, we have to note that this positive change is the result of the bad geometry (large ULR) of the previous lighting system. Based on Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations we provide a comparison of different indicators that can be used to qualify the remodelling, and to predict the possible changes in light pollution.

  15. Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis Salina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braden Crowe

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of algal biofuel yield will require empirical determination of physiological responses to the environment, particularly light and temperature. One strain of interest, Nannochloropsis salina, was subjected to ranges of light intensity (5–850 μmol m−2 s−1 and temperature (13–40 °C and its exponential growth rate, total fatty acids (TFA and fatty acid composition were measured. The maximum acclimated growth rate was 1.3 day−1 at 23 °C and 250 μmol m−2 s−1. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID after transesterification to corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs. A sharp increase in TFA containing elevated palmitic acid (C16:0 and palmitoleic acid (C16:1 during exponential growth at high light was observed, indicating likely triacylglycerol accumulation due to photo-oxidative stress. Lower light resulted in increases in the relative abundance of unsaturated fatty acids; in thin cultures, increases were observed in palmitoleic and eicosapentaenoic acids (C20:5ω3. As cultures aged and the effective light intensity per cell converged to very low levels, fatty acid profiles became more similar and there was a notable increase of oleic acid (C18:1ω9. The amount of unsaturated fatty acids was inversely proportional to temperature, demonstrating physiological adaptations to increase membrane fluidity. These data will improve prediction of fatty acid characteristics and yields relevant to biofuel production.

  16. Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis Salina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Miller, Tyler W.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Hook, Paul W.; Crowe, Braden J.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2012-03-12

    Accurate prediction of algal biofuel yield will require empirical determination of physiological responses to the climate, particularly light and temperature. One strain of interest, Nannochloropsis salina, was subjected to ranges of light intensity (5-850 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and temperature (13-40 C); exponential growth rate, total fatty acids (TFA) and fatty acid composition were measured. The maximum acclimated growth rate was 1.3 day{sup -1} at 23 C and 250 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) after transesterification to corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A sharp increase in TFA containing elevated palmitic acid (C16:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) during exponential growth at high light was observed, indicating likely triacylglycerol accumulation due to photo-oxidative stress. Lower light resulted in increases in the relative abundance of unsaturated fatty acids; in thin cultures, increases were observed in palmitoleic and eicosapentaenoeic acids (C20:5{omega}3). As cultures aged and the effective light intensity per cell converged to very low levels, fatty acid profiles became more similar and there was a notable increase of oleic acid (C18:1{omega}9). The amount of unsaturated fatty acids was inversely proportional to temperature, demonstrating physiological adaptations to increase membrane fluidity. This data will improve prediction of fatty acid characteristics and yields relevant to biofuel production.

  17. Measurement of spin Hall effect of reflected light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi; Li, Yan; He, Huanyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2009-09-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent nanometer-sized displacements of the spin Hall effect of the reflected light from a planar air-glass interface. In the case of the vertical polarization, the displacement is found to increase with the incident angle and subsequently decrease after approximately 48 deg, while in the case of the horizontal polarization, it changes rapidly near the Brewster angle. For a fixed incident angle of 30 deg, the displacement decreases to zero as the polarization angle approaches approximately 39 deg from 0 deg (the horizontal polarization) and then increases in the opposite direction until 90 deg (the vertical polarization).

  18. Spin Hall effect of a light beam in anisotropic metamaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Ming; Zhou Xin-Xing; Luo Hai-Lu; Wen Shuang-Chun

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate a switchable spin Hall effect of light (SHEL) in reflection for three specific dispersion relations at an air-anisotropic metamaterial interface.The displacements of horizontal and vertical polarization components vary with the incident angle at different dispersion relations.The transverse displacements can be obtained with the relevant metamaterial whose refractive index can be arbitrarily tailed.The results of the SHEL in the metamaterial provide a new way for manipulating the transverse displacements of a specific polarization component.

  19. Geometric phase gradient and spin Hall effect of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) of light originates from the spin-orbit interaction, which can be explained in terms of two geometric phases: the Rytov-Vladimirskii-Berry phase and the Pancharatnam-Berry phase. Here we present a unified theoretical description of the SHE based on the two types of geometric phase gradients, and observe experimentally the SHE in structured dielectric metasurfaces induced by the PB phase. Unlike the weak real-space spin-Hall shift induced by the SRB phase occurring at interfacial reflection/refraction, the observed SHE occurs in momentum space is large enough to be measured directly.

  20. Demonstration of large field effect in topological insulator films via a high-κ back gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Y.; Lin, H. Y.; Yang, S. R.; Chen, K. H. M.; Lin, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Young, L. B.; Cheng, C. K.; Fanchiang, Y. T.; Tseng, S. C.; Hong, M.; Kwo, J.

    2016-05-01

    The spintronics applications long anticipated for topological insulators (TIs) has been hampered due to the presence of high density intrinsic defects in the bulk states. In this work we demonstrate the back-gating effect on TIs by integrating Bi2Se3 films 6-10 quintuple layer (QL) thick with amorphous high-κ oxides of Al2O3 and Y2O3. Large gating effect of tuning the Fermi level EF to very close to the band gap was observed, with an applied bias of an order of magnitude smaller than those of the SiO2 back gate, and the modulation of film resistance can reach as high as 1200%. The dependence of the gating effect on the TI film thickness was investigated, and ΔN2D/ΔVg varies with TI film thickness as ˜t-0.75. To enhance the gating effect, a Y2O3 layer thickness 4 nm was inserted into Al2O3 gate stack to increase the total κ value to 13.2. A 1.4 times stronger gating effect is observed, and the increment of induced carrier numbers is in good agreement with additional charges accumulated in the higher κ oxides. Moreover, we have reduced the intrinsic carrier concentration in the TI film by doping Te to Bi2Se3 to form Bi2TexSe1-x. The observation of a mixed state of ambipolar field that both electrons and holes are present indicates that we have tuned the EF very close to the Dirac Point. These results have demonstrated that our capability of gating TIs with high-κ back gate to pave the way to spin devices of tunable EF for dissipationless spintronics based on well-established semiconductor technology.

  1. Technology demonstration: geostatistical and hydrologic analysis of salt areas. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, P.G.; Oberlander, P.L.; Rice, W.A.; Devary, J.L.; Nelson, R.W.; Tucker, P.E.

    1982-09-01

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) requested Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to: (1) use geostatistical analyses to evaluate the adequacy of hydrologic data from three salt regions, each of which contains a potential nuclear waste repository site; and (2) demonstrate a methodology that allows quantification of the value of additional data collection. The three regions examined are the Paradox Basin in Utah, the Permian Basin in Texas, and the Mississippi Study Area. Additional and new data became available to ONWI during and following these analyses; therefore, this report must be considered a methodology demonstration here would apply as illustrated had the complete data sets been available. A combination of geostatistical and hydrologic analyses was used for this demonstration. Geostatistical analyses provided an optimal estimate of the potentiometric surface from the available data, a measure of the uncertainty of that estimate, and a means for selecting and evaluating the location of future data. The hydrologic analyses included the calculation of transmissivities, flow paths, travel times, and ground-water flow rates from hypothetical repository sites. Simulation techniques were used to evaluate the effect of optimally located future data on the potentiometric surface, flow lines, travel times, and flow rates. Data availability, quality, quantity, and conformance with model assumptions differed in each of the salt areas. Report highlights for the three locations are given.

  2. Effect of plasmonic losses on light emission enhancement in quantum-wells coupled to metallic gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Toufik; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka

    2013-12-01

    Recent experimental work has shown significant luminescence enhancement from near-surface quantum-well (QW) structures using metallic grating to convert surface plasmon (SP) modes into radiative modes. This work introduces a detailed theoretical study of plasmonic losses and the role of SPs in improving light extraction from grated light-emitting QW structures, using the fluctuational electrodynamics method. The method explains experimental results demonstrating emission enhancement, light scattering, and plasmonic coupling in the structures. We study these effects in angle-resolved reflectometry and luminescence setups in InGaN QW structures with silver grating. In contrast to experiments, our model allows direct calculation of the optical losses. The model predicts that the plasmonic coupling and scattering increases light emission by a factor of up to three compared to a flat semiconductor structure. This corresponds to reducing the absorption losses from approximately 93% in the ungrated metallic structure to 75% in the grated structure. Lower losses are associated with a significant emission enhancement enabled by the SPs of silver/GaN interfaces, which are present in the blue/green wavelength range, and can be optimized by carefully nanostructuring the metal layer and by the positioning of the QW. In general, the enhancement results from the interplay of mode scattering, conversion of SP energy directly into light, and losses in the metallic grating. The reported losses are very high when compared to the losses present in modern light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Albeit, our work provides tools needed for further optimization of plasmonic light extraction, eventually leading to highly efficient LEDs.

  3. Emission Characteristics and Effect of Battery Drain in "Budget" Curing Lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShaafi, M M; Harlow, J E; Price, H L; Rueggeberg, F A; Labrie, D; AlQahtani, M Q; Price, R B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, "budget" dental light-emitting diode (LED)-based light-curing units (LCUs) have become available over the Internet. These LCUs claim equal features and performance compared to LCUs from major manufacturers, but at a lower cost. This study examined radiant power, spectral emission, beam irradiance profiles, effective emission ratios, and the ability of LCUs to provide sustained output values during the lifetime of a single, fully charged battery. Three examples of each budget LCU were purchased over the Internet (KY-L029A and KY-L036A, Foshan Keyuan Medical Equipment Co, and the Woodpecker LED.B, Guilin Woodpecker Medical Instrument Co). Major dental manufacturers provided three models: Elipar S10 and Paradigm (3M ESPE) and the Bluephase G2 (Ivoclar Vivadent). Radiant power emissions were measured using a laboratory-grade thermopile system, and the spectral emission was captured using a spectroradiometer system. Irradiance profiles at the tip end were measured using a modified laser beam profiler, and the proportion of optical tip area that delivered in excess of 400 mW/cm(2) (termed the effective emission ratio) was displayed using calibrated beam profile images. Emitted power was monitored over sequential exposures from each LCU starting at a fully charged battery state. The results indicated that there was less than a 100-mW/cm(2) difference between manufacturer-stated average tip end irradiance and the measured output. All the budget lights had smaller optical tip areas, and two demonstrated lower effective emission ratios than did the units from the major manufacturers. The budget lights showed discontinuous values of irradiance over their tip ends. One unit delivered extremely high output levels near the center of the light tip. Two of the budget lights were unable to maintain sustained and stable light output as the battery charge decreased with use, whereas those lights from the major manufacturers all provided a sustained light output for at least

  4. LED Lighting System Reliability Modeling and Inference via Random Effects Gamma Process and Copula Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibing Hao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Light emitting diode (LED lamp has attracted increasing interest in the field of lighting systems due to its low energy and long lifetime. For different functions (i.e., illumination and color, it may have two or more performance characteristics. When the multiple performance characteristics are dependent, it creates a challenging problem to accurately analyze the system reliability. In this paper, we assume that the system has two performance characteristics, and each performance characteristic is governed by a random effects Gamma process where the random effects can capture the unit to unit differences. The dependency of performance characteristics is described by a Frank copula function. Via the copula function, the reliability assessment model is proposed. Considering the model is so complicated and analytically intractable, the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method is used to estimate the unknown parameters. A numerical example about actual LED lamps data is given to demonstrate the usefulness and validity of the proposed model and method.

  5. A Visual Demonstration of Solvent Effect in Chemical Kinetics through Blue Bottle Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *R. Azmat

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the study of chemical kinetics, usually solvent effect was explained to show the consequences on rate of reaction theoretically which is difficult to understand for under graduate students. The blue bottle experiment as a “one day activity” can be used to explain well visually the solvent effect through demonstration of color change. Kinetics of reduction of methylene green by sucrose and mannose in pure and aqueous methanol medium in presence of NaOH has been investigated for demonstration of solvent effect. The two sugars sucrose and mannose were selected for the experiment those acts as a reducing agents in a basic solution and reduces the methylene green into colorless form. The progress of this reduction reaction was followed by the color changes that the methylene green goes through in variable percentage of alcohol. When the bottle is shaken the oxygen in the air mixes with the solution and oxidizes the methylene green back to its intermediate state (purple. The color of the solution will gradually change and become purple (intermediate and then colorless in 5-10% methanol but in pure methanol color transition were Blue-> purple-> pink indicate the color due to the alcoholic medium. It was observed that increase in percentage in the solvent composition decrease the rate of reduction. The pink color continues due to alcoholic medium which may be attributed with the solvent effect. The observed variation in reading with solvent compositions has been interpreted in terms of interactions of media with the reacting species and the transitions state involved in this reaction.

  6. Effect of melatonin and lighting schedule on energy metabolism in broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apeldoorn, E.J.; Schrama, J.W.; Mashaly, M.M.; Parmentier, H.K.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of melatonin and lighting schedule on energy metabolism in broiler chickens was studied. Eight groups of six female broiler chickens each were assigned to a continuous lighting schedule [23 h light (L):1 h darkness (D)] or an intermittent lighting schedule (1L:3D), and were fed a diet wit

  7. Advanced high-power pulsed light device to decontaminate food from pathogens: effects on Salmonella typhimurium viability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksiene, Z; Gudelis, V; Buchovec, I; Raudeliuniene, J

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an advanced high-power pulsed light device for decontamination of food matrix and to evaluate its antibacterial efficiency. Key parameters of constructed device-emitted light spectrum, pulse duration, pulse power density, frequency of pulses, dependence of emitted spectrum on input voltage, irradiation homogenicity, possible thermal effects as well as antimicrobial efficiency were evaluated. Antimicrobial efficiency of high-power pulsed light technique was demonstrated and evaluated by two independent methods - spread plate and Miles-Misra method. Viability of Salmonella typhimurium as function of a given light dose (number of pulses) and pulse frequency was examined. According to the data obtained, viability of Salmonella typhimurium reduced by 7 log order after 100 light pulses with power density 133 W cm(-2). In addition, data indicate, that the pulse frequency did not influence the outcome of pathogen inactivation in the region 1-5 Hz. Moreover, no hyperthermic effect was detected during irradiation even after 500 pulses on all shelves with different distance from light source and subsequently different pulse power density (0-252 W cm(-2)). Newly constructed high-power pulsed light technique is effective nonthermal tool for inactivation of Salmonella typhimurium even by 7 log order in vitro. Novel advanced high-power pulsed light device can be a useful tool for development of nonthermal food decontamination technologies.

  8. Cumulative effects in inflation with ultra-light entropy modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achúcarro, Ana; Atal, Vicente; Germani, Cristiano; Palma, Gonzalo A.

    2017-02-01

    In multi-field inflation one or more non-adiabatic modes may become light, potentially inducing large levels of isocurvature perturbations in the cosmic microwave background. If in addition these light modes are coupled to the adiabatic mode, they influence its evolution on super horizon scales. Here we consider the case in which a non-adiabatic mode becomes approximately massless (``ultralight") while still coupled to the adiabatic mode, a typical situation that arises with pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons or moduli. This ultralight mode freezes on super-horizon scales and acts as a constant source for the curvature perturbation, making it grow linearly in time and effectively suppressing the isocurvature component. We identify a Stückelberg-like emergent shift symmetry that underlies this behavior. As inflation lasts for many e-folds, the integrated effect of this source enhances the power spectrum of the adiabatic mode, while keeping the non-adiabatic spectrum approximately untouched. In this case, towards the end of inflation all the fluctuations, adiabatic and non-adiabatic, are dominated by a single degree of freedom.

  9. Transparency Effect of Electrolyte on Light Back-Scattering in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sharifi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, a film of TiO2 particles of ~300 nm size is employed in DSCs as the back reflector film to enhance the light harvesting. In this study, two electrolytes with different transparencies, iodide-based and cobalt-based electrolytes, were used to investigate the transparency effect of electrolytes on light back-scattering from back scattering layer and also to study its effect on the performance of DSCs. The use of cobalt-based electrolyte is recommended from the view point of optical properties as due to the light absorption in electrolytes, the current density losses are 2.9mA/cm2 and 4.2 mA/cm2 in cobalt- and iodide-based electrolytes, respectively, and the transmission of 100% is observed for cobalt-based electrolyte in 500-600 nm in spite of iodide-based electrolyte. Use of light back-scattering layer, unlike iodide-based cell, causes external quantum efficiency in cobalt-base cell to increase for the wavelengths lower than 350 nm since cobalt-base electrolyte has transparency in this region. In addition, optical calculations demonstrate that in the range 400-500 nm, in which dye has a noticeable absorption, absorption loss is 40% and 30% for iodide- and cobalt-based electrolytes, respectively.

  10. Direct Demonstration of the Concept of Unrestricted Effective-Medium Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Zhanna M.; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2014-01-01

    The modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index is defined as one that yields accurate values of a representative set of far-field scattering characteristics (including the scattering matrix) for an object made of randomly heterogeneous materials. We validate the concept of the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index by comparing numerically exact superposition T-matrix results for a spherical host randomly filled with a large number of identical small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie results for a homogeneous spherical counterpart. A remarkable quantitative agreement between the superposition T-matrix and Lorenz-Mie scattering matrices over the entire range of scattering angles demonstrates unequivocally that the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index is a sound (albeit still phenomenological) concept provided that the size parameter of the inclusions is sufficiently small and their number is sufficiently large. Furthermore, it appears that in cases when the concept of the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index works, its actual value is close to that predicted by the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule.

  11. Orally administered whole egg demonstrates antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Mao; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Ogino, Yumi; Yoshida, Junki; Tomonaga, Shozo; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have reported that vegetarian diets are associated with a higher prevalence of major depression. Therefore, we hypothesised that the consumption of animal products, especially eggs, may have positive effects on mental health, especially on major depression, because a previous study reported that egg consumption produces numerous beneficial effects in humans. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic whole-egg treatment on depression-like behaviours in Wistar rats, a control strain, and Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression. In both the rats, either whole-egg solution (5 ml/kg) or distilled water (5 ml/kg) was orally administrated for 35 days. During these periods, the open-field test (OFT) was conducted on the 21st day, and a forced swimming test (FST) was enforced on the 27th and 28th days. On the 36th day, the plasma and brain were collected. Chronic whole-egg treatment did not affect line crossing in the OFT, whereas it reduced the total duration of immobility in the FST on both strains. Furthermore, interestingly, the results indicated the possibility that whole-egg treatment elevated the incorporation of tryptophan into the brain, and the tryptophan concentration in the prefrontal cortex was actually increased by the treatment. This study demonstrated that whole-egg treatment exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. It is suggested that whole egg may be an excellent food for preventing and alleviating the conditions of major depression.

  12. Simultaneously Enhancing Light Emission and Suppressing Efficiency Droop in GaN Microwire-Based Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode by the Piezo-Phototronic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingfu; Peng, Wenbo; Yu, Ruomeng; Zou, Haiyang; Dai, Yejing; Zi, Yunlong; Wu, Changsheng; Li, Shuti; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-06-14

    Achievement of p-n homojuncted GaN enables the birth of III-nitride light emitters. Owing to the wurtzite-structure of GaN, piezoelectric polarization charges present at the interface can effectively control/tune the optoelectric behaviors of local charge-carriers (i.e., the piezo-phototronic effect). Here, we demonstrate the significantly enhanced light-output efficiency and suppressed efficiency droop in GaN microwire (MW)-based p-n junction ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED) by the piezo-phototronic effect. By applying a -0.12% static compressive strain perpendicular to the p-n junction interface, the relative external quantum efficiency of the LED is enhanced by over 600%. Furthermore, efficiency droop is markedly reduced from 46.6% to 7.5% and corresponding droop onset current density shifts from 10 to 26.7 A cm(-2). Enhanced electrons confinement and improved holes injection efficiency by the piezo-phototronic effect are revealed and theoretically confirmed as the physical mechanisms. This study offers an unconventional path to develop high efficiency, strong brightness and high power III-nitride light sources.

  13. Effects of nocturnal light on (clock gene expression in peripheral organs: a role for the autonomic innervation of the liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Cailotto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The biological clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, controls the daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Early studies demonstrated that light exposure not only affects the phase of the SCN but also the functional activity of peripheral organs. More recently it was shown that the same light stimulus induces immediate changes in clock gene expression in the pineal and adrenal, suggesting a role of peripheral clocks in the organ-specific output. In the present study, we further investigated the immediate effect of nocturnal light exposure on clock genes and metabolism-related genes in different organs of the rat. In addition, we investigated the role of the autonomic nervous system as a possible output pathway of the SCN to modify the activity of the liver after light exposure. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we demonstrated that light, applied at different circadian times, affects clock gene expression in a different manner, depending on the time of day and the organ. However, the changes in clock gene expression did not correlate in a consistent manner with those of the output genes (i.e., genes involved in the functional output of an organ. Then, by selectively removing the autonomic innervation to the liver, we demonstrated that light affects liver gene expression not only via the hormonal pathway but also via the autonomic input. CONCLUSION: Nocturnal light immediately affects peripheral clock gene expression but without a clear correlation with organ-specific output genes, raising the question whether the peripheral clock plays a "decisive" role in the immediate (functional response of an organ to nocturnal light exposure. Interestingly, the autonomic innervation of the liver is essential to transmit the light information from the SCN, indicating that the autonomic nervous system is an important gateway for the SCN to cause an immediate resetting of peripheral physiology after phase

  14. Magnetoelectric Effects in Local Light-Matter Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    We study the generic interaction of a monochromatic electromagnetic field with bi-isotropic nanoparticles. Such an interaction is described by dipole-coupling terms associated with the breaking of dual, P- and T-symmetries, including the chirality and the nonreciprocal magnetoelectric effect. We calculate absorption rates, radiation forces, and radiation torques for the nanoparticles and introduce novel characteristics of the field quantifying the transfer of energy, momentum, and angular-momentum in these interactions. In particular, we put forward the concept of 'magnetoelectric energy density', quantifying the local PT-symmetry of the field. Akin to the 'super-chiral' light suggested recently for sensitive local probing of molecular chirality [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 163901 (2010); Science 332, 333 (2011)], here we describe a complex field for sensitive probing of the nonreciprocal magnetoelectric effect in nanoparticles or molecules.

  15. "Demonstrating Masculinity" Via Intimate Partner Aggression: The Moderating Effect of Heavy Episodic Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Claire G; Leone, Ruschelle M; Gallagher, Kathryn E; Parrott, Dominic J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the mediational effect of masculine gender role stress on the relation between adherence to dimensions of a hegemonic masculinity and male-to-female intimate partner physical aggression. Men's history of heavy episodic drinking was also examined as a moderator of the proposed mediation effect. A sample of 392 heterosexual men from the southeastern United States who had been in an intimate relationship within the past year completed measures of hegemonic masculine norms (i.e., status, toughness, and antifemininity), masculine gender role stress, alcohol use patterns, and intimate partner physical aggression. Results indicated that the indirect effects of adherence to the antifemininity and toughness norms on physical aggression toward female intimate partners via masculine gender role stress were significant and marginal, respectively. A significant indirect effect of status was not detected. Moreover, subsequent analyses revealed that the indirect effects of antifemininity and toughness were significant only among men with a history of heavy episodic drinking. These findings suggest that heavy episodic drinking exacerbates a gender-relevant stress pathway for intimate partner aggression among men who adhere to specific norms of masculinity. Overall, results suggest that the proximal effect of heavy episodic drinking focuses men's attention on gender-based schemas associated with antifemininity and toughness, which facilitates partner-directed aggression as a means to demonstrate these aspects of their masculinity. Implications for the intersection between men's adherence to specific norms of hegemonic masculinity, cognitive appraisal of gender relevant situations, and characteristic patterns of alcohol consumption are discussed.

