WorldWideScience

Sample records for demonstrated positive effects

  1. A Demonstration of Regression False Positive Selection in Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Business analytics courses, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, have substantial predictive modeling components. The predictive modeling in these courses requires students to estimate and test many linear regressions. As a result, false positive variable selection ("type I errors") is…

  2. A Demonstration of Regression False Positive Selection in Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Business analytics courses, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, have substantial predictive modeling components. The predictive modeling in these courses requires students to estimate and test many linear regressions. As a result, false positive variable selection ("type I errors") is…

  3. Experimental demonstration of interaction region beam waist position knob for luminosity leveling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yue [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bai, Mei [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Advanced Simulation; Duan, Zhe [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Luo, Yun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marusic, Aljosa [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Robert-Demolaize, Guillaume [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shen, Xiaozhe [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of the model-dependent control of the interaction region beam waist position (s* knob) at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The s* adjustment provides an alternative way of controlling the luminosity and is only known method to control the luminosity and reduce the pinch effect of the future eRHIC. In this paper, we will first demonstrate the effectiveness of the s* knob in luminosity controlling and its application in the future electron ion collider, eRHIC, followed by the detail experimental demonstration of such knob in RHIC.

  4. Studying the Greenhouse Effect: A Simple Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, G.; Ouzounis, K.

    2000-01-01

    Studies the parameters involved in a presentation of the greenhouse effect and describes a simple demonstration of this effect. Required equipment includes a 100-120 watt lamp, a 250mL beaker, and a thermometer capable of recording 0-750 degrees Celsius together with a small amount of chloroform. (Author/SAH)

  5. Emotional Effects of Positive Forms of Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Валентиновна Ионова

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problem of emotional significance of a positive form of speech. Based on the methodology of emotions linguistics, linguoecology, communicative linguistics and the methods of description, comparison and discourse analysis, the author distinguishes some types of speech situations that demonstrate visible differences between positive expression of emotions and their content and the pragmatic effect. The difference between the notions of “positive communication” and “positive form of communication” is demonstrated. Special attention is given to the following types of positive emotional communication: tolerant emotional communication, emotional emphasis, emotional neglect, and emotional tabooing. The utterances in situations of real and textual communication demonstrate negative effects of statements expressed in a positive form and identify the specifics of positive forms of emotional communication in comparison with rational communication.

  6. Experiments to Demonstrate Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirí

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials are used in many current applications. The purpose of this paper is to explain the basic properties of pyroelectric and piezoelectric effects and demonstrate them in simple experiments. Pyroelectricity is presented on lead zirconium titanate (PZT) ceramics as an electric charge generated by the temperature…

  7. Simple Demonstration of the Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molki, Arman

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose a simple and low-cost experimental set-up through which science educators can demonstrate the Seebeck effect using a thermocouple and an instrumentation amplifier. The experiment can be set up and conducted during a 1-hour laboratory session. (Contains 3 tables and 3 figures.)

  8. Negative effects of positive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Procedures classified as positive reinforcement are generally regarded as more desirable than those classified as aversive-those that involve negative reinforcement or punishment. This is a crude test of the desirability of a procedure to change or maintain behavior. The problems can be identified on the basis of theory, experimental analysis, and consideration of practical cases. Theoretically, the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement has proven difficult (some would say the distinction is untenable). When the distinction is made purely in operational terms, experiments reveal that positive reinforcement has aversive functions. On a practical level, positive reinforcement can lead to deleterious effects, and it is implicated in a range of personal and societal problems. These issues challenge us to identify other criteria for judging behavioral procedures.

  9. Demonstrating EnTracked a System for Energy-Efficient Position Tracking for Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Jensen, Jakob Langdal; Godsk, Torben

    An important feature of a modern mobile device is that it can position itself. Not only for use on the device but also for remote applications that require tracking of the device. To be useful, such position tracking has to be energy-efficient to avoid having a major impact on the battery life...... of the mobile device. To address this challenge we have build a system named EnTracked that, based on the estimation and prediction of system conditions and mobility, schedules position updates to both minimize energy consumption and optimize robustness. In this demonstration we would like to show how...

  10. A demonstration of position angle-only weak lensing shear estimators on the GREAT3 simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Whittaker, Lee; Battye, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    We develop and apply the position angle-only shear estimator of Whittaker et al. (2014) to realistic galaxy images. This is done by demonstrating the method on the simulations of the GREAT3 challenge (Mandelbaum et al. 2014b), which include contributions from anisotropic PSFs. We measure the position angles of the galaxies using three distinct methods - the integrated light method, quadrupole moments of surface brightness, and using model-based ellipticity measurements provided by IM3SHAPE. A weighting scheme is adopted to address biases in the position angle measurements which arise in the presence of an anisotropic PSF. Biases on the shear estimates, due to measurement errors on the position angles and correlations between the measurement errors and the true position angles, are corrected for using simulated galaxy images and an iterative procedure. The properties of the simulations are estimated using the deep field images provided as part of the challenge. A method is developed to match the distributions ...

  11. Demonstrating Tools and Results of a Measurement Campaign for Indoor GPS Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Blunck, Henrik; Godsk, Torben;

    It has been considered a fact that GPS performs too poorly inside buildings to provide usable indoor positioning. We demo raw measurements and results from a measurement campaign which show that using state-of-the-art receivers GPS availability is good in many buildings with standard material walls...... satellite constellation geometry. A comprehensive analysis of the measurement campaign appears as full paper in Pervasive 2010, titled Indoor Positioning Using GPS Revisited. In this demonstration we present the campaign analysis results with an emphasis on visualization and animation. Another focus...

  12. Simulations to demonstrate reduction of the Gordon-Haus effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuse, D

    1992-01-01

    The superposition of spontaneous emission noise on a train of soliton pulses produces a random change of the center frequency of the soliton spectrum that causes a change of the group velocity of individual solitons, which in long-light-wave systems translates into a random jitter of the position of the pulses at the receiver. This phenomenon is known as the Gordon-Haus effect. If uncontrolled, the Gordon-Haus effect sets a definite limit on the permissible data rate or on the length of soliton-based light-wave systems. Recently Kodama and Hasegawa [Opt. Lett. 17, 31 (1992)] have shown that the Gordon-Haus effect can be suppressed by placing filters along the fiber that reduce the frequency jitter and the concomitant group-velocity changes. We demonstrate the reduction of the Gordon-Haus effect by computer simulations.

  13. Detecting subtle expressions: older adults demonstrate automatic and controlled positive response bias in emotional perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dan R; Whiting, Wythe L

    2013-03-01

    The present study examined age differences in emotional perception for the detection of low-intensity, single-emotion facial expressions. Confirming the "positivity effect," at 60 ms and 2,000 ms presentation rates older adults (age = 61+ years, n = 39) exhibited a response bias favoring happy over neutral responses, whereas younger adults (age = 18-23 years, n = 40) favored neutral responses. Furthermore, older adults favored neutral over fearful responses at the 60 ms presentation rate, relative to younger adults. The finding that age differences in response bias were most pronounced at the 60 ms versus 2,000 ms presentation rate suggests that positivity effects in emotional perception rely partly on automatic processing.

  14. Ancestral resurrection of anthropoid estrogen receptor β demonstrates functional consequences of positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckle, Amy; McGowen, Michael R; Xing, Jun; Chen, Caoyi; Sterner, Kirstin N; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2017-09-13

    Anthropoid primates arose during the Eocene approximately 55 million years ago (mya), and extant anthropoids share a most recent common ancestor ∼40mya. Paleontology has been very successful at describing the morphological phenotypes of extinct anthropoids. Less well understood is the molecular biology of these extinct species as well as the phenotypic consequences of evolutionary variation in their genomes. Here we resurrect the most recent common ancestral anthropoid estrogen receptor β gene (ESR2) and demonstrate that the function of this ancestral estrogen receptor has been maintained during human descent but was altered during early New World monkey (NWM) evolution by becoming a more potent transcriptional activator. We tested hypotheses of adaptive evolution in the protein coding sequences of ESR2, and determined that ESR2 evolved via episodic positive selection on the NWM stem lineage. We separately co-transfected ESR2 constructs for human, NWM, and the anthropoid ancestor along with reporter gene vectors and performed hormone binding dose response experiments that measure transactivation activity. We found the transactivation potentials of the ancestral and human sequences to be significantly lower (p<0.0001 in each comparison) than that of the NWM when treated with estradiol, the most prevalent estrogen. We conclude the difference in fold activation is due to positive selection in the NWM ERβ ligand binding domain. Our study validates inferential methods for detecting adaptive evolution that predict functional consequences of nucleotide substitutions and points a way toward examining the functional consequences of positive Darwinian selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Negative effects of positive reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Perone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Procedures classified as positive reinforcement are generally regarded as more desirable than those classified as aversive—those that involve negative reinforcement or punishment. This is a crude test of the desirability of a procedure to change or maintain behavior. The problems can be identified on the basis of theory, experimental analysis, and consideration of practical cases. Theoretically, the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement has proven difficult (some would say t...

