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Sample records for demonstrated reduced tongue

  1. Tongue Scrapers Only Slightly Reduce Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your desktop! more... Tongue Scrapers Only Slightly Reduce Bad Breath Article Chapters Tongue Scrapers Only Slightly Reduce ... oral cavity. Reviewed: January 2012 Related Articles: Halitosis (Bad Breath) Do You Have Traveler's Breath? Does a ...

  2. Effectiveness of a new toothbrush design versus a conventional tongue scraper in improving breath odor and reducing tongue microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Assirati Casemiro

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, specific instruments or regular toothbrushes have routinely been used to remove tongue biofilm and improve breath odor. Toothbrushes with a tongue scraper on the back of their head have recently been introduced to the market. The present study compared the effectiveness of a manual toothbrush with this new design, i.e., possessing a tongue scraper, and a commercial tongue scraper in improving breath odor and reducing the aerobic and anaerobic microbiota of tongue surface. The evaluations occurred at 4 moments, when the participants (n=30 had their halitosis quantified with a halimeter and scored according to a 4-point scoring system corresponding to different levels of intensity. Saliva was collected for counts of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Data were analyzed statistically by Friedman's test (p<0.05. When differences were detected, the Wilcoxon test adjusted for Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons (group to group. The results confirmed the importance of mechanical cleaning of the tongue, since this procedure provided an improvement in halitosis and reduction of aerobe and anaerobe counts. Regarding the evaluated methods, the toothbrush's tongue scraper and conventional tongue scraper had a similar performance in terms of breath improvement and reduction of tongue microbiota, and may be indicated as effective methods for tongue cleaning.

  3. Development and functional demonstration of a wireless intraoral inductive tongue computer interface for severely disabled persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N S Andreasen Struijk, Lotte; Lontis, Eugen R; Gaihede, Michael; Caltenco, Hector A; Lund, Morten Enemark; Schioeler, Henrik; Bentsen, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with tetraplegia depend on alternative interfaces in order to control computers and other electronic equipment. Current interfaces are often limited in the number of available control commands, and may compromise the social identity of an individual due to their undesirable appearance. The purpose of this study was to implement an alternative computer interface, which was fully embedded into the oral cavity and which provided multiple control commands. The development of a wireless, intraoral, inductive tongue computer was described. The interface encompassed a 10-key keypad area and a mouse pad area. This system was embedded wirelessly into the oral cavity of the user. The functionality of the system was demonstrated in two tetraplegic individuals and two able-bodied individuals Results: The system was invisible during use and allowed the user to type on a computer using either the keypad area or the mouse pad. The maximal typing rate was 1.8 s for repetitively typing a correct character with the keypad area and 1.4 s for repetitively typing a correct character with the mouse pad area. The results suggest that this inductive tongue computer interface provides an esthetically acceptable and functionally efficient environmental control for a severely disabled user. Implications for Rehabilitation New Design, Implementation and detection methods for intra oral assistive devices. Demonstration of wireless, powering and encapsulation techniques suitable for intra oral embedment of assistive devices. Demonstration of the functionality of a rechargeable and fully embedded intra oral tongue controlled computer input device.

  4. The foreign-language effect: thinking in a foreign tongue reduces decision biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keysar, Boaz; Hayakawa, Sayuri L; An, Sun Gyu

    2012-06-01

    Would you make the same decisions in a foreign language as you would in your native tongue? It may be intuitive that people would make the same choices regardless of the language they are using, or that the difficulty of using a foreign language would make decisions less systematic. We discovered, however, that the opposite is true: Using a foreign language reduces decision-making biases. Four experiments show that the framing effect disappears when choices are presented in a foreign tongue. Whereas people were risk averse for gains and risk seeking for losses when choices were presented in their native tongue, they were not influenced by this framing manipulation in a foreign language. Two additional experiments show that using a foreign language reduces loss aversion, increasing the acceptance of both hypothetical and real bets with positive expected value. We propose that these effects arise because a foreign language provides greater cognitive and emotional distance than a native tongue does.

  5. Internal Kinematics of the Volume-Reduced Tongue: A Longitudinal Microsonometric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Shcherbatyy, Volodymyr; Liu, Zi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study examined tongue internal kinematics during feeding over time after its volume reduction. Six ultrasonic crystals were implanted into the tongue to record distance changes in anterior width (AW), bilateral lengths (LENG), posterior thicknesses (THICK), and posterior dorsal (PDW) and ventral (PVW) widths in five sibling pairs of Yucatan minipigs (N = 10). In each pair, one received tongue volume reduction surgery (reduction), and the other had the identical incisions without tissue removal (sham). Functional deformation of the tongue from preimplanted ultrasonic crystals was recorded during natural feeding 1 day before, 7-8, 13-15, and 28-30 days after the surgery. The results revealed that feeding behavior and tongue functional deformation were unchanged over time in the sham pigs. However, at Days 7-8, more frequent and longer ingestion episodes were seen in the reduction as compared with the sham. Moreover, deformational changes in AW and LENG decreased, whereas those in THICK, PDW, and PVW increased significantly (P  0.05), PDW (P  0.05). These results suggest that the tongue volume reduction has significant and persistent impacts on feeding behaviors and tongue internal kinematics, and the restoring capacity of internal kinematics in the anterior tongue is limited and incomplete over time.

  6. Automatic Prompting and Positive Attention to Reduce Tongue Protrusion and Head Tilting by Two Adults with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Pichierri, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed a simple behavioral strategy for reducing stereotypic tongue protrusion and forward head tilting displayed by a woman and a man with severe to profound intellectual disabilities. The strategy involved (a) auditory prompting (i.e., verbal encouragements to keep the tongue in the mouth or the head upright) delivered automatically…

  7. Automatic Prompting and Positive Attention to Reduce Tongue Protrusion and Head Tilting by Two Adults With Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancioni, G.E.; Singh, N.N.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Sigafoos, J.; Didden, H.C.M.; Pichierri, S.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed a simple behavioral strategy for reducing stereotypic tongue protrusion and forward head tilting displayed by a woman and a man with severe to profound intellectual disabilities. The strategy involved (a) auditory prompting (i.e., verbal encouragements to keep the tongue in the m

  8. Fissured Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020 Annual Meeting Orlando, FL Our Partners Fissured Tongue The term fissured tongue describes the finding of multiple small furrows or grooves on the dorsal (top) surface of the tongue. These fissures can be shallow or deep, single ...

  9. Tongue biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - tongue ... A tongue biopsy can be done using a needle. You will get numbing medicine at the place where the ... provider will gently stick the needle into the tongue and remove a tiny piece of tissue. Some ...

  10. Your Tongue

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    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Tongue KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Tongue Print A A ... sing. And don't forget talking and tasting! Tongue Twister Has anyone ever told you that the ...

  11. Cyclopamine and jervine in embryonic rat tongue cultures demonstrate a role for Shh signaling in taste papilla development and patterning: fungiform papillae double in number and form in novel locations in dorsal lingual epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistretta, Charlotte M; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Gaffield, William; MacCallum, Donald K

    2003-02-01

    furrow, nor was development of the single circumvallate papilla altered. The results demonstrate a prominent role for Shh in fungiform papilla induction and patterning and indicate differences in morphogenetic control of fungiform and circumvallate papilla development and numbers. Furthermore, a previously unknown, broad competence of dorsal lingual epithelium to form fungiform papillae on both anterior and posterior oral tongue is revealed.

  12. Tongue (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tongue is mainly composed of muscles. It is covered with a mucous membrane. Small nodules of tissue (papillae) cover the upper surface of the tongue. Between the papillae are the taste buds, which ...

  13. Yellow Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may suggest jaundice References Goldstein BG, et al. Oral lesions. http://uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 21, 2015. ... Jan. 27, 2015. Geographic tongue. American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. http://www.aaomp.org/public/geographic-tongue.php. ...

  14. Tongue Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your tongue helps you taste, swallow, and chew. You also use it to speak. Your tongue is made up of many muscles. The upper surface contains your taste buds. Problems with the tongue include Pain Swelling Changes in color or texture ...

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis, traditional Chinese tongue demonstration and apoptosis%类风湿关节炎、中医舌象与细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕军影

    2006-01-01

    胞凋亡的内在联系有待研究,以进一步揭示类风湿性关节炎证的本质、舌象形成的机制.%OBJECTIVE: To comprehend the development of research on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and apoptosis so as to find the interrelationship and changing rules, probe into the apoptotic characteristics of RA.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based search of Medline and foreign language books of National Science and Technology Library was performed for English literatures related to RA and apoptosis from January 1995 to December 2003 with the key words of "rheumatoid arthritis,apoptosis".Meanwhile, Chinese articles about RA, traditional Chinese tongue demonstration and apoptosis were searched in Chongqing Vip Database of Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals, Tsinghua Tongfang Database of Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals and Chinese CD Database of Literatures on Biomedicine with the key words of "rheumatoid arthritis,apoptosis, tongue demonstration".STUDY SELECTION: Data were selected in the first searching, literatures on correlation between RA and apoptosis were searched in full-text.Accepting criteria: ①Experimental researches about RA and apoptosis. ②Clinincal researchs about RA and apoptosis. ③Researches on traditional Chinese tongue demonstration and apoptosis. Excluded criteria: Repetitive studies.DATA EXTRACTION: A total of 82 researches about RA and apoptosis werecollected, 13 ones in which were in accordance with the accepting criteria. Of the 69 excluded articles, 58 ones were repetitive studies and 11 ones were reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS: Of 13 literatures, 11 ones were checked by experimental research and clinical research. It was found from the examinations of synovium of joint and peripheral blood (PB) that there were abnomal apoptoses in RA, which indicated that the invasion, nature of drug and physical therapy were in relation to the apoptosis of synovial cells. Rest 2articles were researches on apoptosis of tongue demonstration of

  16. Effects of Dining on Tongue Endurance and Swallowing-Related Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kays, Stephanie A.; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that eating a meal reduces tongue strength and endurance in healthy old and young adults. It was predicted that older adults would show greater declines in tongue endurance while demonstrating higher perceived effort, longer meal durations, and clinical signs of swallowing difficulty.…

  17. Geographic Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, most often related to eating hot, spicy, salty or acidic foods Many people with geographic tongue ... sensitive oral tissues, including: Hot, spicy, acidic or salty foods Tobacco products Toothpaste that contains tartar-control ...

  18. Tongue problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tongue pain may also occur with: Diabetic neuropathy Leukoplakia Mouth ulcers Oral cancer After menopause, some women ... problem. Medicine may be prescribed for mouth ulcers, leukoplakia, oral cancer, and other mouth sores. Anti-inflammatory ...

  19. Geographic tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a long time. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if the symptoms last longer than 10 days. Seek immediate medical help if: You have breathing problems. Your tongue ...

  20. Infrahyoid myofascial flap for tongue reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Remmert, Stephan

    2006-11-01

    For selected cases, reconstruction of the tongue may be required after tumor removal. This study was undertaken to demonstrate a simplified concept of tongue reconstruction with emphasis on infrahyoid myofascial flaps (IMF). The defects of the tongue were classified in 23 patients according to the extent of tumor growth, functional and surgical aspects. The oral tongue (OT; n = 1), base of tongue (BT; n = 12) or both areas (OT and BT; n = 10) were involved, with (n = 14) or without (n = 9) infiltration of adjacent tissues. Minor defects (extent (1/4) or less) required no reconstructive procedure at any area. Major defect closure (extent (1/2)-3/4) was accomplished with a combination of IMF covered by a radial forearm flap (RFF). A complete reconstruction of the OT was achieved with a combination of a bilateral IMF covered by a RFF. Whenever the complete BT has to be removed, interposition of a vein graft to establish a sufficient arterial blood supply to the remaining OT is mandatory. Moreover, a larynx lift to prevent aspiration is recommendable. Resection of adjacent soft tissues requires a larger RFF (OT; BT) or flaps from the shoulder-back region (BT and OT). Whenever the integrity of the mandible has to be sacrificed, a free fibula graft serves as an excellent tool for reconstruction. IMF serves as a reliable tool for minor or major reconstructive procedures of the tongue. Reliability and versatility of IMF may contribute to a reduced time required for surgery since harvesting is performed in the neck area immediately after neck dissection. Moreover, harvesting of the IMF does not result in an increased postoperative morbidity. Hence, functional restoration can be achieved with a more cost-effective procedure.

  1. Imaging of tongue carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Cheng K.; Chong, Vincent F.H.

    2006-01-01

    The tongue enables taste and plays a critical role in formation of food bolus and deglutition. The tongue is also crucial for speech and the earliest sign of tongue paresis is a change in the quality of speech. Given the importance of the tongue, tongue carcinoma should be accurately staged in order to optimise treatment options and preserve organ function. The intent of this review is to familiarise radiologists with the pertinent anatomy of the tongue and the behaviour of tongue carcinoma s...

  2. Tongue-Tie (Ankyloglossia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Tongue-tie (Ankyloglossia) Tongue-tie (Ankyloglossia) Patient Health Information ... may be serious in some individuals. When Is Tongue-tie a Problem That Needs Treatment? In Infants ...

  3. Tongue-Driven Wheelchair Out-Maneuvers the Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 496-3500 Share Science Highlight: January 2, 2014 Tongue-Driven Wheelchair Out-Maneuvers the Competition Researchers funded ... Imaging and Bioengineering have demonstrated that their novel Tongue Drive System is superior to other assistive devices ...

  4. Isolated tongue tremor after gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun J; Im, Joo-Hyuk; Lee, Jae-Hong; Cho, A-Hyun; Kwon, Miseon; Lee, Myoung C

    2005-01-01

    We describe a patient who had an isolated tongue tremor with an audible click after gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic schwannoma. The nature of the tongue tremor was clearly demonstrated by videofluoroscopy. The possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Tongue Color Analysis for Medical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An in-depth systematic tongue color analysis system for medical applications is proposed. Using the tongue color gamut, tongue foreground pixels are first extracted and assigned to one of 12 colors representing this gamut. The ratio of each color for the entire image is calculated and forms a tongue color feature vector. Experimenting on a large dataset consisting of 143 Healthy and 902 Disease (13 groups of more than 10 samples and one miscellaneous group, a given tongue sample can be classified into one of these two classes with an average accuracy of 91.99%. Further testing showed that Disease samples can be split into three clusters, and within each cluster most if not all the illnesses are distinguished from one another. In total 11 illnesses have a classification rate greater than 70%. This demonstrates a relationship between the state of the human body and its tongue color.

  6. Base of tongue schwannoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yu-Lan Mary; Zimmer, Lee A; Myers, Eugene N

    2006-07-01

    Both malignant and benign lesions may be found on the base of the tongue, including metastasis from other sites. Various surgical approaches to the base of tongue have been described. Here, we report a case of a 26-year-old woman with a schwannoma in the base of tongue removed through a suprahyoid pharyngotomy approach. The biology and pathology of schwannoma in the oral cavity are discussed. The advantage of the suprahyoid pharyngotomy approach for complete excision of a mass in the base of tongue is demonstrated.

  7. Phonetic measures of reduced tongue movement correlate with negative symptom severity in hospitalized patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Michael A; Lunden, S L Anya; Cristofaro, Sarah L; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Bailey, C Thomas; Broussard, Beth; Fogarty, Robert; Johnson, Stephanie; Zhang, Shayi; Compton, Michael T

    2012-12-01

    Aprosody, or flattened speech intonation, is a recognized negative symptom of schizophrenia, though it has rarely been studied from a linguistic/phonological perspective. To bring the latest advances in computational linguistics to the phenomenology of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, a clinical first-episode psychosis research team joined with a phonetics/computational linguistics team to conduct a preliminary, proof-of-concept study. Video recordings from a semi-structured clinical research interview were available from 47 first-episode psychosis patients. Audio tracks of the video recordings were extracted, and after review of quality, 25 recordings were available for phonetic analysis. These files were de-noised and a trained phonologist extracted a 1-minute sample of each patient's speech. WaveSurfer 1.8.5 was used to create, from each speech sample, a file of formant values (F0, F1, F2, where F0 is the fundamental frequency and F1 and F2 are resonance bands indicating the moment-by-moment shape of the oral cavity). Variability in these phonetic indices was correlated with severity of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptom scores using Pearson correlations. A measure of variability of tongue front-to-back position-the standard deviation of F2-was statistically significantly correlated with the severity of negative symptoms (r=-0.446, p=0.03). This study demonstrates a statistically significant and meaningful correlation between negative symptom severity and phonetically measured reductions in tongue movements during speech in a sample of first-episode patients just initiating treatment. Further studies of negative symptoms, applying computational linguistics methods, are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cortico-muscular synchronization by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles during isometric tongue protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Hitoshi; Mima, Tatsuya; Yazawa, Shogo; Matsuhashi, Masao; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Funahashi, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Tongue movements contribute to oral functions including swallowing, vocalizing, and breathing. Fine tongue movements are regulated through efferent and afferent connections between the cortex and tongue. It has been demonstrated that cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) is reflected at two frequency bands during isometric tongue protrusions: the beta (β) band at 15-35Hz and the low-frequency band at 2-10Hz. The CMC at the β band (β-CMC) reflects motor commands from the primary motor cortex (M1) to the tongue muscles through hypoglossal motoneuron pools. However, the generator mechanism of the CMC at the low-frequency band (low-CMC) remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of low-CMC during isometric tongue protrusion using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) were also recorded following electrical tongue stimulation. Significant low-CMC and β-CMC were observed over both hemispheres for each side of the tongue. Time-domain analysis showed that the MEG signal followed the electromyography signal for low-CMC, which was contrary to the finding that the MEG signal preceded the electromyography signal for β-CMC. The mean conduction time from the tongue to the cortex was not significantly different between the low-CMC (mean, 80.9ms) and SEFs (mean, 71.1ms). The cortical sources of low-CMC were located significantly posterior (mean, 10.1mm) to the sources of β-CMC in M1, but were in the same area as tongue SEFs in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). These results reveal that the low-CMC may be driven by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles to S1, and that the oscillatory interaction was derived from each side of the tongue to both hemispheres. Oscillatory proprioceptive feedback from the tongue muscles may aid in the coordination of sophisticated tongue movements in humans.

  9. Effects of exercise on swallowing and tongue strength in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, C L; Husaini, H; Falciglia, D; DeLacure, M; Branski, R C; Kraus, D; Lee, N; Ho, M; Ganz, C; Smith, B; Sanfilippo, N

    2014-05-01

    Tongue strength is reduced in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Tongue strengthening protocols have resulted in improved lingual strength and swallowing in healthy individuals, as well as in patients following a neurological event. However, no studies have examined the efficacy of tongue strengthening exercises on tongue strength, swallowing, and quality of life (QOL; Head and Neck Cancer Inventory) in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. A randomized clinical trial examined the effects of a tongue strengthening programme paired with traditional exercises vs. traditional exercises alone. Dependent variables included tongue strength, swallowing, and QOL in a group of patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Differences with regard to tongue strength and oropharyngeal swallow efficiency (OPSE) were not observed within or between groups. QOL in the eating and speech domains improved following treatment in both groups. However, the experimental group demonstrated greater impairment in QOL in the social disruption domain following treatment, whereas the control group demonstrated a slight improvement in functioning. Tongue strengthening did not yield a statistically significant improvement in either tongue strength or swallowing measures in this patient cohort. Patient compliance and treatment timing may be factors underlying these outcomes.

  10. Reduced Expression of the Antigen Processing Machinery Components TAP2, LMP2, and LMP7 in Tonsillar and Base of Tongue Cancer and Implications for Clinical Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Tertipis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV–positive tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC and base of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (BOTSCC have a better clinical outcome than those with corresponding HPV-negative tumors. Moreover, there is a strong positive correlation between absent/low as opposed to strong HLA class I expression and favorable clinical outcome for HPV-positive tumors, while the reverse applies to HPV-negative tumors. The expression of the antigen processing machinery (APM components TAP1, TAP2, LMP2, and LMP7 in these tumors in relation to HPV status, HLA class I expression, each other, and clinical outcome was therefore investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded TSCC and BOTSCC, derived from 151 patients and previously analyzed for HPV DNA, HLA class I, and LMP10 expression were stained by immunohistochemistry for TAP1, TAP2, LMP2, and LMP7. RESULTS: Absent/low TAP2, LMP2, and LMP7 expression, similar to HLA class I and LMP10, was common in TSCC and BOTSCC, irrespective of HPV status. Expression of TAP1 and TAP2 was correlated, as was LMP2 to LMP7. LMP2 and LMP7 expression was also associated to HLA class I expression. Moreover, absence of LMP7 was linked to increased disease-free survival in both HPV-positive and HPV-negative cases. CONCLUSION: Reduced expression of TAP2, LMP2, and LMP7 was frequent in TSCC and BOTSCC and their expression as well as that of TAP1 was often interrelated. Furthermore, low LMP7 expression correlated to better clinical outcome and may, together with HPV status, potentially be used for prediction of treatment response.

  11. Cat tongue Velcro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Alexis; Martinez, Andrea; Jung, Hyewon; Tsai, Ting-Wen; Hu, David

    2016-11-01

    A cat's tongue is covered in an array of spines called papillae. These spines are thought to be used in grooming and rasping meat from bones of prey, although no mechanism has been given. We use high-speed video to film a cat removing cat food deeply wedged into a 3-D printed fur mat. We show that the spines on the tongue act as Velcro for particles. The tongue itself is highly elastic. As the cat presses it against a substrate, the tongue flattens and the spines separate. When the tongue is removed from the substrate the spines come together, wedging particles between them. This elasticity-driven entrapment permits the surface of the tongue to act as a carrier for hard to reach particles, and to increase the efficacy of grooming and feeding.

  12. Short faces, big tongues: developmental origin of the human chin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Coquerelle

    Full Text Available During the course of human evolution, the retraction of the face underneath the braincase, and closer to the cervical column, has reduced the horizontal dimension of the vocal tract. By contrast, the relative size of the tongue has not been reduced, implying a rearrangement of the space at the back of the vocal tract to allow breathing and swallowing. This may have left a morphological signature such as a chin (mental prominence that can potentially be interpreted in Homo. Long considered an autopomorphic trait of Homo sapiens, various extinct hominins show different forms of mental prominence. These features may be the evolutionary by-product of equivalent developmental constraints correlated with an enlarged tongue. In order to investigate developmental mechanisms related to this hypothesis, we compare modern 34 human infants against 8 chimpanzee fetuses, whom development of the mandibular symphysis passes through similar stages. The study sets out to test that the shared ontogenetic shape changes of the symphysis observed in both species are driven by the same factor--space restriction at the back of the vocal tract and the associated arrangement of the tongue and hyoid bone. We apply geometric morphometric methods to extensive three-dimensional anatomical landmarks and semilandmarks configuration, capturing the geometry of the cervico-craniofacial complex including the hyoid bone, tongue muscle and the mandible. We demonstrate that in both species, the forward displacement of the mental region derives from the arrangement of the tongue and hyoid bone, in order to cope with the relative horizontal narrowing of the oral cavity. Because humans and chimpanzees share this pattern of developmental integration, the different forms of mental prominence seen in some extinct hominids likely originate from equivalent ontogenetic constraints. Variations in this process could account for similar morphologies.

  13. CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL FEATURE OF EARLY TONGUE AMYLOIDOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical pathological feature and diagnostic criteria of tongue amyloidosis (AL).Methods During 1992 to 2005, 25 patients pathologically diagnosed as tongue AL in our hospital were reviewed retrospectively, and all of them had no enlarged tongue. Haematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunohistochemical staining were used to detect the amyloid deposition on the tongue.Results Totally 84 % (21/25) patients had symptoms of xerostomia and taste-blindness, 44 % (11/25) patients complained of activity limitation of tongue. Macroscopic observation showed mucosa pallescence, punctuate hemorrhage, red grain particles, and ulcers on the tongue. HE staining indicated amyloid depositions in basement membrane,muscle cell, vessel wall, and nerve fiber. Immunohistochemical study demonstrated kappa light-chain deposition in 64%(16/25) cases, and lambda light-chain deposition in 36 % (9/25) cases. They presented in vessel wall, nerve fiber, and muscle cells.Conclusion The biopsy is an important means for the diagnosis of early tongue AL, and the wide variety of amyloid light chain is helpful to differential diagnosis.

  14. A soft biomimetic tongue: model reconstruction and motion tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuanming; Xu, Weiliang; Li, Xiaoning

    2016-04-01

    A bioinspired robotic tongue which is actuated by a network of compressed air is proposed for the purpose of mimicking the movements of human tongue. It can be applied in the fields such as medical science and food engineering. The robotic tongue is made of two kinds of silicone rubber Ecoflex 0030 and PDMS with the shape simplified from real human tongue. In order to characterize the robotic tongue, a series of experiments were carried out. Laser scan was applied to reconstruct the static model of robotic tongue when it was under pressurization. After each scan, the robotic tongue was scattered into dense points in the same 3D coordinate system and the coordinates of each point were recorded. Motion tracking system (OptiTrack) was used to track and record the whole process of deformation dynamically during the loading and unloading phase. In the experiments, five types of deformation were achieved including roll-up, roll-down, elongation, groove and twist. Utilizing the discrete points generated by laser scan, the accurate parameterized outline of robotic tongue under different pressure was obtained, which could help demonstrate the static characteristic of robotic tongue. The precise deformation process under one pressure was acquired through the OptiTrack system which contains a series of digital cameras, markers on the robotic tongue and a set of hardware and software for data processing. By means of tracking and recording different process of deformation under different pressure, the dynamic characteristic of robotic tongue could be achieved.

  15. Image Analysis for Tongue Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENLansun; WEIBaoguo; CAIYiheng; ZHANGXinfeng; WANGYanqing; CHENJing; KONGLingbiao

    2003-01-01

    Tongue diagnosis is one of the essential methods in traditional Chinese medical diagnosis. The ac-curacy of tongue diagnosis can be improved by tongue char-acterization. This paper investigates the use of image anal-ysis techniques for tongue characterization by evaluating visual features obtained from images. A tongue imaging and analysis instrument (TIAI) was developed to acquire digital color tongue images. Several novel approaches are presented for color calibration, tongue area segmentation,quantitative analysis and qualitative description for the colors of tongue and its coating, the thickness and moisture of coating and quantification of the cracks of the toilgue.The overall accuracy of the automatic analysis of the colors of tongue and the thickness of tongue coating exceeds 85%.This work shows the promising future of tongue character-ization.

  16. [Tongue play and manganese deficiency in dairy cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatzias, H; Roubies, N; Polizopoulou, Z; Papasteriades, A

    1995-09-01

    The present paper discusses "tongue rolling" observed in dairy cattle farms of a region in northern Greece associated with manganese deficiency. In these animals total body manganese status was evaluated by determining hair, as well as feed manganese content. Cows exhibiting tongue rolling had significantly lower hair manganese content, compared to non-tongue rolling control animals from other farms; in addition, feedstuff analysis demonstrated that manganese and inorganic phosphorus intake of affected cows was also significantly lower.

  17. 76 FR 10038 - Determination That a Demonstration Needle Exchange Program Would be Effective in Reducing Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Determination That a Demonstration Needle Exchange Program Would be Effective in Reducing... agent for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. This determination reflects the scientific evidence supporting the important public health benefit of SSPs, and is necessary to meet the statutory...

  18. Stimulating effect of tongue on craniofacial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, G H; Becker, R; Hübner, A; Pommerenke, F

    1991-01-01

    The influence of the tongue on craniofacial growth was studied in 96 Mini-Lewe miniature pigs. The animals were partially glossectomized at different ages and slaughtered at various intervals after operation. The skulls were macerated for biometric analysis. Mandibular growth was significantly reduced lengthwise in animals glossectomized at age 12 weeks. The role played by the tongue in orofacial growth was also indicated by the reduced width of the lower jaw. In pigs partially glossectomized at age 12 weeks, lateral growth of the entire lower jaw was reduced after eight weeks. In animals glossectomized at age six weeks, lateral growth of the lower jaw was reduced in the region of the 1st deciduous molars and the canines after glossectomy. Partial glossectomy had no significant effects on vertical growth of the lower jaw, growth of the upper jaw or overall skull growth. Shortening of the tongue in miniature pigs six weeks old resulted in no measurable jaw changes 23 weeks after surgery.

  19. Geographic Tongue in Monozygotic Twins

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhar M, Guna

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses a case of 5-year-old girl monozygotic twins who were suffering from geographic tongue (GT), a benign inflammatory disorder of the tongue which is characterized by circinate, irregular erythematous lesions on the dorsum and lateral borders of the tongue caused by loss of filiform papillae of the tongue epithelium. Whilst geographic tongue is a common entity, reports on this condition are uncommon in the literature. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report which...

  20. Sonic hedgehog acts as a negative regulator of {beta}-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Fabian T; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Plate, Karl H; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear beta-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. beta-Catenin activation in APC(min/+) mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses beta-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate beta-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear beta-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched(+/-) mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear beta-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce beta-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on beta-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/beta-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control beta-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC.

  1. The Tongue and Quill

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    many sources; e.g., official records, private communications and automated transactions. emoticons —Facial expressions drawn on the computer (see page...AFH 33-337 30 June 1997 The Tongue and Quill Communication is an essential tool for the twenty-first century Air Force Report Documentation Page... Communications and Information THE TONGUE AND QUILL Supersedes AFH 37-137, 31 August 1994 Certified by: ACSC/DEX (Lt Col Kermit Phelps) OPR: ACSC/DEXP (Mrs

  2. Demonstration of Hadoop-GIS: A Spatial Data Warehousing System Over MapReduce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Ablimit; Sun, Xiling; Vo, Hoang; Liu, Qioaling; Lee, Rubao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saltz, Joel; Wang, Fusheng

    2013-11-01

    The proliferation of GPS-enabled devices, and the rapid improvement of scientific instruments have resulted in massive amounts of spatial data in the last decade. Support of high performance spatial queries on large volumes data has become increasingly important in numerous fields, which requires a scalable and efficient spatial data warehousing solution as existing approaches exhibit scalability limitations and efficiency bottlenecks for large scale spatial applications. In this demonstration, we present Hadoop-GIS - a scalable and high performance spatial query system over MapReduce. Hadoop-GIS provides an efficient spatial query engine to process spatial queries, data and space based partitioning, and query pipelines that parallelize queries implicitly on MapReduce. Hadoop-GIS also provides an expressive, SQL-like spatial query language for workload specification. We will demonstrate how spatial queries are expressed in spatially extended SQL queries, and submitted through a command line/web interface for execution. Parallel to our system demonstration, we explain the system architecture and details on how queries are translated to MapReduce operators, optimized, and executed on Hadoop. In addition, we will showcase how the system can be used to support two representative real world use cases: large scale pathology analytical imaging, and geo-spatial data warehousing.

  3. Convergence of macroscopic tongue anatomy in ruminants and scaling relationships with body mass or tongue length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Andrea R; Schmuck, Ute; Meloro, Carlo; Clauss, Marcus; Hofmann, Reinhold R

    2016-03-01

    Various morphological measures demonstrate convergent evolution in ruminants with their natural diet, in particular with respect to the browser/grazer dichotomy. Here, we report quantitative macroanatomical measures of the tongue (length and width of specific parts) of 65 ruminant species and relate them to either body mass (BM) or total tongue length, and to the percentage of grass in the natural diet (%grass). Models without and with accounting for the phylogenetic structures of the dataset were used, and models were ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion. Scaling relationships followed geometric principles, that is, length measures scaled with BM to the power of 0.33. Models that used tongue length rather than BM as a body size proxy were consistently ranked better, indicating that using size proxies that are less susceptible to a wider variety of factors (such as BM that fluctuates with body condition) should be attempted whenever possible. The proportion of the freely mobile tongue tip of the total tongue (and hence also the corpus length) was negatively correlated to %grass, in accordance with concepts that the feeding mechanism of browsers requires more mobile tongues. It should be noted that some nonbrowsers, such as cattle, use a peculiar mechanism for grazing that also requires long, mobile tongues, but they appear to be exceptions. A larger corpus width with increasing %grass corresponds to differences in snout shape with broader snouts in grazers. The Torus linguae is longer with increasing %grass, a finding that still warrants functional interpretation. This study shows that tongue measures covary with diet in ruminants. In contrast, the shape of the tongue (straight or "hourglass-shaped" as measured by the ratio of the widest and smallest corpus width) is unrelated to diet and is influenced strongly by phylogeny.

  4. Can persuasive and demonstrative messages to visitors reduce littering in river beaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingolani, Ana M; Barberá, Iván; Renison, Daniel; Barri, Fernando R

    2016-12-01

    Littering of public areas is a significant problem worldwide. Here we evaluate the success of persuasive and demonstrative messages at reducing littering in highly visited river beaches in Argentina. We made an intervention at the beaches which consisted of a personalized verbal request asking visitors to take their litter to the waste cans (persuasive message) while they were exposed to the example of picking up the litter already left on the beach (demonstrative message). We conducted 102 observations distributed over 29 dates, two years and four beaches. Each observation consisted of three or four rounds: before the presence of visitors we cleaned the beaches, during the stay of visitors we made the intervention (once or twice) in two out of the four beaches, and early next morning we estimated the amount of litter left per beach. Litter weight ranged from 0 to 53gvisitor(-1)day(-1). Littering per visitor was reduced an average of 35% due to the intervention (p=0.049). We also found differences among beaches (p=0.001), and an increase in littering with crowding (p=0.005). We show for the first time that the personalized request combined with the example of picking up litter is effective in reducing littering in a Latin American country. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Automatic Tongue Tracking in X-Ray Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Changwei; LI Rui; YU Lingyun; YU Jun; WANG Zengfu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging is an eff ective technique to obtain the continuous motions of the vocal tract during speech, and Active appearance model (AAM) is a useful tool to analyze the X-ray images. However, for the task of tongue tracking in X-ray images, the accuracy of AAM fit-ting is insufficient. AAM aims to minimize the residual er-ror between the model appearance and the input image. It often fails to accurately converge to the true landmarks. To improve the tracking accuracy, we propose a fitting method by combining Constrained local model (CLM) into AAM. In our method, we first combine the objective functions of AAM and CLM into a single ob jective function. Then, we pro ject out the texture variation and derive a gradi-ent based method to optimize the objective function. Our method eff ectively incorporates not only the shape prior and global texture, but also local texture around each land-mark. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method significantly reduces the fitting error. We also show that re-alistic 3D tongue animation can be created by using tongue tracking results of the X-ray images.

  6. Epidermoid Cyst of Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choubarga Naik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cyst occurring within the tongue is rare. A 5 year old male child was brought to OPD with a tongue mass which was gradually increasing in size. There was associated difficulty in speech and mastication as the swelling increased in size. Intraoral examination revealed moderately tender, fluctuant and enlarged tongue. A diagnosis of dermoid cyst was made and the patient was booked for surgery. Excision of the cyst was done under general anaesthesia. Post-operative histopathology was done. The histopathological findings confirm the diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst, characterized by the presence of: (I a cyst cavity lined by stratified squamous epithelium with keratinization on the surface; and (II connective tissue with a mild inflammation. The proposed treatment was considered successful as the case was solved and there was no recurrence. Keywords: dermoid; epidermoid cyst;tounge. | PubMed

  7. Electronic tongue: An analytical gustatory tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, Rewanthwar Swathi; Lakshmi, P K

    2012-01-01

    Taste is an important organoleptic property governing acceptance of products for administration through mouth. But majority of drugs available are bitter in taste. For patient acceptability and compliance, bitter taste drugs are masked by adding several flavoring agents. Thus, taste assessment is one important quality control parameter for evaluating taste-masked formulations. The primary method for the taste measurement of drug substances and formulations is by human panelists. The use of sensory panelists is very difficult and problematic in industry and this is due to the potential toxicity of drugs and subjectivity of taste panelists, problems in recruiting taste panelists, motivation and panel maintenance are significantly difficult when working with unpleasant products. Furthermore, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-unapproved molecules cannot be tested. Therefore, analytical taste-sensing multichannel sensory system called as electronic tongue (e-tongue or artificial tongue) which can assess taste have been replacing the sensory panelists. Thus, e-tongue includes benefits like reducing reliance on human panel. The present review focuses on the electrochemical concepts in instrumentation, performance qualification of E-tongue, and applications in various fields.

  8. Electronic tongue: An analytical gustatory tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rewanthwar Swathi Latha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Taste is an important organoleptic property governing acceptance of products for administration through mouth. But majority of drugs available are bitter in taste. For patient acceptability and compliance, bitter taste drugs are masked by adding several flavoring agents. Thus, taste assessment is one important quality control parameter for evaluating taste-masked formulations. The primary method for the taste measurement of drug substances and formulations is by human panelists. The use of sensory panelists is very difficult and problematic in industry and this is due to the potential toxicity of drugs and subjectivity of taste panelists, problems in recruiting taste panelists, motivation and panel maintenance are significantly difficult when working with unpleasant products. Furthermore, Food and Drug Administration (FDA-unapproved molecules cannot be tested. Therefore, analytical taste-sensing multichannel sensory system called as electronic tongue (e-tongue or artificial tongue which can assess taste have been replacing the sensory panelists. Thus, e-tongue includes benefits like reducing reliance on human panel. The present review focuses on the electrochemical concepts in instrumentation, performance qualification of E-tongue, and applications in various fields.

  9. GIP-overexpressing mice demonstrate reduced diet-induced obesity and steatosis, and improved glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Kim

    Full Text Available Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP is a gastrointestinal hormone that potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during a meal. Since GIP has also been shown to exert β-cell prosurvival and adipocyte lipogenic effects in rodents, both GIP receptor agonists and antagonists have been considered as potential therapeutics in type 2 diabetes (T2DM. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that chronically elevating GIP levels in a transgenic (Tg mouse model would increase adipose tissue expansion and exert beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. In contrast, although GIP Tg mice demonstrated enhanced β-cell function, resulting in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, they exhibited reduced diet-induced obesity. Adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and hepatic steatosis were both greatly reduced, and a number of genes involved in lipid metabolism/inflammatory signaling pathways were found to be down-regulated. Reduced adiposity in GIP Tg mice was associated with decreased energy intake, involving overexpression of hypothalamic GIP. Together, these studies suggest that, in the context of over-nutrition, transgenic GIP overexpression has the potential to improve hepatic and adipocyte function as well as glucose homeostasis.

  10. Tongue schwannoma: clinicopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalfamo, Luciano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Nava, Carla; Familiari, Elena; Petrocelli, Marzia; Iudicello, Valeria; Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; De Ponte, Francesco Saverio

    2011-05-01

    Schwannomas are peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Approximately 25% of extracranial schwannomas are located in the head and neck district, but only 1% shows an intraoral origin. We report a case of a 28-year-old patient with a tongue schwannoma. Morphologic analysis and immunohistochemical findings strongly support the diagnosis. Surgical treatment is discussed.

  11. Schwannoma of tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Carlos; Pons-García, María Asunción; González-García, Raúl; Monje-Gil, Florencio

    2014-06-01

    The schwannomas are nervous tissue tumors. We report a case of schwannoma of oral tongue. Because schwannomas are quite rare in the oral cavity, they are often not immediately included in the differential diagnosis of oropharyngeal masses, causing delay in identification and treatment. The definitive diagnosis requires histopathologic examination.

  12. A Fast SVM-Based Tongue's Colour Classification Aided by k-Means Clustering Identifiers and Colour Attributes as Computer-Assisted Tool for Tongue Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Chia Yee; Kawanabe, Tadaaki; Odaguchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Fuminori

    2017-01-01

    In tongue diagnosis, colour information of tongue body has kept valuable information regarding the state of disease and its correlation with the internal organs. Qualitatively, practitioners may have difficulty in their judgement due to the instable lighting condition and naked eye's ability to capture the exact colour distribution on the tongue especially the tongue with multicolour substance. To overcome this ambiguity, this paper presents a two-stage tongue's multicolour classification based on a support vector machine (SVM) whose support vectors are reduced by our proposed k-means clustering identifiers and red colour range for precise tongue colour diagnosis. In the first stage, k-means clustering is used to cluster a tongue image into four clusters of image background (black), deep red region, red/light red region, and transitional region. In the second-stage classification, red/light red tongue images are further classified into red tongue or light red tongue based on the red colour range derived in our work. Overall, true rate classification accuracy of the proposed two-stage classification to diagnose red, light red, and deep red tongue colours is 94%. The number of support vectors in SVM is improved by 41.2%, and the execution time for one image is recorded as 48 seconds.

  13. Morphology of the tongue in a newborn Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Junji; Yamada, Tadasu K; Yoshimura, Ken; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2008-02-01

    This light and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) study on the tongue of a newborn Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri) demonstrated a clear difference in its form from than that of other cetacean and adult Stejneger's beaked whales. This newborn Stejneger's beaked whale had a spoon-like shaped tongue. The dorsal surface in the center part of the tongue was flat and did not have papillae, but there were marginal papillae and small papillae on the anterior part of the tongue. In the posterior of the tongue, hillock-shaped papillae with taste buds on the epithelium were observed.

  14. Cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous roles for IRF6 during development of the tongue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Goudy

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6 encodes a highly conserved helix-turn-helix DNA binding protein and is a member of the interferon regulatory family of DNA transcription factors. Mutations in IRF6 lead to isolated and syndromic forms of cleft lip and palate, most notably Van der Woude syndrome (VWS and Popliteal Ptyerigium Syndrome (PPS. Mice lacking both copies of Irf6 have severe limb, skin, palatal and esophageal abnormalities, due to significantly altered and delayed epithelial development. However, a recent report showed that MCS9.7, an enhancer near Irf6, is active in the tongue, suggesting that Irf6 may also be expressed in the tongue. Indeed, we detected Irf6 staining in the mesoderm-derived muscle during development of the tongue. Dual labeling experiments demonstrated that Irf6 was expressed only in the Myf5+ cell lineage, which originates from the segmental paraxial mesoderm and gives rise to the muscles of the tongue. Fate mapping of the segmental paraxial mesoderm cells revealed a cell-autonomous Irf6 function with reduced and poorly organized Myf5+ cell lineage in the tongue. Molecular analyses showed that the Irf6-/- embryos had aberrant cytoskeletal formation of the segmental paraxial mesoderm in the tongue. Fate mapping of the cranial neural crest cells revealed non-cell-autonomous Irf6 function with the loss of the inter-molar eminence. Loss of Irf6 function altered Bmp2, Bmp4, Shh, and Fgf10 signaling suggesting that these genes are involved in Irf6 signaling. Based on these data, Irf6 plays important cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous roles in muscular differentiation and cytoskeletal formation in the tongue.

  15. Technology demonstration for reducing mercury emissions from small-scale gold refining facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habegger, L. J.; Fernandez, L. E.; Engle, M.; Bailey, J. L.; Peterson, D. P.; MacDonell, M. M.; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-06-30

    coagulation and collection of the mercury aerosols in exhaust ducts, which is dependent on the hood and collector configuration, was also evaluated. Prototype demonstration tests verified the theoretical basis for mercury aerosol capture that can be used to optimize the baffle plate design, flow rates, and hood exhaust ducts and plenum to achieve 80% or higher removal efficiencies. Results indicated that installation configuration significantly influences a system's capture efficiency. Configurations that retained existing inlet ducts resulted in system efficiencies of more than 80%, whereas installation configurations without inlet ducts significantly reduced capture efficiency. As an alternative to increasing the volume of inlet ducts, the number of baffle plates in the system baffle assembly could be doubled to increase efficiency. Recommended installation and operation procedures were developed on the basis of these results. A water-based mercury capture system developed in Indonesia for installation in smaller shops was also tested and shown to be effective for certain applications. The cost of construction and installation of the baffle plate prototype was approximately US$400. These costs were reported as acceptable by local gold shop owners and government regulators, and were significantly lower than the cost of an alternate charcoal/copper mesh mercury filter available in the region, which costs about US$10,000. A sampling procedure that consists of a particle filter combined with a vapor analyzer was demonstrated as an effective procedure for analyzing both the aerosol and vapor components of the mercury concentrations. Two key findings for enhancing higher mercury collection were identified. First, the aerosol/vapor mercury emissions must be given sufficient time for the mercury particles to coagulate to a size that can be readily captured by the baffle plates. An interval of at least 6 seconds of transit time between the point of evaporation and contact with

  16. Technology demonstration for reducing mercury emissions from small-scale gold refining facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habegger, L. J.; Fernandez, L. E.; Engle, M.; Bailey, J. L.; Peterson, D. P.; MacDonell, M. M.; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-06-30

    coagulation and collection of the mercury aerosols in exhaust ducts, which is dependent on the hood and collector configuration, was also evaluated. Prototype demonstration tests verified the theoretical basis for mercury aerosol capture that can be used to optimize the baffle plate design, flow rates, and hood exhaust ducts and plenum to achieve 80% or higher removal efficiencies. Results indicated that installation configuration significantly influences a system's capture efficiency. Configurations that retained existing inlet ducts resulted in system efficiencies of more than 80%, whereas installation configurations without inlet ducts significantly reduced capture efficiency. As an alternative to increasing the volume of inlet ducts, the number of baffle plates in the system baffle assembly could be doubled to increase efficiency. Recommended installation and operation procedures were developed on the basis of these results. A water-based mercury capture system developed in Indonesia for installation in smaller shops was also tested and shown to be effective for certain applications. The cost of construction and installation of the baffle plate prototype was approximately US$400. These costs were reported as acceptable by local gold shop owners and government regulators, and were significantly lower than the cost of an alternate charcoal/copper mesh mercury filter available in the region, which costs about US$10,000. A sampling procedure that consists of a particle filter combined with a vapor analyzer was demonstrated as an effective procedure for analyzing both the aerosol and vapor components of the mercury concentrations. Two key findings for enhancing higher mercury collection were identified. First, the aerosol/vapor mercury emissions must be given sufficient time for the mercury particles to coagulate to a size that can be readily captured by the baffle plates. An interval of at least 6 seconds of transit time between the point of evaporation and contact with

  17. AMDO TIBETAN TONGUE TWISTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blo rtan rdo rje

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tibetan tongue twisters are a distinctive and significant part of Tibetan oral folk literature. They are made up of words and phrases related to what people see and experience in daily life. These words are strung together and are difficult to articulate rapidly and fluently, often because of a succession of questions and/ or similar consonantal sounds. This article sheds light on this poorly studied, vanishing, aspect of Tibetan tradition by focusing on tongue twisters that were once popular in Pha bzhi (Hayu 哈 玉 , a subdivision of Skya rgya (Jiajia 贾 加 Administrative Village, Skya rgya Township, Gcan tsha (Jianzha 尖扎 County, Rma lho (Huangnan 黄南 Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Mtsho sngon (Qinghai 青海 Province, PR China.

  18. Characterization of Streptococcus oligofermentans sucrose metabolism demonstrates reduced pyruvic and lactic acid production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Xu-dong; YUE Lin; GAO Xue-jun

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus (S.) oligofermentans is a newly identified bacteria with a yet to be defined mechanism of sucrose metabolism that results in acid production.This study aimed to investigate the biochemical mechanisms of S.oligoferm-entans glucose metaolism.Methods The S.oligofermentans LMG21532,Lactobacillus (L.) fermentum 38 and the S.S.mutans UA140 were used to characterize sucrose metabolism by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and lactic acid production.Continuous dynamics and high performance capillary electrophoresis were used to determine LDH activity and lactic acid production,respectively,from bacteria collected at 0,10 and 30 minutes after cultured in 10% sucrose.Results These analyses demonstrated that LDH activity of the three bacterial strains examined remained stable but significantly different throughout the sucrose fermentation process.The S.o/igofermentans LDH activity ((0.61±0.05) U/mg) was significantly lower than that of L.fermentum ((52.91+8.97) U/mg).In addition,the S.oligofermentans total lactate production ((0.048±0.021) mmol/L) was also significantly lower than that of L.fermentum ((0.958±0.201) mmol/L).Although the S.oligofermentans LDH production was almost double of that produced by S.mutans ((0.32±0.07) U/mg),lactic acid production was approximately one sixth that of S.mutans ((0.296±0.058) mmol/L).Additional tests examining pyruvic acid production (the LDH substrate) demonstrated that lactic acid concentrations correlated with pyruvic acid production.That is,pyruvic acid production by S.oligofermentans was undetectable following sucrose incubation,however,(0.074±t0.024) and (0.175±0.098) mmol/L pyruvic acid were produced by S.mutans and L.fermentum,respectively.Conclusion S.oligofermentans is incapable of fermenting carbohydrates to produce enough pyruvic acid,which results in reduced lactic acid production.

  19. "Hidden" tongue jewellery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, C M

    2001-06-01

    Tongue piercing has many associated risks. This is a case report of a patient who, to avoid parental disapproval, hid the dorsal aspect of a lingual stud device. Subsequently, the dorsum repaired. The device could no longer be removed manually and warranted surgical removal. Despite being in situ for over two years, no further complications arose, but all efforts to obtain patient agreement for removal of the device failed.

  20. Modeling the consequences of tongue surgery on tongue mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Buchaillard, Stéphanie; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the current achievements of a long term project aiming at predicting and assessing the impact of tongue and mouth floor surgery on tongue mobility. The ultimate objective of this project is the design of a software with which surgeons should be able (1) to design a 3D biomechanical model of the tongue and of the mouth floor that matches the anatomical characteristics of each patient specific oral cavity, (2) to simulate the anatomical changes induced by the surgery and the possible reconstruction, and (3) to quantitatively predict and assess the consequences of these anatomical changes on tongue mobility and speech production after surgery.

  1. Sarcoidosis Th17 Cells are ESAT-6 Antigen Specific but Demonstrate Reduced IFN-γ Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Bradley W.; Ploetze, Kristen; Isom, Joan; Chambers-Harris, Isfahan; Braun, Nicole A.; Taylor, Thyneice; Abraham, Susamma; Mageto, Yolanda; Culver, Dan A.; Oswald-Richter, Kyra A.; Drake, Wonder P.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Many patients with sarcoidosis demonstrate antigen-specific immunity to mycobacterial virulence factors. Th-17 cells are crucial to the immune response in granulomatous inflammation, and have recently been shown to be present in greater numbers in the peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF) of sarcoidosis patients than healthy controls. It is unclear whether Th-17 cells in sarcoidosis are specific for mycobacterial antigens, or whether they have similar functionality to control Th-17 cells. Methods Flow cytometry was used to determine the numbers of Th-17 cells present in the peripheral blood and BALF of patients with sarcoidosis, the percentage of Th-17 cells that were specific to the mycobacterial virulence factor ESAT-6, and as well as to assess IFN-γ expression in Th-17 cells following polyclonal stimulation. Results Patients with sarcoidosis had greater numbers of Th-17 cells in the peripheral blood and BALF than controls and produced significantly more extracellular IL-17A (p=0.03 and p=0.02, respectively). ESAT-6 specific Th-17 cells were present in both peripheral blood and BALF of sarcoidosis patients (psarcoidosis patients produced less IFN-γ than healthy controls. Conclusions Patients with sarcoidosis have mycobacterial antigen-specific Th-17 cells peripherally and in sites of active sarcoidosis involvement. Despite the Th1 immunophenotype of sarcoidosis immunology, the Th-17 cells have reduced IFN-γ expression, compared to healthy controls. This reduction in immunity may contribute to sarcoidosis pathogenesis. PMID:23073617

  2. Black hairy tongue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2014-08-21

    Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a benign medical condition characterized by elongated filiform lingual papillae with typical carpet-like appearance of the dorsum of the tongue. Its prevalence varies geographically, typically ranging from 0.6% to 11.3%. Known predisposing factors include smoking, excessive coffee/black tea consumption, poor oral hygiene, trigeminal neuralgia, general debilitation, xerostomia, and medication use. Clinical presentation varies but is typically asymptomatic, although aesthetic concerns are common. Differential diagnosis includes pseudo-BHT, acanthosis nigricans, oral hairy leukoplakia, pigmented fungiform papillae of the tongue, and congenital melanocytic/melanotic nevi/macules. Clinical diagnosis relies on visual observation, detailed history taking, and occasionally microscopic evaluation. Treatment involves identification and discontinuation of the offending agent, modifications of chronic predisposing factors, patient's re-assurance to the benign nature of the condition, and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene with gentle debridement to promote desquamation. Complications of BHT (burning mouth syndrome, halitosis, nausea, gagging, dysgeusia) typically respond to therapy. Prognosis is excellent with treatment of underlying medical conditions. BHT remains an important medical condition which may result in additional burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate prevention, recognition and treatment.

  3. Contact hypersensitivity after tongue piercing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananta Herachakri P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently tongue piercing has become increasingly popular in the society. Several case reports have presented various complications of tongue piercing. However, there is no scientific evidence about contact hypersensitivity to tongue piercing. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the contact hypersensitivity after using tongue piercing. Methods: Nineteen male Rattus norvegicus were divided into three groups: group A treated with vaseline on the back and dorsum tongue (control group, group B (I treated with HgCl2 10% cream on the tongue dorsum, group B (II treated with tongue piercing for 10 days and group C with HgCl 2 10% cream on the back, ear lobe, and tongue, then re-exposure with same materials on ear, back and tongue for 24 and 48 hours. Before and after 24 and 48 hours applications, ear width was measured with sliding caliper. At the end of treatments, the rats were sacrificed. All tissue specimens were made for Hematoylin Eosine (H&E staining examination. The number of mononuclear cells was counted under light microscope Data was analyzed with One-Way ANOVA followed by LSD (p<0.05. Results: The result of this study showed that there were a significant difference of the thickness of ear lobe and the number of mononuclear cells (lymphocyte and monocyte among all groups. Conclusion: It is concluded that tongue piercing induce contact hypersensitivity.Latar belakang: Saat ini pemakaian tongue piercing sangat popular di masyarakat. Beberapa laporan kasus menunjukkan bahwa tongue piercing menimbulkan beberapa komplikasi. Namun, belum ada bukti ilmiah mengenai reaksi hipesensitivitas tongue piercing. Tujuan: Untuk mengetahui reaksi hipersensitivitas setelah menggunakan tongue piercing. Metode: Sembilan belas tikus jantan Rattus novergicus yang dibagi dalam tiga kemlompok yaitu: grup A diberi perlakuan dengan vaselin pada punggung dan dorsum lidah, grup B (I diberi perlakuan dengan krim HgCl2 10% pada dorsum lidah dan B

  4. Reducing Plug Loads in Office Spaces: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Metzger, I.; Cutler, D.; Holland, G.; Hanada, A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of its overall strategy to meet its energy goals, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) partnered with the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. This project was one of several demonstrations of new or underutilized commercial energy technologies. The common goal was to demonstrate and measure the performance and economic benefit of the system while monitoring any ancillary impacts to related standards of service and operation and maintenance (O&M) practices. In short, demonstrations at naval facilities simultaneously evaluate the benefits and compatibility of the technology with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) mission, and with NAVFAC's design, construction, operations, and maintenance practices, in particular. This project demonstrated the performance of commercially available advanced power strips (APSs) for plug load energy reductions in building A4 at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii.