  16. The effects of bluephase LED light on fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malčić, Ana Ivanišević; Pavičić, Ivan; Trošić, Ivančica; Simeon, Paris; Katanec, Davor; Krmek, Silvana Jukić

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Bluephase light emitting diode (LED) light on cell viability, colony-forming ability and proliferation in V79 cell culture and to determine how much the temperature of the nutrient medium rose. Methods: The investigation included a low (L), soft start (S) and high (H) illumination mode for 20, 40 and 80 seconds. The viability was determined by the trypan blue exclusion test, colony-forming ability by counting colonies 7 days after exposure and cell proliferation by the cell counts on 5 post-exposure days. The temperature change during illumination was recorded (0.1°C sensitivity). Results: In each experimental condition, 90–95% of the cells were viable, which was in the same range as the controls. Colony-forming ability was not found to be significantly lower (P<.05). A significant decrease in proliferation was recorded on the 4th post-exposure day with S and H irrespective of time, on the 3rd day with S for 80 s and H for 40 and 80 s, and with S and H for 80 s on the 2nd day (P<.05).The temperature rise was significant with S (P<.05) and H (P<.05), irrespective of exposure duration. Conclusion: Dependent on total energy density, LED blue light affects the mitotic activity of cells in its path to a certain extent. Altered mitotic activity was not noted with illumination at the low power mode (intensity of 421.7 ±1.1 mW/cm2). The greatest temperature rise was 8.3 °C and occurred at the highest intensity and exposure duration. PMID:22904660

  17. Blue light effects on rose photosynthesis and photomorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, F; Girault, T; Douillet, O; Guillemain, G; Sintes, G; Laffaire, M; Ben Ahmed, H; Smiti, S; Huché-Thélier, L; Leduc, N

    2013-01-01

    Through its impact on photosynthesis and morphogenesis, light is the environmental factor that most affects plant architecture. Using light rather than chemicals to manage plant architecture could reduce the impact on the environment. However, the understanding of how light modulates plant architecture is still poor and further research is needed. To address this question, we examined the development of two rose cultivars, Rosa hybrida'Radrazz' and Rosa chinensis'Old Blush', cultivated under two light qualities. Plants were grown from one-node cuttings for 6 weeks under white or blue light at equal photosynthetic efficiencies. While plant development was totally inhibited in darkness, blue light could sustain full development from bud burst until flowering. Blue light reduced the net CO(2) assimilation rate of fully expanded leaves in both cultivars, despite increasing stomatal conductance and intercellular CO(2) concentrations. In 'Radrazz', the reduction in CO(2) assimilation under blue light was related to a decrease in photosynthetic pigment content, while in both cultivars, the chl a/b ratio increased. Surprisingly, blue light could induce the same organogenetic activity of the shoot apical meristem, growth of the metamers and flower development as white light. The normal development of rose plants under blue light reveals the strong adaptive properties of rose plants to their light environment. It also indicates that photomorphogenetic processes can all be triggered by blue wavelengths and that despite a lower assimilation rate, blue light can provide sufficient energy via photosynthesis to sustain normal growth and development in roses.

  18. effect of light intensity on the cure characteristics of photo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-05

    May 5, 2012 ... Design: A laboratory based cross sectional study. Setting: Public and ... set out to determine the light intensity emitted by light curing units ... polymerised with it. MATERIAL AND METHODS ..... J. of Oral Rehab. 2005; 32:.

  19. Demonstrating a lack of brand/cause effects on point of sale donations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Joshua T.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Point of sale cause-related marketing has raised over $2 billion for charities over the past 30 years, yet the subject remains largely unexplored in academic literature. The subject of brand/cause fit, however, is prolific throughout extant research, with many studies showing that high congruence between a company and a charity is necessary to achieve philanthropic success. This paper challenges current marketing thinking both conceptually and empirically. Employing tests of no-effect hypotheses following the guidelines set out by Cortina and Folger (1998, it is established that, in the point of sale cause-related marketing context, the traditional effects of brand/cause fits do not apply. Across three studies involving experimental designs and over 500 respondents, the results of one-way ANOVA analyses consistently demonstrate that a low brand/cause fit can be just as effective as a high/brand cause fit. These findings contribute to a profound understanding of social efforts such as cause-related marketing may not be as simple or easily understood as was once thought.

  20. Effects of light-emitting diode light v. fluorescent light on growing performance, activity levels and well-being of non-beak-trimmed W-36 pullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K; Xin, H; Settar, P

    2017-06-05

    More energy-efficient, readily dimmable, long-lasting and more affordable light-emitting diode (LED) lights are increasingly finding applications in poultry production facilities. Despite anecdotal evidence about the benefits of such lighting on bird performance and behavior, concrete research data were lacking. In this study, a commercial poultry-specific LED light (dim-to-blue, controllable correlated color temperature (CCT) from 4500 to 5300 K) and a typical compact fluorescent light (CFL) (soft white, CCT=2700 K) were compared with regards to their effects on growing performance, activity levels, and feather and comb conditions of non-beak-trimmed W-36 pullets during a 14-week rearing period. A total of 1280-day-old pullets in two successive batches, 640 birds each, were used in the study. For each batch, pullets were randomly assigned to four identical litter-floor rooms equipped with perches, two rooms per light regimen, 160 birds per room. Body weight, BW uniformity (BWU), BW gain (BWG) and cumulative mortality rate (CMR) of the pullets were determined every 2 weeks from day-old to 14 weeks of age (WOA). Activity levels of the pullets at 5 to 14 WOA were delineated by movement index. Results revealed that pullets under the LED and CFL lights had comparable BW (1140±5 g v. 1135±5 g, P=0.41), BWU (90.8±1.0% v. 91.9±1.0%, P=0.48) and CMR (1.3±0.6% v. 2.7±0.6%, P=0.18) at 14 WOA despite some varying BWG during the rearing. Circadian activity levels of the pullets were higher under the LED light than under the CFL light, possibly resulting from differences in spectrum and/or perceived light intensity between the two lights. No feather damage or comb wound was apparent in either light regimen at the end of the rearing period. The results contribute to understanding the impact of emerging LED lights on pullets rearing which is a critical component of egg production.

  1. Effects of Pupil Diameter on Light Detection and Temporal Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachel S Li; Andrew W Siu; Johnny C Liyu; Elice C Chan

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the effects of pupil variation on light detection and temporal modulation across the central visual field.Methods:Light detection sensitivity (LDS) and low flickering frequency (6Hz) temporal modulation sensitivity (TMS) of 20 young subjects were measured from the central visual field of the right eyes using an automated perimeter (Medmont M600). The measurements were taken under 3 artificial pupils, I.e. 3 mm, 4.3 mm and 6 mm diameters.The sensitivities were grouped and averaged for different retinal eccentricities(3°, 6°, 10° and 15°).Results:TMS and LDS were reduced with increasing retinal eccentricities( P < 0.001)and decreasing pupil diameters( P < 0.001). TMS collected from all pupil diameters were significantly different from each other( P < 0.001). Similarly, LDS under 3 mm pupil was statistically different from those of 4.3 mm and 6 mm(P < 0.003). Comparison of the hills of vision showed that pupil variation resulted in significantly different slopes (P=0.001).The slopes were also found to be significantly different between TMS and LDS (P=0.012).Conclusions: The data showed that dilated pupil resulted in significantly higher sensitivities than those of smaller pupil for both visual functions. The difference in the slopes of hills of vision also suggested that the variation in retinal illumination affected the visual responses differently at various retinal eccentricitities for TMS and LDS.

  2. Chiral effective theory with a light scalar and lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Soto, J; Tarrús, J

    2011-01-01

    We extend the usual chiral perturbation theory framework ($\\chi$PT) to allow the inclusion of a light dynamical isosinglet scalar. Using lattice QCD results, and a few phenomenological inputs, we explore the parameter space of the effective theory. The extended theory collects already at LO the ball park contribution to the pion mass and decay constant, thus achieving an accuracy that is comparable to the one of the standard $\\chi$PT at NLO results. We check explicitly that radiative corrections do not spoil this behavior and keep the theory stable under mild variations of the parameters. The parameter sets that are compatible with the current mass and width of the sigma resonance turn out to reproduce the experimental values of the S-wave pion-pion scattering lengths very accurately. We also extract the average value of the two light quark--masses and evaluate the impact of the dynamical singlet field in the low--energy constants $\\bar{l}_3$ and $\\bar{l}_4$ of $\\chi$PT. We emphasize that more accurate lattic...

  3. Cumulative effects in inflation with ultra-light entropy modes

    CERN Document Server

    Achúcarro, Ana; Germani, Cristiano; Palma, Gonzalo A

    2016-01-01

    In multi-field inflation one or more non-adiabatic modes may become light, potentially inducing large levels of isocurvature perturbations in the cosmic microwave background. If in addition these light modes are coupled to the adiabatic mode, they influence its evolution on super horizon scales. Here we consider the case in which a non-adiabatic mode becomes approximately massless ("ultralight") while still coupled to the adiabatic mode, a typical situation that arises with pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons or moduli. This ultralight mode freezes on super-horizon scales and acts as a constant source for the curvature perturbation, making it grow linearly in time. We identify a St\\"uckelberg-like emergent shift symmetry that underlies this behavior. As inflation lasts for many e-folds, the integrated effect of this source enhances the power spectrum of the adiabatic mode, while keeping the non-adiabatic spectrum approximately untouched. In this case, towards the end of inflation all the fluctuations, adiabatic and...

  4. Light quality and temperature effects on antirrhinum growth and development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KHATTAK Abdul Mateen; PEARSON Simon

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to examine the effects of light quality on the growth and development of antirrhinum under three different temperatures 19℃, 24℃ and 27℃ in glasshouses. Five different colour filters (i.e. 'Red absorbing', 'Blue absorbing', 'Blue and Red absorbing' and two 'partially Blue absorbing' materials) were tested, with one clear polythene as a control. Plant height, internode length and leaf area were significantly affected by the spectral filters as well as the temperature.Analysis of color filter's effect on presumed photoreceptors to exist indicated that antirrhinum plant height was regulated by the action of a blue acting photoreceptor (BAP) and not the phytochrome. There was no evidence for an effect ofphytochrome or BAP on time to flowering, however, increasing temperature levels effectively decreased the time to flowering. To predict the effects of different spectral qualities and temperature, simple models were created from data on plant height, internode length and time to flowering. These models were then applied to simulate the potential benefits of spectral filters and temperature in manipulation of growth control and flowering in antirrhinum.

  5. Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder. The Effects of Timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEESTERS, Y; JANSEN, JHC; BEERSMA, DGM; BOUHUYS, AL; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    Background. Sixty-eight patients with seasonal affective disorder participated in a 10 000-lux light treatment study in which two questions were addressed: do response rates differ when the light is applied at different times of the day and does short-term rank ordering of morning and evening light

  6. Effect of light-emitting diode vs. fluorescent lighting on laying hens in aviary hen houses: Part 1 - Operational characteristics of lights and production traits of hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, H; Zhao, Y; Wang, T; Ning, Z; Xin, H

    2016-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) lights are becoming more affordable for agricultural applications. Despite many lab-scale studies concerning impact of LED on poultry, little research has been documented under field production conditions, especially for laying hens. This 15-month field study was carried out to evaluate the effects of LED vs. fluorescent (FL) lights on laying hens (Dekalb white breed) using 4 (2 pairs) aviary hen houses each at a nominal capacity of 50,000 hens. The evaluation was done regarding operational characteristics of the lights and hen production traits. The results show that spatial distribution of the LED light was less uniform than that of the FL light. Light intensity of the LED light decreased by 27% after 3,360 h use but remained quite steady from 3,360 to 5,760 h use. Eleven out of 762 (1.44%) LED lamps (new at onset of the study) in the 2 houses failed during the 15-month experiment period. The neck area of the LED lamp was hottest, presumably the primary reason for the lamp failure as cracks were noticed in the neck region of all failed LED lamps. No differences were observed in egg weight, hen-day egg production, feed use, and mortality rate between LED and FL regimens. However, hens under the FL had higher eggs per hen housed and better feed conversion than those under the LED during 20 to 70 wk production (P Hens under the LED tended to have less feather uniformity and insulation than those under the FL (P hens under the LED showed a larger median avoidance distance than those under the FL at 36 wk age (P hens under the LED were more alert; but no difference at 60 wk age. More comparative research to quantify behavioral and production responses of different breeds of hens to LED vs. FL lighting seems warranted.

  7. Microwave phase shifter with controllable power response based on slow-and fast-light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, Jose

    2009-01-01

    We suggest and experimentally demonstrate a method for increasing the tunable rf phase shift of semiconductor waveguides while at the same time enabling control of the rf power. This method is based on the use of slow- and fast-light effects in a cascade of semiconductor optical amplifiers combined...

  8. Role of combined effect of visible light and ionizing radiation on stimulation of plant development. [. gamma. rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Bagabova, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    It was demonstrated that developmental processes activated in plants by quanta of red light (sprouting of dormant salad seeds, anthocyan synthesis) are very sensitive to ..gamma.. quanta, and that the combined effect of these two factors is important to expression of stimulated development after presowing exposure of seeds to ..gamma.. radiation.

  9. The Light Velocity Casimir Effect Does the Velocity of Light Increase when Propagating Between the Casimir Plates?

    CERN Document Server

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01

    We propose experiments that might be set up to detect the increase in the velocity of light in a vacuum in the laboratory frame for photons travelling between (and perpendicular to) the Casimir plates in a vacuum. The Casimir plates are two closely spaced, conductive plates, where an attractive force is observed to exist between the plates called the 'Casimir Force'. We propose that the velocity of light in a vacuum increases when propagating between two transparent Casimir Plates. We call this effect the 'Light Velocity Casimir Effect' or LVC effect. The LVC effect happens because the vacuum energy density in between the plates is lower than that outside the Casimir plates. The conductive plates disallow certain frequencies of electrically charged virtual particles to exist inside the plates, thus lowering the inside vacuum particle density, compared to the density outside the plates. The reduced (electrically charged) virtual particle density results in fewer photon scattering events inside the plates, whic...

  10. First demonstration of orange-yellow light emitter devices in InGaP/InAlGaP laser structure using strain-induced quantum well intermixing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Mohammed A.; Al-Jabr, Ahmad A.; Elafandy, Rami T.; Oubei, Hassan M.; Alias, Mohd S.; Alnahhas, Bayan A.; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Ng, Tien Khee; Shehata, Mohamed; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel strain-induced quantum well intermixing (QWI) technique is employed on InGaP/InAlGaP material system to promote interdiffusion via application of a thick-dielectric encapsulant layer, in conjunction with cycle annealing at elevated temperature. Broad area devices fabricated from this novel cost-effective QWI technique lased at room-temperature at a wavelength as short as 608nm with a total output power of ~46mW. This is the shortest- wavelength electrically pumped visible semiconductor laser, and the first report of lasing action yet reported from post- growth interdiffused process. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the first yellow superluminescent diode (SLD) at a wavelength of 583nm with a total two-facet output power of ~4.5mW - the highest optical power ever reported at this wavelength in this material system. The demonstration of the yellow SLD without complicated multiquantum barriers to suppress the carrier overflow will have a great impact in realizing the yellow laser diode.

  11. First demonstration of orange-yellow light emitter devices in InGaP/InAlGaP laser structure using strain-induced quantum well intermixing technique

    KAUST Repository

    Majid, Mohammed A.

    2016-03-07

    In this paper, a novel strain-induced quantum well intermixing (QWI) technique is employed on InGaP/InAlGaP material system to promote interdiffusion via application of a thick-dielectric encapsulant layer, in conjunction with cycle annealing at elevated temperature. Broad area devices fabricated from this novel cost-effective QWI technique lased at room-temperature at a wavelength as short as 608nm with a total output power of ~46mW. This is the shortest- wavelength electrically pumped visible semiconductor laser, and the first report of lasing action yet reported from post- growth interdiffused process. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the first yellow superluminescent diode (SLD) at a wavelength of 583nm with a total two-facet output power of ~4.5mW - the highest optical power ever reported at this wavelength in this material system. The demonstration of the yellow SLD without complicated multiquantum barriers to suppress the carrier overflow will have a great impact in realizing the yellow laser diode. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  12. The effects of concentrated ultraviolet light on high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of stability in the performance of solar cells is clearly recognized as fundamental. Some of the highest efficiency silicon solar cells demonstrated to date, such as the Point Contact solar cell and the Passivated Emitter solar cell, rely upon the passivation of cell surfaces in order to minimize recombination, which reduces cell power output. Recently, it has been shown that exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light of wavelengths present in the terrestrial solar spectrum can damage a passivating silicon-oxide interface and increase recombination. In this study, we compared the performance of Point Contact and Passivated Emitter solar cells after exposure to UV light. We also examined the effect of UV exposure on oxide-passivated silicon wafers. We found that current Passivated Emitter designs are stable at both one-sun and under concentrated sunlight. The evolution of Point Contact concentrator cell performance shows a clear trend towards more stable cells. 15 refs., 18 figs.

  13. Conformational Effects of UV Light on DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haorong; Li, Ruixin; Li, Shiming; Andréasson, Joakim; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2017-02-01

    The responses of DNA origami conformation to UV radiation of different wavelengths and doses are investigated. Short- and medium-wavelength UV light can cause photo-lesions in DNA origami. At moderate doses, the lesions do not cause any visible defects in the origami, nor do they significantly affect the hybridization capability. Instead, they help relieve the internal stress in the origami structure and restore it to the designed conformation. At high doses, staple dissociation increases which causes structural disintegration. Long-wavelength UV does not show any effect on origami conformation by itself. We show that this UV range can be used in conjunction with photoactive molecules for photo-reconfiguration, while avoiding any damage to the DNA structures.

  14. Ginger: Measuring Gravitomagnetic Effects by Means of Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    GINGER is a proposal for a new experiment aimed to the detection of the gravito-magnetic Lense-Thirring effect at the surface of the Earth. A three-dimensional set of ring lasers will be mounted on a rigid "monument". In a ring laser a light beam traveling counterclockwise is superposed to another beam traveling in the opposite sense. The anisotropy in the propagation leads to standing waves with slightly different frequencies in the two directions; the resulting beat frequency is proportional to the absolute rotation rate in space, including the gravito-magnetic drag. The experiment is planned to be built in the Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy and is based on an international collaboration among four Italian groups, the Technische Universität München and the University of Canterbury in Christchurch (NZ).

  15. ESWT and alendronate sodium demonstrate equal protective effects in osteoarthritis of the knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Chou, Wen-Yi; Hsu, Shan-Ling; Huang, Chien-Yiu; Cheng, Jai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and alendronate sodium (alendronate) in osteoarthritis (OA) of rat knees. The control group was subjected to a sham surgery and did not receive either ESWT or alendronate treatment. The OA group underwent anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and medial meniscectomy (MM) surgery and did not receive either ESWT or alendronate. The ESWT group underwent ACLT and MM surgery and received ESWT after the surgery. The alendronate group received alendronate after ACLT and MM surgery. The evaluations included radiograph, bone mineral density (BMD), serum C-telopeptide collagen II (CTX-II), cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP), alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, histopathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiographs at 12 weeks showed pronounced OA changes in the OA group. The BMD values, CTX-II, COMP, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin showed no significant difference between ESWT and alendronate groups. In histopathology, the Mankin and Safranin O scores significantly increased in the OA, ESWT and alendronate groups, but without any significant difference between the ESWT and alendronate groups. In immunohistochemical analysis, the von Willebrand factor (vWF), vascular endothelial factor (VEGF), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), and osteocalcin expressions in articular cartilage and subchondral bone showed a significant decrease in the OA group, but no difference was noted between the ESWT and alendronate groups. In conclusion, ESWT and alendronate sodium demonstrate equal protective effects from developing osteoarthritis of the knee in rats.

  16. Experimental assessment of thermal effects of high power density light stimulation for optogenetics control of deep brain structures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senova, Suhan; Scisniak, Ilona; Chiang, Chih Chieh; Doignon, Isabelle; Martin, Claire; Palfi, Stephane; Chaillet, Antoine; Pain, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    2D surface maps of light distribution and temperature increase were recorded in wild type anesthetized rats brains during 90s light stimulation at 478nm (blue) and 638nm (red) with continuous or pulsed optical stimulations with corresponding power ranging from 100 up to 1200 mW/mm² at the output of an optical fiber. Post mortem maps were recorded in the same animals to assess the cooling effect of blood flow. Post mortem histological analysis were carried out to assess whether high power light stimulations had phototoxic effects or could trigger non physiological functional activation. Temperature increase remains below physiological changes (0,5 -1°) for stimulations up to 400mW/mm² at 40Hz. . Histology did not show significant irreversible modifications or damage to the tissues. The spatial profile of light distribution and heat were correlated and demonstrate as expected a rapid attenuation with diatnce to the fiber.

  17. Blue light-induced immunosuppression in Bactrocera dorsalis adults, as a carryover effect of larval exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, K; Noor, M; Hori, M; Ali, A; Hussain, A; Peng, W; Chang, C-J; Zhang, H

    2017-05-09

    Detrimental effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on living organisms are well understood, little is known about the effects of blue light irradiation. Although a recent study revealed that blue light caused more harmful effects on insects than UV light and blue light irradiation killed insect pests of various orders including Diptera, the effects of blue light on physiology of insects are still largely unknown. Here we studied the effects of blue light irradiation on cuticular melanin in larval and the immune response in adult stage of Bactrocera dorsalis. We also evaluated the effects of blue light exposure in larval stage on various age and mass at metamorphosis and the mediatory role of cuticular melanin in carryover effects of larval stressors across metamorphosis. We found that larvae exposed to blue light decreased melanin contents in their exoskeleton with smaller mass and delayed metamorphosis than insects reared without blue light exposure. Across metamorphosis, lower melanotic encapsulation response and higher susceptibility to Beauveria bassiana was detected in adults that had been exposed to blue light at their larval stage, thereby constituting the first evidence that blue light impaired adult immune function in B. dorsalis as a carryover effect of larval exposure.

  18. Laser light propagation in adipose tissue and laser effects on adipose cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarte, Efraín; Rebolledo, Aldo; Gutierrez, Oscar; Criollo, William; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, José; Ramírez, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    Recently Neira et al. have presented a new liposuction technique that demonstrated the movement of fat from inside to outside of the cell, using a low-level laser device during a liposuction procedure with Ultrawet solution. The clinical observations, allowed this new surgical development, started a set of physical, histological and pharmacological studies aimed to determine the mechanisms involved in the observed fat mobilization concomitant to external laser application in liposuction procedures. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, studies show that the cellular arrangement of normal adipose tissue changes when laser light from a diode laser: 10 mW, 635 nm is applied. Laser exposures longer than 6 minutes cause the total destruction of the adipocyte panicles. Detailed observation of the adipose cells show that by short irradiation times (less than four minutes) the cell membrane exhibits dark zones, that collapse by longer laser exposures. Optical measurements show that effective penetration length depends on the laser intensity. Moreover, the light scattering is enhanced by diffraction and subsequent interference effects, and the tumescent solution produces a clearing of the tissue optical medium. Finally, isolate adipose cell observation show that fat release from adipocytes is a concomitant effect between the tumescent solution (adrenaline) and laser light, revealing a synergism which conduces to the aperture, and maybe the disruption, of the cell membrane. All these studies were consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from inside the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides a strong modification of the cellular membranes.

  19. Realization of effective light trapping and omnidirectional antireflection in smooth surface silicon nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W Q; Oh, J I; Shen, W Z

    2011-02-11

    We have successfully fabricated well-ordered silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays of smooth surface by using a low-cost and facile Ag-assisted chemical etching technique. We have experimentally found that the reflectance can be significantly suppressed (absorption in SiNW arrays, we have obtained a photocurrent enhancement of up to 425% per unit volume of material as compared to crystalline Si, implying that effective light trapping can be realized in the as-grown samples. In addition, we have demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that the as-grown samples have an omnidirectional high-efficiency antireflection property.

  20. Illumination Effect of Laser Light in Foggy Objects Using an Active Imaging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Yong-Jin; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Active imaging techniques usually provide improved image information when compared to passive imaging techniques. Active vision is a direct visualization technique using an artificial illuminant. Range-gated imaging (RGI) technique is one of active vision technologies. The RGI technique extracts vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, objects are illuminated for ultra-short time by a high intensity illuminant and then the light reflected from objects is captured by a highly sensitive image sensor with the exposure of ultra-short time. The Range-gated imaging is an emerging technology in the field of surveillance for security application, especially in the visualization of darken night or foggy environment. Although RGI viewing was discovered in the 1960's, this technology is currently more applicable by virtue of the rapid development of optical and sensor technologies, such as highly sensitive imaging sensor and ultra-short pulse laser light. Especially, this system can be adopted in robot-vision system by virtue of the compact system configuration. During the past decades, several applications of this technology have been applied in target recognition and in harsh environments, such as fog, underwater vision. Also, this technology has been demonstrated range imaging based on range-gated imaging. Laser light having a short pulse width is usually used for the range-gated imaging system. In this paper, an illumination effect of laser light in foggy objects is studied using a range-gated imaging system. The used imaging system consists of an ultra-short pulse (0.35 ns) laser light and a gated imaging sensor. The experiment is carried out to monitor objects in a box filled by fog. In this paper, the effects by fog particles in range-gated imaging technique are studied. Edge blurring and range distortion are the generated by fog particles.