  16. A Demonstration of GPS Landslide Monitoring Using Online Positioning User Service (OPUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies have been frequently applied to landslide study, both as a complement, and as an alternative to conventional surveying methods. However, most applications of GPS for landslide monitoring have been limited to the academic community for research purposes. High-accuracy GPS has not been widely equipped in geotechnical companies and used by technicians. The main issue that limits the applications of GPS in the practice of high-accuracy landslide monitoring is the complexity of GPS data processing. This study demonstrated an approach using the Online Positioning User Service (OPUS) (http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/OPUS) provided by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to process GPS data and conduct long-term landslide monitoring in the Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands Region. Continuous GPS data collected at a creeping landslide site during two years were used to evaluate different scenarios for landslide surveying: continuous or campaign, long duration or short duration, morning or afternoon (different weather conditions). OPUS uses Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) managed by NGS (http://www.ngs.noaa.giv/CORS/) as references and user data as a rover to solve a position. There are 19 CORS permanent GPS stations in the Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands region. The dense GPS network provides a precise and reliable reference frame for subcentimeter-accuracy landslide monitoring in this region. Our criterion for the accuracy was the root-mean-square (RMS) of OPUS solutions over a 2-year period with respect to true landslide displacement time series overt the same period. The true landslide displacements were derived from a single-baseline (130 m) GPS processing by using 24-hour continuous data. If continuous GPS surveying is performed in the field, then OPUS static processing can provide 0.6 cm horizontal and 1.1 cm vertical precision with few outliers. If repeated

  17. Inter-island optical link demonstration using high-data-rate pulse-position modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, Michael; Arnold, Felix; Thieme, Björn

    2014-03-01

    The growing data-rate demand on satellite communication systems has led to the increased interest in optical space communication solutions for uplinks and downlinks between satellites and ground stations. As one example for applications that benefit from higher data-rates offered by optical links, RUAG Space studied an uplink scenario from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to a Geostationary Orbit (GEO), under the European Space Agency project formally known as "Optical Communications Transceiver for Atmospheric Links" (OCTAL). Particularly suitable for optical links through turbulent atmospheres are robust Pulse Position Modulation (PPM) schemes. Communication electronics using a Multi-Pulse PPM (MPPM) scheme have been developed, increasing the data-rate compared to traditional PPM at a constant peak-to-average ratio while allowing a widely configurable data-rate range. The communication system was tested together with a newly developed receiver and transmitter at a wavelength of 1055nm in a field test campaign on the Canary Islands, where the transmitter telescope was located on La Palma while the receiver was installed within the ESA Optical Ground Station on Tenerife. The nearly horizontal link between the two islands with a link distance of 142km allowed validation of relevant system performances under stringent atmospheric conditions. A data-rate of more than 360Mbps could be demonstrated using MPPM, while nearly 220Mbps could be achieved with traditional PPM, well exceeding the targeted data-rate of the studied UAV-to-GEO scenario. Following an introduction on the applied MPPM schemes, the architecture of the test setup is described, different modulation schemes are compared and the test results of this Inter-Island Test Campaign performed in October 2012 are presented.

  18. Positive effects of creating mandalas

    OpenAIRE

    Toroš, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present master’s thesis is to examine the psychological effects of creating mandalas and to give recommendations for a better use of the mandalas in the practice of art assistance in order to help in this way others and oneself. Mandalas are sacred symbols, used in Hinduism and Buddhist religion practices as tools for meditation and concentration. They are geometrical representations of the creation of the cosmos and schemas of all that was created. Jung sat the foundations...

  19. Demonstration of a high sensitivity GNSS software receiver for indoor positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Ma, Martin; Broumandan, Ali; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-03-01

    Advances in signal processing techniques contributed to the significant improvements of GNSS receiver performance in dense multipath environments and created the opportunities for a new category of high-sensitivity GNSS (HS-GNSS) receivers that can provide GNSS location services in indoor environments. The difficulties in improving the availability, reliability, and accuracy of these indoor capable GNSS receivers exceed those of the receivers designed for the most hostile urban canyon environments. The authors of this paper identified the vector tracking schemes, signal propagation statistics, and parallel processing techniques that are critical to a robust HS-GNSS receiver for indoor environments and successfully incorporated them into a fully functional high-sensitivity software receiver. A flexible vector-based receiver architecture is introduced to combine these key indoor signal processing technologies into GSNRx-hs™ - the high sensitivity software navigation receiver developed at the University of Calgary. The resulting receiver can perform multi-mode vector tracking in indoor environment at various levels of location and timing uncertainties. In addition to the obvious improvements in time-to-first-fix (TTFF) and signal sensitivity, the field test results in indoor environments surrounded by wood, glass, and concrete showed that the new techniques effectively improved the performance of indoor GNSS positioning. With fine GNSS timing, the proposed receiver can consistently deliver indoor navigation solution with the horizontal accuracy of 2-15 m depending on the satellite geometry and the indoor environments. If only the coarse GNSS timing is available, the horizontal accuracy of the indoor navigation solution from the proposed receiver is around 30 m depending on the coarse timing accuracy, the satellite geometry, and the indoor environments. From the preliminary field test results, it has been observed that the signal processing sensitivity is the

  20. Position Auctions with Externalities and Brand Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Hummel, Patrick; McAfee, R. Preston

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents models for predicted click-through rates in position auctions that take into account two possibilities that are not normally considered---that the identities of ads shown in other positions may affect the probability that an ad in a particular position receives a click (externalities) and that some ads may be less adversely affected by being shown in a lower position than others (brand effects). We present a general axiomatic methodology for how click probabilities are aff...

  1. Experimental demonstration of illusion optics with ``external cloaking'' effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Guochang; Li, Fang; Fang, Guangyou

    2011-08-01

    A metamaterial "illusion optics" with "complementary medium" and "restoring medium" is designed by using inductor-capacitor (L-C) network medium. The unprecedented effects of "external cloaking" and "transforming one object to appear as another" are demonstrated experimentally. We also demonstrate that the non-resonant nature of the L-C network decreases the sensitivity of the "external cloaking" effect to the variation of the frequency and results in an acceptable bandwidth of the whole device.

  2. Multilevel Modeling of Item Position Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    In many testing programs it is assumed that the context or position in which an item is administered does not have a differential effect on examinee responses to the item. Violations of this assumption may bias item response theory estimates of item and person parameters. This study examines the potentially biasing effects of item position. A…

  3. A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate the Peltier Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougal, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the Peltier, or thermoelectric effect, which provides a way of cooling a system by coupling it thermally to the junction of two materials suitably chosen, shaped, and connected to a d.c. current. Describes an apparatus which simply and inexpensively demonstrates this effect. (MLH)

  4. Effective Classroom-Management & Positive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberer-Nagler, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    This article offers practical information for primary teachers to become more knowledgable, skilled and effective in their work. Aspects of positive teaching and learning are explored. Innovative methods for transforming common classroom management struggles into opportunities for positive change and for changing negative behaviors into positive…

  5. Now is the time for AAPL to demonstrate leadership by advocating positions of social importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Abraham L; Halpern, John H; Freedman, Alfred M

    2004-01-01

    The American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL) and other medical organizations have not taken a position on the abolition of capital punishment because of a long-standing tradition of remaining neutral on "nonmedical" societal issues that are highly divisive. It is the authors' contention that taking a stand on vital social issues that are clearly in the public interest is wholly consistent with the stated purposes of AAPL and that the time has come for an open and frank discussion by the membership on the merits of altering its policy, with particular focus on eliminating the death penalty. The present article explains why capital punishment can no longer be considered a nonmedical societal issue and why AAPL must awaken to take on controversial matters such as this one. For AAPL to continue to avoid this debate and silence any attempt to organize opposition to the current status quo will only serve to embolden those who argue in favor of the death penalty. Such continued silence betrays any notion of neutrality and is an abdication of the canons of medical ethics we have all sworn to uphold.

  6. The Physics behind a Simple Demonstration of the Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Gavin A.

    2014-01-01

    A simple, and popular, demonstration of the greenhouse effect involves a higher temperature being observed in a container with an elevated concentration of CO[subscript 2] inside than in a container with just air enclosed, when subject to direct light. The CO[subscript 2] absorbs outgoing thermal radiation and causes the air inside the container…

  7. The Mercury-Drag Effect, a Demonstration of Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D. H.; Teese, R. B

    1969-01-01

    The mercury-drag effect is demonstrated when mercury vapor diffuses through nitrogen gas at low pressure, passing through tubes of different radii to liquid nitrogen-cooled cold traps. The pressure changes of the nitrogen gas on the mercury-deficient side of the cold traps are observed and compared with theoretical and experimental valves from the…

  8. Effect of gravity on vertical eye position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrot-Deseilligny, C

    2009-05-01

    There is growing evidence that gravity markedly influences vertical eye position and movements. A new model for the organization of brainstem upgaze pathways is presented in this review. The crossing ventral tegmental tract (CVTT) could be the efferent tract of an "antigravitational" pathway terminating at the elevator muscle motoneurons in the third nerve nuclei and comprising, upstream, the superior vestibular nucleus and y-group, the flocculus, and the otoliths. This pathway functions in parallel to the medial longitudinal fasciculus pathways, which control vertical eye movements made to compensate for all vertical head movements and may also comprise the "gravitational" vestibular pathways, involved in the central reflection of the gravity effect. The CVTT could provide the upgaze system with the supplement of tonic activity required to counteract the gravity effect expressed in the gravitational pathway, being permanently modulated according to the static positions of the head (i.e., the instantaneous gravity vector) between a maximal activity in the upright position and a minimal activity in horizontal positions. Different types of arguments support this new model. The permanent influence of gravity on vertical eye position is strongly suggested by the vertical slow phases and nystagmus observed after rapid changes in hypo- or hypergravity. The chin-beating nystagmus, existing in normal subjects with their head in the upside-down position, suggests that gravity is not compensated for in the downgaze system. Upbeat nystagmus due to brainstem lesions, most likely affecting the CVTT circuitry, is improved when the head is in the horizontal position, suggesting that this circuitry is involved in the counteraction of gravity between the upright and horizontal positions of the head. In downbeat nystagmus due to floccular damage, in which a permanent hyperexcitation of the CVTT could exist, a marked influence of static positions of the head is also observed. Finally