  5. Slip of the tongue: Implications for evolution and language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Gillian S; Rodriguez, Alina

    2015-08-01

    A prevailing theory regarding the evolution of language implicates a gestural stage prior to the emergence of speech. In support of a transition of human language from a gestural to a vocal system, articulation of the hands and the tongue are underpinned by overlapping left hemisphere dominant neural regions. Behavioral studies demonstrate that human adults perform sympathetic mouth actions in imitative synchrony with manual actions. Additionally, right-handedness for precision manual actions in children has been correlated with the typical development of language, while a lack of hand bias has been associated with psychopathology. It therefore stands to reason that sympathetic mouth actions during fine precision motor action of the hands may be lateralized. We employed a fine-grained behavioral coding paradigm to provide the first investigation of tongue protrusions in typically developing 4-year old children. Tongue protrusions were investigated across a range of cognitive tasks that required varying degrees of manual action: precision motor action, gross motor action and no motor actions. The rate of tongue protrusions was influenced by the motor requirements of the task and tongue protrusions were significantly right-biased for only precision manual motor action (p<.001). From an evolutionary perspective, tongue protrusions can drive new investigations regarding how an early human communication system transitioned from hand to mouth. From a developmental perspective, the present study may serve to reveal patterns of tongue protrusions during the motor development of typically developing children.

  6. MULTIPLE IMAGING TECHNIQUES DEMONSTRATE THE MANIPULATION OF SURFACES TO REDUCE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface imaging techniques were combined to determine appropriate manipulation of technologically important surfaces for commercial applications. Stainless steel surfaces were engineered to reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during product processing...

  7. Demonstration and Validation of a High-Performance Floor-Sealant System to Reduce Concrete Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    System to Reduce Concrete Degradation Final Report on Project F10-AR02 Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es ea rc h La bo ra to ry Clint...of a High-Performance Floor-Sealant System to Reduce Concrete Degradation Final Report on Project F10-AR02 Clint A. Wilson and Susan A. Drozdz...Under Project F10-AR02, “Application of an Innovative, High Performance Concrete Floor Sealant at Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia” ERDC/CERL TR-15-9 ii

  8. Diagnostic Method of Diabetes Based on Support Vector Machine and Tongue Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xu, Jiatuo; Hu, Xiaojuan; Chen, Qingguang; Tu, Liping; Huang, Jingbin; Cui, Ji

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this research is to develop a diagnostic method of diabetes based on standardized tongue image using support vector machine (SVM). Methods. Tongue images of 296 diabetic subjects and 531 nondiabetic subjects were collected by the TDA-1 digital tongue instrument. Tongue body and tongue coating were separated by the division-merging method and chrominance-threshold method. With extracted color and texture features of the tongue image as input variables, the diagnostic model of diabetes with SVM was trained. After optimizing the combination of SVM kernel parameters and input variables, the influences of the combinations on the model were analyzed. Results. After normalizing parameters of tongue images, the accuracy rate of diabetes predication was increased from 77.83% to 78.77%. The accuracy rate and area under curve (AUC) were not reduced after reducing the dimensions of tongue features with principal component analysis (PCA), while substantially saving the training time. During the training for selecting SVM parameters by genetic algorithm (GA), the accuracy rate of cross-validation was grown from 72% or so to 83.06%. Finally, we compare with several state-of-the-art algorithms, and experimental results show that our algorithm has the best predictive accuracy. Conclusions. The diagnostic method of diabetes on the basis of tongue images in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is of great value, indicating the feasibility of digitalized tongue diagnosis.

  9. Diagnostic Method of Diabetes Based on Support Vector Machine and Tongue Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaojuan; Chen, Qingguang; Tu, Liping; Huang, Jingbin; Cui, Ji

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this research is to develop a diagnostic method of diabetes based on standardized tongue image using support vector machine (SVM). Methods. Tongue images of 296 diabetic subjects and 531 nondiabetic subjects were collected by the TDA-1 digital tongue instrument. Tongue body and tongue coating were separated by the division-merging method and chrominance-threshold method. With extracted color and texture features of the tongue image as input variables, the diagnostic model of diabetes with SVM was trained. After optimizing the combination of SVM kernel parameters and input variables, the influences of the combinations on the model were analyzed. Results. After normalizing parameters of tongue images, the accuracy rate of diabetes predication was increased from 77.83% to 78.77%. The accuracy rate and area under curve (AUC) were not reduced after reducing the dimensions of tongue features with principal component analysis (PCA), while substantially saving the training time. During the training for selecting SVM parameters by genetic algorithm (GA), the accuracy rate of cross-validation was grown from 72% or so to 83.06%. Finally, we compare with several state-of-the-art algorithms, and experimental results show that our algorithm has the best predictive accuracy. Conclusions. The diagnostic method of diabetes on the basis of tongue images in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is of great value, indicating the feasibility of digitalized tongue diagnosis. PMID:28133611

  10. Diagnostic Method of Diabetes Based on Support Vector Machine and Tongue Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this research is to develop a diagnostic method of diabetes based on standardized tongue image using support vector machine (SVM. Methods. Tongue images of 296 diabetic subjects and 531 nondiabetic subjects were collected by the TDA-1 digital tongue instrument. Tongue body and tongue coating were separated by the division-merging method and chrominance-threshold method. With extracted color and texture features of the tongue image as input variables, the diagnostic model of diabetes with SVM was trained. After optimizing the combination of SVM kernel parameters and input variables, the influences of the combinations on the model were analyzed. Results. After normalizing parameters of tongue images, the accuracy rate of diabetes predication was increased from 77.83% to 78.77%. The accuracy rate and area under curve (AUC were not reduced after reducing the dimensions of tongue features with principal component analysis (PCA, while substantially saving the training time. During the training for selecting SVM parameters by genetic algorithm (GA, the accuracy rate of cross-validation was grown from 72% or so to 83.06%. Finally, we compare with several state-of-the-art algorithms, and experimental results show that our algorithm has the best predictive accuracy. Conclusions. The diagnostic method of diabetes on the basis of tongue images in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM is of great value, indicating the feasibility of digitalized tongue diagnosis.

  11. Demonstration of an Environmentally Benign and Reduced Corrosion Runway Deicing Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    petroleum consumption; conserve water; reduce waste; support sustainable communities; and leverage Federal purchasing power to promote environmentally...environmentally-sound operation of DoD airports. Wetlands and aquatic life can be adversely affected by exposure to seemingly low toxicity chemicals...Mountain Home AFB 3,450 Misawa, Japan 81,996 Hill AFB, UT 56,013 Osan, S. Korea 12,000 Elmendorf AFB, AK 105,000 Kunsan, S. Korea 24,000 (a) Obtained

  12. Partial amputation of the tongue--self-inflicted or physical assault?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthal, S; Bayer, R; Doerre, A; Dreßler, J

    2016-05-01

    Injuries of the tongue are generally self-inflicted lesions and occur during different diseases or external incidents. The amputation of the tongue is a rare event. In this article, we report about a woman presenting with a complete amputation of the anterior third of the tongue. The morphological findings, which are essential for the differentiation of self-inflicted injuries and injuries caused by a third party, are demonstrated.

  13. Is There a Correlation between Languages Spoken and Intricate Movements of Tongue? A Comparative Study of Various Movements of Tongue among the Three Ethnic Races of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Satheesha B; Awal, Mahfuzah Binti; Han, Chang Wei; Sivaram, Ganeshram; Vigneswaran, Thimesha; Choon, Tee Lian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tongue is mainly used for taste, chewing and in speech. In the present study, we focused on the secondary function of the tongue as to how it is used in phonetic pronunciation and linguistics and how these factors affect tongue movements. Objective To compare all possible movements of tongue among Malaysians belonging to three ethnic races and to find out if there is any link between languages spoken and ability to perform various tongue movements. Materials and Methods A total of 450 undergraduate medical students participated in the study. The students were chosen from three different races i.e. Malays, Chinese and Indians (Malaysian Indians). Data was collected from the students through a semi-structured interview following which each student was asked to demonstrate various tongue movements like protrusion, retraction, flattening, rolling, twisting, folding or any other special movements. The data obtained was first segregated and analysed according to gender, race and types and dialects of languages spoken. Results We found that most of the Malaysians were able to perform the basic movements of tongue like protrusion, flattening movements and very few were able to perform twisting and folding of the tongue. The ability to perform normal tongue movements and special movements like folding, twisting, rolling and others was higher among Indians when compared to Malay and Chinese. Conclusion Languages spoken by Indians involve detailed tongue rolling and folding in pronouncing certain words and may be the reason as to why Indians are more versatile with tongue movements as compared to the other two races amongst Malaysians. It may be a possibility that languages spoken by a person serves as a variable that increases their ability to perform special tongue movements besides influenced by the genetic makeup of a person. PMID:26894051

  14. 21 CFR 880.6230 - Tongue depressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tongue depressor. 880.6230 Section 880.6230 Food... § 880.6230 Tongue depressor. (a) Identification. A tongue depressor is a device intended to displace the tongue to facilitate examination of the surrounding organs and tissues. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. The tongue after whiplash: case report and osteopathic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordoni BB

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Bordoni,1-3 Fabiola Marelli,2,3 Bruno Morabito2-4 1Department of Cardiology, Santa Maria Nascente IRCCS, Don Carlo Gnocchi Foundation, Institute of Hospitalization and Care with Scientific Address, Milan, 2CRESO, School of Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Castellanza,3CRESO, School of Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Falconara Marittima, Ancona, 4Foundation Polyclinic University A, Gemelli University Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy Abstract: The tongue plays a fundamental role in several bodily functions; in the case of a dysfunction, an exhaustive knowledge of manual techniques to treat the tongue is useful in order to help patients on their path toward recovery. A 30-year-old male patient with a recent history of whiplash, with increasing cervical pain during swallowing and reduced ability to open the mouth, was treated with osteopathic techniques addressed to the tongue. The osteopathic techniques led to a disappearance of pain and the complete recovery of the normal functions of the tongue, such as swallowing and mouth opening. The manual osteopathic approach consists of applying a low load, in order to produce a long-lasting stretching of the myofascial complex, with the aim of restoring the optimal length of this continuum, decreasing pain, and improving functionality. According to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first article reporting a case of resolution of a post whiplash disorder through osteopathic treatment of the tongue. Keywords: tongue, indirect osteopathic techniques, fascia, fascial release

  16. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome.

  17. Exuberant neuronal convergence onto reduced taste bud targets with preservation of neural specificity in mice overexpressing neurotrophin in the tongue epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Faisal N; Krimm, Robin F; Whitehead, Mark C

    2007-12-12

    A mouse fungiform taste bud is innervated by only four to five geniculate ganglion neurons; their peripheral fibers do not branch to other buds. We examined whether the degree or specificity of this exclusive innervation pattern is influenced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a prominent lingual neurotrophin implicated in taste receptoneural development. Labeled ganglion cells were counted after injecting single buds with different color markers in BDNF-lingual-overexpressing (OE) mice. To evaluate the end-organs, taste buds and a class of putative taste receptor cells were counted from progeny of BDNF-OE mice crossbred with green fluorescent protein (GFP) (gustducin) transgenic mice. Fungiform bud numbers in BDNF-OE mice are 35%, yet geniculate neuron numbers are 195%, of wild-type mice. Neurons labeled by single-bud injections in BDNF-OE animals were increased fourfold versus controls. Injecting three buds, each with different color markers, resulted in predominantly single-labeled ganglion cells, a discrete innervation pattern similar to controls. Thus, hyper-innervation of BDNF-OE buds involves many neurons innervating single buds, not increased fiber branching. Therefore, both wild-type and BDNF-OE mice exhibit, in fungiform buds, the same, "discrete" receptoneural pattern, this despite dramatic neurotrophin overexpression-related decreases in bud numbers and increases in innervation density. Hyperinnervation did not affect GFP positive cell numbers; proportions of GFP cells in BDNF-OE buds were the same as in wild-type mice. Total numbers of ganglion cells innervating buds in transgenic mice are similar to controls; the density of taste input to the brain appears maintained despite dramatically reduced receptor organs and increased ganglion cells.

  18. The Negative Transfer of Mother Tongue in Vocabulary of Non-English Majors in Vocational Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚妮

    2012-01-01

      The transfer of mother tongue has always been influencing students in second language acquisition. This paper at⁃tempts to analyze the negative transfer in vocabulary of non-English majors in vocational colleges and briefly proposes some strategies to reduce the negative transfer of mother tongue.

  19. Small interfering RNA targeting ILK inhibits metastasis in human tongue cancer cells through repression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yu [College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Laboratory of Forensic Medicine and Biomedical Information, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Qi, Jin [The Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University (China); Deng, Shixiong [College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Laboratory of Forensic Medicine and Biomedical Information, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wang, Cheng [Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Luyu [Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chen, Junxia, E-mail: chjunxia@126.com [Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2013-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase. Accumulating evidences suggest that ILK are involved in cell–matrix interactions, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, angiogenesis and Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. EMT has been postulated as a prerequisite for metastasis. The reports have demonstrated that EMT was implicated in metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, here we further postulate that ILK might participate in EMT of tongue cancer. We showed that ILK siRNA inhibited EMT with low N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as high E-cadherin expression in vivo and in vitro. We found that knockdown of ILK inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion as well as changed cell morphology. We also demonstrated that ILK siRNA inhibited phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets Akt and GSK3β as well as reduced expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Furthermore, we found that the tongue tumor with high metastasis capability showed higher ILK, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as lower E-cadherin expression in clinical specimens. Finally, ILK siRNA led to the suppression for tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest that ILK could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for tongue cancer. Highlights: • ILK siRNA influences cell morphology, cell cycle, migration and invasion. • ILK siRNA affects the expression of proteins associated with EMT. • ILK expression is related to EMT in clinical human tongue tumors. • ILK siRNA inhibits metastasis of the tongue cancer cells through suppressing EMT.

  20. Computer Aided Image Enhancement Of Tongue For Diagnosis In Ayurvedic Medical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanalakshmi MIRYALA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda is one of the traditional medical systems practiced in India and south Asian countries from ancient times. Tongue diagnosis is one of the important areas in physical diagnosis of treatment of health disorders in Ayurveda. The diagnosis is usually carried out by the medical practitioner with visually understanding the tongue, but the process of understanding the tongue image is not an easy task to carry out. The difficulty arises because of the irregular shape of the tongue, overlapping of colors, effect of outside light, dominance of saliva on cracks and buds etc. In this paper, we propose an application of computer aided digital image enhancement methods for processing the tongue image to highlight the true color and white coating, cracks, pimples/buds etc., so that the practitioner can get more valuable information compared to direct visual examination of the tongue. The method mainly consists of two techniques; first, color image filtering and enhancement for identifying the true nature of colors on different parts of the tongue and to bring out white coating; second, contrast enhancement and image sharpening in grey scale for highlighting the shape, cracks, buds and pimples. The aim of our method is to help in reducing the complexity in tongue image understanding for the practitioner. The data of the experimental results reveal that our method produces significant useful result for the tongue diagnosis

  1. Reduced-gravity Environment Hardware Demonstrations of a Prototype Miniaturized Flow Cytometer and Companion Microfluidic Mixing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Candice; Sharpe, Julia Z.; Bishara, Andrew M.; Nelson, Emily S.; Weaver, Aaron S.; Brown, Daniel; McKay, Terri L.; Griffin, DeVon; Chan, Eugene Y.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, astronaut blood samples were collected in-flight, transported to earth on the Space Shuttle, and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. If humans are to travel beyond low Earth orbit, a transition towards space-ready, point-of-care (POC) testing is required. Such testing needs to be comprehensive, easy to perform in a reduced-gravity environment, and unaffected by the stresses of launch and spaceflight. Countless POC devices have been developed to mimic laboratory scale counterparts, but most have narrow applications and few have demonstrable use in an in-flight, reduced-gravity environment. In fact, demonstrations of biomedical diagnostics in reduced gravity are limited altogether, making component choice and certain logistical challenges difficult to approach when seeking to test new technology. To help fill the void, we are presenting a modular method for the construction and operation of a prototype blood diagnostic device and its associated parabolic flight test rig that meet the standards for flight-testing onboard a parabolic flight, reduced-gravity aircraft. The method first focuses on rig assembly for in-flight, reduced-gravity testing of a flow cytometer and a companion microfluidic mixing chip. Components are adaptable to other designs and some custom components, such as a microvolume sample loader and the micromixer may be of particular interest. The method then shifts focus to flight preparation, by offering guidelines and suggestions to prepare for a successful flight test with regard to user training, development of a standard operating procedure (SOP), and other issues. Finally, in-flight experimental procedures specific to our demonstrations are described. PMID:25490614

  2. Reduced-gravity environment hardware demonstrations of a prototype miniaturized flow cytometer and companion microfluidic mixing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, William S; Yin, Zhizhong; Bae, Candice; Sharpe, Julia Z; Bishara, Andrew M; Nelson, Emily S; Weaver, Aaron S; Brown, Daniel; McKay, Terri L; Griffin, DeVon; Chan, Eugene Y

    2014-11-13

    Until recently, astronaut blood samples were collected in-flight, transported to earth on the Space Shuttle, and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. If humans are to travel beyond low Earth orbit, a transition towards space-ready, point-of-care (POC) testing is required. Such testing needs to be comprehensive, easy to perform in a reduced-gravity environment, and unaffected by the stresses of launch and spaceflight. Countless POC devices have been developed to mimic laboratory scale counterparts, but most have narrow applications and few have demonstrable use in an in-flight, reduced-gravity environment. In fact, demonstrations of biomedical diagnostics in reduced gravity are limited altogether, making component choice and certain logistical challenges difficult to approach when seeking to test new technology. To help fill the void, we are presenting a modular method for the construction and operation of a prototype blood diagnostic device and its associated parabolic flight test rig that meet the standards for flight-testing onboard a parabolic flight, reduced-gravity aircraft. The method first focuses on rig assembly for in-flight, reduced-gravity testing of a flow cytometer and a companion microfluidic mixing chip. Components are adaptable to other designs and some custom components, such as a microvolume sample loader and the micromixer may be of particular interest. The method then shifts focus to flight preparation, by offering guidelines and suggestions to prepare for a successful flight test with regard to user training, development of a standard operating procedure (SOP), and other issues. Finally, in-flight experimental procedures specific to our demonstrations are described.

  3. Tongue Image Feature Extraction in TCM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong; DU Lian-xiang; LU Fu-ping; DU Jun-ping

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, digital image processing and computer vision techniques are applied to study tongue images for feature extraction with VC++ and Matlab. Extraction and analysis of the tongue surface features are based on shape, color, edge, and texture. The developed software has various functions and good user interface and is easy to use. Feature data for tongue image pattern recognition is provided, which form a sound basis for the future tongue image recognition.

  4. Cine-MRI swallowing evaluation after tongue reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, Dana M. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)], E-mail: dmhartl@aol.com; Kolb, Frederic; Bretagne, Evelyne [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Bidault, Francois; Sigal, Robert [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2010-01-15

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of cine-MRI for non-invasive swallowing evaluation after surgery for lingual carcinoma with reconstruction using microvascular free flaps. Methods: Ten patients with stage IV carcinoma of the mobile tongue and/or tongue base treated by surgical resection and reconstruction with a free flap were evaluated after an average of 4.3 years (range: 1.5-11 years), using cine-MRI in 'single-shot fast spin echo' (SSFSE) mode. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy of swallowing was performed before MRI to detect aspiration. The tolerance and ability to complete the exam were noted. The mobilities of the oral and pharyngeal structures visualized were evaluated as normal, reduced or increased. Results: Cine-MRI was well tolerated in all cases; 'dry' swallow was performed for the 2 patients with clinical aspiration. Tongue base-pharyngeal wall contact was observed in 5 cases. An increased anterior tongue recoil, increased mandibular recoil, increased posterior oropharyngeal wall advancement and an increased laryngeal elevation were observed in 4 cases. One case of a passive 'slide' mechanism was observed. Conclusions: Cine-MRI is a safe, non-invasive technique for the evaluation of the mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures after free-flap reconstruction of the tongue. For selected cases, it may be complementary to clinical examination for evaluation of dysphagia after surgery and free-flap reconstruction. Further technical advances will be necessary before cine-MRI can replace videofluoroscopy, however.

  5. The tongue after whiplash: case report and osteopathic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, Fabiola; Morabito, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The tongue plays a fundamental role in several bodily functions; in the case of a dysfunction, an exhaustive knowledge of manual techniques to treat the tongue is useful in order to help patients on their path toward recovery. A 30-year-old male patient with a recent history of whiplash, with increasing cervical pain during swallowing and reduced ability to open the mouth, was treated with osteopathic techniques addressed to the tongue. The osteopathic techniques led to a disappearance of pain and the complete recovery of the normal functions of the tongue, such as swallowing and mouth opening. The manual osteopathic approach consists of applying a low load, in order to produce a long-lasting stretching of the myofascial complex, with the aim of restoring the optimal length of this continuum, decreasing pain, and improving functionality. According to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first article reporting a case of resolution of a post whiplash disorder through osteopathic treatment of the tongue. PMID:27462180

  6. Ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumor of tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Yin Tsai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumor (ECMT is a rare entity of the dorsal tongue first described in 1995. Herein, we report a rare case of lingual ECMT in a 41-year-old man. Patient presented with an asymptomatic, small nodule (0.5 cm in diameter in the anterior tongue. The pathological findings showed uni-lobular proliferation of fusiform cells, arranged in net-like sheets or swirls, in a chondromyxoid background. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for S-100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, but negative for epithelial markers. Familiarity with this entity helps pathologists make a correct diagnosis.

  7. Tongue as the Window to the Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsung O.Cheng

    2011-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: I read with great interest your masterful article on study of the tongue in patients with coronary heart disease. Tongue is, indeed, the window to the heart. Many cardiovascular diseases including coronary heart disease can be accurately diagnosed by the Chinese traditional physicians by careful inspection of the tongue (Figure 1).

  8. Interface Electronic Circuitry for an Electronic Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Buehler, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Electronic circuitry has been developed to serve as an interface between an electronic tongue and digital input/output boards in a laptop computer that is used to control the tongue and process its readings. Electronic tongues can be used for a variety of purposes, including evaluating water quality, analyzing biochemicals, analyzing biofilms, and measuring electrical conductivities of soils.

  9. Fully integrated wireless inductive tongue computer interface for disabled people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijk, Lotte N S Andreasen; Lontis, Eugen Romulus; Bentsen, Bo; Christensen, Henrik Vie; Caltenco, Hector A; Lund, Morten Enemark

    2009-01-01

    This work describes a novel fully integrated inductive tongue computer interface for disabled people. The interface consists of an oral unit placed in the mouth, including inductive sensors, related electronics, a system for wireless transmission and a rechargeable battery. The system is activated using an activation unit placed on the tongue, and incorporates 18 inductive sensors, arranged in both a key area and a mouse-pad area. The system's functionality was demonstrated in a pilot experiment, where a typing rate of up to 70 characters/minute was obtained with an error rate of 3%. Future work will include tests with disabled subjects.

  10. Tongue piercing by a Yogi: QEEG observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Erik; Wilson, Vietta E; Gunkelman, Jay; Kawakami, Mitsumasa; Sata, Misa; Barton, William; Johnston, James

    2006-12-01

    : This study reports on the QEEG observations recorded from a yogi during tongue piercing in which he demonstrated voluntary pain control. The QEEG was recorded with a Lexicor 1620 from 19 sites with appropriate controls for impedence and artifacts. A neurologist read the data for abnormalities and the QEEG was analyzed by mapping, single and multiple hertz bins, coherence, and statistical comparisons with a normative database. The session included a meditation baseline and tongue piercing. During the meditative baseline period the yogi's QEEG maps suggesting that he was able to lower his brain activity to a resting state. This state showed a predominance of slow wave potentials (delta) during piercing and suggested that the yogi induced a state that may be similar to those found when individuals are under analgesia. Further research should be conducted with a group of individuals who demonstrate exceptional self-regulation to determine the underlying mechanisms, and whether the skills can be used to teach others how to manage pain.

  11. Morphology and fibre-type distribution in the tongue of the Pogona vitticeps lizard (Iguania, Agamidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zghikh, Leïla-Nastasia; Vangysel, Emilie; Nonclercq, Denis; Legrand, Alexandre; Blairon, Bernard; Berri, Cécile; Bordeau, Thierry; Rémy, Christophe; Burtéa, Carmen; Montuelle, Stéphane J; Bels, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Agamid lizards use tongue prehension for capturing all types of prey. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional relationship between tongue structure, both surface and musculature, and function during prey capture in Pogona vitticeps. The lack of a detailed description of the distribution of fibre-types in the tongue muscles in some iguanian lizards has hindered the understanding of the functional morphology of the lizard tongue. Three methodological approaches were used to fill this gap. First, morphological analyses were performed (i) on the tongue surface through scanning electron microscopy, and (ii) on the lingual muscle by histological coloration and histochemistry to identify fibre-typing. Secondly, kinematics of prey capture was quantified by using high-speed video recordings to determine the movement capabilities of the tongue. Finally, electromyography (EMG) was used to identify the motor pattern tongue muscles during prey capture. Morphological and functional data were combined to discuss the functional morphology of the tongue in agamid lizards, in relation to their diet. During tongue protraction, M. genioglossus contracts 420 ± 96 ms before tongue-prey contact. Subsequently, Mm. verticalis and hyoglossus contract throughout tongue protraction and retraction. Significant differences are found between the timing of activity of the protractor muscles between omnivorous agamids (Pogona sp., this study) and insectivorous species (Agama sp.), despite similar tongue and jaw kinematics. The data confirm that specialisation toward a diet which includes more vegetal materials is associated with significant changes in tongue morphology and function. Histoenzymology demonstrates that protractor and retractor muscles differ in fibre composition. The proportion of fast glycolytic fibres is significantly higher in the M. hyoglossus (retractor muscle) than in the M. genioglossus (protractor muscle), and this difference is proposed to be associated

  12. Tongues of Men and Angels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGraw, John J.

    2012-01-01

    The accelerating popularity of Charismatic Christianity has brought with it a host of new sensibilities and ritual practices. Glossolalia, or ‘speaking in tongues,’ stands out among these as a particularly dramatic innovation. Typically staid churchgoers, once touched by the Holy Spirit, begin...

  13. Editorial: Mother Tongue and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Linguists, language experts and child-psychologists believe that children can learn better in their mother tongue but that doesn’t go against multilingual education. It has also been observed that children studying through multilingual system develop better thinking and skills than monolingual education systems. Parents and peer all can help the child understand the issues if it

  14. Solitary angiokeratoma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sion-Vardy, Netta; Manor, Esther; Puterman, Max; Bodner, Lipa

    2008-01-01

    Angiokeratoma is a rare cutaneous lesion. It can be either a generalized systemic form, presenting as multiple asymptomatic papules on the skin, associated with metabolic diseases or a solitary cutaneous form. Oral cavity involvement is more common in the systemic form, as a part of a more generalized cutaneous disease, but very rare in the localized form of angiokeratoma. A 45-year-old female presented with a painless lesion on the tongue of one months duration, which bled occasionally. On clinical examination, a lesion of approximately 5 mm in diameter was observed on the left surface of the tongue. The lesion was purple in color with a granulomatous appearance. There were no other changes in the oral mucosa. On dermatologic examination, no angiokeratomas were found, anywhere on the skin. The lesion was excised under local anesthesia. The histologic diagnosis was angiokeratoma. A case of a solitary angiokeratoma of the tongue is reported. We report here the third intra-oral case and the second case in the tongue with solitary angiokeratoma.

  15. Mittal bonded tongue thrusting appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available These days majority of orthodontist includes bonded molar attachment in their inventory to eliminate the discomfort of molar separation during initial appointment and band spaces left at the end of treatment. This article describes a innovative and economical method of attachment of bonded tongue crib if required during the initial or later stages of treatment along with bonded molar tubes.

  16. Tongues of Men and Angels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGraw, John J.

    2012-01-01

    The accelerating popularity of Charismatic Christianity has brought with it a host of new sensibilities and ritual practices. Glossolalia, or ‘speaking in tongues,’ stands out among these as a particularly dramatic innovation. Typically staid churchgoers, once touched by the Holy Spirit, begin...

  17. RELEASE OF TONGUE-TIE IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Raveenthiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arguably, release of tongue tie is the oldest surgical procedure and it is perhaps older than circumcision. According to the Old Testament, the Lord released the tied tongue of Moses and made him speak well. Tongue-tie is pedantically known as ankyloglossia inferior minor. Simplicity of its treatment has earned this malady several etiological attributions such as difficulty of speech and breast feeding. All over the world, lactation consultants refer neonates for release of tongue tie as they believe it to be the cause of maternal nipple pain.Perhaps this is the only indication of tongue tie release in neonates.

  18. Relationship between tongue strength and 1-year life expectancy in elderly people needing nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Yuri; Kikutani, Takeshi; Tamura, Fumiyo; Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-01-05

    Tongue strength is a useful indicator of oral function and has been found to decrease with aging and reduced physical functioning. The present study aimed to assess the relationships of tongue strength with physical function, mental function, and nutritional status, and also between these factors and 1-year outcomes, to determine whether tongue strength is related to life expectancy in elderly people needing nursing care. The subjects were 140 elderly individuals requiring needing nursing care (49 men and 91 women; ≥65 years). The investigated items included sex, age, activities of daily living (ADL), comorbidity, cognitive function, nutritional status, eating function, occlusal support, and tongue strength. Furthermore, a follow-up study was conducted 1 year later, and factors related to death were identified. The mean tongue strength of the total 140 subjects was 20.3 ± 8.6 kPa. Tongue strength was assessed relative to each of the investigated items, using the t test and one-way analysis of variance. Tongue strength was significantly related to ADL, comorbidity, cognitive function, calf circumference, food intake, and occlusal support. Fifteen subjects were found to have died at the 1-year follow-up study. We assessed the relationships of 1-year outcomes with each of the factors examined, and 1-year outcomes were found to be significantly related to ADL and tongue strength.

  19. Geographic tongue and psoriasis: clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical and genetic correlation - a literature review*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciani, Bruna Lavinas Sayed; Domingos, Tábata Alves; Teixeira-Souza, Thays; dos Santos, Vanessa de Carla Batista; Gonzaga, Heron Fernando de Sousa; Cardoso-Oliveira, Juliana; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos; Dias, Eliane Pedra; Carneiro, Sueli

    2016-01-01

    Geographic tongue is a chronic, inflammatory, and immune-mediated oral lesion of unknown etiology. It is characterized by serpiginous white areas around the atrophic mucosa, which alternation between activity, remission and reactivation at various locations gave the names benign migratory glossitis and wandering rash of the tongue. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with frequent cutaneous involvement and an immunogenetic basis of great importance in clinical practice. The association between geographic tongue and psoriasis has been demonstrated in various studies, based on observation of its fundamental lesions, microscopic similarity between the two conditions and the presence of a common genetic marker, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-C*06. The difficulty however in accepting the diagnosis of geographic tongue as oral psoriasis is the fact that not all patients with geographic tongue present psoriasis. Some authors believe that the prevalence of geographic tongue would be much greater if psoriatic patients underwent thorough oral examination. This study aimed to develop a literature review performed between 1980 and 2014, in which consultation of theses, dissertations and selected scientific articles were conducted through search in Scielo and Bireme databases, from Medline and Lilacs sources, relating the common characteristics between geographic tongue and psoriasis. We observed that the frequency of oral lesions is relatively common, but to establish a correct diagnosis of oral psoriasis, immunohistochemical and genetic histopathological analyzes are necessary, thus highlighting the importance of oral examination in psoriatic patients and cutaneous examination in patients with geographic tongue. PMID:27579734

  20. Tongue controlled computer game: A new approach for rehabilitation of tongue motor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of tongue-disability, age and gender on motor performance for a tongue training paradigm involving playing a computer game using the Tongue Drive System (TDS). Design: Two controlled observational studies. Setting: A neurorehabilitation center and a dental...... of motivation, fun, pain and fatigue between groups in any of the studies (P>0.094). Conclusions: The present study provided evidence that tongue-disability and age can influence behavioral measures of tongue motor performance. TDS may be a new adjunctive neurorehabilitation regime in treating tongue...... school. Participants: In Study 1, eleven tongue-disabled patients with symptoms of dysphagia and dysarthria and 11 age-and sex-matched controls participated in tongue training. In Study 2, 16 healthy elderly and 16 healthy young participants volunteered. Intervention: In study 1 and study 2, the tongue...

  1. Repeated tongue lift movement induces neuroplasticity in corticomotor control of tongue and jaw muscles in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komoda, Yoshihiro; Lida, Takashi; Kothari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated tongue lift training (TLT) on the excitability of the corticomotor representation of the human tongue and jaw musculature. Sixteen participants performed three series of TLT for 41min on each of 5 consecutive days. Each TLT series consisted of two....... EMG recordings from the left and right tongue dorsum and masseter muscles were made at three pressure levels (5kPa, 10kPa, 100% tongue lift), and tongue, masseter, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) MEPs were measured. There were no significant day-to-day differences in the tongue pressure during...

  2. 3-D neurohistology of transparent tongue in health and injury with optical clearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-En eHua

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tongue receives extensive innervation to perform taste, sensory, and motor functions. Details of the tongue neuroanatomy and its plasticity in response to injury offer insights to investigate tongue neurophysiology and pathophysiology. However, due to the dispersed nature of the neural network, standard histology cannot provide a global view of the innervation. We prepared transparent mouse tongue by optical clearing to reveal the spatial features of the tongue innervation and its remodeling in injury. Immunostaining of neuronal markers, including PGP9.5 (pan-neuronal marker, calcitonin gene-related peptide (sensory nerves, tyrosine hydroxylase (sympathetic nerves, and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (cholinergic parasympathetic nerves and neuromuscular junctions, was combined with vessel painting and nuclear staining to label the tissue network and architecture. The tongue specimens were immersed in the optical-clearing solution to facilitate photon penetration for 3-dimensiontal (3-D confocal microscopy. Taking advantage of the transparent tissue, we simultaneously revealed the tongue microstructure and innervation with subcellular-level resolution. 3-D projection of the papillary neurovascular complex and taste bud innervation was used to demonstrate the spatial features of tongue mucosa and the panoramic imaging approach. In the tongue injury induced by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide administration in the drinking water, we observed neural tissue remodeling in response to the changes of mucosal and muscular structures. Neural networks and the neuromuscular junctions were both found rearranged at the peri-lesional region, suggesting the nerve-lesion interactions in response to injury. Overall, this new tongue histological approach provides a useful tool for 3-D imaging of neural tissues to better characterize their roles with the mucosal and muscular components in health and disease.

  3. Linezolid induced black hairy tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindan Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Black hairy tongue (BHT also called as lingua villosa nigra, is a self limiting benign condition characterized by hypertrophy and elongation of filiform papillae of tongue with brown or black discoloration. Smoking, poor oral hygiene, xerostomia, using peroxide containing mouth washes, substance abuse and drugs (steroids, methyldopa, olanzapine, etc are the predisposing factors. However its occurrence in relation to linezolid ingestion among south Indians has not been reported in PubMed database. Here we report a case, where significant association of linezolid intake with BHT was found in a 10-year-old boy, who was treated with tablet linezolid for post surgical infection of left side radial neck fracture. This case is reported for the rarity of occurrence with linezolid therapy. According to Naranjo adverse drug reaction (ADR causality scale, the association of BHT due to linezolid in our case was probable.

  4. Ossifying chondrolipoma of the tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Desanka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chondrolipomas and osteolipomas are uncommon variants of lipomatous tumors. Case report. We presented a 60-year-old woman with ossifying chondrolipoma of the tongue. Clinical examination revealed a firm nodular mass, located in the midline of the posterior region on the dorsal surface of the tongue. Histologically, the lesion was well-delimited showing areas of mature adipocytes arranged in lobules and separated by fibrous connective tissue septa, islands of mature cartilaginous tissue and osseous metaplasia. Trabeculae of lamellar bone within a fibro-fatty background were visible throughout the tumor. The cartilaginous areas merging centrally with bone formation and fatty marrow tissue were present, as well as the hematopoietic elements in the fatty marrow. The bone forming was found to be through both membranous and enchondral mechanisms. Conclusion. Ossifying chrondrolipoma with hematopoietic elements is extremely unusual lesion. This interesting entity should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lingual lesions.

  5. Peroneal Flap for Tongue Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Sheng; Liu, Wen-Chung; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Chen, Lee-Wei; Yang, Kuo-Chung

    2017-07-01

    Background For large tongue defects, reconstructive surgeons have devised a variety of feasible options, such as radial forearm free flap and anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap. In our institution, peroneal flap has been the workhorse flap for the soft tissue defect in head and neck reconstruction. We present our experience using peroneal flap in tongue reconstruction. Patients and Methods The study included 47 patients who had undergone tongue reconstructions with peroneal flaps after tumor resection. The size and location of the defect after tumor resection determined whether the peroneal flaps could be harvested as pure septocutaneous flaps to solely reconstruct the neotongue or to carry an additional muscle bulk to fill the adjacent defect. Retrospective chart review was used to look for postoperative complications and to perform functional assessments (which were also performed through telephone inquiry). Results Of the 47 patients, 3 (6%) had flap failure and 1 (2.1%) had partial flap necrosis. The hemiglossectomy group had better results than the total glossectomy group with respect to speech and diet, but neither of these results reached statistical significance (p = 1.0 for speech and p = 0.06 for diet). The results of the subtotal glossectomy group were better than those of the total glossectomy group with respect to diet (p = 0.03). No statistically significant differences were noted among the three groups with respect to cosmetic aspect (p = 0.64). Conclusions Considering its reasonable postoperative complication rates and functional results, peroneal flap can be considered a feasible option for tongue reconstruction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  7. Somatosensory processing of the tongue in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwako Sakamoto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We review research on somatosensory (tactile processing of the tongue based on data obtained using non-invasive neurophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Technical difficulties in stimulating the tongue, due to the noise elicited by the stimulator, the fixation of the stimulator, and the vomiting reflex, have necessitated the development of specialized devices. In this article, we show the brain activity relating to somatosensory processing of the tongue evoked by such devices. More recently, the postero-lateral part of the tongue has been stimulated, and the brain response compared with that on stimulation of the antero-lateral part of the tongue. It is likely that a difference existed in somatosensory processing of the tongue, particularly around primary somatosensory cortex (SI, Brodmann area 40 (BA 40, and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC.

  8. Chronic tongue ulceration resolved by sulpiride: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, H; Shimahara, M

    2009-07-01

    We report two patients with chronic tongue ulceration who were successfully treated using sulpiride. The clinical diagnosis was oral candidiasis related to long-term steroid treatment. The results of the culture test and cytological examination supported this diagnosis, but antifungal treatment was ineffective and the tongue pain in these patients became more severe. Furthermore, the pain could not be relieved by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We therefore prescribed sulpiride in addition to NSAIDs to reduce the tongue pain. A consequent improvement in both pain severity and ulceration was observed 2-3 weeks after sulpiride administration.

  9. A Pilot Study of the Tongue Pull-Back Exercise for Improving Tongue-Base Retraction and Two Novel Methods to Add Resistance to the Tongue Pull-Back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovarp, Laurie; King, Lauren; Off, Catherine; Liss, Julie

    2016-06-01

    This pilot study investigated the tongue pull-back (TPB) exercise to improve tongue-base retraction as well as two methods to add resistance to the TPB. Surface electromyography (sEMG) to the submental triangle was used as an indication of tongue-base activity on 13 healthy adults during: (1) saliva swallow, (2) 15 mL water swallow, (3) effortful swallow, (4) unassisted TPB, (5) TPB with added resistance by holding the tongue with gauze (finger-resisted TPB), and (6) TPB with the tongue clipped to a spring-loaded tension resistance device (device-resisted TPB). Order of the exercises was randomized. The exercises fell into two groups-weak and intense. Weak exercises included saliva swallow, water swallow, and unassisted TPB (mean sEMG = 19.07 μV, p = .593). Intense exercises included effortful swallow, finger-resisted TPB, and device-resisted TPB (mean sEMG = 36.44 μV, p = .315). Each intense exercise resulted in significantly higher mean sEMG peak amplitude than each weak exercise (p swallow was not significantly different than the unassisted TPB (p = .171). This study provides preliminary evidence that the unassisted TPB may not be any more helpful for improving tongue-base retraction than normal swallowing. Adding resistance to the TPB by holding the tongue with gauze may be an effective alternative. This study also demonstrates proof-of-concept for creating a device to attach to the tongue and provide tension resistance during the TPB exercise. Further research with a more sophisticated design is needed before such a device can be fully developed and implemented clinically.

  10. Giant Plexiform Schwannoma of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Nisa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 38-year-old woman that presented with a very slowly enlarging mass of the tongue. MRI revealed a large mass originating in the tongue base and extending to the supraglottic space. Biopsy of this tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. An endaural approach allowed complete resection of the tumor. Definitive histopathological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma. Schwannoma or neurilemoma represents a benign tumor potentially affecting any nerve. The head and neck region is a relatively common location for schwannomas, but tongue schwannomas are considered to be rare and pose the problem of both clinical and histological differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  11. Giant plexiform schwannoma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisa, Lluís; von Büren, Toni; Tiab, Amine; Giger, Roland

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 38-year-old woman that presented with a very slowly enlarging mass of the tongue. MRI revealed a large mass originating in the tongue base and extending to the supraglottic space. Biopsy of this tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. An endaural approach allowed complete resection of the tumor. Definitive histopathological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma. Schwannoma or neurilemoma represents a benign tumor potentially affecting any nerve. The head and neck region is a relatively common location for schwannomas, but tongue schwannomas are considered to be rare and pose the problem of both clinical and histological differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  12. Effectiveness of mechanical tongue cleaning on breath odour and tongue coating: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.I. van der Sleen; D.E. Slot; E. van Trijffel; E.G. Winkel; G.A. van der Weijden

    2010-01-01

    Background:  The objective of this review was to summarize the available evidence regarding the effects of mechanical tongue cleaning compared with no mechanical tongue cleaning on breath odour and tongue coating (TC). Methods:  PubMed-MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane-CENTRAL were searched to identify p

  13. Effectiveness of mechanical tongue cleaning on breath odour and tongue coating : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Sleen, M. I.; Slot, D. E.; Van Trijffel, E.; Winkel, E. G.; Van der Weijden, G. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The objective of this review was to summarize the available evidence regarding the effects of mechanical tongue cleaning compared with no mechanical tongue cleaning on breath odour and tongue coating (TC). Methods: PubMed-MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane-CENTRAL were searched to identify pot

  14. Tongue Strength: Its Relationship to Tongue Thrusting, Open-Bite, and Articulatory Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, James P.; Culatta, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    No significant differences in tongue strength were found between any of the three groups of 7- to 16-year old children: normal speaking with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, frontal lisping with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, and normal controls. (Author/DLS)

  15. A Touch of Tongues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Camelia

    2010-01-01

    In this volume, Mark Daniel Cohen offers, in the first part, a fresh and intelligent look at Sophocles, re-writing Antigone almost as a Beckettian version of Tristan and Isolde. The modern-day domestic drama is continued in the second part of the volume, in which selected poems aptly combine the ...... the trivial and the sublime, the mark and measure of every great classic. This introduction offers an analysis of both, drama and poetry and demonstrates the extent to which creative writing enhances a highly reflective and philosophical thought. ......In this volume, Mark Daniel Cohen offers, in the first part, a fresh and intelligent look at Sophocles, re-writing Antigone almost as a Beckettian version of Tristan and Isolde. The modern-day domestic drama is continued in the second part of the volume, in which selected poems aptly combine...

  16. The lingual dorsal surface of the blue-tongue skink (Tiliqua scincoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Germanà, G P; Levanti, M B

    2009-10-01

    The blue-tongue lizard (Tiliqua scincoides) is a variety of large skink common throughout Australia. There are seven species of Tiliqua and all of them have long bodies, short limbs and short and robust tails. T. scincoides occurs in a wide range of habitats; its diet is omnivorous. When threatened, it opens the mouth and protrudes its characteristic large fleshy cobalt blue tongue. It is currently found as a popular species and also as a pet animal in the European countries. No data are available in literature about the morphology of the tongue of T. scincoides; therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate by means of scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy, the anatomy of the dorsal lingual surface. Our results demonstrate the presence of a tongue tip with a smooth surface without papillae. The foretongue was characterized by a stratified epithelium with foliate-like papillae and deep inter-papillar spaces in the middle part and cylindrical papillae with a flat surface in the lateral parts. All the posterior area of the tongue was characterized by more compacted papillae and the inter-papillar spaces were very narrow. Light microscopy showed the presence of melanin throughout the tongue. No taste buds were recognized on the lingual dorsal surface. Therefore, the papillae probably have a mechanical function showing an important role in the swallowing phase. The morphology of the tongue surface can be correlated to the diet and, different roles, as in other examined species, can be hypothesized for different areas.

  17. Frog tongue acts as muscle-powered adhesive tape

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-01-01

    Frogs are well known to capture fast-moving prey by flicking their sticky tongues out of the mouth. This tongue projection behaviour happens extremely fast which makes frog tongues a biological high-speed adhesive system. The processes at the interface between tongue and prey, and thus the mechanism of adhesion, however, are completely unknown. Here, we captured the contact mechanics of frog tongues by filming tongue adhesion at 2000 frames per second through an illuminated glass. We found th...

  18. Hemiatrophy of the tongue due to hypoglossal schwannoma shown by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, A; Shigemori, M; Abe, T; Yamashita, M; Kojima, K; Noguchi, S

    1994-04-01

    Schwannomas account for 8.5% of all intracranial tumours; more than 90% arise from the 8th cranial nerve. Only 42 cases of schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve have been reported. A 59 year-old woman developed right hemiatrophy of the tongue, clearly demonstrated on MRI, as was a small hypoglossal schwannoma. High signal was seen in the atrophic side of the tongue on both T1- and T2-weighted images, as described in the literature.

  19. Daily reduction of oral malodor with the use of a sonic tongue brush combined with an antibacterial tongue spray in a randomized cross-over clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, S; Gomez-Pereira, P; Hewett, K; Horstman, P; Patel, J; Greenman, J

    2016-02-12

    The objective of this clinical investigation was to test the effectiveness on breath odor of a newly designed sonic tongue brush (TongueCare+, TC). It consists of a soft silicone brush optimally designed based on the tongue's anatomy to remove bacterial biofilm from the tongue's complex surface, and it is coupled with a sonic power toothbrush handle. TC was used in combination with an antibacterial tongue spray (BreathRx, BRx) containing 0.09% cetylpyridinium chloride and 0.7% zinc gluconate. A total of 21 participants with oral malodor exceeding the threshold for recognition took part in this cross-over clinical investigation, which consisted of a single use of four treatment arms with one week washout period in between. The treatments consisted of: (1) TC  +  BRx, (2) TC  +  water, (3) BRx and (4) water. Malodor levels and bacterial density were monitored up to 6 h by organoleptic scoring and selective plating, respectively. The organoleptic score and bacterial density were significantly lower after using TC  +  BRx compared to all alternative treatments at all time points. A significant decrease in both parameters was detected after a single use of TC  +  BRx, from levels characteristic of high oral malodor, to barely noticeable levels after treatment and this was maintained up to 6 h. Moreover, we identified a significant positive correlation between bacterial density and organoleptic score, confirming that bacterial tongue biofilm is the root cause of oral malodor in these subjects. The results of this clinical investigation demonstrated that the combined treatment of a sonic tongue brush with the antibacterial tongue spray is able to deliver more than 6 h of fresh breath following a single use. The clinical investigation was registered at the ISRCTN registry under study identification number ISRCTN38199132.

  20. A Bayesian approach to distinguishing interdigitated tongue muscles from limited diffusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chuyang; Murano, Emi; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2015-10-01

    The tongue is a critical organ for a variety of functions, including swallowing, respiration, and speech. It contains intrinsic and extrinsic muscles that play an important role in changing its shape and position. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used to reconstruct tongue muscle fiber tracts. However, previous studies have been unable to reconstruct the crossing fibers that occur where the tongue muscles interdigitate, which is a large percentage of the tongue volume. To resolve crossing fibers, multi-tensor models on DTI and more advanced imaging modalities, such as high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), have been proposed. However, because of the involuntary nature of swallowing, there is insufficient time to acquire a sufficient number of diffusion gradient directions to resolve crossing fibers while the in vivo tongue is in a fixed position. In this work, we address the challenge of distinguishing interdigitated tongue muscles from limited diffusion magnetic resonance imaging by using a multi-tensor model with a fixed tensor basis and incorporating prior directional knowledge. The prior directional knowledge provides information on likely fiber directions at each voxel, and is computed with anatomical knowledge of tongue muscles. The fiber directions are estimated within a maximum a posteriori (MAP) framework, and the resulting objective function is solved using a noise-aware weighted ℓ1-norm minimization algorithm. Experiments were performed on a digital crossing phantom and in vivo tongue diffusion data including three control subjects and four patients with glossectomies. On the digital phantom, effects of parameters, noise, and prior direction accuracy were studied, and parameter settings for real data were determined. The results on the in vivo data demonstrate that the proposed method is able to resolve interdigitated tongue muscles with limited gradient directions. The distributions of the

  1. Tongue's substance and coating recognition analysis using HSV color threshold in tongue diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Nur Diyana; Ooi, Chia Yee; Kawanabe, Tadaaki; Mi, Xiaoyu

    2016-07-01

    In ISO TC249 conference, tongue diagnosis has been one of the most active research and their objectifications has become significant with the help of numerous statistical and machine learning algorithm. Color information of substance or tongue body has kept valuable information regarding the state of disease and its correlation with the internal organs. In order to produce high reproducibility of color measurement analysis, tongue images have to undergo several procedures such as color correction, segmentation and tongue's substance-coating separation. This paper presents a novel method to recognize substance and coating from tongue images and eliminate the tongue coating for accurate substance color measurement for diagnosis. By utilizing Hue, Saturation, Value (HSV) color space, new color-brightness threshold parameters have been devised to improve the efficiency of tongue's substance and coating separation procedures and eliminate shadows. The algorithm offers fast processing time around 0.98 seconds for 60,000 pixels tongue image. The successful tongue's substance and coating separation rate reported is 90% compared to the labelled data verified by the practitioners. Using 300 tongue images, the substance Lab color measurement with small standard deviation had revealed the effectiveness of this proposed method in computerized tongue diagnosis system.

  2. Tongue force in patients with myasthenia gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, FG; Kuks, JBM; van der Glas, HW; Wassenberg, MWM; Bosman, F

    2000-01-01

    Objectives - The aim was to study tongue force in patients with bulbar myasthenia gravis and compare it with that of patients with ocular myasthenia gravis, patients in clinical remission who previously suffered from bulbar myasthenia gravis, and healthy subjects. Material and methods - Tongue force

  3. Looking Mother Tongue Instruction through Different Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Kapil Dev

    2008-01-01

    Mother Tongue Instruction has been a debatable issue since long. There may be two options in the medium of instruction: either to teach especially primary and preprimary schoolchildren in their own mother tongue or continue using second or foreign language as the medium of instruction. Both of the approaches bear some pros and cons. This article…

  4. A Brief Analysis on Slips of Tongue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟庆瑜

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of slips of tongue is very common in our daily life.And it is closely related to some psychological reasons.This paper aims to introduce the research about this phenomenon, to present the types of slips of tongue and some analysis on it.

  5. Tongue as the Window to the Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsung O. Cheng

    2011-01-01

    To the Editor: I read with great interest your masterful article on study of the tongue in patients with coronary heart disease.Tongue is,indeed,the window to the heart.Many cardiovascular diseases including coronary heart disease can be accurately diagnosed by the Chinese traditional physicians by careful inspection of the tongue(Figure 1).

  6. Mu rhythm desynchronization by tongue thrust observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakihara, Kotoe; Inagaki, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the mu rhythm in the sensorimotor area during tongue thrust observation and to obtain an answer to the question as to how subtle non-verbal orofacial movement observation activates the sensorimotor area. Ten healthy volunteers performed finger tap execution, tongue thrust execution, and tongue thrust observation. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 128 electrodes placed on the scalp, and regions of interest were set at sensorimotor areas. The event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) for the mu rhythm (8-13 Hz) and beta (13-25 Hz) bands were measured. Tongue thrust observation induced mu rhythm ERD, and the ERD was detected at the left hemisphere regardless whether the observed tongue thrust was toward the left or right. Mu rhythm ERD was also recorded during tongue thrust execution. However, temporal analysis revealed that the ERD associated with tongue thrust observation preceded that associated with execution by approximately 2 s. Tongue thrust observation induces mu rhythm ERD in sensorimotor cortex with left hemispheric dominance.

  7. Sensor Arrays and Electronic Tongue Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel del Valle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes recent work performed with electronic tongue systems utilizing electrochemical sensors. The electronic tongues concept is a new trend in sensors that uses arrays of sensors together with chemometric tools to unravel the complex information generated. Initial contributions and also the most used variant employ conventional ion selective electrodes, in which it is named potentiometric electronic tongue. The second important variant is the one that employs voltammetry for its operation. As chemometric processing tool, the use of artificial neural networks as the preferred data processing variant will be described. The use of the sensor arrays inserted in flow injection or sequential injection systems will exemplify attempts made to automate the operation of electronic tongues. Significant use of biosensors, mainly enzyme-based, to form what is already named bioelectronic tongue will be also presented. Application examples will be illustrated with selected study cases from the Sensors and Biosensors Group at the Autonomous University of Barcelona.

  8. Paleoecology of the Niland Tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, E.I.

    1987-01-01

    The swamp or paludal ecosystem is preserved in coals and carbonaceous shales. Remains of organisms of the swamp communities consist of bacteria and fungi; algae; invertebrates such as pelecypods, gastropods, ostracodes, and insects; vertebrates such as a hard-shelled turtle and crocodiles; and vascular plant remains. Aquatic communities are found in dark shale and are represented by the remains of bacteria and fungi; algae; invertebrates such as pelecypods, gastropods, and insects; and vertebrates such as crocodiles, fish, and a soft-shelled turtle. No vascular macrophytes (rooted aquatic vegetation) could be identified in the pollen and spore assemblage. Charophytes are abundant and show that colonies of the aquatic alga lived on the lake bottoms. The great variety of organisms suggests that the environment had a high input of nutrients. The phosphate-rich Phosphoria Formation, which could serve as a good source of nutrients, cropped out in the watershed of the Niland Tongue basin. The ostracode-crocodile association, calcareous charophytes, and good preservation of plant tissues and palynomorphs put limits on the alkaline geochemical environment in which the lacustrine rocks were deposited. The palynomorphs in the Niland Tongue rocks are dark yellow and light brown in color. These colors suggest that rocks containing them have been buried deeper in the past than they are today.