  1. Red light sensitive heterojunction organic field-effect transistors based on neodymium phthalocyanine as photosensitive layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Wenli; Tang, Yu [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yao, Bo [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Department of Physics, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China); Zhou, Maoqing; Luo, Xiao; Li, Yao; Zhong, Junkang; Sun, Lei [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Peng, Yingquan, E-mail: yqpeng@lzu.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, South Tianshui Road 222#, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-08-31

    Compared with organic photodiodes, photoresponsive organic field-effect transistors (photOFETs) exhibit higher sensitivity and lower noise. The performance of photOFETs based on conventional single layer structure is generally poor due to the low carrier mobility of the active channel materials. We demonstrate a high performance photOFET operating in red light with a structure of C60/neodymium phthalocyanine (NdPc{sub 2}) planar heterojunction. PhotOFETs based on single-layer NdPc{sub 2} and C60/NdPc{sub 2} heterojunction (denoted as NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs and C60/NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs, respectively) were fabricated and characterized. It is concluded that the photOFETs with heterojunction structure showed superior performance compared to that of single layer photOFETs. And for red light with a wavelength of 655 nm, C60/NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs exhibited a large photoresponsivity of ~ 0.8 A/W, which is approximately 62 times larger than that of NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs under the same conditions. The high performance of C60/NdPc{sub 2}-photOFETs is attributed to its high light absorption coefficient, high exciton dissociation efficiency and high carrier mobility. - Highlights: • The mobility of light-sensitive organic materials is generally low. • We fabricated C60/NdPc{sub 2} photoresponsive organic field-effect transistors (photOFETs). • The performance of C60/NdPc{sub 2} photOFETs is superior than single-layer NdPc{sub 2} photOFETs. • C60/NdPc{sub 2} photOFETs exhibited a large photoresponsivity of ~ 0.8 A/W for red light.

  2. Light interacting with atomic ensembles: collective, cooperative and mesoscopic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Guerin, W; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative scattering has been the subject of intense research in the last years. In this article, we discuss the concept of cooperative scattering from a broad perspective. We briefly review the various collective effects that occur when light interacts with an ensemble of atoms. We show that some effects that have been recently discussed in the context of "single-photon superradiance", or cooperative scattering in the linear-optics regime, can also be explained by "standard optics", i.e., using macroscopic quantities such as the susceptibility or the diffusion coefficient. We explain why some collective effects depend on the atomic density, and others on the optical depth. In particular, we show that, for a large and dilute atomic sample driven by a far-detuned laser, the decay of the fluorescence, which exhibits superradiant and subradiant dynamics, depends only on the on-resonance optical depth. We also discuss the link between concepts that are independently studied in the quantum-optics community and i...

  3. Experimental Demonstration of Effective Medium Approximation Breakdown in Deeply Subwavelength All-Dielectric Multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Andryieuski, Andrei; Takayama, Osamu;

    2015-01-01

    stacks are composed of alternating alumina and titania layers fabricated using atomic layer deposition. For light incident on such multilayers at angles near the total internal reflection, we observe pronounced differences in the reflectance spectra for structures with 10- vs 20-nm thick layers, as well...

  4. Effects of light wavelengths on extracellular and capsular polysaccharide production by Nostoc flagelliforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pei-pei; Sun, Ying; Jia, Shi-ru; Zhong, Cheng; Tan, Zhi-lei

    2014-05-25

    The influences of different wavelengths of light (red 660nm, yellow 590nm, green 520nm, blue 460nm, purple 400nm) and white light on extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) production by Nostoc flagelliforme in liquid culture were demonstrated in this study. The results showed that, compared with white light, red and blue lights significantly increased both EPS and CPS production while yellow light reduced their production; purple and green lights stimulated EPS production but inhibited CPS formation. Nine constituent monosaccharides and one uronic acid were detected in both EPS and CPS, and their ratios showed significant differences among treatment with different light wavelengths. However, the advanced structure of EPS and CPS from various light conditions did not present obvious difference through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction characterization. These findings establish a basis for development of high-yielding polysaccharide production process and understanding their regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of coloured light on Ipomoea purpurea growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surducan, Vasile; Lung, Ildiko; Surducan, Emanoil

    2009-08-01

    Ipomoea purpurea is a climbing ornamental plant native to Mexico. The paper is describing the experimental setup and results for indoor growing plants exposed to white LED light (inside a reference chamber) and four different wavelength LED lights (inside a measure chamber). Four growing experiments of 12-15 days, took place in identical environmental conditions (identical temperature and relative humidity inside the reference and measure chambers, similar lighting conditions and soil moisture). At the end of the experiments, the plant chlorophyll and xanthophylls content have been measured and the plant aspect (vegetal mass, leaves colour and robustness) has been observed. The smallest content in chlorophyll (a and b) was developed by the plants growth in blue light (480 nm), however those plants where 10% taller than plants growth in white light, but less robust. The higher content in carotenoids and xanthophylls was observed in plants which growth in white and red light.

  6. Piezo-phototronic effect-induced dual-mode light and ultrasound emissions from ZnS:Mn/PMN-PT thin-film structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Gao, Guanyin; Chan, Helen L W; Dai, Jiyan; Wang, Yu; Hao, Jianhua

    2012-04-03

    Electric-field-controllable luminescence of a ZnS:Mn/PMN-PT system is demonstrated. The light-emission of ZnS:Mn is caused by the piezoelectric potential, resulting from the converse piezoelectric effect of the PMN-PT substrate. Simultaneous generation of light and ultrasound waves is observed in this single system, which offers great potential to develop a dual-modal source combing light and ultrasonic waves for various applications.

  7. Direct effects of ethane dimethanesulphonate on epididymal function in adult rats. An in vitro demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinefelter, G.L.; Roberts, N.L.; Suarez, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that the Leydig cell toxicant ethane dimethanesulphonate (EDS) produces multiple effects on the epididymis after a single in vivo exposure. To determine whether any of the perturbations were mediated by a direct action of the compound, we used a novel system for the coculture of epididymal epithelial cells and sperm from the caput epididymidis. This system maintains the morphologic integrity and cell polarity of the epididymal epithelial cells before and during coculture, and the sperm recovered after coculture have intact plasma and acrosomal membranes. In addition, several functions required for epididymal sperm maturation are expressed, including the secretion of protein by the epididymal epithelium, the association of secreted protein with the plasma membrane of cocultured sperm, and the acquisition of progressive motility by cocultured sperm. In vitro exposure of epididymal epithelial cells and sperm to EDS results in a significant decline in protein secretion by the epithelial cells during coculture, and in particular, a dose-dependent decline in a 36- to 38-kd protein (PI 4.0 to 4.5) and a 34- to 36-kd protein (PI 4.5 to 5.0). Moreover, these and other proteins are not recovered from the sperm membrane of cocultured sperm after EDS treatment. Finally, EDS results in a dose-dependent decline in the percentage of both motile and progressively motile sperm recovered after coculture compared with that of sperm from untreated cocultures.

  8. Effect of science magic applied in interactive lecture demonstrations on conceptual understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufiq, Muhammad; Suhandi, Andi; Liliawati, Winny

    2017-08-01

    Research about the application of science magic-assisting Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILD) has been conducted. This research is aimed at providing description about the comparison of the improvement of the conceptual understanding of lesson on pressure between students who receive physics lesson through science magic-assisting ILD and students who receive physics lesson through ILD without science magic. This research used a quasi-experiment methods with Control Group Pretest-Posttest Design. The subject of the research is all students of class VIII in one of MTs (Islamic junior high school) in Pekalongan. Research samples were selected using random sampling technique. Data about students' conceptual understanding was collected using test instrument of conceptual understanding in the form of multiple choices. N-gain average calculation was performed in order to determine the improvement of students' conceptual understanding. The result of the research shows that conceptual understanding of students on lesson about pressure who received lesson with ILD using science magic is higher than students who received lesson with ILD without science magic . Therefore, the conclusion is that the application of science magic ILD is more effective to improve the conceptual understanding of lesson on pressure.

  9. Dynamic Memory Cells Using MoS2 Field-Effect Transistors Demonstrating Femtoampere Leakage Currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Chaitanya U; Xu, Weichao; Su, Yang; Robbins, Matthew C; Kim, Chris H; Koester, Steven J

    2016-09-27

    Two-dimensional semiconductors such as transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are of tremendous interest for scaled logic and memory applications. One of the most promising TMDs for scaled transistors is molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and several recent reports have shown excellent performance and scalability for MoS2 MOSFETs. An often overlooked feature of MoS2 is that its wide band gap (1.8 eV in monolayer) and high effective masses should lead to extremely low off-state leakage currents. These features could be extremely important for dynamic memory applications where the refresh rate is the primary factor affecting the power consumption. Theoretical predictions suggest that leakage currents in the 10(-18) to 10(-15) A/μm range could be possible, even in scaled transistor geometries. Here, we demonstrate the operation of one- and two-transistor dynamic memory circuits using MoS2 MOSFETs. We characterize the retention times in these circuits and show that the two-transistor memory cell reveals MoS2 MOSFETs leakage currents as low as 1.7 × 10(-15) A/μm, a value that is below the noise floor of conventional DC measurements. These results have important implications for the future use of MoS2 MOSFETs in low-power circuit applications.

  10. Clinical effectiveness of the massachusetts childhood obesity research demonstration initiative among low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveras, Elsie M; Perkins, Meghan; Anand, Shikha; Woo Baidal, Jennifer A; Nelson, Candace C; Kamdar, Neil; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Gortmaker, Steven L; Barrett, Jessica L; Davison, Kirsten K; Land, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    To examine the extent to which a clinical intervention resulted in reduced BMI z scores among 2- to 12-year-old children compared to routine practice (treatment as usual [TAU]). The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) project is a multifaceted initiative to prevent childhood obesity among low-income children. At the federally qualified community health centers (FQHCs) of two communities (Intervention Site #1 and #2), the following were implemented: (1) pediatric weight management training, (2) electronic decision supports for clinicians, (3) on-site Healthy Weight Clinics, (4) community health worker integration, and (5) healthful clinical environment changes. One FQHC in a demographically matched community served as the TAU site. Using electronic health records, we assessed BMI z scores and used linear mixed models to examine BMI z score change over 2 years in each intervention site compared to a TAU site. Compared to children in the TAU site (n = 2,286), children in Intervention Site #2 (n = 1,368) had a significant decline in BMI z scores following the start of the intervention (-0.16 units/y; 95% confidence interval: -0.21 to -0.12). No evidence of an effect was found in Intervention Site #1 (n = 111). The MA-CORD clinical interventions were associated with modest improvement in BMI z scores in one of two intervention communities compared to a TAU community. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  11. High cortisol awakening response is associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus Per Juul; Lunde, Marianne Anita; Undén, M;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the predictive validity of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in patients with non-seasonal major depression. METHOD: Patients were treated with sertraline in combination with bright or dim light therapy for a 5-week period. Saliva cortisol levels were measured in 63...... patients, as an awakening profile, before medication and light therapy started. The CAR was calculated by using three time-points: awakening and 20 and 60 min after awakening. RESULTS: Patients with low CAR had a very substantial effect of bright light therapy compared with dim light therapy, whereas...... patients with a high CAR had no effect of bright light therapy compared with dim light therapy. CONCLUSION: High CAR was associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy. This result raises the question of whether bright light acts through a mechanism different from...

  12. Effect of magnetic field of light on refractive index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Tao

    2004-01-01

    Light refraction in a medium results from energy exchange between the medium and the magnetic field of the light. Formulas of refractive index, that is, the ratio of light speed in vacuum to light speed in the medium, were derived with the inductor model of electron cloud and the law of energy conservation. Refractive indices of several media were calculated using the formulas derived, and the calculated results are in agreement with the results measured. The anisotropy and the nonlinearity of the refractive index are explained with the theory described in this work.

  13. Paterno`-Bu¨chi Reaction as a Demonstration of Chemical Kinetics and Synthetic Photochemistry Using a Light Emitting Diode Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew P.; Agger, Jonathan; Wong, Lu Shin

    2015-01-01

    The Paterno`-Bu¨chi photocycloaddition reaction is used as the basis for physical-organic final-year undergraduate laboratory experiments designed to emphasize the multidisciplinary approach to modern-day chemical practice. These reactions are performed using commercially available LED-based light sources, which offer a convenient and safe tool…

  14. Paterno`-Bu¨chi Reaction as a Demonstration of Chemical Kinetics and Synthetic Photochemistry Using a Light Emitting Diode Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew P.; Agger, Jonathan; Wong, Lu Shin

    2015-01-01

    The Paterno`-Bu¨chi photocycloaddition reaction is used as the basis for physical-organic final-year undergraduate laboratory experiments designed to emphasize the multidisciplinary approach to modern-day chemical practice. These reactions are performed using commercially available LED-based light sources, which offer a convenient and safe tool…

  15. Effects of light exposure and sleep displacement on dim light melatonin onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, MCM; Beersma, DGM; Korte, HJ; Van den Hoofdakker, RH

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to induce in two different ways, a phase-angle difference between the circadian pacemaker and the imposed sleep-wake cycle in humans, we intended to: (i) shift the circadian pacemaker by exposure to bright light and keep the timing of the sleep-wake cycle fixed; and (ii)

  16. LIGHT / DARK PREFERENCE IN Danio rerio: EFFECTS OF LIGHT EXPOSURE DURATION AND DAY PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Alberto Gellis de Mattos Dias

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The animals have anatomical and physiological structures influenced by luminosity. In fish, the pineal gland cells contain photoreceptors and the suprachiasmatic nucleus seems to be involved in biological rhythm just like in other vertebrates. This work aims to describe the role of luminosity and day periods in Danio rerio's Light/Dark preference. For this purpose 160 naive adult undetermined sex Zebrafish were divided into 5 groups of 32 subjects and kept in isolated aquaria with light control. Afterwards, each fish was tested in the Light/Dark aquaria, with water column of 5 centimeters. There was an habituation period of 5 minutes (300 seconds followed by removal of the sliding doors, allowing the subjects to explore the apparatus for 15 minutes (900 seconds. Tests were performed in different day periods, as follows: Morning (06:00 – 12:00 h; Afternoon (12:00 – 18:00 h; Night (18:00 – 24:00 h; Late Night (24:00 – 06:00 h. Our results show that the time of permanence is sensitive to day period. The number of crossings and latency were not influenced by the period of the day. Further studies regarding biological basis of Light/Dark Preference should be carried out in order to understand the role of circadian function in Danio rerio's behavior. Keywords: Danio rerio, zebrafish, behavior, light-dark preference, anxiety. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18561/2179-5746/biotaamazonia.v4n3p106-111

  17. Slow-light effect in dual-periodic photonic lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yamilov, Alexey G; Bertino, Massimo F

    2007-01-01

    We present analytical and numerical study of photonic lattice with short- and long-range harmonic modulations of the refractive index. Such structures can be prepared experimentally with holographic photolithography. In the spectral region of photonic bandgap of the underlying single-periodic crystal, we observe a series of bands with anomalously small dispersion. The related slow-light effect is attributed to the long-range modulation in the photonic lattice, that leads to formation of an array of evanescently-coupled high-$Q$ cavities. The band structure of the lattice is studied with several techniques: (i) transfer matrix approach; (ii) analysis of resonant coupling in process of band folding; (iii) effective medium approach based on coupled-mode theory; and (iv) Bogolyubov-Mitropolsky approach. The latter method, commonly used in the studies of nonlinear oscillators, was employed to investigate the behavior of the eigen-function envelopes and the band structure of our dual-periodic photonic lattice. We s...

  18. Long-Lasting Light Effects in Imbibed Kalanchoë blossfeldiana Seeds in the Presence of Gibberellic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethy, R; Dedonder, A; Cappelle, M; Fredericq, H; De Greef, J

    1990-05-01

    Two brief red (R) irradiations, separated by 24 hours, given to Kalanchoë blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Feuerblüte seeds, made secondarily dormant by a prolonged dark incubation period on water and transferred to GA(3), induce very low germination. Some effect of these irradiations is preserved, however, during a long dark interval in fully imbibed seeds and greatly increases the germination induced by another brief R exposure. This long-lasting light effect is, at 20 degrees C, only lost after a dark interval of about 1 month. It can also be induced by two brief far-red (FR) exposures. Its preservation is temperature-dependent, low temperatures being favorable. Light-induced changes in the ATP-content were demonstrated during preservation and expression of the long-lasting light effect, indicating a long-lasting metabolic change. In seeds with primary dormancy sown on GA(3), an analogous long-lasting light effect is induced by one or two brief R or FR irradiations, even when they are given before germination can take place. The presence of GA(3), which was shown to induce a very low fluence germination response in Kalanchoë seeds, is required for the occurrence of the long-lasting light effect. The data suggest long-term preservation of some effect(s) of Pfr rather than persistent presence of Pfr itself.

  19. Effectiveness of Demonstration and Lecture Methods in Learning Concept in Economics among Secondary School Students in Borno State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Amin Umar; Bala, Dauda; Ladu, Kolomi Mutah

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the Effectiveness of Demonstration and Lecture Methods in Learning concepts in Economics among Secondary School Students in Borno state, Nigeria. Five objectives: to determine the effectiveness of demonstration method in learning economics concepts among secondary school students in Borno state, determine the effectiveness…

  20. Passive damping technology demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Robert E.; Spencer, Susan M.; Austin, Eric M.; Johnson, Conor D.

    1995-05-01

    A Hughes Space Company study was undertaken to (1) acquire the analytical capability to design effective passive damping treatments and to predict the damped dynamic performance with reasonable accuracy; (2) demonstrate reasonable test and analysis agreement for both baseline and damped baseline hardware; and (3) achieve a 75% reduction in peak transmissibility and 50% reduction in rms random vibration response. Hughes Space Company teamed with CSA Engineering to learn how to apply passive damping technology to their products successfully in a cost-effective manner. Existing hardware was selected for the demonstration because (1) previous designs were lightly damped and had difficulty in vibration test; (2) multiple damping concepts could be investigated; (3) the finite element model, hardware, and test fixture would be available; and (4) damping devices could be easily implemented. Bracket, strut, and sandwich panel damping treatments that met the performance goals were developed by analysis. The baseline, baseline with damped bracket, and baseline with damped strut designs were built and tested. The test results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical predictions and demonstrated that the desired reduction in dynamic response could be achieved. Having successfully demonstrated this approach, it can now be used with confidence for future designs as a means for reducing weight and enhancing reliability.

  1. Effect of Distance on Light Transmission Through Polymerized Resin Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromaa, M K; Lassila, L V J; Vallittu, P K

    2017-09-01

    Light transmittance of dental composites varies between products and shades, but also light curing units differ to each other in their irradiance and fiber optic structure of curing tip. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is linear relationship between the distance of the curing tip to the resin composite and irradiance at lower surface of the resin composite. Disks of 1 mm thickness (6mm diameter) were fabricated. Light transmittance (intensity) through the disk was measured at distance of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 mm from the light tip with two light curing units Elipar S10 (3M-ESPE) and Silverlight (GC). Irradiance ratio (irradiance on the sensor surface without the composite disk / with the composite disk) was calculated and plotted against the distance of the light curing tip. Statistical analysis was carried out using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA, Tukey's, α =0.05). Irradiance ratio varied between 18% to 24% with Silverlight and 21% to 26% with Elipar S10 light curing units. There were statistically significant differences between the ratios with different distances of the light curing tip (p⟨0.05). Interestingly, the highest irradiance ratio for Elipar S10 unit was found with 4 mm distance of the tip, whereas Silverlight unit had the highest ratio with 6 mm distance. Out of two tested resin composites, the flowable composite showed higher irradiance ratio than regular packable resin composite. Increase of distance of the light curing tip from the composite surface decreased the absolute irradiance underneath of composite, as expected. However, there seemed to be device dependent optimal distance of 4-6 mm to reach the most efficient irradiance ratio through the composite resin keeping in mind that most efficient transmission of light through the material is reached by having light curing tip in contact to the material. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  2. A Palatable Introduction to and Demonstration of Statistical Main Effects and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Andrew N.; Marek, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Because concrete explanations in a familiar context facilitate understanding, we illustrate the concept of an interaction via a baking analogy to provide students with food for thought. The demonstration initially introduces the concepts of independent and dependent variables using a chocolate chip cookie recipe. The demonstration provides an…

  3. Effect of Dialogue on Demonstrations: Direct Quotations, Facial Portrayals, Hand Gestures, and Figurative References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavelas, Janet; Gerwing, Jennifer; Healing, Sara

    2014-01-01

    "Demonstrations" (e.g., direct quotations, conversational facial portrayals, conversational hand gestures, and figurative references) lack conventional meanings, relying instead on a resemblance to their referent. Two experiments tested our theory that demonstrations are a class of communicative acts that speakers are more likely to use…

  4. Effects of low-power light therapy on wound healing: LASER x LED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Maria Emília de Abreu; Araújo, Angélica Rodrigues de; Piancastelli, André Costa Cruz; Pinotti, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Several studies demonstrate the benefits of low-power light therapy on wound healing. However, the use of LED as a therapeutic resource remains controversial. There are questions regarding the equality or not of biological effects promoted by LED and LASER. One objective of this review was to determine the biological effects that support the use of LED on wound healing. Another objective was to identify LED´s parameters for the treatment of wounds. The biological effects and parameters of LED will be compared to those of LASER. Literature was obtained from online databases such as Medline, PubMed, Science Direct and Scielo. The search was restricted to studies published in English and Portuguese from 1992 to 2012. Sixty-eight studies in vitro and in animals were analyzed. LED and LASER promote similar biological effects, such as decrease of inflammatory cells, increased fibroblast proliferation, stimulation of angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation and increased synthesis of collagen. The irradiation parameters are also similar between LED and LASER. The biological effects are dependent on irradiation parameters, mainly wavelength and dose. This review elucidates the importance of defining parameters for the use of light devices.

  5. Effects of fixation and tissue processing on immunohistochemical demonstration of specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, M M; Srivastava, S; Fredenburgh, J; Stockard, C R; Myers, R B; Grizzle, W E

    1996-09-01

    Identification of biomarkers in archival tissues using immunochemistry is becoming increasingly important for determining the diagnosis and prognosis of tumors, for characterizing preinvasive neoplastic changes in glandular tissues such as prostate, for evaluating the response of tumors and preinvasive neoplastic changes to certain therapies (i.e., as a surrogate intermediate end point), for selecting patients who are candidates for specific therapies (e.g., immunotherapy) and for retrospective studies. For detecting specific biomarkers it is important to understand the limitations imposed by the fixation methods and processing of the tissues. This study was designed to determine the effects of fixation on the detection in archival paraffin blocks of selected antigens postulated to be important in tumor biology. We evaluated the antigens TGF alpha, p185erbB-2, broad spectrum keratins, p53, and TAG-72 (B72.3). Fixatives evaluated included standard preparations of neutral buffered formalin, acid formalin, zinc formalin, alcoholic formalin, ethanol, methanol, and Bouin's fixative. We found that in general neutral buffered formalin is the poorest fixative for maintaining antigen recognition by immunohistochemistry and that no single fixative was best for all antigens. The dehydrating (coagulant) fixatives (e.g., ethanol and methanol) preserved immunorecognition of p53 and broad spectrum keratins best while the slow cross-linking fixatives (e.g., unbuffered zinc formalin) were best for demonstrating TGF alpha and p185erbB-2. Fixatives other than neutral buffered formalin produced equivalent recognition of the epitope of TAG-72 by B72.3. In formalin fixed archival tissues, only a portion of the antigen signal can be detected by routine immunohistologic methods.