  9. Experimental demonstration of topological effects in bianisotropic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Khanikaev, Alexander B; Filonov, Dmitry S; Smirnova, Daria A; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-03-03

    Existence of robust edge states at interfaces of topologically dissimilar systems is one of the most fascinating manifestations of a novel nontrivial state of matter, a topological insulator. Such nontrivial states were originally predicted and discovered in condensed matter physics, but they find their counterparts in other fields of physics, including the physics of classical waves and electromagnetism. Here, we present the first experimental realization of a topological insulator for electromagnetic waves based on engineered bianisotropic metamaterials. By employing the near-field scanning technique, we demonstrate experimentally the topologically robust propagation of electromagnetic waves around sharp corners without backscattering effects.

  10. The Mozart effect may only be demonstrable in nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, A; Esgate, A

    2002-12-01

    The "Mozart effect" is the tendency to score higher on spatiotemporal IQ subscales following exposure to complex music such as Mozart's Sonata K.448. This phenomenon was investigated in 20 musicians and 20 nonmusicians. The trion model predicts increased synchrony between musical and spatiotemporal centres in the right cerebral hemisphere. Since increased left-hemispheric involvement in music processing occurs as a result of music training, predictions deriving from the possibility of increased synchrony with left-hemispheric areas in musicians were tested. These included improved performance on language as well as spatiotemporal tasks. Spatiotemporal, synonym generation, and rhyming word generation tasks were employed as was the Mozart Sonata K.448. A Mozart effect was demonstrated on the spatiotemporal task, and the facilitatory effect of exposure to Mozart was greater for the nonmusician group. This finding adds to the robustness of the Mozart effect since novel tasks were used. No Mozart effect was found for either group on the verbal tasks, although the musicians scored higher on rhyming word generation. This new finding adds to the number of nonmusical tasks apparently showing long-term benefits from music training. However, no systematic link was found between performance on any task and number of years spent in music training. The failure to induce a Mozart effect in the musician group on verbal tasks, as well as that group's limited facilitation on spatiotemporal tasks, may be associated with either a ceiling effect due to the long-term effects of music training or from methodological factors. Both possibilities are discussed.

  11. Micro-position sensor using faraday effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElfresh, Michael; Lucas, Matthew; Silveira, Joseph P.; Groves, Scott E.

    2007-02-27

    A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

  12. Demonstration of Complementary Ternary Graphene Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Ji; Kim, So-Young; Noh, Jinwoo; Shim, Chang Hoo; Jung, Ukjin; Lee, Sang Kyung; Chang, Kyoung Eun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun

    2016-12-01

    Strong demand for power reduction in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices calls for novel devices and architectures. Since ternary logic architecture can perform the same function as binary logic architecture with a much lower device density and higher information density, a switch device suitable for the ternary logic has been pursued for several decades. However, a single device that satisfies all the requirements for ternary logic architecture has not been demonstrated. We demonstrated a ternary graphene field-effect transistor (TGFET), showing three discrete current states in one device. The ternary function was achieved by introducing a metal strip to the middle of graphene channel, which created an N-P-N or P-N-P doping pattern depending on the work function of the metal. In addition, a standard ternary inverter working at room temperature has been achieved by modulating the work function of the metal in a graphene channel. The feasibility of a ternary inverter indicates that a general ternary logic architecture can be realized using complementary TGFETs. This breakthrough will provide a key stepping-stone for an extreme-low-power computing technology.

  13. Demonstration of long-pulse acceleration of high power positive ion beam with JT-60 positive ion source in Japan–Korea joint experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, A., E-mail: kojima.atsushi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Hanada, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Jeong, S.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Y.S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, D.H.; Kim, T.S.; Lee, K.W.; Park, M.; Jung, B.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Mogaki, K.; Komata, M.; Dairaku, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The long-pulse acceleration of the high-power positive ion beam has been demonstrated with the JT-60 positive ion source in the joint experiment among Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) under the collaboration program for the development of plasma heating and current drive systems. In this joint experiment, the increase of the heat load and the breakdowns induced by the degradation of the beam optics due to the gas accumulation was one of the critical issues for the long-pulse acceleration. As a result of development of the long-pulse operation techniques of the ion source and facilities of the neutral beam test stand in KAERI, 2 MW 100 s beam has been achieved for the first time. The achieved beam performance satisfies the JT-60SA requirement which is designed to be a 1.94 MW ion beam power from an ion source corresponding to total neutral beam power of 20 MW with 24 ion sources. Therefore, it was found that the JT-60 positive ion sources were applicable in the JT-60SA neutral beam injectors. Moreover, because this ion source is planned to be a backup ion source for KSTAR, the operational region and characteristic has been clarified to apply to the KSTAR neutral beam injector.

  14. Experimental demonstration of the time reversal Aharonov-Casher effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsten, Tobias; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Sekine, Yoshiaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    2006-11-10

    We demonstrate the time reversal Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect in small arrays of mesoscopic semiconductor rings. By using an electrostatic gate we can control the spin precession rate and follow the AC phase over several interference periods. We show that we control the precession rate in two different gate voltage ranges; in the lower range the gate voltage dependence is strong and linear and in the higher range the dependence in almost an order of magnitude weaker. We also see the second harmonic of the AC interference, oscillating with half the period. We finally map the AC phase to the spin-orbit interaction parameter alpha and find it is consistent with Shubnikov-de Haas analysis.

  15. Effect of Altitude Error on Position Precision of Double-Star Position System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xueyuan; LI Tingjun; QIU Libo; LIN Yu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of two kinds of methods for obtaining altitudes on the position precision are analyzed, and the error expressions are deduced. Many simulation results show that in the two cases, the effects of the same altitude errors on the positioning precision are identical, and the rules that the two altitude errors affect positioning precision can be expressed as that altitude error has little effect on the east-west position error, but has large effect on the south-north position error.

  16. Demonstration of the greenhouse effect for elementary school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, Jelena

    2014-05-01

    The school where I work is part of the "Step by step towards the sustainable development school" project. Project activities are partly directed towards the popularization of science. As a physics teacher, I have had the opportunity to engage in designing interactive workshops, aiming to introduce younger students to simple experiments which illustrate different natural phenomena, and also in organization, preparation and implementation of school and city science festival (in 2012 and 2013). Numerous displays, workshops and experiments served to introduce a large number of visitors to different topics in the area of science and technology. One of the subjects of forthcoming science festival, planned for May of 2014, is the climate change. To that effect, eight grade students will hold a demonstration and explanation of the greenhouse effect. Although the terms greenhouse effect and global warming are widely used in media, most of the elementary school students in Serbia have poor understanding of the underlying scientific concepts. The experiment with analysis and discussion will first be implemented in one eight-grade class (14 years of age). After that, a group of students from this class will present their newly-acquired knowledge to their peers and younger students at the science fair. Activity objectives: • Explain how atmosphere affects the surface temperature of Earth • Conduct an experiment to demonstrate the greenhouse effect • Analyze the consequences of climate changes Experiment description: Take two empty, transparent containers and add a layer of garden soil. Use cardboard or similar material to make housings for the thermometers. Hang them in the containers, so that they don't touch the soil. Cover one container with a glass panel, and leave the other one open. Place identical incandescent light bulbs at the same distance above each container. Turn the light bulbs on. The students should mark the thermometer readings every 2 minutes, for 20

  17. The Positive Effect of China English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晖

    2013-01-01

    With China’s open-door policy, entry into WTO, the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, Shanghai World Expo 2010 and the globalization, more and more Chinese people are learning English and large numbers of people around the world are visit⁃ing and getting to know more about Chinese culture. During the process, an English variety, China English, appears. There is heated discussion about this variety among many scholars. Some approve the positive effect and the feasibility of China English, while others adopt a suspicious and disapproving attitude towards it. This dissertation aims to provide some theoretic analysis and evidence to support the positive effect of China English in terms of vocabulary in intercultural communication. The dissertation firstly introduces the concept and the history of China English and then makes a comparison between the easily confused terms of“Chinglish”and“China English”. In the second part, it gives a clear picture of the current argument over the variety in the aspects of institutionalized and performance variety, the inevitable Chinese transfer and its positive role in intercultural communication as a result of its intelligibility and identity. In the third part, some evidences are shown here. The borrowing English words of Chinese origin are increasingly absorbed into some famous English language dictionary like the ox⁃ford English dictionary. As for the western media, they also accept and adopt this influential English variety. Therefore, we should adopt an objective and correct attitude towards China English, and we should actively apply China English in intercultural com⁃munication to promote Chinese culture to the world.