  9. Preliminary assessment of Tongue Drive System in medium term usage for computer access and wheelchair control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Behnaz; Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2011-01-01

    Tongue Drive System (TDS) is a wireless, wearable assistive technology that enables individuals with severe motor impairments access computers, drive wheelchairs, and control their environments using tongue motion. In this paper, we have evaluated the TDS performance as a computer input device using ISO9241-9 standard tasks for pointing and selecting, based on the well known Fitts' Law, and as a powered wheelchair controller through an obstacle course navigation task. Nine able-bodied subjects who already had tongue piercing participated in this trial over 5 sessions during 5 weeks, allowing us to study the TDS learning process and its current limiting factors. Subjects worn tongue rings made of titanium in the form of a barbell with a small rare earth magnetic tracer hermetically sealed inside the upper ball. Comparing the results between 1(st) and 5(th) sessions showed that subjects' performance improved in all the measures through 5 sessions, demonstrating the effects of learning.

  10. Rehabilitation and nutritional support for sarcopenic dysphagia and tongue atrophy after glossectomy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, Nao; Shamoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Keisuke; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Motoyuki; Fujii, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is related to long-term weight loss and reduced body mass index in patients with head and neck cancer. We describe a 76-y-old woman who had severe sarcopenic dysphagia and atrophy of the reconstructed tongue for 17 mo after subtotal glossectomy due to tongue cancer and lost 14 kg during that period. Upon admission, the patient received diagnoses of malnutrition in the context of social or environmental circumstances with insufficient energy intake, loss of muscle mass, localized fluid accumulation, weight loss, and sarcopenia due to reduced skeletal muscle mass (skeletal muscle index dysphagia rehabilitation to improve sarcopenia, atrophy of the reconstructed tongue, and dysphagia. After 20 mo of treatment, she was considered to be no longer malnourished (11 kg weight gain) and without sarcopenia (skeletal muscle index 4.01 cm(2)/m(2)), and the volume of the reconstructed tongue was increased. Sarcopenia and atrophy of the reconstructed tongue may cause dysphagia after glossectomy due to tongue cancer. Additionally, nutritional support and rehabilitation could improve such dysphagia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Demonstration Project on Driving with Reduced Visual Acuity and a Bioptic Telescope System in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis-Dankers, Bart J.M.; Kooijman, Aart C.; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; Busscher, Rens B.; Bredewoud, Ruud A.; Derksen, Peter H.; Amersfoort, Anoeska; IJsseldijk, Martin A.M.; Delden, Geert W. van; Grotenhuis, Thea H.P.A.; Witvliet, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In Europe, driving a passenger car is prohibited if binocular best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) is below 0.5 (20/40). Some US states allow people with reduced visual acuity to use a bioptic telescope system when driving. The aim of our study is to introduce a bioptic telescope system

  12. Fusion of Potentiometric & Voltammetric Electronic Tongue for Classification of Black Tea Taste based on Theaflavins (TF) Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Legin, Andrey; Papieva, Irina; Sarkar, Subrata; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Kartsova, Anna; Ghosh, Arunangshu; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib

    2011-09-01

    Black tea is an extensively consumed beverage worldwide with an expanding market. The final quality of black tea depends upon number of chemical compounds present in the tea. Out of these compounds, theaflavins (TF), which is responsible for astringency in black tea, plays an important role in determining the final taste of the finished black tea. The present paper reports our effort to correlate the theaflavins contents with the voltammetric and potentiometric electronic tongue (e-tongue) data. Noble metal-based electrode array has been used for collecting data though voltammetric electronic tongue where as liquid filled membrane based electrodes have been used for potentiometric electronic tongue. Black tea samples with tea taster score and biochemical results have been collected from Tea Research Association, Tocklai, India for the analysis purpose. In this paper, voltammetric and potentiometric e-tongue responses are combined to demonstrate improvement of cluster formation among tea samples with different ranges of TF values.

  13. Surgical approaches for tongue base schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Binbin; Zhu, Songsong; Qiao, Yang; Ye, Weimin; Maimaiti, Abdikerimjian; Hu, Jingzhou; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign nerve sheath tumor originating from Schwann cells. They are well circumscribed and rarely infiltrate and metastasize. Schwannomas of the head and neck commonly occur in the tongue followed by the palate, floor of mouth, buccal mucosa, and mandible. Tongue base schwannomas could extend to the pharyngeal cavity or the floor of the mouse, and it is difficult to differentiate between tumors of the lingual, hypoglossal, and glossopharyngeal nerves.Surgical treatment of tongue base schwannomas is difficult because of limited operative exposure. Although mandibulotomy with lip splitting could obtain good exposure, surgeons might strike a balance between exposure obtaining and morbidity following because there are intricate neurovascular anatomical relationships in this region, and mandibulotomy with lip splitting would cause significant morbidity. Surgical approach options are important for tongue base schwannoma removal. From March 2008 to March 2010, 8 patients were clinically and pathologically diagnosed with tongue base schwannomas in our department, and all underwent surgical treatment. In our experience, transoral approach was used for tongue base schwannomas extending to the floor of the mouse and suprahyroid pharyngotomy approach for those extending to the pharyngeal cavity. Follow-up was made until now. One patient who experienced transoral excision still experienced numbness in the region of the lateral tongue tip, and the other 7 patients had no postoperative long-term complications.

  14. A Fast SVM-Based Tongue’s Colour Classification Aided by k-Means Clustering Identifiers and Colour Attributes as Computer-Assisted Tool for Tongue Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Diyana Kamarudin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In tongue diagnosis, colour information of tongue body has kept valuable information regarding the state of disease and its correlation with the internal organs. Qualitatively, practitioners may have difficulty in their judgement due to the instable lighting condition and naked eye’s ability to capture the exact colour distribution on the tongue especially the tongue with multicolour substance. To overcome this ambiguity, this paper presents a two-stage tongue’s multicolour classification based on a support vector machine (SVM whose support vectors are reduced by our proposed k-means clustering identifiers and red colour range for precise tongue colour diagnosis. In the first stage, k-means clustering is used to cluster a tongue image into four clusters of image background (black, deep red region, red/light red region, and transitional region. In the second-stage classification, red/light red tongue images are further classified into red tongue or light red tongue based on the red colour range derived in our work. Overall, true rate classification accuracy of the proposed two-stage classification to diagnose red, light red, and deep red tongue colours is 94%. The number of support vectors in SVM is improved by 41.2%, and the execution time for one image is recorded as 48 seconds.

  15. The tongue, mandible, hyoid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Messina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The craniocervical-mandibular system works in harmony and allows different functional tasks as the postural control of the cervical region. This system is formed by the temporomandibular joint, the masticatory muscles and ligaments connecting the temporomandibular joint and the cervical region. It has been seen to affect human posture, and many disorders of the temporomandibular joints may affect this functional arrangement. Notwithstanding this system considered as a functional arrangement, may offer various clinical explanations, it does not hold anatomical connections with the posterior region of the cranium, thus it should not be refered to as a craniocervical arrangement. For this reason a new interpretation of such system as the tongue, mandible, hyoid system should be considered. Such functional reinterpretation between these three anatomical structures allows further comprehension of specific clinical conditions connected to deglutition aspects or the temporomandibular joint, for such needs to be taken into account during clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Electronic Tongue Containing Redox and Conductivity Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Electronic Tongue (E-tongue 2) is an assembly of sensors for measuring concentrations of metal ions and possibly other contaminants in water. Potential uses for electronic tongues include monitoring the chemical quality of water in a variety of natural, industrial, and laboratory settings, and detecting micro-organisms indirectly by measuring microbially influenced corrosion. The device includes a heater, a temperature sensor, an oxidation/reduction (redox) sensor pair, an electrical sensor, an array of eight galvanic cells, and eight ion-specific electrodes.

  17. LRG-1 expression in tongue cancer tissue and effect of targeted inhibition of LRG-1 by siRNA on tongue cancer viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Jun Li; Zhi-Zhong Zhang; Ke-Qian Zhi; Liang-Zhi Du

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study LRG-1 expression in tongue cancer tissue and the effect of targeted inhibition of LRG-1 by siRNA on tongue cancer viability.Methods:Tongue cancer tissue and para-carcinoma tissue were collected to determine LRG-1 expression; tongue cancer cell lines Tca8113 were cultured and transfected with negative control siRNA (NC-siRNA group) and LRG1-targeted siRNA (LRG1-siRNA group) respectively, and the cell viability as well as the expression levels of angiogenesis molecules, apoptosis molecules and autophagy molecules were determined.Results:LRG-1 expression level in tongue cancer tissue was significantly higher than that in para-carcinoma tissue; after siRNA transfection, cell OD value of NC-siRNA group showed increasing trend, cell OD value of LRG1-siRNA group showed decreasing trend, cell OD values of LRG1-siRNA group at all points in time after transfection were significantly lower than those of NC-siRNA group; 24h after transfection, angiogenesis-related molecules HIF-1α, PI3K, Akt and VEGF as well as anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2, Bmi-1 and Survivin expression levels in cells of LRG1-siRNA group were significantly lower than those of NC-siRNA group, pro-apoptotic molecules p53 and Caspase-3 as well as autophagy molecules Beclin-1 and LC3II expression levels were significantly higher than those of NC-siRNA group, and LC3I expression level was not significantly different from that of NC-siRNA group.Conclusions:LRG-1 shows a trend of high expression in tongue cancer tissue, and targeted inhibition of LRG-1 expression can reduce tongue cancer cell viability, inhibit angiogenesis and promote cell apoptosis and autophagy process.

  18. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CENTRIFUGAL PUMP CASINGS TO DETECT THE CRACK AT THE TONGUE REGION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramana Podugu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to identify one of the reasons for the crack to initiate at the tongue region. The design of the tongue region of the centrifugal pump casing plays an important role in influencing the pump performance and cavitation. Tongue region should have enough strength to withstand against repeated loads imparted by the impeller. Crack at the tongue region is examined under hydrostatic pressure conditions .Practically, at the site location it was observed that the crack was formed at the tongue region when the casing was tested under hydrostatic pressure. Static linear analysis is performed to identify the critical zone where the maximum stress occurs that causes failure. Maximum stress is observed at the tongue region. To reduce the maximum stress, ribs thickness was increased in addition to increasing the portion of the volute thickness. Geometrical modifications are suggested in such a way that there is no effect on the hydraulic performance and to avoid increase in manufacturing cost. Stress distribution of the centrifugal pump casing volute is simulated using finite element software like Ansys. In this paper an attempt was made to validate finite element analysisresults with test conditions and found good concurrence between FEA results and theoretical results.

  19. Complementary effects of antioxidants and sunscreens in reducing UV-induced skin damage as demonstrated by skin biomarker expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oresajo, Christian; Yatskayer, Margarita; Galdi, Angelike; Foltis, Peter; Pillai, Sreekumar

    2010-06-01

    UV-exposure of the skin causes oxidative stress, leading to inflammatory reactions and premature skin aging. Sunscreens protect by absorbing or reflecting UV on the skin surface. Antioxidants provide protection by quenching UV-induced reactive oxygen species inside skin. To evaluate the complementary photoprotective benefits of formulas containing either an antioxidant complex of Cassia alata leaf extract or a combination of the antioxidant complex and sunscreens on normal healthy volunteers using biomarkers of skin damage. Each formula and a placebo control were applied separately to selected areas on the lower back of 10 individuals for 4 consecutive days. On Day 4, the control and three test sites were exposed to 5 x MED (minimal erythemal dose) of solar-simulated UV-irradiation (UVR). On Day 5, 4-mm punch biopsies were collected from the four exposed sites and a control site (untreated, unexposed) for immunohistochemistry. Exposure to 5 x MED demonstrated significant damage as assessed by thymine dimer formation, MMP-9 and p53 protein expression on untreated exposed skin. The formula containing sunscreens + the antioxidant complex was the most protective, followed by the formula with the antioxidant alone. The study demonstrated that a combination of antioxidants and sunscreens complement each other, resulting in superior photoprotection.

  20. Ultrasound Images of the Tongue: A Tutorial for Assessment and Remediation of Speech Sound Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jonathan L; McAllister Byun, Tara; Boyce, Suzanne E; Hamilton, Sarah; Tiede, Mark; Phillips, Emily; Rivera-Campos, Ahmed; Whalen, Douglas H

    2017-01-03

    Diagnostic ultrasound imaging has been a common tool in medical practice for several decades. It provides a safe and effective method for imaging structures internal to the body. There has been a recent increase in the use of ultrasound technology to visualize the shape and movements of the tongue during speech, both in typical speakers and in clinical populations. Ultrasound imaging of speech has greatly expanded our understanding of how sounds articulated with the tongue (lingual sounds) are produced. Such information can be particularly valuable for speech-language pathologists. Among other advantages, ultrasound images can be used during speech therapy to provide (1) illustrative models of typical (i.e. "correct") tongue configurations for speech sounds, and (2) a source of insight into the articulatory nature of deviant productions. The images can also be used as an additional source of feedback for clinical populations learning to distinguish their better productions from their incorrect productions, en route to establishing more effective articulatory habits. Ultrasound feedback is increasingly used by scientists and clinicians as both the expertise of the users increases and as the expense of the equipment declines. In this tutorial, procedures are presented for collecting ultrasound images of the tongue in a clinical context. We illustrate these procedures in an extended example featuring one common error sound, American English /r/. Images of correct and distorted /r/ are used to demonstrate (1) how to interpret ultrasound images, (2) how to assess tongue shape during production of speech sounds, (3), how to categorize tongue shape errors, and (4), how to provide visual feedback to elicit a more appropriate and functional tongue shape. We present a sample protocol for using real-time ultrasound images of the tongue for visual feedback to remediate speech sound errors. Additionally, example data are shown to illustrate outcomes with the procedure.

  1. Change in Tongue Morphology in Response to Expiratory Resistance Loading Investigated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Yoshimi; Shuntoh, Hisato; Mitamura, Masaaki; Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of expiratory resistance load on the tongue area encompassing the suprahyoid and genioglossus muscles. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy individuals (15 males, 15 females, mean age: 28.9 years). [Methods] Magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate morphological changes in response to resistive expiratory pressure loading in the area encompassing the suprahyoid and genioglossus muscles. Images were taken when water pressure was sustained at 0%, 10%, 30%, and 50% of maximum resistive expiratory pressure. We then measured tongue area using image analysis software, and the morphological changes were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance followed by post hoc comparisons. [Results] A significant change in the tongue area was detected in both sexes upon loading. Multiple comparison analysis revealed further significant differences in tongue area as well as changes in tongue area in response to the different expiratory pressures. [Conclusion] The findings demonstrate that higher expiratory pressure facilitates greater reduction in tongue area. PMID:24259824

  2. Cross-activation and detraining effects of tongue exercise in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaser, Allison J; Ciucci, Michelle R; Connor, Nadine P

    2016-01-15

    Voice and swallowing deficits can occur with aging. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow may be used to treat swallowing disorders, but may also benefit vocal function due to cross-system activation effects. It is unknown how exercise-based neuroplasticity contributes to behavior and maintenance following treatment. Eighty rats were used to examine behavioral parameters and changes in neurotrophins after tongue exercise paired with a swallow. Tongue forces and ultrasonic vocalizations were recorded before and after training/detraining in young and old rats. Tissue was analyzed for neurotrophin content. Results showed tongue exercise paired with a swallow was associated with increased tongue forces at all ages. Gains diminished after detraining in old rats. Age-related changes in vocalizations, neurotrophin 4 (NT4), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were found. Minimal cross-system activation effects were observed. Neuroplastic benefits were demonstrated with exercise in old rats through behavioral improvements and up-regulation of BDNF in the hypoglossal nucleus. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow should be developed, studied, and optimized in human clinical research to treat swallowing and voice disorders in elderly people.

  3. Intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in the victims of house fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoshiaki; Moriya, Fumio; Nakanishi, Akinori

    2003-03-01

    Intramuscular bleeding of the tongue is frequently observed in autopsy cases of house fire victims. The meaning of this finding has not yet been fully discussed. We examined 69 autopsy cases of house fire victims and investigated several factors contributing to intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Victims comprised 45 males and 24 females, ranging in age from 1 to 95 years old. Sixty-four cases (93%) involved severely charred bodies, while the remaining five bodies displayed slight burns. Factors studied were age, sex, posture of the body at the scene of the fire, degree of burn injury and carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) levels in blood. CO-Hb level proved to be the only factor relevant to intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Of 69 autopsy cases, 23 (33%) demonstrated intramuscular bleeding of the tongue (13 cases of slight bleeding, ten cases of severe bleeding). Low concentrations of CO-Hb (fire victims. The burned regions of the body in the early stage of the fire process were unclear due to severe charring in most victims. However, asphyxiation due to neck compression is known to often induce intramuscular bleeding of the tongue. Lack of skin elasticity following burns, particularly in the neck, might act in a similar manner to asphyxial neck compression. In conclusion, intramuscular bleeding of the tongue in fire victims may occur as a vital reaction to burns.

  4. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their

  5. Tongue diagnosis:relationship between sublingual tongue morphology in three tongue protrusion angles and menstrual clinical symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tim Hideaki Tanaka

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The morphological and color characteristics of the tongue sublingual veins (SLVs) can manifest differently within the subjects, depending on the way their tongue is curled upward. This study was conducted in order to investigate the clinical relevancy of tongue SLV diagnosis in relation to menstrual clinical symptoms (pain, clots, heavy, and scanty), using three different inspection procedures (IP1, IP2, and IP3). METHODS: Three-hundred and seventy-seven female patients were asked to stick out their tongues in three speciifc ways which were intended to create different tongue protrusion angles. The SLV parameters for thickness (TK), length (LE), color (CL), shape (SP), and nodules (ND) were then evaluated. RESULTS: According to the results of the Waldχ2 test, IP1 provides the best model for pain (R2 = 0.155), IP3 for clots (R2 = 0.437), IP2 for heavy (R2 = 0.268), and scanty (R2 = 0.192). Abnormal SLV diagnostic parameters were most strongly associated with the clinical symptom of clots (R2= 0.492). CONCLUSION: While the study showed the relations between tongue SLV features and menstrual clinical symptoms, as wel it showed that IP2 was the best overal predictor for the symptomatic indexes used in this study, and using one particular SLV inspection procedure may not be sufifcient. The application of a particular inspection method alone may cause under- or over-estimation of SLV abnormalities.

  6. Potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer: Tongue diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuwen; Yang, Xi; Qi, Quan; Pan, Yuefen; Chen, Yongchao; Shen, Junjun; Liao, Haihong; Ji, Zhaoning

    2016-06-01

    Tongue diagnosis, as a unique method of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), was used to discriminate physiological functions and pathological conditions by observing the changes of the tongue and tongue coating. The aims of the present study were to explore a potential screening and early diagnosis method of cancer through evaluating the differences of the images of tongue and tongue coating and the microbiome on the tongue coating. The DS01-B tongue diagnostic information acquisition system was used to photograph and analyze the tongue and tongue coating. The next-generation sequencing technology was used to determine the V2-V4 hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA to investigate the microbiome on the tongue coating. Bioinformatics and statistical methods were used to analyze the microbial community structure and diversity. Comparing with the healthy people, the number of mirror-like tongue, thick tongue coating and the moisture of tongue were increased in cancers. The dominant color of the tongue in the healthy people was reddish while it was purple in the cancers. The relative abundance of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas in the healthy people were higher than that in the cancers. We also found 6 kinds of special microorganisms at species level in cancers. The study suggested that tongue diagnosis may provide potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer.

  7. Transfer of mother tongue in SLA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米海燕

    2012-01-01

    In SLA transfer of mother tongue can not be overlooked. And we group it into positive transfer and negative transfer, which are reflected on different levels including pronunciation, vocabulary, syntax and culture.

  8. Investigation of the Chinese rolling tongue consonants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ligang; Keni'ti Kido

    2000-01-01

    Some special monosyllabic Chinese words which contain rolling tongue consonants are discussed. Based on the spectrum analysis, the special characteristic is found at a frequency higher than 3 kHz. The distinction is not only in the consonant part but also in the vowel part.The people in the north region of China distinguish the rolling tongue consonants from the straight tongue consonants both in utterance and in hearing, but those in the south region of China do not. The results of the hearing investigation using synthesized speech show that the consonant part corresponding to the normal one has more effect than the vowel part on the recognition of the words containing the rolling tongue consonant.

  9. Huge Tongue Lipoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Damghani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lipomas are among the most common tumors of the human body. However, they are uncommon in the oral cavity and are observed as slow growing, painless, and asymptomatic yellowish submucosal masses. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice and recurrence is not expected.    Case Report: The case of a 30-year-old woman with a huge lipoma on the tip of her tongue since 3 years, is presented. She had difficulty with speech and mastication because the tongue tumor was filling the oral cavity. Clinical examination revealed a yellowish lesion, measuring 8 cm in maximum diameter, protruding from the lingual surface. The tumor was surgically excised with restoration of normal tongue function and histopathological examination of the tumor confirmed that it was a lipoma.   Conclusion:  Tongue lipoma is rarely seen and can be a cause of macroglossia. Surgical excision for lipoma is indicated for symptomatic relief and exclusion of associated malignancy.

  10. Instruction in the Mother Tongues in Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikes, Melanie

    1984-01-01

    Educational practices and problems in Yugoslavia with regard to bilingual education are described. The effect of mother-tongue education on the students' academic achievement and literacy attainment is also examined. (RM)

  11. Commissioning of the tongue-and-groove modelling in treatment planning systems: from static fields to VMAT treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Victor; Vera-Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Vieillevigne, Laure; Saez, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    Adequate modelling of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) by treatment planning systems (TPS) is essential for accurate dose calculations in intensity-modulated radiation-therapy. For this reason modern TPSs incorporate MLC characteristics such as the leaf end curvature, MLC transmission and the tongue-and-groove. However, the modelling of the tongue-and-groove is often neglected during TPS commissioning and it is not known how accurate it is. This study evaluates the dosimetric consequences of the tongue-and-groove effect for two different MLC models using both film dosimetry and ionisation chambers. A set of comprehensive tests are presented that evaluate the ability of TPSs to accurately model this effect in (a) static fields, (b) sliding window beams and (c) VMAT arcs. The tests proposed are useful for the commissioning of TPSs and for the validation of major upgrades. With the ECLIPSE TPS, relevant differences were found between calculations and measurements for beams with dynamic MLCs in the presence of the TG effect, especially for the High Definition MLC, small gap sizes and the 1 mm calculation grid. For this combination, dose differences as high as 10% and 7% were obtained for dynamic MLC gaps of 5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. These differences indicate inadequate modelling of the tongue-and-groove effect, which might not be identified without the proposed tests. In particular, the TPS tended to underestimate the calculated dose, which may require tuning of other configuration parameters in the TPS (such as the dosimetric leaf gap) in order to maximise the agreement between calculations and measurements in clinical plans. In conclusion, a need for better modelling of the MLC by TPSs is demonstrated, one of the relevant aspects being the tongue-and-groove effect. This would improve the accuracy of TPS calculations, especially for plans using small MLC gaps, such as plans with small target volumes or high complexities. Improved modelling of the MLC would

  12. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Demonstrates Reduced Periventricular Cerebral Blood Flow in Dogs with Ventriculomegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Schmidt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature of ventriculomegaly in dogs is still a matter of debate. Signs of increased intraventricular pressure and atrophy of the cerebral white matter have been found in dogs with ventriculomegaly, which would imply increased intraventricular pressure and, therefore, a pathological condition, i.e., to some extent. Reduced periventricular blood flow was found in people with high elevated intraventricular pressure. The aim of this study was to compare periventricular brain perfusion in dogs with and without ventriculomegaly using perfusion weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging to clarify as to whether ventriculomegaly might be associated with an increase in intraventricular pressure. Perfusion was measured in 32 Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCS with ventriculomegaly, 10 CKCSs were examined as a control group. Cerebral blood flow (CBF was measured using free-hand regions of interest (ROI in five brain regions: periventricular white matter, caudate nucleus, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. CBF was significantly lower in the periventricular white matter of the dogs with ventriculomegaly (p = 0.0029 but not in the other ROIs. Reduction of periventricular CBF might imply increase of intraventricular pressure in ventriculomegaly.

  13. Techniques and results of brachytherapy for carcinoma of the tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingu, Kenichi; Akita, Yuzou [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Shimamura, Yasushi; Kunitake, Naonobu; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Oomagari, Junichi; Wada, Susumu; Uehara, Satoru; Masuda, Kouji

    1997-11-01

    Three hundred and twelve patients with 1987 UICC T1, 2 carcinoma of the tongue, who underwent definitive brachytherapy from November, 1978 to March, 1991 in the Department of Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital, and from January, 1985 to December, 1994 in the Department of Radiotherapy, Kyushu Cancer Center, were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were admitted 15-30 mg Pentazocine and O.25 mg Atropine sulfate as the premedication. Thirty to 60 minutes after, the tip of tongue and the lesion were put under local infiltration anesthesia with 10-20 ml of 1-2% Lidocaine or 1% Procaine HCL. The tongue was pulled out by the thread of the tip. Partial resection or wide excisional biopsy of the tumor was performed to reduce the tumor volume and the radiation volume and also to estimate Jacobson-Yamamoto`s grading histologically in the bottom of the tumor. Radium needles or Iridium hair pins were implanted in the lesion following Paterson`s method, and left for 3-10 days to the minimum tumor dose of 70 Gy calculated by computer. The secondary neck lymph node metastases rates of the patients with T1 carcinoma of the tongue were 27% and 53% in the Jacobson-Yamamoto grading 1-3 group and 4 group. The rates of the patients with T2 were 28% and 82% in 1-3 group and 4 group. Two year`s local control rates of the patients with T1 and T2 carcinoma were 95% and 82%. Two year`s late reaction (mandibular bone exposure or refractory ulcer of soft tissue) rates of the patients with T1 and T2 carcinoma were 7% and 12%. (author)

  14. Giant Plexiform Schwannoma of the Tongue

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 38-year-old woman that presented with a very slowly enlarging mass of the tongue. MRI revealed a large mass originating in the tongue base and extending to the supraglottic space. Biopsy of this tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. An endaural approach allowed complete resection of the tumor. Definitive histopathological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma. Schwannoma or neurilemoma represents a benign tumor potentially affecting any nerve. The head and ...

  15. Impacts of an Improved Low-Level Cloud Scheme on the Eastern Pacific ITCZ-Cold Tongue Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DM Fushan; YU Rucong; ZHANG Xuehong; YU Yongqiang; LI Jianglong

    2005-01-01

    A statistically-based low-level cloud parameterization scheme is introduced, modified, and applied in the Flexible coupled General Circulation Model (FGCM-0). It is found that the low-level cloud scheme makes improved simulations of low-level cloud fractions and net surface shortwave radiation fluxes in the subtropical eastern oceans off western coasts in the model. Accompanying the improvement in the net surface shortwave radiation fluxes, the simulated distribution of SSTs is more reasonably asymmetrical about the equator in the tropical eastern Pacific, which suppresses, to some extent, the development of the double ITCZ in the model. Warm SST biases in the ITCZ north of the equator are more realistically reduced, too. But the equatorial cold tongue is strengthened and extends further westward, which reduces the precipitation rate in the western equatorial Pacific but increases it in the ITCZ north of the equator in the far eastern Pacific. It is demonstrated that the low-level cloud-radiation feedback would enhance the cooperative feedback between the equatorial cold tongue and the ITCZ. Based on surface layer heat budget analyses, it is demonstrated that the reduction of SSTs is attributed to both the thermodynamic cooling process modified by the increase of cloud fractions and the oceanic dynamical cooling processes associated with the strengthened surface wind in the eastern equatorial Pacific, but it is mainly attributed to oceanic dynamical cooling processes associated with the strengthening of surface wind in the central and western equatorial Pacific.

  16. Tongue coating removal: comparison of the efficiency of three techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Sassa Marocchio

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Compare the efficiency of three techniques for tongue cleaning, by comparison of the amount of tongue coating removed by each technique. Methods: Tongue cleaning was performed using an Oral B 30 (Procter&Gamble, São Paulo, Brasil toothbrush; a Saude Bucal (Odomed, São Paulo, Brasil tongue scraper, and a new tongue cleaning technique, consisting of a tongue cleaner with bristles and a scraping edge and a Halitus® (Halitus, Campinas, Brasil tongue cleaning spray solution. The study design used 15 healthy volunteers who were submitted to each of the tongue cleaning techniques, once every 21 days. The volunteers were instructed to abstain from any procedure to clean their tongues, for 48 hours before the application of each technique. At each scheduled time, a dental professional performed a single standardized tongue cleaning procedure using one of the cleaning methods, and inserted the removed tongue coating into a test tube. Results: The results were obtained by weighing the tube test with tongue coating after the cleaning procedure (final weight deducting the weight of the empty tube test (initial weight. The findings showed that the new tongue cleaning technique (combination of a tongue cleaner with brush and scraper plus a tongue cleaning spray solution was statistically superior in removing tongue coating when compared with the tongue scraper or toothbrush, probably due to the technique and materials used. Conclusion: The tongue cleaning procedure, when performed within a specific technique, associated with products that improve the cleaning action, makes possible to reach better results, allowing the removal of more tongue coating.

  17. Amperometric Bioelectronic Tongue for glucose determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan Al-Issa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An amperometric Bioelectronic Tongue is reported for glucose determination that contains eight sensor electrodes constructed using different metal electrodes (Pt, Au, oxidoreductase enzymes (glucose oxidase, ascorbate oxidase, uricase, and membrane coatings (Nafion, chitosan. The response to varying concentrations of glucose, ascorbic acid, uric acid, and acetaminophen was tested for two models, concentration determination by current density measurements at individual electrodes and concentration determination by a linear regression model for the entire electrode array. The reduced chi-squared for the full array model was found to be about one order of magnitude lower than that for the individual-electrode model. Discrimination of glucose from chemical interference by the other three species is accomplished through a combination of enzyme catalysis, metal electrocatalysis, and membrane surface charge. The benefit of incorporating enzyme electrodes into the sensor array is illustrated by the lower correlation coefficients between different enzyme electrodes relative to non-enzyme coated electrodes. This approach can be more generally applied to detection of other substrates of oxidoreductase enzymes.

  18. [Research progress on the risk factors of geographic tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huamei, Yang; Yu, Zhou; Xin, Zeng; Ga, Liao; Qianming, Chen

    2015-02-01

    Geographic tongue, also called benign migratory glossitis, is a common and superficial benign inflammatory disorder that affects the tongue epithelium. The majority of geographic tongue lesions typically manifest as irregular central erythematous patches. These lesions, which are caused by the loss of filiform papillae, are defined by an elevated whitish band-like border that can change location, size, and pattern over a period of time. Histological observations of the oral mucosa affected by geographic tongue revealed nonspecific inflammation. Some reports described cases of migratory stomatitis, wherein lesions simultaneously manifested on the extra lingual oral mucosa. This condition is also called ectopic geographic tongue, which is clinically and histologically similar to the type normally confined to the tongue. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic and do not require treatment. The condition may spontaneously exhibit periods of remission and exacerbation with good prognosis. The specific etiology of geographic tongue remains unknown. Geographic tongue is age-related and is prevalent among young individuals. Various etiological factors that have been suggested in literature include immunological factors, genetic factors, atopic or allergic tendency, emotional stress, tobacco consumption, hormonal disturbances, and zinc deficiency. Geographic tongue may coexist with other disorders, such as fissured tongue, psoriasis, diabetes mellitus, gastroin- testinal diseases, burning mouth syndrome, and Down syndrome. Experts currently disagree on whether geographic tongue is an oral manifestation of psoriasis. Moreover, some scholars suggest that geographic tongue is a prestage of fissured tongue. The objective of this review is to summarize current research on risk factors of geographic tongue.

  19. Does bilingualism twist your tongue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, Tamar H; Goldrick, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    The current study investigated whether bilingualism affects the processing of sub-lexical representations specifying the sound structure of words. Spanish-English bilinguals, Mandarin-English bilinguals, and English-only monolinguals repeated English tongue twisters. Twister materials had word or nonword targets (thus varying in whether lexical information did or did not support sound processing), and similar or dissimilar sounds (thus varying in difficulty with respect to competition at a sub-lexical level). Even though bilinguals had learned English at an early age, and spoke English without an accent, Spanish-English bilinguals produced significantly more twister errors than monolinguals, particularly in the absence of lexical support. Mandarin-English bilinguals were also disadvantaged, but more consistently across all twister types. These results reveal that bilingual disadvantages extend beyond the lexical level to affect the processing of sub-lexical representations. More generally, these findings suggest that experience with sound structures (and not simply their intrinsic complexity) shapes sub-lexical processing for all speakers.

  20. Repeated tongue lift movement induces neuroplasticity in corticomotor control of tongue and jaw muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoda, Yoshihiro; Iida, Takashi; Kothari, Mohit; Komiyama, Osamu; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Kawara, Misao; Sessle, Barry; Svensson, Peter

    2015-11-19

    This study investigated the effect of repeated tongue lift training (TLT) on the excitability of the corticomotor representation of the human tongue and jaw musculature. Sixteen participants performed three series of TLT for 41 min on each of 5 consecutive days. Each TLT series consisted of two pressure levels (5 kPa and 10 kPa). All participants underwent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in four sessions: (1) before TLT on Day 1 (baseline), (2) after TLT on Day 1, (3) before TLT on Day 5, and (4) after TLT on Day 5. EMG recordings from the left and right tongue dorsum and masseter muscles were made at three pressure levels (5 kPa, 10 kPa, 100% tongue lift), and tongue, masseter, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) MEPs were measured. There were no significant day-to-day differences in the tongue pressure during maximum voluntary contractions. The amplitudes and thresholds of tongue and masseter MEPs after TLT on Day 5 were respectively higher and lower than before TLT on Day 1 (Ptongue and masseter MEP areas; no significant changes occurred in MEP onset latencies. FDI MEP parameters (amplitude, threshold, area, latency) were not significantly different between the four sessions. Our findings suggest that repeated TLT can trigger neuroplasticity reflected in increased excitability of the corticomotor representation of not only the tongue muscles but also the masseter muscles.

  1. Influence of the ability to roll the tongue and tongue-training parameters on oral motor performance and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Basic, Aida;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Training of tongue function is an important part of rehabilitation of patients with brain damage. A standardized tongue-training task has been shown to induce cortical plasticity. This study tested the possible influence of the natural ability to roll the tongue and modulations of tongue......-training parameters on tongue-training performance. DESIGN: A total of 44 healthy adult subjects participated. 29 subjects (15 with and 14 without ability to roll their tongue) performed 1h standard tongue-training task. Another 15 subjects participated in 2 sessions: Standard and Modulation in randomized order....... Standard session: 1h tongue-training with fixed training parameters; Modulation session: 1h tongue-training with modulation of training parameters every 20min (3 different settings - A, B, C, with different timing of task). Perceived task difficulty was evaluated on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS...

  2. Effects of bite raising and occlusal awareness on tongue thrust in untreated children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, José S; Lelong, Odette

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of conscious bite (occlusal awareness), with or without immediate bite raising, on tongue thrust during swallowing and speech. A total of 110 untreated children (age range, 7-12 years; mean, 9 years 8 months) were examined with various extraoral and intraoral observation tests. Subjects were divided according to sex and score on the labiolingual dysfunction index (LLDI) into high (LLDI-H) and weak (LLDI-W) dysfunction groups. A special, previously tested chocolate paste was used to map tongue and tooth contacts during task performance, including conscious bite (occlusal awareness) with and without bite raising. The bite was raised with an overlay or provisional occlusal plane placed unilaterally on the maxillary right molar. The results did not show any difference between boys and girls, but other findings were related to the LLDI score. Habitual mouth closure and swallowing without the provisional occlusal plane produced less pronounced bite contact in the LLDI-H group. Swallowing with conscious bite increased the bite contact in both groups but predominantly in the LLDI-H group. Tongue thrust reacted inversely to bite contacts: it was reduced when occlusion was perceived with and without bite raise but somewhat more with the provisional occlusal plane. The LLDI-W group was less affected. Tongue thrust was inhibited in both groups during speaking with bite raising and occlusal awareness. These results indicate that conscious bite helps to control the tongue. Slight raising of the bite increases occlusal awareness and its inhibiting effect on tongue thrust. A provisional occlusal plane or a similar overlay might be a useful adjunct in training the tongue to retrude in subjects with oral dysfunction.

  3. Segmentation of tongue muscles from super-resolution magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Prince, Jerry L; Murano, Emi Z; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2015-02-01

    Imaging and quantification of tongue anatomy is helpful in surgical planning, post-operative rehabilitation of tongue cancer patients, and studying of how humans adapt and learn new strategies for breathing, swallowing and speaking to compensate for changes in function caused by disease, medical interventions or aging. In vivo acquisition of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) images with clearly visible tongue muscles is currently not feasible because of breathing and involuntary swallowing motions that occur over lengthy imaging times. However, recent advances in image reconstruction now allow the generation of super-resolution 3D MR images from sets of orthogonal images, acquired at a high in-plane resolution and combined using super-resolution techniques. This paper presents, to the best of our knowledge, the first attempt towards automatic tongue muscle segmentation from MR images. We devised a database of ten super-resolution 3D MR images, in which the genioglossus and inferior longitudinalis tongue muscles were manually segmented and annotated with landmarks. We demonstrate the feasibility of segmenting the muscles of interest automatically by applying the landmark-based game-theoretic framework (GTF), where a landmark detector based on Haar-like features and an optimal assignment-based shape representation were integrated. The obtained segmentation results were validated against an independent manual segmentation performed by a second observer, as well as against B-splines and demons atlasing approaches. The segmentation performance resulted in mean Dice coefficients of 85.3%, 81.8%, 78.8% and 75.8% for the second observer, GTF, B-splines atlasing and demons atlasing, respectively. The obtained level of segmentation accuracy indicates that computerized tongue muscle segmentation may be used in surgical planning and treatment outcome analysis of tongue cancer patients, and in studies of normal subjects and subjects with speech and

  4. Segmentation of Tongue Muscles from Super-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Prince, Jerry L.; Murano, Emi Z.; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-01-01

    Imaging and quantification of tongue anatomy is helpful in surgical planning, post-operative rehabilitation of tongue cancer patients, and studying of how humans adapt and learn new strategies for breathing, swallowing and speaking to compensate for changes in function caused by disease, medical interventions or aging. In vivo acquisition of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) images with clearly visible tongue muscles is currently not feasible because of breathing and involuntary swallowing motions that occur over lengthy imaging times. However, recent advances in image reconstruction now allow the generation of super-resolution 3D MR images from sets of orthogonal images, acquired at a high in-plane resolution and combined using super-resolution techniques. This paper presents, to the best of our knowledge, the first attempt towards automatic tongue muscle segmentation from MR images. We devised a database of ten super-resolution 3D MR images, in which the genioglossus and inferior longitudinalis tongue muscles were manually segmented and annotated with landmarks. We demonstrate the feasibility of segmenting the muscles of interest automatically by applying the landmark-based game-theoretic framework (GTF), where a landmark detector based on Haar-like features and an optimal assignment-based shape representation were integrated. The obtained segmentation results were validated against an independent manual segmentation performed by a second observer, as well as against B-splines and demons atlasing approaches. The segmentation performance resulted in mean Dice coefficients of 85.3%, 81.8%, 78.8% and 75.8% for the second observer, GTF, B-splines atlasing and demons atlasing, respectively. The obtained level of segmentation accuracy indicates that computerized tongue muscle segmentation may be used in surgical planning and treatment outcome analysis of tongue cancer patients, and in studies of normal subjects and subjects with speech and

  5. Influences of age, tongue region, and chorda tympani nerve sectioning on signal detection measures of lingual taste sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L; Heidt, Julie M; MacGillivray, Michael R; Dsouza, Merle; Tracey, Elisabeth H; Mirza, Natasha; Bigelow, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Although the ability to taste is critical for ingestion, nutrition, and quality of life, a clear understanding of the influences of age, sex, and chorda tympani (CT) resection on taste function in different regions of the anterior tongue is generally lacking. In this study we employed criterion-free signal detection analysis to assess electric and chemical taste function on multiple tongue regions in normal individuals varying in age and sex and in patients with unilateral CT resections. The subjects were 33 healthy volunteers, ranging from 18 to 87 years of age, and 9 persons, 27 to 77 years of age, with unilateral CT lesions. The influences of age, sex, tongue region, and chorda tympani resections on signal detection sensitivity (d') and response bias (β) measures was assessed in 16 tongue regions to weak electric currents and solutions of sucrose, sodium chloride, and caffeine. Significant age-related decrements in d' were found for sucrose (p=0.012), sodium chloride (p=0.002), caffeine (p=0.006), and electric current (EC) (p=0.0001). Significant posterior to anterior, and medial to lateral, gradients of increasing performance were present for most stimuli. β was larger on the anterior than the posterior tongue for the electrical stimulus in the youngest subjects, whereas the opposite was true for sucrose in the oldest subjects. No sex differences were apparent. d' was depressed ipsilateral to the CT lesion side to varying degrees in all tongue regions, with the weakest influences occurring on the medial and anterior tongue. CT did not meaningfully influence β. This study is the first to employ signal detection analysis to assess the regional sensitivity of the tongue to chemical and electrical stimuli. It clearly demonstrates that tongue regions differ from one another in terms of their age-related sensitivity and their susceptibility to CT lesions.

  6. The geometry of resonance tongues : a singularity theory approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, Hendrik; Golubitsky, Martin; Vegter, Gert

    2003-01-01

    Resonance tongues and their boundaries are studied for nondegenerate and (certain) degenerate Hopf bifurcations of maps using singularity theory methods of equivariant contact equivalence and universal unfoldings. We recover the standard theory of tongues (the nondegencrate case) in a straightforwar

  7. Mother Tongue Eclipsing in the Linguistic Repertoire of Yoruba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-31

    Oct 31, 2016 ... Yoruba-speaking parents acquire English as their First Language and Yoruba ..... first language (or mother tongue) learning and reinforcement available to .... use their mother tongue, they would do things that would motivate.

  8. Schwannoma of the base of tongue – A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Panduranga Kamath

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Schwannomas arising in the base of tongue are rare and are not often included in the differential diagnosis. They are usually benign and have excellent prognosis as compared to the usual malignant lesions which occur in the tongue base.

  9. [Vasculogenic mimicry in tongue squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaogen; Liu, Chundong; Luo, Luqiao; Cai, Xiaohui

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the presence of vasculogenic mimicry (VM) in tongue squamous cell carcinoma and explore its clinical significance. Forty-two surgical specimens of tongue squamous cell carcinoma were examined for the presence of VM using HE staining and double staining of CD34 and PAS. Of the 42 specimens, 18 (42.86%) showed the presence of VM. VM was not correlated with the patients' age or gender, but with lymph node metastasis and the grade of tumor differentiation. Compared with tumors without VM, the tumors with VM had a significantly higher rate of lymph node metastasis (P<0.05) and a lower grade of differentiation (P<0.05). VM can be present in tongue squamous cell carcinoma, and the poorly differentiated tumors contain more VM, which is associated with a greater likeliness of lymph node metastasis and a poorer prognosis.

  10. The Tongue as an Excitable Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Seiden, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Geographic tongue (GT) is a benign condition affecting approximately 2% of the population, whereby the papillae covering the upper part of the tongue are lost due to a slowly expanding inflammation. The resultant dynamical appearance of the tongue has striking similarities with well known phenomena observed in excitable media, such as forest fires, cardiac dynamics and chemically-driven reaction-diffusion systems. Here we explore the dynamics associated with GT from a dynamical systems perspective, utilizing cellular automata simulations. We emphasize similarities with other excitable systems as well as unique features observed in GT. Our results shed light on the evolution of the inflammation and contribute to the classification of the severity of the condition, based on the characteristic patterns observed in GT patients.

  11. Undulating tongue in Wilson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nagappa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual occurrence of involuntary movement involving the tongue in a patient with confirmed Wilson′s disease (WD. She manifested with slow, hypophonic speech and dysphagia of 4 months duration, associated with pseudobulbar affect, apathy, drooling and dystonia of upper extremities of 1 month duration. Our patient had an uncommon tongue movement which was arrhythmic. There was no feature to suggest tremor, chorea or dystonia. It might be described as athetoid as there was a writhing quality, but of lesser amplitude. Thus, the phenomenology was uncommon in clinical practice and the surface of the tongue was seen to "ripple" like a liquid surface agitated by an object or breeze. Isolated lingual dyskinesias are rare in WD. It is important to evaluate them for WD, a potentially treatable disorder.

  12. Radiation response of the mouse tongue epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, R.; Kummermehr, J.

    1986-01-01

    Mouse tongue mucosa has been used as a model to study dose responses to local irradiation. Although the irradiation procedures is less feasible and more time-consuming than e.g. snout irradiation, the tongue is the only location where a reasonable area of intraoral, multilayered epithelium in the mouse can be locally treated and scored, and a relatively small burden is imposed on the animal. In pilot experiments with external 300 kV x-irradiation just tolerated by the lip, the authors did not see critical damage to the tongue. In the present model, the onset of denudation was not correctly predicted by the normal turnover time of the tissue.

  13. Progress of Biomimetic Artificial Nose and Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Qingjun

    2009-05-01

    As two of the basic senses of human beings, olfaction and gustation play a very important role in daily life. These two types of chemical sensors are important for recognizing environmental conditions. Electronic nose and electronic tongue, which mimics animals' olfaction and gustation to detect odors and chemical components, have been carried out due to their potential commercial applications for biomedicine, food industry and environmental protection. In this report, the biomimetic artificial nose and tongue is presented. Firstly, the smell and taste sensors mimicking the mammalian olfaction and gustation was described, and then, some mimetic design of electronic nose and tongue for odorants and tastants detection are developed. Finally, olfactory and gustatory biosensors are presented as the developing trends of this field.

  14. Three-dimensional tori and Arnold tongues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekikawa, Munehisa, E-mail: sekikawa@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical and Intelligent Engineering, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya-shi 321-8585 (Japan); Inaba, Naohiko [Organization for the Strategic Coordination of Research and Intellectual Property, Meiji University, Kawasaki-shi 214-8571 (Japan); Kamiyama, Kyohei [Department of Electronics and Bioinformatics, Meiji University, Kawasaki-shi 214-8571 (Japan); Aihara, Kazuyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku 153-8505 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    This study analyzes an Arnold resonance web, which includes complicated quasi-periodic bifurcations, by conducting a Lyapunov analysis for a coupled delayed logistic map. The map can exhibit a two-dimensional invariant torus (IT), which corresponds to a three-dimensional torus in vector fields. Numerous one-dimensional invariant closed curves (ICCs), which correspond to two-dimensional tori in vector fields, exist in a very complicated but reasonable manner inside an IT-generating region. Periodic solutions emerge at the intersections of two different thin ICC-generating regions, which we call ICC-Arnold tongues, because all three independent-frequency components of the IT become rational at the intersections. Additionally, we observe a significant bifurcation structure where conventional Arnold tongues transit to ICC-Arnold tongues through a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in the neighborhood of a quasi-periodic Hopf bifurcation (or a quasi-periodic Neimark-Sacker bifurcation) boundary.

  15. [True double dermoid cyst of the tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Callejo, F J; Roselló Millat, P; Alpera Lacruz, R; Platero Zamarreño, A; Jubert, A

    2001-10-01

    Dermoid cysts into ENT zone are specially infrequent--just the 7% of the organism--, and extremely rare if are located in the tongue. They are usually detected as midline acute swelling, and produce swallowing, speech and sleep disorders at neonatal period because of their congenital character. We present an eleven-year-old boy admitted at our Hospital bearing a submandibular and oral swelling, and dysphagia with odynophagia, finally diagnosed as an intralingual double dermoid cyst of the anterior two thirds. The history of frenulectomy due to a presumed ankyloglossia, the previous presence of a dorsal tumour in tongue with a difficult phonetic articulation, and the midline location of lesions made us to suspect on dermoid cysts of the tongue. Complete surgical excision were diagnostic and therapeutic, and the child recovered totally their mastication, swallowing and speech abilities. Pathophysiological aspects, treatment and the atypical course of the case are discussed.

  16. A Giant Hemangioma of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Saedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vascular abnormalities are relatively uncommon lesions, but head and neck is a common region for vascular malformation which is classified as benign tumors. In this paper, the authors report a rare presentation of vascular malformation in the tongue and its managements. Case Report: An 18 months 2 old child presented with a giant mass of tongue which caused functional and aesthetic problem. The rapid growth pattern of cavernous hemangioma was refractory to corticosteroid. The lesion was excised without any complication. Since the mass was so huge that not only filled entire oral cavity but was protruding outside, airway management was a great challenge for anesthesia plan and at the same time surgical technique was difficult to select. Conclusion: Despite different recommended modalities in managing hemangiomas of the tongue, in cases of huge malformations, surgery could be the mainstay treatment and provided that critical care measures are taken in to account, could be performed very safely.

  17. Effect of mouth-rinse formulations on oral malodour processes in tongue-derived perfusion biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, S; Hewett, K; Greenman, J

    2012-03-01

    An in vitro matrix biofilm perfusion model of tongue-derived microcosms for studying volatile sulfur compound (VSC) biogenesis has been previously described. The model was modified in order to monitor H(2)S in situ by use of a specialized electrode assembly based on microbial fuel cell technology. This system was designed to give real-time measurements expressed as electrode power output, which were proportional to H(2)S levels, measured by other means. In addition to the model modifications, the aim of this study was to demonstrate the biofilm responses following single or multiple exposure to biocidal, biostatic or VSC-inhibiting active compounds used in products. Tongue-derived biofilms (n = 6 per experiment) were perfused with one-fifth strength BHI at 20 ml h(-1) pH 7.2 and pulsed with putative treatment agent, placebo and controls including Zn(2+) ions and chlorhexidine (CHX). Compared with their pre-treatment conditions, all biofilms responded to the treatments in terms of reductions in hydrogen sulfide generation (as detected by the biofilm-electrode response) and other microbial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as detected using a selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry analyser. The microbiological analysis of the treated and control biofilms show that test products (formulations with active agents) all gave reduced cell populations compared to the control biofilm. An order of effects (magnitude and duration) suggests that both the test agent and CHX produced the strongest reductions, distinct from the responses obtained for the placebo and water controls, which were largely similar. It is concluded that the in vitro perfusion model may be used to replicate many of the activities and reactions believed to be occurring by the tongue biofilm microflora within a real mouth, including H(2)S and VOC biogenesis and their inhibition by exposure to active agents.

  18. Pre-mental foramen mandibulotomy for resecting tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Guang-yan; ZHANG Lei; GUO Chuan-bin; HUANG Min-xian; MAO Chi; PENG Xin

    2005-01-01

    Background Resection of tumors arising from the tongue base and the parapharyngeal space is difficult for exposure and manipulation because of their obscure location. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical approach of the pre-mental foramen mandibulotomy for resecting the tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space.Methods Fifty-one patients with tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space were treated using the mandibulotomy approach on the pre-mental foramen. In the present study, this technique was described in detail. The patients were followed up for three months to six years with a mean of 26 months. Results The tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space could be exposed clearly and be resected radically by surgical approach of pre-mental foramen mandibulotomy. The surgical complications were reduced. Conclusions Compared to other surgical approaches, such as lateral mandibulotomy, midline mandibulotomy, the suprahyoid parapharyngeal approach, and paramedian mandibulotomy, we found that the pre-mental foramen mandibulotomy is the ideal choice for resecting the tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space.

  19. Quantitative diagnosis of tongue cancer from histological images in an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Chen, Zhuo G.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    We developed a chemically-induced oral cancer animal model and a computer aided method for tongue cancer diagnosis. The animal model allows us to monitor the progress of the lesions over time. Tongue tissue dissected from mice was sent for histological processing. Representative areas of hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue from tongue sections were captured for classifying tumor and non-tumor tissue. The image set used in this paper consisted of 214 color images (114 tumor and 100 normal tissue samples). A total of 738 color, texture, morphometry and topology features were extracted from the histological images. The combination of image features from epithelium tissue and its constituent nuclei and cytoplasm has been demonstrated to improve the classification results. With ten iteration nested cross validation, the method achieved an average sensitivity of 96.5% and a specificity of 99% for tongue cancer detection. The next step of this research is to apply this approach to human tissue for computer aided diagnosis of tongue cancer.

  20. ephrin ligands and Eph receptors show regionally restricted expression in the developing palate and tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Machado Xavier

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Eph family receptor-interacting (ephrin ligands and erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma (Eph receptors constitute the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Ephrin ligands and their receptors form an important cell communication system with widespread roles in normal physiology and disease pathogenesis. In order to investigate potential roles of the ephrin-Eph system during palatogenesis and tongue development, we have characterized the cellular mRNA expression of family members EphrinA1-A3, EphA1–A8 and EphrinB2, EphB1, EphB4 during murine embryogenesis between embryonic day 13.5–16.5 using radioactive in situ hybridization. With the exception of EphA6 and ephrinA3, all genes were regionally expressed during the process of palatogenesis, with restricted and often overlapping domains. Transcripts were identified in the palate epithelium, localized at the tip of the palatal shelves, in the mesenchyme and also confined to the medial epithelium seam. Numerous Eph transcripts were also identified during tongue development. In particular, EphA1 and EphA2 demonstrated a highly restricted and specific expression in the tongue epithelium at all stages examined, whereas EphA3 was strongly expressed in the lateral tongue mesenchyme. These results suggest regulatory roles for ephrin-EphA signaling in development of the murine palate and tongue.

  1. Sensory evaluation and electronic tongue for sensing flavored mineral water taste attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, László; Gere, Attila; Szöllősi, Dániel; Kovács, Zoltán; Kókai, Zoltán; Fekete, András

    2013-10-01

    In this article a trained sensory panel evaluated 6 flavored mineral water samples. The samples consisted of 3 different brands, each with 2 flavors (pear-lemon grass and josta berry). The applied sensory method was profile analysis. Our aim was to analyze the sensory profiles and to investigate the similarities between the sensitivity of the trained human panel and an electronic tongue device. Another objective was to demonstrate the possibilities for the prediction of sensory attributes from electronic tongue measurements using a multivariate statistical method (Partial Least Squares regression [PLS]). The results showed that the products manufactured under different brand name but with the same aromas had very similar sensory profiles. The panel performance evaluation showed that it is appropriate (discrimination ability, repeatability, and panel consensus) to compare the panel's results with the results of the electronic tongue. The samples can be discriminated by the electronic tongue and an accurate classification model can be built. Principal Component Analysis BiPlot diagrams showed that Brand A and B were similar because the manufacturers use the same aroma brands for their products. It can be concluded that Brand C was quite different compared to the other samples independently of the aroma content. Based on the electronic tongue results good prediction models can be obtained with high correlation coefficient (r(2) > 0.81) and low prediction error (RMSEP < 13.71 on the scale of the sensory evaluation from 0 to 100).