  6. Ustur whole body case 0269: demonstrating effectiveness of i.v. CA-DTPA for Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, A.C.; Sasser, L.B.; Stuit, D.B. [US Transuranium and Uranium Registries, College of Pharmacy, Washington State University, 1845 Terminal Drive, Suite 201, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Glover, S.E. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 598 Rhodes Hall, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Carbaugh, E.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as effective as promptly administered Ca-EDTA. (authors)

  7. USTUR WHOLE BODY CASE 0269: DEMONSTRATING EFFECTIVENESS OF I.V. CA-DTPA FOR PU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Anthony C.; Sasser , Lyle B.; Stuit, Dorothy B.; Glover, Samuel E.; Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2008-01-28

    This whole body donation case (USTUR Registrant) involved a single acute inhalation of an acidic Pu(NO3)4 solution in the form of an aerosol ‘mist.’ Chelation treatment with i.v. Ca-EDTA was initiated on the day of the intake, and continued intermittently over 6 months. After 2½ years with no further treatment, a course of i.v. Ca-DTPA was administered. A total of 400 measurements of 239+240Pu excreted in urine were recorded; starting on the first day (both before and during the initial Ca-EDTA chelation), and continuing for 37 years. This sampling included all intervals of chelation. In addition, 91 measurements of 239+240Pu-in-feces were recorded over this whole period. The Registrant died about 38 years after the intake, at age 79 y, with extensive carcinomatosis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. At autopsy, all major soft tissue organs were harvested for radiochemical analyses of their 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am content. Also, all types of bone (comprising about half the skeleton) were harvested for radiochemical analyses, as well as samples of skin, subcutaneous fat and muscle. This comprehensive dataset has been applied to derive ‘chelation-enhanced’ transfer rates in the ICRP Publication 67 plutonium biokinetic model, representing the behaviour of blood-borne and tissue-incorporated plutonium during intervals of therapy. The resulting model of the separate effects of i.v. Ca-EDTA and Ca-DTPA chelation shows that the therapy administered in this case succeeded in reducing substantially the long-term burden of plutonium in all body organs, except for the lungs. The calculated reductions in organ content at the time of death are approximately 40% for the liver, 60% for other soft tissues (muscle, skin, glands, etc.), 50% for the kidneys, and 50% for the skeleton. Essentially all of the substantial reduction in skeletal burden occurred in trabecular bone. This modeling exercise demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as

  8. Light-dependent magnetoreception in birds: the effect of intensity of 565-nm green light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltschko, W.; Wiltschko, R.; Munro, U.

    In a previous study, Australian silvereyes tested in autumn under monochromatic 565-nm green light at intensities of 2.1 and 7.5mWm-2 preferred their normal northerly migratory direction, whereas they showed a significantly different tendency towards northwest at 15.0mWm-2. Repeating these experiments in spring with silvereyes migrating southward, we again observed well-oriented tendencies in the migratory direction at 2.1 and 7.5mWm-2. At 15.0mWm-2, however, the birds once more preferred northwesterly directions, i.e. their response under this condition proved to be independent of the migratory direction. This contradicts the interpretation that monochromatic green light of this high intensity leads to a rotation of compass information; instead, it appears to produce sensory input that causes birds to give up their migratory direction in favor of a fixed direction of as yet unknown origin.

  9. Effect of Light Conducting Cylindrical Inserts on Gingival Microleakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM. Moazzami

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Microleakage in the gingival floor of class II composite restorations can compromise the marginal adaptation of the filling material to the cavity edges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light conducting cylindrical inserts in decreasing the microleakage of the gingival floor in cavities 1mm below the CEJ.Materials and Methods: Eighty maxillary first molars were randomly divided into eight groups according to use of glass inserts, type of resin (Coltene unfilled resin versus Scotchbond multi purpose and filling technique (one-unit versus incremental. Proximal class II cavities were prepared in all samples with the gingival floor one millimeter below the CEJ. Etched and silan-treated glass inserts were made from 2mm cylindrical bioglass material and cavities were restored according to research protocol. The samples were subjected to 2500 thermal cycles (5-55oC, immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin solution, embedded in epoxy resin and cut centrally and laterally (buccally or lingually in a mesiodistal direction. Microleakage was scored and collected data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests.Results: Minimal dye penetration was observed in the group that employed the incre-mental technique along with Scotchbond, with or without glass inserts. A significant difference was observed between the eight groups. In addition the use of the incremental technique and glass inserts had a significant effect on the microleakage of lateral and central sections, respectively. Application of dentin bonding agent signifi-cantly affected both sections.Conclusion: Glass inserts were effective in decreasing cervical microleakage of class II cavities restored with composite resin.

  10. Effect of package light transmittance on vitamin content of milk. Part 2: UHT whole milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saffert, A.; Pieper, G.; Jetten, J.

    2008-01-01

    This work is the second part of a milk study evaluating the effect of package light transmittance on the vitamin content of milk, in this case on UHT whole milk. The milk was stored at three different light intensities in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles with varying light transmittance as

  11. Effect of Commercial Synthappret BAP Treatment on the Tailorabilitv of Light-Weight Worsted Wool Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Gehui(王革辉); Zhang Weiyuan(张渭源); Postle, R.; Phillips, D.

    2001-01-01

    By means of measurement with the FAST instruments,the effect of commercial Synthappret BAP treatment on the tailorability of light-weight wool worsted fabrics has been investigated. It was found that the commercial Synthappret BAP treatment improved the tailorability of the light-weight wool fabrics mainly by increasing the bending stiffness of the light-weight wool fabrics.

  12. Effect of package light transmittance on vitamin content of milk. Part 2: UHT whole milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saffert, A.; Pieper, G.; Jetten, J.

    2008-01-01

    This work is the second part of a milk study evaluating the effect of package light transmittance on the vitamin content of milk, in this case on UHT whole milk. The milk was stored at three different light intensities in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles with varying light transmittance as d

  13. Antagonistic and synergistic effects of light irradiation on the effects of copper on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheloni, Giulia; Cosio, Claudia; Slaveykova, Vera I., E-mail: vera.slaveykova@unige.ch

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Light intensity and spectral composition affect Cu uptake and effects to C. reinhardtii. • High light (HL) reduced Cu effect on growth inhibition, oxidative stress and damage. • HL in combination with Cu up-regulated genes involved in the antioxidant responses. • HL with increased UVB radiation exacerbated Cu uptake and Cu-induced toxic effects. - Abstract: The present study showed the important role of light intensity and spectral composition on Cu uptake and effects on green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. High-intenisty light (HL) increased cellular Cu concentrations, but mitigated the Cu-induced decrease in chlorophyll fluorescence, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation at high Cu concentrations, indicating that Cu and HL interact in an antagonistic manner. HL up-regulated the transcription of genes involved in the antioxidant response in C. reinhardtii and thus reduced the oxidative stress upon exposure to Cu and HL. Combined exposure to Cu and UVBR resulted in an increase of cellular Cu contents and caused severe oxidative damage to the cells. The observed effects were higher than the sum of the effects corresponding to exposure to UVBR or Cu alone suggesting a synergistic interaction.

  14. The installation for measuring of specific coefficient of force light materials with turn of light effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butenko V. K.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The installation for measuring of specific coefficient of candle-power light of returning surfaces on the accordance of ДСТУ 4100-2002 is developed. The construction of installation provides more wide in comparison with analogues range of measuring — from 10–1 to 104 kd/(lk·m2. Limit of the basic assumed relative error of measuring is no more then ±15%.

  15. IMPROVED LIGHT MICROSCOPIC DEMONSTRATION OF D-AMINO-ACID OXIDASE ACTIVITY IN CRYOTOME SECTIONS USING CERIUM IONS AS CAPTURING AND AMPLIFYING AGENT - THE CE/CE-H2O2-DAB PROCEDURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HALBHUBER, KJ; FEUERSTEIN, H; ZIMMERMANN, N; KLINGER, M; KALICHARAN, D; HUPFER, U

    1991-01-01

    The light microscopical demonstration of D-amino acid oxidase (AAOX) activity with cerium (Ce III) as the capturing agent was improved. The incubation medium was stabilized by the employment of triethanolamine and detrane complexed cerium. A considerable increase in intensity of the reaction was

  16. LIGHT AND ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC DEMONSTRATION OF THE OUABAIN-SENSITIVE, POTASSIUM-DEPENDENT P-NITROPHENYLPHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY (K-NPPASE) USING A CE-MG-DOUBLE CAPTURE TECHNIQUE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GLIESING, M; KALICHARAN, D; HALBHUBER, KJ

    The cerium-based method of Kobayashi et al. for the histochemical demonstration of K-NPPase activity was improved. Besides Ce3+ additionally Mg2+ ions as orthophosphate capture were employed (double capture technique). For light microscopical purposes the Mg-phosphate was converted into Ce-phosphate

  17. Effect of a combination of green and blue monochromatic light on broiler immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziqiang; Cao, Jing; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2014-09-05

    Our previous study suggested that green light or blue light would enhance the broiler immune response; this study was conducted to evaluate whether a combination of green and blue monochromatic light would result in improved immune response. A total of 192 Arbor Acre male broilers were exposed to white light, red light, green light, and blue light from 0 to 26 days. From 27 to 49 days, half of the broilers in green light and blue light were switched to blue light (G-B) and green light (B-G), respectively. The levels of anti-Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) IgG in G-B group were elevated by 11.9-40.3% and 17.4-48.7%, respectively, compared to single monochromatic lights (Plight groups. However, the serum TNF-α concentration in the G-B group was reduced by 3.64-40.5% compared to other groups, and no significant difference was found between the G-B and B-G groups in any type of detection index at the end of the experiment. These results suggested that the combination of G-B and B-G monochromatic light could effectively enhance the antibody titer, the proliferation index of lymphocytes and alleviate the stress response in broilers. Therefore, the combination of green and blue monochromatic light can improve the immune function of broilers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Light Drag Effect of Vacuum Tube Versus Light Propagation in Stationary Vacuum Tube with Moving Source and Receiver

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ruyong; He, Le; Zhang, Wenyan; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We presented a new way to examine the principle of relativity of Special Relativity. According to the principle of relativity, the light dragging by moving media and the light propagation in stationary media with moving source and receiver should be two totally equivalent phenomena. We select a vacuum tube with two glass rods at two ends as the optical media. The length of the middle vacuum cell is L and the thicknesses of the glass rods with refractive index n are D1 and D2. The light drag effect of the moving vacuum tube with speed v is a first-order effect, delta t = 2(n-1)(D1+D2)v/c^2, which is independent of L because vacuum does not perform a drag effect. Predicted by the principle of relativity, the change of the light propagation time interval with stationary vacuum tube and moving source and receiver must be the same, i.e., delta tao = delta t = 2(n-1)(D1+D2)v/c^2. However all analyses have shown that the change of the propagation time interval delta tao is caused by the motion of the receiver during...

  19. Nanostructural Effect of ZnO on Light Extraction Efficiency of Near-Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jae Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ZnO nanostructures on the light output power of 375 nm near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (NUV-LEDs was investigated by comparing one-dimensional (1D nanorods (NR-ZnO with two-dimensional (2D nanosheets (NS-ZnO. ZnO nanostructures were grown on a planar indium tin oxide (ITO by solution based method at low temperature of 90°C without degradation of the forward voltage. At an injection current of 100 mA, the light output efficiency of NUV-LED with NR-ZnO was enhanced by around 30% compared to the conventional NUV-LEDs without ZnO nanostructures. This improvement is due to the formation of a surface texturing, resulting in a larger escape cone and a multiple scattering for the photons in the NUV-LED, whereas the light output efficiency of NUV-LED with NS-ZnO was lower than that of the conventional NUV-LEDs due to the internal reflection and light absorption in the defective sites of NS-ZnO.

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  1. Simple and effective calculations about spectral power distributions of outdoor light sources for computer vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiandong; Duan, Zhigang; Ren, Weihong; Han, Zhi; Tang, Yandong

    2016-04-04

    The spectral power distributions (SPD) of outdoor light sources are not constant over time and atmospheric conditions, which causes the appearance variation of a scene and common natural illumination phenomena, such as twilight, shadow, and haze/fog. Calculating the SPD of outdoor light sources at different time (or zenith angles) and under different atmospheric conditions is of interest to physically-based vision. In this paper, for computer vision and its applications, we propose a feasible, simple, and effective SPD calculating method based on analyzing the transmittance functions of absorption and scattering along the path of solar radiation through the atmosphere in the visible spectrum. Compared with previous SPD calculation methods, our model has less parameters and is accurate enough to be directly applied in computer vision. It can be applied in computer vision tasks including spectral inverse calculation, lighting conversion, and shadowed image processing. The experimental results of the applications demonstrate that our calculation methods have practical values in computer vision. It establishes a bridge between image and physical environmental information, e.g., time, location, and weather conditions.

  2. Chemical and sensory effects of storing sauvignon Blanc wine in colored bottles under artificial light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Mella, Alejandro; Flores-Valdivia, Daniela; Laurie, V Felipe; López-Solís, Remigio; Peña-Neira, Álvaro

    2014-07-23

    The chemical and sensory effects of storing Sauvignon Blanc in colored bottles and exposing them to artificial light were examined. The colors of the bottles chosen were Dead Leaf Green, Antique Green, Amber, and Flint. The light was provided by fluorescent tubes with a regime of 16 h of exposure during 8 months of storage. The results indicated that the wine's chemical composition was affected by the type of bottle used. The Flint bottle presented the lowest concentration of total phenols. Yellow coloration was not dependent on the bottle color, as the wine in darker bottles (Amber, Antique Green, and Dead Leaf Green) had considerably more yellow color development than the wine in clear bottles. With regard to the sensory analyses performed, a trend showing an increase in color intensity and a decrease in overall aromas depending on the bottle color was observed. The wine's aromatic description changed significantly during its storage under artificial light conditions, demonstrating a decrease in vegetal aromas and an increase in citrus and tropical flavors that was dependent on the bottle color.

  3. The Casimir effect in light-front quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Hiller, J R

    2014-01-01

    We show that the standard result for the Casimir force between conducting plates at rest in an inertial frame can be computed in light-front quantization. This is not the same as light-front analyses where the plates are at "rest" in an infinite momentum frame. In that case, Lenz and Steinbacher have shown that the result does not agree with the standard result for plates at rest. The two important ingredients in the present analysis are a careful treatment of the boundary conditions, inspired by the work of Almeida et al. on oblique light-front coordinates, and computation of the ordinary energy density, rather than the light-front energy density.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF TWO INSTRUMENT LIGHTING SYSTEMS ON DARK ADAPTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    used. No significant differences were found between the types of lighting systems used. It is concluded that the flight conditions of starlit night sky affect dark adaptation levels to a significant degree.

  5. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  6. The effect of light deprivation in patients with Stargardt disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teussink, M.M.; Lee, M.D.; Smith, R.T.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Klaver, C.C.; Klevering, B.J.; Theelen, T.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether long-term protection from light exposure affects the rate of disease progression in patients with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1), measured using fundus autofluorescence imaging. DESIGN: Longitudinal, retrospective, interventional case series. METHODS: F

  7. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-12-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  8. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier, E-mail: javierh@triumf.ca; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia [TRIUMF (Canada); Barnea, Nir [The Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  9. Effective light absorption and its enhancement factor for silicon nanowire-based solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhiqiang; Li, Meicheng; Mwenya, Trevor; Fu, Pengfei; Li, Yingfeng; Song, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    Although nanowire (NW) antireflection coating can enhance light trapping capability, which is generally used in crystal silicon (CS) based solar cells, whether it can improve light absorption in the CS body depends on the NW geometrical shape and their geometrical parameters. In order to conveniently compare with the bare silicon, two enhancement factors E(T) and E(A) are defined and introduced to quantitatively evaluate the efficient light trapping capability of NW antireflective layer and the effective light absorption capability of CS body. Five different shapes (cylindrical, truncated conical, convex conical, conical, and concave conical) of silicon NW arrays arranged in a square are studied, and the theoretical results indicate that excellent light trapping does not mean more light can be absorbed in the CS body. The convex conical NW has the best light trapping, but the concave conical NW has the best effective light absorption. Furthermore, if the cross section of silicon NW is changed into a square, both light trapping and effective light absorption are enhanced, and the Eiffel Tower shaped NW arrays have optimal effective light absorption.

  10. Effects of monochromatic light on mucosal mechanical and immunological barriers in the small intestine of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, D; Li, J; Wang, Z X; Cao, J; Li, T T; Chen, J L; Chen, Y X

    2011-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that green and blue monochromatic lights were effective to stimulate immune response of the spleen in broilers. This study was designed to investigate the effects of monochromatic light on both gut mucosal mechanical and immunological barriers. A total of 120 Arbor Acre male broilers on post-hatching day (P) 0 were exposed to red light, green light (GL), blue light (BL), and white light (WL) for 49 d, respectively. As compared with broilers exposed to WL, the broilers exposed to GL showed that the villus height of small intestine was increased by 19.5% (P = 0.0205) and 38.8% (P = 0.0149), the crypt depth of small intestine was decreased by 15.1% (P = 0.0049) and 10.1% (P = 0.0005), and the ratios of villus height to crypt depth were increased by 39.3% (P < 0.0001) and 52.5% (P < 0.0001) at P7 and P21, respectively. Until P49, an increased villus height (33.6%, P = 0.0076), a decreased crypt depth (15.4%, P = 0.0201), and an increased villus height-to-crypt depth ratio (58.5%, P < 0.0001) were observed in the BL group as compared with the WL group. On the other hand, the numbers of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (27.9%, P < 0.0001 and 37.0%, P < 0.0001), goblet cells (GC, 22.1%, P < 0.0001 and 18.1%, P < 0.0001), and IgA(+) cells (14.8%, P = 0.0543 and 47.9%, P = 0.0377) in the small intestine were significantly increased in the GL group as compared with the WL group at P7 and P21, respectively. The numbers of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (36.2%, P < 0.0001), GC (26.5%, P < 0.0001), and IgA(+) cells (68.0%, P = 0.0177) in the BL group were also higher than those in the WL group at P49. These results suggest that both mucosal mechanical and immunological barriers of the small intestine may be improved by rearing broilers under GL at an early age and under BL at an older age.

  11. Light Emission Properties of a Cross-Conjugated Fluorene Polymer: Demonstration of Its Use in Electro-Luminescence and Lasing Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Romero-Servin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Light emission properties of a fluorene cross-conjugated polymer (PF–1 based on the monomer 4,7-bis[2-(9,9-dimethylfluorenyl] benzo[1,2,5]thiadiazole are reported. This polymer exhibits solubility at high concentrations, good processability into thin solid films of good quality and a broad emission band with a fluorescence quantum yield of approximately 1. Based on these features, in this paper we implemented the use of PF–1 as an active layer in polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs and as a laser gain medium in solution. To get insight on the conducting properties of PF–1, two different electron injectors, poly [(9,9-bis(3′-(N,N-dimethylamino propyl-2,7-fluorene-alt-2,7-(9,9–dioctylfluorene] (PFN and lithium fluoride (LiF, were used in a simple PLED architecture. PLEDs with the PFN film were found to exhibit better performance with a maximum luminous efficiency of 40 cd/A, a turn-on voltage (Von of approximately 4.5 V and a luminance maximum of 878 cd/m2 at 5.5 V, with a current density of 20 A/m2. For the lasing properties of PF–1, we found a lasing threshold of around 75 μJ and a tunability of 20 nm. These values are comparable with those of rhodamine 6G, a well-known laser dye.

  12. Public lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The function of public lighting and the relationship between public lighting and accidents are considered briefly as aspects of effective countermeasures. Research needs and recent developments in installation and operational described. Public lighting is an efficient accident countermeasure, but

  13. [Effects of light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut seedling leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meng-Meng; Wang, Ming-Lun; Wang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Yue-Fu; Zhao, Chang-Xing

    2014-02-01

    This study explored the effects of different light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut (Qinhua 6) seedling leaves. The results showed that, compared with natural light, blue light (445-470 nm) could significantly improve the specific leaf area (SLA), chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content of peanut seedlings. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate were higher, the intercellular CO2 content was lower, and the photosynthetic efficiency was improved significantly under blue light. Red light (610-660 nm) could improve the chlorophyll content significantly, and reduce SLA, chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content, with a lower photosynthetic efficiency than natural light. Green light (515-520 nm) and yellow light (590-595 nm) were not conducive to photosynthetic pigment accumulation of leaves, and significantly inhibited leaf photosynthesis of peanut seedlings.

  14. Electric dipole moments of light nuclei in effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bsaisou, Jan; Liebig, Susanna; Minossi, David [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Hanhart, Christoph; Nogga, Andreas; Vries, Jordy de; Wirzba, Andreas [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); JARA - Forces and Matter Experiments, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Meissner, UlfG. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); JARA - Forces and Matter Experiments, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Electric dipole moments (EDMs) break parity (P) and time-reversal (T) symmetry and thus, by the CPT-theorem, CP-symmetry. Once measured, they will be unambiguous signs of new physics since CP-violation from the standard mechanism predicts EDMs that are experimentally inaccessible in the foreseeable future. We calculate within the framework of effective field theory the two-nucleon contributions to the EDMs of the deuteron, helion, and triton induced by P- and T-violating terms that arise from the QCD θ-term or dimension-6 sources of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). We demonstrate what insights into physics beyond the SM can be gained from a suitable combination of measurements and, if needed, supplementary lattice QCD calculations.

  15. Present or Play: The Effect of Serious Gaming on Demonstrated Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Tom; Spil, Antonius A.M.; van der Burg, Sanne; Wenzler, Ivo; Dalmolen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is one of the newest developments in the world of learning and is gaining increasing attention within the business environment. Although many practitioners claim that serious gaming has more impact on demonstrated behaviour of trainees when compared to common presentations, little

  16. Present or Play: The Effect of Serious Gaming on Demonstrated Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Tom; Spil, Ton; van der Burg, Sanne; Wenzler, Ivo; Dalmolen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is one of the newest developments in the world of learning and is gaining increasing attention within the business environment. Although many practitioners claim that serious gaming has more impact on demonstrated behaviour of trainees when compared to common presentations, little evidence exists. In this paper, the authors present…

  17. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  18. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  19. Present or Play: The Effect of Serious Gaming on Demonstrated Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Tom; Spil, Ton; van der Burg, Sanne; Wenzler, Ivo; Dalmolen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is one of the newest developments in the world of learning and is gaining increasing attention within the business environment. Although many practitioners claim that serious gaming has more impact on demonstrated behaviour of trainees when compared to common presentations, little evidence exists. In this paper, the authors present…

  20. Cerenkov light identification with Si low-temperature detectors with Neganov-Luke effect-enhanced sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Gironi, L; Brofferio, C; Capelli, S; Carniti, P; Cassina, L; Clemenza, M; Cremonesi, O; Faverzani, M; Ferri, E; Fossati, E; Giachero, A; Gotti, C; Maino, M; Margesin, B; Moretti, F; Nucciotti, A; Pavan, M; Pessina, G; Pozzi, S; Previtali, E; Puiu, A; Sisti, M; Terranova, F

    2016-01-01

    A new generation of cryogenic light detectors exploiting Neganov-Luke effect to enhance the thermal signal has been used to detect the Cherenkov light emitted by the electrons interacting in TeO$_{2}$ crystals. With this mechanism a high significance event-by-event discrimination between alpha and beta/gamma interactions at the $^{130}$Te neutrino-less double beta decay Q-value - (2527.515 $\\pm$ 0.013) keV - has been demonstrated. This measurement opens the possibility of drastically reducing the background in cryogenic experiments based on TeO$_{2}$.