  18. Fluency and positivity as possible causes of the truth effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Christian; Bayer, Myriam; Alves, Hans; Koch, Alex; Stahl, Christoph

    2011-09-01

    Statements' rated truth increases when people encounter them repeatedly. Processing fluency is a central variable to explain this truth effect. However, people experience processing fluency positively, and these positive experiences might cause the truth effect. Three studies investigated positivity and fluency influences on the truth effect. Study 1 found correlations between elicited positive feelings and rated truth. Study 2 replicated the repetition-based truth effect, but positivity did not influence the effect. Study 3 conveyed positive and negative correlations between positivity and truth in a learning phase. We again replicated the truth effect, but positivity only influenced judgments for easy statements in the learning phase. Thus, across three studies, we found positivity effects on rated truth, but not on the repetition-based truth effect: We conclude that positivity does not explain the standard truth effect, but the role of positive experiences for truth judgments deserves further investigation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Positive reinforcement training for a trunk wash in Nepal's working elephants: demonstrating alternatives to traditional elephant training techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagen, Ariel; Acharya, Narayan; Kaufman, Gretchen E

    2014-01-01

    Many trainers of animals in the zoo now rely on positive reinforcement training to teach animals to voluntarily participate in husbandry and veterinary procedures in an effort to improve behavioral reliability, captive management, and welfare. However, captive elephant handlers in Nepal still rely heavily on punishment- and aversion-based methods. The aim of this project was to determine the effectiveness of secondary positive reinforcement (SPR) in training free-contact elephants in Nepal to voluntarily participate in a trunk wash for the purpose of tuberculosis testing. Five female elephants, 4 juveniles and 1 adult, were enrolled in the project. Data were collected in the form of minutes of training, number of offers made for each training task, and success rate for each task in performance tests. Four out of 5 elephants, all juveniles, successfully learned the trunk wash in 35 sessions or fewer, with each session lasting a mean duration of 12 min. The elephants' performance improved from a mean success rate of 39.0% to 89.3% during the course of the training. This study proves that it is feasible to efficiently train juvenile, free-contact, traditionally trained elephants in Nepal to voluntarily and reliably participate in a trunk wash using only SPR techniques.

  20. Single-position Hall effect measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining a distance (Y) between a first position on and an electrical boundary (34) of a test sample by a multi-point probe comprising four contact elements, comprising: contacting the test sample with the four contact elements (20,22,24,26) at the first position, applying a magne...

  1. Have complementary therapies demonstrated effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Llanio Comella, Nagore; Fernández Matilla, Meritxell; Castellano Cuesta, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has improved thanks to the use of highly effective drugs. However, patients usually require long term therapy, which is not free of side effects. Therefore RA patients often demand complementary medicine, they seek additional sources of relief and/or less side effects. In fact 30-60% of rheumatic patients use some form of complementary medicine. Therefore, from conventional medicine, if we want to optimally treat our patients facilitating communication with them we must know the most commonly used complementary medicines. The aim of this review is to assess, based on published scientific research, what complementary therapies commonly used by patients with RA are effective and safe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  2. A Faraday effect position sensor for interventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, M; Umathum, R; Sikora, J; Brenner, S; Aguor, E N; Semmler, W

    2006-02-21

    An optical sensor is presented which determines the position and one degree of orientation within a magnetic resonance tomograph. The sensor utilizes the Faraday effect to measure the local magnetic field, which is modulated by switching additional linear magnetic fields, the gradients. Existing methods for instrument localization during an interventional MR procedure often use electrically conducting structures at the instruments that can heat up excessively during MRI and are thus a significant danger for the patient. The proposed optical Faraday effect position sensor consists of non-magnetic and electrically non-conducting components only so that heating is avoided and the sensor could be applied safely even within the human body. With a non-magnetic prototype set-up, experiments were performed to demonstrate the possibility of measuring both the localization and the orientation in a magnetic resonance tomograph. In a 30 mT m(-1) gradient field, a localization uncertainty of 1.5 cm could be achieved.

  3. Demonstrating Effectiveness of Antibiotics Against Known Bacteria Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Lois M.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures are described for showing the effectiveness of antibiotics (penicillin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) against a nonpathogenic bacteria strain (Bacillus cereus). Methods are outlined for preparing nutrient agar, sterilizing tubes, pouring agar plates, preparing antibiotic discs, and transferring antibiotic discs to agar plates. (CS)

  4. Demonstrating Effectiveness of Antibiotics Against Known Bacteria Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Lois M.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures are described for showing the effectiveness of antibiotics (penicillin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) against a nonpathogenic bacteria strain (Bacillus cereus). Methods are outlined for preparing nutrient agar, sterilizing tubes, pouring agar plates, preparing antibiotic discs, and transferring antibiotic discs to agar plates. (CS)

  5. Positional Accuracy Assessment for Effective Shoreline Change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2016-06-01

    Jun 1, 2016 ... closely the positions of discrete objects or features are compared to their ..... definition and detection: a review”, Journal of. Coastal Research ... types: An Approach to Modeling and Querying. Moving. Objects in. Databases”,.

  6. Differential effects of arousal in positive and negative autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jaclyn Hennessey; Addis, Donna Rose; Giovanello, Kelly S

    2012-01-01

    Autobiographical memories are characterised by a range of emotions and emotional reactions. Recent research has demonstrated that differences in emotional valence (positive vs. negative emotion) and arousal (the degree of emotional intensity) differentially influence the retrieved memory narrative. Although the mnemonic effects of valence and arousal have both been heavily studied, it is currently unclear whether the effects of emotional arousal are equivalent for positive and negative autobiographical events. In the current study, multilevel models were used to examine differential effects of emotional valence and arousal on the richness of autobiographical memory retrieval both between and within subjects. Thirty-four young adults were asked to retrieve personal autobiographical memories associated with popular musical cues and to rate the valence, arousal and richness of these events. The multilevel analyses identified independent influences of valence and intensity upon retrieval characteristics at the within- and between-subject levels. In addition, the within-subject interactions between valence and arousal highlighted differential effects of arousal for positive and negative memories. These findings have important implications for future studies of emotion and memory, highlighting the importance of considering both valence and arousal when examining the role emotion plays in the richness of memory representation.

  7. Neonatal handling: an overview of the positive and negative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raineki, Charlis; Lucion, Aldo B; Weinberg, Joanne

    2014-12-01

    As one of the first rodent models designed to investigate the effects of early-life experiences, the neonatal handling paradigm has helped us better understand how subtle changes in the infant environment can powerfully drive neurodevelopment of the immature brain in typical or atypical trajectories. Here, we review data from more than 50 years demonstrating the compelling effects of neonatal handling on behavior, physiology, and neural function across the lifespan. Moreover, we present data that challenge the classical view of neonatal handling as an animal model that results only in positive/beneficial outcomes. Indeed, the overall goal of this review is to offer the suggestion that the effects of early-life experiences-including neonatal handling-are nuanced rather than unidirectional. Both beneficial and negative outcomes may occur, depending on the parameters of testing, sex of the subject, and neurobehavioral system analyzed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Effects of Academic Positive Practice on Cursive Letter Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabee, W. Scott

    1988-01-01

    Academic positive practice was used to correct errors of cursive letter writing in three third graders. Following each writing error, students correctly formed each incorrect letter 20 times. Students demonstrated improvement over baseline levels of performance. (Author/DB)

  9. Personal Belongings--A Positive Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Peter H.; Smith, Chris S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of personal belongings on perceptions of the elderly in institutions was tested through color slides in two groups of medical students. The elderly person surrounded by personal belongings was perceived in a less negative way than the same person in bare surroundings. (Author)

  10. Regulation of positive and negative emotion: Effects of sociocultural context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A. Snyder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has demonstrated that the use of emotion regulation strategies can vary by sociocultural context. In a previous study, we reported changes in the use of two different emotion regulation strategies at an annual alternative cultural event, Burning Man (McRae, Heller, John, & Gross, 2011. In this sociocultural context, as compared to home, participants reported less use of expressive suppression (a strategy generally associated with maladaptive outcomes, and greater use of cognitive reappraisal (a strategy associated with adaptive outcomes. What remained unclear was whether these changes in self-reported emotion regulation strategy use were characterized by changes in the regulation of positive emotion, negative emotion, or both. We addressed this issue in the current study by asking Burning Man participants separate questions about positive and negative emotion. Using multiple datasets, we not only replicated our previous findings, but also found that the decreased use of suppression is primarily driven by reports of decreased suppression of positive emotion at Burning Man. By contrast, the reported increased use of reappraisal is not characterized by differential reappraisal of positive and negative emotion at Burning Man. Moreover, we observed novel individual differences in the magnitude of these effects. The contextual changes in self-reported suppression that we report are strongest for men and younger participants. For those who had previously attended Burning Man, we observed lower levels of self-reported suppression in both sociocultural contexts: Burning Man and home. These findings have implications for understanding the ways in which certain sociocultural contexts may decrease suppression, and possibly minimize its associated maladaptive effects.