  2. Tongues in degree 4 Blaschke products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Jordi; Fagella, Núria; Garijo, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the family of Blasche products {{B}a}(z)={{z}3}\\frac{z-a}{1-\\bar{a}z} , which is a rational family of perturbations of the doubling map. We focus on the tongue-like sets which appear in its parameter plane. We first study their basic topological properties and afterwards we investigate how bifurcations take place in a neighborhood of their tips. Finally we see how the fixed tongue extends beyond its natural domain of definition.

  3. Lingual neurofibroma causing dysaesthesia of the tongue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Eva; Nørgaard, Tove; Rye Rasmussen, Eva

    2013-01-01

    of otorhinolaryngology with irritation and dysaesthesia of the lateral aspect of the tongue. The only finding was a slightly red area from which a biopsy was taken. The macroscopic findings observed by the surgeon were consistent with normal tongue tissue. The histopathological examination showed a small, rounded tumour...... closely approximated to an invagination of the surface epithelium and with a small lymphatic infiltrate. The tumour was a neurofibroma. A Schwannoma type B was considered but the presence of small nerves and positive neurofilament reaction favoured a neurofibroma. The patient had no other neurofibromas...

  4. [Comparative imaging of cancers of the tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradji-Melia, P; Bruneton, J N; Balu-Maestro, C; Marcy, P Y; Dubruque, F; Dassonville, O

    1993-05-01

    In a comparative study of 18 cases of tongue cancer examined with ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the authors assess the advantages and disadvantages of each technique. MRI seems to be more effective for the detection of small lesions, the examination of the mobile part of the tongue, in case of dental artifacts, for the study of regional extension and to screen recurrence. CT retains its indications for large tumors in patients who are in a poor general condition, tired, and cannot stand lengthy examinations. Ultrasonography remains the first-intention examination in all cases because of its indisputable superiority for lymph node examination.

  5. Schwannoma of the tongue: one case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevio, E; Gorini, E; Lenzi, A; Migliorini, L

    2002-01-01

    The schwannomas are nervous tissue tumours that arise from Schwann cells; they are uncommon in peripheral nerves and rare in the tongue. After, a review of the literature, we present a case of schwannoma which arose in the ventral part of the body of the tongue. The tumour presented as a slowly growing mass producing few symptoms. The diagnosis of schwannoma is usually made post-operatively by histological identification although modern imaging techniques can provide useful indications. The treatment is exclusively surgical and usually enucleation of the mass is uncomplicated. There are no reports of malignant transformation.

  6. SCHWANNOMA OF THE TONGUE - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyananda Rao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: A case report of an 18 - year - old young girl presented with a slow - growing, painless swelling on the right side of the tongue since 4 years. This was associated with disturbances in mastication. Examination revealed a 3 cm x 4 cm, globular smooth, mobile mass on right side of the tongue. There was no neurological deficit and no neck nodes palpable. She underwent excision of the mass under general anaesthesia. Complete enucleation with primary closure was carried out. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and histo patho logical evaluation was consistent with schwannoma. The patient is recurrence free till date

  7. Tongue Control and Its Implication in Pronunciation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouni, Slim

    2014-01-01

    Pronunciation training based on speech production techniques illustrating tongue movements is gaining popularity. However, there is not sufficient evidence that learners can imitate some tongue animation. In this paper, we argue that although controlling tongue movement related to speech is not such an easy task, training with visual feedback…

  8. Evidence for an elastic projection mechanism in the chameleon tongue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de J.H.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2004-01-01

    To capture prey, chameleons ballistically project their tongues as far as 1.5 body lengths with accelerations of up to 500 m s-2. At the core of a chameleon's tongue is a cylindrical tongue skeleton surrounded by the accelerator muscle. Previously, the cylindrical accelerator muscle was assumed to p

  9. A three-dimensional atlas of human tongue muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Ira; Mu, Liancai

    2013-07-01

    The human tongue is one of the most important yet least understood structures of the body. One reason for the relative lack of research on the human tongue is its complex anatomy. This is a real barrier to investigators as there are few anatomical resources in the literature that show this complex anatomy clearly. As a result, the diagnosis and treatment of tongue disorders lags behind that for other structures of the head and neck. This report intended to fill this gap by displaying the tongue's anatomy in multiple ways. The primary material used in this study was serial axial images of the male and female human tongue from the Visible Human (VH) Project of the National Library of Medicine. In addition, thick serial coronal sections of three human tongues were rendered translucent. The VH axial images were computer reconstructed into serial coronal sections and each tongue muscle was outlined. These outlines were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) computer model of the tongue that allows each muscle to be seen in its in vivo anatomical position. The thick coronal sections supplement the 3D model by showing details of the complex interweaving of tongue muscles throughout the tongue. The graphics are perhaps the clearest guide to date to aid clinical or basic science investigators in identifying each tongue muscle in any part of the human tongue.

  10. Is use of laser really essential for release of tongue-tie?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Vikrant Dilip; Pawar, Sudhir; Modi, Sachin; Saddiwal, Rashmi; Khade, Mayur; Tendulkar, Hrishikesh

    2014-05-01

    Ankyloglossia, or tongue-tie, is a congenital condition characterized by a short, thickened, or abnormally tight lingual frenulum. This anomaly can cause a varying degree of reduced tongue mobility and has been associated with functional limitations including breastfeeding difficulties, atypical swallowing habits, speech articulation problems, mechanical problems such as inability to clean the oral cavity, and psychosocial stress. In this article, we report a 50-year-old female patient with tongue-tie having difficulty in speech and maintenance of oral hygiene due to high attachment of lingual frenum. The patient was managed by frenectomy by conventional method (scalpel and blade) under local anesthesia as an outpatient procedure without any complications. She later required speech therapy lessons for improvement of speech.

  11. Impaired tongue strength and endurance in developmental verbal dyspraxia: a physiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, B E; Attard, M D; Ozanne, A E; Stokes, P D

    1995-01-01

    Tongue strength and endurance measures were obtained from six children with developmental verbal dyspraxia (DVD) aged between 5;6 years and 11;5 years and compared to those achieved by six normal speaking controls matched for age and sex. The instrument for measuring tongue strength comprised an air-filled soft rubber bulb connected to a pressure transducer. The results indicated that the DVD group had weaker lingual musculature than the controls. In addition the DVD subjects exhibited significantly reduced tongue strength endurance compared with the controls. Overall the findings support the hypothesis that a motor impairment forms at least part of the basis of DVD and may be indicative of the presence of a concomitant dysarthria in children with DVD, or may reflect an underspecification of the motor programme. The need for revision of contemporary taxonomies relating to childhood motor speech disorders is discussed.

  12. ERK-GluR1 phosphorylation in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neurons is involved in pain associated with dry tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Yuka; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Shinoda, Masamichi; Kubo, Asako; Chen, Jui Yen; Noma, Noboru; Batbold, Dulguun; Imamura, Yoshiki; Sessle, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    phosphorylated GluR1-IR cells was significantly reduced in PD98059-administrated rats compared to the vehicle-administrated tongue-dry rats. Conclusions These findings suggest that the pERK-pGluR1 cascade is involved in central sensitization of trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis nociceptive neurons, thus resulting in tongue mechanical hyperalgesia associated with tongue drying. PMID:27118769

  13. Electronic tongue-based discrimination of Korean rice wines (makgeolli) including prediction of sensory evaluation and instrumental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo-Sik; Lee, Jang-Eun; Park, Hyun-Jin

    2014-05-15

    A commercial electronic tongue was used to discriminate Korean rice wines (makgeolli) brewed from nine cultivars of rice with different amino acid and fatty acid compositions. The E-tongue was applied to establish prediction models with sensory evaluation or LC-MS/MS by partial least squares regression (PLSR). All makgeollis were classified into three groups by principal components analysis, and the separation pattern was affected by rice qualities and yeast fermentation. Makgeolli taste changed from the complicated comprising sweetness, saltiness, and umami to the uncomplicated, such as bitterness and then, sourness, with a decrease of amino acids and fatty acids in the rice. The quantitative correlation between E-tongue and sensory scores or LC-MS/MS by PLSR demonstrated that E-tongue could well predict most of the sensory attributes with relatively acceptable r(2), except for bitterness, but could not predict most of the chemical compounds responsible for taste attributes, except for ribose, lactate, succinate, and tryptophan.

  14. Tongue Pressure and Submental Surface Electromyography Measures during Noneffortful and Effortful Saliva Swallows in Healthy Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Erin M.; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The effortful swallow, a compensatory technique frequently employed by speech-language pathologists for their patients with dysphagia, is still not fully understood in terms of how it modifies the swallow. In particular, although age-related changes are known to reduce maximum isometric tongue pressure, it is not known whether age affects…

  15. Tongue Pressure and Submental Surface Electromyography Measures during Noneffortful and Effortful Saliva Swallows in Healthy Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Erin M.; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The effortful swallow, a compensatory technique frequently employed by speech-language pathologists for their patients with dysphagia, is still not fully understood in terms of how it modifies the swallow. In particular, although age-related changes are known to reduce maximum isometric tongue pressure, it is not known whether age affects…

  16. Association of marijuana smoking with oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancers: pooled analysis from the INHANCE consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Morgan A; Chaturvedi, Anil K; Kelsey, Karl; Straif, Kurt; Berthiller, Julien; Schwartz, Stephen M; Smith, Elaine; Wyss, Annah; Brennan, Paul; Olshan, Andrew F; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Muscat, Joshua; Lazarus, Philip; McClean, Michael; Chen, Chu; Vaughan, Thomas L; Wunsch-Filho, Victor; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Matos, Elena; Menezes, Ana; Daudt, Alexander W; Fernandez, Leticia; Posner, Marshall; Boffetta, Paolo; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hashibe, Mia; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancers has increased over the last 20 years which parallels increased use of marijuana among individuals born after 1950. A pooled analysis was conducted comprising individual-level data from nine case-control studies from the United States and Latin America in the INHANCE consortium. Self-reported information on marijuana smoking, demographic, and behavioral factors was obtained from 1,921 oropharyngeal cases, 356 oral tongue cases, and 7,639 controls. Compared with never marijuana smokers, ever marijuana smokers had an elevated risk of oropharyngeal [adjusted OR (aOR), 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.47] and a reduced risk of oral tongue cancer (aOR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.29, 0.75). The risk of oropharyngeal cancer remained elevated among never tobacco and alcohol users. The risk of oral tongue cancer was reduced among never users of tobacco and alcohol. Sensitivity analysis adjusting for potential confounding by HPV exposure attenuated the association of marijuana use with oropharyngeal cancer (aOR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.71-1.25), but had no effect on the oral tongue cancer association. These results suggest that the association of marijuana use with head and neck carcinoma may differ by tumor site. The associations of marijuana use with oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancer are consistent with both possible pro- and anticarcinogenic effects of cannabinoids. Additional work is needed to rule out various sources of bias, including residual confounding by HPV infection and misclassification of marijuana exposure.

  17. Tongue controlled computer game: A new approach for rehabilitation of tongue motor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of tongue-disability, age and gender on motor performance for a tongue training paradigm involving playing a computer game using the Tongue Drive System (TDS). Design: Two controlled observational studies. Setting: A neurorehabilitation center and a dental...... training lasted 30 min and 40 min respectively. The participants were instructed to play a computer game with the tongue using TDS. Main Outcome Measures: Motor performance was compared between groups in both studies. Correlation analyses were performed between age and relative improvement in performance...... young participants performed better than healthy elderly (Peffect of gender (P=0.140). There was a significant negative correlation between age and relative improvement in performance (δ=-0.450, P=0.009). There were no significant differences in subject-based reports...

  18. Ablation of advanced tongue or base of tongue cancer and reconstruction with free flap: functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, C Y; Su, C Y; Hwang, C F; Chuang, H C; Jeng, S F; Chen, Y C

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the functional outcomes of patients who underwent total or nearly total glossectomy for advanced tongue or base of tongue cancer. We used the radial forearm free flap (RFFF), anterior lateral thigh flap (ALTF) or fibular osteocutaneous flap (FOCF) to reconstruct the oral defect after radical resection in 39 patients undergoing total or nearly total glossectomy with laryngeal preservation. Good functional outcomes, measured by independent feeding, speech and swallowing were achieved in 35, 36 and 35 patients, respectively. The cumulative 4-year survival rates were 63.8% for tongue cancer and 42.9% for base of tongue cancer. Reconstruction with free flaps is a feasible method to restore the functional outcomes in speech and deglutition among patients who undergo total or nearly total glossectomy with laryngeal preservation.

  19. Use of a biomechanical tongue model to predict the impact of tongue surgery on speech production

    CERN Document Server

    Buchaillard, Stéphanie; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents predictions of the consequences of tongue surgery on speech production. For this purpose, a 3D finite element model of the tongue is used that represents this articulator as a deformable structure in which tongue muscles anatomy is realistically described. Two examples of tongue surgery, which are common in the treatment of cancers of the oral cavity, are modelled, namely a hemiglossectomy and a large resection of the mouth floor. In both cases, three kinds of possible reconstruction are simulated, assuming flaps with different stiffness. Predictions are computed for the cardinal vowels /i, a, u/ in the absence of any compensatory strategy, i.e. with the same motor commands as the one associated with the production of these vowels in non-pathological conditions. The estimated vocal tract area functions and the corresponding formants are compared to the ones obtained under normal conditions

  20. A Normative-Speaker Validation Study of Two Indices Developed to Quantify Tongue Dorsum Activity from Midsagittal Tongue Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    This study reported adult scores on two measures of tongue shape, based on midsagittal tongue shape data from ultrasound imaging. One of the measures quantified the extent of tongue dorsum excursion, and the other measure represented the place of maximal excursion. Data from six adult speakers of Scottish Standard English without speech disorders…

  1. Peritoneal mesothelioma metastasis to the tongue – Comparison with 8 pleural mesothelioma reports with tongue metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa V. Vazquez

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Metastasis of MM to the tongue is rare and usually in the uncommon context of MM with multiple sites of extra-thoracic or extra-abdominal spread. We have described a unique clinical manifestation of a rare subtype of mesothelioma. Moreover, we have tabulated and summarised details (including responses to surgery or/and radiotherapy regarding all reported cases of mesotheliomas with tongue metastasis.

  2. The Tongue Map, Real or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    Students need practice in proposing hypotheses, developing experiments that will test these hypotheses, and generating data that they will analyze to support or refute them. I describe a guided-inquiry activity based on the "tongue map" concept, appropriate for middle school and high school students.

  3. Ground-Tracking With a Forked Tongue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Scientists since Aristotle’s day have wondered why the tongues of snakes and many lizards——are forked, a trait that dates from at least the Cretaceous,more than 65 million years ago.Now Kurt Schwenk,a University of Connecticut evolutionary biologist, thinks he knows the answer. "It gives them the abil-

  4. Native American Languages as Heritage Mother Tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Teresa L.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines current efforts to revitalise, stabilise, and maintain Indigenous languages in the USA. Most Native American languages are no longer acquired as a first language by children. They are nonetheless languages of identity and heritage, and in this sense can and should be considered mother tongues. The article begins with a…

  5. Mother Tongue Education: Necessary? Possible? Sustainable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Barbara Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Issues affecting pre-school education in a rural area of Kenya are highlighted in a study of a mother tongue education (MTE) programme in one indigenous language group, the Pokomo. Factors supporting the introduction of MTE include official support for MTE, the welcoming of non-government stakeholder involvement in education, the presence of…

  6. Acute dystonia mimicking angioedema of the tongue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva Rye; Pallesen, Kristine A U; Bygum, Anette

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of acute dystonia of the face, jaw and tongue caused by metoclopramide and mimicking angioedema. The patient had attacks for several years before the correct diagnosis was made and we present the first ever published video footage of an attack. This adverse drug reaction is known...

  7. ADIEU TO TONGUE TIE. LINGUAL FRENECTOMY: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Sanadi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A Frenum is a fold of mucous membrane, usually with enclosed muscle fibers, that attaches the lips and cheeks to the alveolar mucosa and/or mucosa and underlying periosteum. Tongue tie or ankyloglossia is a developmental anomaly of the tongue characterized by an abnormally short, thick lingual frenum resulting in limitation of tongue movement. It causes difficulty in speech articulation due to limitation in tongue movement. In this article we report a case of 24 years old female with Tongue tie, complaining of difficulty in speech. It was surgically treated with uneventful healing and good patient satisfaction.

  8. Availability of Tongue Diagnosis System for Assessing Tongue Coating Thickness in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juyeon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tongue diagnosis is an important procedure in traditional Korean medicine (TKM. In particular, tongue coating thickness (TCT is deemed to show the progression of the disease. However, conventional tongue diagnosis has limitations because of various external factors. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the availability of tongue diagnosis system (TDS in the assessment of TCT. This study has been designed as a prospective clinical trial involving 60 patients with functional dyspepsia. Tongue images will be obtained by TDS twice with a 30 min interval. The system will measure the percentage of TCT and classify it as either no coating, thin coating, or thick coating according to the existing diagnostic criteria. After finishing the collection of 60 patients' tongue images, TCT on the images will be simultaneously evaluated by the conventional method to establish the gold standard for assessing TCT by 5 well-trained clinicians. The evaluation will be repeated by the same clinicians after 2 weeks, but the order of the images will be changed. This trial is expected to provide clinical evidence for the availability of TDS as a diagnostic tool and to contribute to the standardization of the diagnosis system used in TKM. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01864837.

  9. A 3-Dimensional Atlas of Human Tongue Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    SANDERS, IRA; MU, LIANCAI

    2013-01-01

    The human tongue is one of the most important yet least understood structures of the body. One reason for the relative lack of research on the human tongue is its complex anatomy. This is a real barrier to investigators as there are few anatomical resources in the literature that show this complex anatomy clearly. As a result, the diagnosis and treatment of tongue disorders lags behind that for other structures of the head and neck. This report intended to fill this gap by displaying the tongue’s anatomy in multiple ways. The primary material used in this study was serial axial images of the male and female human tongue from the Visible Human (VH) Project of the National Library of Medicine. In addition, thick serial coronal sections of three human tongues were rendered translucent. The VH axial images were computer reconstructed into serial coronal sections and each tongue muscle was outlined. These outlines were used to construct a 3-dimensional computer model of the tongue that allows each muscle to be seen in its in vivo anatomical position. The thick coronal sections supplement the 3-D model by showing details of the complex interweaving of tongue muscles throughout the tongue. The graphics are perhaps the clearest guide to date to aid clinical or basic science investigators in identifying each tongue muscle in any part of the human tongue. PMID:23650264

  10. Anatomical and histological structure of the tongue and histochemical characteristics of the lingual salivary glands in the Chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar, Gray 1830).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, S; Sağsöz, H; Akbalik, M E

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to examine the morphology of the tongue and the histochemical features of the lingual salivary glands in this species. 2. The tongue was elongated, terminating in a rather sharp, dagger-like apex. On the surface of the tongue and situated between the body and root of the tongue, two rows of conical papillae, the sharp apices of which pointed towards the posterior part of the tongue, were observed. The keratinised epithelium lining the dorsal surface lacked typical gustatory papillae. However, it was observed that taste buds were present in the epithelium of the lingual body and root. The tongue was supported by a structure composed of hyaline cartilage, the paraglossum, which extended from the lingual root to the apex. Simple branched tubular glands, which were encapsulated by connective tissue, were embedded within the submucosa in the body (anterior salivary glands) and root (posterior salivary glands) of the tongue. It was observed that the secretion of the lingual glands contained neutral mucins, proteoglycans containing carboxylic acid, weak and strong sulphated groups, N-acetylated sialomucins, but lacked glycogen. 3. It was demonstrated that, the general morphological features, papillary distribution of the tongue and the histological structure of the mucosa epithelium and the supportive elements displayed similarity to those of other domestic avian species. It was also determined that, in view of the particular feeding types, in the partridge, the presence of the papillary crest was not correlated with diet.

  11. Case report macroglossia: Review and application of tongue reduction technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilommi R. Irhamni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital macroglossia is uncommon condition, Enlargement can be true as seen in vascular malformations or muscular enlargement. It may cause significant symptoms in children such as sleep apnea, respiratory distress, drooling, difficulty in swallowing and dysarthria. Long-standing macroglossia leads to an anterior open bite deformity, mucosal changes, exposure to potential trauma, increased incidence of upper respiratory tract infections and failure to thrive. Tongue movements, sounds and Speech articulation may also be affected. It is important to achieve uniform global reduction of the enlarged tongue for functional as well as esthetic reasons. The multiple techniques advocated for tongue reduction reveal that an ideal procedure has yet to emerge. In our case report we describe a modified reduction technique of the tongue globally preserving the taste, sensation and mobility of the tongue suitable for cases of enlargement of the tongue as in muscular hypertrophy. It can be used for repeat reductions without jeopardizing the mobility and sensibility of the tongue.

  12. Mitochondrial assembly receptor expression is an independent prognosticator for patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan-Ye; Chen, Chang-Han; Chien, Chih-Yen; Lin, Wei-Che; Huang, Wan-Ting; Li, Shau-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the local renin-angiotensin system has been implicated in various malignancies. The mitochondrial assembly receptor is a newly identified receptor for angiotensin peptides, angiotensin-(1-7), and has an important role in the renin-angiotensin system. However, the role of the mitochondrial assembly receptor in the prognosis of cancer patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of mitochondrial assembly receptor signaling in the prognosis of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Mitochondrial assembly receptor immunohistochemistry was examined in 151 oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma patients and was correlated with treatment outcome. The functional relevance of the mitochondrial assembly receptor in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell lines was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Mitochondrial assembly receptor overexpression was significantly correlated with early pathological T classification ( p=0.029) and the absence of extracapsular spread ( p=0.039). Univariate analyses demonstrated that mitochondrial assembly receptor overexpression was significantly associated with superior overall survival ( p=0.012). In multivariate comparison, mitochondrial assembly receptor overexpression remained independently associated with superior overall survival ( p=0.008, hazard ratio=1.862). In vitro, angiotensin-(1-7) suppressed the cell growth in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells, and this response was reversed by the mitochondrial assembly receptor antagonist, A779. Mitochondrial assembly receptor expression is independently associated with the prognosis of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma patients. These findings suggest that mitochondrial assembly receptor signaling may be a promising novel target for oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

  13. Harmonic scalpel versus flexible CO2 laser for tongue resection: A histopathological analysis of thermal damage in human cadavers

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    Wolf Tamir

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monopolar cautery is the most commonly used surgical cutting and hemostatic tool for head and neck surgery. There are newer technologies that are being utilized with the goal of precise cutting, decreasing blood loss, reducing thermal damage, and allowing faster wound healing. Our study compares thermal damage caused by Harmonic scalpel and CO2 laser to cadaveric tongue. Methods Two fresh human cadaver heads were enrolled for the study. Oral tongue was exposed and incisions were made in the tongue akin to a tongue tumor resection using the harmonic scalpel and flexible C02 laser fiber at various settings recommended for surgery. The margins of resection were sampled, labeled, and sent for pathological analysis to assess depth of thermal damage calculated in millimeters. The pathologist was blinded to the surgical tool used. Control tongue tissue was also sent for comparison as a baseline for comparison. Results Three tongue samples were studied to assess depth of thermal damage by harmonic scalpel. The mean depth of thermal damage was 0.69 (range, 0.51 - 0.82. Five tongue samples were studied to assess depth of thermal damage by CO2 laser. The mean depth of thermal damage was 0.3 (range, 0.22 to 0.43. As expected, control samples showed 0 mm of thermal damage. There was a statistically significant difference between the depth of thermal injury to tongue resection margins by harmonic scalpel as compared to CO2 laser, (p = 0.003. Conclusion In a cadaveric model, flexible CO2 laser fiber causes less depth of thermal damage when compared with harmonic scalpel at settings utilized in our study. However, the relevance of this information in terms of wound healing, hemostasis, safety, cost-effectiveness, and surgical outcomes needs to be further studied in clinical settings.

  14. Simulations of the consequences of tongue surgery on tongue mobility: implications for speech production in post-surgery conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Buchaillard, Stéphanie; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents simulations of the impact of tongue surgery on tongue movements and on speech articulation. For this, a 3D biomechanical Finite Element (FE) model of the tongue is used. Muscles are represented within the FE structure by specific subsets of elements. The tongue model is inserted in the upper airways including jaw, palate and pharyngeal walls. Two examples of tongue surgery, which are quite common in the treatment of cancers of the oral cavity are modelled: hemiglossectomy and large resection of the mouth floor. Three kinds of reconstruction are also modelled, assuming flaps with a low, medium or high stiffnesses. The impact of the surgery without any reconstruction and with the three different reconstructions is quantitatively measured and compared during simulated speech production sequences. More precisely, differences in global 3D tongue shape and in velocity patterns during tongue displacements are evaluated.

  15. DENSE PHASE REBURN COMBUSTION SYSTEM (DPRCS) DEMONSTRATION ON A 154 MWE TANGENTIAL FURNACE: ADDITIONAL AREA OF INTEREST-TO DEVELOP AND DEMONSTRATE AN IN-FURNACE MULTI-POLLUTANT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE NOx, SO2 & Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen C. Wiley; Steven Castagnero; Geoff Green; Kevin Davis; David White

    2004-03-01

    Semi-dense phase pneumatic delivery and injection of calcium and sodium sorbents, and microfine powdered coal, at various sidewall elevations of an online operating coal-fired power plant, was investigated for the express purpose of developing an in-furnace, economic multi-pollutant reduction methodology for NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} & Hg. The 154 MWe tangentially-fired furnace that was selected for a full-scale demonstration, was recently retrofitted for NO{sub x} reduction with a high velocity rotating-opposed over-fire air system. The ROFA system, a Mobotec USA technology, has a proven track record of breaking up laminar flow along furnace walls, thereby enhancing the mix of all constituents of combustion. The knowledge gained from injecting sorbents and micronized coal into well mixed combustion gases with significant improvement in particulate retention time, should serve well the goals of an in-furnace multi-pollutant reduction technology; that of reducing back-end cleanup costs on a wide variety of pollutants, on a cost per ton basis, by first accomplishing significant in-furnace reductions of all pollutants.

  16. Proposal for a New Noncontact Method for Measuring Tongue Moisture to Assist in Tongue Diagnosis and Development of the Tongue Image Analyzing System, Which Can Separately Record the Gloss Components of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Nakaguchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tongue diagnosis is a noninvasive diagnosis and is traditionally one of the most important tools for physicians who practice Kampo (traditional Japanese medicine. However, it is a subjective process, and its results can depend on the experience of the physician performing it. Previous studies have reported how to measure and evaluate the shape and color of the tongue objectively. Therefore, this study focused on the glossy component in order to quantify tongue moisture in tongue diagnosis. We hypothesized that moisture appears as a gloss in captured images and measured the amount of water on the tongue surface in 13 subjects. The results showed a high correlation between the degree of gloss and the amount of water on the tongue surface and suggested that the moisture on the tongue can be estimated by the degree of gloss in a captured image. Because the moisture level on the tongue changes during the course of taking photos, it became clear that we had to wait at least 3 minutes between photos. Based on these results, we established the tongue image analyzing system (TIAS, which can consistently record the gloss and color of the tongue surface simultaneously.

  17. [Observation of the ultrastructure of the tongue coating].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hideaki

    2006-03-01

    An observational study was conducted to clarify the morphological features of the fine structure of the tongue coating, which is one of the main causes of halitosis. Tongue specimens from cadavers, whom dental students had practiced on for anatomy class, were used as materials to observe the surface structure. Tongue coatings were obtained from patients who were referred to the Fresh Breath Clinic, Dental Hospital, Tokyo Medical and Dental University. After macroscopic observation of the tongue surface, tongue coating and examination of halitosis, the tongue coating was scraped carefully, following which it was observed using a light microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results obtained were as follows. The tongue coating consisted mainly of bacteria and desquamated keratinized epithelium which originated chiefly from the filiform papilla. The desquamated keratinized epithelium was also composed of degenerated epithelium of every level, from a comparatively normal epithelium to a fragmented altered epithelium. In addition, the level of degeneration of the keratinized epithelium differed according to the state of distribution and the revitalization of bacteria located in its surroundings. The intensity of halitosis increased with the amount of tongue coating. Increased amounts of tongue coating, however, did not necessarily correlate with increased halitosis in the patients. It was suggested that the severity of halitosis was probably associated with the level of bacterial invasion-related degeneration of the desquamated keratinized epithelium (tongue coating's quality).

  18. Improved denture retention in patients with retracted tongues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hua; Chen, Jen-Hao; Lee, Huey-Er; Chang, Hong-Po; Chen, Hong-Sen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Chou, Tsau-Mau

    2009-08-01

    Patients who wear mandibular dentures and hold their tongues in retracted positions alter the dimensions of the sublingual space and disrupt the peripheral seal that is needed for optimal denture retention. The authors studied whether retention could be improved if patients moved their tongues from a retracted resting position to an ideal resting position. The authors observed and classified the mandibular residual ridge morphologies of 85 participants who wore complete dentures. The authors recorded and compared the retention of the mandibular denture before and after repositioning the tongue to the ideal resting position. When the participants' tongues were in a retracted resting position, the average retention of the mandibular denture was 75.38 gram weight (+/- 81.83 standard deviation [SD]). After participants repositioned their tongues to the ideal resting position, the average retention of the mandibular denture was 118.89 gw (+/- 93.00 SD), an increase of 57.73 percent. In all morphological classes, when participants held their tongues in the ideal resting position, the average mandibular denture retention increased by 57.73 percent, a statistically significant improvement compared with when participants held their tongues in a retracted resting position. Clinicians are encouraged to evaluate carefully the tongue resting position in all patients who wear dentures, help create reasonable therapeutic expectations by informing patients about the significant effect that tongue position will have on future denture retention and provide helpful neuromuscular training for patients with retracted-tongue habits.

  19. Carcinoma cuniculatum arising in the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavaraj, Selvam; Cobb, Alistair; Kalavrezos, Nicholas; Beale, Timothy; Walker, Donald Murray; Jay, Amrita

    2012-03-01

    Carcinoma cuniculatum (CC) is a rare, distinct clinico-pathological variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that is defined histologically by the characteristic infiltrative pattern of a deep, broad, and complex proliferation of stratified squamous epithelium with keratin cores and keratin-filled crypts. Herein, we present a case report of CC of the oral tongue and discuss its diagnosis, management, and outcome, as well as briefly review the world literature. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of CC of the tongue to be reported in the English literature. We draw attention to its clinico-pathological features and highlight that awareness of this entity as a distinct variant of SCC facilitates its correct management.

  20. Electronic Noses and Tongues in Wine Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luz Rodriguez-Mendez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The quality of wines is usually evaluated by a sensory panel formed of trained experts or traditional chemical analysis. Over the last few decades, electronic noses and electronic tongues have been developed to determine the quality of foods and beverages. They consist of arrays of sensors with cross-sensitivity, combined with pattern recognition software, which provide a fingerprint of the samples that can be used to discriminate or classify the samples. This holistic approach is inspired by the method used in mammals to recognize food through their senses. They have been widely applied to the analysis of wines, including quality control, aging control or the detection of fraudulence, among others. In this paper, the current status of research and development in the field of electronic noses and tongues applied to the analysis of wines is reviewed. Their potential applications in the wine industry are described. The review ends with a final comment about expected future developments.

  1. Flow and mixing around a glacier tongue

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    C. L. Stevens

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A glacier tongue floating in the coastal ocean presents a significant obstacle to the local flow and influences oceanic mixing and transport processes. Here ocean shear microstructure observations at a glacier tongue side-wall show tidally-induced flow pulses and vortices as well as concomitant mixing. Flow speeds within the pulses reached around three times that of the ambient tidal flow amplitude and generated vertical velocity shear as large as 3×10−3 s−1. During the maximum flow period turbulent energy dissipation rates reached a maximum of 10−5 m2 s−3, around three decades greater than local background levels. This is in keeping with estimates of the gradient Richardson Number which dropped to around unity. Associated vertical diffusivities are higher that expected from parameterization, possibly reflecting the proximity of the cryotopography.

  2. Biomolecular Markers in Cancer of the Tongue

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    Daris Ferrari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of tongue cancer is increasing worldwide, and its aggressiveness remains high regardless of treatment. Genetic changes and the expression of abnormal proteins have been frequently reported in the case of head and neck cancers, but the little information that has been published concerning tongue tumours is often contradictory. This review will concentrate on the immunohistochemical expression of biomolecular markers and their relationships with clinical behaviour and prognosis. Most of these proteins are associated with nodal stage, tumour progression and metastases, but there is still controversy concerning their impact on disease-free and overall survival, and treatment response. More extensive clinical studies are needed to identify the patterns of molecular alterations and the most reliable predictors in order to develop tailored anti-tumour strategies based on the targeting of hypoxia markers, vascular and lymphangiogenic factors, epidermal growth factor receptors, intracytoplasmatic signalling and apoptosis.

  3. Tongue Liminary Threshold Identification to Electrotactile Stimulation

    CERN Document Server

    Robineau, Fabien; Orliaguet, Jean-Pierre; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    Many applications use electrostimulation of the human skin to provide tactile sensation. The effect of electrotactile stimulations were studied on a 6x6 matrix of tactile electrodes placed on the anterior part of the tongue. The liminary threshold with continuous or discontinuous waveform and patterns with 2 or 4 electrodes was investigated. The result suggest that for energy saving and to improve the yield, it would probably be better to use discontinuous stimulation with two electrode patterns.

  4. Actinomycosis of The Tongue: A Diagnostic Dilemma

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    Aniece Chowdary, Anirudh Kaul, Surinder Atri*

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is a bacterial, suppurative chronic infectious disease caused by Actinomyces israelli.Actinomycotic infections of the cervicofacial region are not uncommon , however Actinomycosis of tongueis rare. A mass that may mimic both benign and malignant neoplasms can be seen at clinical presentationand may mislead the diagnosis. We report a patient who presented with a tumor like tongue mass causingspeech disturbance and difficulty in swallowing, diagnosed as actinomycosis

  5. Cysticercosis of tongue: Cytohistologic approach to diagnosis

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    Govindaswamy Koteeswaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysticercosis is continuing to be a major health problem in developing countries. Radiological and serological techniques are routinely used for pre-operative diagnosis of cysticercosis. But fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC is cost effective and simple procedure, so it is important to be aware of diagnostic pitfalls in the cytomorphologic diagnosis of cysticercosis. We present a case of cysticercosis of tongue, which accounts for only 34 cases in the world literature.

  6. Point-of-care platelet function assays demonstrate reduced responsiveness to clopidogrel, but not aspirin, in patients with Drug-Eluting Stent Thrombosis whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy

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    Dawkins Keith D

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To test the hypothesis that point-of-care assays of platelet reactivity would demonstrate reduced response to antiplatelet therapy in patients who experienced Drug Eluting Stent (DES ST whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy compared to matched DES controls. Whilst the aetiology of stent thrombosis (ST is multifactorial there is increasing evidence from laboratory-based assays that hyporesponsiveness to antiplatelet therapy is a factor in some cases. Methods From 3004 PCI patients, seven survivors of DES ST whilst on dual antiplatelet therapy were identified and each matched with two patients without ST. Analysis was performed using (a short Thrombelastogram PlateletMapping™ (TEG and (b VerifyNow Aspirin and P2Y12 assays. TEG analysis was performed using the Area Under the Curve at 15 minutes (AUC15 as previously described. Results There were no differences in responses to aspirin. There was significantly greater platelet reactivity on clopidogrel in the ST group using the Accumetrics P2Y12 assay (183 ± 51 vs. 108 ± 31, p = 0.02 and a trend towards greater reactivity using TEG AUC15 (910 ± 328 vs. 618 ± 129, p = 0.07. 57% of the ST group by TEG and 43% of the ST cases by Accumetrics PRU had results > two standard deviations above the expected mean in the control group. Conclusion This study demonstrates reduced platelet response to clopidogrel in some patients with DES ST compared to matched controls. The availability of point-of-care assays that can detect these responses raises the possibility of prospectively identifying DES patients at risk of ST and manipulating their subsequent risk.

  7. Base of Tongue Tuberculosis: A Case Report

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    Carlos Chiesa Estomba

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that has displayed increasing incidence in the last decades. It is estimated that up to 20% of tuberculosis cases affect extra-pulmonary organs. In the ENT area, soft palate and tongue are the least probable locations.   Case Report A 62-year-old female with a history of rheumatoid arthritis and treatment with corticosteroids and Adalimumab, developed a foreign body sensation in the pharynx accompanied by a sore throat and halitosis. The laryngoscopy with a 70 degree rigid telescope showed an ulcerated hypertrophic lesion in the right vallecula of about 2-3 cm in the base of the tongue. Acid-alcohol resistant bacilli were found positive for M. tuberculosis, through the Ziehl Neelsen method and Löwenstein culture the patient was treated with tuberculostatic medication. Conclusion:  TB is a possible diagnosis when in the presence of an ulcerated lesion at the base of the tongue, accompanied by sore throat, dysphagia, or foreign body sensation.

  8. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF LONG TERM TONGUE ULCERS

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    Hegde Nidarsh D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Oral ulcers is a very common disorder of the oral mucosa. Patients with signs or symptoms of oral ulcers are sometimes referred to gastroenterology clinics, however, in most instances the ulcers does not reflect gastrointestinal disease, some with a chronic non- healing ulcer are advised biopsy. Indeed, a spectrum of disorders can give rise to oral mucosal ulcers ranging from minor local trauma to significant local disease such as malignancy or systemic illness. Lesions of the tongue have a broad differential diagnosis ranging from benign idiopathic processes to infections, cancers, and infiltrative disorders. This article will focus on common ulcerative disorders of the tongue in aspects of their clinical features and differential diagnosis, two case reports with the diagnosis and conservative management for long-term chronic ulcers. The two cases which are reported in this article had a differential diagnosis of Squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. The clinical picture was craterlike lesion, having a velvety-red base and a rolled, indurated border and most important painless in both cases. Removal of the irritant which was the tooth, rehabilitation of the oral mucosa by lubrication with Cocus Nucifera resulted in the healing of the ulcers. Functional components of Cocus Nucifera are Squaline, tocopherol, phytosterols and other sterols which are all plant steroids.

  9. Methods and studies of tongue reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi A. Numan; LIAO Gui-qing

    2007-01-01

    Total and even partial glossectomy could be a major event in the life of a patient. Tongue function is so complicated which makes maintaining normal functions of the tongue such as swallowing and speech and preserving larynx integrity after the surgery is a primary objective of the surgeon. This task is very difficult and the result is not predictable. Recent years, however, there has been interesting developments in microsurgical techniques, and these advancements enable oral and maxillofacial surgeons to achieve better results and improve the quality of their patient's life. The results even with use of the new technology are still far from perfect. Several reasons may cause variation in the result. Some of them have to do with the patient such as general health and other reasons are due to the method that is used and nature of the defect after the removal of the tumor. This article was undertaken to summarize the various methods and techniques used over the years to restore oral tongue functions after defects.

  10. TONGUE BASE SCHWANNOMA : A RARE ENTITY

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    Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Schwannomas are the benign tumours arising from the Schwann cells. Intraoral and pharyngeal schwannomas are rare and constitute less than 1%. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a 39 year old lady who presented with progressive dysphagia and dysphonia since three months. Intraoral examination showed a well - defined reddish lesion arising from the base of the tongue. She was referred to the department of radiodiagnosis for CT and MRI of the neck to know the extent of the lesion. Differential diagnosis of schwannoma and minor salivary gland tumor was given. Excision biopsy of the lesion was done and the histologic examination showed it as schwannoma. DISCUSSION: Schwannomas of the base of the tongue are rare and should be included in the differential diagnosis based on the imaging features and enhancem ent pattern. CONCLUSION: Imaging features, particularly MRI with contrast helps in differentiating benign from malignant lesions of the base of the tongue. Schwannomas are benign and have good prognosis as they can be excised when compared to the other intraoral malignant lesions.

  11. Defatting Vestibuloplasty for Functional and Esthetic Reconstruction of Tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si-Yeok; Kim, Min-Keun; Kim, Seong-Gon; Kwon, Kwang-Jun; Byun, Jin-Soo; Park, Chan-Jin; Park, Young-Wook

    2014-11-01

    The radial forearm free flap (RFFF) is a thin and pliable tissue with many advantages for tongue reconstruction. However, tongues reconstructed with RFFF occasionally need revision surgery because inadequate defect measurement at primary surgery can lead to bulkiness and limited movement of reconstructed tongue. In this case, the patient underwent partial glossectomy and RFFF reconstruction for treatment of tongue cancer five years prior. We could not make a lower denture for the patient, because the alveolo-lingual sulcus of tongue was almost lost. So we performed vestibuloplasty with a modified Kazanjian method on the lingual vestibule of the mandibular right posterior area, and defatting surgery to debulk the flap. After surgery, we observed that the color and texture of the revised tongue changed to become similar with adjacent tissue. The patient obtained a more functional and esthetic outcome. Accordingly, we present a case report with a review of relevant literature.

  12. Enterobacteriaceae and pseudomonadaceae on the dorsum of the human tongue

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    Simone Conti

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to correlate the presence of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae and Xanthomonadaceae on the posterior dorsum of the human tongue with the presence of tongue coating, gender, age, smoking habit and denture use. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bacteria were isolated from the posterior tongue dorsum of 100 individuals in MacConkey agar medium and were identified by the API 20E system (Biolab-Mérieux. RESULTS: 43% of the individuals, presented the target microorganisms on the tongue dorsum, with greater prevalence among individuals between 40 and 50 years of age (p = 0.001 and non-smokers (p=0.0485. CONCLUSIONS: A higher prevalence of Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae was observed on the tongue dorsum of the individuals evaluated. There was no correlation between these species and the presence and thickness of tongue coating, gender and presence of dentures.

  13. ENTEROBACTERIACEAE AND PSEUDOMONADACEAE ON THE DORSUM OF THE HUMAN TONGUE

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Conti; Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos Santos; Cristiane Yumi Koga-Ito; Antonio Olavo Cardoso Jorge

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to correlate the presence of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae and Xanthomonadaceae on the posterior dorsum of the human tongue with the presence of tongue coating, gender, age, smoking habit and denture use. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bacteria were isolated from the posterior tongue dorsum of 100 individuals in MacConkey agar medium and were identified by the API 20E system (Biolab-Mérieux). RESULTS: 43% of the individuals, presented the targ...

  14. Influence of visual observational conditions on tongue motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Liu, Xuimei; Baad-Hansen, Lene;

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the impact of visual observational conditions on performance during a standardized tongue-protrusion training (TPT) task and to evaluate subject-based reports of helpfulness, disturbance, pain, and fatigue due to the observational conditions on 0-10 numerical rating scales. Forty...... regarding the level of disturbance, pain or fatigue. Self-observation of tongue-training facilitated behavioral aspects of tongue motor learning compared with model-observation but not compared with control....

  15. Base of tongue neurilemmoma: excision by transoral laser microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Ferran; Vilaseca, Isabel; Blanch, Jose Luis; Gaspa, Albert; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel

    2007-09-01

    Benign and malignant tumors of the tongue base can be removed by various surgical approaches. A rare case of neurilemmoma of the base of the tongue removed by transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) is presented. Schwannomas in this area usually present as a slow-growing, painless mass on the tongue surface. In this case, fiberoptic examination and magnetic resonance imaging were crucial as first step studies to elucidate the biology of the lesion.

  16. Ancient schwannoma of the tongue: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilici, Suat; Akpınar, Meltem; Yiğit, Ozgür; Günver, Feray

    2011-01-01

    A 45-year-old male patient had left sided submucosal swelling extending backwards from the tip of the tongue disturbing articulation and swallowing. Submucosally located lesion was 3 x 2 x 1.5 cm in size and totally excised under local anesthesia. In this article, we present a case of ancient schwannoma of tongue. Although a very rare entity, ancient schwannoma should be considered in differential diagnosis of tongue lesions.

  17. Functional morphology of the tongue in the domestic goose (Anser anser f. domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowiak, Hanna; Skieresz-Szewczyk, Kinga; Godynicki, Szymon; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi; Meyer, Wilfried

    2011-09-01

    Using LM and SEM methods, the study describes microstructures in particular areas of the tongue of the goose. A thick multilayered keratinized epithelium forms the "lingual nail" and covers small and giant conical papillae, whereby the first functions as an exoskeleton of the tongue apex, and the latter are arranged along the lingual and well-developed connective tissue cores, and together with the bill lamellae are involved in cutting. The row of conical papillae on the lingual prominence prevents regurgitation of transported food. In the area of the "lingual nail" and in the anterior part of the lingual prominence, Herbst corpuscles are accumulated, which allow to recognize food position. Filiform papillae, as widely distributed between the conical papillae of the body, are responsible for filtering. They can be explained as long keratinized processes of the epithelium and are devoid of connective tissue cores. During food transport, the flattened areas of the lingual body and the lingual prominence are protected by a parakeratinized epithelium, but the root is covered by a nonkeratinized epithelium. The presence of adipose tissue in the tongue probably reduces pressure during food passage, but also promotes mucus evacuation from the lingual glands, thus facilitating food transport. An entoglossal bone with a continuation as cartilage is the stable structural basis of the tongue system.

  18. Double bilobed radial forearm free flap for anterior tongue and floor-of-mouth reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Alvin B; Lavertu, Pierre; Rezaee, Rod P

    2010-04-01

    We describe what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first use of a double bilobed radial forearm free flap in reconstructive surgery of the tongue and floor of the mouth following bilateral tumor resection. Our patient was a 78-year-old man who had experienced tumor recurrence in the anterior floor of the mouth after previous resection and radiotherapy. Eleven weeks postoperatively, the patient could extend his tongue to his hard palate and past his mandibular alveolus anteriorly. Within 6 months, he was able to tolerate an oral diet of soft food and exhibited understandable speech quality. Although the use of a single bilobed radial forearm flap is widely used after hemiglossectomy, our double bilobed modification extends this technique to anterior tongue and floor-of-mouth defects. This technique provides adequate bulk while allowing for depth of a ventral sulcus that will minimize tethering of the tongue and reduce oral incompetence. We recommend that this technique be included in the armamentarium of any reconstructive head and neck cancer surgeon.

  19. Anticarcinogenesis effect of Gynura procumbens (Lour Merr on tongue carcinogenesis in 4NQO-induced rat

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    D. Agustina

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia Gynura procumbens (Lour Merr leaves have been long used as various cancers medication. Many in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated anticarcinogenesis of ethanol extract of Gynura procumbens leaves. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticarcinogenesis of the ethanol extract of Gynura procumbens leaves on 4 nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis. Fifty six 4 week old male Sprague Dawley rats were used in this study and divided into 7 groups. Group 1, 2 and 3 were lingually induced by 4NQO for 8 weeks. In groups 2 and 3 the extract was given simultaneously with or after 4NQO induction finished, each for 10 weeks and 26 weeks, respectively. Groups 4, 5 and 6 were induced by 4NQO for 16 weeks. However, in groups 5 and 6 the extract was given as well simultaneously with or after the 4NQO induction, each for 18 weeks, respectively. Group 7 served as the as untreated control group. The results from microscopical assessment showed that tongue squamous cell carcinomas (SCC developed in 100% (3/3 of group 1. However, only 33.3% (2/6 and 25% (2/8 of rats in groups 2 and 3, respectively demonstrated tongue SCC. Among groups 4, 5 and 6, no significant difference of tongue SCC incidence was observed. From these results it is apparent that the ethanol extract of Gynura procumbens leaves could inhibit the progression of 4NQOinduced rat tongue carcinogenesis in the initiation phase.

  20. Study on classification of soy sauce by electronic tongue technique combined with artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Qin; Zhao, Jie-Wen; Chen, Quan-Sheng; Lin, Hao; Huang, Xing-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Electronic tongue as an analytical tool coupled with pattern recognition was attempted to classify 4 different brands and 2 categories (produced by different processes) of Chinese soy sauce. An electronic tongue system was used for data acquisition of the samples. Some effective variables were extracted from electronic tongue data by principal component analysis (PCA). Backpropagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) was applied to build identification models. PCA score plots show an obvious cluster trend of different brands and different categories of soy sauce in the 2-dimensional space. The optimal BP-ANN model for different brands was achieved when principal components (PCs) were 2, and the identification rate of the discrimination model was 100% in both the calibration set and the prediction set, and the optimal BP-ANN model for different categories had the same result. This work demonstrates that electronic tongue technology combined with a suitable pattern recognition method can be successfully used in the classification of different brands and categories of soy sauce.

  1. Linezolid-induced black hairy tongue: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasawneh Faisal Abdullah

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Linezolid-induced black hairy tongue has been rarely reported. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of linezolid-induced black hairy tongue and review the literature. Case presentation A 56-year-old Caucasian man was admitted with community-acquired pneumonia that failed to respond to levofloxacin 750mg daily. He was started on linezolid and meropenem and was subsequently discharged home on oral linezolid 600mg every 12 hours and intravenous ertapenem 1g daily. On a follow-up clinic visit, day 14 of linezolid therapy, he complained of dysgeusia and his tongue examination was consistent with black hairy tongue. After he finished his antibiotic course, his complaints resolved with regular tongue brushing. Conclusion Black hairy tongue is characterized by abnormal hypertrophy and elongation of filiform papillae. Five reported cases of linezolid-induced black hairy tongue were identified in a MEDLINE search (from January 2000 to June 2012. The Naranjo Probability Scale revealed a probable adverse drug reaction of linezolid-induced black hairy tongue. Potential contributing factors included other antibiotics, drug–drug interaction and poor oral hygiene. Health care professionals should be aware of the possibility of linezolid-induced black hairy tongue. Thorough history for other possible contributing factors should be obtained. Patients on linezolid should be counseled to perform good oral hygiene.

  2. Functional morphology of the tongue in the nutcracker (Nucifraga caryocatactes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowiak, Hanna; Skieresz-Szewczyk, Kinga; Kwieciński, Zbigniew; Trzcielińska-Lorych, Joanna; Godynicki, Szymon

    2010-07-01

    The nutcracker Nucifraga caryocatactes belongs to a group of bird species that use their beak and tongue as tools for obtaining food, such as seeds from hard-to-reach cones or nuts from shells. The aim of the present study, carried out with a scanning electron microscope, was to define the morphological features of the tongue of the nutcracker, which seems to be adapted to its environment through specific methods of obtaining food. One of the characteristic features of the nutcracker's tongue is the unique structure of the anterior part of the tongue, which has two long and highly keratinized processes - a product of the renewable keratinized layer of the epithelium covering the ventral surface of the tongue. These dagger-like processes, which are a modified "lingual nail," take a major role in levering up and shelling seeds, which are transported over the short sulcus-shaped body of the tongue. A unique feature of the nutcracker's tongue is the groove separating the body from the root. Two rows of highly keratinized, mechanical, conical papillae are located at the junction of the body and the root. These papillae are mechanically protective elements for passing food particles in the form of seeds. Among lingual glands, only the posterior lingual glands on the root of the tongue have been observed. Their secretion agglutinates dry food before it is swallowed. Results of the present study indicate that the nutcracker's tongue is an efficient tool resembling a lever that is helpful in shelling seeds.

  3. Relationship between tongue positions and formant frequencies in female speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimin; Shaiman, Susan; Weismer, Gary

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship (1) between acoustic vowel space and the corresponding tongue kinematic vowel space and (2) between formant frequencies (F1 and F2) and tongue x-y coordinates for the same time sampling point. Thirteen healthy female adults participated in this study. Electromagnetic articulography and synchronized acoustic recordings were utilized to obtain vowel acoustic and tongue kinematic data across ten speech tasks. Intra-speaker analyses showed that for 10 of the 13 speakers the acoustic vowel space was moderately to highly correlated with tongue kinematic vowel space; much weaker correlations were obtained for inter-speaker analyses. Correlations of individual formants with tongue positions showed that F1 varied strongly with tongue position variations in the y dimension, whereas F2 was correlated in equal magnitude with variations in the x and y positions. For within-speaker analyses, the size of the acoustic vowel space is likely to provide a reasonable inference of size of the tongue working space for most speakers; unfortunately there is no a priori, obvious way to identify the speakers for whom the covariation is not significant. A second conclusion is that F1 variations reflect tongue height, but F2 is a much more complex reflection of tongue variation in both dimensions.

  4. The role of extensional viscosity in frog tongue projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Alexis; Wagner, Caroline; McKinley, Gareth; Mendelson, Joe; Hu, David

    2014-11-01

    Frogs and other amphibians capture insects through high-speed tongue projection, some achieving tongue accelerations of over fifty times gravity. In this experimental study, we investigate how a frog's sticky saliva enables high-speed prey capture. At the Atlanta zoo, we used high-speed video to film the trajectory of frog tongues during prey capture. We have also designed and built a portable extensional rheometer; by following the capillary-driven thinning in the diameter of a thread of saliva we characterize the relaxation time and extensional viscosity and so infer the adhesive force between the frog tongue and prey.

  5. Experimental demonstration of low-complexity fiber chromatic dispersion mitigation for reduced guard-interval OFDM coherent optical communication systems based on digital spectrum sub-band multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekiha, Mahdi; Tselniker, Igor; Nazarathy, Moshe; Tolmachev, Alex; Plant, David V

    2015-10-05

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel digital signal processing (DSP) structure for reduced guard-interval (RGI) OFDM coherent optical systems. The proposed concept is based on digitally slicing optical channel bandwidth into multiple spectrally disjoint sub-bands which are then processed in parallel. Each low bandwidth sub-band has a smaller delay-spread compared to a full-band signal. This enables compensation of both chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization mode dispersion using a simple timing and one-tap-per-symbol frequency domain equalizer with a small cyclic prefix overhead. In terms of the DSP architecture, this allows for a highly efficient parallelization of DSP tasks performed over the received signal samples by deploying multiple processors running at a lower clock rate. It should be noted that this parallelization is performed in the frequency domain and it allows for flexible optical transceiver schemes. In addition, the resulting optical receiver is simplified due to the removal of the CD compensation equalizer compared to conventional RGI-OFDM systems. In this paper we experimentally demonstrate digital sub-banding of optical bandwidth. We test the system performance for different modulation formats (QPSK, 16QAM and 32QAM) over various transmission distances and optical launch powers using a 1.5% CP overhead in all scenarios. We also compare the proposed RGI-OFDM architecture performance against common single carrier modulation formats. At the same total data rate and signal bandwidth both systems have similar performance and transmission reach whereas the proposed method allows for a significant reduction of computational complexity due to removal of CD pre/post compensation equalizer.