  1. Pulsed light and antimicrobial combination treatments for surface decontamination of cheese: Favorable and antagonistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, J; Sullivan, G; Marostegan, L F; VanWees, S; Hsu, L C; Moraru, C I

    2017-03-01

    Postprocessing cross-contamination of cheese can lead to both food safety issues and significant losses due to spoilage. Pulsed light (PL) treatment, consisting of short, high-energy, broad-spectrum light pulses, has been proven effective in reducing the microbial load on cheese surface. As PL treatment effectiveness is limited by light-cheese interactions, the possibility to improve its effectiveness by combining it with the antimicrobial nisin was explored. The effect of natamycin, which is added to cheeses as an antifungal agent, on PL effectiveness was also investigated. Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Listeria innocua were used as challenge microorganisms. Bacterial cultures in stationary growth phase were diluted to initial inoculum levels of 5 or 7 log cfu per cheese slice. Slices of sharp white Cheddar cheese and white American singles were cut in rectangles of 2.5 × 5 cm. For cheese slices receiving antimicrobial treatment before PL, slices were dipped in natamycin or nisin, spot inoculated with 100 μL of bacterial suspension, and then treated with PL. Cheese slices receiving PL treatment before antimicrobials were spot inoculated, treated with PL, and then treated with antimicrobials. The PL fluence levels from 1.02 to 12.29 J/cm(2) were used. Survivors were enumerated by standard plate counting or the most probable number technique, as appropriate. All treatments were performed in triplicate, and the data were analyzed using a general linear model. Treatment with nisin or natamycin before PL decreased the effectiveness of PL for all bacteria tested. For instance, PL reduced P. fluorescens on Cheddar cheese by 2.19 ± 0.27 log after 6.14 J/cm(2), whereas combination treatments at the same PL fluence yielded barely 1 log reduction. Inactivation of L. innocua on Cheddar was only 0.78 ± 0.01 log when using PL after nisin, compared with a 1.30 ± 0.76 log reduction by nisin alone. This was attributed to the absorption of UV light

  2. Effect of operating microscope light on brain temperature during craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Parthasarathi; Menon, Girish G; Suneel, Puthuvassery R

    2013-07-01

    Operating microscopes used during neurosurgery are fitted with xenon light. Burn injuries have been reported because of xenon microscope lighting as the intensity of xenon light is 300 W. We designed this study to find out if the light of operating microscope causes an increase in temperature of the brain tissue, which is exposed underneath. Twenty-one adult patients scheduled for elective craniotomies were enrolled. Distal esophageal temperature (T Eso), brain temperature under the microscope light (T Brain), and brain temperature under dura mater (T Dura) were measured continuously at 15-minute intervals during microscope use. The irrigation fluid temperature, room temperature, intensity of the microscope light, and the distance of the microscope from the brain surface were kept constant. The average age of the patients was 44±15 years (18 males and 3 females). The mean duration of microscope use was 140±39 minutes. There were no significant changes in T Brain and T Dura and T Eso over time. T Dura was significantly lower than T Brain both at time 0 and 60 minutes but not at 90 minutes. T Brain was significantly lower than T Eso both at time 0 and 60 minutes but not at 90 minutes. The T Dura remained significantly lower than T Eso at 0, 60, and 90 minutes. Our study shows that there is no significant rise in brain temperature under xenon microscope light up to 120 minutes duration, at intensity of 60% to 70%, from a distance of 20 to 25 cm from the brain surface.

  3. Effects of blue pulsed light on human physiological functions and subjective evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuura Tetsuo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been assumed that light with a higher irradiance of pulsed blue light has a much greater influence than that of light with a lower irradiance of steady blue light, although they have the same multiplication value of irradiance and duration. We examined the non-visual physiological effects of blue pulsed light, and determined whether it is sensed visually as being blue. Findings Seven young male volunteers participated in the study. We placed a circular screen (diameter 500 mm in front of the participants and irradiated it using blue and/or white light-emitting diodes (LEDs, and we used halogen lamps as a standard illuminant. We applied three steady light conditions of white LED (F0, blue LED + white LED (F10, and blue LED (F100, and a blue pulsed light condition of a 100-μs pulse width with a 10% duty ratio (P10. The irradiance of all four conditions at the participant's eye level was almost the same, at around 12 μW/cm2. We measured their pupil diameter, recorded electroencephalogram readings and Kwansei Gakuin Sleepiness Scale score, and collected subjective evaluations. The subjective bluish score under the F100 condition was significantly higher than those under other conditions. Even under the P10 condition with a 10% duty ratio of blue pulsed light and the F10 condition, the participant did not perceive the light as bluish. Pupillary light response under the P10 pulsed light condition was significantly greater than under the F10 condition, even though the two conditions had equal blue light components. Conclusions The pupil constricted under the blue pulsed light condition, indicating a non-visual effect of the lighting, even though the participants did not perceive the light as bluish.

  4. Demonstrating the effectiveness of social franchising principles: the emptying of household ventilated improved pits: a case study from South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development Demonstrating the effectiveness of social franchising principles: the emptying of household ventilated improved pits: a case study from South Africa K. Wall, O. Ive, J. Bhagwan, F. Kirwan, W...

  5. Effects of Sugars on the Light Transmittance of Tapioca Starch Pastes during Cold Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to study the influence of sugars (glucose, sucrose and trehalose on the light transmittance of Tapioca Starch (TS gels during cold storage. The effects of sugars on the light transmittance of TS gels were investigated at the concentration of starch 2% (w:w during cold storage. The results showed the light transmittance of TS gels could be improved by sugar addition, according to the sugar type and concentration. The light transmittance increased with the increase of the concentration of the same kind of sugar. And the improvement of light transmittance with the sugar type was according to the order: trehalose>sucrose>glucose. Whether addition of sugar or not, light transmittance decreased with the extension of storage days. Therefore, light transmittance experiment is a simple and inexpensive method to study the effects of sugars on the retrogradation of starch gels with low-concentration.

  6. White LED compared with other light sources: age-dependent photobiological effects and parameters for evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Klanjšek-Gunde, Marta; Bizjak, Grega; Kobav, Matej B

    2015-01-01

    Ergonomic science at work and living places should appraise human factors concerning the photobiological effects of lighting. Thorough knowledge on this subject has been gained in the past; however, few attempts have been made to propose suitable evaluation parameters. The blue light hazard and its influence on melatonin secretion in age-dependent observers is considered in this paper and parameters for its evaluation are proposed. New parameters were applied to analyse the effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources and to compare them with the currently applied light sources. The photobiological effects of light sources with the same illuminance but different spectral power distribution were determined for healthy 4-76-year-old observers. The suitability of new parameters is discussed. Correlated colour temperature, the only parameter currently used to assess photobiological effects, is evaluated and compared to new parameters.

  7. Sulfide silver architectonics of rat, cat, and guinea pig spinal cord. A light microscopic study with Timm's method for demonstration of heavy metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroder, H D

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of heavy metals in the spinal cord of the cat, rat, and guinea pig has been studied histochemically with Timm's sulfide silver method. There was considerable variation in the degree of staining of the neuropil. The dorsal horn showed a laminar staining pattern corresponding...... to the cytoarchitectonic lamination. Lamina I in the cat and guinea pig was light. Lamina II in all three species was heavily stained. In the rat and guinea pig it could be subdivided in a ventral and a dorsal layer, and moreover in the rat a darkly staining borderzone abutting on lamina III was present. Lamina III......, characterized by heterogeneous staining, also appeared dark, although less obvious in the guinea pig. In the ventral horn the coarser stained particles in lamina IX contrasted with the surrounding lamina. Cell staining varied between different cell groups, and within single cell populations. In the cat thoracic...

  8. The effect of red light irradiation on spermatozoa DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Kay W.; Preece, Daryl; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Berns, Michael W.

    2016-09-01

    A key goal in the conservation of endangered species is to increase successful reproduction. In cases where traditional methods of in vitro fertilization are unsuccessful, new methods of assisted reproduction are needed. One option is selective fertilization via optically trapped sperm. A more passive option is red light irradiation. Red light irradiation has been shown to increase sperm motility, thus increasing fertilizing potential. However, there is some concern that exposure to laser irradiation induces the production of oxidative species in cells, which can be damaging to DNA. In order to test the safety of irradiating sperm, sperm samples were exposed to 633 nm laser light and their DNA were tested for oxidative damage. Using fluorescence microscopy, antibody staining, and ELISA to detect oxidative DNA damage, it was concluded that red light irradiation does not pose a safety risk to sperm DNA. The use of red light on sperm has potential in both animal conservation and human reproduction techniques. This method can also be used in conjunction with optical trapping for viable sperm selection.

  9. Adding an Extra Dimension to What Students See through the Light Microscope: A Lab Exercise Demonstrating Critical Analysis for Microscopy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrill, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate lab exercise that demonstrates the importance of students thinking critically about what they see through a microscope. The students are given growth data from tip-growing organisms that suggest the cells grow in a pulsatile manner. The students then critique this data in several exercises that incorporate…

  10. Isotope effects in photo dissociation of ozone with visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früchtl, Marion; Janssen, Christof; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for many chemical oxidation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. In these chemical reactions, ozone can transfer oxygen to other trace gases. This is particularly interesting, since O3 has a very peculiar isotope composition. Following the mass dependent fractionation equation δ17O = 0.52 * δ18O, most fractionation processes depend directly on mass. However, O3 shows an offset to the mass dependent fractionation line. Processes, which show such anomalies, are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). A very well studied example for a chemical reaction that leads to mass independent fractionation is the O3 formation reaction. To what degree O3 destruction reactions need to be considered in order to understand the isotope composition of atmospheric O3 is still not fully understood and an open question within scientific community. We set up new experiments to investigate the isotope effect resulting from photo dissociation of O3 in the Chappuis band (R1). Initial O3 is produced by an electric discharge. After photolysis O3 is collected in a cold trap at the triple point temperature of nitrogen (63K). O3 is then converted to O2 in order to measure the oxygen isotopes of O3 using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To isolate O3 photo dissociation (R1) from O3 decomposition (R2) and secondary O3 formation (R3), we use varying amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) as O atom quencher (R4). In this way we suppress the O + O3 reaction (R3) and determine the isotope fractionation in R1 and R2 separately. We present first results on the isotope effects in O3 photo dissociation with visible light in the presence of different bath gases. Results are interpreted based on chemical kinetics modeling. (R1) O3 + hυ → O (3P) + O2 (R2) O3 + O (3P) → 2 O2 (R3) O + O2 + M → O3 + M (R4) O (3P) + CO + M → CO2 + M

  11. Enhancing slow and fast light effects in quantum dot semiconductor waveguides through ultrafast dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We show that ultrafast carrier dynamics plays an important role on slow and fast light effects based on coherent population oscillations in quantum dot semiconductor waveguides. Fast light in the gain regime and slow light in the absorption regime are found to be enhanced at frequencies beyond th...... the usual limits of the carrier lifetime. The effects are investigated by a comprehensive model and shown to originate from non-equilibrium dynamics within the quantum dot carrier populations....

  12. WOW: light print, light propel, light point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    anywhere in a sample at any orientation using real-time 3D optical micromanipulation with six degrees of freedom. One of the key aspects of our demonstrated WOWs is the change in direction of in-coupled light and the marked increase in numerical aperture of the out-coupled light. Hence, each light...... propelled WOW can tap from a relatively broad incident beam and generate a much more tightly confined light at its tip. The presentation contains both numerical simulations related to the propagation of light through a WOW and preliminary experimental demonstrations on our BioPhotonics Workstation...

  13. Effect of Led Lighting Colors for Laying Japanese Quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KC Nunes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Time of exposure and light intensity rearing house may affect the performance and egg quality of laying quails. This research aimed at evaluating the live performance, egg quality, biometry of the reproductive system, and the gastrointestinal tract of Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica exposed to artificial light-emitting diodes (LED of different colors in comparison with fluorescent lamps. A total of 240 Japanese quails were distributed in completely randomized experimental design with four treatments (fluorescent lamp, and green, red, or blue LED lamps with six replicates of 10 birds each. Average egg weight and eggshell thickness were different (p0.05. The oviduct of 64-d-old hens exposed to green LED lighting was shorter (p<0.05 than those exposed to the fluorescent lamp. Red LED can be used to replace the fluorescent lamps, as they promote the same live performance, egg quality, and morphological development of the reproductive tract of laying Japanese quails.

  14. Preparation and Effect of Lighting on Structures and Properties of GSH Capped ZnSe QDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ling; Peng, Zeze; Zhou, Peijiang; Cheng, Gary J; Nian, Qiong; Lin, Dong; Zhou, Jinhui; Liang, Yuhe

    2015-11-01

    L-glutathione (GSH) capped ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) were prepared by microwave-assisted aqueous synthesis. Then, the resulting QDs were illuminated under dark, ultraviolet light and incandescent light, respectively. Thereby effect of lighting on the structures and properties of QDs were studied systematically. It was revealed that particle size and element content of QDs took a sharp change after irradiation, while the crystal structure maintains nearly unaffected. Comparing to the ZnSe QDs under dark condition, counterparts irradiated by UV light possessed outstanding sphericity, size distribution and dispersion. And the content of sulfur (S) in ZnSe QDs irradiated by UV light was much higher relatively. The effect of lighting on vibration peaks of O-H was considerable. However, this effect was observed to be weak on other chemical bonds. The possible explanation ascribes to photo-chemical interactions can occur between S-H and O-H bonds on the surface of GSH ligand. The lighting induced GSH to occur photocatalytic oxidation on the surface of ZnSe QDs, which improved the optical properties of QDs. The effects of lighting rely on irradiation types, the sequence is UV light, incandescent light and dark from high to low.

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  17. Complete Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  20. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H.; Duijzer, Wianne; Bos, Elisabeth; V, Hommes,

    2016-01-01

    Background The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the

  1. Effects of spectral parameters on the light properties of red-green-blue white light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingsheng; Zhang, Haoxiang; Zhou, Quanbin; Wang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Red-green-blue white light-emitting diodes (RGB-WLEDs) have great potential as commercial solid-state lighting devices, as well as visible light communication because of their high color-rendering index (CRI) and high response frequency. The quality of light of an RGB-WLED strongly depends on its spectral parameters. In this study, we fabricated RGB-WLEDs with red, blue, and green LEDs and measured the spectral power distribution (SPD). The experimental SPD is consistent with the calculated spectrum. We also measured the SPDs of LEDs with different peak wavelengths and extracted the spectral parameters, which were then used for modeling. We studied the effect of the wavelength and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) on both the color rendering index and the luminous efficiency (LE) of the RGB-WLED using simulations. We find that the LE improves as the wavelength of the blue LED increases and the wavelength of the red LED decreases. When the wavelength of the green LED increases, the LE increases first, but later decreases. The CRI of the RGB-WLED increases with the wavelengths of the red, blue, and green LEDs first, but then decreases. The optimal wavelengths and FWHMs for maximum color-rendering and LE of the blue, green, and red LEDs are 466, 536, 606 nm; and 26.0, 34.0, and 19.5 nm, respectively.

  2. Using Mixture Regression to Identify Varying Effects: A Demonstration with Paternal Incarceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, W. Justin; Pleck, Joseph; McBride, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used techniques for identifying the varying effects of stressors involve testing moderator effects via interaction terms in regression or multiple-group analysis in structural equation modeling. The authors present mixture regression as an alternative approach. In contrast to more widely used approaches, mixture regression…

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Reading Programs: A Demonstration with Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Fiona M.; Kieffer, Michael J.; Shand, Robert; Pan, Yilin; Cheng, Henan; Levin, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the value of cost-effectiveness analysis for evaluation and decision making with respect to educational programs and discuss its application to early reading interventions. We describe the conditions for a rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis and illustrate the challenges of applying the method in practice, providing examples of programs…

  4. The effect of ozone on tannery wastewater biological treatment at demonstrative scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iaconi, Claudio; Ramadori, Roberto; Lopez, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports the results obtained during an investigation aimed at transferring to the demonstrative scale an aerobic granular biomass system (SBBGR--Sequencing Batch Biofilter Granular Reactor) integrated with ozonation for the efficient treatment of tannery wastewater. The results show that the integrated process was able to achieve high removal efficiencies for COD, TSS, TKN, surfactants and colour with residual concentrations much lower than the current discharge limits. Furthermore, the process was characterised by a very low sludge production (i.e., 0.1 kg dry sludge/m(3) of treated wastewater) with interesting repercussions on treatment costs (about 1 euro per m(3) of wastewater).

  5. Effects and Mechanism of Blue Light on Monascus in Liquid Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of light on Monascus and the underlying mechanism have received a great deal of interest for the industrial application of Monascus pigments. In this study, we have examined the effects of blue light on the culture morphology, mycelium growth, pigments, and citrinin yield of Monascus in liquid-state and oscillation fermentation, and explored the mechanism at a physiological level. It was found that blue light affected the colony morphology, the composition (chitin content, and permeability of the Monascus mycelium cell wall in static liquid culture, which indicates blue light benefits pigments secreting from aerial mycelium to culture medium. In liquid oscillation fermentation, the yields of Monascus pigments in fermentation broth (darkness 1741 U/g, blue light 2206 U/g and mycelium (darkness 2442 U/g, blue light 1900 U/g cultured under blue light and darkness are different. The total pigments produced per gram of Monascus mycelium under blue light was also higher (4663 U/g than that in darkness (4352 U/g. However, the production of citrinin (88 μg/g under blue light was evidently lower than that in darkness (150 μg/g. According to the degradation of citrinin caused by blue light and hydrogen peroxide, it can be concluded that blue light could degrade citrinin and inhibit the catalase activity of Monascus mycelium, subsequently suppressing the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, which is the active species that degrades citrinin.

  6. Effects and Mechanism of Blue Light on Monascus in Liquid Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Wenqing; Chen, Xiying; Cai, Junhui; Wang, Changlu; He, Weiwei

    2017-03-01

    The effect of light on Monascus and the underlying mechanism have received a great deal of interest for the industrial application of Monascus pigments. In this study, we have examined the effects of blue light on the culture morphology, mycelium growth, pigments, and citrinin yield of Monascus in liquid-state and oscillation fermentation, and explored the mechanism at a physiological level. It was found that blue light affected the colony morphology, the composition (chitin content), and permeability of the Monascus mycelium cell wall in static liquid culture, which indicates blue light benefits pigments secreting from aerial mycelium to culture medium. In liquid oscillation fermentation, the yields of Monascus pigments in fermentation broth (darkness 1741 U/g, blue light 2206 U/g) and mycelium (darkness 2442 U/g, blue light 1900 U/g) cultured under blue light and darkness are different. The total pigments produced per gram of Monascus mycelium under blue light was also higher (4663 U/g) than that in darkness (4352 U/g). However, the production of citrinin (88 μg/g) under blue light was evidently lower than that in darkness (150 μg/g). According to the degradation of citrinin caused by blue light and hydrogen peroxide, it can be concluded that blue light could degrade citrinin and inhibit the catalase activity of Monascus mycelium, subsequently suppressing the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, which is the active species that degrades citrinin.

  7. Lighting and public health.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ierland, J. van & Schreuder, D.A.

    1969-01-01

    The following topics; are discussed with respect to public health: - the effect of visible and ultraviolet radiation upon man. - vision with respect to lighting. interior lighting. - artificial lighting of work environments. - day light and windows. - recommendations for lighting. public lighting. -

  8. Let there be no light: the effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background electroencephalographic rhythms

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jounhong Ryan; Joo, Eun Yeon; Koo, Dae Lim; Hong, Seung Bong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Artificial lighting has been beneficial to society, but unnecessary light exposure at night may cause various health problems. We aimed to investigate how whole-night bedside light can affect sleep quality and brain activity. Patients and methods: Ten healthy sleepers underwent two polysomnography (PSG) sessions, one with the lights off and one with the lights on. PSG variables related to sleep quality were extracted and compared between lights-off and lights-on sleep. Sp...

  9. Effect of the thickness of light absorption layer on the light-induced transverse thermoelectric effect in Bi2Sr2Co2Oy films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoying Yan; Liqing Sun; Shufang Wang; Guangsheng Fu

    2015-01-01

    Light-induced transverse thermoelectric effect is investigated in incline-oriented Bi2 Sr2Co2Oy thin films covered with a graphite light absorption layer.Upon the illumination of a 980 nm cw laser,an enhanced voltage signal is detected and the improvement degree is found to be dependent on the thickness of the graphite layer.A twodimensional (2D) heat transport model using the finite-difference method provides a reasonable explanation to the experimental data.Present results give some valuable instructions for the design of light absorption layers in this type of detector.

  10. Demonstration of a quasi-scalar angular Goos-Hänchen effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merano, M; Hermosa, N; Aiello, A; Woerdman, J P

    2010-11-01

    We show experimentally that the angular Goos-Hänchen (GH) effect can be easily observed, also without employing its resonant enhancement at Brewster incidence. An s-polarized beam was used to decouple the polarization from the propagation dynamics of the beam. We found that, in this case, the angular GH effect can be strongly enhanced by increasing the angular aperture of the Gaussian beam. Our experiments suggest a route toward observing the angular GH effect for true scalar waves, such as acoustic waves and quantum matter waves.

  11. Noise effects and filtering in controlled light exposure microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Hoebe; C.J.F. van Noorden; E.M.M. Manders

    2010-01-01

    Phototoxicity and photobleaching are major limitations of fluorescence live-cell microscopy. A straightforward way to limit phototoxicity and photobleaching is reduction of the excitation light dose, but this causes loss of image quality. In confocal fluorescence microscopy, the field of view is ill

  12. Effects of light and temperature on duckweed photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedge, R.M.; Burris, J.E.

    1982-06-01

    Rates of photosynthesis of Lemna minor L. and Spirodela punctata, two aquatic angiosperms, were measured at different temperatures and light intensities. Photosynthesis was measured both as oxygen evolution and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation. At temperatures ranging from 15 to 35/sup 0/C, light saturation of photosynthetic O/sub 2/ evolution of Lemna occured from 300-600 ..mu..E m/sup -2/ s/sup -1/, while in Spirodela photosynthetic O/sub 2/ evolution was light saturated at 5600-1200 ..mu..E m/sup -2/ s/sup -1/. Photosynthetic O/sub 2/ evolution of both species was photoinhibited at light intensities greater than 1200 ..mu..E m/sup -2/ s/sup -1/. The optimal temperature for Lemna photosynthetic O/sub 2/ evolution was 30/sup 0/C, while the optimal temperatures for /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation were from 20 to 30/sup 0/C. For Spirodela maximum photosynthetic O/sub 2/, evolution occurred at 35/sup 0/C, while maximum /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation was at 30/sup 0/C.

  13. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H; Duijzer, Wianne B.; Hommes, Vanja

    2016-01-01

    Background The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the treatment of SAD. In this study, a comparison has been made between the effects of broad-wavelength light without ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths compared to narrow-band blue light in the treatment of ...

  14. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H; Duijzer, Wianne; Bos, Elisabeth; V, Hommes,

    2016-01-01

    Background The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the treatment of SAD. In this study, a comparison has been made between the effects of broad-wavelength light without ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths compared to narrow-band blue light in the treatment of ...

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  18. Combined Effects of Ocean Acidification and Light or Nitrogen Availabilities on 13C Fractionation in Marine Dinoflagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoins, Mirja; Eberlein, Tim; Groβmann, Christian H.; Brandenburg, Karen; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn; Sluijs, Appy; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.

    2016-01-01

    Along with increasing oceanic CO2 concentrations, enhanced stratification constrains phytoplankton to shallower upper mixed layers with altered light regimes and nutrient concentrations. Here, we investigate the effects of elevated pCO2 in combination with light or nitrogen-limitation on 13C fractionation (εp) in four dinoflagellate species. We cultured Gonyaulax spinifera and Protoceratium reticulatum in dilute batches under low-light (‘LL’) and high-light (‘HL’) conditions, and grew Alexandrium fundyense and Scrippsiella trochoidea in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures (‘LN’) and nitrogen-replete batches (‘HN’). The observed CO2-dependency of εp remained unaffected by the availability of light for both G. spinifera and P. reticulatum, though at HL εp was consistently lower by about 2.7‰ over the tested CO2 range for P. reticulatum. This may reflect increased uptake of (13C-enriched) bicarbonate fueled by increased ATP production under HL conditions. The observed CO2-dependency of εp disappeared under LN conditions in both A. fundyense and S. trochoidea. The generally higher εp under LN may be associated with lower organic carbon production rates and/or higher ATP:NADPH ratios. CO2-dependent εp under non-limiting conditions has been observed in several dinoflagellate species, showing potential for a new CO2-proxy. Our results however demonstrate that light- and nitrogen-limitation also affect εp, thereby illustrating the need to carefully consider prevailing environmental conditions. PMID:27153107

  19. Effect of light intensity on food detection in captive great fruit-eating bats, Artibeus lituratus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Eduardo de A; Pessoa, Valdir F; Aguiar, Ludmilla M S; Pessoa, Daniel M A

    2014-11-01

    Bats are known for their well-developed echolocation. However, several experiments focused on the bat visual system have shown evidence of the importance of visual cues under specific luminosity for different aspects of bat biology, including foraging behavior. This study examined the foraging abilities of five female great fruit-eating bats, Artibeus lituratus, under different light intensities. Animals were given a series of tasks to test for discrimination between a food target against an inedible background, under light levels similar to the twilight illumination (18lx), the full moon (2lx) and complete darkness (0lx). We found that the bats required a longer time frame to detect targets under a light intensity similar to twilight, possibly due to inhibitory effects present under a more intense light level. Additionally, bats were more efficient at detecting and capturing targets under light conditions similar to the luminosity of a full moon, suggesting that visual cues were important for target discrimination. These results demonstrate that light intensity affects foraging behavior and enables the use of visual cues for food detection in frugivorous bats. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neotropical Behaviour.