  11. Effects of the "Positive Action" Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development among Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kendra M.; Vuchinich, Samuel; Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L.; Acock, Alan; Bavarian, Niloofar; Day, Joseph; Silverthorn, Naida; Flay, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of "Positive Action," a school-based social-emotional and character development intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school…

  12. Effects of the "Positive Action" Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development among Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kendra M.; Vuchinich, Samuel; Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L.; Acock, Alan; Bavarian, Niloofar; Day, Joseph; Silverthorn, Naida; Flay, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of "Positive Action," a school-based social-emotional and character development intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school…

  13. Positive effects of subliminal stimulation on memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakalis, E; Lowe, G

    1992-06-01

    To assess the effect of subliminally embedded auditory material on short-term recall, 60 volunteer subjects undertook a face-name-occupation memory test before and after a 15-min. intervention. They were randomly assigned into three groups (a control group and two experimental groups) and allocated to one of the following conditions: (1) no sound, (2) supraliminal presentation of relaxing music, and (3) subliminal presentation of memory-improvement affirmations embedded in relaxing music. After intervention, only the subliminal group significantly improved their performance on recall of names.

  14. Reducing edge effects and improving position resolution in position sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifelder, R.; Haigh, A.T.; Karp, J.S. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Large two dimensional position sensitive NaI (Tl) crystals used in positron emission tomographs and elsewhere normally have gaps or inactive, unusable areas at the edges. Experiments aimed at reducing these edge effects have been performed. Unencapsulated crystals have been used to test the feasibility of optically coupling crystals together to decrease gap size. Other experiments increased the sampling of the scintillation light at the edges in order to obtain better position sensitivity. Work was also performed to treat the edges to reduce unwanted reflections and increase the position sensitive area. Finally, experiments aimed at improving the position resolution throughout the crystal as well as at the edges were performed.

  15. Heterogeneity within the gram-positive anaerobic cocci demonstrated by analysis of 16S-23S intergenic ribosomal RNA polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K E; Davies, C E; Wilson, M J; Stephens, P; Lewis, M A O; Hall, V; Brazier, J; Thomas, D W

    2002-11-01

    Peptostreptococci are gram-positive, strictly anaerobic bacteria which, although regarded as members of the commensal human microflora, are also frequently isolated from sites of clinical infection. The study of this diverse group of opportunist pathogens has been hindered by an inadequate taxonomy and the lack of a valid identification scheme. Recent re-classification of the Peptostreptococcus family into five distinct genus groups has helped to clarify the situation. However, this has been on the basis of 16S rRNA sequence determinations, which are both time-consuming and expensive. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA spacer polymorphisms for the rapid differentiation of the currently recognised taxa within the group of anaerobic gram-positive cocci. A collection comprising 19 reference strains with representatives of each of the 15 species, two close relatives and two of the well-characterised groups, together with 38 test strains was studied. All strains were identified to species group level by phenotypic means. Amplification of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) with universal primers produced distinct banding patterns for all the 19 reference strains and the patterns could be differentiated easily visually. However, of the 38 test strains, less than half could be speciated from ISR analysis alone. Only five groups produced correlating banding patterns for all members tested (Peptoniphilus lacrimalis, P. ivorii, Anaerococcus octavius, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and Micromonas micros). For other species, either the type strain differed significantly from other species members (e.g., A. hydrogenalis) or there appeared to be considerable intra-species variation (e.g., A. vaginalis). Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences for the 'trisimilis' and 'betaGAL' groups showed that both are most closely related to the Anaerococcus group. This work highlights the heterogeneous nature of a number of Peptostreptococcus

  16. Effects of the Positive Action Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development Among Urban Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Kendra M.; Vuchinich, Samuel; Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L.; Acock, Alan; Bavarian, Niloofar; Day, Joseph; Silverthorn, Naida; Flay, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of Positive Action, a school-based social-emotional and character development (SECD) intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school level. A multiple-measure self-report protocol assessed four key strengths and resources for PYD: self-concept, peer affiliations, ethics, and social skills....

  17. Orally administered whole egg demonstrates antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Mao; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Ogino, Yumi; Yoshida, Junki; Tomonaga, Shozo; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have reported that vegetarian diets are associated with a higher prevalence of major depression. Therefore, we hypothesised that the consumption of animal products, especially eggs, may have positive effects on mental health, especially on major depression, because a previous study reported that egg consumption produces numerous beneficial effects in humans. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic whole-egg treatment on depression-like behaviours in Wistar rats, a control strain, and Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression. In both the rats, either whole-egg solution (5 ml/kg) or distilled water (5 ml/kg) was orally administrated for 35 days. During these periods, the open-field test (OFT) was conducted on the 21st day, and a forced swimming test (FST) was enforced on the 27th and 28th days. On the 36th day, the plasma and brain were collected. Chronic whole-egg treatment did not affect line crossing in the OFT, whereas it reduced the total duration of immobility in the FST on both strains. Furthermore, interestingly, the results indicated the possibility that whole-egg treatment elevated the incorporation of tryptophan into the brain, and the tryptophan concentration in the prefrontal cortex was actually increased by the treatment. This study demonstrated that whole-egg treatment exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. It is suggested that whole egg may be an excellent food for preventing and alleviating the conditions of major depression.

  18. Positive emotions and the social broadening effects of Barack Obama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Anthony D; Burrow, Anthony L; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E

    2012-10-01

    Past experiments have demonstrated that the cognitive broadening produced by positive emotions may extend to social contexts. Building on this evidence, we hypothesized that positive emotions triggered by thinking about Barack Obama may broaden and expand people's sense of self to include others. Results from an expressive-writing study demonstrated that African American college students prompted to write about Obama immediately prior to and after the 2008 presidential election used more plural self-references, fewer other-references, and more social references. Mediation analyses revealed that writing about Obama increased positive emotions, which in turn increased the likelihood that people thought in terms of more-inclusive superordinate categories (we and us rather than they and them). Implications of these findings for the role of positive emotions in perspective-taking and intergroup relations are considered.

  19. Effect of change in head position on diffusion tensor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamoto, Megumi; Takaba, Junko; Kushima, Toshio [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Hospital; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki

    2001-06-01

    It is important to understand the motion probing gradient direction and nerve fiber tract structure to assess diffusion-weighted imaging, which is affected by the position of subjects. However, diffusion tensor imaging may be able to reproduce exact anisotropy regardless of the position of the subject. Therefore, we examined the effect of the position of subjects on diffusion tensor imaging. The value of fractional anisotropy and eigenvalue 1 in standard position were equal to the values of other documented records. Change in head position caused no significant difference in eigenvector imaging, the value of fractional anisotropy, or eigenvalue 1. (author)

  20. The better, the bigger: The effect of graded positive performance feedback on the reward positivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frömer, Romy; Stürmer, Birgit; Sommer, Werner

    2016-02-01

    In this study on skill acquisition in a computerized throwing task, we examined the effect of graded correct-related performance feedback on the reward positivity of the event-related brain potential (ERP). Theories of reinforcement learning predict effects of reward magnitude and expectancy on the reward prediction error. The later is supposed to be reflected in reward positivity, a fronto-central ERP component. A sample of 68 participants learned to throw at a beamer-projected target disk while performance accuracy, displayed as the place of impact of the projectile on the target, served as graded feedback. Effects of performance accuracy in successful trials, hit frequency, and preceding trial performance on reward positivity were analyzed simultaneously on a trial-by-trial basis by means of linear mixed models. In accord with previous findings, reward positivity increased with feedback about more accurate performance. This relationship was not linear, but cubic, with larger impact of feedback towards the end of the accuracy distribution. In line with being a measure of expectancy, the reward positivity decreased with increasing hit frequency and was larger after unsuccessful trials. The effect of hit frequency was more pronounced following successful trials. These results indicate a fast trial-by-trial adaptation of expectation. The results confirm predictions of reinforcement learning theory and extend previous findings on reward magnitude to the area of complex, goal directed skill acquisition.

  1. Antimicrobial effects of positively charged surfaces on adhering Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottenbos, B; Grijpma, DW; van der Mei, HC; Feijen, J; Busscher, HJ

    The infection of biomaterials is determined by an interplay of adhesion and surface growth of the infecting organisms. In this study, the antimicrobial effects on adhering bacteria of a positively charged poly(methacrylate) surface ( potential +12 mV) were compared with those of negatively charged

  2. A low information theory of ballot position effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brockington, David

    2003-01-01

    This article suggests a theory of ballot position effect based on the amount of information present in the electorate while accounting for several alternative hypotheses. The more information that voters have, all other factors held constant, the less a role ballot position will play. Additionally,

  3. Hall Effect Thruster for High Power Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop a flight version of a high power Hall Effect thruster. While numerous high power Hall Effect thrusters have been demonstrated in the...

  4. Going positive: The effects of negative and positive advertising on candidate success and voter turnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam C Malloy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the depth of research on negative advertising in campaigns, scholars have wondered why candidates continue to attack their opponents. We build on this research by considering real-world campaign contexts in which candidates are working in competition with each other and have to react to the decisions of the opposing campaign. Our results suggest that it is never efficacious for candidates to run attack ads, but running positive ads can increase a candidate’s margin of victory. These results are conditioned by two factors: candidates must both stay positive and out-advertise their opponent. Second, the effects of positive advertising are strongest in areas where the candidate is losing or winning by a large margin—areas where they might be tempted to not advertise at all.