  6. Highly Ordered Graphene Oxide and Reduced Graphene Oxide Based Polymer Nanocomposites: Promise and Limits for Dynamic Impacts Demonstrated in Model Organic Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelter, Dirk; Hintze-Bruening, Horst

    2016-06-29

    Graphene oxide (GO) dispersed in water has been combined with a mixture of aqueous polymer dispersions and melamine formaldehyde resin (MF). Stable low viscous fluids with no obvious signs of mesoscale ordering at 0.3 wt % yield transparent films with GO loadings up to one weight percent in the form of homogeneously aligned double strands, each comprising few individual layers of the carbon allotrope. While baking of the films at 160 °C results in minor thermal reduction of GO, in situ reduction with excess hydroxylamine (HA) in the presence of the polymer colloids yields stable dispersions in which amphiphilic graphene like flakes temporarily encapsulate gaseous reaction products. Depending on the parameters in the time-temperature domain, the hollow spheres may be transferred into solid material or disassemble during film formation, the latter case providing black, smooth, and transparent films with up to eight magnitudes increased electrical conductivity and an oxygen permeability 30-fold higher compared to the neat polymer matrix. In contrast, GO reduces oxygen permeability by that factor, while water permeability stays unchanged. Thermo-mechanical measurements reveal matrix stiffening by the platelets as well as by HA, the latter via modifying the MF reactivity. Excellent stone chip resistance and ballistic impact tests demonstrate efficient energy dissipation and crack deflection provided by the laminate like morphology of GO based composite. On the contrary, the same material only provides moderate substrate protection in rain erosion tests.

  7. Pax9 is required for filiform papilla development and suppresses skin-specific differentiation of the mammalian tongue epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Leon; Kist, Ralf; Aw, Andrew; Wappler, Ilka; Peters, Heiko

    2004-11-01

    The epidermis is a derivative of the surface ectoderm. It forms a protective barrier and specific appendages including hair, nails, and different eccrine glands. The surface ectoderm also forms the epithelium of the oral cavity and tongue, which develop a slightly different barrier and form different appendages such as teeth, filiform papillae, taste papillae, and salivary glands. How this region-specific differentiation is genetically controlled is largely unknown. We show here that Pax9, which is expressed in the epithelium of the tongue but not in skin, regulates several aspects of tongue-specific epithelial differentiation. In Pax9-deficient mice filiform papillae lack the anterior-posterior polarity, a defect that is associated with temporal-spatial changes in Hoxc13 expression. Barrier formation is disturbed in the mutant tongue and genome-wide expression profiling revealed that the expression of specific keratins (Krt), keratin-associated proteins, and members of the epidermal differentiation complex is significantly down-regulated. In situ hybridization demonstrated that several 'hard' keratins, Krt1-5, Krt1-24, and Krt2-16, are not expressed in the absence of Pax9. Notably, specific 'soft' keratins, Krt2-1 and Krt2-17, normally weakly expressed in the tongue but present at high levels in skin and in orthokeratinized oral dysplasia are up-regulated in the mutant tongue epithelium. This result indicates a partial trans-differentiation to an epithelium with skin-specific characteristics. Together, our findings show that Pax9 regulates appendage formation in the mammalian tongue and identify Pax9 as an important factor for the region-specific differentiation of the surface ectoderm.

  8. Taste masking analysis in pharmaceutical formulation development using an electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jack Y; Keeney, Melissa P

    2006-03-09

    The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility for taste masking and comparison of taste intensity during formulation development using a multichannel taste sensor system (e-Tongue). Seven taste sensors used in the e-Tongue were cross-selective for five basic tastes while having different sensitivity or responsibility for different tastes. Each of the individual sensors concurrently contributes to the detection of most substances in a complicated sample through the different electronic output. Taste-masking efficiency was evaluated using quinine as a bitter model compound and a sweetener, acesulfame K, as a bitterness inhibitor. In a 0.2 mM quinine solution, the group distance obtained from e-Tongue analysis was reduced with increasing concentration of acesulfame K. This result suggests that the sensors could detect the inhibition of bitterness by a sweetener and could be used for optimization of the sweetener level in a liquid formulation. In addition, the bitterness inhibition of quinine by using other known taste-masking excipients including sodium acetate, NaCl, Prosweet flavor, and Debittering powder or soft drinks could be detected by the e-Tongue. These results further suggest that the e-Tongue should be useful in a taste-masking evaluation study on selecting appropriate taste-masking excipients for a solution formulation or a reconstitution vehicle for a drug-in-bottle formulation. In another study, the intensity of the taste for several drug substances known to be bitter was compared using the e-Tongue. It was found that the group distance was 695 for prednisolone and 686 for quinine, which is much higher than that of caffeine (102). These results indicate that the taste of prednisolone and quinine is stronger or more bitter than that of caffeine as expected. Based on the group distance, the relative intensity of bitterness for these compounds could be ranked in the following order: ranitidine HCl>prednisolone Na>quinine HCl approximately

  9. FRMD4A: A potential therapeutic target for the treatment of tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xianghuai; Jia, Bo; Lin, Xi; Han, Jiusong; Qiu, Xiaoling; Chu, Hongxing; Sun, Xiang; Hu, Weitao; Pan, Jie; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Jianjiang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify agents capable of inhibiting the invasion and metastasis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma and thereby improve the outcomes of patients suffering from tongue cancer. FRMD4A antibodies were used to probe 78 paraffin-embedded specimens of tongue squamous cell carcinoma and 15 normal tongue tissues, which served as controls. Immunohistochemical methods were then used for analysis. Clinical pathological parameters were obtained, and the association between FRMD4A expression in the samples and the pathological parameters was analyzed. The human tongue cancer cell line CAL27 was used to study the effects of FRMD4A. CAL27 cells were transfected with small-interfering RNA against FRMD4A (FRMD4A-siRNA) and the mRNA and protein levels of FMRD4A were then evaluated by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. The proliferation and cell-cycle assays of CAL27 cells were evaluated using the CCK8 method and flow cytometry. The invasion and migration of the cells were measured using a Matrigel invasion chamber and a scratch assay, respectively. The results showed FRMD4A overexpression in tongue squamous cell carcinoma, and the positive reaction was predominately located in the cytoplasm. Tumor clinical stage and lymph node metastasis showed a statistically significant correlation with FRMD4A expression. Transient silencing of the FRMD4A gene for 24 and 48 h significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression of FRMD4A, respctively. Silencing FRMD4A gene reduced the proliferation of CAL27 cells and led to cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, as well as significantly suppressing the migration and invasion capacity of CAL27 cells. The findings of the present study suggest that FRMD4A expression correlates with the development of tongue squamous cell carcinoma. For this reason, FRMD4A merits further study as it may be suitable for use as a therapeutic agent in antitumor treatment regimens. PMID:27666346

  10. Effects of tongue position and lung volume on voluntary maximal tongue protrusion force in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboisky, Julian P; Luu, Billy L; Butler, Jane E; Gandevia, Simon C

    2015-01-15

    Maximal voluntary protrusion force of the human tongue has not been examined in positions beyond the incisors or at different lung volumes. Tongue force was recorded with the tongue tip at eight positions relative to the incisors (12 and 4mm protrusion, neutral and 4, 12, 16, 24 and 32mm retraction) at functional residual capacity (FRC), total lung capacity (TLC) and residual volume (RV) in 15 healthy subjects. Maximal force occurred between 12mm and 32mm retraction (median 16mm). Maximum force at FRC was reproducible at the optimal tongue position across sessions (P=0.68). Across all positions at FRC the average force was highest at 24mm retraction (28.3±5.3N, mean±95% CI) and lowest at 12mm protrusion (49.1±4.6% maximum; Ptongue positions, maximal force was on average 9.3% lower at FRC than TLC and RV (range: 4.5-12.7% maximum, P<0.05). Retracted positions produce higher-force protrusions with a small effect of lung volume.

  11. E-Nose and e-Tongue combination for improved recognition of fruit juice samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddi, Z; Mabrouk, S; Bougrini, M; Tahri, K; Sghaier, K; Barhoumi, H; El Bari, N; Maaref, A; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Bouchikhi, B

    2014-05-01

    There are many important challenges related to food security analysis by application of chemical and electrochemical sensors. One critical parameter is the development of reliable tools, capable of performing an overall sensory analysis. In these systems, as much information as possible is required in relation to smell, taste and colour. Here, we investigated the possibility of using a multisensor data fusion approach, which combines an e-Nose and an e-Tongue, adept in generating combined aroma and taste profiles. In order to shed light on this concept, classification of various Tunisian fruit juices using a low-level of abstraction data fusion technique was attempted. Five tin oxide-based Taguchi Gas Sensors were applied in the e-Nose instrument and the e-Tongue was designed using six potentiometric sensors. Four different commercial brands along with eleven fruit juice varieties were characterised using the e-Nose and the e-Tongue as individual techniques, followed by a combination of the two together. Applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) separately on the respective e-Nose and e-Tongue data, only few distinct groups were discriminated. However, by employing the low-level of abstraction data fusion technique, very impressive findings were achieved. The Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network reached a 100% success rate in the recognition of the eleven-fruit juices. Therefore, data fusion approach can successfully merge individual data from multiple origins to draw the right conclusions that are more fruitful when compared to the original single data. Hence, this work has demonstrated that data fusion strategy used to combine e-Nose and e-Tongue signals led to a system of complementary and comprehensive information of the fruit juices which outperformed the performance of each instrument when applied separately.

  12. Vowel category dependence of the relationship between palate height, tongue height, and oral area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Pizza, Shamala; Alwan, Abeer; Cha, Jul Setsu; Haker, Katherine

    2003-06-01

    This article evaluates intertalker variance of oral area, logarithm of the oral area, tongue height, and formant frequencies as a function of vowel category. The data consist of coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences and acoustic recordings of 5 talkers, each producing 11 different vowels. Tongue height (left, right, and midsagittal), palate height, and oral area were measured in 3 coronal sections anterior to the oropharyngeal bend and were subjected to multivariate analysis of variance, variance ratio analysis, and regression analysis. The primary finding of this article is that oral area (between palate and tongue) showed less intertalker variance during production of vowels with an oral place of articulation (palatal and velar vowels) than during production of vowels with a uvular or pharyngeal place of articulation. Although oral area variance is place dependent, percentage variance (log area variance) is not place dependent. Midsagittal tongue height in the molar region was positively correlated with palate height during production of palatal vowels, but not during production of nonpalatal vowels. Taken together, these results suggest that small oral areas are characterized by relatively talker-independent vowel targets and that meeting these talker-independent targets is important enough that each talker adjusts his or her own tongue height to compensate for talker-dependent differences in constriction anatomy. Computer simulation results are presented to demonstrate that these results may be explained by an acoustic control strategy: When talkers with very different anatomical characteristics try to match talker-independent formant targets, the resulting area variances are minimized near the primary vocal tract constriction.

  13. Spindle cell haemangioma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Kathryn E M; Felstead, Andrew M; Haacke, Norman; Theaker, Jeffrey; Brennan, Peter A; Colbert, Serryth D

    2016-11-01

    Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH) is an uncommon benign vascular tumor that rarely occurs in the mouth. We present an SCH arising in the tongue of a 52-year-old otherwise healthy woman. SCH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular tumors in the oral cavity and not misinterpreted as a more aggressive vascular tumor. We describe the clinical presentation, investigation, differential diagnosis and management of this condition and a literature search showing published case reports. Although SCH rarely presents in the oral cavity it needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of oral cavity tumors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Studying the effectiveness of activated carbon R95 respirators in reducing the inhalation of combustion by-products in Hanoi, Vietnam: a demonstration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wertheim Heiman FL

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urban air pollution is an increasing health problem, particularly in Asia, where the combustion of fossil fuels has increased rapidly as a result of industrialization and socio-economic development. The adverse health impacts of urban air pollution are well established, but less is known about effective intervention strategies. In this demonstration study we set out to establish methods to assess whether wearing an R95 activated carbon respirator could reduce intake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH in street workers in Hanoi, Vietnam. Methods In this demonstration study we performed a cross-over study in which non-smoking participants that worked at least 4 hours per day on the street in Hanoi were randomly allocated to specific respirator wearing sequences for a duration of 2 weeks. Urines were collected after each period, i.e. twice per week, at the end of the working day to measure hydroxy PAHs (OH-PAH using gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry. The primary endpoint was the urinary concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP. Results Forty-four participants (54.5% male, median age 40 years were enrolled with the majority being motorbike taxi drivers (38.6% or street vendors (34.1%. The baseline creatinine corrected urinary level for 1-OHP was much higher than other international comparisons: 1020 ng/g creatinine (IQR: 604–1551. Wearing a R95 mask had no significant effect on 1-OHP levels: estimated multiplicative effect 1.0 (95% CI: 0.92-1.09 or other OH-PAHs, except 1-hydroxynaphthalene (1-OHN: 0.86 (95% CI: 0.11-0.96. Conclusions High levels of urine OH-PAHs were found in Hanoi street workers. No effect was seen on urine OH-PAH levels by wearing R95 particulate respirators in an area of high urban air pollution, except for 1-OHN. A lack of effect may be de to gaseous phase PAHs that were not filtered efficiently by the respirator. The high levels of urinary OH-PAHs found, urges for effective

  15. Spatiotemporal Coupling of the Tongue in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Mili S.; Green, Jordan R.; Yunusova, Yana; Hanford, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of the investigation was to identify deficits in spatiotemporal coupling between tongue regions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The relations between disease-related changes in tongue movement patterns and speech intelligibility were also determined. Methods: The authors recorded word productions from 11…

  16. Spatiotemporal Coupling of the Tongue in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Mili S.; Green, Jordan R.; Yunusova, Yana; Hanford, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of the investigation was to identify deficits in spatiotemporal coupling between tongue regions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The relations between disease-related changes in tongue movement patterns and speech intelligibility were also determined. Methods: The authors recorded word productions from 11…

  17. Malignant melanoma of the tongue following low-dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalemeris, G.C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Gray, G.F. Jr.; Glick, A.D.

    1985-03-01

    A 47-year-old man had a spindly malignant melanoma of the tongue many years after low-dose radiation therapy for lichen planus. To our knowledge, only 12 melanomas of the tongue have been reported previously, and in none of these was radiation documented.

  18. Extremely high-power tongue projection in plethodontid salamanders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deban, S.M.; O'Reilly, J.C.; Dicke, U.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Many plethodontid salamanders project their tongues ballistically at high speed and for relatively great distances. Capturing evasive prey relies on the tongue reaching the target in minimum time, therefore it is expected that power production, or the rate of energy release, is maximized during tong

  19. Pedagogical Competencies for Mother-Tongue Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to elaborate a framework for both the foundation and application of professional standards for mother-tongue teachers. The main issue with which this study is concerned constitutes the lack of a set of clear standards for the initial training of mother-tongue teachers. In terms of theory, that which has currently been analyzed in…

  20. Evaluation of Manometric Measures during Tongue-Hold Swallows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeltgen, Sebastian H.; Witte, Ulrike; Gumbley, Freya; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Based on visual inspection, prior research documented increased movement of the posterior pharyngeal wall in healthy volunteers during tongue-hold swallows. This manometric study investigated the immediate effects of the tongue-hold maneuver on pharyngeal peak pressure generation, duration of pressure generation, and pressure slope…

  1. Phonological Encoding in Mandarin Chinese: Evidence from Tongue Twisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kember, Heather; Croot, Karen; Patrick, Ellis

    2015-12-01

    Models of connected speech production in Mandarin Chinese must specify how lexical tone, speech segments, and phrase-level prosody are integrated in speech production. This study used tongue twisters to test predictions of the two different models of word form encoding. Tongue twisters were constructed from 5 sets of characters that rotated pairs of initial segments or pairs of tones, or both, across format (ABAB, ABBA), and across position of the characters in four-character tongue twister strings. Fifty two native Mandarin Chinese speakers read aloud 120 tongue twisters, repeating each one six times in a row. They made a total of 3503 (2.34%) segment errors and 1372 (.92%) tone errors. Segment errors occurred on the onsets of the first and third characters in the ABBA but not ABAB segment-alternating tongue twisters, and on the onsets of the second and fourth characters of the tone-alternating tongue twisters. Tone errors were highest on the third and fourth characters in the tone-alternating tongue twisters. The pattern of tone errors is consistent with the claim that tone is associated to a metrical frame prior to segment encoding, while the format by position interaction found for the segment-alternating tongue twisters suggest articulatory gestures oscillate in segment production as proposed by gestural phonology.

  2. Alterations in contractile properties of tongue muscles in old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Fumikazu; Connor, Nadine P; Konopacki, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Fatigue and weakness are well-known signs of aging that are related to sarcopenia, or loss of skeletal muscle mass, organization, and strength. Sarcopenia may affect swallowing. The tongue plays a vital role in swallowing, but there is limited knowledge regarding age-related changes in lingual muscle contractile properties. Our purpose was to determine whether alterations in tongue force, temporal features of tongue muscle contraction, and fatigability are manifested as a function of aging in old rats. We evaluated tongue muscle contractile properties in young and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats. Contractions were elicited via bilateral electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves. Maximum tongue forces and fatigability were not significantly altered in old animals, but aging was associated with significantly longer twitch contraction time and longer half-decay recovery time intervals (p < .01). The results indicated that old animals generated sufficient maximum tongue forces, but were slower in achieving these forces than young animals. These findings are consistent with reports of altered temporal parameters of tongue actions during swallowing in humans, and suggest that a disruption in the timing of muscle contraction onset and recovery may contribute to the altered tongue kinetics observed with aging.

  3. Repair of large palatal fistula using tongue flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejjal Nawfal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large palatal fistulas are a challenging problem in cleft surgery. Many techniques are used to close the defect. The tongue flap is an easy and reproductible procedure for managing this complication. The authors report a case of a large palatal fistula closure with anteriorly based tongue flap.

  4. Tongue Measures in Individuals with Normal and Impaired Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierwalt, Julie A. G.; Youmans, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation sought to add to the extant literature on measures of normal tongue function, to provide information on measures of tongue function in a group of individuals with oral phase dysphagia, and to provide a comparison of these 2 groups matched for age and gender. Method: The Iowa Oral Performance Instrument was utilized to…

  5. Effect of tongue thrust swallowing on position of anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaly, Tahereh; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Amini, Foroozandeh

    2009-01-01

    There is no consensus about the effect of tongue thrusting on incisor position. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the position of anterior teeth in growing children with tongue thrust swallowing. In the present study 193 subjects with an age range of 9 to 13 years participated. All the patients were examined by a trained investigator and those having tongue thrust swallowing were selected and the position of their anterior teeth was compared with a control group consisting of 36 subjects with normal occlusion. Data was analyzed by independent sample t-test. Among the 193 students who were examined in this study, 10 cases (5%) were diagnosed to be tongue thrusters. Overjet was significantly increased in tongue thrust individuals (P 0.05). The results indicated that tongue thrust may have an environmental effect on dentofacial structures. Considering the high incidence of tongue thrust in orthodontic patients, it is suggested that dental practitioners observe patients of all ages and those in all stages of orthodontic treatment for evidence of tongue thrust swallowing.

  6. Mother Tongue and Education in Africa: Publicising the Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kioko, Angelina N.; Ndung'u, Ruth W.; Njoroge, Martin C.; Mutiga, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Varied realities surround the use of mother tongue education in Africa. These realities are entrenched in the attitudes and misconceptions that have gone unchallenged due to inadequate literature on the successful use of mother tongues in the classroom and beyond. The realities discussed in this paper include the frustrations of children…

  7. The Use of Mother Tongue in Second Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵鸣霄; 张立杰

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the specific application of mother tongue in Second Language learning from the perspective of class management, introducing learning methods, teaching vocabulary, teaching grammar, dealing with exercises and testing, and cooperation among students. It is concluded that mother tongue should be properly used in Second Language Teaching in or-der to improve the teaching of second language.

  8. Methods for quantifying tongue shape and complexity using ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Katherine M; Tiede, Mark K; Whalen, D H

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of tongue shape is potentially useful for indexing articulatory strategies arising from intervention, therapy and development. Tongue shape complexity is a parameter that can be used to reflect regional functional independence of the tongue musculature. This paper considers three different shape quantification methods - based on Procrustes analysis, curvature inflections and Fourier coefficients - and uses a linear discriminant analysis to test how well each method is able to classify tongue shapes from different phonemes. Test data are taken from six native speakers of American English producing 15 phoneme types. Results classify tongue shapes accurately when combined across quantification methods. These methods hold promise for extending the use of ultrasound in clinical assessments of speech deficits.

  9. Training induced cortical plasticity compared between three tongue training paradigms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different training types and secondary to test gender differences on the training-related cortical plasticity induced by three different tongue training paradigms: 1. Therapeutic tongue exercises (TTE), 2. Playing computer games......) (control) were established using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at three time-points: (1) before tongue training, (2) immediately after training, (3) 1 h after training. Subject-based reports of motivation, fun, pain and fatigue were evaluated on 0-10 numerical rating scales (NRS) after training......-points. No significant effect of tongue training on FDI MEPs was observed (P>0.335). The tongue cortical motor map areas were not significantly increased by training (P>0.142). Training with TDS was most motivating and fun (Plevel was not different between groups...

  10. Base of Tongue Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prepageran Narayanan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of base of tongue tuberculosis following pulmonary tuberculosis. Patient presented to us with chief complaints of sore throat and pain on swallowing for period of 3 months. On examination with 70 degree telescope, we observed an ulcer on right side of base of tongue. The edges of the ulcer appeared to be undermined with whitish slough at the centre of the ulcer. Examination of neck showed a multiple small palpable middle deep cervical lymph nodes on right side of neck. Biopsy of the ulcer was taken, which showed granulomatous inflammation, suggestive of tuberculosis. Laboratory investigations revealed a raise in erythrocyte sedimentation rate, sputum for acid fast bacilli was strongly positive. Chest X ray was performed for patient showed multiple areas of consolidation. Patient was referred to chest clinic for further management of tuberculosis and was started on anti-tuberculous drugs. In conclusion tuberculosis of oral cavity is rare, but should be considered among one of the differential diagnosis of the oral lesions and biopsy is necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

  11. Tongue pressure patterns during water swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Daniel; Kieser, Jules; Bolter, Chris; Swain, Michael; Singh, Bhavia; Waddell, J Neil

    2010-03-01

    Bolus propulsion during the normal oral phase of swallowing is thought to be characterised by the sequential elevation of the front, middle, and posterior regions of the dorsum of the tongue. However, the coordinated orchestration of lingual movement is still poorly understood. This study examined how pressures generated by the tongue against the hard palate differed between three points along the midline of the tongue. Specifically, we tested three hypotheses: (1) that there are defined individual patterns of pressure change within the mouth during liquid swallowing; (2) that there are significant negative pressures generated at defined moments during normal swallowing; and, (3) that liquid swallowing is governed by the interplay of pressures generated in an anteroposterior direction in the mouth. Using a metal appliance described previously, we measured absolute pressures during water swallows in six healthy volunteers (4 male, 2 female) with an age range of 25-35 years. Participants performed three 10-ml water swallows from a small cup on five separate days, thus providing data for a total of 15 separate water swallows. There was a distinct pattern to the each of the pressure signals, and this pattern was preserved in the mean obtained when the data were pooled. Furthermore, raw signals from the same subjects presented consistent patterns at each of the five testing sessions. In all subjects, pressure at the anterior and hind palate tended to be negative relative to the preswallow value; at mid-palate, however, pressure changes were less consistent between individuals. When the pressure differences between the sites were calculated, we found that during the swallow a net negative pressure difference developed between anterior and mid-palate and a net positive pressure difference developed between mid-palate and hind palate. Large, rapid fluctuations in pressure occurred at all sites and these varied several-fold between subjects. When the brief sharp reduction

  12. Controlling posture using a plantar pressure-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback system

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    The present paper introduces an original biofeedback system for improving human balance control, whose underlying principle consists in providing additional sensory information related to foot sole pressure distribution to the user through a tongue-placed tactile output device. To assess the effect of this biofeedback system on postural control during quiet standing, ten young healthy adults were asked to stand as immobile as possible with their eyes closed in two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were recorded using a force platform. Results showed reduced CoP displacements in the Biofeedback relative to the No-biofeedback condition. The present findings evidenced the ability of the central nervous system to efficiently integrate an artificial plantar-based, tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for controlling control posture during quiet standing.

  13. A tongue for all seasons: extreme phenotypic flexibility in salamandrid newts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Egon; Handschuh, Stephan; Aerts, Peter; Van Wassenbergh, Sam

    2017-04-21

    Many organisms faced with seasonally fluctuating abiotic and biotic conditions respond by altering their phenotype to account for the demands of environmental changes. Here we discovered that newts, which switch seasonally between an aquatic and terrestrial lifestyle, grow a complex adhesive system on their tongue pad consisting of slender lingual papillae and mucus-producing cells to increase the efficiency of prey capture as they move from water onto land. The adhesive system is reduced again as newts switch back to their aquatic stage, where they use suction to capture prey. As suction performance is also enhanced seasonally by reshaping of the mouth due to the growth of labial lobes, our results show that newts are exceptional in exhibiting phenotypic flexibility in two alternating components (i.e. tongue pad and labial lobes) within a single functional system, and suggest that this form of phenotypic flexibility demands complex genetic regulation.

  14. Detection of Adulteration in Argan Oil by Using an Electronic Nose and a Voltammetric Electronic Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiha Bougrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adulteration detection of argan oil is one of the main aspects of its quality control. Following recent fraud scandals, it is mandatory to ensure product quality and customer protection. The aim of this study is to detect the percentages of adulteration of argan oil with sunflower oil by using the combination of a voltammetric e-tongue and an e-nose based on metal oxide semiconductor sensors and pattern recognition techniques. Data analysis is performed by three pattern recognition methods: principal component analysis (PCA, discriminant factor analysis (DFA, and support vector machines (SVMs. Excellent results were obtained in the differentiation between unadulterated and adulterated argan oil with sunflower one. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to demonstrate whether the combined e-nose and e-tongue technologies could be successfully applied to the detection of adulteration of argan oil.

  15. SPR imaging based electronic tongue via landscape images for complex mixture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genua, Maria; Garçon, Laurie-Amandine; Mounier, Violette; Wehry, Hillary; Buhot, Arnaud; Billon, Martial; Calemczuk, Roberto; Bonnaffé, David; Hou, Yanxia; Livache, Thierry

    2014-12-01

    Electronic noses/tongues (eN/eT) have emerged as promising alternatives for analysis of complex mixtures in the domain of food and beverage quality control. We have recently developed an electronic tongue by combining surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) with an array of non-specific and cross-reactive receptors prepared by simply mixing two small molecules in varying and controlled proportions and allowing the mixtures to self-assemble on the SPRi prism surface. The obtained eT generated novel and unique 2D continuous evolution profiles (CEPs) and 3D continuous evolution landscapes (CELs) based on which the differentiation of complex mixtures such as red wine, beer and milk were successful. The preliminary experiments performed for monitoring the deterioration of UHT milk demonstrated its potential for quality control applications. Furthermore, the eT exhibited good repeatability and stability, capable of operating after a minimum storage period of 5 months.

  16. Tongue worm (Pentastomida) infection in ball pythons (Python regius) – a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałęcki, Remigiusz; Sokół, Rajmund; Dudek, Agnieszka

    Tongue worms (Pentastomida) are endoparasites causing pentastomiasis, an invasive disease representing a threat to exotic animals and humans. Animals acquire infection via the alimentary tract. In reptiles, the parasite is present in the lungs, resulting in symptoms from the respiratory system. Pentastomiasis may be asymptomatic, but nonspecific symptoms may occur at high parasite concentrations. Due to the harmful effects of many antiparasitic substances, tongue worm invasion in reptiles remains not fully treatable. Although pentasomiasis is rarely diagnosed in Poland, pentastomids were diagnosed in two ball pythons, who were patients of the “Poliklinika Weterynaryjna” veterinary clinic. They demonstrated problems with the respiratory system and a significant deterioration of health. Fenbendazole at a dose of 100 mg/kg b.w., repeated after 7 days was shown to be effective.

  17. [Mycological examination and the taste disorder test for the tongues of diabetes mellitus patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Takuro

    2008-12-01

    The mycological examination by the cotton swab method and the taste disorder test using the filter-paper method were taken for the tongues of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Candida albicans was isolated from 29 out of 81 patients. The mean serum HbA1c level of patients with C. albicans was significantly higher than that of patients without it. DM patients demonstrated significantly higher incidences of taste disorders than healthy controls, but there was no relationship between C. albicans of the tongue and taste disorders. The taste disorders tended to occur in the DM patients who had nerve complications. The results suggested the taste disorder test using the filter-paper methods contributes to easy detection of the nerve complications in DM patients.

  18. Tongue resting pressure of the tongue anchorage pad in different body positions: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, J; Xu, K; Gao, X; Xu, T

    2015-06-01

    We designed a modified transpalatal arch (tongue anchorage pad, TAP) to help control the vertical dimension. This study aimed to evaluate its efficiency by measuring the tongue resting pressure at different anteroposterior positions of the TAP in the upright and supine positions and to investigate the effect of changes in body position. Our study recruited 17 volunteers with individual normal occlusion (4 males, 13 females, age 22-33 years). An individualised TAP was designed for each subject. With a miniature sensor (FSS1500NS) installed in the device, we measured the pressure at the level of the distal second premolar (PM2), the first molar (M1) and the second molar (M2) in both the upright and supine positions. Nonparametric analysis was applied with the level of significance set at 0.05. In the upright position, tongue pressures obtained at PM2, M1 and M2 were 183.94, 130.81 and 113.07 Pa, respectively, with the maximum value detected at PM2 (P = 0.001). While in the supine position, pressures of 187.03, 156.87 and 201.69 Pa were detected at the same sites, with significantly higher values for M1 (P = 0.002) and M2 (P = 0.004). Tongue resting pressure decreases from the anterior aspect to the posterior aspect in the upright position. In the supine position, the pressure is consistent across the midline with pressure enhancement at M1 and M2. As many questions remain about this appliance and appropriate intruding force, further clinical and basic studies are required prior to its clinical implementation.

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymers as recognition materials for electronic tongues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tan-Phat; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2015-12-15

    For over three decades now, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have successfully been used for selective chemical sensing because the shape and size of their imprinted molecular cavities perfectly matched those of the target analyte molecules. Moreover, orientation of recognizing sites of these cavities corresponded to those of the binding sites of the template molecules. In contrast, electronic tongue (e-tongue) is usually an array of low-affinity recognition units. Its selectivity is based on recognition pattern or multivariate analysis. Merging these two sensing devices led to a synergetic hybrid sensor, an MIP based e-tongue. Fabrication of these e-tongues permitted simultaneous sensing and discriminating several analytes in complex solutions of many components so that these arrays compensated for limitation in cross-reactivity of MIPs. Apparently, analytical signals generated by MIP-based e-tongues, compared to those of ordinary sensor arrays, were more reliable where a unique pattern or 'fingerprint' for each analyte was generated. Additionally, several transduction platforms (from spectroscopic to electrochemical) engaged in constructing MIP-based e-tongues, found their broad and flexible applications. The present review critically evaluates achievements in recent developments of the MIP based e-tongues for chemosensing.

  20. Electronic Tongue for Quantitation of Contaminants in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Marlin; Kuhlman, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    An assembly of sensors, denoted an electronic tongue, is undergoing development as a prototype of compact devices for use in measuring concentrations of contaminants in water. Thus far, the electronic tongue has been tested on ions of Cu, Zn, Pb, and Fe and shown to respond to concentrations as low as about 10 parts per million. This electronic tongue is expected to be capable of measuring concentrations of other metal ions and organic compounds. Potential uses for electronic tongues include monitoring the chemical quality of water in a variety of natural, industrial, and laboratory settings; detecting micro-organisms indirectly by measuring microbially influenced corrosion; and characterizing compounds of interest to the pharmaceutical and food industries. This version of the electronic tongue includes a heater, a temperature sensor, an array of ion-specific electrodes, an oxidation/ reduction sensor pair, an electrical-conductivity sensor, and an array of galvanic cells, all on one compact ceramic substrate. Special-purpose electronic excitation and readout circuitry for the sensors has also been constructed. The main advantage of the electronic tongue, relative to electrodes of this type used traditionally to assess water quality, is extreme ruggedness. The types of measurements that can be performed by use of the sensors on the electronic tongue are quite varied. The best combination of types of measurements for a given application depends on the specific contaminants that one seeks to detect. Experimental studies to identify such combinations were in progress at the time of reporting the information for this article.

  1. Living in limbo: Being diagnosed with oral tongue cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Philiponis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oral tongue cancer presents clinical challenges to effective diagnosis that affect patient experience. Patient experience of the diagnostic process is poorly described, making opportunities for nursing intervention unclear. Methods: We qualitatively describe, using constant comparative analysis, oral tongue cancer diagnosis using data from a larger grounded theory study of oral tongue cancer survivorship. Using constant comparative analysis - in keeping with the methodology of the main study - we analyzed 16 survivor interviews for themes explaining the patient experience of oral tongue cancer diagnosis. Results: We termed the broader diagnostic process "living in limbo." This process includes the themes describing the peri-diagnostic process itself - "self-detected lesion," "lack of concern," "seeking help," "not a straightforward diagnosis," and "hearing the diagnosis." Entry into treatment concludes "Living in Limbo" and is described by the theme "worry and trust." Conclusions: Our findings are limited by retrospective interviews and participant homogeneity among other features. Future research with prospective designs and diverse groups of people at risk for and diagnosed with oral tongue cancer, as well as targeting those who have had negative biopsies with no eventual diagnosis of oral tongue cancer, will build on our findings. Further, study of patient experience in other sociocultural context and healthcare systems is needed to inform nursing science and practice. Finally, "living in limbo" suggests that clinician and public education about oral tongue cancer diagnosis is needed.

  2. Tongue prints: A novel biometric and potential forensic tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, T.; Jeddy, Nadeem; Nithya, S.

    2016-01-01

    Tongue is a vital internal organ well encased within the oral cavity and protected from the environment. It has unique features which differ from individual to individual and even between identical twins. The color, shape, and surface features are characteristic of every individual, and this serves as a tool for identification. Many modes of biometric systems have come into existence such as fingerprint, iris scan, skin color, signature verification, voice recognition, and face recognition. The search for a new personal identification method secure has led to the use of the lingual impression or the tongue print as a method of biometric authentication. Tongue characteristics exhibit sexual dimorphism thus aiding in the identification of the person. Emerging as a novel biometric tool, tongue prints also hold the promise of a potential forensic tool. This review highlights the uniqueness of tongue prints and its superiority over other biometric identification systems. The various methods of tongue print collection and the classification of tongue features are also elucidated. PMID:28123263

  3. Tongue prints: A novel biometric and potential forensic tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tongue is a vital internal organ well encased within the oral cavity and protected from the environment. It has unique features which differ from individual to individual and even between identical twins. The color, shape, and surface features are characteristic of every individual, and this serves as a tool for identification. Many modes of biometric systems have come into existence such as fingerprint, iris scan, skin color, signature verification, voice recognition, and face recognition. The search for a new personal identification method secure has led to the use of the lingual impression or the tongue print as a method of biometric authentication. Tongue characteristics exhibit sexual dimorphism thus aiding in the identification of the person. Emerging as a novel biometric tool, tongue prints also hold the promise of a potential forensic tool. This review highlights the uniqueness of tongue prints and its superiority over other biometric identification systems. The various methods of tongue print collection and the classification of tongue features are also elucidated.

  4. Morphological study of the northern pike (Esox lucius) tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghinezhad, Javad; Rahmati-holasoo, Hooman; Fayyaz, Sahel; Zargar, Ashkan

    2015-09-01

    The northern pike (Esox lucius) is a fresh water species belonging to the Esocidae family. It is a carnivorous fish feeding mostly on invertebrates and fishes. Due to the scantiness of relevant literature regarding the morphology of the tongue in fish we carried out this study with the aim of providing information on the dorsal surface morphology and histological structures of the tongue in E. lucius. The tongues of five E. lucius were examined using light- and scanning electron- microscopy (SEM) techniques. The SEM studies revealed the presence of numerous teeth, longitudinal mucosal strands and scattered taste buds spread on the tongue surface. Histological studies using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining showed that the musculature was not visible in the tongue of E. lucius. The tongue is composed of mucosa, and submucosa supported by osteocartilagionous skeleton. The mucosa consists of several layers of unicellular mucous cells interrupted by numerous teeth. The derivation of teeth from the underlying bronchial skeleton was visible in longitudinal section. The scattered taste buds with a typical onion shape were also present. Overall, the morphological features of the E. lucius tongue together suggested its mechanical and sensory roles. The findings of this study together with morphological and physiological data from other fishes contribute to the knowledge of the nutrition and feeding behavior in aquaculture species.

  5. On the Application of Mother tongue in Primary school English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘侠

    2013-01-01

    This paper first briefly reviews the application of mother tongue in primary school English teaching and then hackles the positive contribution of learners’ mother tongue thinking and mother tongue knowledge in English learning.Finally,it suggests that it is necessary for English teachers at the primary school to make use of mother tongue in timely and appropriate way.

  6. Explorations of the Similarities and Differences between the Mother Tongue and the Second Language Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宝权

    2001-01-01

    This paper mainly discusses the similarities and differences between the mother tongue and the second language learning. That is, major characteristics of the mother tongue acquisition, the second language with own peculiarities and big difference from the mother tongue, some significant similarities between the mother tongue and the second languages and the implication for classroom teaching.

  7. Leukokeratosis nicotina glossi-smokers' tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, A G; Van Wyk, C W

    1977-12-01

    "Leukokeratosis nicotina glossi" or "smokers' tongue" is a homogeneous leukoplakia with evenly distributed pin-point hemispherical depressions. Histologically, there is a loss of glossal papillae, hyperkeratosis, acanthosis and the formation of large drop-shaped rete pegs with central clefting and occasional parakeratotic plugging. Mitotic activity and atypia are not marked and there is no evidence of Candida species infection. In some respects the lesion histologically resembles verrucous carcinoma but, unlike that condition, papillomatosis is not clinically noticeable and an invasive "leading edge" is not apparent. All but one of the subjects in which the lesion was seen were men, all had concurrent leukokeratosis nicotina palati and two gave histories of laryngeal carcinoma.

  8. [A case of tongue base schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huishan; Yang, Feng; Zhuo, Mingying

    2013-09-01

    Published reports of benign nerve sheath tumors of the oropharynx especially at tongue base are extremely rare. They may slowly growing but represent a potential threat to the airway, prompt diagnosis and treatment are vital. To our knowledge, this case presents the rare clinical condition and the first giant one. Due to the rarity, awareness of the possibility of a schwannoma in various otolaryngological conditions is an important step in making a correct clinical diagnosis. Here we represent a rare case of a giant schwannoma that arose from valleculae projecting to supraglottis to cause swallowing difficult but no breathing problem. The mass was completely removed, and no recurrence during next 2 years follow-up.

  9. Schwannoma of the tongue in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukšić, Ivica; Müller, Danko; Virag, Mišo; Manojlović, Spomenka; Ostović, Karmen Trutin

    2011-09-01

    A schwannoma or neurilemmoma is a benign, slow growing, usually solitary and encapsulated tumour originating from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath. Approximately 25-40% of all schwannomas are seen in the soft tissues of the head and neck, often originate from the acoustic nerve. Intraoral schwannomas are rare and account for 1% of schwannomas of the head and neck region. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy diagnosed with a schwannoma of the tongue. The purpose of this report is to emphasize the possibility of diagnosing schwannoma among all other lingual lesions in children. The disease itself was diagnosed histologically after complete surgical excision. Five years after surgical treatment, the patient is without signs of recurrence. This paper highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of this very rare entity.

  10. Recent Progresses in Analysis of Tongue Manifestation for Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Bao-guo; CAI Yi-heng; ZHANG Xin-feng; SHEN Lan-sun

    2005-01-01

    Tongue diagnosis is one of the most precious and widely used diagnostic methods in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). However, due to its subjective, qualitative and experience-dependent nature, the studies on tongue characterization have been widely emphasized. This paper surveys recent progresses in analysis of tongue manifestation. These new developments include the cross-network and cross-media color reproduction of tongue image, the automatic segmentation of tongue body based on knowledge, the automatic analysis of curdiness and griminess for the tongue fur and the automatic analysis of plumpness, wryness and dot -thorn of tongue body. The clinic experiments verify the validity of these new methods.

  11. The pattern of tongue positions and properties of Kazak vowels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ruiqing

    2017-06-01

    Acoustic analysis of Kazak vowels has been undertaken and values of the first two formants are extracted as the data for the pattern of tongue positions. Both formant values and the pattern of tongue positions of Kazak vowels indicate that there is a relative minimal-pair contrast distribution among the vowels. Although all of the vowels are within the area of the cardinal vowels, most Kazak vowel are centralized and the ultimate of tongue positions is confined in a comparatively small area. Vowels [e] and [ɨ] are actually not that as the IPA signified.

  12. Tongue Strength is Associated with Grip Strength and Nutritional Status in Older Adult Inpatients of a Rehabilitation Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kotomi; Nakayama, Enri; Tohara, Haruka; Maeda, Tomomi; Sugimoto, Motonobu; Takehisa, Takahiro; Takehisa, Yozo; Ueda, Koichiro

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether tongue strength observed in older adult inpatients of a rehabilitation hospital is associated with muscle function, nutritional status, and dysphagia. A total of 174 older adult inpatients aged 65 years and older in rehabilitation (64 men, 110 women; median age, 84 years; interquartile range, 80-89 years) who were suspected of having reduced tongue strength due to sarcopenia were included in this study. Isometric tongue strength was measured using a device fitted with a disposable oral balloon probe. We evaluated age, muscle function as assessed by the Barthel index and grip strength, nutritional status as measured by the Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form (MNA-SF), body mass index, serum albumin, controlling nutritional status, and calf circumference and arm muscle area to assess muscle mass. In addition, the functional oral intake scale (FOIS) was used as an index of dysphagia. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that isometric tongue strength was independently associated with grip strength (coefficient = 0.33, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.54, p = 0.002), MNA-SF (coefficient = 0.74, 95 % CI 0.12-1.35, p = 0.019), and FOIS (coefficient = 0.02, 95 % CI 0.00-0.15, p = 0.047). To maintain and improve tongue strength in association with sarcopenic dysphagia, exercise therapy and nutritional therapy interventions, as well as direct interventions to address tongue strength, may be effective in dysphagia rehabilitation in older adult inpatients.

  13. Functional MRI of tongue motor tasks in patients with tongue cancer: observations before and after partial glossectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haupage, Samantha; Branski, Ryan C.; Kraus, Dennis [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Head and Neck Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Peck, Kyung K. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics and Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Hsu, Meier [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Holodny, Andrei [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The current study seeks to provide preliminary data regarding this central, adaptive response during tongue motor tasks utilizing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after glossectomy. Six patients, with confirmed histological diagnoses of oral tongue cancer, underwent fMRI before and 6 months after partial glossectomy. These data were compared to nine healthy controls. All subjects performed three tongue motor tasks during fMRI: tongue tapping (TT), dry swallow (Dry), and wet swallow (Wet). Following surgery, increased activation was subjectively observed in the superior parietal lobule, supplementary motor area, and anterior cingulate. Region of interest (ROI) analysis of the precentral gyrus confirmed increased cortical activity following surgery. In addition, comparisons between pre-surgical scans and controls suggested the dry swallow task was sensitive to elicit tongue-related activation in the precentral gyrus (p {<=} 0.05). The adaptive changes in the cortex following partial glossectomy reflect recruitment of the parietal, frontal, and cingulate cortex during tongue motor tasks. In addition, post-operative activation patterns more closely approximated control levels than the pre-operative scans. Furthermore, the dry swallow task appears most specific to elicit tongue-related cortical activity. (orig.)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  15. Intermittent peripheral tissue ischemia during coronary ischemia reduces myocardial infarction through a KATP-dependent mechanism: first demonstration of remote ischemic perconditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Smerup, M; Konstantinov, I E

    2006-01-01

    . Intermittent limb ischemia during myocardial ischemia reduces MI, preserves global systolic and diastolic function, and protects against arrhythmia during the reperfusion phase through a K(ATP) channel-dependent mechanism. Understanding this process may have important therapeutic implications for a range...

  16. Morphological evidence of local reflex arc in the rat's tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altdorfer, K; Zelles, T; Pongor, E; Fehér, Erzsébet

    2012-12-01

    Lingual components of the autonomic nervous system are considered to be the most rostral portion of the enteric nervous system. Therefore our aim was to study the intrinsic nerve cell bodies and synapses using immunohisto-, immunocytochemical methods. Several small groups of ganglia with cell bodies immunoreactive (IR) for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and substance P (SP) were observed just below the gustatory epithelium. A few somatostatin and galanin IR nerve cell bodies were also found. Many IR cell bodies were also demonstrated in the glands and next to blood vessels. Some of these cell bodies were multipolar and some of them were small neurons with an ovoid shape having only one process. Cell bodies positive for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were detected neither in the superficial nor in the deep portion. Electronmicroscopical analysis demonstrated different IR nerve fibres having axo-somatic and axo-dendritic synapses with other immunonegative cells. In a few cases VIP IR nerve processes were found to synaptize with other VIP positive nerve cell bodies. These results support the existance of intralingual reflex in the tongue, where the ganglia might have an integrative role of the different neuropeptide containing nerve fibres.

  17. Function of microorganisms in tongue coating in oral malodor%舌苔微生物在口臭中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁金龙(综述); 陈霄迟(审校)

    2013-01-01

    Although?the?dorsum?of?the?tongue?harbors?one?of?the?most?complex?microbiological?niches?in?human?ecology,?information?on?the?relationship?of?tongue?flora?with?health?and?disease?is?very?limited.?Similarly,?the?nature?of?the?tongue?coating?and?the?factors?that?influence?its?development?and?composition?are?almost?unknown.?Recently,?the?agents?that?cause?oral?malodour?have?been?identified.?These?agents?include?volatile?sulfur?compounds,?propionic?acid,?butyric?acid,?cadaverine,?putrescine,?indole,?skatole,?etc.,?and?especially,?hydrogen?sulfide?and?methyl?mercaptan.?Furthermore,?these?substances?had?a?significantly?positive?correlation?with?tongue?biofilms.?Tongue?coating?can?be?successfully?managed?by?combining?mechanical?cleaning(brushing,?tongue?brushing,?tongue?scraping)?and?various?chemical?solutions.?This?combination?can?effectively?reduce?bad?breath.?The?purpose?of?this?review?is?to?evaluate?the?present?knowledge?in?tongue?niche?and?tongue?coating?by?focusing?on?the?microbiology?of?the?tongue?biofilm.?Special?emphasis?will?be?given?on?the?evaluation?of?the?evidence?linking?tongue?biofilm?with?oral?halitosis.%舌背微生物群是人体生态学中最复杂的系统之一,但有关舌背微生物群对健康和疾病的影响却知之甚少,舌苔的组成及其影响因素大部分不为人知。近年来的研究证实,口臭与挥发性硫化物、丙酸、丁酸、尸胺、腐胺、吲哚和粪臭素等,特别是与硫化氢和甲硫醇的关系十分密切,而舌背的诸多明确或未明确的甚至特异的微生物与这些口臭物质关系密切。通过刷牙、刷舌和刮舌等机械清除法控制舌苔,联合应用抗菌药物控制舌背微生物群,或者机械清除和药物治疗相结合可以有效减轻口臭。本文就舌苔的微生态环境、舌苔细菌与口臭和舌苔的控制与口臭等研究进展作一综述。

  18. Learning where to feed: the use of social information in flower-visiting Pallas' long-tongued bats (Glossophaga soricina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Andreas; Kolar, Miriam; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam

    2016-03-01

    Social learning is a widespread phenomenon among vertebrates that influences various patterns of behaviour and is often reported with respect to foraging behaviour. The use of social information by foraging bats was documented in insectivorous, carnivorous and frugivorous species, but there are little data whether flower-visiting nectarivorous bats (Phyllostomidae: Glossophaginae) can acquire information about food from other individuals. In this study, we conducted an experiment with a demonstrator-observer paradigm to investigate whether flower-visiting Pallas' long-tongued bats (Glossophaga soricina) are able to socially learn novel flower positions via observation of, or interaction with, knowledgeable conspecifics. The results demonstrate that flower-visiting G. soricina are able to use social information for the location of novel flower positions and can thereby reduce energy-costly search efforts. This social transmission is explainable as a result of local enhancement; learning bats might rely on both visual and echo-acoustical perception and are likely to eavesdrop on auditory cues that are emitted by feeding conspecifics. We additionally tested the spatial memory capacity of former demonstrator bats when retrieving a learned flower position, and the results indicate that flower-visiting bats remember a learned flower position after several weeks.

  19. E-tongue 2 REDOX response to heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, M. G.; Kuhlman, G. M.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    E-Tongue 2 an array of electrochemical sensors including REDOX electrodes for Cylic Voltammetry and Anodic Stripping Voltammetry measurements, Galvanic cells for corrosion measurements, and Ion Selective Electrodes.

  20. The Novel Mechanical Property of Tongue of a Woodpecker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P Zhou; X Q Kong; C W Wu; Z Chen

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials such as bone, teeth, nacre and silk are known to have superior mechanical properties due to their specific nanocomposite structures. Here we report that the woodpecker's tongue exhibits a novel strength and flexibility due to its special composite micro/nanostructure. The tongue consists of a flexible cartilage-and-bone skeleton covered with a thin layer tissue of high strength and elasticity. At the interface between the cartilage-and-bone skeleton and the tissue layer, there is a hierarchical fiber-typed connection. It is this special design of the tongue that makes the woodpeckers efficient in catching the insects inside trees. The special micro/nanostructures of the woodpecker's tongue show us a potential method to enhance the interfacial connection between soft and hard material layers forr bio-inspired composite system designs.

  1. Weighted Nuclear Norm Minimization Based Tongue Specular Reflection Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenchao Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In computational tongue diagnosis, specular reflection is generally inevitable in tongue image acquisition, which has adverse impact on the feature extraction and tends to degrade the diagnosis performance. In this paper, we proposed a two-stage (i.e., the detection and inpainting pipeline approach to address this issue: (i by considering both highlight reflection and subreflection areas, a superpixel-based segmentation method was adopted for the detection of the specular reflection areas; (ii by extending the weighted nuclear norm minimization (WNNM model, a nonlocal inpainting method is proposed for specular reflection removal. Experimental results on synthetic and real images show that the proposed method is accurate in detecting the specular reflection areas and is effective in restoring tongue image with more natural texture information of tongue body.

  2. Evaluation of milk and dairy products by electronic tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Hruškar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of electronic tongue or taste sensor has been developed rapidly in the last decade due to their large potential in food quality control. The electronic tongue is based on electrochemical sensors combined with multivariate data analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminating ability of the electronic tongue for the recognition of different milk and yoghurt samples from different producers and various dairy products from one producer. The results were evaluated by multivariate data analysis - Principal components analysis. The electronic tongue α-ASTREE (Alpha M.O.S has successfully distinguished five brands of milk purchased on the Croatian market, five brands of yoghurt also purchased on Croatian market and differentiated among various products from one dairy producer.

  3. Tongue base schwannoma: report, review, and unique surgical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Raja; Carron, Michael A; Mathog, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    Base of tongue schwannomas are exceedingly rare and therefore often are not immediately included in the differential diagnosis and treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. After a thorough review of the English literature, we found only 6 previously reported cases of tongue base schwannomas. We are contributing a report of a 37-year-old woman with progressive dysphagia, dysarthria, and large tongue base schwannoma. Diagnosis was confirmed by imaging studies and biopsy followed by surgical excision designed to preserve nerve function. A number of surgical approaches have been described for tongue base schwannomas. Each has its own degree of postoperative morbidity. The use of a unilateral transcervical incision with blunt dissection was simple and quickly accomplished with protection of nearby nerves. Histologic identification of Antoni A and B areas along with strong and diffuse staining with S-100 stain pathologically completed the diagnosis of schwannoma.

  4. Ballistic tongue projection in chameleons maintains high performance at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher V; Deban, Stephen M

    2010-03-23

    Environmental temperature impacts the physical activity and ecology of ectothermic animals through its effects on muscle contractile physiology. Sprinting, swimming, and jumping performance of ectotherms decreases by at least 33% over a 10 degrees C drop, accompanied by a similar decline in muscle power. We propose that ballistic movements that are powered by recoil of elastic tissues are less thermally dependent than movements that rely on direct muscular power. We found that an elastically powered movement, ballistic tongue projection in chameleons, maintains high performance over a 20 degrees C range. Peak velocity and power decline by only 10%-19% with a 10 degrees C drop, compared to >42% for nonelastic, muscle-powered tongue retraction. These results indicate that the elastic recoil mechanism circumvents the constraints that low temperature imposes on muscle rate properties and thereby reduces the thermal dependence of tongue projection. We propose that organisms that use elastic recoil mechanisms for ecologically important movements such as feeding and locomotion may benefit from an expanded thermal niche.

  5. On the Atlantic cold tongue mode and the role of the Pacific ENSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. F. De Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dominant mode of coupled ocean-atmosphere variability in the Tropical Atlantic is analysed in this work from a melange of datasets, focusing on the seasonal development and evolution of the Bjerknes feedback responsible for the generation of the Atlantic cold tongue mode. The strength, seasonality and interannual variability of this mode is investigated through a joint EOF analysis of the anomalies of zonal wind velocity in the western basin together with sea surface temperature from the easternmost Tropical Atlantic, and analysed in conjunction with the depth of the 20 °C isotherm, representing the three mechanisms responsible for the generation of the Bjerknes feedback. Results from the EOF analyses confirm the robustness and seasonality of the Atlantic cold tongue mode, with a positive feedback phase peaking during boreal summer when the Bjerknes feedback is stronger. Analysis of an event in 2005 shows that the positive feedback is followed by a negative feedback phase triggered by the wind field and driven by oceanic heat advection. More importantly, we investigated the linearized impact of Niño events in the Pacific Ocean over the Atlantic by projecting the NINO 3.4 index over the Atlantic data. The Atlantic cold tongue mode has its variance reduced from 62% to 47% in the projected dataset, revealing that the Pacific ENSO has an inhibiting effect over its Atlantic counterpart.

  6. Oncologic and functional results after transhyoid surgical approach for cancer of the base of tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Juan P; Díaz-Molina, Juan Pablo; Moreno, Carla; Suárez, Carlos

    2011-08-01

    The optimal treatment for base of tongue cancer remains unclear, especially in advanced stages. We retrospectively review 84 previously untreated patients that underwent a transhyoid resection of a base of tongue carcinoma. Sixty-four patients (76%) underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Five patients had stage II disease, 6 had stage III, 58 had stage IVA, and 15 had stage IVB. The overall recurrence rate was 68%. Five-year disease-specific survival rates by stage were 100%, 67%, 27%, and 8% for stage II to IVB, respectively (p = .0007). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of lymph node metastases was an independent predictor of reduced disease-specific survival rates (p = .02). All patients maintained an intelligible voice, and oral alimentation was successfully recovered in 97.5% of them. The transhyoid approach allowed adequate resection of base of tongue cancers with low morbidity and acceptable functional results, but the oncologic outcomes in advanced stages are poor. Head Neck, 2011. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ultrastructure of the horse tongue: further observations on the lingual integumentary architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, C J; Levin, M; Lopes, M A

    2000-03-01

    This investigation examined primarily epidermal specializations of the adult horse tongue by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Samples were collected from seven regions of the normal tongue of various breeds of horse. The filiform papillae, present on the dorsal and lateral aspects but not the ventral aspect of the tongue, were short, slender and finger-like structures with variable-shaped terminae. The epidermal thickness and height of dermal ridges were reduced on fungiform and vallate papillae, but tissue architecture and keratinocyte ultrastructure of most of the lingual epidermis corresponded to the common mammalian epidermal paradigm. One unique finding was the highly localized clustering of epidermal cells with exceptionally high content of PAS-negative trichohyalin cytoplasmic granules at a location atop the dermal ridges and beneath the base of filiform papillae. These granular cells were immediately subjacent to clusters of clear, non-granulated epidermal cells. It is believed that this integumentary specialization may enhance the structural strength at this localized site of the tissue architecture, in relationship to the mechanical papillae.