  20. The effects of taurine on vigabatrin, high light intensity and mydriasis induced retinal toxicity in the pigmented rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Allan D; Truchot, Nathalie; Pickersgill, Nigel; Thale, Zia Irene; Rosolen, Serge G; Botteron, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to establish a model that may be used for examining the effect of Vigabatrin-induced retinal toxicity in pigmented rats, and subsequently examine the possible effects of taurine on the retinal toxicity. In the first part of the study, pigmented Long Evans rats were subjected to combinations of induced mydriasis, low/high light intensities (40/2000 lx) and oral administration of near-MTD (Maximum Tolerated Dose) doses (200 mg/kg/day) of Vigabatrin for up to 6 weeks. The combination of mydriasis and high light intensity applied to Long Evans rats resulted in retinal damage that was increased by the administration of Vigabatrin. In the second part of the study Long Evans rats were subjected to combinations of induced mydriasis and high/low light intensity (40/2000 lx) while being orally administered low (30 mg/kg/day) or high (200 mg/kg/day) doses of Vigabatrin for up to 6 weeks. In addition, selected groups of animals were administered taurine via the drinking water (20 mg/ml), resulting in systemic taurine concentrations of approximately threefold the endogenous concentration. The combined results of the studies demonstrate that retinal damage can be induced in pigmented animals when combining mydriasis and high light intensity. Retinal damage was functionally evaluated by electroretinography (ERG), then confirmed by histopathology. While depending on mydriasis and high light intensity, administration of Vigabatrin increased the retinal toxicity and resulted in the formation of rosette-like structures in the retina in a dose-related manner. Administration of taurine did not alleviate the Vigabatrin-induced retinal toxicity, as demonstrated either functionally by ERG or morphologically, although systemic concentrations of 3-fold the endogenous levels were reached, and it was thus not possible to demonstrate a protective effect of taurine in these pigmented animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental demonstration of programmable multi-functional spin logic cell based on spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Wan, C. H.; Yuan, Z. H.; Fang, C.; Kong, W. J.; Wu, H.; Zhang, Q. T.; Tao, B. S.; Han, X. F.

    2017-04-01

    Confronting with the gigantic volume of data produced every day, raising integration density by reducing the size of devices becomes harder and harder to meet the ever-increasing demand for high-performance computers. One feasible path is to actualize more logic functions in one cell. In this respect, we experimentally demonstrate a prototype spin-orbit torque based spin logic cell integrated with five frequently used logic functions (AND, OR, NOT, NAND and NOR). The cell can be easily programmed and reprogrammed to perform desired function. Furthermore, the information stored in cells is symmetry-protected, making it possible to expand into logic gate array where the cell can be manipulated one by one without changing the information of other undesired cells. This work provides a prospective example of multi-functional spin logic cell with reprogrammability and nonvolatility, which will advance the application of spin logic devices.

  2. Demonstration of a novel dispersive spectral splitting optical element for cost- effective photovoltaic conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Maragliano, Carlo; Bronzoni, Matteo; Rampino, Stefano; Fitzgerald, Eugene A; Chiesa, Matteo; Stefancich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In this letter we report the preliminary validation of a low-cost paradigm for photovoltaic power generation that utilizes a prismatic Fresnel-like lens to simultaneously concentrate and separate sunlight into continuous laterally spaced spectral bands, which are then fed into spectrally matched single-junction photovoltaic cells. A prismatic lens was designed using geometric optics and the dispersive properties of the employed material, and its performance was simulated with a ray- tracing software. After device optimization, it was fabricated by injection molding, suitable for large-scale mass production. We report an average optical transmittance of ~ 90% over the VNIR range with spectral separation in excellent agreement with our simulations. Finally, two prototype systems were tested: one with GaAsP and c-Si photovoltaic devices and one with a pair of copper indium gallium selenide based solar cells. The systems demonstrated an increase in peak electrical power output of 51% and 64% respectively under wh...

  3. Experimental Demonstration of the Stabilizing Effect of Dielectric Coatings on Magnetically Accelerated Imploding Metallic Liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, T J; Peterson, K J; Yu, E P; McBride, R D; Sinars, D B; Gomez, M R; Jennings, C A; Martin, M R; Rosenthal, S E; Schroen, D G; Sefkow, A B; Slutz, S A; Tomlinson, K; Vesey, R A

    2016-02-12

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70  μm of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR=Rin,0/Rin(z,t)] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. The inner-wall radius Rin(z,t) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130  μm over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  4. A Laboratory to Demonstrate the Effect of Thermal History on Semicrystalline Polymers Using Rapid Scanning Rate Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Kessler, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of semicrystalline polymers is essential for materials scientists and engineers. In this article, we describe a materials science laboratory to demonstrate the effect of parameters such as heating rate and isothermal annealing conditions on the thermal behavior of…

  5. A Laboratory to Demonstrate the Effect of Thermal History on Semicrystalline Polymers Using Rapid Scanning Rate Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Kessler, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of semicrystalline polymers is essential for materials scientists and engineers. In this article, we describe a materials science laboratory to demonstrate the effect of parameters such as heating rate and isothermal annealing conditions on the thermal behavior of…

  6. Effects of signal light on the fuel consumption and emissions under car-following model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Yi, Zhi-Yan; Lin, Qing-Feng

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a car-following model is utilized to study the effects of signal light on each vehicle's fuel consumption, CO, HC and NOX. The numerical results show that each vehicle's fuel consumption and emissions are influenced by the signal light and that the effects are related to the green split of the signal light and the vehicle's time headway at the origin, which can help drivers adjust their micro driving behavior on the road with a signal light to reduce their fuel consumption and emissions.

  7. Organic light emitting field effect transistors based on an ambipolar p-i-n layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorano, V.; Bramanti, A.; Carallo, S.; Cingolani, R.; Gigli, G.

    2010-03-01

    A bottom contact/top gate ambipolar "p-i-n" layered light emitting field effect transistor with the active medium inserted between two doped transport layers, is reported. The doping profile results crucial to the capability of emitting light, as well as to the electrical characteristics of the device. In this sense, high output current at relative low applied gate/drain voltage and light emission along the whole large area transistor channel are observed, putting the basis to full integration of organic light emitting field effect transistors in planar complex devices.

  8. Light-Driven Contact Hearing Aid for Broad-Spectrum Amplification: Safety and Effectiveness Pivotal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, Bruce J; Perkins, Rodney; Murray, Michael; Levy, Suzanne Carr; Puria, Sunil

    2017-03-01

    Demonstrate safety and effectiveness of the light-driven contact hearing aid to support FDA clearance. A single-arm, open-label investigational-device clinical trial. Two private-practice and one hospital-based ENT clinics. Forty-three subjects (86 ears) with mild-to-severe bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment. Bilateral amplification delivered via a light-driven contact hearing aid comprising a Tympanic Lens (Lens) with a customized platform to directly drive the umbo and a behind-the-ear sound processor (Processor) that encodes sound into light pulses to wirelessly deliver signal and power to the Lens. The primary safety endpoint was a determination of "no change" (PTA4 hearing at the 120-day measurement interval. The primary efficacy endpoint was improvement in word recognition using NU-6 at the 30-day measurement interval over the baseline unaided case. Secondary efficacy endpoints included functional gain from 2 to 10 kHz and speech-in-noise improvement over the baseline unaided case using both omnidirectional and directional microphones. The results for the 86 ears in the study determined a mean change of -0.40 dB in PTA4, indicating no change in residual hearing (p Hearing in Noise Test was 0.75 dB (p = 0.028) and 3.14 dB (p < 0.0001) for the omnidirectional and directional microphone modes, respectively. The safety and effectiveness data supported a de novo 510(k) submission that received clearance from the FDA.

  9. Experimental Demonstration of Electromagnetic Induced Transparency and Dispersion Effects in Cs Atom Vapour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊香; 董瑞芳; 常宏; 谢常德; 彭忻墀; 肖敏

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the electromagnetically induced transparency and dispersion of a A-type three-level atomic system are experimentally measured with a vapour cell of Cs atoms. The steep dispersion at low absorption is observed. Thus a small group velocity for the probe beam is inferred from the measured dispersion curve.

  10. Demonstrating the Effectiveness of an Integrated and Intensive Research Methods and Statistics Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliske, Rebecca M.; Caldwell, Tracy L.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We developed a two-semester series of intensive (six-contact hours per week) behavioral research methods courses with an integrated statistics curriculum. Our approach includes the use of team-based learning, authentic projects, and Excel and SPSS. We assessed the effectiveness of our approach by examining our students' content area scores on the…

  11. An Effective and Economical Photometer for Classroom Demonstrations and Laboratory Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Anthony E.; Young, Colin C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple, effective, and inexpensive spectrophotometer design that may be used in a stand-alone teaching module, and to enhance various unit operations experiments. The spectrophotometers described performed as well as a commercial option at estimating cell concentration in a bioreactor and tracking a first-order reaction. Such devices…

  12. Demonstrating the Effectiveness of an Integrated and Intensive Research Methods and Statistics Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliske, Rebecca M.; Caldwell, Tracy L.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We developed a two-semester series of intensive (six-contact hours per week) behavioral research methods courses with an integrated statistics curriculum. Our approach includes the use of team-based learning, authentic projects, and Excel and SPSS. We assessed the effectiveness of our approach by examining our students' content area scores on the…

  13. Is Teaching Simple Surgical Skills Using an Operant Learning Program More Effective Than Teaching by Demonstration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, I Martin; Pryor, Karen W; McKeon, Theresa R

    2016-04-01

    A surgical procedure is a complex behavior that can be constructed from foundation or component behaviors. Both the component and the composite behaviors built from them are much more likely to recur if it they are reinforced (operant learning). Behaviors in humans have been successfully reinforced using the acoustic stimulus from a mechanical clicker, where the clicker serves as a conditioned reinforcer that communicates in a way that is language- and judgment-free; however, to our knowledge, the use of operant-learning principles has not been formally evaluated for acquisition of surgical skills. Two surgical tasks were taught and compared using two teaching strategies: (1) an operant learning methodology using a conditioned, acoustic reinforcer (a clicker) for positive reinforcement; and (2) a more classical approach using demonstration alone. Our goal was to determine whether a group that is taught a surgical skill using an operant learning procedure would more precisely perform that skill than a group that is taught by demonstration alone. Two specific behaviors, "tying the locking, sliding knot" and "making a low-angle drill hole," were taught to the 2014 Postgraduate Year (PGY)-1 class and first- and second-year medical students, using an operant learning procedure incorporating precise scripts along with acoustic feedback. The control groups, composed of PGY-1 and -2 nonorthopaedic surgical residents and first- and second-year medical students, were taught using demonstration alone. The precision and speed of each behavior was recorded for each individual by a single experienced surgeon, skilled in operant learning. The groups were then compared. The operant learning group achieved better precision tying the locking, sliding knot than did the control group. Twelve of the 12 test group learners tied the knot and precisely performed all six component steps, whereas only four of the 12 control group learners tied the knot and correctly performed all six

  14. Effects of Changes in Colored Light on Brain and Calf Muscle Blood Concentration and Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Weinzirl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Color light therapy is a therapeutic method in complementary medicine. In color therapy, light of two contrasting colors is often applied in a sequential order. The aim of this study was to investigate possible physiological effects, i.e., changes in the blood volume and oxygenation in the brain and calf muscle of healthy subjects who were exposed to red and blue light in sequential order. The hypothesis was that if a subject is first exposed to blue and then red light, the effect of the red light will be enhanced due to the contrastingly different characteristics of the two colors. The same was expected for blue light, if first exposing a subject to red and then to blue light. Twelve healthy volunteers (six male, six female were measured twice on two different days by near-infrared spectroscopy during exposure to colored light. Two sequences of colored light were applied in a controlled, randomized, crossover design: first blue, then red, and vice versa. For the brain and muscle, the results showed no significant differences in blood volume and oxygenation between the two sequences, and a high interindividual physiological variability. Thus, the hypothesis had to be rejected. Comparing these data to results from a previous study, where subjects were exposed to blue and red light without sequential color changes, shows that the results of the current study appear to be similar to those of red light exposure. This may indicate that the exposure to red light was preponderant and thus effects of blue light were outweighed.

  15. Orbital angular momentum complex spectrum analyzer for vortex light based on rotational Doppler Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Hailong; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Pei; Chen, Dongxu; Cai, Xinlun; Li, Fuli; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The function to measure orbital angular momentum (OAM) distribution of vortex light is essential for OAM applications. Although there are lots of works to measure OAM modes, it is difficult to measure the power distribution of different OAM modes quantitatively and instantaneously, let alone measure the phase distribution among them. In this work, we demonstrate an OAM complex spectrum analyzer, which enables to measure the power and phase distribution of OAM modes simultaneously by employing rotational Doppler Effect. The original OAM mode distribution is mapped to electrical spectrum of beating signals with a photodetector. The power distribution and phase distribution of superimposed OAM beams are successfully retrieved by analyzing the electrical spectrum. We also extend the measurement to other spatial modes, such as linear polarization modes. These results represent a new landmark of spatial mode analysis and show great potentials in optical communication and OAM quantum state tomography.

  16. Effect of input spectrum on the spectral switch characteristics in a white-light Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundavanam, Maruthi M; Viswanathan, Nirmal K; Rao, D Narayana

    2009-12-01

    We report here a detailed experimental study to demonstrate the effect of source spectral characteristics such as spectral bandwidth (Deltalambda), peak wavelength (lambda(0)), and shape of the spectrum on the spectral shifts and spectral switches measured due to temporal correlation in a white-light Michelson interferometer operated in the spectral domain. Behavior of the spectral switch characteristics such as the switch position, switch amplitude, and switch symmetry are discussed in detail as a function of optical path difference between the interfering beams. The experimental results are compared with numerical calculations carried out using interference law in the spectral domain with modified source spectral characteristics. On the basis of our results we feel that our study is of critical importance in the selection of source spectral characteristics to further improve the longitudinal resolution or the measurement sensitivity in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and microscopy.

  17. Origin of magnetic field effect enhancement by electrical stress in organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnich, S. A.; Niedermeier, U.; Melzer, C.; Sarfert, W.; von Seggern, H.

    2009-06-01

    Recently, it has been discovered that the magnetic field effect (MFE) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on poly(para-phenylene vinylene) can be enhanced by exposing the diode to moderate electrical stress. Here, we disclose the mechanism behind this way of improving the MFE. We first show that electronic traps in general play an important role for the MFE. Optical depletion of available trap states by infrared illumination leads to a decrease in the MFE. Furthermore, we demonstrate that annealing of the OLED at high temperatures eliminates the MFE improvement of the previously performed electrical conditioning. However, the improvement can be restored by subsequent conditioning at higher current or voltage. Thus it is likely that electrical stress is accompanied by a transformation of the polymer morphology or conformation resulting in a formation of energetic traps for charge carriers.

  18. Phase statistics of light wave reflected from one-dimensional optical disordered media and its effects on light transport properties

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Light wave reflection from optical disordered media is always associate with its phase, and the phase statistics influence the reflection statistics. We report a detailed numerical study of the statistics of the reflection coefficient RR* and its associated phase(theta) for plane electromagnetic waves reflected from one dimensional (1D) Gaussian white-noise optical disordered media, ranging from weak to strong disordered regimes. We solve numerically the full Fokker-Planck (FP) equation for the joint probability distribution in the RR* - phase(theta) space for different lengths of the sample with different disorder strengths. The statistical optical transport properties of 1D optical disordered media are calculated using the full FP equation numerically. This constitutes a complete solution for the reflection phase statistics and its effects on light transport properties in a 1D Gaussian white-noise disordered optical potentials. Our results show the regime of the validation of the random phase approximations...

  19. Coriolis effect and spin Hall effect of light in an inhomogeneous chiral medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongliang; Shi, Lina; Xie, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin Hall effect of spinning light in an inhomogeneous chiral medium. The Hamiltonian equations of the photon are analytically obtained within eikonal approximation in the noninertial orthogonal frame. Besides the usual spin curvature coupling, the chiral parameter enters the Hamiltonian as a spin-torsion-like interaction. We reveal that both terms have parallel geometric origins as the Coriolis terms of Maxwell's equations in nontrivial frames.

  20. The effect of science demonstrations as a community service activity on pre-service science teachers' teaching practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Derya Kaltakci

    2016-03-01

    In the scope of this study, pre-service science teachers (PSST) developed and carried out science demonstrations with everyday materials for elementary school students as a community service activity. 17 PSST enrolled in the community services practices course at Kocaeli University comprised the sample of the present study. Community service practices aim to develop consciousness of social responsibility and professional skills, as well as to gain awareness of social and community problems and find solutions for pre-service teachers. With this aim, each PSST developed five science demonstration activities and their brochures during a semester. At the end of the semester, a total of 85 demonstrations were carried out at public elementary schools, which are especially located in socioeconomically poor districts of Kocaeli, Turkey. In the present case study, the effect of developing and carrying out science demonstrations for elementary school students on six of the PSST' teaching practices on density and buoyancy concept was investigated. 30-minute interviews conducted with each PSST, videos recorded during their demonstration performances, brochures they prepared for their demonstration activities, and reflection papers were used as data collection tools of the study. The results showed that community service practices with science demonstrations had positive effects on PSST' science content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge.

  1. Baca geothermal demonstration project baseline ecosystem studies of cooling tower emission effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, P.; Osterling, R.; Price, D.; Westermeier, J.

    1981-03-01

    Results of baseline studies for boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine in vegetation and soil near the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant are provided for the 1980 sampling season. Preliminary results of visual vegetation assessments and population density studies of soil invertebrate fauna are also provided. Foliage samples were collected for chemical analysis on a total of 17 plots on 5 transects. Two to five plant species were sampled at each plot. Samples were collected in June-July and September. Soil samples were collected at each plot during September. Visual vegetation inspections were conducted along each transect. Eighty-eight soil samples were collected for soil invertebrate studies. Boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine levels in vegetation were within normal range for natural vegetation and crops. Concentrations of soil arsenic and mercury were comparable to foliage concentrations. Boron concentrations were lower in soil than in foliage, whereas soil fluorine concentrations were considerably higher than foliage concentrations. With the exception of heavy insect infestations in June-July, no vegetation abnormalities were noted. Preliminary soil invertebrate analysis indicated an overall arthropod density of approximately 100,000/m/sup 2/ which appears within the normal range encountered in forest and meadow soil.

  2. Ole Roemer and the Light-Time Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, C.

    2005-07-01

    We discuss the observational background of Roemer's remarkable hypothesis that the velocity of light is finite. The outcome of the joint efforts of a highly-skilled instrumentalist and a team of surveyors driven to produce accurate maps and technically supported by the revolutionary advancements in horology, illustrates the synergy between the accuracy of the O and the C terms in the O-C concept which led to one of the most fundamental discoveries of the Renaissance.

  3. Giant Clams and Rising CO2: Light May Ameliorate Effects of Ocean Acidification on a Solar-Powered Animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sue-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change and ocean acidification pose a serious threat to marine life. Marine invertebrates are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification, especially highly calcareous taxa such as molluscs, echinoderms and corals. The largest of all bivalve molluscs, giant clams, are already threatened by a variety of local pressures, including overharvesting, and are in decline worldwide. Several giant clam species are listed as 'Vulnerable' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and now climate change and ocean acidification pose an additional threat to their conservation. Unlike most other molluscs, giant clams are 'solar-powered' animals containing photosynthetic algal symbionts suggesting that light could influence the effects of ocean acidification on these vulnerable animals. In this study, juvenile fluted giant clams Tridacna squamosa were exposed to three levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) (control ~400, mid ~650 and high ~950 μatm) and light (photosynthetically active radiation 35, 65 and 304 μmol photons m-2 s-1). Elevated CO2 projected for the end of this century (~650 and ~950 μatm) reduced giant clam survival and growth at mid-light levels. However, effects of CO2 on survival were absent at high-light, with 100% survival across all CO2 levels. Effects of CO2 on growth of surviving clams were lessened, but not removed, at high-light levels. Shell growth and total animal mass gain were still reduced at high-CO2. This study demonstrates the potential for light to alleviate effects of ocean acidification on survival and growth in a threatened calcareous marine invertebrate. Managing water quality (e.g. turbidity and sedimentation) in coastal areas to maintain water clarity may help ameliorate some negative effects of ocean acidification on giant clams and potentially other solar-powered calcifiers, such as hard corals.

  4. Giant Clams and Rising CO2: Light May Ameliorate Effects of Ocean Acidification on a Solar-Powered Animal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-Ann Watson

    Full Text Available Global climate change and ocean acidification pose a serious threat to marine life. Marine invertebrates are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification, especially highly calcareous taxa such as molluscs, echinoderms and corals. The largest of all bivalve molluscs, giant clams, are already threatened by a variety of local pressures, including overharvesting, and are in decline worldwide. Several giant clam species are listed as 'Vulnerable' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and now climate change and ocean acidification pose an additional threat to their conservation. Unlike most other molluscs, giant clams are 'solar-powered' animals containing photosynthetic algal symbionts suggesting that light could influence the effects of ocean acidification on these vulnerable animals. In this study, juvenile fluted giant clams Tridacna squamosa were exposed to three levels of carbon dioxide (CO2 (control ~400, mid ~650 and high ~950 μatm and light (photosynthetically active radiation 35, 65 and 304 μmol photons m-2 s-1. Elevated CO2 projected for the end of this century (~650 and ~950 μatm reduced giant clam survival and growth at mid-light levels. However, effects of CO2 on survival were absent at high-light, with 100% survival across all CO2 levels. Effects of CO2 on growth of surviving clams were lessened, but not removed, at high-light levels. Shell growth and total animal mass gain were still reduced at high-CO2. This study demonstrates the potential for light to alleviate effects of ocean acidification on survival and growth in a threatened calcareous marine invertebrate. Managing water quality (e.g. turbidity and sedimentation in coastal areas to maintain water clarity may help ameliorate some negative effects of ocean acidification on giant clams and potentially other solar-powered calcifiers, such as hard corals.

  5. Seagrass productivity: the effect of light on carbon uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, S.L.; McRoy, C.P.

    1982-08-01

    Productivity, as estimated by /sup 14/C uptake, was determined as a function of irradiance for six North American seagrasses (Thalassia testudinum Banks ex. Koenig, Syringodium filiforme Kuetz, Halodule wrightii Aschers., Halophila engelmanni Aschers., Phyllospadix scouleri Hook and Ruppia maritima L.s.l.) from temperature, subtropical and tropical environments. Light versus productivity curves were typical of those of aquatic plants. Seagrasses achieved high rates of uptake (up to 17.31 mg C (g dry)-1 h-1) and exhibited high saturation irradiances (greater than or equal to 40% surface irradiance). Within each environment half-saturation and saturation irradiances were similar, indicating no competition for light in the production systems of the various species. Between environments maximum productivity and saturation irradiances changed as a function of the differing irradiance. When rates were normalized for ambient irradiance, there were no differences in maximum rates, except for plants from Texas. In the subtropics and tropics where several species co-exist in the same seagrass bed, two types of responses occurred, corresponding to climax versus colonizer species. The difference in the responses appeared in the initial and maximum rates and in sensitivity to high irradiance. Productivity of seagrasses can be estimated, with certain limitations, from light measurements using the equations of Michaelis-Menten and Steele. (Refs. 35).

  6. Explicit demonstration of the role of Marangoni effect in the breakup of nanoscale liquid filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seric, Ivana; Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Hartnett, Chris; Fowlkes, Jason; Rack, Philip; Kondic, Lou

    2016-11-01

    We consider a breakup of bi-metal filaments deposited on a solid substrate. These filaments are exposed to laser irradiation and, while in the liquid phase, evolve by a process resembling breakup of a liquid jet governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The novel element is that the Marangoni effect, resulting from a different surface tension of the two metals from which the filament is built, is crucial in understanding the instability development. In particular, Marangoni effect may lead to the inversion of the breakup process, producing droplets at the locations where according to the Rayleigh-Plateau theory dry spots would be expected. We present experimental results carried out with Cu-Ni filaments, as well as direct numerical simulations based on a novel algorithm that includes variable surface tension in a Volume-of-Fluid based Navier-Stokes solver. These results suggest the possibility of using Marangoni effect for the purpose of self- and directed-assembly on the nanoscale. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET-1604351.