  5. Contextual effect of positive intergroup contact on outgroup prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Oliver; Schmid, Katharina; Lolliot, Simon; Swart, Hermann; Stolle, Dietlind; Tausch, Nicole; Al Ramiah, Ananthi; Wagner, Ulrich; Vertovec, Steven; Hewstone, Miles

    2014-01-01

    We assessed evidence for a contextual effect of positive intergroup contact, whereby the effect of intergroup contact between social contexts (the between-level effect) on outgroup prejudice is greater than the effect of individual-level contact within contexts (the within-level effect). Across seven large-scale surveys (five cross-sectional and two longitudinal), using multilevel analyses, we found a reliable contextual effect. This effect was found in multiple countries, operationalizing context at multiple levels (regions, districts, and neighborhoods), and with and without controlling for a range of demographic and context variables. In four studies (three cross-sectional and one longitudinal) we showed that the association between context-level contact and prejudice was largely mediated by more tolerant norms. In social contexts where positive contact with outgroups was more commonplace, norms supported such positive interactions between members of different groups. Thus, positive contact reduces prejudice on a macrolevel, whereby people are influenced by the behavior of others in their social context, not merely on a microscale, via individuals’ direct experience of positive contact with outgroup members. These findings reinforce the view that contact has a significant role to play in prejudice reduction, and has great policy potential as a means to improve intergroup relations, because it can simultaneously impact large numbers of people. PMID:24591627

  6. Contextual effect of positive intergroup contact on outgroup prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Oliver; Schmid, Katharina; Lolliot, Simon; Swart, Hermann; Stolle, Dietlind; Tausch, Nicole; Al Ramiah, Ananthi; Wagner, Ulrich; Vertovec, Steven; Hewstone, Miles

    2014-03-18

    We assessed evidence for a contextual effect of positive intergroup contact, whereby the effect of intergroup contact between social contexts (the between-level effect) on outgroup prejudice is greater than the effect of individual-level contact within contexts (the within-level effect). Across seven large-scale surveys (five cross-sectional and two longitudinal), using multilevel analyses, we found a reliable contextual effect. This effect was found in multiple countries, operationalizing context at multiple levels (regions, districts, and neighborhoods), and with and without controlling for a range of demographic and context variables. In four studies (three cross-sectional and one longitudinal) we showed that the association between context-level contact and prejudice was largely mediated by more tolerant norms. In social contexts where positive contact with outgroups was more commonplace, norms supported such positive interactions between members of different groups. Thus, positive contact reduces prejudice on a macrolevel, whereby people are influenced by the behavior of others in their social context, not merely on a microscale, via individuals' direct experience of positive contact with outgroup members. These findings reinforce the view that contact has a significant role to play in prejudice reduction, and has great policy potential as a means to improve intergroup relations, because it can simultaneously impact large numbers of people.

  7. Effects of the Positive Action Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development Among Urban Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kendra M; Vuchinich, Samuel; Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L; Acock, Alan; Bavarian, Niloofar; Day, Joseph; Silverthorn, Naida; Flay, Brian R

    This study evaluated effects of Positive Action, a school-based social-emotional and character development (SECD) intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school level. A multiple-measure self-report protocol assessed four key strengths and resources for PYD: self-concept, peer affiliations, ethics, and social skills. Students (n=1170) were assessed from grades 3 to 8, the duration of the intervention, with drop-outs and late entrants included in analyses. Growth curve analyses revealed evidence of favorable program effects on each of the four types of resources. The study contributes to PYD research by providing evidence for school-based interventions in low-income, urban contexts for ethnic minority youth.

  8. Aging and emotional memory: cognitive mechanisms underlying the positivity effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniol, Julia; Voss, Andreas; Grady, Cheryl L

    2008-12-01

    Younger adults tend to remember negative information better than positive or neutral information (negativity bias). The negativity bias is reduced in aging, with older adults occasionally exhibiting superior memory for positive, as opposed to negative or neutral, information (positivity bias). Two experiments with younger (N=24 in Experiment 1, N=25 in Experiment 2; age range: 18-35 years) and older adults (N=24 in both experiments; age range: 60-85 years) investigated the cognitive mechanisms responsible for age-related differences in recognition memory for emotional information. Results from diffusion model analyses (R. Ratcliff, 1978) indicated that the effects of valence on response bias were similar in both age groups but that Age x Valence interactions emerged in memory retrieval. Specifically, older adults experienced greater overall familiarity for positive items than younger adults. We interpret this finding in terms of an age-related increase in the accessibility of positive information in long-term memory.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of online positive psychology: Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolier, Linda; Majo, Cristina; Smit, Filip; Westerhof, Gerben Johan; Haverman, Merel; Walburg, J.A.; Riper, Heleen; Bohlmeijer, Ernst Thomas

    2014-01-01

    As yet, no evidence is available about the cost-effectiveness of positive psychological interventions. When offered via the Internet, these interventions may be particularly cost-effective, because they are highly scalable and do not rely on scant resources such as therapists’ time. Alongside a rand

  10. Selective control of attention supports the positivity effect in aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Sasse

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence for a positivity effect in healthy aging, which describes an age-specific increased focus on positive compared to negative information. Life-span researchers have attributed this effect to the selective allocation of cognitive resources in the service of prioritized emotional goals. We explored the basic principles of this assumption by assessing selective attention and memory for visual stimuli, differing in emotional content and self-relevance, in young and old participants. To specifically address the impact of cognitive control, voluntary attentional selection during the presentation of multiple-item displays was analyzed and linked to participants' general ability of cognitive control. Results revealed a positivity effect in older adults' selective attention and memory, which was particularly pronounced for self-relevant stimuli. Focusing on positive and ignoring negative information was most evident in older participants with a generally higher ability to exert top-down control during visual search. Our findings highlight the role of controlled selectivity in the occurrence of a positivity effect in aging. Since the effect has been related to well-being in later life, we suggest that the ability to selectively allocate top-down control might represent a resilience factor for emotional health in aging.

  11. The effect of science demonstrations as a community service activity on pre-service science teachers' teaching practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Derya Kaltakci

    2016-03-01

    In the scope of this study, pre-service science teachers (PSST) developed and carried out science demonstrations with everyday materials for elementary school students as a community service activity. 17 PSST enrolled in the community services practices course at Kocaeli University comprised the sample of the present study. Community service practices aim to develop consciousness of social responsibility and professional skills, as well as to gain awareness of social and community problems and find solutions for pre-service teachers. With this aim, each PSST developed five science demonstration activities and their brochures during a semester. At the end of the semester, a total of 85 demonstrations were carried out at public elementary schools, which are especially located in socioeconomically poor districts of Kocaeli, Turkey. In the present case study, the effect of developing and carrying out science demonstrations for elementary school students on six of the PSST' teaching practices on density and buoyancy concept was investigated. 30-minute interviews conducted with each PSST, videos recorded during their demonstration performances, brochures they prepared for their demonstration activities, and reflection papers were used as data collection tools of the study. The results showed that community service practices with science demonstrations had positive effects on PSST' science content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge.

  12. Position-dependent effects of polylysine on Sec protein transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fu-Cheng; Bageshwar, Umesh K; Musser, Siegfried M

    2012-04-13

    The bacterial Sec protein translocation system catalyzes the transport of unfolded precursor proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Using a recently developed real time fluorescence-based transport assay, the effects of the number and distribution of positive charges on the transport time and transport efficiency of proOmpA were examined. As expected, an increase in the number of lysine residues generally increased transport time and decreased transport efficiency. However, the observed effects were highly dependent on the polylysine position in the mature domain. In addition, a string of consecutive positive charges generally had a more significant effect on transport time and efficiency than separating the charges into two or more charged segments. Thirty positive charges distributed throughout the mature domain resulted in effects similar to 10 consecutive charges near the N terminus of the mature domain. These data support a model in which the local effects of positive charge on the translocation kinetics dominate over total thermodynamic constraints. The rapid translocation kinetics of some highly charged proOmpA mutants suggest that the charge is partially shielded from the electric field gradient during transport, possibly by the co-migration of counter ions. The transport times of precursors with multiple positively charged sequences, or "pause sites," were fairly well predicted by a local effect model. However, the kinetic profile predicted by this local effect model was not observed. Instead, the transport kinetics observed for precursors with multiple polylysine segments support a model in which translocation through the SecYEG pore is not the rate-limiting step of transport.

  13. Experimental demonstration of 360 tunable RF phase shift using slow and fast light effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, Jose;

    2009-01-01

    A microwave photonic phase shifter realizing 360º phase shift over a RF bandwidth of more than 10 GHz is demonstrated using optical filtering assisted slow and fast light effects in a cascaded structure of semiconductor optical amplifiers....

  14. Chewing and Attention: A Positive Effect on Sustained Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Hirano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chewing is crushing food not only to aid swallowing and digestion, but also to help stress relief and regulate cognitive function, especially in attention. It is well known that chewing gum is used for sleepiness prevention during work, learning, and driving, suggesting a link between chewing and sustained attention. We hypothesized that chewing elevates attention and/or alertness, leading to improvements in cognitive performance. We carried out a systematic review of the PubMed database. We inspected the attributes of effects on attention in studies investigating the effects of chewing on attention or alertness conducted with pre-post design in healthy subjects, except elderly. We identified 151 references, 22 of which were included: 14 (64% showed positive attributes of effects on attention, 1 (5% showed negative attributes of effects on attention, 5 (23% showed both positive and negative attributes of effects on attention, and 2 (9% showed no significant attributes of effects on attention. Thus, positive attributes of effects of chewing on attention, especially on sustained attention, were shown in over half of the reports. These effects also appeared with improvement in mood and stress relief and were influenced by time-on-task effect. Further studies are needed, but chewing could be useful for modifying cognitive function.