  8. Monitoring of alcoholic fermentation using near infrared and mid infrared spectroscopies combined with electronic nose and electronic tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buratti, S., E-mail: susanna.buratti@unimi.it [Department of Food Science and Technology, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ballabio, D. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Giovanelli, G. [Department of Food Science and Technology, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dominguez, C.M. Zuluanga [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Alimentos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Bogota (Colombia); Moles, A.; Benedetti, S.; Sinelli, N. [Department of Food Science and Technology, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-07-04

    spectroscopies are useful to investigate molecular changes involved in wine fermentation while electronic nose and electronic tongue can be applied to detect the evolution of taste and aroma profile. Moreover, as demonstrated through the modeling of NIR, MIR, electronic nose and electronic tongue data, these non destructive methods are suitable for the monitoring of must-wine fermentation giving crucial information about the quality of the final product in agreement with chemical parameters. Although in this study the measurements were carried out in off-line mode, in future these non destructive techniques could be valid and simple tools, able to provide in-time information about the fermentation process and to assure the quality of wine.

  9. The Prevalence of Tongue Thrusting in Patients with Periodontal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    S.A Miremadi; A.A. Khoshkhounejad; E. Mahdavi

    2005-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Tongue thrust and/or its consequent swallowing pattern are amongst the parafunctional habits that have always been considered as etiological factors for dental disorders by different investigators.Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tongue thrusting and the incidence of periodontal disorders associated with this habit among patients referred to the Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Mat...

  10. An Electromyographic Study of Jaw and Tongue Reflexes in Frogs

    OpenAIRE

    熊井, 敏文; 野村, 浩道

    1983-01-01

    Electromyographic activities of jaw and tongue muscles produced reflexly by mechanical and chemical stimulation of various loci of orofacial region were studied in the frog, Rana nigromaculata. Temporal muscle activity occurred when mechanical stimuli were applied to the palatal ridge, lower lip, root of tongue and pharynx. Electromyograms of the masseter muscle were similar to that of the temporal muscle, but the masseter muscle activity was occurred ipsilaterally and was not occurred by the...

  11. SCHWANNOMA OF TONGUE, A RARE INTRAORAL NEOPLASM: CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas are truly encapsulated neoplasms of the human body and are always solitary. Only 1-2% occur intraorally with tongue being the most common site. A 20yr old male presented with a painless, slow growing swelling on the left side of the tongue for the past 1 year. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done and a benign mesenchymal lesion, possibility of Schwannoma was given. Biopsy of the tumour was performed and sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the diagnosis of Sc...

  12. Discrimination of Apple Liqueurs (Nalewka Using a Voltammetric Electronic Tongue, UV-Vis and Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Śliwińska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The capability of a phthalocyanine-based voltammetric electronic tongue to analyze strong alcoholic beverages has been evaluated and compared with the performance of spectroscopic techniques coupled to chemometrics. Nalewka Polish liqueurs prepared from five apple varieties have been used as a model of strong liqueurs. Principal Component Analysis has demonstrated that the best discrimination between liqueurs prepared from different apple varieties is achieved using the e-tongue and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Raman spectra coupled to chemometrics have not been efficient in discriminating liqueurs. The calculated Euclidean distances and the k-Nearest Neighbors algorithm (kNN confirmed these results. The main advantage of the e-tongue is that, using PLS-1, good correlations have been found simultaneously with the phenolic content measured by the Folin–Ciocalteu method (R2 of 0.97 in calibration and R2 of 0.93 in validation and also with the density, a marker of the alcoholic content method (R2 of 0.93 in calibration and R2 of 0.88 in validation. UV-Vis coupled with chemometrics has shown good correlations only with the phenolic content (R2 of 0.99 in calibration and R2 of 0.99 in validation but correlations with the alcoholic content were low. Raman coupled with chemometrics has shown good correlations only with density (R2 of 0.96 in calibration and R2 of 0.85 in validation. In summary, from the three holistic methods evaluated to analyze strong alcoholic liqueurs, the voltammetric electronic tongue using phthalocyanines as sensing elements is superior to Raman or UV-Vis techniques because it shows an excellent discrimination capability and remarkable correlations with both antioxidant capacity and alcoholic content—the most important parameters to be measured in this type of liqueurs.

  13. Atlas-Based Automatic Generation of Subject-Specific Finite Element Tongue Meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijar, Ahmad; Rohan, Pierre-Yves; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2016-01-01

    Generation of subject-specific 3D finite element (FE) models requires the processing of numerous medical images in order to precisely extract geometrical information about subject-specific anatomy. This processing remains extremely challenging. To overcome this difficulty, we present an automatic atlas-based method that generates subject-specific FE meshes via a 3D registration guided by Magnetic Resonance images. The method extracts a 3D transformation by registering the atlas' volume image to the subject's one, and establishes a one-to-one correspondence between the two volumes. The 3D transformation field deforms the atlas' mesh to generate the subject-specific FE mesh. To preserve the quality of the subject-specific mesh, a diffeomorphic non-rigid registration based on B-spline free-form deformations is used, which guarantees a non-folding and one-to-one transformation. Two evaluations of the method are provided. First, a publicly available CT-database is used to assess the capability to accurately capture the complexity of each subject-specific Lung's geometry. Second, FE tongue meshes are generated for two healthy volunteers and two patients suffering from tongue cancer using MR images. It is shown that the method generates an appropriate representation of the subject-specific geometry while preserving the quality of the FE meshes for subsequent FE analysis. To demonstrate the importance of our method in a clinical context, a subject-specific mesh is used to simulate tongue's biomechanical response to the activation of an important tongue muscle, before and after cancer surgery.

  14. Grounding and calving cycle of Mertz Ice Tongue revealed by shallow Mertz Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwei; Holland, David M.; Cheng, Xiao; Gong, Peng

    2016-09-01

    A recent study, using remote sensing, provided evidence that a seafloor shoal influenced the 2010 calving event of the Mertz Ice Tongue (MIT), by partially grounding the MIT several years earlier. In this paper, we start by proposing a method to calculate firn air content (FAC) around Mertz from seafloor-touching icebergs. Our calculations indicate the FAC around Mertz region as 4.87 ± 1.31 m. We then design an indirect method of using freeboard and sea surface height data extracted from ICESat/GLAS, FAC, and relatively accurate seafloor topography to detect grounding sections of the MIT between 2002 and 2008 and analyze the process of grounding prior to the calving event. By synthesizing remote sensing data, we point out that the grounding position was localized northeast of the Mertz ice front close to the Mertz Bank. The grounding outlines of the tongue caused by the Mertz Bank are extracted as well. From 2002 to 2008, the grounding area increased and the grounding became more pronounced. Additionally, the ice tongue could not effectively climb over the Mertz Bank in following the upstream ice flow direction and that is why MIT rotated clockwise after late 2002. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the area-increasing trend of the MIT changed little after calving (˜ 36 km2 a-1), thus allowing us to use remote sensing to estimate the elapsed time until the MIT can reground on and be bent by the shoal. This period is approximately 70 years. Our observations suggest that the calving of the MIT is a cyclical process controlled by the presence of the shallow Mertz Bank location and the flow rate of the tongue. This calving cycle also explains the cyclic variations in sea-surface conditions around the Mertz detected by earlier studies.

  15. Discrimination of Apple Liqueurs (Nalewka) Using a Voltammetric Electronic Tongue, UV-Vis and Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska, Magdalena; Garcia-Hernandez, Celia; Kościński, Mikołaj; Dymerski, Tomasz; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek; Śliwińska-Bartkowiak, Małgorzata; Jurga, Stefan; Garcia-Cabezon, Cristina; Rodriguez-Mendez, Maria Luz

    2016-10-09

    The capability of a phthalocyanine-based voltammetric electronic tongue to analyze strong alcoholic beverages has been evaluated and compared with the performance of spectroscopic techniques coupled to chemometrics. Nalewka Polish liqueurs prepared from five apple varieties have been used as a model of strong liqueurs. Principal Component Analysis has demonstrated that the best discrimination between liqueurs prepared from different apple varieties is achieved using the e-tongue and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Raman spectra coupled to chemometrics have not been efficient in discriminating liqueurs. The calculated Euclidean distances and the k-Nearest Neighbors algorithm (kNN) confirmed these results. The main advantage of the e-tongue is that, using PLS-1, good correlations have been found simultaneously with the phenolic content measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method (R² of 0.97 in calibration and R² of 0.93 in validation) and also with the density, a marker of the alcoholic content method (R² of 0.93 in calibration and R² of 0.88 in validation). UV-Vis coupled with chemometrics has shown good correlations only with the phenolic content (R² of 0.99 in calibration and R² of 0.99 in validation) but correlations with the alcoholic content were low. Raman coupled with chemometrics has shown good correlations only with density (R² of 0.96 in calibration and R² of 0.85 in validation). In summary, from the three holistic methods evaluated to analyze strong alcoholic liqueurs, the voltammetric electronic tongue using phthalocyanines as sensing elements is superior to Raman or UV-Vis techniques because it shows an excellent discrimination capability and remarkable correlations with both antioxidant capacity and alcoholic content-the most important parameters to be measured in this type of liqueurs.

  16. Effects of tongue pressing effortful swallow in older healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taeok; Kim, Youngsun

    2016-01-01

    The risk of swallowing disorders is increased for older individuals due to weak tongue and pharyngeal muscle strength. This study was appraised the value of a preventative approach by developing the tongue pressing effortful swallow (TPES) applied using a home-based and self-administered procedure. The TPES was developed by combining two swallowing exercises: tongue strengthening exercise and the effortful swallow. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the TPES on maximum tongue pressure and peak amplitude of submental muscle activity in older individuals. 27 older individuals (mean 73 years) performed a 4-week TPES. The exercise program was adapted to a home-based and self-administered procedure. The maximum tongue pressure was measured by the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument and peak amplitude of submental muscle activity by surface electromyography (sEMG). Statistical comparisons were made by a matched pairs t-test (psEMG did not differ between before and after exercises. The TPES had a positive impact in older individuals. The TPES, a combining exercise, was possible because two exercises had common physiological events. The TPES was a more innovative and efficient approach than the tongue strengthening exercise alone. In addition, older individuals were able to perform the swallowing exercise at home and by themselves with little assistance. Future research needs to refine the TPES and apply it to patients with dysphagia. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Enlarged tongue due to primary systemic amyloidosis:clinicopathologic observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘卫红; 李娜萍; 梁国芬

    2004-01-01

    @@Primary amyloidosis (AL) is characterized by deposition of abnormal extra cellular protein in the form of fibrils in many organs, especially the heart, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and peripheral nervous system.1 Involvement of the tongue is not uncommon in primary AL. In 22 % to 26 % of patients suffering from AL, amyloid deposition in the tongue can result in an enlarged tongue.2 Lingual changes arising from localization or from all over, AL has been reported frequently as initial signs of the disease. Macroscopically, it is difficult to distinguish AL of the tongue from other lesions. In view of the variety of protein species involved and the wide spectrum of possible clinical presentations,3 the diagnosis of lingual AL is frequently overlooked, because immunohistochemical studies of such cases have not been undertaken. Here we describe two male patients with primary systemic AL who developed enlarged tongues. In addition to the manifestation of lingual AL, in which oral signs were the primary indicators of the disease, we describe the immunohistochemical findings of the tongue to discuss diagnostic criteria for lingual amyloid in primary AL.

  18. Properties of Magnetic Tongues over a Solar Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Poisson, M; Fuentes, M López; Mandrini, C H

    2016-01-01

    The photospheric spatial distribution of the main magnetic polarities of bipolar active regions (ARs) presents during their emergence deformations are known as magnetic tongues. They are attributed to the presence of twist in the toroidal magnetic flux-tubes that form the ARs. The aim of this article is to study the twist of newly emerged ARs from the evolution of magnetic tongues observed in photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms. We apply the procedure described by Poisson et al. (2015, Solar Phys. 290, 727) to ARs observed over the full Solar Cycle 23 and the beginning of Cycle 24. Our results show that the hemispherical rule obtained using the tongues as a proxy of the twist has a weak sign-dominance (53 % in the southern hemisphere and 58 % in the northern hemisphere). By defining the variation of the tongue angle, we characterize the strength of the magnetic tongues during different phases of the AR emergence. We find that there is a tendency of the tongues to be stronger during the beginning of the em...

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  1. Complete Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  4. Quantitative Contributions of the Muscles of the Tongue, Floor-of-Mouth, Jaw, and Velum to Tongue-to-Palate Pressure Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Jaffe, Debra M.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Finnegan, Eileen M.; Van Daele, Douglas J.; Luschei, Erich S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between tongue-to-palate pressure and the electromyography (EMG) measured from the mylohyoid, anterior belly of the digastric, geniohyoid, medial pterygoid, velum, genioglossus, and intrinsic tongue muscles. Methods: Seven healthy adults performed tongue-to-palate pressure…

  5. Reduced ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) mismatch following endobronchial valve insertion demonstrated by Gallium-68 V/Q photon emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Paul; Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Callahan, Jason; Siva, Shankar; Hofman, Michael S; Steinfort, Daniel P

    2017-09-01

    Endobronchial valves (EBVs) are increasingly deployed in the management of severe emphysema. Initial studies focussed on volume reduction as the mechanism, with subsequent improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). More recent studies have emphasized importance of perfusion on predicting outcomes, though findings have been inconsistent. Gallium-68 ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) photon emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is a novel imaging modality with advantages in spatial resolution, quantitation, and speed over conventional V/Q scintigraphy. We report a pilot case in which V/Q-PET/CT demonstrated discordant findings compared with quantitative CT analysis, and directed left lower lobe EBV placement. The patient experienced a significant improvement in 6-min walk distance (6MWD) without change in spirometry. Post-EBV V/Q-PET/CT demonstrated a marked decrease in unmatched (detrimental) V/Q areas and improvement in overall V/Q matching on post-EBV V/Q-PET/CT. These preliminary novel findings suggest that EBVs improve V/Q matching and may explain the observed functional improvements.

  6. A biological/chemical process for reduced waste and energy consumption, Caprolactam production: Phase 1, Select microorganisms and demonstrate feasibility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St.Martin, E.J.

    1995-08-01

    A novel biological/chemical process for converting cyclohexane into caprolactam was investigated. Microorganisms in a bioreactor would be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone followed by chemical synthesis of caprolactam using ammonia. The proposed bioprocess would be more energy efficient and reduce byproducts and wastes that are generated by the current chemical process. We have been successful in isolating from natural soil and water samples two microorganisms that can utilize cyclohexane as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. These microorganisms were shown to have the correct metabolic intermediates and enzymes to convert cyclohexane into cyclohexanol, cyclohexanone and caprolactone. Genetic techniques to create and select for caprolactone hydrolase negative-mutants are being developed. These blocked-mutants will be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone but, because of the block, be unable to metabolize the caprolactone further and excrete it as a final end product.

  7. Beer classification by means of a potentiometric electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetó, Xavier; Gutiérrez-Capitán, Manuel; Calvo, Daniel; del Valle, Manel

    2013-12-01

    In this work, an electronic tongue (ET) system based on an array of potentiometric ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) for the discrimination of different commercial beer types is presented. The array was formed by 21 ISEs combining both cationic and anionic sensors with others with generic response. For this purpose beer samples were analyzed with the ET without any pretreatment rather than the smooth agitation of the samples with a magnetic stirrer in order to reduce the foaming of samples, which could interfere into the measurements. Then, the obtained responses were evaluated using two different pattern recognition methods, principal component analysis (PCA), which allowed identifying some initial patterns, and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) in order to achieve the correct recognition of sample varieties (81.9% accuracy). In the case of LDA, a stepwise inclusion method for variable selection based on Mahalanobis distance criteria was used to select the most discriminating variables. In this respect, the results showed that the use of supervised pattern recognition methods such as LDA is a good alternative for the resolution of complex identification situations. In addition, in order to show an ET quantitative application, beer alcohol content was predicted from the array data employing an artificial neural network model (root mean square error for testing subset was 0.131 abv).

  8. Effects of tongue-hold swallows on suprahyoid muscle activation according to the relative tongue protrusion length: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Tongue-hold swallow (THS) is a therapeutic maneuver used to increase the posterior pharyngeal wall motion during swallowing. This maneuver has also been reported to result in increased activation of the suprahyoid muscles. The hypothesis of this study was that the degree of suprahyoid muscle activation would depend on the tongue protrusion-length. The aim of this study was to investigate the activation levels of the suprahyoid muscles by surface electromyography (sEMG) while performing the THS maneuver at three tongue-protrusion lengths. Suprahyoid muscle activity during THSs was recorded in 25 adult volunteers (17 women and 8 men; age range 20-38 years). To record the activity of the suprahyoid muscles while the participants performed the maneuver, surface wireless EMG electrodes separated by a distance of 1 cm were placed on the skin on both sides of the midline under the chin. Each activity was recorded three times. Data analysis was performed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Our results revealed that participants exhibited greater electrical activity during THS with 2/3rd or maximal tongue protrusion as compared to THS with 1/3rd tongue protrusion (p ≤ 0.001). To maximize the therapeutic effect of the THS maneuver, it is advised to protrude the tongue maximally as long as swallowing is possible.

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  12. Field tests demonstrating reduced activity of ivermectin and moxidectin against small strongyles in horses on 14 farms in Central Kentucky in 2007-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Eugene T; Tolliver, Sharon C; Collins, Sandra S; Ionita, Mariana; Kuzmina, Tetiana A; Rossano, Mary

    2011-02-01

    Efficacy of ivermectin (IVM) and moxidectin (MOX) against small strongyles was evaluated in horses (n=363) in field tests on 14 farms in Central Kentucky between 2007 and 2009. Most of the horses were yearlings but a few were weanlings and mares. The number of horses treated with IVM was 255 and those treated with MOX was 108. Horses on six farms were allotted into two groups. One group was treated with each of the two drugs, whereas horses on the other eight farms were treated with only one of the two drugs--IVM on six farms and MOX on two farms. Strongyle eggs per gram of feces (EPGs) compared to initial use of IVM and MOX returned almost twice as quickly after treatment of horses on all of the farms. IVM has been used much more extensively in this geographical area than MOX. Reduced activity of MOX was evident even on farms with rare or no apparent previous use of MOX but with probable extensive use of IVM.

  13. Embryonic tongue morphogenesis in an organ culture model of mouse mandibular arches: blocking Sonic hedgehog signaling leads to microglossia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Daisuke; Soeno, Yuuichi; Fujita, Kazuya; Sato, Kaori; Aoba, Takaaki; Taya, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Mouse tongue development is initiated with the formation of lateral lingual swellings just before fusion between the mediodorsal surfaces of the mandibular arches at around embryonic day 11.0. Here, we investigated the role of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling in embryonic mouse tongue morphogenesis. For this, we used an organ culture model of the mandibular arches from mouse embryos at embryonic day 10.5. When the Shh signaling inhibitor jervine was added to the culture medium for 24-96 h, the formation of lateral lingual swellings and subsequent epithelial invagination into the mesenchyme were impaired markedly, leading to a hypoplastic tongue with an incomplete oral sulcus. Notably, jervine treatment reduced the proliferation of non-myogenic mesenchymal cells at the onset of forming the lateral lingual swellings, whereas it did not affect the proliferation and differentiation of a myogenic cell lineage, which created a cell community at the central circumferential region of the lateral lingual swellings as seen in vivo and in control cultures lacking the inhibitor. Thus, epithelium-derived Shh signaling stimulates the proliferation of non-myogenic mesenchymal cells essential for forming lateral lingual swellings and contributes to epithelial invagination into the mesenchyme during early tongue development.

  14. Exercise-induced rescue of tongue function without striatal dopamine sparing in a rat neurotoxin model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Schaser, Allison J; Russell, John A

    2013-09-01

    Unilateral lesions to the medial forebrain bundle with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lead to force and timing deficits during a complex licking task. We hypothesized that training targeting tongue force generation during licking would improve timing and force measures and also lead to striatal dopamine sparing. Nine month-old male Fisher344/Brown Norway rats were used in this experiment. Sixteen rats were in the control condition and received tongue exercise (n=8) or no exercise (n=8). Fourteen rats were in the 6-OHDA lesion condition and underwent tongue exercise (n=7) and or no exercise (n=7). Following 4 weeks of training and post-training measures, all animals underwent bilateral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves to measure muscle contractile properties and were then transcardially perfused and brain tissues collected for immunohistochemistry to examine striatal dopamine content. Results demonstrated that exercise animals performed better for maximal force, average force, and press rate than their no-exercise counterparts, and the 6-OHDA animals that underwent exercise performed as well as the Control No Exercise group. Interestingly, there were no group differences for tetanic muscle force, despite behavioral recovery of forces. Additionally, behavioral and neurochemical analyses indicate that there were no differences in striatal dopamine. Thus, targeted exercise can improve tongue force and timing deficits related to 6-OHDA lesions and this exercise likely has a central, versus peripheral (muscle strength) mechanism. However, this mechanism is not related to sparing of striatal dopamine content. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High-speed real-time magnetic resonance imaging of fast tongue movements in elite horn players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, Peter W; Frahm, Jens; Voit, Dirk; Joseph, Arun A; Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the use of high-speed real-time (RT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in quantifying very rapid motor function within the oropharyngeal cavity of six elite horn players. Based on simultaneous sound recordings, the efficacy of RT-MRI films at 30 and 100 frames per second (fps) was assessed for tongue movements associated with double tonguing performance. Serial images with a nominal temporal resolution of 10.0 and 33.3 ms were obtained by highly undersampled radial fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences (5 and 17 spokes, respectively) using complementary sets of spokes for successive acquisitions (extending over 9 and 5 frames, respectively). Reconstructions of high-speed images were obtained by temporally regularized nonlinear inversion (NLINV) as previously described. A customized MATLAB toolkit was developed for the extraction of line profiles from MRI films to quantify temporal phenomena associated with task performance. The analyses reveal that for the present setting, which required the use of a temporal median filter to optimize image quality, acquisition rates of 30 fps are inadequate to accurately detect tongue movements during double tonguing, but that rates of 100 fps do allow for a precise quantification of movement. These data for the first time demonstrate the extreme performance of elite horn players. High-speed RT-MRI offers so far unavailable opportunities to study the oropharyngeal movements during brass playing with future potential for teaching and the treatment of patients suffering from dystonia.

  16. Prey transport kinematics in Tupinambis teguixin and Varanus exanthematicus: conservation of feeding behavior in 'chemosensory-tongued' lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, J A; McBrayer, L D; Reilly, S M

    2000-02-01

    Although lizards have been predicted to show extensive intraoral prey-processing behaviors, quantitative analyses of the types of prey-processing behavior they demonstrate and of their kinematics have been limited. The more basal lizard lineages (Iguanians) have undergone some study, but the prey-processing repertoires of crown taxa have not been thoroughly examined and quantitative comparisons of behaviors within or among species have not been made. In this study, the prey transport behavior of the savannah monitor (Varanus exanthematicus) and gold tegu (Tupinambis teguixin) are described. Although these two lineages have independently evolved tongues that are highly specialized for chemoreception, we found that they share the same three distinct types of transport behavior. These behavior patterns are (i) a purely inertial transport, (ii) an inertial transport with use of the tongue, and (iii) a non-inertial lingual transport. The tongue is used extensively in both the inertial and the purely lingual transport behaviors. More than 75 % of all transport behaviors involved tongue movements. These species appear to exhibit a conservation of feeding kinematics compared with patterns known for basal lizards. A hypothesis for the evolution of inertial feeding is proposed.

  17. Ischaemic necrosis of the tongue as a rare complication of cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulstaert, E; Roggeman, E; Beeckman, A-S; Moerman, M; Vanderstraeten, E; Rasquin, K; Monsaert, E; Baert, D; Dewint, P; Burvenich, P; Van Steenkiste, C

    2015-12-01

    Ischaemic necrosis of the tongue is an unusual clinical finding. In most cases it is associated with vasculitis, particularly giant cell arteritis (GCA). Other causes include profound cardiogenic shock. We report a case of tongue necrosis in an 81-year-old Caucasian woman. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for cardiogenic shock. Swelling of the tongue was reported before intubation and evolved into tongue ischaemia and necrosis of the tip of the tongue. After surgical debridement the patient recovered. To our knowledge, this is the second report of a patient surviving tongue necrosis resulting from cardiogenic shock.

  18. [Methodological study on digitalization of tongue image in traditional Chinese medical diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue; Yang, Jie; Shen, Li

    2004-12-01

    This is a research aimed at proposing a computerized tongue analysis method based on computerized image processing for quantizing the tongue properties in traditional Chinese medical diagnosis. The chromatic algorithm and 2-D Gabor wavelet transformation are applied to segmenting tongue from original image. The statistical method is adopted in identifying the colors of each pixel, which are attributed to the tongue substance and coating respectively. Thickness of tongue coating is determined by energy of 2-D Gabor wavelet coefficients (GWTE). The distribution of GWTE and invariant moment algorithm are used to judge the tongue texture. The experiment result shows that all methods proposed in this paper are effective.

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  20. ICT Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Bay, Gina

    In this demonstration we present and discuss two interrelated on-line learning resources aimed at supporting international students at Danish universities in building study skills (the Study Metro) and avoiding plagiarism (Stopplagiarism). We emphasize the necessity of designing online learning r...

  1. Effects of the Amplitude and Frequency of Salinity Fluctuation on the Body Composition and Energy Budget of Juvenile Tongue Sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sachin Onkar KHAIRNAR; TIAN Xiangli; FANG Ziheng; DONG Shuanglin

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the amplitude (±2, ±4, ±6, and ±8) and frequency (2, 4, and 8d) of salinity fluctuation on the body composi-tion and energy budget of juvenile tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) were investigated in a 64-d experiment. Results showed that the amplitude and frequency of salinity fluctuation had significant interaction and both substantially affected the final weight and specific growth rate of juvenile tongue sole. The tongue sole exhibited better growth in treatments with moderate amplitude and fre-quency of salinity fluctuation (amplitude ±4–6; frequency 4–8d) than in other treatments and the control. In terms of energy budget, salinity fluctuation strongly affected the proportions of energy components, including those deposited for growth and lost in respira-tion, feces, and excretion. Moderately amplitude and frequency of salinity fluctuationg that favored the growth of tongue sole parti-tioned more energy for growth and less energy for metabolism than the constant and other amplitude and frequency of salinity fluc-tuation. Average energy budget for tongue sole at moderately fluctuating salinity was determined to be 100C(food)=30.92G(growth) +10.30F(feces)+6.77U(excretion)+52.01R(respiration). Energetic advantage at moderately fluctuating salinity, including increased energy intake, high assimilation efficiency, reduced metabolism expenditure, and more energy partitioned into growth, might account for the enhancement of tongue sole growth. Commercial farmers are recommended to rear juvenile tongue sole with moderate salin-ity fluctuations for better growth performance of this species.

  2. Effect of tongue position on masseter and temporalis electromyographic activity during swallowing and maximal voluntary clenching: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, C; Astaburuaga, F; Falace, D; Ramirez, V; Manns, A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the tonic electromyographic (EMG) activity of the temporalis and masseter muscles following placement of the tongue either on the palate or in the floor of the mouth during swallowing and maximal voluntary clenching (MVC). Thirty healthy dental students with natural dentition and bilateral molar support, between the ages of 18 and 22, with no prior history of oro-facial injury, or current or past pain in the jaw, mouth or tongue participated in the study. Tonic masseter and temporalis EMG activities were recorded using surface electrodes. Subjects were instructed to passively place the tongue either on the anterior hard palate or in the floor of the mouth during swallowing and MVC. At each tongue position, the resulting EMG was recorded. During swallowing, no significant difference in EMG activity was found either for the masseter (P-value = 0.1592) or the temporalis (P-value = 0.0546) muscles, regardless of the tongue position. During MVC, there was a statistically significant difference for both the masseter (P-value = 0.0016) and the temporalis (P-value = 0.0277) muscles with lower levels recorded with the tongue in the floor of the mouth. This study found that in normal, pain-free subjects, placing the tongue in the floor of the mouth significantly reduces masticatory muscle activity during MVC. Thus, it may be considered as a possible therapeutic option to decrease masticatory muscle activity; however, further research is needed in patients with oro-facial pain.

  3. Assessment of the impact of tongue size in patients with bimaxillary protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesina, Bola Ayodele; Otuyemi, Olayinka Donald; Kolawole, Kikelomo Adebanke; Adeyemi, Abigail Tokunbo

    2013-06-01

    Tongue size, posture and pressure are considered to have significant influences on the positioning of dentoalveolar structures. Based on the equilibrium theory, forward resting posture of the tongue with light force and long duration could have both a horizontal and vertical effect on teeth. Bimaxillary proclination, a malocclusion trait often seen in African descents with multifactorial etiological factors, could well be related to tongue dimensions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between tongue dimensions and bimaxillary proclination patients. One hundred selected lateral cephalometric radiographs of consecutive orthodontic patients who met the study criteria were divided into study (bimaxillary proclination with interincisal angle [I/I]bimaxillary proclination group were higher than those in the control group except for tongue proportion. These differences were statistically significant for tongue thickness, tongue length and intermaxillary space length (P bimaxillary proclination and a normal interincisal relationship (P > 0.05). None of the variables (tongue thickness, tongue length, intermaxillary space length, tongue area and percentage tongue proportion) could be used as predictors for interincisal relationship. Tongue length, thickness and intermaxillary space length were significantly different between the bimaxillary and normal subjects. However, none of the measured tongue variables could be used as a predictor for incisor relationship. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Transcriptomic dissection of tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Joel L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The head and neck/oral squamous cell carcinoma (HNOSCC is a diverse group of cancers, which develop from many different anatomic sites and are associated with different risk factors and genetic characteristics. The oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC is one of the most common types of HNOSCC. It is significantly more aggressive than other forms of HNOSCC, in terms of local invasion and spread. In this study, we aim to identify specific transcriptomic signatures that associated with OTSCC. Results Genome-wide transcriptomic profiles were obtained for 53 primary OTSCCs and 22 matching normal tissues. Genes that exhibit statistically significant differences in expression between OTSCCs and normal were identified. These include up-regulated genes (MMP1, MMP10, MMP3, MMP12, PTHLH, INHBA, LAMC2, IL8, KRT17, COL1A2, IFI6, ISG15, PLAU, GREM1, MMP9, IFI44, CXCL1, and down-regulated genes (KRT4, MAL, CRNN, SCEL, CRISP3, SPINK5, CLCA4, ADH1B, P11, TGM3, RHCG, PPP1R3C, CEACAM7, HPGD, CFD, ABCA8, CLU, CYP3A5. The expressional difference of IL8 and MMP9 were further validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The Gene Ontology analysis suggested a number of altered biological processes in OTSCCs, including enhancements in phosphate transport, collagen catabolism, I-kappaB kinase/NF-kappaB signaling cascade, extracellular matrix organization and biogenesis, chemotaxis, as well as suppressions of superoxide release, hydrogen peroxide metabolism, cellular response to hydrogen peroxide, keratinization, and keratinocyte differentiation in OTSCCs. Conclusion In summary, our study provided a transcriptomic signature for OTSCC that may lead to a diagnosis or screen tool and provide the foundation for further functional validation of these specific candidate genes for OTSCC.

  5. Building sensory receptors on the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Bruce; Witt, Martin

    2004-12-01

    Neurotrophins, neurotrophin receptors and sensory neurons are required for the development of lingual sense organs. For example, neurotrophin 3 sustains lingual somatosensory neurons. In the traditional view, sensory axons will terminate where neurotrophin expression is most pronounced. Yet, lingual somatosensory axons characteristically terminate in each filiform papilla and in each somatosensory prominence within a cluster of cells expressing the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), rather than terminating among the adjacent cells that secrete neurotrophin 3. The p75NTR on special specialized clusters of epithelial cells may promote axonal arborization in vivo since its over-expression by fibroblasts enhances neurite outgrowth from overlying somatosensory neurons in vitro. Two classical observations have implicated gustatory neurons in the development and maintenance of mammalian taste buds--the early arrival times of embryonic innervation and the loss of taste buds after their denervation in adults. In the modern era more than a dozen experimental studies have used early denervation or neurotrophin gene mutations to evaluate mammalian gustatory organ development. Necessary for taste organ development, brain-derived neurotrophic factor sustains developing gustatory neurons. The cardinal conclusion is readily summarized: taste buds in the palate and tongue are induced by innervation. Taste buds are unstable: the death and birth of taste receptor cells relentlessly remodels synaptic connections. As receptor cells turn over, the sensory code for taste quality is probably stabilized by selective synapse formation between each type of gustatory axon and its matching taste receptor cell. We anticipate important new discoveries of molecular interactions among the epithelium, the underlying mesenchyme and gustatory innervation that build the gustatory papillae, their specialized epithelial cells, and the resulting taste buds.

  6. Does Mother Tongue Interfere in Second Language Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Nur Denizer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mother tongue largely refers to not only the language one learns from one’s mother but also the speaker’s dominant and home language. It’s also called native language. This study was conducted to find whether mother tongue interferences in second-language learning, and if so; whether it affects the learners’ performance in four language skills, and also in which skill(s it has the biggest effect. Data collection tool included a questionnaire by which participants were asked to rate the questions and tick-circle or write in the correct blank. The questionnaire was based on both quantitative and qualitative approaches with the help of 4-point Likert-scale questions and one open-ended question at the last part. The participants of the study were 20 volunteer students (15 females and 5 males in Uludag University on whom the questionnaire was randomly applied.  They ranged in age from 18 to 40 and the mean age was 23. Their mother tongue was Turkish, and they knew English as a foreign language. The questionnaire shows that mother tongue interferes with second language learning in some way. In English language, the most challenging part was Grammar, while the most difficult and influenced skills was Speaking. In addition, participants had difficulty with speaking without any preparation. When it comes to having difficulty, participants had difficulty with determiners, English tenses and articles. The results indicated the interference of mother tongue in almost all aspects.

  7. Policy and experiment in mother tongue literacy in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinnaso, F. Niyi

    1993-07-01

    The advocacy for initial mother tongue literacy in elementary schools and in adult education has been intensified within the past three decades, reflecting new attitudes to cultural diversity, especially to multilingual and multicultural education. This paper assesses the efforts made in one country, Nigeria, to achieve mother tongue literacy for its citizens, through a comparative analysis of the national policy on mother tongue literacy and the Ife experimental project, whose major purpose was to test the effectiveness of the use of the mother tongue as a medium of instruction throughout the six years of primary education. Although, like the Ife project, many experimental projects on mother tongue literacy in other countries are shown to have succeeded in realizing their objectives, the findings highlight the mediating effects of several non-linguistic variables. The findings indicate that its use as the medium of instruction in schools cannot compensate for the deficiencies in the educational system, particularly poor quality instructional facilities, or the social barriers in the wider society which prevent certain groups of minority children from learning well in school. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  8. Tongue thickness relates to nutritional status in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Fumiyo; Kikutani, Takeshi; Tohara, Takashi; Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi; Yaegaki, Ken

    2012-12-01

    Many elderly people under long-term care suffer from malnutrition caused by dysphagia, frequently leading to sarcopenia. Our hypothesis is that sarcopenia may compromise oral function, resulting in dysphagia. The objectives of this study were to evaluate sarcopenia of the lingual muscles by measuring the tongue thickness, and elucidate its relationship with nutritional status. We examined 104 elderly subjects (mean age = 80.3 ± 7.9 years). Anthropometric data, such as triceps skinfold thickness and midarm muscle area (AMA), were obtained. The tongue thickness of the central part was determined using ultrasonography. Measurement was performed twice and the mean value was obtained. The relationship between tongue thickness and nutritional status was analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. AMA and age were identified by multiple-regression analysis as factors influencing tongue thickness. The results of this study suggest that malnutrition may induce sarcopenia not only in the skeletal muscles but also in the tongue.

  9. Morphometric growth relationships of the immature human mandible and tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Erin F; Kieser, Jules A; Kramer, Beverley

    2014-06-01

    The masticatory apparatus is a highly adaptive musculoskeletal complex comprising several relatively independent structural components, which assist in functions including feeding and breathing. We hypothesized that the tongue is elemental in the maintenance of normal ontogeny of the mandible and in its post-natal growth and development, and tested this using a morphometric approach. We assessed tongue and mandibular measurements in 174 (97 male) human cadavers. Landmark lingual and mandibular data were gathered individuals aged between 20 gestational weeks and 3 yr postnatal. In this analysis, geometric morphometrics assisted in visualizing the morphometrical growth changes in the mandible and tongue. A linear correlation in conjunction with principal component analysis further visualized the growth relationship between these structures. We found that the growth of the tongue and mandible were intrinsically linked in size and shape between 20 gestational weeks and 24 months postnatal. However, the mandible continued to change in shape and size into the 3rd yr of life, whereas the tongue only increased in size over this same period of time. These findings provide valuable insights into the allometric growth relationship between these structures, potentially assisting the clinician in predicting the behaviour of these structures in the assessment of malocclusions.

  10. Tongue-jaw kinematic correlates of /s/ spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembowski, James S.; Crumb, Richard K.

    2004-05-01

    Frequencies of spectral peaks for fricatives are determined by the size of the resonating cavity anterior to the place of articulatory constriction in the upper vocal tract. For /s/, this cavity size may be altered through anterior-posterior (a-p) movements of the tongue blade forming the constriction, changes of jaw height, and degree of lip protrusion. With respect to intensity, modeling studies suggest that intensity of fricative spectral peaks may be related to degree of articulatory constriction. These spectral-kinematic relationships have been little studied in natural speech. This study used data from the University of Wisconsin X-Ray Microbeam Database to examine the relationship between spectral peaks and movements of the tongue and jaw in the /s/ productions of one normal speaker. Results showed no relationship between a-p tongue position and frequency of spectral peaks. However, a significant inverse correlation related peak between frequency and jaw opening. Thus, for this speaker jaw height appeared a more important determinant of spectral variability for /s/ than tongue position. Additional results showed a significant relationship between peak intensity and distance of the tongue blade from the palate. These natural speech data will be discussed with respect to models and theories of fricative production.

  11. Review on the current trends in tongue diagnosis systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jin Jung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tongue diagnosis is an essential process to noninvasively assess the condition of a patient's internal organs in traditional medicine. To obtain quantitative and objective diagnostic results, image acquisition and analysis devices called tongue diagnosis systems (TDSs are required. These systems consist of hardware including cameras, light sources, and a ColorChecker, and software for color correction, segmentation of tongue region, and tongue classification. To improve the performance of TDSs, various types TDSs have been developed. Hyperspectral imaging TDSs have been suggested to acquire more information than a two-dimensional (2D image with visible light waves, as it allows collection of data from multiple bands. Three-dimensional (3D imaging TDSs have been suggested to provide 3D geometry. In the near future, mobile devices like the smart phone will offer applications for assessment of health condition using tongue images. Various technologies for the TDS have respective unique advantages and specificities according to the application and diagnostic environment, but this variation may cause inconsistent diagnoses in practical clinical applications. In this manuscript, we reviewed the current trends in TDSs for the standardization of systems. In conclusion, the standardization of TDSs can supply the general public and oriental medical doctors with convenient, prompt, and accurate information with diagnostic results for assessing the health condition.

  12. Schwannoma base tongue: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, N A; Wagh, M; Balagopal, P G; Gupta, S; Sukumaran, R; Sebastian, P

    2014-07-01

    Schwannomas are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. These are rare in the oral cavity (1%). The most common site of involvement in oral cavity is the tongue. Posterior third of tongue is not frequently involved. The aim of this paper is to present a case report of base tongue schwannoma and review literature of this rare tumor. Data from literature were analyzed for age, gender, presenting symptom, size at presentation, and surgical approach. We report a case of 26 year-old male who presented with swelling posterior 1/3rd tongue and change in quality of voice. He was evaluated for the same with MR and incision biopsy and was planned for surgery. Surgery was abandoned at a district hospital due to difficulty in intubation. At our center he underwent fibro optic bronchoscopy guided intubation followed by general anesthesia. He underwent excision of mass using left paramedian lip spitting approach with mandibulotomy and mandibular swing. Tumor was excised in toto. His postoperative recovery was uneventful. Literature review between 2001 and 2012 was done. 15 cases of base tongue schwannoma were identified. The most common age group involved was between 30-40 years. There was a slightly higher incidence in females. All patients were symptomatic at presentation. Most common complaints were related to swallowing and throat pain. Most patients underwent transoral excision of the tumor.

  13. Paired pulse TMS stimulation and human tongue corticomotor pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk;

    (CS) and the test stimulus (TS). The aim of the present methodological study was to optimize stimulus parameters for ppTMS studies of tongue motor control by examining the influence of different ISI and intensities of the CS on SICI and ICF. Methods: 17 healthy volunteers participated (mean age: 22.......6±0.8 years). ppTMS was applied to the “hot-spot” of the tongue motor cortex and motor evoked potential (MEPs) were recorded from the tongue muscles with surface EMG electrodes. TS intensity was set at 120% of resting motor threshold (rMT). Single pulse and six different ISIs for ppTMS: 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 10, 15...... different intensities of CS and ISIs. Conclusion: Significant SICI but no ICF was evoked with the present stimulus paradigms. The two stimulus intensities of the CS evoked similar responses. These results may be applied in future studies on the effect of tongue training on SICI and ICF in the tongue motor...

  14. Glomus tumor (golomangioma) of the tongue. A light and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Y; Weather, D R; Neville, B W; Benoit, P W; Pedley, D M

    1981-09-01

    A rare case of an intraoral glomus tumor on the ventral surface on the tongue was studied by light and electron microscopy. With light microscopy, the tumor was composed of dilated vascular channels surrounded by "epithelioid" glomus cells exhibiting large round nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Bodian stains showed significant staining for nerve fibers among the tumor cells. Electron microscopic study demonstrated that the tumor cells had ultrastructural features which were similar to both smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, suggesting that a "transitional" cell may give rise to glomus tumor. The literature on oral glomus tumors is briefly reviewed.

  15. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in trigeminal ganglion neurons contributes tongue-referred pain associated with tooth pulp inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Kinuyo; Shimizu, Kohei; Matsuura, Shingo; Ogiso, Bunnai; Omagari, Daisuke; Asano, Masatake; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Shinoda, Masamichi; Iwata, Koichi

    2013-11-23

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the mechanisms underlying tongue-referred pain associated with tooth pulp inflammation. Using mechanical and temperature stimulation following dental surgery, we have demonstrated that dental inflammation and hyperalgesia correlates with increased immunohistochemical staining of neurons for TLR4 and HSP70. Mechanical or heat hyperalgesia significantly enhanced in the ipsilateral tongue at 1 to 9 days after complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) application to the left lower molar tooth pulp compared with that of sham-treated or vehicle-applied rats. The number of fluorogold (FG)-labeled TLR4-immunoreactive (IR) cells was significantly larger in CFA-applied rats compared with sham-treated or vehicle-applied rats to the molar tooth. The number of heat shock protein (Hsp) 70-IR neurons in trigeminal ganglion (TG) was significantly increased on day 3 after CFA application compared with sham-treated or vehicle-applied rats to the molar tooth. About 9.2% of TG neurons were labeled with DiI applied to the molar tooth and FG injected into the tongue, and 15.4% of TG neurons were labeled with FG injected into the tongue and Alexa-labeled Hsp70-IR applied to the tooth. Three days after Hsp70 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) application to the tooth in naive rats, mechanical or heat hyperalgesia was significantly enhanced compared with that of saline-applied rats. Following successive LPS-RS, an antagonist of TLR4, administration to the TG for 3 days, the enhanced mechanical or heat hyperalgesia was significantly reversed compared with that of saline-injected rats. Noxious mechanical responses of TG neurons innervating the tongue were significantly higher in CFA-applied rats compare with sham rats to the tooth. Hsp70 mRNA levels of the tooth pulp and TG were not different between CFA-applied rats and sham rats. The present findings indicate that Hsp70 transported from the tooth pulp to TG neurons or expressed in TG neurons is released from

  16. Development and demonstration of a method to monitor the effects of measures to reduce VOC emissions in the EU. LIFE 95/NL/A11/NL/365/ZHL [1996-1998] (Final Report )

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuken, M.P.; Oss, R.F. van

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, TNO was granted by the European Commission to carry out in the framework of the LIFE programme a project entitled "Development and dem-onstration of a method to monitor the effects of measures to reduce VOC emis-sions in the EU". An additional grant was supplied by the Dutch Ministry for Ho

  17. An evaluation of microbial profile in halitosis with tongue coating using PCR (polymerase chain reaction)- a clinical and microbiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj R, Dinesh; Bhushan, Kala S; K L, Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Medline search using key words halitosis, tongue coating, polymerase chain reaction, microbial profile did not reveal any study. Hence, the purpose of the present investigation was to assess the malodor using the organoleptic method and tanita device; to quantify odoriferous microorganisms using Polymerase Chain Reaction technique in chronic periodontitis patients. The study included 30 chronic periodontitis patients. Halitosis was detected using organoleptic assessment & tanita breath alert. Microbial analysis of Pg, Tf & Fn was done using PCR. Plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding index (GBI) were recorded. The maximum score of 3 for tongue coating was found in 60% of selected subjects. The tanita breath alert measured VSC level of score 2 in 60% of selected subjects while organoleptic score of 4 was found in 50% of subjects. The maximum mean value of 31.1±36.5 was found to be of F. nucleatum (Fn) followed by P. gingivalis (Pg) (13±13.3) & T. forsythia (Tf) (7.16±8.68) in tongue samples of selected patients. A weak positive correlation was found between VSC levels (tanita score & organoleptic score) and clinical parameters. The halitosis assessment by measuring VSC levels using organoleptic method and tanita breath alert are clinically feasible. Maximum tongue coating was found in 60% of patients. Fn was found comparatively more than the Pg & Tf. A weak positive correlation was found between VSC levels and clinical parameters such as PI, GI & GBI. Thus,the dentist/ periodontist should emphasise on tongue cleaning measures that would reduce the odoriferous microbial load.

  18. 76 FR 5649 - Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.-Construction and Operation-Western Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.--Construction and Operation-- Western... Tongue River Railroad Company's (TRRC) application to construct and operate a rail line in...

  19. A Comparative Study of Contemporary Color Tongue Image Extraction Methods Based on HSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfeng Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tongue image with coating is of important clinical diagnostic meaning, but traditional tongue image extraction method is not competent for extraction of tongue image with thick coating. In this paper, a novel method is suggested, which applies multiobjective greedy rules and makes fusion of color and space information in order to extract tongue image accurately. A comparative study of several contemporary tongue image extraction methods is also made from the aspects of accuracy and efficiency. As the experimental results show, geodesic active contour is quite slow and not accurate, the other 3 methods achieve fairly good segmentation results except in the case of the tongue with thick coating, our method achieves ideal segmentation results whatever types of tongue images are, and efficiency of our method is acceptable for the application of quantitative check of tongue image.

  20. Differences in the Tongue Features of Primary Dysmenorrhea Patients and Controls over a Normal Menstrual Cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jihye Kim; Haebeom Lee; Hyunho Kim; Jong Yeol Kim; Keun Ho Kim

    2017-01-01

      Background. The aims of this study were to investigate the relationships between tongue features and the existence of menstrual pain and to provide basic information regarding the changes in tongue features...

  1. Tongue entrapment by chew toys in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, A; Van Goethem, B; Verhaert, L

    2010-10-01

    Compression of a chew toy during regular play activity can create a vacuum effect eventually causing entrapment of oral tissues. Two cases of tongue entrapment are described, which resulted in severe tissue swelling, oedema and vascular obstruction. In the first dog, the toy was removed by the veterinary surgeon under general anaesthesia. Damage to the tongue proved to be reversible and the dog recovered uneventfully. In the second patient, the toy was forcefully removed by the owner. The resulting tongue necrosis required partial amputation. Treatment of this emergency condition consists of elimination of the negative pressure inside the toy by piercing it or even by insufflation of positive pressure inside the toy, and of an atraumatic manipulation to prevent further damage to the compromised tissues.

  2. Cavernous hemangioma of the tongue: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Kamala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are developmental vascular abnormalities and more than 50% of these lesions occur in the head and neck region, with the lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, and palate most commonly involved. They are considered as hamartomas rather than true neoplasms. Here we report a case of hemangioma of the body of the tongue, discussing the diagnostic aspects and treatment modalities of such lesion and emphasizing the role of the color Doppler ultrasonography, especially in the diagnosis and treatment. Factors such as patient′s age, size and site of lesion and the proximity of lesion to vital structure are paramount in the determination of the therapeutic approach and surgical excision. Even though radiotherapy, cryotherapy, laser therapy, medical treatment, injection of sclerosing substances and the selective embolization of the lingual artery seem to have some efficacy, the author conclude that surgery is the therapy of choice in the isolated vascular lesions of the body of the tongue.

  3. Adenocarcinoma involving the tongue and the epiglottis in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laus, Fulvio; Rossi, Giacomo; Paggi, Emanuele; Bordicchia, Matteo; Fratini, Margherita; Tesei, Beniamino

    2014-03-01

    Tumors involving the oral cavity of the horse are uncommon. No cases of equine adenocarcinoma on the dorsum of the tongue have been reported in the literature. We report a case of adenocarcinoma located on the dorsum of the posterior one-third of the tongue in a 29-year-old gelding with severe dysphagia. Endoscopy revealed an epiglottis involvement, and histology was consistent with adenocarcinoma arising from minor salivary glands, which was associated with a severe fungal colonization of affected tissues. The goals of this report are to present an uncommon case of dorsum of the tongue-associated neoplasia and to highlight the association with atypical fungal colonization, to review the literature and to discuss possible clinical approach and prognosis.

  4. Cutaneous metastasis from squamous carcinoma of the base of tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashnin Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cutaneous metastasis from head and neck cancer is uncommon and it is seen from laryngeal cancer. Cutaneous metastasis from the base of tongue is relatively rare. Case Report: A 55-year-old male, who was a treated case of squamous carcinoma of the base of tongue presented with metastatic nodule on the skin of face and thigh. But, there was complete resolution of the tumor at the primary site. In the present case, clinically obvious cutaneous nodules with metastasis appeared soon after the completion of treatment with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. The metastasis to the skin of face clinically appeared like an inflammatory lesion. Fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the diagnosis of metastasis to skin at both the sites. Conclusion: Our case has highlighted that there could be associated occult skin metastasis at the time of diagnosis in squamous carcinoma of the base of tongue.

  5. Influence of visual observational conditions on tongue motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Liu, Xuimei; Baad-Hansen, Lene

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the impact of visual observational conditions on performance during a standardized tongue-protrusion training (TPT) task and to evaluate subject-based reports of helpfulness, disturbance, pain, and fatigue due to the observational conditions on 0-10 numerical rating scales. Forty-e...... regarding the level of disturbance, pain or fatigue. Self-observation of tongue-training facilitated behavioral aspects of tongue motor learning compared with model-observation but not compared with control....... feedback of their own TPT performance, Group 3: control group performed the TPT without any conditioning. There was no overall difference between groups but TPT performance increased over time. A significant group x time interaction indicated that the self-observation group performed significantly better...

  6. Tongue cancer during pregnancy: Surgery and more, a multidisciplinary challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Marta; Elrefaey, Shimaa Hassan; Peccatori, Fedro; Favia, Gianfranco; Navach, Valeria; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Capaccio, Pasquale; Venturino, Marco; Tredici, Stefano; Alterio, Daniela; Mosca, Fabio; Pugni, Lorenza; Scarfone, Giovanna; Cossu Rocca, Maria; Calabrese, Luca

    2016-02-01

    No international guidelines are available for the treatment of oral tongue cancer during pregnancy. Six patients with tongue cancer during pregnancy were identified by a retrospective chart review. In three of the cases we did not follow the standard treatment, the women had disease progression, and two of them died after a short time. A multidisciplinary discussion and literature review suggest that following the standard surgical procedure could be the optimal treatment to ensure mother and baby health in tongue cancer. Nonetheless choosing between maternal advantage and potential fetal damage should not be an individual medical decision. Treatment "customization" is a possibility. Patients and their families should be provided with comprehensive information and appropriate support in order to fully participate in the decision-making process. The patient's care may be improved if carried out in a specialized maternity center where the surgical oncologic treatment is managed together with the obstetric aspects.

  7. Schwannoma of tongue base treated with transoral carbon dioxide laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrzad, H; Persaud, R; Papadimitriou, N; Kaniyur, S; Mochloulis, G

    2006-12-01

    Schwannomas are benign slow growing solitary tumours of nerve sheath origin and can arise from any myelinated nerve. They have been reported to occur in most parts of the body with the highest incidence (25%) in the head and neck region, although tongue base lesions are rare. The tumour is resistant to radiotherapy, and therefore, the treatment of choice is surgery. We present a case of a tongue base schwannoma which was completely extirpated with a carbon dioxide laser via the transoral approach. The patient experienced virtually no morbidity from the use of the laser. Whilst tongue base schwannoma has been documented, we could not find an earlier report in the English literature describing our method of treatment. We conclude that transoral carbon dioxide laser can be added to the surgical armamentarium for the management of other similar cases in the future.

  8. Application of Electronic Tongue Technique in Taste Evaluation of Sweet Sauce%电子舌技术在甜面酱口感评价中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璐; 黄明泉; 孙宝国; 田红玉; 陈海涛

    2012-01-01

    对7种不同品牌的甜面酱用电子舌交叉型传感器进行检测,同时测定其4项理化指标(总酸值、氨基态氮值、食盐含量、还原糖含量),所得数据用主成分分析法(PCA)进行分析比较,并将电子舌传感器响应信号值与理化指标进行了简单相关性分析(CCA),研究表明:该电子舌可以从综合口感方面对7个品牌的甜面酱样品进行有效的区分,并且理化指标和传感器相应信号之间具有较强相关性。因此,电子舌技术有望应用于甜面酱生产的在线监控,以保证其品质的一致性与评价的客观性。%Seven different brands of sweet sauces were evaluated using electronic tongue with cross-type sensors,and four physicochemical indices including total acid value,amino nitrogen value,salt content and reducing sugar content of these sweet sauces were also determined.The acquired data were analyzed by principal component analysis(PCA) and canonical correlation analysis(CCA).Results demonstrate that electronic tongue technique was very effective in discriminating 7 different sweet sauce brands according to overall taste evaluation.Moreover,an obvious correlation between physiochemical indices and sensor response signals was observed.Accordingly,electronic tongue technique can be hopefully applied for online production monitoring of sweet sauce so as to ensure consistency and objectivity in quality evaluation.