  7. Implantation of juvenile human chondrocytes demonstrates no adverse effect on spinal nerve tissue in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külling, Fabrice A; Liu, Jane J; Liebenberg, Ellen; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2016-09-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a common disabling condition for millions of individuals. Injection of xenogenic juvenile chondrocytes (XJC) into the disc space has been shown to have a therapeutic potential for disc repair. In the current study, XJC were injected extra-discally on neural structures in an in vivo rat hemilaminectomy model to compare the histological and behavioral effects on XJC and fibrin glue carrier. Twenty-four rats were assigned to four groups: cells plus carrier, carrier alone, sham hemi-laminectomy, and a positive control (nerve root ligation). A right-sided hemilaminectomy was performed and the study material was placed on and around the exposed L4 nerve root and the spinal cord. Pre- and postoperatively mechanical allodynia was tested on the ipsilateral hind paw using the von Frey up-down method. The lumbar spines were harvested after 6 and 12 weeks for nerve histology and TNF-α quantification. After a brief period of hyperalgesia, the von Frey data indicate there are no adverse effects of placing XJC on spinal nerve roots in rats. However ligation of nerve root showed significant allodynia compared to the other groups. These behavioral data were supported by histological analyses. While these results need to be confirmed over a larger period of time, they suggest that XJC transplantation into the disc space shows no adverse effect on nerve tissue.

  8. Effects of light-emitting diode spectra on the vertebrate ancient long opsin and gonadotropin hormone in the goldfish Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin Ah; Kim, Na Na; Choi, Young Jae; Choi, Ji Yong; Kim, Bong-Seok; Choi, Cheol Young

    2016-08-05

    We determined the molecular mechanism underlying the environmental (photoperiodic) regulation of sexual maturation in fish, we examined the expression of sexual maturation-related hormones and vertebrate ancient long opsin (VAL-opsin) in goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to different light spectra (red and green light-emitting diodes). We further evaluated the effect of exogenous gonadotropin hormone (GTH) on the expression of VAL-opsin under different light conditions. Our results demonstrated that the expression of GTHs was higher in the fish exposed to green light, and VAL-opsin levels were increased in the fish receiving GTH injection. Therefore, we have uncovered a molecular mechanism underlying the environmental (light)-induced trigger for sexual maturation: VAL-opsin is activated by green light and GTH, which promotes the expression of sexual maturation genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of diffuse light in cultivation of roses; Effecten van diffuus licht in de rozenteelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schapendonk, A. [Plant-Dynamics, Englaan 8, 6703 EW Wageningen (Netherlands); Rappoldt, K. [EcoCurves, Kamperfoelieweg 17, 9753 ER Haren (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    An overview is given of the effects of diffuse glass and the rose production and the interactions with light, CO2 and Relative Humidity. Diffuse glass prevents peaks in the horizontal distribution of light and increases the average use of light [Dutch] Een overzicht wordt gegeven van de effecten van diffuus glas op de opbrengst van roos en de interacties met licht, CO2, en RV. Diffuus glas voorkomt pieken in de horizontale lichtverdeling en verhoogt de gemiddelde lichtbenutting.

  10. Fasciola hepatica: effect of the natural light level on cercarial emergence from temperature-challenged Galba truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignoles Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As abrupt changes in water temperature (thermal shock triggered a significantly greater cercarial emergence of Fasciola hepatica from experimentally infected Galba truncatula, laboratory investigations were carried out to study the influence of light on cercarial emergence in snails subjected to a thermal shock every week (a mean of 12 °C for 3 h during the patent period. Thermal shock for these temperature-challenged (TC snails was carried out outdoors under artificial or natural light, or indoors under constant artificial light. Compared with the infected control snails always reared indoors at 20 °C, the number of cercariae in TC snails subjected to a thermal shock and natural light outdoors was significantly greater. The repetition of this experiment by subjecting TC snails to the same thermal shock indoors under an artificial light level ranging from 600 to 3000 lux did not show any significant difference among the numbers of cercariae in the different subgroups. A detailed analysis of the results noted in the TC snails subjected to natural light during the thermal shock demonstrated that the number of cercariae-releasing snails was significantly higher between 601 and 1200 lux and for the highest nebulosity values (7–8 octas, which corresponds to a sufficiently or completely overcast sky. Contrary to the intensity of artificial light, which did not influence cercarial emergence, the natural light level had a significant effect on this process when F. hepatica-infected snails were subjected to a regular thermal shock during the patent period.

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  12. ICT Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Bay, Gina

    In this demonstration we present and discuss two interrelated on-line learning resources aimed at supporting international students at Danish universities in building study skills (the Study Metro) and avoiding plagiarism (Stopplagiarism). We emphasize the necessity of designing online learning r...

  13. Effect of sediment turbidity and color on light output measurement for Microtox Basic Solid-Phase Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, T; Abbondanzi, F; Casado-Martinez, C; DelValls, T A; Guerra, R; Iacondini, A

    2005-06-01

    In this work, sediment samples collected from several Spanish harbours were tested with two toxicity procedures, designed for solid samples: the Microtox Basic Solid-Phase Test (BSPT) and a modified procedure of the previous test protocol (mBSPT). According to the BSPT procedure, after initial light readings, pure bacteria were exposed to sediment suspension dilutions and light production was directly measured on suspended sediments without any further manipulation. As measurements are likely to be affected by sediment turbidity and color, a variation in initial light measurement has been here suggested, in order to consider the sample effect at all time readings during the test. Firstly, when sediment suspensions at different concentrations were added to bacteria suspension, immediately the initial light output drastically decayed by more than 50% in signal difference, resulting in a false inhibition, as effect of sample turbidity/color. This effect was more evident at high EC50 values, when slightly or not toxic samples were assessed. Secondly, the comparison of the EC50 obtained with both procedures, demonstrated that the mBSPT produced higher EC50 values (less toxic) than those obtained with the standard procedure. The mBSPT procedure resulted rapid and effective and it could be applied simultaneously with BSPT, in order to better evaluate the toxicity.

  14. Investigation on physiological and clinical effects of different light sources in TMJ photobiomodulation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenoff, J.

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Laser light Electromagnetic energy has some typical properties for discussions on laser irradiation abilities to control the acute and chronic disorders in TMJ. Material and Methods During the last six years we have been completed well controlled clinical trials based on the criteria of the American Academy of orofacial pain. The study over the 600 patients (300 women and 300 men), mean age of 47 years have been developed. Patients have been selected on the main clinical sign of TMJ pain and have been divided into four main groups according to the type of PDT method. Based on the action spectra, various wavelengths have been used for TMJ Photodynamic Therapy. Constant dose and time of exposition, as well as various range of frequencies have been applied. In this way the Laser biostimulation response has been directly proportional to the total energy dose, depending of light intensity. Physiological and clinical effects of the followed "active regions"- 660 - 680, 760 - 780, 810 - 830 and 904 - 987 nm have been valued by method of comparative analysis. Methods applied: LLLT - TENS - red surface laser acupuncture (LA), PIPBM - LA, Laser bioenergetics approach, Complex therapeutic program (CTP). Results evaluation will be demonstrated by comparative digital ortopantomograph analysis, EEG brain maps, VAS, a metric analysis of the level of the maximum active Mandible opening and EPST through electrophysiological signal evaluation of the patient's body.

  15. The environmental virtual observatory pilot (EVOp): a cloud solution demonstrating effective science for efficient decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, R. J.; Emmett, B.; McDonald, A.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental managers and policy makers face a challenging future trying to accommodate growing expectations of environmental well-being, while subject to maturing regulation, constrained budgets and a public scrutiny that expects easier and more meaningful access to data and decision logic. To support such a challenge requires new tools and new approaches. The EVOp is an initiative from the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) designed to deliver proof of concept for these new tools and approaches. A series of exemplar 'big catchment science questions' are posed and the prospects for their solution are assessed. These are then used to develop cloud solutions for serving data, models, visualisation and analysis tools to scientists, regulators, private companies and the public, all of whom have different expectations of what environmental information is important. Approaches are tested regularly with users using SCRUM. The VO vision encompasses seven key ambitions: i. being driven by the need to contribute to the solution of major environmental issues that impinge on, or link to, catchment science ii. having the flexibility and adaptability to address future problems not yet defined or fully clarified iii. being able to communicate issues and solutions to a range of audiences iv. supporting easy access by a variety of users v. drawing meaningful information from data and models and identifying the constraints on application in terms of errors, uncertainties, etc vi. adding value and cost effectiveness to current investigations by supporting transfer and scale adjustment thus limiting the repetition of expensive field monitoring addressing essentially the same issues in varying locations vii. promoting effective interfacing of robust science with a variety of end users by using terminology or measures familiar to the user (or required by regulation), including financial and carbon accounting, whole life or fixed period costing, risk as probability or as

  16. Effects of light and temperature on seed germination in Cecropia hololeuca Miq. (Cecropiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godoi Simone

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of Cecropia hololeuca were submitted to regimes of constant and alternating temperatures, associated with photoperiods of white light, "shade light" and continuous darkness under controlled conditions in laboratory. Seeds did not germinate at constant temperatures of 10°C to 20°C and above 35°C. Seeds only germinated in the darkness when the temperature was alternated. "Shade light" inhibited germination. We concluded that the regime of alternating temperatures suppressed the light effects on seed germination of this species.

  17. Growth of shredders on leaf litter biofilms: the effect of light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, R.J.M.; Waluto, B.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Gardeniers, J.J.P.; Beijer, J.A.J.; Scheffer, M.

    2005-01-01

    1. The effect of light intensity on the decomposition of poplar (Populus nigra) leaves and growth of the shredders, Asellus aquaticus and Gammarus pulex, was studied in a laboratory experiment. The response was studied along a gradient of six light intensities of 0, 5, 23, 54, 97 and 156 ¿mol m -2 s

  18. Effect of light quality on movement of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allema, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this project was to study the effect of red light on night time behaviour of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae). An experiment was conducted in experimental arenas in the autumn of 2008. Beetles were recorded 20 min per hour during a period of 8 hours under red light, near in

  19. Effect of Bonny Light Crude Oil Pollution of Soil on the Growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Devika

    ABSTRACT: The effect of Bonny Light Crude oil pollution of soil and ... In the Control treatments, a declining trend in plant growth was observed from .... needed to accommodate 2 oil levels replicated 5 times. Fresh unweathered Bonny Light Crude (BLC) ... Mean * Plant Height (cm) at Different Successive Plantings.

  20. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Chen; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  1. The effect of scattered light sensor orientation on roughness measurement of curved polished surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The effect of angular orientation of a scattered light sensor with respect to main curvature and surface lay on roughness measurements is evaluated. A commercial scattered light sensor OS 500-32 from Optosurf GmbH was used. The investigation was performed on polished cylindrical surfaces with cro...

  2. Effects of light ingress through ventilation fan apertures on selected blood variables of male broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing broiler house size and ventilation capacity have resulted in increased light ingress through ventilation system component apertures. The effective photoperiod for broilers may create local increases in light intensity, which may also impact broiler’ body homeostasis. The objective of this...

  3. The Stimulating Effect of Bright Light on Physical Performance Depends on Internal Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Forstner, Sebastian; Halle, Martin; Schlangen, Luc; Roenneberg, Till; Schmidt-Trucksaess, Arno

    2012-01-01

    The human circadian clock regulates the daily timing of sleep, alertness and performance and is synchronized to the 24-h day by the environmental light-dark cycle. Bright light exposure has been shown to positively affect sleepiness and alertness, yet little is known about its effects on physical pe

  4. Combined Effects of Ocean Acidification and Light or Nitrogen Availabilities on

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoins, M.; Eberlein, T.; Großmann, C.H.; Brandenburg, K.; Reichart, G.-J.; Rost, B.; Sluijs, A.; Van de Waal, D.B.

    2016-01-01

    Along with increasing oceanic CO2 concentrations, enhanced stratification constrains phytoplankton to shallower upper mixed layers with altered light regimes and nutrient concentrations. Here, we investigate the effects of elevated pCO2 in combination with light or nitrogen-limitation on 13C fractio

  5. Experimental Demonstration of Microwave Signal/Electric Thruster Plasma Interaction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Afroz J.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Curran, Frank M.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was designed and conducted in the Electric Propulsion Laboratory of NASA Lewis Research Center to assess the impact of ion thruster exhaust plasma plume on electromagnetic signal propagation. A microwave transmission experiment was set up inside the propulsion test bed using a pair of broadband horn antennas and a 30 cm 2.3 kW ion thruster. Frequency of signal propagation covered from 6.5 to 18 GHz range. The stainless steel test bed when enclosed can be depressurized to simulate a near vacuum environment. A pulsed CW system with gating hardware was utilized to eliminate multiple chamber reflections from the test signal. Microwave signal was transmitted and received between the two hours when the thruster was operating at a given power level in such a way that the signal propagation path crossed directly through the plume volume. Signal attenuation and phase shift due to the plume was measured for the entire frequency band. Results for this worst case configuration simulation indicate that the effects of the ion thruster plume on microwave signals is a negligible attenuation (within 0.15 dB) and a small phase shift (within 8 deg.). This paper describes the detailed experiment and presents some of the results.

  6. Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) in Moroccan Jews: Demonstration of a founder effect by extened haplotype analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.; Helling, S.; Prosen, L.; Kastner, D.L.; Gruberg, L.; Pras, M. (Heller Institute for Medical Research, Tel-Hashomer (Israel))

    1993-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease causing attacks of fever and serositis. The FMF gene (designated MEF') is on 16p, with the gene order 16 cen-D16S80-MEF-D16S94-D16S283-D16S291-16pter. Here the authors report the association of FMF susceptibility with alleles at D16S94, D16S283, and D16S291 among 31 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families 14 Moroccan families. For the non-Moroccans, only the allelic association at D16S94 approached statistical significance. Haplotype analysis showed that 18/25 Moroccan FMF chromosomes, versus 0/21 noncarrier chromosomes, bore a specific haplotype for D16S94-D16S283-D16S291. Among non-Moroccans this haplotype was present in 6/26 FMF chromosomes versus 1/28 controls. Both groups of families are largely descended from Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition. The strong haplotype association seen among the Moroccans is most likely a founder effect, given the recent origin and genetic isolation of the Moroccan Jewish community. The lowest haplotype frequency among non-Moroccan carriers may reflect differences both in history and in population genetics. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Effect of inhaled iloprost on the exercise function of Fontan patients: a demonstration of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jonathan; Ubeda-Tikkanen, Ana; Clair, Mathieu; Fernandes, Susan M; Graham, Dionne A; Milliren, Carly E; Daly, Kevin P; Mullen, Mary P; Landzberg, Michael J

    2013-10-03

    Exercise capacity following Fontan surgery is often depressed. An inability to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance appropriately during exercise may contribute to this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to determine whether administration of iloprost, a selective pulmonary vasodilator, would improve exercise function after Fontan procedure. Double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled, crossover trial. Patients performed two cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPX) separated by iloprost or placebo) was administered before each CPX. 18 patients aged 12-49 (median 17) years were recruited. Mild throat discomfort developed in 10/18 patients during iloprost administration; all but 1 were able to complete treatment. No symptoms developed during placebo treatments (piloprost (median increase 1.2 ml/beat; piloprost. Only 3/6 patients with peak VO2 >30 ml/kg/min had higher peak VO2 following iloprost (pIloprost improves the peak oxygen pulse and peak VO2 of patients with Fontan physiology and appears to be particularly beneficial among patients with impaired exercise function. Treatment is associated with minor side effects. These findings support the concept of pulmonary vasodilator therapy in Fontan patients with limited functional capacity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effects of a Demonstration School Program on Nuclear Energy for Elementary School Students in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, EunOk; Lee, Seung Koo; Choi, Yoon Seok [Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Advancing nuclear energy and radiation technology to drive the country forward should be based on the understanding and acceptance of the public. Korea has provided numerous types of information to increase public acceptance of nuclear energy, but it has been difficult to change adults’ perceptions and increase their acceptance of nuclear energy. As a result, social costs are rising. After a pilot program of 13 classes on understanding nuclear energy and radiation offered to elementary school students, who were expected to easily change their perceptions and to experience a relatively greater educational effect, this study analyzed changes to knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding nuclear energy. In addition, this program was the first curriculum of its kind used as a step to lay the groundwork for offering it nationally in the free semester system. Therefore, the study analyzed its appropriateness to educational purposes. A lack of research and practice on communication strategies could be responsible for the situation in Korea of low support for nuclear energy because Korea does not have public understanding even though it is a nuclear energy exporter. If Korea implemented strategic communications from this point, such efforts could reduce unnecessary social costs.

  9. Influence of oxygen tension of the metabolism of vascular smooth muscle: demonstration of a Pasteur effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnqvist, H J; Lundholm, L

    1976-01-01

    The influence of variations of oxygen tension on the metabolism of bovine mesenteric arteries was studied in vitro. Glucose uptake, lactate production, glycogen content, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CrP) and incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein were determined. The mesenteric arteries were suspended in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer which was aerated with a gas mixture containing 5% CO2,O-95% O2 and N2 to 100%. Reduction of the O2 concentration of the gas phase from 95-20% resulted in little metabolic change. A further reduction from 20-0% O2 increased the lactate production 4-fold, indicating a marked Pasteur effect. At 0% O2 the glucose uptake was moderately increased and the glycogen content was decreased. The tissue level of CrP was reduced at a low oxygen tension and at 0% O2 the ATP content was also lowered. The incorporation of leucine into proteins was reduced at 0% O2.

  10. Effects of different lighting programs on semi-heavy laying hens reared in open shelters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Jorge de Freitas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of of lighting programs on the zootechnic performance and egg quality of semi-heavy laying hens were evaluated. Three light programs were tested: continuous lighting of 15h (artificial+natural, intermittent lighting (two photophases of 15s between the natural light and natural increased lighting. 192 birds were used, accommodated in a shed divided into three environments in such a way that the lighting of any given one did not interfere with the others. The experimental period lasted 112 days, during which the zootechnic performance was evaluated through the egg production, feed intake, weight and mass of eggs. The quality of the eggs was valued through their specific gravity, weight and shell thickness, and Haugh unit measurement. The design was entirely randomized, with eight repetitions, and the averages of the treatments were compared by the SNK test (5%. In the results of performance, the feed intake and egg weight were similar (P0.05 under the natural light program. The quality of the eggs was not altered (P<0.05 by any of the programs. It was concluded that the intermittent lighting program could be use in open sheds, maintaining the zootechnic performance of semi-heavy laying hens and without altering the quality of their eggs. In contrast, the program of natural increased light reduces egg production.

  11. 基于MATLAB GUI的汽车外灯控制系统演示模型%DEMONSTRATION MODEL OF CONTROL SYSTEM FOR EXTERIOR AUTOMOBILE LIGHTING BASED ON MATLAB GUI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭洪源; 许维胜; 余有灵

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a demonstration model of control system for exterior automobile lighting based on Matlab GUI after analysed the control pattern of exterior automobile lighting of existing electronic appliances in automobile industry, and which has been adopted at last. The Matlab software has the characteristic of good scalability, and has powerful computation function, the Matlab Guide development environment it integrates is convenient in establishing friendly man-machine interface. The application of this scheme makes the function management of exterior automobile lighting more intuitive; moreover, it facilitates the modification of control logic and function of exterior automobile lighting.%在分析现有汽车行业电子电器汽车外灯控制方式的基础上,提出一种基于Matlab GUI的汽车外灯控制系统演示模型,并最终得到应用.Matlab软件具有很好的拓展性,并且具有强大的计算功能,其集成的Matlab Guide开发环境方便建立良好的人机交互界面.该方案的应用使得汽车外灯功能管理变得更加直观,并且便于对汽车外灯控制逻辑以及功能进行修改.

  12. Test of "Light" cigarette counter-advertising using a standard test of advertising effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Shiffman, S; Burton, S.; Pillitteri, J.; Gitchell, J; di, M; Sweeney, C; Wardle, P.; Koehler, G.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate systematically the effectiveness of six advertising strategies (two message strategies presented in three different contexts) designed to promote smoking cessation by addressing smokers' misperceptions about Light cigarettes.
DESIGN—Smokers viewed one of six, 30 second test television concept advertisements, which varied by message (one emphasising how the sensory effects of Lights can be deceptive, the other describing the effects of vent blocking) and by ad context (no...

  13. Demonstration of 575-Mb/s downlink and 225-Mb/s uplink bi-directional SCM-WDM visible light communication using RGB LED and phosphor-based LED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanquan; Wang, Yiguang; Chi, Nan; Yu, Jianjun; Shang, Huiliang

    2013-01-14

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel full-duplex bi-directional subcarrier multiplexing (SCM)-wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) visible light communication (VLC) system based on commercially available red-green-blue (RGB) light emitting diode (LED) and phosphor-based LED (P-LED) with 575-Mb/s downstream and 225-Mb/s upstream transmission, employing various modulation orders of quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM). For the downlink, red and green colors/wavelengths are assigned to carry useful information, while blue chip is just kept lighting to maintain the white color illumination, and for the uplink, the low-cost P-LED is implemented. In this demonstration, pre-equalization and post-equalization are also adopted to compensate the severe frequency response of LEDs. Using this scheme, 4-user downlink and 1-user uplink transmission can be achieved. Furthermore, it can support more users by adjusting the bandwidth of each sub-channel. Bit error rates (BERs) of all links are below pre-forward-error-correction (pre-FEC) threshold of 3.8x 10(-3) after 66-cm free-space delivery. The results show that this scheme has great potential in the practical VLC system.

  14. Effective connectivity analysis demonstrates involvement of premotor cortex during speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osnes, Berge; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Specht, Karsten

    2011-02-01

    Several reports of premotor cortex involvement in speech perception have been put forward. Still, the functional role of premotor cortex is under debate. In order to investigate the functional role of premotor cortex, we presented parametrically varied speech stimuli in both a behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. White noise was transformed over seven distinct steps into a speech sound and presented to the participants in a randomized order. As control condition served the same transformation from white noise into a music instrument sound. The fMRI data were modelled with Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) where the effective connectivity between Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale, superior temporal sulcus and premotor cortex were tested. The fMRI results revealed a graded increase in activation in the left superior temporal sulcus. Premotor cortex activity was only present at an intermediate step when the speech sounds became identifiable but were still distorted but was not present when the speech sounds were clearly perceivable. A Bayesian model selection procedure favored a model that contained significant interconnections between Heschl's gyrus, planum temporal, and superior temporal sulcus when processing speech sounds. In addition, bidirectional connections between premotor cortex and superior temporal sulcus and from planum temporale to premotor cortex were significant. Processing non-speech sounds initiated no significant connections to premotor cortex. Since the highest level of motor activity was observed only when processing identifiable sounds with incomplete phonological information, it is concluded that premotor cortex is not generally necessary for speech perception but may facilitate interpreting a sound as speech when the acoustic input is sparse.

  15. Effects of Color Lights on Performance, Immune Response and Hematological Indices of Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobhan Firouzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been shown the effects of light wave length on broilers performance in experimental assay, but we decided to evaluate the effects of different color lights on broiler performance, immune response and hematological parameters in filed study. For this purpose, 40000 day-old broiler chickens were placed in four houses as follow: green, sunny yellow, blue and red light. All light sources were equalized at the intensity of 25 lux, with light period of 23 hours daily. In days 8, 18, 30 and 42 from each house, 25 samples of serum were obtained to evaluate the ND-antibody responses. At 42 days of age, 25 blood samples were taken from each house to evaluate HDL, LDL, VLDL, triglyceride, cholesterol, total protein, creatinine, BUN and glucose of serum. The live body weight and feed intake were recorded weekly and Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR was calculated. The results indicated that the birds reared under yellow and blue light had the best and weakest performance, respectively. The decrease of maternal antibody in group which reared under green light was the slowest and at the end of experiment the birds which were exposed to green and blue light had the highest ND antibody titers among all groups but it was insignificant (P>0.05. The birds in yellow light house showed a significant increase in total serum protein (P0.05.