  15. Chewing and attention: a positive effect on sustained attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Onozuka, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Chewing is crushing food not only to aid swallowing and digestion, but also to help stress relief and regulate cognitive function, especially in attention. It is well known that chewing gum is used for sleepiness prevention during work, learning, and driving, suggesting a link between chewing and sustained attention. We hypothesized that chewing elevates attention and/or alertness, leading to improvements in cognitive performance. We carried out a systematic review of the PubMed database. We inspected the attributes of effects on attention in studies investigating the effects of chewing on attention or alertness conducted with pre-post design in healthy subjects, except elderly. We identified 151 references, 22 of which were included: 14 (64%) showed positive attributes of effects on attention, 1 (5%) showed negative attributes of effects on attention, 5 (23%) showed both positive and negative attributes of effects on attention, and 2 (9%) showed no significant attributes of effects on attention. Thus, positive attributes of effects of chewing on attention, especially on sustained attention, were shown in over half of the reports. These effects also appeared with improvement in mood and stress relief and were influenced by time-on-task effect. Further studies are needed, but chewing could be useful for modifying cognitive function.

  16. Viewing-position effects in the Stroop task: Initial fixation position modulates Stroop effects in fully colored words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Patrick; Ducrot, Stéphanie

    2010-08-01

    In two experiments that we conducted with adult (Experiment 1) and child (Experiment 2) participants, we experimentally controlled the eyes' first fixation in the word using a variable viewing-position technique in a classical all-letter-coloring Stroop procedure. We explored the impact of initial-fixation position (optimal viewing position [OVP] vs. end of the word) on the magnitude of Stroop effects (both interference and facilitation). The results showed that both interference and facilitation effects were reduced when the first fixation was located at the end of the word rather than at the OVP. These data make a new contribution to the study of the role of low-level processes in Stroop effects and add support to the growing body of research indicating that oculomotor processes can act as moderators of cognitive processes in the determination of Stroop effects.

  17. Effect of The Swimmer's Head Position on Passive Drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Matteo; Gatta, Giorgio

    2015-12-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the head position on passive drag with a towing-line experiment in a swimming pool. The tests were performed on ten male swimmers with regional level swimming skills and at least 10 years of competitive swimming experience. They were towed underwater (at a depth of 60 cm) at three speeds (1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 m/s) and in two body positions (arms above the swimmer's head and arms alongside the body). These two body positions were repeated while the swimmer's head was positioned in three different ways: head-up, head-middle and head-down in relation to the body's horizontal alignment. The results showed a reduction of 4-5.2% in the average passive drag at all speeds when the head was down or aligned to the swimmer's arms alongside the body, in comparison to the head-up position. A major significant decrease of 10.4-10.9% (p < 0.05) was shown when the head was down or aligned at the swimmer's arms above the swimmer's head. The passive drag tended to decrease significantly by a mean of 17.6% (p < 0.001) for all speeds examined with the arms alongside the body position rather than with the arms above the head position. The swimmer's head location may play an important role in reducing hydrodynamic resistance during passive underwater gliding.

  18. The effect of illuminant position on perceived curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, W; Johnston, A

    1996-05-01

    In shaded scenes surface features can appear either concave or convex, depending upon the viewer's judgement about the direction of the prevailing illumination. If other curvature cues are added to the image this ambiguity can be removed. However, it is not clear to what extent, if any, illuminant position exerts an influence on the perceived magnitude of surface curvature. Subjects were presented with pairs of spherical surface patches in a curvature matching task. The patches were defined by shading and texture cues. The perceived curvature of a standard patch was measured as a function of light source position. We found a clear effect of light source position on apparent curvature. Perceived curvature decreased as light source tilt increased and as light source slant decreased. We also found that the strength of this effect is determined partly by a surface's reflectance function and partly by the relative weight of the texture cue. When a specular component was added to the stimuli, the effect of light source orientation was weakened. The weight of the texture cue was manipulated by disrupting the regular distribution of texture elements. We found an inverse relationship between the strength of the effect and the weight of the texture cue: lowering the texture cue weight resulted in an enhancement of the illuminant position effect.

  19. The theory behind the age-related positivity effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E Reed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The positivity effect refers to an age-related trend that favors positive over negative stimuli in cognitive processing. Relative to their younger counterparts, older people attend to and remember more positive than negative information. Since the effect was initially identified and the conceptual basis articulated (Mather & Carstensen, 2005 scores of independent replications and related findings have appeared in the literature. Over the same period, a number of investigations have failed to observe age differences in the cognitive processing of emotional material. When findings are considered in theoretical context, a reliable pattern of evidence emerges that helps to refine conceptual tenets. In this article we articulate the operational definition and theoretical foundations of the positivity effect and review the empirical evidence based on studies of visual attention, memory, decision-making, and neural activation. We conclude with a discussion of future research directions with emphasis on the conditions where a focus on positive information may benefit and/or impair cognitive performance in older people.

  20. The Coo Effect in the International Brand Positioning Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kobuszewski Volles

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose: This study aims to develop a model in order to understand how Chinese companies strategically position their brands, considering the causes of the country of origin (COO effect, when going through the process of internationalization. Design/methodology/approach: The study approach a qualitative case study that incorporates two different Chinese companies with subsidiaries settled in Brazil. It was conducted depth interviews with different components of the studied firms. Findings: In this way, it was developed a model that try to explain the positive and/or negative effect of general attributes from China (labor market, institution framework and education on the brand positioning divers (value preposition, points of leverage, primary target and image reinforcement, which influences on the cost-benefit strategy approach of the brands when positioning internationally. Research limitations/implications: Considering that this research is a qualitative study of two Chinese companies, further qualitative and quantitative studies would be fruitful to the validity of the presented model. Originality/value: In order to contribute to the academic field, it was found that this research present a unique model considering different causes of the COO effect that might affect the international branding positioning.

  1. Antagonistic effect of brevicin on Gram positive and Gram negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Senthil Kumar

    activity on Gram positive and negative food borne bacteria. ... have been a common practice in the history of mankind .... To evaluate the thermal stability of the brevicin, the lyophilized ..... microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of protein-dye ... its effect on the sensory acceptability of cooked, sliced, vacuum-.

  2. The Positive Effects of Cognitive Learning Styles in ELT Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagcioglu, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    In the EFL, ESL, ESP and in the ELT classes, students are taught their courses with different kinds of methods and approaches. Cognitive learning styles are the most essential styles in foreign language education. In this paper, the positive effects of cognitive learning styles will be handled. The benefits of these styles will be highlighted.…

  3. Effects of prone and reverse trendelenburg positioning on ocular parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Geordie P; Szirth, Bernard C; Bennett, Henry L; Huang, Sophia S; Thaker, Rajesh S; Heary, Robert F; Turbin, Roger E

    2010-01-01

    : In a pilot study of awake volunteers, intraocular pressure (IOP), choroid layer thickness, and optic nerve diameter were shown to increase in the prone position over 5 h with a nonsignificant trend of attenuation using a 4-degree increase of table inclination. These effects have previously not been isolated from anesthetic and fluid administration over a prolonged period, using an adequate sample size. : After institutional review board approval, 10 healthy volunteers underwent IOP measurement (Tono-Pen XL, Medtronic Solan, Jacksonville, FL) as well as choroidal thickness and optic nerve diameter assessment (Sonomed B-1000, Sonomed, Inc., Lake Success, NY, or the I System-ABD, Innovative Imaging, Inc., Sacramento, CA) on a Jackson table (Orthopedic Systems, Inc., Union City, CA), during 5 h horizontal prone and 5 h 4-degree reverse Trendelenburg positioning. Measurements were assessed as initial supine, initial prone, and hourly thereafter. Vital signs were recorded at each position and time point. : IOP, choroidal thickness, and optic nerve diameter were observed to increase with time in the prone position. A small degree of reverse Trendelenburg attenuated the increase in choroidal thickness but not IOP or optic nerve diameter. : Prolonged prone positioning increases IOP, choroid layer thickness, and optic nerve diameter independent of anesthetics and intravenous fluid infusion and 4 degrees of table inclination (15 cm of head to foot vertical disparity) may not attenuate these effects.

  4. The effect of elbow position on biceps tendon reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keles Isik

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testing of tendon (T reflex is the basic method used in the diagnostic procedure of clinical neurology. Measurement of T reflexes precisely can be a valuable adjunct to clinical examination. Quantification of T reflexes may provide more accurate results. Aims: To analyze the effect of elbow position on biceps T reflex. Settings and Design: A self-controlled clinical trial of biceps T reflex testing at the Electrophysiology Unit of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Methods and Materials: Biceps T reflex was obtained utilizing a hand-held electronic reflex hammer in 50 extremities of 25 healthy volunteers and the effect of elbow position (at 90°, 120° and 150° on reflex response was evaluated. Statistical Analysis: Repeated-measures analysis of variance by the General Linear Model and Pearson correlation test procedures. Results: Onset latency was significantly shorter at 120° of elbow position. The maximum amplitude value of biceps T reflex was obtained at 90° of elbow position. Onset latency of the reflex correlated significantly with the height and arm length but not with age. Conclusions: The electrophysiological measurement of T reflexes is an easy and useful method in the quantification of reflexes, supplying more objective data. However, when performing T reflex studies, the position of the extremity should be taken into consideration to achieve more reliable results.