  9. Dislocated Tongue Muscle Attachment and Cleft Palate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouskoura, T; El Fersioui, Y; Angelini, M; Graf, D; Katsaros, C; Chiquet, M

    2016-04-01

    In Pierre Robin sequence, a retracted tongue due to micrognathia is thought to physically obstruct palatal shelf elevation and thereby cause cleft palate. However, micrognathia is not always associated with palatal clefting. Here, by using the Bmp7-null mouse model presenting with cleft palate and severe micrognathia, we provide the first causative mechanism linking the two. In wild-type embryos, the genioglossus muscle, which mediates tongue protrusion, originates from the rostral process of Meckel's cartilage and later from the mandibular symphysis, with 2 tendons positive for Scleraxis messenger RNA. In E13.5 Bmp7-null embryos, a rostral process failed to form, and a mandibular symphysis was absent at E17.5. Consequently, the genioglossus muscle fibers were diverted toward the lingual surface of Meckel's cartilage and mandibles, where they attached in an aponeurosis that ectopically expressed Scleraxis. The deflection of genioglossus fibers from the anterior-posterior toward the medial-lateral axis alters their direction of contraction and necessarily compromises tongue protrusion. Since this muscle abnormality precedes palatal shelf elevation, it is likely to contribute to clefting. In contrast, embryos with a cranial mesenchyme-specific deletion of Bmp7 (Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre) exhibited some degree of micrognathia but no cleft palate. In these embryos, a rostral process was present, indicating that mesenchyme-derived Bmp7 is dispensable for its formation. Moreover, the genioglossus appeared normal in Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre embryos, further supporting a role of aberrant tongue muscle attachment in palatal clefting. We thus propose that in Pierre Robin sequence, palatal shelf elevation is not impaired simply by physical obstruction by the tongue but by a specific developmental defect that leads to functional changes in tongue movements.

  10. Optimizing Outcomes following Total and Subtotal Tongue Reconstruction: A Systematic Review of the Contemporary Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Oscar J; Leland, Hyuma A; Langevin, Claude-Jean; Wong, Alex; Carey, Joseph N; Ciudad, Pedro; Chen, Hung-Chi; Patel, Ketan M

    2017-02-01

    Background More than 45,000 Americans are diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer annually and multimodal treatment often requires wide excision, lymphadenectomy, chemotherapy, and radiation. Total and subtotal lingual resection severely impairs speech, swallow, and quality of life (QoL). This study investigates functional outcomes and QoL following subtotal and total tongue resection with free tissue transfer reconstruction. Materials and Methods A systematic review of the English language literature was performed using PubMed, Ovid, Embase, and Cochrane databases based on predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Included studies were reviewed for surgical technique, adjuvant treatment, surgical and functional outcomes, and QoL. Results From an initial search yield of 1,467 articles, 22 studies were included for final analysis. Speech intelligibility was correlated with the volume and degree of protuberance of the neotongue. Adjuvant therapy (radiation) and large tumor size were associated with worse speech and swallow recovery. At 1 year follow-up, despite 14 to 20% rates of silent aspiration, 82 to 97% of patients resumed oral feeding. Neurotized flaps have been demonstrated to improve flap sensation but have not yet demonstrated any significant impact on speech or swallow recovery. Finally, many patients continue to experience pain after surgery, but patient motivation, family support with physician, and speech therapist follow-up are associated with improved QoL scores. Conclusion Tongue reconstruction is dictated by the amount of soft tissue resection. Taking into consideration the most common factors involved after tongue resection and reconstruction, further studies should focus on more objective measurements to offer solutions and maximize final outcomes.

  11. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CENTRIFUGAL PUMP CASINGS TO DETECT THE CRACK AT THE TONGUE REGION.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify one of the reasons for the crack to initiate at the tongue region. The design of the tongue region of the centrifugal pump casing plays an important role in influencing the pump performance and cavitation. Tongue region should have enough strength to withstand against repeated loads imparted by the impeller. Crack at the tongue region is examined under hydrostatic pressure conditions .Practically, at the site location it was observed that the crack w...

  12. Effects of tongue volume reduction on craniofacial growth: A longitudinal study on orofacial skeletons and dental arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi-Jun; Shcherbatyy, Volodymyr; Gu, Gaoman; Perkins, Jonathan A

    2008-10-01

    The interaction between tongue size/volume and craniofacial skeletal growth is essential for understanding the mechanism of specific types of malocclusion and objectively measuring outcomes of various surgical and/or orthodontic treatments. Currently available information on this interaction is limited. This study was designed to examine how tongue body volume reduction affects craniofacial skeleton and dental arch formation during the rapid growth period in five 12-week-old Yucatan minipig sibling pairs. One of each pair received a standardized reduction glossectomy to reduce tongue volume by 15-17% (reduction group), and the other had the reduction glossectomy incisions without tissue removal (sham group). Before surgery, five stainless steel screws were implanted into standardized craniofacial skeletal locations. A series of cephalograms, lateral and axial, were obtained longitudinally at 1 week preoperative, and 2 and 4 weeks postoperative. These images were traced using superimposition, and linear and angular variables were measured digitally. Upon euthanasia, direct osteometric measurements were obtained from harvested skulls. Five en-bloc bone pieces were further cut for bone mineral examination by dual photon/energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The results indicate that: (1) while daily food consumption and weekly body weight were not significantly affected, tongue volume reduction showed an overall negative effect on the linear expansion of craniofacial skeletons; (2) premaxilla and mandibular symphysis lengths, and anterior dental arch width were significantly less in reduction than sham animals at 2 and/or 4 weeks after the surgery; (3) both premaxilla/maxilla and mandible bone mineral density and content were lower in reduction than sham animals, significantly lower in anterior mandible; (4) craniofacial skeletal and dental arch size were significantly smaller in reduction than sham animals, being most significant in the mandibular anterior length and

  13. Treatment and retention of relapsed anterior open-bite with low tongue posture and tongue-tie: A 10-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yu-Jin; Kim, Su-Jung; Munkhshur, Janchivdorj; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Ngan, Peter; Kim, Seong-Hun

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the current report is to present 6-year long-term stability and 10-year follow-up data for an adult patient who was treated with a tongue elevator for relapsed anterior open-bite. The 19-year-old male patient presented with the chief complaint of difficulty in chewing his food. Collectively, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed an anterior open-bite, low tongue posture, and tongue-tie. The patient opted for orthodontic treatment alone, without any surgical procedure. A lingual frenectomy was recommended to avoid the risk of relapse, but the patient declined because he was not experiencing tongue discomfort. Initial treatment of the anterior open-bite with molar intrusion and tongue exercises was successful, but relapse occurred during the retention period. A tongue elevator was used for retreatment, because the approach was minimally invasive and suited the patient's requirements regarding discomfort, cost, and time. The appliance changed the tongue posture and generated an altered tongue force, which ultimately resulted in intrusive dentoalveolar effects, and a subsequent counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. The results showed long-term stability and were maintained for six years through continual use of the tongue elevator. The results of this case indicated that a tongue elevator could be used not only as an alternative treatment for open-bite, but also as an active retainer.

  14. A Novel Method for the Discrimination of Semen Arecae and Its Processed Products by Using Computer Vision, Electronic Nose, and Electronic Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Areca nut, commonly known locally as Semen Arecae (SA in China, has been used as an important Chinese herbal medicine for thousands of years. The raw SA (RAW is commonly processed by stir-baking to yellow (SBY, stir-baking to dark brown (SBD, and stir-baking to carbon dark (SBC for different clinical uses. In our present investigation, intelligent sensory technologies consisting of computer vision (CV, electronic nose (E-nose, and electronic tongue (E-tongue were employed in order to develop a novel and accurate method for discrimination of SA and its processed products. Firstly, the color parameters and electronic sensory responses of E-nose and E-tongue of the samples were determined, respectively. Then, indicative components including 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF and arecoline (ARE were determined by HPLC. Finally, principal component analysis (PCA and discriminant factor analysis (DFA were performed. The results demonstrated that these three instruments can effectively discriminate SA and its processed products. 5-HMF and ARE can reflect the stir-baking degree of SA. Interestingly, the two components showed close correlations to the color parameters and sensory responses of E-nose and E-tongue. In conclusion, this novel method based on CV, E-nose, and E-tongue can be successfully used to discriminate SA and its processed products.

  15. PRESLA: An original device to measure the mechanical interaction between tongue and teeth or palate during speech production

    CERN Document Server

    Jeannin, Christophe; Payan, Yohan; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Dittmar, André; Géhin, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    An original experimental procedure is presented to measure the mechanical interaction between tongue and teeth and palate during speech production. It consists in using edentulous people as subjects and to insert pressure sensors in the structure of a replication of their dental prosthesis. This is assumed to induce no speech production perturbation for subjects who are used to speak with their prosthesis. Data collected from 4 subjects of French demonstrate the usability of the system.

  16. Controversies in the management of tongue base cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Tongue base cancer is one of the most lethal head and neck cancers. There is considerable controversy in the management of this disease with wide variation of opinion within the literature. METHODS: We discuss the presentation, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies which exist in the literature. Articles were reviewed from 1970 to 2007 within the Medline, Pubmed and Cochrane libraries. CONCLUSIONS: Smokers with a history of persistent unilateral neck pain, even in the absence of clinical signs warrant MRI neck imaging. Tongue base cancer organ preservation therapeutic strategies, radiation and concomitant platinum based chemotherapy, currently optimise oncologic and quality of life outcomes.

  17. The Influence of Mother Tongue on English Teaching in Chinese Universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bing

    2004-01-01

    @@ 0 Introduction A lot of English learning researchers focus on the influence of mother tongue on English learning and teaching.Corder,the British applied linguist thought that mother tongue influenced the English learning positively (or negatively) when the language rules of mother tongue and a of target language show no (much) differences.

  18. 9 CFR 319.762 - Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. 319.762 Section 319.762 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Salads and Meat Spreads § 319.762 Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. “Ham Spread,” “Tongue...

  19. Effect of Tongue Exercise on Protrusive Force and Muscle Fiber Area in Aging Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. The authors' purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Method: Forty-eight young adult,…

  20. Tongue-Pressure and Hyoid Movement Timing in Healthy Liquid Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona; Sasse, Caroline; Bressmann, Tim

    2012-01-01

    It was hypothesized that tongue-palate pressure generation might directly facilitate hyoid movement in swallowing through the anatomical connections of the extrinsic tongue muscles. If true, non-invasive measures of tongue-palate pressure timing might serve as a proxy measure of hyoid excursion. The timing relationships between events in the…

  1. A three-dimensional kinematic analysis of tongue flicking in Python molurus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de J.H.; Sluijs, van der I.; Snelderwaard, P.C.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2004-01-01

    The forked snake tongue is a muscular organ without hard skeletal support. A functional interpretation of the variable arrangement of the intrinsic muscles along the tongue requires a quantitative analysis of the motion performance during tongue protrusion and flicking. Therefore, high-speed fluoros

  2. Analysis of 3-D Tongue Motion from Tagged and Cine Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring tongue deformation and internal muscle motion during speech has been a challenging task because the tongue deforms in 3 dimensions, contains interdigitated muscles, and is largely hidden within the vocal tract. In this article, a new method is proposed to analyze tagged and cine magnetic resonance images of the tongue during…

  3. Analysis of 3-D Tongue Motion from Tagged and Cine Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring tongue deformation and internal muscle motion during speech has been a challenging task because the tongue deforms in 3 dimensions, contains interdigitated muscles, and is largely hidden within the vocal tract. In this article, a new method is proposed to analyze tagged and cine magnetic resonance images of the tongue during…

  4. Acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel space in speakers with and without dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimin; Littlejohn, Meghan Anne; Simmons, Zachary

    2017-04-01

    The purpose is to investigate acoustic and tongue body kinematic vowel dispersion patterns and vowel space in speakers with and without dysarthria secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel spaces were examined at the same time sampling point using electromagnetic articulography in 11 speakers with dysarthria secondary to ALS and 11 speakers without dysarthria. Tongue kinematic data were collected from the tongue body sensor (∼25 mm posterior from the tongue apex). A number of acoustic and tongue body kinematic variables were tested. The result showed that the acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel dispersion patterns are different between the groups. Acoustic and tongue body kinematic vowel spaces are highly correlated; however, unlike acoustic vowel space, tongue body kinematic vowel space was not significantly different between the groups. Both acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel dispersion patterns are sensitive to the group difference, especially with high vowels. The tongue kinematic vowel space approach is too crude to differentiate the speakers with dysarthria secondary to ALS from speakers without dysarthria. To examine tongue range of motion in speakers with dysarthria, a more refined articulatory kinematic approach needs to be examined in the future.

  5. Effect of Tongue Exercise on Protrusive Force and Muscle Fiber Area in Aging Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. The authors' purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Method: Forty-eight young adult,…

  6. Multicomponent analysis of fermentation growth media using the electronic tongue (ET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legin, A.; Kirsanov, D.; Rudnitskaya, A.;

    2004-01-01

    A potentiometric electronic tongue (ET) consisting of eight cross-sensitive chemical sensors and a standard pH electrode has been appliedfor analysis of simulated fermentation solutions typical for fermentation processes with Aspergillus niger . The electronic tongue has been found capable...... samples. Sensor performance was fast and reproducible which promises well for routine application of the electronic tongue for fermentation process monitoring....

  7. Oral stereognostic ability among tongue thrusters with interdental lisp, tongue thrusters without interdental lisp and normal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, E A; Geffner, D; Schlanger, P

    1976-02-01

    30 children, i.e., 10 children per group, 8 yr. of age, were given an oral stereognostic test. This test of 10 geometric forms varying in shape were developed by NIDR. 47 stimuli pairs were used and 10 pairs were repeated to measure test reliability. Subjects were blindfolded and asked to respond whether Items 1 and 2, presented consecutively, were the same or different. Results indicated that both groups of tongue thrusters with and without interdental lisp scored significantly more poorly than did normal children (t = 4.68, P less than .001; t = 5.00, P less than .001), respectively. There were no significant differences, however, between tongue thrusters with and without interdental lisp (t = .33, P greater than .05). Observations indicated that normal children used the tongue tip more frequently and accurately when discriminating the geometric forms than did the other groups.

  8. GASIS demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidas, E.H. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  9. Dynamics of tongue microbial communities with single-nucleotide resolution using oligotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Mark Welch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The human mouth is an excellent system to study the dynamics of microbial communities and their interactions with their host. We employed oligotyping to analyze, with single-nucleotide resolution, oral microbial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequence data from a time course sampled from the tongue of two individuals, and we interpret our results in the context of oligotypes that we previously identified in the oral data from the Human Microbiome Project. Our previous work established that many of these oligotypes had dramatically different distributions between individuals and across oral habitats, suggesting that they represented functionally different organisms. Here we demonstrate the presence of a consistent tongue microbiome but with rapidly fluctuating proportions of the characteristic taxa. In some cases closely related oligotypes representing strains or variants within a single species displayed fluctuating relative abundances over time, while in other cases an initially dominant oligotype was replaced by another oligotype of the same species. We use this high temporal and taxonomic level of resolution to detect correlated changes in oligotype abundance that could indicate which taxa likely interact synergistically or occupy similar habitats, and which likely interact antagonistically or prefer distinct habitats. For example, we found a strong correlation in abundance over time between two oligotypes from different families of Gamma Proteobacteria, suggesting a close functional or ecological relationship between them. In summary, the tongue is colonized by a microbial community of moderate complexity whose proportional abundance fluctuates widely on time scales of days. The drivers and functional consequences of these community dynamics are not known, but we expect they will prove tractable to future, targeted studies employing taxonomically resolved analysis of high-throughput sequencing data sampled at appropriate temporal intervals and

  10. Teaching Tongue-Tied Students: Ankyloglossia in the Instrumental Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovel, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Ankyloglossia is a significant medical condition that has not been adequately addressed in music education literature. While practically every instructor will have students who struggle with ankyloglossia, many teachers are entirely unaware of this condition's various symptoms and treatments. Ankyloglossia, more commonly known as tongue-tie, is a…

  11. Mother Tongue Use in Task-Based Language Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Viet

    2012-01-01

    Researches of English language teaching (ELT) have focused on using mother tongue (L1) for years. The proliferation of task-based language teaching (TBLT) has been also occurred. Considerable findings have been made in the existing literature of the two fields; however, no mentions have been made in the combination of these two ELT aspects, i.e.,…

  12. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  13. Artificial tongue based on metal-biomolecule coordination polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ran, Xiang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-02-25

    We construct an array-based recognition system (the so-called artificial tongue) through the self-assembly of nucleotides, dyes and lanthanide ions. Metal ions are selected as model analytes for verifying its discrimination ability. The work provides valuable insights into the application and development of biomolecule-based materials.

  14. Vision of tongue movements bias auditory speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Bartoli, Eleonora; Maffongelli, Laura; Berry, Jeffrey James; Fadiga, Luciano

    2014-10-01

    Audiovisual speech perception is likely based on the association between auditory and visual information into stable audiovisual maps. Conflicting audiovisual inputs generate perceptual illusions such as the McGurk effect. Audiovisual mismatch effects could be either driven by the detection of violations in the standard audiovisual statistics or via the sensorimotor reconstruction of the distal articulatory event that generated the audiovisual ambiguity. In order to disambiguate between the two hypotheses we exploit the fact that the tongue is hidden to vision. For this reason, tongue movement encoding can solely be learned via speech production but not via others׳ speech perception alone. Here we asked participants to identify speech sounds while matching or mismatching visual representations of tongue movements which were shown. Vision of congruent tongue movements facilitated auditory speech identification with respect to incongruent trials. This result suggests that direct visual experience of an articulator movement is not necessary for the generation of audiovisual mismatch effects. Furthermore, we suggest that audiovisual integration in speech may benefit from speech production learning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tapping into tongue motion to substitute or augment upper limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghovanloo, Maysam; Sahadat, M. Nazmus; Zhang, Zhenxuan; Kong, Fanpeng; Sebkhi, Nordine

    2017-05-01

    Assistive technologies (AT) play an important role in the lives of people with disabilities. Most importantly, they allow individuals with severe physical disabilities become more independence. Inherent abilities of the human tongue originated from its strong representation in the motor cortex, its direct connection to the brain through well-protected cranial nerves, and easy access without a surgery have resulted in development of a series of tongue-operated ATs that tap into the dexterous, intuitive, rapid, precise, and tireless motion of the tongue. These ATs not only help people with tetraplegia as a result of spinal cord injury or degenerative neurological diseases to access computers/smartphones, drive wheelchairs, and interact with their environments but also have the potential to enhance rehabilitation paradigms for stroke survivors. In this paper, various types of tongue operated ATs are discussed based on their working principles and task based performances. Comparisons are drawn based on widely accepted and standardized quantitative measures, such as throughput, information transfer rate, typing speed/accuracy, tracking error, navigation period, and navigation accuracy as well as qualitative measures, such as user feedback. Finally, the prospects of using variations of these versatile devices to enhance human performance in environments that limit hand and finger movements, such as space exploration or underwater operations are discussed.

  16. Contingent negative variation elicited before jaw and tongue movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Iizuka, T

    2005-12-01

    Contingent negative variation (CNV) is a negative brain potential occurring between two successive stimuli when the first stimulus is a warning and the second stimulus requires a motor response. The CNV is interpreted as an expression of the cognitive processes in preparation for a response directed to a purpose. Using 19 electrodes we recorded CNVs for mouth opening, closing and lateral movements, tongue protrusion and hand extension in 10 healthy subjects. The aim of the study was to examine the motor control mechanism underlying jaw and tongue movements in a cognitive paradigm. The first stimulus (S1) served as a preparatory warning signal for the imperative stimulus (S2) 2 s after the S1. The subject performed the experimental tasks after the S2. The grand average CNVs for jaw and tongue movements showed a bilaterally widespread negativity with the maximum in the vertex region (Cz). The early CNV was identified about 400 ms after the S1 and its amplitude was highest at the midline-frontal area. The late CNV started approximately 1000 ms after the S1 with the maximum at Cz. The mean amplitude was significantly lower for hand extension than for the other tasks, and significantly higher for lateral movement than for mouth closing, suggesting that the CNV amplitude can be affected by the complexity of the task. The CNV recording may provide a means to study the neuronal activity necessary for the sensorimotor integration of jaw and tongue movements.

  17. Resonance tongues in Hill's equations : A geometric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H; Simo, C

    2000-01-01

    The geometry of resonance tongues is considered in, mainly reversible, versions of Hill's equation, close to the classical Mathieu case. Hill's map assigns to each value of the multiparameter the corresponding Poincare matrix. Dy an averaging method, the geometry of Hill's map locally can be underst

  18. Education in the Mother Tongue and Educational Achievement in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvalan, Grazziella

    1984-01-01

    Studies show that the use of the mother-tongue (Guarani) as a medium of instruction with students in Paraguay is the most significant determining factor in the acquisition of knowledge. The discrepancy between educational ideology and educational policies in Paraguay regarding the implementation of bilingual education programs negatively affects…

  19. Mother Tongue Education in Singapore: Concerns, Issues and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Leong Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In 1966, the Singapore Government implemented the English-knowing bilingual policy which made it mandatory for all Chinese students to study English as a "First Language" and the Chinese language (CL) as a "Mother Tongue Language" in Singapore schools. Using key literature relevant to Singapore's bilingual educational policy…

  20. Marriage, Sexuality and Moral Responsibility among the Tongu Mafi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-21

    Mar 21, 2016 ... natural death and living an exemplary life (Sarpong, 1971, p. 3;. Dzobo, 1985 ... The moral responsibility of the married couple, family and for that matter ... phenomenological study of the Tongu Mafi people of Ghana, mainly through ... Children of the same parents, including adopted siblings, step brothers ...

  1. A congenital mucocele of the anterior dorsal tongue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong Chung, J.E.; Ensink, R.J.H.; Thijs, H.F.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2014-01-01

    We report on a new-born with a congenital mucocele on the anterior dorsal side of the tongue. The presentation as well as the differential diagnosis of congenital oral swellings is discussed. Because of breastfeeding problems the mucinous swelling was incised and drained two days after birth. Immedi

  2. The Holy Spirit as Dove and as Tongues of Fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the dove and the tongues of fire in Jørgen Gustava Brandt's hymn "Hør himmelsus i tredie time!" (Hear the rush from heaven at the third hour!) The following intertexts are included in the analysis: Acts 2:1-4; Gen 11:1-9, examples of fire as image of God in the Old Testament...

  3. Mother Tongue Education in Singapore: Concerns, Issues and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Leong Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In 1966, the Singapore Government implemented the English-knowing bilingual policy which made it mandatory for all Chinese students to study English as a "First Language" and the Chinese language (CL) as a "Mother Tongue Language" in Singapore schools. Using key literature relevant to Singapore's bilingual educational…

  4. How Children Learn Their Mother Tongue: They Don't

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new solution is offered to the Infant Language Acquisition Problem, rejecting both of Chomsky's alternatives. It proposes that the infant does not acquire his mother tongue by mastering its grammar, whether by inference from personal experience or via an innate Language Acquisition Device such as the UG, but that the language he hears is all…

  5. Tongue-lip adhesion in Pierre Robin sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Kumar, K S; Vylopilli, Suresh; Sivadasan, Anand; Pati, Ajit Kumar; Narayanan, Saju; Nair, Santhy Mohanachandran

    2016-02-01

    Patients with Pierre Robin sequence exhibit varying degrees of airway obstruction and feeding difficulty. In some patients, airway obstruction may be profound, warranting surgical intervention to maintain a patent airway. The purpose of this article is to highlight the advantages of the tongue-lip adhesion procedure for the management of airway obstruction in such patients compared to the currently available options.

  6. The Bumpy Road to Mother Tongue Instruction in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamwendo, Gregory Hankoni

    2008-01-01

    In 1996, the Ministry of Education in Malawi directed that in future Standards 1 to 4 would be taught through mother tongues. It took eight years before the pilot phase of the language policy could begin. The paper critically analyses this situation using Bamgbose's framework which says that, in Africa, language policies tend to follow one or more…

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  8. Operant Control of Pathological Tongue Thrust in Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior modification procedure, carried out at mealtime with a ten-year-old retarded boy who had spastic cerebral palsy, consisted of differential reinforcement and punishment, and resulted in substantial decreases in tongue thrust (reverse swallowing) and food expulsion, and a large increase in observed chewing. (Author/DLS)

  9. Plexiform hypoglossal schwannoma of the tongue and the submandibular region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahdi, Akmam H; Al-Khurrhi, Luay E; Atto, Ghada Z; Dhaher, Ameer

    2012-09-01

    Hypoglossal schwannomas usually develop in the intracranial portion of the brain. Incidence of hypoglossal schwannomas of the submandibular region is extremely rare. A 27-year-old patient presented to us with hypoglossal schwannoma of the tongue and the submandibular region. The tumor was excised intraorally combined with submandibular approach. Histopathologic examination revealed a plexiform schwannoma (a rare variant).

  10. Schwannoma of the tongue: An unusual presentation in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Giridhar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign tumors of nerve sheath and quite uncommon in the oral cavity. In contrast to the earlier reports in the literature, a confounding case of a lingual schwannoma presenting as a symptomatic and exophytic growth on the ventral surface of the tongue in a 12-year-old boy is discussed here.

  11. Schwannoma of the tongue: an unusual presentation in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Giridhar S; Sinha, Samindra Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign tumors of nerve sheath and quite uncommon in the oral cavity. In contrast to the earlier reports in the literature, a confounding case of a lingual schwannoma presenting as a symptomatic and exophytic growth on the ventral surface of the tongue in a 12-year-old boy is discussed here.

  12. The Infraordinary as Spatial Discourse: Tongue of the Dry Cleaner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Nielsen, Espen

    2014-01-01

    of perception, I interrogated a London dry cleaner as an (infra-ordinary) urban function: Tongue of the Dry Cleaner uses creative writing and critical spatial practice as tools for gaining insight. It moves through the elements of the space and production line of the dry cleaner, unfolding it bit by bit...

  13. Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Susan; Paraide, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG), an independent state in the southwest Pacific, is the most linguistically diverse country in the world. Its roughly six million people speak over 800 distinct languages. In spite of this diversity, in 1995 the Papua New Guinean government established a mother tongue-based bilingual education programme in which community…

  14. [Hyperspectral acquisition system for tongue inspection based on X-Y scanning galvanometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Bao-ju

    2011-12-01

    Hyperspectral was used for tongue inspection in the present work to resolve the problem that information of current research for tongue inspection was inadequate. A hyperspectral acquisition system based on X-Y scanning galvanometer was also proposed due to the high cost of the current hyperspectral apparatus. An experiment was made to test the ability of this system. By collecting the hyperspectral information of color pictures with size similar to the tongue, the results of experiment showed that this system can acquire more information of tongue than other methods, and this method can provide a new way for tongue inspection.

  15. [One case of low temperature plasma resection in the neonatal congenital cyst of tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangfang; Ma, Jian; Wu, Jingcai

    2015-09-01

    Our department treated one case of neonatal congenital cyst of tongue in March 23, 2015. The clinical manifestation of the case is mainly laryngeal stridor after birth 10d, and when infants were associated with progressive dysphagia. Electrolaryngoscope examination showed the goitre look like the cyst of tongue. Laryngeal CT scanning showed tongue lesions, consider the possibility of large cyst. Bilateral thyroid gland showed good, and no obvious abnormality was found in the cervical ultrasonography. The children was transferred to the ear-nose-throat department for excision of cyst of tongue by low-temperature plasma knife, and postoperative pathology confirmed the diagnosis of cyst of tongue.

  16. Decreased radiation doses to tongue with “stick-out” tongue position over neutral tongue position in head and neck cancer patients who refused or could not tolerate an intraoral device (bite-block, tongue blade, or mouthpiece) due to trismus, gag reflex, or discomfort during intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Kulasekere, Christina; Derrwaldt, Ronald; Bugno, Jacob; Hatch, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess changes in oral cavity (OC) shapes and radiation doses to tongue with different tongue positions during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) but who refused or did not tolerate an intraoral device (IOD), such as bite block, tongue blade, or mouthpiece. Results Tongue volume outside of OC was 7.1 ± 3.8 cm3 (5.4 ± 2.6% of entire OC and 7.8 ± 3.1% of oral tongue) in IMRT-S. Dmean of OC was 34.9 ± 8.0 Gy and ...

  17. Predatory behavior inTupinambis teguixin (Sauria: Teiidae). I. Tongue-flicking responses to chemical food stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanosky, A A; Iriart, D E; Mercolli, C

    1993-02-01

    Black tegu lizards (Tupinambis teguixin) have the ability to detect food odors and discriminate between them and nonfood odors. This was tested by offering chemical stimuli on cotton-tipped applicators to the animals. Stimuli were from two plant and two animal species known to be principal items in these lizards' diets, demineralized water as an odorless control, and eaude-cologne as an odorous control lacking feeding or social importance. Tongueflick attack score, latency to attack, preattack tongue-flicks, and number of attacks were analyzed. The results clearly demonstrated that this species responds to chemical food stimuli, but does not respond to odorless nonfood stimuli. Responses differed among food types. There were no sex differences. These results are in agreement with the prediction that lizards having forked tongues and an active foraging mode rely on chemical cues for feeding.

  18. Study of inter-fraction movements of tongue during radiation therapy in cases of tongue malignancy using volumetric cone beam computed tomography (CBCT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Athar Ali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Tongue is a mobile organ in head and neck region predisposing it for geographic miss during the course of fractionated radiotherapy for tongue malignancy. This study analyses movement of tongue during the course of radiotherapy using volumetric KV-cone beam computed tomography (KV-CBCT imaging for patients of tongue malignancy treated without using tongue bite. Methods: We analysed 100 KV-cone beam CTs performed on 10 patients with carcinoma of tongue undergoing fractionated radiotherapy. All the patients underwent thermoplastic mask immobilisation and CT simulation. During the course of radiotherapy, all patients underwent volumetric KV-CBCT imaging to assess the movements of tongue. Five arbitrary reference points were used to analyse the movements of tongue in 3-dimensions: 1 Point A: Tip of tongue; 2 Point B: Point over right lateral border, 4 cm posterior to the tip of tongue; 3 Point C: Point over left lateral border, 4 cm posterior to the tip of tongue; 4 Point D: Point over superior most part (dorsum of tongue, 4 cm posterior to the tip of tongue; 5 Point E: Point over the surface of base of tongue at the level of tip of epiglottis. Results: Mean movements of point A: +0.21 cm (SD: 0.12 and -0.23 cm (SD: 0.14, point B: +0.14 cm (SD: 0.04 and -0.19 cm (SD: 0.1, point C: +0.12 cm (SD: 0.05 and -0.14 cm (SD: 0.06, point D: +0.15 cm (SD: 0.07 and -0.29 cm (SD: 0.22 and point E: +0.23 cm (SD: 0.15 and -0.23 cm (SD: 0.14. Conclusion: Organ movement is one of the great challenges encountered during radiotherapy. Tongue is one such organ in head and neck region. Concept of internal target volume (ITV margin which takes into account the internal organ movements should be considered for tongue malignancies. ITV to PTV margin will depend on the setup accuracy, immobilization device and imaging modality utilised for setup verification. In an IGRT (Image Guided Radio Therapy setup, a PTV margin of 0.3 to 0.5 cm from ITV would be safe.

  19. Manipulators inspired by the tongue of the chameleon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debray, Alexis

    2011-06-01

    Chameleons have developed a specialized ballistic tongue which elongates more than six times its rest length at speeds higher than 3.5 m s(-1) and accelerations 350 m s(-2), with a highly flexible mobile part, and which applies no continuous force during forward motion. These characteristics are possible because this tongue consists of two highly specialized systems, an ejection system for the forward motion and an accordion-like system for the retraction. Four manipulators inspired by the tongue of the chameleon and based on this design have been developed, resulting in three characteristics similar to the tongue of the chameleon: extensibility of the manipulator, flexibility of the mobile part, and absence of continuous force during the forward motion. The first manipulator mimics the basic mechanism of the tongue of the chameleon and reproduced its basic performances. A second manipulator performs a catching function at a speed of 3.5 m s(-1) with an acceleration of 573 m s(-2) while elongating seven times its rest length. The design of this manipulator is such that the dc motor used for retraction applies a torque 25 times its rated torque. Moreover, during the retraction, the mobile part of the manipulator moves due to its own inertia, allowing the dc motor to rotate at full velocity. In another manipulator, the addition of an elastomer in the mobile part allows for control of the retraction velocity. A model for these two manipulators compares well with the experimental data. Finally, the addition of wings on the mobile part allows us to take the advantage of aerodynamic effects, which is unusual for manipulators.

  20. Management of Large Tongue Schwannoma – A Short Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Medhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign nerve sheath tumor composed of schwann cells. Oral cavity is a rare site for schwannomas, tongue being the most common location. Here we are presenting a case of a young adult who presented with a huge swelling in the tongue which was removed by mandibulotomy approach and pre-operative tracheostomy. A 22-year-old male patient presented to the outpatient department with a history of swelling in the tongue for the last 4 years with progressive difficulty in swallowing food and change of voice over the last few months. Upon examination a large swelling was observed on the posterior part of the tongue compromising the oropharyngeal inlet. The approximate size of the swelling was 5cmx4cm. After proper clinical evaluation the patient was advised to obtain a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study of the oral cavity, which showed it to be a nerve sheath tumor (Schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve branch. The patient was admitted for surgery. As difficult intubation was anticipated, pre-operative tracheostomy was performed. The tongue mass was approached by right paramedian mandibulotomy using a transcervical lip split incision. Post operative histopathological examination of the removed specimen showed hypercellular ‘Antony A’ area with plump spindle cells and hypocellular ‘Antony B’ area in a Hematoxylin & eosin stain (200x. This confirmed the diagnosis for a schwannoma. As each and every case is unique in its presentation, so is the management. The idea of presenting the above case is to emphasise the role of selection for the proper approach and foresee the preventable complications while working around the airway.

  1. 78 FR 1936 - Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.-Rail Construction and Operation-In Custer, Powder River and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... a proceeding known as Tongue River III.\\3\\ \\1\\ Tongue River R.R.--Rail Constr. and Operation--In....2d 758 (9th Cir.), cert. denied, 484 U.S. 976 (1987). \\2\\ Tongue River R.R.--Rail Constr. and..., 1996). \\3\\ Tongue River R.R.--Rail Constr. and Operation--Western Alignment, FD 30186 (Sub-No. 3) (STB...

  2. Tongue pressure during swallowing in adults with down syndrome and its relationship with palatal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Megumi; Igari, Kazuko; Hanawa, Soshi; Ito, Ayumi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ishida, Naoko; Koyama, Shigeto; Ono, Takahiro; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    In individuals with Down syndrome, hypotonicity of the tongue and an underdeveloped maxilla may lead to poor oral motor coordination, which adversely affects the oral phase of swallowing. This study aimed to evaluate the characteristics of pressure produced by the tongue against the hard palate during swallowing in individuals with Down syndrome. In addition, the relationship between tongue pressure and palatal morphology was examined. We studied nine adults with Down syndrome and ten healthy adults as controls. Tongue pressure while swallowing 5 mL water was recorded by a sensor sheet system with five measuring points attached to the hard palate. Palatal length, depth, width, curvature, and slope were measured by three-dimensional digital maxillary imaging. The order of onset of tongue pressure on the median line of the hard palate was the same in all participants, except for three with Down syndrome. The duration and maximal magnitude of tongue pressure on the median line in nine participants with Down syndrome were significantly shorter and lower than those of controls. In participants with Down syndrome, significant positive correlations were observed between the duration of tongue pressure at the mid-median part of the hard palate and palatal depth and width, and between the duration and maximal magnitude of tongue pressure at the posterior-median part and palatal length. These findings suggest that impaired tongue activity, poor tongue control, and constrained tongue motion due to a short and narrow palate contribute to swallowing difficulty in individuals with Down syndrome.

  3. Sexual dimorphism in the histologic organization of the muscle fibers in human tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Deivis; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira; Heck, Layana; Xavier, Léder Leal

    2014-07-01

    Tongue movements are critical for speech, swallowing, and respiration; and tongue dysfunction could lead to dysarthria, dysphagia, and obstructive sleep apnea, respectively. Our current understanding of the contributions of specific tongue muscles (TOs) to precise movement patterns is limited. Likewise, there is still little information regarding the orientation of histologic muscle fibers of the tongue in humans, especially between men and women. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the histologic organization in the tongue of men and women. Ten tongues were studied in human specimens obtained from necropsies (five men and five women). The muscles were analyzed using histology, and the morphometric parameters were measured using Image Pro-Plus Software (Image Pro-Plus 6.0; Media Cybernetics, Silver Spring, MD). Slices were obtained from the anterior, median, and posterior parts of the tongue. We classified and estimated the percentages of transverse (T), oblique (O), and longitudinal (L) fibers in the tongue. To quantify the percentage of fibers in each category in the tongue, the shape coefficient (Shape Z) was estimated. Statistical differences were found between the orientation of the muscle fibers of men and women only for the middle region of the tongue. The middle region of the tongue in women compared with men has a smaller difference in the variation of the percentage of fibers T (P=0.0004), O (P=0.0006), and L (P=0.0013). These morphologic findings are probably related to physiological differences.

  4. The Tip-of-the-Tongue Heuristic: How Tip-of-the-Tongue States Confer Perceptibility on Inaccessible Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Anne M.; Claxton, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that the presence of a tip-of-the-tongue (TOT) state--the sense that a word is in memory when its retrieval fails--is used as a heuristic for inferring that an inaccessible word has characteristics that are consistent with greater word perceptibility. When reporting a TOT state, people judged an unretrieved word as more likely to…

  5. Morphology of the tongue of the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae). II. Histological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crole, M R; Soley, J T

    2009-12-01

    Although a number of brief, fragmented descriptions have been provided on the gross morphology of the ratite tongue, very few studies have documented the histological structure of this organ. This paper presents the first definitive histological description of the emu tongue and reviews, consolidates and compares the scattered information on the histology of the ratite tongue available in the literature. Five tongues were removed from heads obtained from birds at slaughter and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Appropriate longitudinal and transverse segments were removed, routinely processed for light microscopy, and sections examined after staining with H & E and PAS. The entire tongue (body and root) is invested by a non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. The supporting connective tissue of the tongue dorsum displays only large, simple branched tubular mucus-secreting glands, whereas the caudal tongue body ventrum and tongue root, in addition to these glands, also exhibits small, simple tubular mucus-secreting glands. Herbst corpuscles are associated with the large, simple branched glands. Lymphoid tissue is restricted to the tongue ventrum and is particularly obvious at the junction of the ventral tongue body and frenulum where a large aggregation of diffuse lymphoid tissue, with nodular tissue proximally, was consistently observed. A structure resembling a taste bud was located in the epithelium on the caudal extremity of the tongue root of one bird. This is the first reported observation of taste buds in ratites. Forming the core of the tongue body is the cartilaginous paraglossum lying dorsal to the partially ossified rostral projection of the basihyale. The histological features of the emu tongue are generally similar to those described for the greater rhea and ostrich, except that taste buds were not identified in these species. The results would suggest that the emu tongue functions as a sensory organ, both for taste and touch (by virtue of

  6. Morphology of the tongue of the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae. II. Histological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Crole

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Although a number of brief, fragmented descriptions have been provided on the gross morphology of the ratite tongue, very few studies have documented the histological structure of this organ. This paper presents the first definitive histological description of the emu tongue and reviews, consolidates and compares the scattered information on the histology of the ratite tongue available in the literature. Five tongues were removed from heads obtained from birds at slaughter and fixed in 10 % neutral buffered formalin. Appropriate longitudinal and transverse segments were removed, routinely processed for light microscopy, and sections examined after staining with H & E and PAS. The entire tongue (body and root is invested by a non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. The supporting connective tissue of the tongue dorsum displays only large, simple branched tubular mucussecreting glands, whereas the caudal tongue body ventrum and tongue root, in addition to these glands, also exhibits small, simple tubular mucus-secreting glands. Herbst corpuscles are associated with the large, simple branched glands. Lymphoid tissue is restricted to the tongue ventrum and is particularly obvious at the junction of the ventral tongue body and frenulum where a large aggregation of diffuse lymphoid tissue, with nodular tissue proximally, was consistently observed. A structure resembling a taste bud was located in the epithelium on the caudal extremity of the tongue root of one bird. This is the first reported observation of taste buds in ratites. Forming the core of the tongue body is the cartilaginous paraglossum lying dorsal to the partially ossified rostral projection of the basihyale. The histological features of the emu tongue are generally similar to those described for the greater rhea and ostrich, except that taste buds were not identified in these species. The results would suggest that the emu tongue functions as a sensory organ, both for taste and

  7. Prediction of Pneumonia in Acute Stroke Patients Using Tongue Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Masahiro; Hosomi, Naohisa; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Imamura, Eiji; Shishido, Takeo; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Yoshikawa, Mineka; Tsuga, Kazuhiro; Wakabayashi, Shinichi; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction caused by stroke is a risk factor for aspiration pneumonia. Tongue pressure measurement is a simple and noninvasive method for evaluating swallowing dysfunction. We have hypothesized that low tongue pressure may be able to predict pneumonia occurrence in acute stroke patients. Tongue pressure was measured using balloon-type equipment in 220 acute stroke patients. The modified Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA) score was evaluated independently on the same day. Tongue pressure was measured every week thereafter. An improvement in tongue pressure was observed within the first 2 weeks. Receiver operating curve analysis was performed to determine the ability of tongue pressure to predict modified MASA score <95, which suggests swallowing dysfunction. The optimal cutoff for tongue pressure was 21.6 kPa (χ2 = 45.82, p<0.001, sensitivity 95.9%, specificity 91.8%, area under the curve = 0.97). The tongue pressure was significantly lower in patients with pneumonia than in those without pneumonia. Using a Cox proportional hazard model for pneumonia onset with a cutoff tongue pressure value of 21.6 kPa and adjustment for age, sex, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission, the tongue pressure had additional predictive power for pneumonia onset (hazard ratio, 7.95; 95% confidence interval, 2.09 to 52.11; p = 0.0013). In the group with low tongue pressure, 27 of 95 patients showed improvement of tongue pressure within 2 weeks. Pneumonia occurred frequently in patients without improvement of tongue pressure, but not in patients with improvement (31/68 and 2/27, p<0.001). Tongue pressure is a sensitive indicator for predicting pneumonia occurrence in acute stroke patients. PMID:27802333

  8. Tongue Pressure Modulation for Initial Gel Consistency in a Different Oral Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Sumiko; Hori, Kazuhiro; Tamine, Ken-ichi; Fujiwara, Shigehiro; Inoue, Makoto; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Funami, Takahiro; Ishihara, Sayaka; Ono, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Background In the recent hyper-aged societies of developed countries, the market for soft diets for patients with dysphagia has been growing and numerous jelly-type foods have become available. However, interrelationships between the biomechanics of oral strategies and jelly texture remain unclear. The present study investigated the influence of the initial consistency of jelly on tongue motor kinetics in different oral strategies by measuring tongue pressure against the hard palate. Methods Jellies created as a mixture of deacylated gellan gum and psyllium seed gum with different initial consistencies (hard, medium or soft) were prepared as test foods. Tongue pressure production while ingesting 5 ml of jelly using different oral strategies (Squeezing or Mastication) was recorded in eight healthy volunteers using an ultra-thin sensor sheet system. Maximal magnitude, duration and total integrated values (tongue work) of tongue pressure for size reduction and swallowing in each strategy were compared among initial consistencies of jelly, and between Squeezing and Mastication. Results In Squeezing, the tongue performed more work for size reduction with increasing initial consistency of jelly by modulating both the magnitude and duration of tongue pressure over a wide area of hard palate, but tongue work for swallowing increased at the posterior-median and circumferential parts by modulating only the magnitude of tongue pressure. Conversely, in Mastication, the tongue performed more work for size reduction with increasing initial consistency of jelly by modulating both magnitude and duration of tongue pressure mainly at the posterior part of the hard palate, but tongue work as well as other tongue pressure parameters for swallowing showed no differences by type of jelly. Conclusions These results reveal fine modulations in tongue-palate contact according to the initial consistency of jelly and oral strategies. PMID:24643054

  9. Rational development of taste masked oral liquids guided by an electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woertz, Katharina; Tissen, Corinna; Kleinebudde, Peter; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2010-11-15

    Human taste testing is often associated with ethical concerns, organizational and validation issues. Electrochemical sensor array systems, so called electronic tongues, offer an alternative to assess the taste of multi-component liquid formulations. Therefore, it should be investigated how an electronic tongue can be implemented in the rational development of taste masked formulations. Taste masking of bitter tasting quinine hydrochloride (QH) in a liquid formulation was carried out by screening sweetening agents (sucrose, glucose, fructose, mannitol, sucralose, sodium saccharin, acesulfame potassium, and monoammonium glycyrrhizinate), strong and weak cation ion exchange (IE) resins (Amberlite™ IRP69, Amberlite™ IRP88, and Indion 234), and soluble complexing agents (α-, β-, hydroxypropyl-β-, sulfobutyl ether-β- and γ-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin). Amberlite™ IRP88 showed the best binding capacity for quinine (1.9 g quinine/1 g IE). The addition of sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) could significantly reduce the bitter taste of QH (79% reduction of free QH). The SBE-β-CD formulation was further improved by adding sodium saccharin as secondary taste masking agent. It could also be shown that presence of strawberry flavor and the preservative domiphen bromide does not affect evaluation of taste masking efficiency. The introduced stepwise approach was shown to be applicable to rationally develop novel taste masked formulations.

  10. The Autumn of break-ups: When Jakobshavn Isbrae lost its floating tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, A.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Truffer, M.; Motyka, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Capturing the temporal variability in outlet glacier flow remains one of the holy grails in ice sheet modeling. Here we demonstrate progress using the three-dimensional Parallel Ice Sheet Model. Using a first-order calving law and prescribed subshelf basal melt rates, we performed high-resolution (<1km) hindcasts of the Greenland Ice Sheet of the 1989-2012 period. These hindcasts allow us to study the processes governing ice-shelf thinning, break-up, and subsequent speed-ups and dynamic thinning. Focussing our analysis on the Jakobshavn basin we show that our simulations are able to capture the thinning of the floating tongue resulting from increased subshelf basal melt rates. Furthermore, our simulations capture both the magnitude and the timing of the dynamic thinning associated with the loss of the floating tongue, as well as the speed-up. We find little seasonal variations in surface speeds prior to 1995, and strong variations thereafter, in good agreement with observations of Echelmeyer and Harrison (1991) and Joughin et al (2012).

  11. Measured and Estimated Sodium-Adsorption Ratios for Tongue River and its Tributaries, Montana and Wyoming, 2004-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, M.R.; Nimick, David A.; Cleasby, Thomas E.; Kinsey, Stacy M.; Lambing, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The Tongue River drains an area of about 5,400 square miles and flows northward from its headwaters in the Bighorn National Forest of northeastern Wyoming to join the Yellowstone River at Miles City, Montana. Water from the Tongue River and its tributaries is extensively used for irrigation in both Wyoming and Montana. The Tongue River watershed contains vast coal deposits that are extracted at several surface mines. In some areas of the watershed, the coal beds also contain methane gas (coal-bed methane or natural gas), which has become the focus of intense exploration and development. Production of coal-bed methane requires the pumping of large volumes of ground water from the coal beds to reduce water pressure within the formation and release the stored gas. Water from the coal beds typically is high in sodium and low in calcium and magnesium, resulting in a high sodium-adsorption ratio (SAR). Disposal of ground water with high sodium concentrations into the Tongue River has the potential to increase salinity and SAR of water in the river, and potentially reduce the quality of water for irrigation purposes. This report documents SAR values measured in water samples collected at 12 monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed and presents regression relations between specific conductance (SC) and SAR at each site for the years 2004-06. SAR in water samples was determined from laboratory-measured concentrations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium. The results of regression analysis indicated that SC and SAR were significantly related (p-values developed for most monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed were used with continuous SC data to estimate daily SAR during the 2004 and 2005 irrigation seasons and to estimate 2006 provisional SAR values, which were displayed on the Web in real-time. Water samples were collected and analyzed from seven sites on the main stem of the Tongue River located at: (1) Monarch, Wyoming, station 06299980, (2) State line near

  12. Daylong Effect of Tooth Brushing or Combination Tooth Brushing and Tongue Cleaning Using Antiplaque®Toothpaste on Volatile Sulphur Compound Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indriasti Indah Wardhany

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the daylong effect of Antiplaque® toothpaste active copound and the effect of tooth brushing or combination of tooth brushing and tongue cleaning on Volatile Sulphur Compounds (VSC levels. Methods: Clinical experimental double blinded microbiological and clinical examination. Subjects mainly from dental faculty student with or without a chief complain of halitosis. One hundred and twenty subjects were divided into four groups that consist of thirty samples each group. Two group are treatment subjects were divided into four groups that consist thirty samples each group. Two groups are treatment groups using Antiplaque® toothpaste and two groups are control groups using placebo toothpaste. The daylong effects of VSC levels are measured by Halimeter and organoleptic. The intraoral status were measured including periodontal status and tongue index. Result: There are a reduction of VSC levels in both treatment and control group, but the reduction only significant in group using Antiplaque® toothpaste (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p<0.05. There are a reduction of VSC levels in both treatment using Antiplaque® toothpaste, but the combination of tooth brushing and tongue cleaning reduced VSC levels significantly lower than tooth brushing treatment (Mann Whitney U test, P,0.05. Conclusion: Tooth brushing and tongue cleaning using Antiplaque® toothpaste significantly reduced VSC levels.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i2.95

  13. Clinical evaluation of Lugol's iodine staining in the treatment of stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, M; Shigeta, T; Takahashi, H; Minamikawa, T; Komatsubara, H; Oguni, A; Shibuya, Y; Komori, T

    2011-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is often surrounded by epithelial dysplasia; leaving it unresected can result in local recurrence. Staining with Lugol's iodine solution detects epithelial dysplasia in oral mucosa, but whether it decreases local recurrence after OSCC surgery is unknown. This study investigated local recurrence rates in patients with early tongue cancer who underwent surgery using Lugol's staining. 93 patients with T1-2N0 tongue SCC underwent partial glossectomy using Lugol's staining during surgery. Resection was performed at least 5mm from the margin of the unstained area. Patients were investigated retrospectively for local recurrence status. Postoperative histology revealed negative surgical margins for SCC or epithelial dysplasia in 81 patients, close margins for SCC in 5, positive margins for mild epithelial dysplasia in 6, and a positive margin for SCC in one. Those with a positive or a close margin for SCC underwent additional resection 2-4 weeks after surgery; one was proved histologically to have residual SCC. No patients developed local recurrence, but 2 died of neck metastasis and 2 of distant metastasis. The 5-year disease specific survival rate was 93.8%. Lugol's staining during surgery can reduce local recurrence and improve survival in patients with early tongue SCC.

  14. The Classification of Tongue Colors with Standardized Acquisition and ICC Profile Correction in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Goal. The application of digital image processing techniques and machine learning methods in tongue image classification in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM has been widely studied nowadays. However, it is difficult for the outcomes to generalize because of lack of color reproducibility and image standardization. Our study aims at the exploration of tongue colors classification with a standardized tongue image acquisition process and color correction. Methods. Three traditional Chinese medical experts are chosen to identify the selected tongue pictures taken by the TDA-1 tongue imaging device in TIFF format through ICC profile correction. Then we compare the mean value of L*a*b* of different tongue colors and evaluate the effect of the tongue color classification by machine learning methods. Results. The L*a*b* values of the five tongue colors are statistically different. Random forest method has a better performance than SVM in classification. SMOTE algorithm can increase classification accuracy by solving the imbalance of the varied color samples. Conclusions. At the premise of standardized tongue acquisition and color reproduction, preliminary objectification of tongue color classification in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM is feasible.

  15. Tongue Inspection in TCM: Observations in a Study Sample of Patients Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Joyce K; Chang, Michelle; Quinn, Jessica; Capili, Bernadette

    2014-02-01

    Background: One of the principal diagnostic methods in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is the inspection of the tongue. This method involves examination of the shape, size, color, and texture of the tongue body and coat and helps reveal the state of organ functions and progression of conditions. Literature on tongue observations for patients who have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is minimal. Objective: The goal of this study was to provide a clinical "snapshot" of initial tongue assessments of 159 patients living with HIV, who participated in an acupuncture clinical trial for chronic nausea. The aim was to explore the similarities and differences observed in tongue assessments. Design: This study was part of a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded (subjects and evaluators), parallel-groups, acupuncture clinical trial for treating chronic nausea. Setting: The study was conducted at a large urban New York City academic health center. Patients: The patients in this study were 159 individuals who had HIV infections and who had histories of chronic nausea for ≥3 months. Main Outcome Measures: Initial tongue assessments were recorded for seven basic characteristics: (1) tongue color; (2) tongue shape; (3) tongue body quality; (4) coat color; (5) coat weight; (6) coat surface; and (7) tongue action. Results: The overall tongue picture seen in these patients was that the tongue was swollen and toothmarked, had a pink body with cracks, and had a thick, dry white coat. Conclusions: The HIV disease itself and the use of long term medications affect the Blood, Qi, Yin, and Yang. The observation of the tongue provides a window into the process of the disease and, ultimately, insight for clinical care. This sample population snapshot illustrates the complex processes seen in long-term chronic conditions managed by pharmacologic medications.

  16. Bilateral sensory deprivation of trigeminal afferent fibres on corticomotor control of human tongue musculature: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, M; Baad-Hansen, L; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has demonstrated changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in human limb muscles following modulation of sensory afferent inputs. The aim of this study was to determine whether bilateral local anaesthesia (LA) of the lingual nerve affects the excitability of the tongue motor cortex (MI) as measured by TMS. The effect on MEPs after bilateral LA of the lingual nerve was studied, while the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle served as a control in ten healthy participants. MEPs were measured on the right side of the tongue dorsum in four different conditions: (i) immediately prior to anaesthesia (baseline), (ii) during bilateral LA block of the lingual nerve, (iii) after anaesthesia had subjectively subsided (recovery) and (iv) 3 h after bilateral lingual block injection. MEPs were assessed using stimulus-response curves in steps of 10% of motor threshold (T). Eight stimuli were given at each stimulus level. The amplitudes of the tongue MEPs were significantly influenced by the stimulus intensity (P < 0·001) but not by condition (P = 0·186). However, post hoc tests showed that MEPS were statistically significantly higher during bilateral LA block condition compared with baseline at T + 40%, T + 50% and T + 60% (P < 0·028) and also compared with recovery at T + 60% (P = 0·010) as well as at 3 h after injection at T + 50% and T + 60% (P < 0·029). Bilateral LA block of the lingual nerve seems to be associated with a facilitation of the corticomotor pathways related to the tongue musculature.