  16. Light propagation in disordered media: From Maxwell equations to a spherical p-spin model and light condensation effects

    KAUST Repository

    Toth, Laszlo Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The well-known phenomenon of the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), a striking consequence of the Bose-Einstein statistics, has been traditionally linked to an ensemble of ultra-cold gas molecules. However, classical systems can also exhibit condensation effects; in the field of photonics, for example, signatures of this condensation in the mode dynamics (\\'light condensation\\', LC) have been theoretically investigated and experimentally observed in various types of multimode lasers [1,2 and ref. therein]. © 2013 IEEE.

  17. Education Demonstration Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, A.; Lee, R. L.

    2003-10-01

    The General Atomics fusion education program ``Scientist in the Classroom" (SIC) now in its sixth year, uses scientists and engineers to present plasma as a state of matter to students in the classroom. Using hands-on equipment, students see how magnets, gas pressure changes, and different gases are turned into plasmas. A piston, sealed volume, and vacuum chamber illuminate ideal gas laws. Liquid nitrogen is used to explore thermodynamic temperature effects and changes in states of matter. Light bulbs are excited with a Tesla coil to ionize gases, thus becoming an inexpensive plasma devices and a plasma tube shows magnetic interactions with plasma. The demonstration equipment used in this program is built with simple designs and common commercial equipment keeping in mind a teacher's tight budget. The SIC program ( ˜25 school presentations per year) has become very popular and has acquired an enthusiastic group of regular teacher clientele requesting repeat visits. In addition, three very popular and successful ``Build-It" days, sponsored by the General Atomics Fusion Education Outreach Program, enables teachers to build and keep in their classroom some of this equipment. The demonstration devices will be presented along with their ``build-it" details.

  18. The contribution of the diffuse light component to the topographic effect on remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, C.; Holben, B.

    1980-01-01

    The topographic effect is measured by the difference between the global radiance from inclined surfaces as a function of their orientation relative to the sensor position and light source. The short wave radiant energy incident on a surface is composed of direct sunlight, scattered skylight, and light reflected from surrounding terrain. The latter two components are commonly known as the diffuse component. The contribution of the diffuse light component to the topographic effect was examined and the significance of this diffuse component with respect to two direct radiance models was assessed. Diffuse and global spectral radiances were measured for a series of slopes and aspects of a uniform and surface in the red and photographic infrared parts of the spectrum, using a nadir pointing two channel handheld radiometer. The diffuse light was found to produce a topographic effect which varied from the topographic effect for direct light. The topographic effect caused by diffuse light was found to increase slightly with solar elevation and wavelength for the channels examined. The correlations between data derived from two simple direct radiance simulation models and the field data were not significantly affected when the diffuse component was removed from the radiances. Radiances from a 60 percent reflective surface, assuming no atmospheric path radiance, the diffuse light topographic effect contributed a maximum range of 3 pixel values in simulated LANDSAT data from all aspects with slopes up to 30 degrees.

  19. Optimizing LED lighting for space plant growth unit: Joint effects of photon flux density, red to white ratios and intermittent light pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avercheva, O. V.; Berkovich, Yu. A.; Konovalova, I. O.; Radchenko, S. G.; Lapach, S. N.; Bassarskaya, E. M.; Kochetova, G. V.; Zhigalova, T. V.; Yakovleva, O. S.; Tarakanov, I. G.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work were to choose a quantitative optimality criterion for estimating the quality of plant LED lighting regimes inside space greenhouses and to construct regression models of crop productivity and the optimality criterion depending on the level of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), the proportion of the red component in the light spectrum and the duration of the duty cycle (Chinese cabbage Brassica сhinensis L. as an example). The properties of the obtained models were described in the context of predicting crop dry weight and the optimality criterion behavior when varying plant lighting parameters. Results of the fractional 3-factor experiment demonstrated the share of the PPFD level participation in the crop dry weight accumulation was 84.4% at almost any combination of other lighting parameters, but when PPFD value increased up to 500 μmol m-2 s-1 the pulse light and supplemental light from red LEDs could additionally increase crop productivity. Analysis of the optimality criterion response to variation of lighting parameters showed that the maximum coordinates were the following: PPFD = 500 μmol m-2 s-1, about 70%-proportion of the red component of the light spectrum (PPFDLEDred/PPFDLEDwhite = 1.5) and the duty cycle with a period of 501 μs. Thus, LED crop lighting with these parameters was optimal for achieving high crop productivity and for efficient use of energy in the given range of lighting parameter values.

  20. Suborganellar localisation and effect of light on Helianthus tuberosus chloroplast transglutaminases and their substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondini, L; Del Duca, S; Dall'Agata, L; Bassi, R; Gastaldelli, M; Della Mea, M; Di Sandro, A; Claparols, I; Serafini-Fracassini, D

    2003-05-01

    The light stimulation of transglutaminase (TGase EC 2.3.2.13) activity was verified by incubating isolated chloroplasts of Helianthus tuberosus L. continuously or for alternate periods of light or dark (light/dark and dark/light). The first 10 min of incubation always represented the critical period. Light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHCII) were more intensely labelled by (14)C-polyamines under light and light/dark than under dark and dark/light conditions. Chloroplasts were fractionated into thylakoid- and stroma-enriched fractions in which multiple TGase forms and substrates were found. Antibodies against TGase recognised 58- and 24-kDa bands in thylakoids and a 150-kDa band in the stroma. The latter, and its 150-kDa fraction, catalysed the conjugation of 14C-polyamines to Rubisco. In both fractions (thylakoid-pre and stroma-pre) the analysis of polyamine glutamyl derivatives showed a significant light-affected conjugation of polyamines to endogenous proteins. Alternatively, entire chloroplasts were incubated and afterwards their sub-fractions were isolated (thylakoid-post and stroma-post). The PSII and LHCII complexes were more intensely immunodetected in thylakoid-post than in thylakoid-pre, especially under dark conditions. Conversely, the conjugation of polyamines to thylakoid proteins was clearly light-stimulated in thylakoid-post, and much less in thylakoid-pre. Stroma-pre proteins were poorly polyamine-conjugated and not light-affected; on the contrary, stroma-post proteins were much more polyamine-modified and strongly light-stimulated. Thus, the light-activated conjugation depends mainly on the presence of the thylakoid fraction during the assay. The protective effect on chloroplasts under photo-damage, stress or senescence conditions attributed in the literature to free polyamines is discussed with regard to the occurrence of polyamine conjugates catalysed by TGases.

  1. Evaluation of light dependence of monoterpene emission and its effect on surface ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Shimadera, Hikari; Kondo, Akira; Bao, Hai; Shrestha, Kundan Lal; Inoue, Yoshio

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of light intensity on monoterpene emission from the three dominant coniferous tree species in Japan (Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtusa and Pinus densiflora). Monoterpene emission experiments were conducted by using a growth chamber where temperature and light intensity can be controlled. In the experiments, air temperature was set at 30 °C and light intensity was set at 0, 500, 700, 850, 1200, and 1400 μmol m-2s-1. Because monoterpene emissions from the three tree species similarly increased with increasing light intensity, a new empirical equation considering light dependence was proposed to estimate monoterpene emission. In addition, monoterpene emission in the Kinki region of Japan was estimated with and without light dependence using meteorological field produced by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) in summer 2010. The monoterpene emissions estimated with light dependence were larger than those without light dependence in the daytime under clear sky conditions and consistently smaller in the nighttime. In order to evaluate the effect of light dependence of monoterpene emission on ozone concentration in the Kinki region, two cases of air quality simulations by the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) were conducted using the monoterpene emission data estimated with and without light dependence. Comparisons of the two cases showed that the monoterpene emission changes due to light dependence slightly but systematically affected ozone concentrations. Monoterpene generally played a role of reducing ozone concentration in the CMAQ simulations. Consequently, because of the light dependence, the mean daily maximum ozone concentrations decreased by 0.3 ppb on average with a maximum of 2.2 ppb, and the mean daily minimum values increased by 0.4 ppb on average with a maximum of 1.8 ppb in the Kinki region in summer 2010.

  2. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H; Duijzer, Wianne B; Hommes, Vanja

    2016-02-18

    The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the treatment of SAD. In this study, a comparison has been made between the effects of broad-wavelength light without ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths compared to narrow-band blue light in the treatment of sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder (Sub-SAD). In a 15-day design, 48 participants suffering from Sub-SAD completed 20-minute sessions of light treatment on five consecutive days. 22 participants were given bright white-light treatment (BLT, broad-wavelength light without UV 10 000 lux, irradiance 31.7 Watt/m(2)) and 26 participants received narrow-band blue light (BLUE, 100 lux, irradiance 1.0 Watt/m(2)). All participants completed daily and weekly questionnaires concerning mood, activation, sleep quality, sleepiness and energy. Also, mood and energy levels were assessed by means of the SIGH-SAD, the primary outcome measure. On day 15, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (BLT 54.8 %, effect size 1.7 and BLUE 50.7 %, effect size 1.9). No statistically significant differences were found on the main outcome measures. Light treatment is an effective treatment for Sub-SAD. The use of narrow-band blue-light treatment is equally effective as bright white-light treatment. This study was registered in the Dutch Trial Register (Nederlands Trial Register TC =  4342 ) (20-12-2013).

  3. Analysis of an effective optical filtering technique to enhance microwave phase shifts based on slow and fast light effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Öhman, Filip; Xue, Weiqi

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically analyze and interpret an effective mechanism, which employs optical filtering to enhance the microwave phase shift that can be achieved in semiconductor optical amplifiers based on slow and fast light effects.......We theoretically analyze and interpret an effective mechanism, which employs optical filtering to enhance the microwave phase shift that can be achieved in semiconductor optical amplifiers based on slow and fast light effects....

  4. The effect of photometric and geometric context on photometric and geometric lightness effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas Y; Brainard, David H

    2014-01-24

    We measured the lightness of probe tabs embedded at different orientations in various contextual images presented on a computer-controlled stereo display. Two background context planes met along a horizontal roof-like ridge. Each plane was a graphic rendering of a set of achromatic surfaces with the simulated illumination for each plane controlled independently. Photometric context was varied by changing the difference in simulated illumination intensity between the two background planes. Geometric context was varied by changing the angle between them. We parsed the data into separate photometric effects and geometric effects. For fixed geometry, varying photometric context led to linear changes in both the photometric and geometric effects. Varying geometric context did not produce a statistically reliable change in either the photometric or geometric effects.

  5. Effects of green and red light in βL-crystallin and ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, J Horacio; Reynaga-Hernández, Elizabeth; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Montero-Morán, Gabriela; Sanchez-Dominguez, Margarita; Mercado-Uribe, Hilda

    2015-12-14

    The effects of visible light on biological systems have been widely studied. In particular, the alterations of blue light on the ocular lens have recently attracted much attention. Here, we present a study about the effects produced by green and red light on two different proteins: βL-crystallin and ovalbumin. Based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence emission measurements, we found that both wavelengths induce structural changes in these proteins. We also observed that βL-crystallin aggregates. Our work may advance our understanding about conformational and aggregation processes in proteins subjected to visible radiation and the possible relationship with cataracts. While blue light has been considered the only harmful component in the visible espectrum, our findings show the possibility that lower energy components may be also of some concern.

  6. Effect of phototherapy with turquoise vs. blue LED light of equal irradiance in jaundiced neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Finn; Vandborg, Pernille K; Madsen, Poul H;

    2016-01-01

    for phototherapy is light emitting diodes (LEDs). AIM: Compare the bilirubin reducing effect in jaundiced neonates treated either with turquoise- or blue LED light with peak emission at 497 nm or 459 nm, respectively, with equal irradiance on the infants. METHODS: Infants with gestational age ≥33 weeks......) decrease of total serum bilirubin was 35.3% (32.5; 37.3) and 33.1% (27.1; 36.8) for infants treated with turquoise- and blue light, respectively. The difference was non-significant (p=0.53). The decrease was positively correlated to postnatal age and negatively to birth weight. CONCLUSION: Using LED light...... of equal irradiance, turquoise- and blue light had equal bilirubin reducing effect on hyperbilirubinemia of neonates.Pediatric Research (2015); doi:10.1038/pr.2015.209....

  7. Effect of Road Lighting on the Quality of Dual Carriageway Road Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Edigbe Johnnie

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study is exciting because it introduced a new quality of road service assessment approach. The study explored the effect of road lighting on the quality of dual carriageway road service. Based on the hypothesis that road lighting has no significant effect on the level of road service, an impact study was carried out in Skudai town, Malaysia. Twenty four hours continuous traffic volume, vehicle types and speeds data were collected during daylight, road lighting and dry weather conditions for two directional flows. Results show that travel speeds speed during daylight and road lighting periods did not differ significantly. The study concluded road lighting does not affect the quality of road service significantly.

  8. Optical Interference Effects by Metal Cathode in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhao-Xin; WANG Li-Duo; QIU Yong

    2004-01-01

    The dependence of light intensities of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) on the distance of emission zone to metal cathode is investigated numerically. The investigation is based on the half-space optical model that accounts for optical interference effects of metal cathode. We find that light intensities of OLEDs are functions of the distance of emission zone from the metal cathode because of the effect of interference of the metal cathode.This interference leads to an optimal location of emission zone in OLEDs for the maximum of light intensities.Optimal locations of emission zone are numerically shown in various emitting colour OLEDs with different metal cathodes and these results are expected to give insight into the preparation of high efficiency full colour or white light OLEDs.

  9. Deducing effective light transport parameters in optically thin systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzamuto, Giacomo; Toninelli, Costanza; Wiersma, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    We present an extensive Monte Carlo study on light transport in optically thin slabs, addressing both axial and transverse propagation. We completely characterize the so-called ballistic-to-diffusive transition, notably in terms of the spatial variance of the transmitted/reflected profile. We test the validity of the prediction cast by diffusion theory, that the spatial variance should grow independently of absorption and, to a first approximation, of the sample thickness and refractive index contrast. Based on a large set of simulated data, we build a freely available look-up table routine allowing reliable and precise determination of the microscopic transport parameters starting from robust observables which are independent of absolute intensity measurements. We also present the Monte Carlo software package that was developed for the purpose of this study.

  10. Neutrino Oscillation Effects on Supernova Light Element Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, T; Yokomakura, H; Kimura, K; Takamura, A; Hartmann, D H

    2006-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations affect light element synthesis through the neutrino-process in supernova explosions. The 7Li and 11B yields produced in a supernova explosion of a 16.2 solar-mass star model increase by factors of 1.9 and 1.3 in the case of large mixing angle solution with normal mass hierarchy and sin^{2}2theta_{13} > 0.002 compared with those without the oscillations. In the case of inverted mass hierarchy or nonadiabatic 13-mixing resonance, the increment of their yields is much smaller. Neutrino oscillations raise the reaction rates of charged-current neutrino-process reactions in the region outside oxygen-rich layers. The number ratio of 7Li/11B could be a tracer of normal mass hierarchy and relatively large theta_{13}, still satisfying sin^{2}2theta_{13} < 0.1, through future precise observations in stars having strong supernova component.

  11. Light induced tunnel effect in CNT-Si photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramo, C., E-mail: aramo@na.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosio, M. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Bonavolontà, C. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Centro per Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive 18, Povo di Trento, 38123 Trento (Italy); Castrucci, P. [INFN, Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dip. di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Crivellari, M. [Centro per Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive 18, Povo di Trento, 38123 Trento (Italy); De Crescenzi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dip. di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); De Lisio, C. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Fiandrini, E. [INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Dip. di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Piazza Università 1, 06100 Perugia (Italy); and others

    2016-07-11

    Negative differential resistance (NDR), for which the current is a decreasing function of the voltage, has been observed in the current–voltage curves of several types of structures. We measured tunnelling current and NDR by illuminating large area heterojunction obtained by growing Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the surface of n-doped Silicon substrate. In the absence of light, the current flow is null until a junction threshold of about 2.4 V is reached, beyond which the dark current flows at room temperature with a very low intensity of few nA. When illuminated, a current of tens nA is observed at a drain voltage of about 1.5 V. At higher voltage the current intensity decreases according to a negative resistance of the order of MΩ. In the following we report details of tunneling photodiode realized and negative resistance characteristics.

  12. Effects of spectral composition, photoperiod and light intensity on the gonadal development of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Denggao; Xu, Shihong; Song, Changbin; Chi, Liang; Li, Xian; Sun, Guoxiang; Liu, Baoliang; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Artificial lighting regimes have been successfully used to inhibit sexual maturity of Atlantic salmon in confinement. However, when these operations are applied in commercial recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) using standard lighting technology, sexual maturation is not suppressed. In this study, an L9 (33) orthogonal design was used to determine the effects of three factors (spectral composition, photoperiod, and light intensity) on the gonadal development of Atlantic salmon in RAS. We demonstrated that the photoperiod at the tested levels had a much greater effect on the gonadosomatic index and female Fulton condition factor than spectral composition and light intensity. The photoperiod had a significant effect on the secretion of sex steroids and melatonin ( P0.05). The optimum lighting levels in female and male Atlantic salmon were LD 8:16, 455 nm (or 625 nm), 8.60 W/m2; and LD 8:16, 8.60 W/m2, 455 nm respectively. These conditions not only delayed gonadal development, but also had no negative effects on Atlantic salmon growth in RAS. These results demonstrate that a combination of spectral composition, photoperiod and light intensity is effective at delaying the gonadal development of both male and female salmon in RAS.

  13. [Effects of light quality on the growth characteristics and biochemical component of Chlorella pyrenoidosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing-Qing; Fang, Zhi-Guo; Ji, Wen-Wen; Xia, Hui-Long

    2014-11-01

    Effect of light quality, including red light, blue light, white light, red and blue mixing light with ratios of 8: 1, 8:2 and 8 : 3, on the growth characteristics and biochenmical composition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was investigated based on light emitting diode (LED). Results showed that Chlorella pyrenoidosa grew best under blue light, and the optical density, specific growth rate and biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was about 2.4, 0.10 d(-1) and 0.64 g x L(-1), respectively, while the optical density of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was between 1.0 and 1.7, the specific growth rate was between 0.07-0.10 d(-1) and the biomass was between 0.27 and 0.38 g x L(-1) under other light quality after 30 days of cultivation. Under blue light, the optical density, specific growth rate and biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was approximately 2.05 times, 1.33 times and 2.06 times higher than red light, respectively. Moreover, red and blue mixing light was conducive to the synthesis of chlorophyll a and β-carotene of Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and blue light could promote the synthesis of chlorophyll b. Chlorophyll a and carotenoids content of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was 13.5 mg xg(-1) and 5.8 mg x g(-1) respectively under red and blue mixing light with a ratio of 8:1, while it was 8.4 mg x g(-1) and 3.6 mg x g(-1) respectively under blue light. Red and blue mixing light was more conducive to protein and total lipid content per dry cell of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Protein and total lipid content was 489.3 mg x g(-1) and 311.2 mg x g(-1) under red and blue mixing light with a ratio of 8 : 3, while it was 400.9 mg x g(-1) and 231.9 mg x g(-1) respectively under blue light.

  14. Optical effects of exposing intact human lenses to ultraviolet radiation and visible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Eskildsen, Lars; Lundeman, Jesper Holm

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human lens is continuously exposed to high levels of light. Ultraviolet radiation is believed to play a causative role in the development of cataract. In vivo, however, the lens is mainly exposed to visible light and the ageing lens absorbs a great part of the short wavelength...... region of incoming visible light. The aim of the present study was to examine the optical effects on human lenses of short wavelength visible light and ultraviolet radiation. METHODS: Naturally aged human donor lenses were irradiated with UVA (355 nm), violet (400 and 405 nm) and green (532 nm) lasers....... The effect of irradiation was evaluated qualitatively by photography and quantitatively by measuring the direct transmission before and after irradiation. Furthermore, the effect of pulsed and continuous laser systems was compared as was the effect of short, intermediate and prolonged exposures. RESULTS...

  15. Optical effects of exposing intact human lenses to ultraviolet radiation and visible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Eskildsen, Lars Baunsgaard; Lundeman, Jesper Holm

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The human lens is continuously exposed to high levels of light. Ultraviolet radiation is believed to play a causative role in the development of cataract. In vivo, however, the lens is mainly exposed to visible light and the ageing lens absorbs a great part of the short...... wavelength region of incoming visible light. The aim of the present study was to examine the optical effects on human lenses of short wavelength visible light and ultraviolet radiation. METHODS: Naturally aged human donor lenses were irradiated with UVA (355 nm), violet (400 and 405 nm) and green (532 nm......) lasers. The effect of irradiation was evaluated qualitatively by photography and quantitatively by measuring the direct transmission before and after irradiation. Furthermore, the effect of pulsed and continuous laser systems was compared as was the effect of short, intermediate and prolonged exposures...

  16. Calculating the Finite-Speed-of-Light Effect in Atom Gravimeters with General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    This work mainly presents a relativistic analytical calculating method for the finite speed-of-light effect in atom gravimeters, which can simplify the deriva- tion and give a more complete expression for the associated correction.

  17. Self-bending of light in photorefractive semiconductors with hot-electron effect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ziółkowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    .... We show how the competition between electron and hole conductivity can influence light propagation, leading to the self-bending effect of optical beam trajectory, which depending on the value of trap...

  18. Effect of radiation light characteristics on surface hardness of paint-on resin for shade modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation light characteristics--of different types of clinical light-curing unit--on polymerization efficiency, as determined by the surface hardness of light-cured paint-on resins. Four shades of paint-on resin for shade modification of restorative resins were used. Materials were cured using one laboratory and three clinical light-curing units with different light sources, namely tungsten-halogen, LED, plasma arc, and xenon flash lamps. Knoop hardness measurements were taken at both the top and bottom surfaces of the specimens to assess the mechanical properties and degree of polymerization. Both LED and plasma arc light units caused significantly poorer surface hardness than the halogen and laboratory xenon lights. In addition, the transparent shade was more sensitive to surface hardness than other chromatic shades. Our results indicated that the polymerization efficiency of paint-on resin was significantly influenced by the radiation light characteristics of clinical light-curing units.

  19. Effect of light with different wavelengths on Nostoc flagelliforme cells in liquid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu-Jie; Li, Jing; Wei, Shu-Mei; Chen, Nan; Xiao, Yu-Peng; Tan, Zhi-Lei; Jia, Shi-Ru; Yuan, Nan-Nan; Tan, Ning; Song, Yi-Jie

    2013-04-01

    The effects of lights with different wavelengths on the growth and the yield of extracellular polysaccharides of Nostoc flagelliforme cells were investigated in a liquid cultivation. N. flagelliforme cells were cultured for 16 days in 500 ml conical flasks containing BG11 culture medium under 27 micromol·m-2·s-1 of light intensity and 25 degrees C on a rotary shaker (140 rpm). The chlorophyll a, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin, and phycoerythrin contents in N. flagelliforme cells under the lights of different wavelengths were also measured. It was found that the cell biomass and the yield of polysaccharide changed with different wavelengths of light. The biomass and the yield of extracellular polysaccharides under the red or violet light were higher than those under other light colors. Chlorophyll a, phycocyanin, and allophycocyanin are the main pigments in N. flagelliforme cells. The results showed that N. flagelliforme, like other cyanobacteria, has the ability of adjusting the contents and relative ratio of its pigments with the light quality. As a conclusion, N. flagelliforme cells favor red and violet lights and perform the complementary chromatic adaptation ability to acclimate to the changes of the light quality in the environment.

  20. Light and clomazone effects on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) callus and leaf discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camper, N D; McDonald, S K; Burrows, P M

    2003-11-01

    The effects of clomazone on the growth of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. 'NC2326') callus and leaf discs were studied under four light regimes. Callus cultures and leaf discs were grown on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with IAA and kinetin. Light regimes were: dark grown callus kept in the dark and also transferred to the light; light grown callus kept in the light and also transferred to the dark. Two-month-old callus (cultured for 2 months from initiation) grew more rapidly than twelve-month-old callus (cultured for 12 months from initiation) under all conditions tested. Callus transferred from light to dark, or from dark to light, increased in fresh weight slower than did the callus maintained totally in light or dark. Clomazone (2-[(2-chlorophenyl)methyl]-4,4-dimethyl-3-isoxazolidinone) at 140 mg l(-1) or more was lethal to both callus and leaf discs whereas 10 mg l(-1) was stimulatory to growth. Callus tissue responded to clomazone differently depending on the light regime under which it was grown. While clomazone may be affecting the isoprenoid pathway in the callus and leaf disks resulting in growth inhibition, it is possible that other target sites are also being affected and contribute to the reduced growth.