  17. [Sigmund Freud, Rudolf Meringer and Carl Mayer: slips of the tongue and mis-readings. The history of a controversy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterhuber, Hartmann

    2007-01-01

    In both his The Psychopathology of Everyday Life and his Lectures Sigmund Freud derived the terms unconscious, preconscious and conscious, particularly from slips in speech, slips in reading and forgetfulness. In these slips, Freud recognised parallels to dreams. In the work mentioned, he analysed these in depth as part of mental motivation. In the papers referred to, Sigmund Freud paid tribute to Rudolf Meringer and Carl Mayer's study which was published in 1895. Meringer and Mayer showed as phenomena reversals and rearrangement of whole words, syllables or sounds, along with pre-tones or anticipations and echoes, word contaminations and word substitutions as responsible for slips of the tongue. The present work demonstrates how passionately these three scientists have contributed to the controversy of their standpoints. For modern psycholinguistics and the psychology of language, speech errors are always an expression of a momentary malfunction of the human speech production system: for the cognitive process of speech production slips of the tongue offer an insight into speech processing. Pre-tones and echoes, serialization errors, as Meringer and Mayer recognised, represent the vast majority of slips of the tongue. They do not reveal any hidden point. But with lexical-semantic slips of the tongue the question of mental motivation is admissible. This short paper is a sign of appreciation and gratitude: firstly, a modest birthday gift for Sigmund Freud, secondly homage to Carl Mayer, who influenced generations of neurologists in his 40 years of chairing the Psychiatric-Neurological Clinic in Innsbruck, so that Hans Ganner rightly spoke of a "Carl Mayer School". But lastly, this short study is also-and especially-a late recognition of Rudolf Meringer, the great Austrian linguist. The view an individual has concerning mental processes and the "topology of the psychic apparatus" is decisive as to the power of determination attached to the unconscious.

  18. Effects of various rinsing protocols after the use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride toothpaste on the acid production of dental plaque and tongue flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardu, V A M; van Loveren, C; Heijnsbroek, M; Buijs, M J; van der Weijden, G A; ten Cate, J M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of various rinsing protocols on oral acid production 6 h after tooth brushing with an amine fluoride/stannous fluoride (AmF/SnF2) toothpaste. After a 14-day period of using F-free toothpaste, 30 participants followed three experimental protocols each, followed by F-free washout periods in a randomized crossover trial. They used AmF/SnF2 toothpaste twice daily for 1 week, and after brushing, they either rinsed with tap water, omitted the post-brush rinse, or rinsed with an AmF/SnF2 mouthwash. In the F-free washout periods, the participants brushed their teeth without further instructions. Six hours after the last brushing (+/-rinsing) of each period, subjects rinsed with 10 ml 10% sucrose solution for 2 min. A tongue film sample and a buccal plaque sample were taken 4 and 8 min after the sucrose challenge, respectively. Metabolic acid ions were determined by capillary electrophoresis. The results show that (1) omitting the post-brush water rinse did not reduce the production of lactic, acetic or minor acids in plaque, nor on the tongue, and that (2) the additional use of AmF/SnF2 mouthwash after brushing reduced the acid production in plaque and tongue samples for at least 6 h. The distributions of acids produced in the plaque or tongue samples were not statistically different between experimental periods. It is concluded that an increase in the antimetabolic effect of AmF/SnF2 toothpaste in between two daily brushing exercises is not achieved by omitting the post-brush water rinse. The additional use of AmF/SnF2 mouthwash after brushing is effective in reducing the acid metabolism in dental plaque and tongue flora. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE EFFICIENCY OF CRYOGENIC TREATMENT FOR TONGUE CANCER

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    T. D. Tabolinovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cryogenic treatment results that have no analogues in Russian and foreign practice were analyzed in 121 patients with tongue cancer. The data on survival rates were used to objectively evaluate the efficiency of tongue cancer cryodestruction in accordance with the extent and pattern of a tumor process. Analysis of long-term (5–30-years results indicated the efficiency of cryodestruction used alone and in combination with radiation and drug therapies in 83.6 % of the new-onset patients and in 73.3 % of the patients with circumscribed recurrences and residual tumors. Recurrent cancer occurred in 19.3 % of 109 patients who had completed treatment: in 16.4 % of the new-onset patients and in 26.7 % of the patients with recurrences and uncured tumors. Local complications from the wound occurred in 6.6 % of the patients and were abolished in the postoperative period.

  20. Automatic Monitoring Electronic Tongue with MEAs for Environmental Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaofang Zou; Hong Men; Yi Li; Yinping Wang; Ping Wang

    2006-01-01

    An automatic monitoring electronic tongue based on differential pulse stripping voltammetry (DPSV) was developed for heavy metals analysis. Simultaneous detections of trace Zn(Ⅱ), Cd(Ⅱ), Pb(Ⅱ), Cu(Ⅱ), Fe(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅲ) in water samples were performed with three electrochemical sensors. The sensor chip combined a silicon-based Hg-coated Au microelectrode array (MEA) as the working electrode on one side with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode and a Pt counter electrode on the other side. With a computer controlled multipotentiostat, pumps and valves, the electronic tongue realized in-situ real-time detection of the six metals mentioned above at parts-per-billion level without manual operation.

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus, pregnancy and carcinoma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Jeffrey David; Baldwin, Andrew; Byrd, Louise

    2013-05-31

    We present a case which describes a 29-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus who was treated aggressively with cytotoxic immunosuppression. Five years later and approximately 12 weeks pregnant, she is confirmed as having carcinoma of the tongue. Not wishing to consider termination of her pregnancy, she underwent surgical resection, which included partial glossectomy with microvascular reconstruction. Good oral function (speech and swallowing) was restored within 2 weeks. The pregnancy proceeded relatively uneventfully to 37 weeks gestation when proteinuric hypertension necessitated induction of labour. She remains well with no evidence of recurrence. This case highlights the options available in the treatment of carcinoma of the tongue during pregnancy together with the ethical considerations required, balanced against optimising maternal outcomes.

  2. Novel materials and applications of electronic noses and tongues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouma, Perena; Sberveglieri, Giorgio

    2004-10-01

    This introductory article describes the content of the October 2004 issue of MRS Bulletin focusing on novel materials and applications of electronic noses and tongues. The articles in this issue review the state of the art in materials, devices, and data processing algorithms used in electronic olfaction and taste systems. The most common gas- and liquid-phase analyte detection tools are presented and compared with traditional chemical analysis instrumentation such as gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy systems. Metal oxides, polymer/polymer composites, and dyes are covered in these articles as key sensing materials. Resistive, optical, electrochemical, and other types of electronic nose and tongue systems are reviewed, and their use in diverse applications, including environmental and food-quality monitoring and medical diagnostics, is discussed.

  3. Free flap transfer reconstruction in managing tongue carcinoma during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yuko; Fukuda, Kenji; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Nishimoto, Soh; Terada, Tomonori; Wada, Ryu; Sotsuka, Yohei; Kawai, Kenichiro; Kakibuchi, Masao

    2017-08-01

    Malignant oral cancers do not commonly occur in pregnant women. But when they do, the presence of a foetus and maternal physiological changes complicate and limit the treatment options. Risk benefit assessment and balancing of them are always important. A 33-year-old woman, who was 25 weeks pregnant, presented with a squamous cell carcinoma on her tongue. She was clinically staged II (T2, N0 and M0). Discussions between the patient, surgical teams and obstetricians agreed to continue her pregnancy while managing the tumour. Hemi-glossectomy and ipsilateral neck dissection was performed. Free antero-lateral thigh flap was transferred to reconstruct the tongue defect, successfully. The patient gave birth to a healthy baby afterward. She is tumour free for 6 years. Free flap reconstruction can be an option, even if the patient is pregnant.

  4. Bilateral lymphoepithelial cyst of the tongue: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Igor Henrique Morais; Romanach, Mario Jose; Carvalho, Alessandra Tavares; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Leao, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino

    2013-01-01

    A lymphoepithelial cyst (LC) is a rare occurrence in the oral cavity, lined by a keratinized stratified squamous epithelium that is surrounded by diffuse lymphoid tissue, that often contains lymphoid follicles. The clinical aspect of oral LC includes an asymptomatic yellowish nodule (less than 10 mm) with regular surface and soft consistency. It usually affects the floor of the mouth and the ventral and posterolateral surfaces of the tongue in adult male patients. To date, approximately 280 cases of LC in the oral cavity have been reported in the literature; however, none of them appear bilaterally. This article presents the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of a unique bilateral LC in the posterolateral region of the tongue.

  5. Mother Tongue Tuition in Sweden - Curriculum Analysis and Classroom Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne REATH WARREN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The model of Mother Tongue Tuition (MTT which has developed in Sweden since the 1970’s offers speakers of languages other than Swedish the opportunity to request tuition in their mother tongue, from kindergarten through to year 12. It is unique among the major immigrant-receiving countries of the world yet little is known about MTT and its syllabus outside of its Nordic context. This article examines the syllabus for MTT from two perspectives; firstly using the framework of Constructive Alignment, secondly from the perspective of what is hidden. The intended syllabus is revealed as well-aligned, but the hidden curriculum impedes successful enactment in many contexts. Examples from case studies in a larger on-going research project offer an alternate approach to syllabus implementation when the negative effects of the hidden curriculum are challenged. While highly context-specific, this model may represent a step in the right direction for implementation of the syllabus.

  6. Dynamic multileaf collimation without `tongue-and-groove' underdosage effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Santvoort, J. P. C.; Heijmen, B. J. M.

    1996-10-01

    In all commercially available multileaf collimators, a `tongue-and-groove' - or similar - construction is used for reduction of leakage radiation between adjacent leaves. These constructions can cause serious underdosages in intensity-modulated photon beams. A method for leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation, which fully avoids these underdosage effects, is presented. The method is based on pairwise synchronizations of trajectories of adjacent leaf pairs, such that the delivered beam intensity in each `tongue-and-groove' region is always equal to the smallest of the two prescribed intensities for the two corresponding leaf pairs. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for a large number of intensity-modulated fields, using the dynamic multileaf collimation mode of our MM50 Racetrack Microtron. Compared to dynamic multileaf collimation without synchronization, beam-on times are always equal or longer. For the cases that we studied, the beam-on time was typically increased by 5 to 15%.

  7. Dynamic multileaf collimation without 'tongue-and-groove' underdosage effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Santvoort, J P; Heijmen, B J

    1996-10-01

    In all commercially available multileaf collimators, a 'tongue-and-groove'--or similar--construction is used for reduction of leakage radiation between adjacent leaves. These constructions can cause serious underdosages in intensity-modulated photon beams. A method for leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation, which fully avoids these underdosage effects, is presented. The method is based on pairwise synchronizations of trajectories of adjacent leaf pairs, such that the delivered beam intensity in each 'tongue-and-groove' region is always equal to the smallest of the two prescribed intensities for the two corresponding leaf pairs. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for a large number of intensity-modulated fields, using the dynamic multileaf collimation mode of our MM50 Racetrack Microtron. Compared to dynamic multileaf collimation without synchronization, beam-on times are always equal or longer. For the cases that we studied, the beam-on time was typically increased by 5 to 15%.

  8. Giant Cell Fibroma of the Tongue: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrokh Farhadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell fibroma of the tongue is a rare benign fibrous tumor of connective tissues in the oral cavity, very few of which have been reported. This benign neoplasm has a predilection for the gingiva and .usually occurs in women under 30. Since this tumor is clinically, and especially histopathologically, placed in the differential diagnosis list of benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors, its proper diagnosis is of great significance because widespread and unnecessary surgeries are avoided as a result. The aim of the present report is to present a case of the tumor in the tongue of a 65-year-old man. The fibroma is a benign fibrous tumor of connective tissues which is microscopically classified in differential diagnosis with other soft tissue tumors since its proper diagnosis prevents from extensive and unnecessary surgeries on the patient.

  9. Measurement Of Beer Taste Attributes Using An Electronic Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polshin, Evgeny; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Nicolaï, Bart; Saison, Daan; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Delvaux, Filip; Legin, Andrey

    2009-05-01

    The present work deals with the results of the application of an electronic tongue system as an analytical tool for rapid assessment of beer flavour. Fifty samples of Belgian and Dutch beers of different types, characterized with respect to sensory properties and bitterness, were analyzed using the electronic tongue (ET) based on potentiometric chemical sensors. The ET was capable of predicting 10 sensory attributes of beer with good precision including sweetness, sourness, intensity, body, etc., as well as the most important instrumental parameter—bitterness. These results show a good promise for further progressing of the ET as a new analytical technique for the fast assessment of taste attributes and bitterness, in particular, in the food and brewery industries.

  10. Greenland Ice Shelves and Ice Tongues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels

    2017-01-01

    literature and physical properties are reviewed. There exists a difference between: (1) Floating glaciers in northern Greenland (>77°N) which experience bottom melting as their dominant ablation mechanism and calve relatively thin, but large (km-sized) tabular icebergs (‘ice islands’), and (2) Grounded......This chapter focuses on a review of the glaciers on north and northeast Greenland that terminate in fiords with long glacier tongues and floating, ice-shelf-like margins. There is some debate as to whether these glacier tongues can be classified as a traditional ice shelf, so the relevant...... glaciers further south (melting estimated at up to 10 m year−1 for locations...

  11. Arnol'd Tongues and Quantum Accelerator Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Guarneri, I; Rebuzzini, L; Fishman, Shmuel; Guarneri, Italo; Rebuzzini, Laura

    2005-01-01

    The stable periodic orbits of an area-preserving map on the 2-torus, which is formally a variant of the Standard Map, have been shown to explain the quantum accelerator modes that were discovered in experiments with laser-cooled atoms. We show that their parametric dependence exhibits Arnol'd-like tongues and perform a perturbative analysis of such structures. We thus explain the arithmetical organisation of the accelerator modes and discuss experimental implications thereof.

  12. The Prevalence of Tongue Thrusting in Patients with Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Miremadi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Tongue thrust and/or its consequent swallowing pattern are amongst the parafunctional habits that have always been considered as etiological factors for dental disorders by different investigators.Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tongue thrusting and the incidence of periodontal disorders associated with this habit among patients referred to the Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Material and Methods: Two hundred and eighty patients, undergoing first phase of periodontal therapy, were selected. Among them, those who had tongue thrusting were diagnosed and periodontal indices (probing depth, gingival recession, spacing and gingival enlargement were measured. Also, crown-root ratio was assessed for each anterior tooth.Results: Tongue thrusting was seen in 27.3%of patients, whereas 29.8% and 33.8% of them showed an increase in periodontal pocket depths in their upper and lower jaws,respectively. Gingival recession was found in the upper jaw in 12.98% and in the lowerjaw in 49.35% of the cases. Crown to root length ratio in 24.6% of the upper incisors and 35.1% of the lower incisors were found to be higher than normal. Spacing was observed between the incisors in 31.2% and 41.6% of the patients in the upper and lower jaws, respectively. Finally 31.2% of the patients showed gingival enlargement.Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed a considerable increase in the prevalence of various periodontal diseases among these subjects. To minimize the clinical problems of such patients, prevention of periodontal diseases through excellent oral hygiene and regular dental visits are suggested.

  13. The treatment of tongue haemangioma by plasma knife surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluhan, A; Bozdemir, K; Ugras, S

    2008-11-01

    A seven-year-old girl presented with a 4 cm x 2 cm lesion of the tongue which was located at the posterior one-third in the midline. The lesion was excised by plasma knife surgery. No complication, such as bleeding, shortness of breath or infection, occurred after the treatment. Plasma knife surgery is an acceptable choice for selected benign lingual vascular malformations.

  14. Teratoma tongue: Case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Manish; Chaudhary, Neena; Rai, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    Teratomas are true neoplasms composed of tissues from all three germinal layers and may exhibit variable levels of maturity. They have an unknown origin and eccentric microscopic appearance. Teratomas arising from the oral cavity are rare in the newborn; only 22 cases have been reported in the literature. We describe a female neonate with an oral teratoma originating from the tongue that was successfully treated with surgery.

  15. Fissured and geographic tongue in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a rare, most often sporadic, genetic disease caused by a chromosomal microdeletion at locus 7q11.23 involving 28 genes. It is characterized by congenital heart defects, neonatal hypercalcemia, skeletal and renal abnormalities, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder, and dysmorphic facies. A number of clinical findings has been reported, but none of the studies evaluated this syndrome considering oral cavity. We here report a fissured and geographic tongue in association with WBS.

  16. Two cross-linguistic factors underlying tongue shapes for vowels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nix, D.A.; Papcun, G.; Hogden, J.; Zlokarnik, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Desirable characteristics of a vocal-tract parametrization include accuracy, low dimensionality, and generalizability across speakers and languages. A low-dimensional, speaker-independent linear parametrization of vowel tongue shapes can be obtained using the PARAFAC three-mode factor analysis procedure. Harshman et al. applied PARAFAC to midsagittal x-ray vowel data from five English speakers, reporting that two speaker-independent factors are required to accurately represent the tongue shape measured along anatomically normalized vocal-tract diameter grid lines. Subsequently, the cross-linguistic generality of this parametrization was brought into question by the application of PARAFAC to Icelandic vowel data, where three nonorthogonal factors were reported. This solution is shown to be degenerate; a reanalysis of Jackson`s Icelandic data produces two factors that match Harshman et al.`s factors for English vowels, contradicting Jackson`s distinction between English and Icelandic language-specific `articulatory primes.` To obtain vowel factors not constrained by artificial measurement grid lines, x-ray tongue shape traces of six English speakers were marked with 13 equally spaced points. PARAFAC analysis of this unconstranied (x,y) coordinate data results in two factors that are clearly interpretable in terms of the traditional vowel quality dimensions front/back, high/low. 14 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Intraoral sonographic features of tongue cancer after radical radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikui, Toru E-mail: chikui@rad.dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Kawazu, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Urashima, Yuusuke; Yuasa, Kenji; Kanda, Shigenobu

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to illustrate the sonographic changes of tongue cancer after radical radiotherapy. Materials and methods: In 24 patients with tongue cancer treated by interstitial brachytherapy (BRT) (uneventful recovery n=16, recurrence n=5, severe soft tissue complication n=3), follow-up examination were performed and both the margin and the vascular pattern were retrospectively assessed. We basically performed US examination at least once every 3 months after BRT within 1 year during follow-up period. Results: In the healing process, intraoral sonography shows an unclear margin immediately after brachytherapy and a transient increase of the vascularity lasted within 6 months after BRT, followed by a decrease in the vascularity. The large difference in echogenicity between the primary site and the surrounding tissue and the increased difference suggested the possibility of either radiation ulceration or recurrence. Conclusion: Intraoral sonography could depict the sequence changes of the tongue after BRT, and it was thus useful to confirm the clinical findings of either radiation ulcers or recurrence.

  18. Sensory intensity assessment of olive oils using an electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Ana C A; Dias, Luís G; Rodrigues, Nuno; Pereira, José A; Peres, António M

    2016-01-01

    Olive oils may be commercialized as intense, medium or light, according to the intensity perception of fruitiness, bitterness and pungency attributes, assessed by a sensory panel. In this work, the capability of an electronic tongue to correctly classify olive oils according to the sensory intensity perception levels was evaluated. Cross-sensitivity and non-specific lipid polymeric membranes were used as sensors. The sensor device was firstly tested using quinine monohydrochloride standard solutions. Mean sensitivities of 14±2 to 25±6 mV/decade, depending on the type of plasticizer used in the lipid membranes, were obtained showing the device capability for evaluating bitterness. Then, linear discriminant models based on sub-sets of sensors, selected by a meta-heuristic simulated annealing algorithm, were established enabling to correctly classify 91% of olive oils according to their intensity sensory grade (leave-one-out cross-validation procedure). This capability was further evaluated using a repeated K-fold cross-validation procedure, showing that the electronic tongue allowed an average correct classification of 80% of the olive oils used for internal-validation. So, the electronic tongue can be seen as a taste sensor, allowing differentiating olive oils with different sensory intensities, and could be used as a preliminary, complementary and practical tool for panelists during olive oil sensory analysis.

  19. PEDICLE TONGUE FLAP SURGERY IN ORAL SUBMUCOUS FIBROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthubabu K

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Oral submucous fibrosis is a disease of unknown aetiology and is a legacy of Indians. It has been variously treated both medically and surgically but neither has been found to be rewarding. Various groups have been studying the therapy schedules and aetiological association, but the conclusions have remained unclear. AIM The study aims to focus on newer surgical therapy stressing on the mechanics and use of pedicle tongue flap in the management of this condition. METHODS AND MATERIALS The study comprised of 40 patients from our outpatient department suffering from oral submucous fibrosis in the age group of 11 to 70 years. The contributory factors of oral submucous fibrosis and the symptoms of the disease were evaluated and the role of pedicle tongue flap surgery in the management of this disease which is a premalignant condition is discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Pedicle tongue flap surgery has given promising results in the treatment of trismus due to oral submucous fibrosis. After the surgery, none of our patients developed any malignant change.

  20. [Microscopic innervation and vascularization of the tongue. General study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, A; Sanchiz, O

    1992-01-01

    Our study deals with 23 prenatal human tongues, and a comparative study was carried out on one neonatal tongue and a few human and animal postnatal tongues. Sagittal and coronal sections were stained with various techniques. After the 7th week, the development of the nerves and their relationships with the neighboring structures can be observed. There are very few capillaries making up the superficial vascular network under the epithelium. The vessels whose walls are beginning to develop include the future red blood cells with their basophilic nuclei. During the whole process of evolution, there is a tight correlation between the collagen fibers and the neighboring structures. The innervation and vascularization--the latter with changes in the vascular walls--progressively increase. A short time before birth, the nerve fibers include their characteristic components, except for the Schmidt-Lantermann fissures. A considerable innervation advances towards the papillae, and anterior and posterior nerve networks enter the papillae, whose connective tissue includes groups of corpuscles on serial sections.

  1. Predicting midsagittal pharynx shape from tongue position during vowel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, D H; Kang, A M; Magen, H S; Fulbright, R K; Gore, J C

    1999-06-01

    The shape of the pharynx has a large effect on the acoustics of vowels, but direct measurement of this part of the vocal tract is difficult. The present study examines the efficacy of inferring midsagittal pharynx shape from the position of the tongue, which is much more amenable to measurement. Midsagittal magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained for multiple repetitions of 11 static English vowels spoken by two subjects (one male and one female). From these, midsagittal widths were measured at approximately 3-mm intervals along the entire vocal tract. A regression analysis was then used to assess whether the pharyngeal widths could be predicted from the locations and width measurements for four positions on the tongue, namely, those likely to be the locations of a receiver coil for an electromagnetometer system. Predictability was quite high throughout the vocal tract (multiple r> 0.9), except for the extreme ends (i.e., larynx and lips) and small decreases for the male subject in the uvula region. The residuals from this analysis showed that the accuracy of predictions was generally quite high, with 89.2% of errors being less than 2 mm. The extremes of the vocal tract, where the resolution of the MRI was poorer, accounted for much of the error. For languages like English, which do not use advanced tongue root (ATR) distinctively, the midsagittal pharynx shape of static vowels can be predicted with high accuracy.

  2. [The application of free tissue flap in simultaneous reconstruction of defects after tongue cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ye; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yong-Ning; Zhao, Ji-Zhi; Yu, Li-Jiang; Shi, Tian-Yin; Ma, Chao

    2013-09-01

    To discuss the feasibility of using free tissue flap for simultaneous tongue reconstruction after tongue cancer resection. Radial forearm flaps and anterolateral thigh flaps were used for simultaneous reconstruction of different defects after tongue cancer resection in 47 cases. The functional evaluation was assessed during the follow-up period of 3 months to 9 years. Only one flap failed,giving a success rate of 97.7%. The 36 patient available for postoperative follow-up were all able to communicate in basic languages and eat normally. Among them, normal speech was found in 34, while slurred speech was found in two. 31 patients could eat normal diet ,while eight could eat soft diet and two could eat liquid diet. Simultaneous tongue reconstruction with free tissue flap is a reliable method with high successful rate. Flaps selection based on different tongue defects is the key point to achieve good functional and cosmetic results for the reconstruction tongue.

  3. Force and complexity of tongue task training influences behavioral measures of motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Huo, Xueliang;

    2012-01-01

    Relearning of motor skills is important in neurorehabilitation. We investigated the improvement of training success during simple tongue protrusion (two force levels) and a more complex tongue-training paradigm using the Tongue Drive System (TDS). We also compared subject-based reports of fun, pain......, fatigue, and motivation between paradigms. Three randomized sessions and one control experiment were performed. Sixteen healthy subjects completed two different 1-h sessions of simple tongue training with 1 N and 3 N, respectively, and one TDS session. After 1 wk, six out of 16 subjects participated...... the experienced group performed equal to the last 5 min of their first TDS session and neither group improved during rest. Training with the TDS was rated as more fun, less painful, less fatiguing, and more motivating compared with simple tongue training. In conclusion, force level and complexity of tongue...

  4. Application of electronic nose and electronic tongue in the dairy industry

    OpenAIRE

    Milna Tudor Kalit; Ksenija Marković; Samir Kalit; Nada Vahčić; Jasmina Havranek

    2014-01-01

    Electronic nose (e-nose) and electronic tongue (e-tongue) instrumental systems were designed to crudely mimic human olfactory and taste sensory organs and are composed of an array of sensors. Complex data sets from electronic nose and electronic tongue signals combined with multivariate statistics represent rapid and efficient tools for classification, discrimination, recognition and identification of samples, as well as for the prediction of concentrations of different compounds. A wide vari...

  5. Negative Transfer of Mother Tongue (Chinese) in Chinese-English Translation of Public Signs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任军

    2009-01-01

    This paper is mainly about the influence of negative transfer of mother tongue on Chinese-English translation. By citing and analyzing errors in Chinese-English sign translation, the author finds that in translating Chinese public signs into English, the translators are influenced by the mother tongue, thus, a large number of errors appear.Key Words: Translation of Public Signs;Negative Transfer; Mother Tongue

  6. Progress in animation of an EMA-controlled tongue model for acoustic-visual speech synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Steiner, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    We present a technique for the animation of a 3D kinematic tongue model, one component of the talking head of an acoustic-visual (AV) speech synthesizer. The skeletal animation approach is adapted to make use of a deformable rig controlled by tongue motion capture data obtained with electromagnetic articulography (EMA), while the tongue surface is extracted from volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Initial results are shown and future work outlined.

  7. A case of black hairy tongue responding to oral nystatin and vitamin B complex treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Kutlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Black hairy tongue, also known as lingua villosa nigra, is characterized by desquamation defects on the dorsal side of the tongue with reactive hypertrophy of the filiform papillae. Although the etiology of the disease is unknown, conditions such as smoking, alcohol and candidal infection are accused. In this study, a case of black hairy tongue which is considered to occur due to poor oral hygiene and candidal infection is presented.

  8. Schwannoma of the tongue: two case reports and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe clinicopathologic and radiographic features of two cases of schwannoma involving the oral tongue and to review the literature of this unusual clinical entity. Case reports with review of the pathologic, radiologic and clinical data for two patients with schwannoma of the tongue are reported. Review of the literature of case reports of schwannomas (neurilemmomas) of the tongue from 1955 to 2006 with analysis of the patient’s age, gender, presenting symptom...

  9. Tongue base schwannoma: differential diagnosis and imaging features with a case presentation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are slow growing, encapsulated neoplasms that arise from the nerve sheath. A vast majority of these benign neoplasms occur in the head and neck region, most commonly involving the 8th cranial nerve. Schwannomas arising from the base of tongue are very rare and, thus, can easily escape the list of differential diagnosis for a posterior tongue mass. A systematic approach is recommended for diagnosis of a posterior tongue mass, with neoplastic, infectious, and congenital categories. ...

  10. Maintenance of the Tongue Arch of Gas-fired Glass Furnace%煤气熔窑舌头碹的维护方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永霞; 杨海英; 孙超; 庄春鹏

    2012-01-01

    燃煤气玻璃熔窑的舌头碹是热负荷最高的部位。舌头碹的烧损直接威胁熔窑的寿命,因此燃煤气玻璃熔窑需经常对小炉舌头碹进行局部热修或整体更换,以减轻因舌头碹问题给熔化带来的不利影响。本文介绍了某公司经过多年实践经验摸索出的集中煤气熔窑舌头碹的维护方法,以期与同行共同探讨。%As the highest heat load part of the gas-fired glass furnace , the tongue arch has always been the "bottleneck" of Gas-fired glass furnace. The burning loss of the tongue arch is a direct threat to the life of the furnace. In order to reduce the adverse effects of melting due to the tongue arch, we often need to give the tongue arch a local hot repair or an overall change. The methods described in this paper are worked out through many years of practical experience by a company and is used to joint research with neers.

  11. Application of Color Calibration Methods for the Tongue-color Images under Nature Indoor Light%一种自然光图像颜色校正方法在舌色图像校正中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屠立平; 许家佗; 张志枫; 陈园; 周昌乐

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To establish a calibration analysis approach of medical image color under the circumstance of non-direct natural indoor light, and use it. METHODS TRM (Topology Resolve-Map) calibration method was established in accordance with the color reduction algorithm, with self-made color and grey patches being supervision color control patches; it was applied to correct 410 cases of clinical tongue image. RESULTS The before and after calibrated a * ,b * values of each group s tongue color were significantly different (P<0.05) except for that of whitish group. Compared with pre-calibration, the dispersion and variation coefficient of post-calibration a * , b * values decreased. The overall consensus rate was 75.5 % after using Fisher' s classification method and artificial classification method to analyze 49 corrected typical tongue cases, with the Kappa value of consistency test result of 0. 675 (P< 0.05). CONCLUSION The characteristics of L * a * b * in varied tongue colors can be better demonstrated after the calibration with TRM. TRM model approach can significantly reduce the color errors of tongue images under natural indoor light, which demonstrates its good color calibration effect.%目的 建立一种室内非直射自然光条件下的医学图像颜色校正分析方法并初步应用.方法 根据色彩还原算法结合自制彩色、灰度色标作为校正的监督色标建立TRM颜色校正方法,并对410幅舌色图像进行了校正.结果 舌色a*、b*值除淡白舌组外,校正前后各组均有显著性差异(P<0.05),校正后a*、b*值离散度和变异系数较校正前减小.49例典型舌象校正后Fisher's分类方法与人工分类比较总体一致率75.5%,一致性检验结果Kappa值为0.675 (P<0.05).结论 不同舌象颜色经拓扑剖分-影射还原法校正后能较好的体现其L*a*b*颜色特征.拓扑剖分-影射还原模型校正方法能明显降低自然光条件下舌色图像的色差,具有良好的颜色校正效果.

  12. Black hairy tongue associated with allo peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yi; ZOU Ping; LI Qiu-bai; YOU Yong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Tongue lesions resulting from mucositis are a frequent complication of high-dose chemotherapy and irradiation. They are very common in patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and tongue lesions due to other causes have also been reported. Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a special tongue lesion, not rare in the population with tobacco abuse, but so far it has not been reported after allo peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-PBHST). Here we presented a patient who developed BHT after allo-PBHST and discussed the factors that may cause this condition.

  13. Is tongue thrust that develops during orthodontic treatment an unrecognized potential road block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawla H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of tongue thrust has often been suspected, long debated and largely dispelled as a primary etiological factor of malocclusion. However, tongue thrust may contribute to poor occlusal intercuspation both during and after treatment. A tongue thrust may also develop during orthodontic mechanotherapy as a result of the transient creation of intra and interarch spaces and this little recognized phenomenon was found to occur in many randomly followed cases. In many instances, this seemingly adaptive and secondary response of the tongue posture and function may persist and thereafter impede the resolution of intra and interarch problems.

  14. Review: Highlights in recent applications of electronic tongues in food analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escuder-Gilabert, Laura [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Valencia, C/Vicente Andres Estelles s/n, E-46100 Burjasot, Valencia (Spain); Peris, Miguel, E-mail: mperist@qim.upv.es [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-04-14

    This paper examines the main features of modern electronic tongues (e-tongues) and their most important applications in food analysis in this new century. The components of an e-tongue (automatic sampler, array of chemical sensors, and data processing system) are described. Applications commented include process monitoring, freshness evaluation and shelf-life investigation, authenticity assessment, foodstuff recognition, quantitative analysis, and other quality control studies. Finally, some interesting remarks concerning the strengths and weaknesses of e-tongues in food analysis are also mentioned.

  15. Tongue pressure during swallowing is decreased in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka-Kondoh, Sato; Kondoh, Jugo; Tamine, Ken-Ichi; Hori, Kazuhiro; Fujiwara, Shigehiro; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Yasui, Kumiko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Sakoda, Saburo; Ono, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    Although dysphagia is a life-threatening problem in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the pathophysiology of oral stage dysphagia is yet to be understood. The present study investigated the tongue motor deficit during swallowing in patients with DMD and its relationship with disease-specific palatal morphology. Tongue pressure during swallowing water was recorded in 11 male patients with DMD and 11 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects using an intra-oral sensor with five measuring points, and the state of tongue pressure production was compared between the groups. Palatal morphology was assessed by a non-contact three-dimensional scanner on maxillary plaster models. In patients with DMD, the normal sequential order of tongue-palate contact was lost and the maximal magnitude and integrated value of tongue pressure on the mid-anterior part of palate were smaller than those in healthy subjects. The width of the palate in patients was greater than that in healthy subjects and the depth of the palate in patients had a negative correlation with tongue pressure magnitude on the median palate. Our results suggested that the deteriorated tongue motor kinetics prevented tongue movement during swallowing that was appropriate for the depth of the palate and affects the state of tongue pressure production during swallowing.

  16. Fast marching over the 2D Gabor magnitude domain for tongue body segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhenchao; Zhang, Hongzhi; Zhang, David; Li, Naimin; Zuo, Wangmeng

    2013-12-01

    Tongue body segmentation is a prerequisite to tongue image analysis and has recently received considerable attention. The existing tongue body segmentation methods usually involve two key steps: edge detection and active contour model (ACM)-based segmentation. However, conventional edge detectors cannot faithfully detect the contour of the tongue body, and the initialization of ACM suffers from the edge discontinuity problem. To address these issues, we proposed a novel tongue body segmentation method, GaborFM, which initializes ACM by performing fast marching over the two-dimensional (2D) Gabor magnitude domain of the tongue images. For the enhancement of the contour of the tongue body, we used the 2D Gabor magnitude-based detector. To cope with the edge discontinuity problem, the fast marching method was utilized to connect the discontinuous contour segments, resulting in a closed and continuous tongue body contour for subsequent ACM-based segmentation. Qualitative and quantitative results showed that GaborFM is superior to the other methods for tongue body segmentation.

  17. Application of an E-Tongue to the Analysis of Monovarietal and Blends of White Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Domingo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a multiparametric system capable of characterizing and classifying white wines according to the grape variety and geographical origin. Besides, it quantifies specific parameters of interest for quality control in wine. The system, known as a hybrid electronic tongue, consists of an array of electrochemical microsensors—six ISFET based sensors, a conductivity sensor, a redox potential sensor and two amperometric electrodes, a gold microelectrode and a microelectrode for sensing electrochemical oxygen demand—and a miniaturized optofluidic system. The test sample set comprised eighteen Catalan monovarietal white wines from four different grape varieties, two Croatian monovarietal white wines and seven bi- and trivarietal mixtures prepared from the Catalan varieties. Different chemometric tools were used to characterize (i.e., Principal Component Analysis, classify (i.e., Soft Independent Modeling Class Analogy and quantify (i.e., Partial-Least Squares some parameters of interest. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the multisensor system for analysis of wine.

  18. Correlated TEM, SEM, and histological observations of filiform papillae of the cow tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steflik, D E; Singh, B B; Mckinney, R V; Boshell, J L

    1983-01-01

    The ultrastructural and histological characteristics of the filiform papillae of the cow tongue are described. These large, conical papillae display a fully keratinized external projection, which demonstrates a dominant hard keratin core partially ensheathed by soft keratin. This biostructure differentiates from a dominant posterior cell line, leading to the hard keratin core, and a thinner anterior cell line which, with contributions from an interpapillary cell line, appears responsible for an attenuating sheath of soft keratin around the hard keratin core. The hard keratin cell line differentiates from cells devoid of keratohyalin granules (KHG), which are rich in thick bundles of tonofilaments. The soft keratin cell line differentiates from cells containing both eosinophil and basophil KHG and dispersed tonofilaments. The bovine filiform papilla also appears similar in biostructure to the mammalian hair shaft and the 'filiform hairs' of the rat penis.

  19. Phonetics and tongue position to improve mandibular denture retention: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, David M; Garcia, Lily T

    2007-11-01

    The fabrication, use, and wear instructions for complete dentures are often the factors determining success. The dentist must help guide the mental attitude of the skeptical patient to foster acceptance and success of complete dentures. A "feeling of looseness" may be a condition experienced while patients learn to wear a new mandibular complete denture. Some patients may not understand the reasons given by dentists for the lack of retention of a new mandibular denture. This type of patient requires more explanation, more advice, and more instruction. A phonetic training technique, to demonstrate to the patient how to retain and stabilize the mandibular denture, may be needed for some denture patients. This article reports the clinical use of phonetics and its effect on tongue position to improve the retention and stability of a mandibular complete denture.

  20. Metacognitive Performance, the Tip-of-Tongue Experience, Is Not Disrupted in Parkinsonian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh-Lee, Justin D; Szymkowicz, Sarah M; Smith, Stefanie L; Otani, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a form of metamemory, the tip-of-tongue phenomenon (TOT), was affected in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The PD patient (n = 22), age-matched elderly control (n = 22), and college student control (n = 46) groups were compared on a motor timing task and TOT measures. Motor timing was assessed using a cued hand-clapping task, whereas TOT was assessed using general knowledge questions. The results indicated that motor timing was significantly impaired in the PD group relative to both control groups. However, all of the TOT metacognitive measures: frequency, strength, and accuracy were statistically equivalent between the PD patients and elderly control groups, both of whom showed significantly better memory performance than college controls. These findings demonstrate that TOT metamemory is not compromised in PD patients, and that further insight into TOT mechanisms in PD may prove helpful in developing novel intervention strategies to enhance memory and general cognitive functions in these patients.

  1. Metacognitive Performance, the Tip-of-Tongue Experience, Is Not Disrupted in Parkinsonian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D. Oh-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether a form of metamemory, the tip-of-tongue phenomenon (TOT, was affected in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. The PD patient (=22, age-matched elderly control (=22, and college student control (=46 groups were compared on a motor timing task and TOT measures. Motor timing was assessed using a cued hand-clapping task, whereas TOT was assessed using general knowledge questions. The results indicated that motor timing was significantly impaired in the PD group relative to both control groups. However, all of the TOT metacognitive measures: frequency, strength, and accuracy were statistically equivalent between the PD patients and elderly control groups, both of whom showed significantly better memory performance than college controls. These findings demonstrate that TOT metamemory is not compromised in PD patients, and that further insight into TOT mechanisms in PD may prove helpful in developing novel intervention strategies to enhance memory and general cognitive functions in these patients.

  2. Improvements in tongue strength and pressure-generation precision following a tongue-pressure training protocol in older individuals with dysphagia: Three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Yeates

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Erin M Yeates1, Sonja M Molfenter1, Catriona M Steele1,2,3,41Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Canada; 2Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 3Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator in Aging; 4Bloorview Kids Rehab, Toronto, CanadaAbstract: Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, often occurs secondary to conditions such as stroke, head injury or progressive disease, many of which increase in frequency with advancing age. Sarcopenia, the gradual loss of muscle bulk and strength, can place older individuals at greater risk for dysphagia. Data are reported for three older participants in a pilot trial of a tongue-pressure training therapy. During the experimental therapy protocol, participants performed isometric strength exercises for the tongue as well as tongue pressure accuracy tasks. Biofeedback was provided using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI, an instrument that measures tongue pressure. Treatment outcome measures show increased isometric tongue strength, improved tongue pressure generation accuracy, improved bolus control on videofluoroscopy, and improved functional dietary intake by mouth. These preliminary results indicate that, for these three adults with dysphagia, tongue-pressure training was beneficial for improving both instrumental and functional aspects of swallowing. The experimental treatment protocol holds promise as a rehabilitative tool for various dysphagia populations.Keywords: speech-language pathology, dysphagia, rehabilitation, aging, strength, accuracy

  3. Suspension of the tongue to the digastric tendon following resection of the anterior mandibular arch for oral cancer prevents postoperative tongue fall and avoids the need for tracheostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resection of the anterior arch of the mandible leads to tongue fall and postoperative stridor because of the detachment of tongue musculature from the mandible. In this article, a simple method of tongue suspension is described which would prevent such complications and the need for tracheostomy. Settings and Design: This study was carried out on patients with oral cancer requiring resection of the anterior arch of the mandible as a part of the surgical resection at a tertiary centre. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 32 patients with oral cancer requiring resection of the anterior arch of the mandible as a part of the surgical resection. Following an appropriate resection of the oral cancer (including the anterior mandibular arch and neck dissection, a silk suture is used to loop the tongue musculature on either side to the intermediate tendon of the digastric muscle. Result: This technique of tongue suspension was used in 32 patients who required resection of the anterior mandibular arch for oral cancer. Prophylactic tracheostomy was not performed. One patient developed stridor at extubation and required temporary tracheostomy. All other patients could be successfully extubated within 12 h of surgery and none experienced postoperative stridor or sleep apnea. One other patient required temporary tracheostomy for pulmonary toilet as he developed aspiration pneumonitis related to nasogastric feed. Conclusion: This simple method of tongue suspension to the digastric tendon prevents postoperative tongue fall and obviates the need for tracheostomy in most instances.

  4. Comparison of quality-of-life in tongue cancer patients undergoing tongue reconstruction with lateral upper arm free flap and radial forearm free flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yujie; Cui, Yaqi; Liao, Guiqing

    2015-01-01

    Surgery entails radical resection, neck dissection and tongue reconstruction has been commonly used in treatment of T2 and T3 tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Although lateral upper arm free flap (LUFF) and radial forearm free flap (RFFF) are similar in texture and thickness, significant differences can be noticed in the donor-site function and surgical demands. In the treatment of T2 and T3 tongue cancer, the choice of either LUFF or RFFF is still not defined.We aim to investigatethe long-term QOL of patients with moderate tongue defect and reconstruction with LUFF or RFFF, based on which to provide clinical suggestion for tongue reconstructions.Sixty-five patients (T2 or T3 stage, 42 underwent tongue reconstruction with RFFF and 23 with LUFF) treated at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-Sen University from January 2005 to June 2009 were included. The QOL of each patient was determined using the questionnaire designed based on the University of Washington Quality-of-Life (UW-QOL, version 4). The questionnaire was accomplished by a qualified medical staff blinded to the study after telephone communication with each patient. Statistical analysis showed that no significant difference was noticed in the long-term QOL of patients with tongue cancer after tongue reconstruction using LUFF or RFFF, respectively, indicating that similar QOLs were obtained in the long-term follow-up of patients with tongue cancer (T2 or T3 stages) using LUFF and RFFF for reconstruction.

  5. Vision substitution and moving objects tracking in 2 and 3 dimensions via vectorial electro-stimulation of the tongue

    OpenAIRE

    Chekhchoukh, Abdessalem; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Glade, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Vision substitution by electro-stimulation has been studied since the 60's. Camera pictures or movies encoded in gray levels are displayed via an electro-stimulation device at the surface of a body part, e.g. the skin or the tongue. Medico-technical devices are developed on this principle to take care of sensorimotor handicaps like blindness or equilibrium, or to guide precise acts like in surgery. We propose here to reduce the complexity of the displayed information t...

  6. Dual-task motor performance with a tongue-operated assistive technology compared with hand operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Ashley N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To provide an alternative motor modality for control, navigation, and communication in individuals suffering from impairment or disability in hand functions, a Tongue Drive System (TDS has been developed that allows for real time tracking of tongue motion in an unobtrusive, wireless, and wearable device that utilizes the magnetic field generated by a miniature disk shaped magnetic tracer attached to the tip of the tongue. The purpose of the study was to compare the influence of a concurrent motor or cognitive task on various aspects of simple movement control between hand and tongue using the TDS technology. Methods Thirteen young able-bodied adults performed rapid and slow goal-directed movements of hand and tongue (with TDS with and without a concurrent motor (hand or tongue or cognitive (arithmetic and memory task. Changes in reaction time, completion time, speed, correctness, accuracy, variability of displacement, and variability of time due to the addition of a concurrent task were compared between hand and tongue. Results The influence of an additional concurrent task on motor performance was similar between the hand and tongue for slow movement in controlling their displacement. In rapid movement with a concurrent motor task, most aspects of motor performance were degraded in hand, while tongue speed during rapid continuous task was maintained. With a concurrent cognitive task, most aspects of motor performance were degraded in tongue, while hand accuracy during the rapid discrete task and hand speed during the rapid continuous task were maintained. Conclusion Rapid goal-directed hand and tongue movements were more consistently susceptible to interference from concurrent motor and cognitive tasks, respectively, compared with the other movement.

  7. Tongue-tie, from embriology to treatment: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dezio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to create a complete analysis about tongue-tie (or short lingual frenum or ankyloglossia according to the most important works published in literature. The analysis allowed us to do a complete evaluation of this problem, from embriology to the therapeutic approach we could use today, focusing our attention on laser-assisted therapy. This review is based on the research on the PubMed Database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov of studies about lingual frenum written in English between January 1980 and May 2014. The keywords inserted were “lingual frenum”, “frenectomy”, “laser therapy”. We have analyzed: case series, case reports, clinical studies, and also literature reviews in which embryology, physiology, diagnosis and treatment of ankyloglossia were described. We excluded laboratory studies, studies based on animal tests and studies about patients with particular syndromes in which we can also find tongue-tie. The selection criteria allowed us to select 42 articles. The treatment options for the releasing of the frenum are surgically represented by frenotomy (i.e. simple horizontal cut of this training and frenectomy (i.e. removal. In both cases, the intervention on the short lingual frenum is simple, short-lasting, and without particular complications. Furthermore, this kind of treatment can be carried out with different devices: with the typical cold blade scalpel or by the use of laser, a new method that shows more advantages over the prior art. Laser-assisted therapy permits to intervene on newborns (from 0 to 20 days, when there are breastfeeding problems without total anesthesia and suture. The Er:YAG, CO2 laser (according to literature data and Diode laser (according to our experience are advantageous, safe and effective in tongue-tie treatment.

  8. Intelligent Agent for Acquisition of the Mother Tongue Vocabulary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigor Moldovan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the following: firstly, the basic ideas of a system that simulate how we consider that a child acquires the mother tongue vocabulary and makes the correspondences between objects, words and senses; secondly: the mechanism for a system that can learn the mother tongue vocabulary using observations and, thirdly, how to make an intelligent agent that can behave like a little child, in the process of mother tongue acquisition.

  9. How Children Learn Their Mother Tongue: They Don't.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Mark

    2016-10-01

    A new solution is offered to the Infant Language Acquisition Problem, rejecting both of Chomsky's alternatives. It proposes that the infant does not acquire his mother tongue by mastering its grammar, whether by inference from personal experience or via an innate Language Acquisition Device such as the UG, but that the language he hears is all saved in his extremely plastic and capacious brain, where it is stored in such a way as to organize it while populating it. The brain is thus transformed into a mind by language. Support for this theory is drawn from such topics as feral children and linguistic experiments with bonobos.

  10. Tongue pressure recordings during speech using complete denture

    CERN Document Server

    Jeannin, Christophe; Payan, Yohan; Dittmar, André; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an original experimental procedure to measure mechanical interactions between tongue and teeth during speech production. Using edentulous people as subjects, pressure transducers are inserted in their complete denture duplicate. Physiology is respected during sound and pressure recording as with standard complete denture. Original calibration device is also described in order to know what kind of information can be extracted from the data. The measurements are realized in different experimental conditions in order to remove the auditory and the orosensory feedbacks. Then the first results of the pilot study are presented

  11. Anesthetic management of schwannoma of the base of the tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upma B Batra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma arising from the base of the tongue are very rare and only a few cases have been reported so far. Definitive diagnosis is always made after a histological examination. Apart from an anticipated difficult airway with a risk of airway obstruction upon induction of general anesthesia, anesthetic concerns also include possibility of trauma to the growth and bleeding with attendant risks. We discuss the awake fiberoptic technique used for endotracheal intubation in such a case. This case report highlights the importance of detailed history taking and clinical examination, with emphasis on airway assessment and preoperative planning.

  12. Tongue-tie, from embriology to treatment: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to create a complete analysis about tongue-tie (or short lingual frenum or ankyloglossia) according to the most important works published in literature. The analysis allowed us to do a complete evaluation of this problem, from embriology to the therapeutic approach we could use today, focusing our attention on laser-assisted therapy. This review is based on the research on the PubMed Database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) of studies about lingual frenum written in English b...

  13. A congenital mucocele of the anterior dorsal tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Chung, J E R E; Ensink, R J H; Thijs, H F H; van den Hoogen, F J A

    2014-07-01

    We report on a new-born with a congenital mucocele on the anterior dorsal side of the tongue. The presentation as well as the differential diagnosis of congenital oral swellings is discussed. Because of breastfeeding problems the mucinous swelling was incised and drained two days after birth. Immediately after drainage the swelling disappeared. Congenital oral swellings are rare. Most of them are mucoceles. Post-partum treatment is surgically, but spontaneous remission has been described. High incidence of recurrence should be taken into account when (micro-)marsupialization or incision as sole treatment is performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anesthetic management of schwannoma of the base of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Upma B; Usha, G; Gogia, Anoop R

    2011-04-01

    Schwannoma arising from the base of the tongue are very rare and only a few cases have been reported so far. Definitive diagnosis is always made after a histological examination. Apart from an anticipated difficult airway with a risk of airway obstruction upon induction of general anesthesia, anesthetic concerns also include possibility of trauma to the growth and bleeding with attendant risks. We discuss the awake fiberoptic technique used for endotracheal intubation in such a case. This case report highlights the importance of detailed history taking and clinical examination, with emphasis on airway assessment and preoperative planning.

  15. Efficiency of a miniaturized silica monolithic cartridge in reducing matrix ions as demonstrated in the simultaneous extraction of morphine and codeine from urine samples for quantification with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, T; Chan, E C Y; Ho, P C

    2011-09-01

    Presence of matrix ions could negatively affect the sensitivity and selectivity of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS). In this study, the efficiency of a miniaturized silica monolithic cartridge in reducing matrix ions was demonstrated in the simultaneous extraction of morphine and codeine from urine samples for quantification with LC-MS. The miniaturized silica monolith with hydroxyl groups present on the largely exposed surface area function as a weak cation exchanger for solid phase extraction (SPE). The miniaturized silica cartridge in 1 cm diameter and 0.5 cm length was housed in a 2-ml syringe fixed over a SPE vacuum manifold for extraction. The cleaning effectiveness of the cartridge was confirmed by osmometer, atomic absorption spectrometer, LC-MS and GC-TOFMS. The drugs were efficiently extracted from urine samples with recoveries ranging from 86% to 114%. The extracted analytes, after concentration and reconstitution, were quantified using LC-MS/MS. The limits of detection for morphine and codeine were 2 ng/ml and 1 ng/mL, respectively. The relative standard deviations of measurements ranged from 3% to 12%. The monolithic sorbent offered good linearity with correlation coefficients > 0.99, over a concentration range of 50-500 ng/ml. The silica monolithic cartridge was found to be more robust than the particle-based packed sorbent and also the commercial cartridge with regards to its recyclability and repeated usage with minimal loss in efficiency. Our study demonstrated the efficiency of the miniaturized silica monolith for removal of matrix ions and extraction of drugs of abuse in urinary screening.

  16. Ablation of advanced tongue cancer and mobile tongue reconstruction by using a sensitive anterolateral thigh and vastus lateralis muscle free flap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tuhar; Zamfirescu, D; Gheorghiță, C; Slăvescu, D; Frunză, A; Lascăr, I

    2015-01-01

    .... The anterior lateral thigh flap sensitive myocutaneous (ALTF) with vastus lateralis muscle was used to reconstruct the oral defect in a patient undergoing total glossectomy with laryngeal preservation for T4 tongue cancer...

  17. Relating speech production to tongue muscle compressions using tagged and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangxu; Ye, Chuyang; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry

    2015-03-01

    The human tongue is composed of multiple internal muscles that work collaboratively during the production of speech. Assessment of muscle mechanics can help understand the creation of tongue motion, interpret clinical observations, and predict surgical outcomes. Although various methods have been proposed for computing the tongue's motion, associating motion with muscle activity in an interdigitated fiber framework has not been studied. In this work, we aim to develop a method that reveals different tongue muscles' activities in different time phases during speech. We use fourdimensional tagged magnetic resonance (MR) images and static high-resolution MR images to obtain tongue motion and muscle anatomy, respectively. Then we compute strain tensors and local tissue compression along the muscle fiber directions in order to reveal their shortening pattern. This process relies on the support from multiple image analysis methods, including super-resolution volume reconstruction from MR image slices, segmentation of internal muscles, tracking the incompressible motion of tissue points using tagged images, propagation of muscle fiber directions over time, and calculation of strain in the line of action, etc. We evaluated the method on a control subject and two postglossectomy patients in a controlled speech task. The normal subject's tongue muscle activity shows high correspondence with the production of speech in different time instants, while both patients' muscle activities show different patterns from the control due to their resected tongues. This method shows potential for relating overall tongue motion to particular muscle activity, which may provide novel information for future clinical and scientific studies.

  18. Tongue Pressure Modulation during Swallowing: Water versus Nectar-Thick Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M.; Bailey, Gemma L.; Molfenter, Sonja M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence of tongue-palate pressure modulation during swallowing between thin and nectar-thick liquids stimuli has been equivocal. This mirrors a lack of clear evidence in the literature of tongue and hyoid movement modulation between nectar-thick and thin liquid swallows. In the current investigation, the authors sought to confirm whether…

  19. Mother Tongue Tuition in Sweden--Curriculum Analysis and Classroom Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reath Warren, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The model of Mother Tongue Tuition (MTT) which has developed in Sweden since the 1970's offers speakers of languages other than Swedish the opportunity to request tuition in their mother tongue, from kindergarten through to year 12. It is unique among the major immigrant-receiving countries of the world yet little is known about MTT and its…

  20. Tongue Motion Patterns in Post-Glossectomy and Typical Speakers: A Principal Components Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Maureen; Langguth, Julie M.; Woo, Jonghye; Chen, Hegang; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined changes in tongue motion caused by glossectomy surgery. A speech task that involved subtle changes in tongue-tip positioning (the motion from /i/ to /s/) was measured. The hypothesis was that patients would have limited motion on the tumor (resected) side and would compensate with greater motion on the…