  5. The effect of shoulder position on inferior glenohumeral mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Dexter W; Talbott, Nancy R

    2017-03-09

    Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Inferior mobilizations are used to treat patients with shoulder dysfunctions. Common positions recommended for promoting an inferior glide include: (1) an open-packed position (OPP) in which the shoulder is in 55° of abduction, 30° of horizontal adduction, and no rotation; (2) neutral position (NP) of the shoulder; and (3) position of 90° of shoulder abduction (ABDP). Studies comparing the impact of position on inferior mobilization are lacking. To determine the effect of shoulder position on humeral movement and mobilization force during inferior mobilizations. Twenty-three subjects were tested bilaterally. Subjects were placed in the OPP, and an ultrasound transducer placed over the superior glenohumeral joint. As inferior mobilization forces were applied through a dynamometer, ultrasound images were taken at rest and during 3 grades of inferior mobilization. This process was repeated in the NP and the ABDP. In the NP, movements during grade 1, 2, and 3 mobilizations were 1.8, 3.8, and 4.5 mm, respectively. Movements measured in the OPP (1.0, 2.4, and 3.6 mm, respectively) and in the ABDP (1.0, 2.2, and 2.3 mm, respectively) were less. Forces were higher in the NP during grade 1, 2, and 3 mobilizations (51.8, 138.7, and 202.1 N, respectively) than in the OPP (37.2, 91.2, and 139.9 N, respectively) and the ABPD (42.5, 115.3, and 165.5 N, respectively). Mobilization position altered the movement and force during inferior mobilizations. Shoulder position should be considered when utilizing inferior mobilizations. NA. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Stason

    Full Text Available Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or head.The demonstration was conducted in 2005-2007 in selected counties of Illinois, Iowa, and Virginia and the entire states of Maine and New Mexico. Medicare claims were compiled for the preceding year and two demonstration years for the demonstration areas and matched comparison areas. The impact of the demonstration was analyzed through multivariate regression analysis with a difference-in-difference framework.Expanded coverage increased Medicare expenditures by $50 million or 28.5% in users of chiropractic services and by $114 million or 10.4% in all patients treated for NMS conditions in demonstration areas during the two-year period. Results varied widely among demonstration areas ranging from increased costs per user of $485 in Northern Illinois and Chicago counties to decreases in costs per user of $59 in New Mexico and $178 in Scott County, Iowa.The demonstration did not assess possible decreases in costs to other insurers, out-of-pocket payments by patients, the need for and costs of pain medications, or longer term clinical benefits such as avoidance of orthopedic surgical procedures beyond the two-year period of the demonstration. It is possible that other payers or beneficiaries saved money during the demonstration while costs to Medicare were increased.

  7. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stason, William B; Ritter, Grant A; Martin, Timothy; Prottas, Jeffrey; Tompkins, Christopher; Shepard, Donald S

    2016-01-01

    Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or head. The demonstration was conducted in 2005-2007 in selected counties of Illinois, Iowa, and Virginia and the entire states of Maine and New Mexico. Medicare claims were compiled for the preceding year and two demonstration years for the demonstration areas and matched comparison areas. The impact of the demonstration was analyzed through multivariate regression analysis with a difference-in-difference framework. Expanded coverage increased Medicare expenditures by $50 million or 28.5% in users of chiropractic services and by $114 million or 10.4% in all patients treated for NMS conditions in demonstration areas during the two-year period. Results varied widely among demonstration areas ranging from increased costs per user of $485 in Northern Illinois and Chicago counties to decreases in costs per user of $59 in New Mexico and $178 in Scott County, Iowa. The demonstration did not assess possible decreases in costs to other insurers, out-of-pocket payments by patients, the need for and costs of pain medications, or longer term clinical benefits such as avoidance of orthopedic surgical procedures beyond the two-year period of the demonstration. It is possible that other payers or beneficiaries saved money during the demonstration while costs to Medicare were increased.

  8. Examining item-position effects in large-scale assessment using the Linear Logistic Test Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTINE HOHENSINN

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available When administering large-scale assessments, item-position effects are of particular importance because the applied test designs very often contain several test booklets with the same items presented at different test positions. Establishing such position effects would be most critical; it would mean that the estimated item parameters do not depend exclusively on the items’ difficulties due to content but also on their presentation positions. As a consequence, item calibration would be biased. By means of the linear logistic test model (LLTM, item-position effects can be tested. In this paper, the results of a simulation study demonstrating how LLTM is indeed able to detect certain position effects in the framework of a large-scale assessment are presented first. Second, empirical item-position effects of a specific large-scale competence assessment in mathematics (4th grade students are analyzed using the LLTM. The results indicate that a small fatigue effect seems to take place. The most important consequence of the given paper is that it is advisable to try pertinent simulation studies before an analysis of empirical data takes place; the reason is, that for the given example, the suggested Likelihood-Ratio test neither holds the nominal type-I-risk, nor qualifies as “robust”, and furthermore occasionally shows very low power.

  9. [Positive feedback is not fully effective in all situations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Kazuho; Horishita, Tomoko; Kanayama, Masaki

    2013-02-01

    This experimental study investigated how leader-member exchange (LMX) and positive feedback pertinent to the goal is related to subordinates' responsibility, assessment of their supervisors, and feeling of being implicitly scolded, to elaborate and confirm the findings of Bezuijen et al. (2010). We hypothesized that positive feedback pertinent to the goal would be more effective compared to unrelated feedback. Secondly, we hypothesized that this effect would be moderated by the quality of LMX. Undergraduate students (29 male, 51 female; 20.4 +/- .63 yrs) participated as subordinates in an experiment consisting of two sessions. The results supported our hypotheses. We found that the positive feedback pertinent to the goal led to increased levels of responsibility. This effect was greater under high-quality LMX conditions, but was inhibited under low-quality LMX conditions. In the high-quality LMX condition, subordinates who did not get any feedback decreased their responsibility, gave lower supervisor assessment ratings, and felt more strongly scolded than under conditions where they received feedback. We discussed the importance of the combination of the quality of the relationship and positive feedback related to the goal, and provided directions for future research.

  10. Postantibiotic effect of ceftaroline against gram-positive organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankuch, G A; Appelbaum, P C

    2009-10-01

    The postantibiotic effects (PAEs), postantibiotic sub-MIC effects (PA-SMEs), and sub-MIC effects (SMEs) of ceftaroline, a novel injectable cephalosporin, were determined for 15 gram-positive organisms. The pneumococcal, staphylococcal, and enterococcal PAEs were 0.8 to 1.8 h, 0.7 to 2.2 h, and 0.2 to 1.1 h, respectively. The corresponding PA-SMEs (0.4 times the MIC) were 2.5 to 6.7 h, 2.9 to >0.0 h, and 7.9 to >10.3 h, respectively. The PA-SMEs were longer than the PAEs, suggesting that sub-MIC levels extend the PAE of ceftaroline against gram-positive cocci.

  11. Torsion effects on a relativistic position-dependent mass system

    CERN Document Server

    Vitória, R L L

    2016-01-01

    We analyse a relativistic scalar particle with a position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation by showing that relativistic bound states solutions can be achieved. Further, we consider the presence of the Coulomb potential and analyse the relativistic position-dependent mass system subject to the Coulomb potential in the spacetime with a space-like dislocation. We also show that a new set of relativistic bound states solutions can be obtained, where there also exists the influence of torsion of the relativistic energy levels. Finally, we investigate an analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect for bound states in this position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation.

  12. EFFECT OF POSITIONAL RELEASE TECHNIQUE IN SUBJECTS WITH SUBACUTE TRAPEZITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweety Charles Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trapezius stretching combined with positional release technique (PRT have found effective in trapezitis, studies are limited to find which technique has shown effective over the other due to lack of control group. The purpose of the study is to find the effect of PRT on pain intensity, functional disability and range of motion in subjects with subacute trapezitis. Method: An experimental study design, selected subjects with subacute trapezitis was randomized into Study and Control group. Total 40 subjects, 20 subjects in each group; data was collected who completed the study. Control group received passive trapezius muscle stretching while Study group received positional release technique with passive trapezius muscle stretching for 8 sessions in 2 weeks. Outcome measurements such as Visual Analogue scale, Neck disability index and cervical Range of motion were measured. Results: There is statistically significant difference (p<0.05 showing improvement in means of VAS, NDI and Range of motion before and after intervention within the groups and there is statistically significant difference when the post-intervention means after 2 weeks of treatment were compared between Study and Control group. Conclusion: It is concluded that the Positional Release Technique with trapezius stretching found to be significantly more added effect than trapezius stretching alone in improving pain, functional disability and cervical movements for subjects with subacute trapezitis.

  13. Method effects: the problem with negatively versus positively keyed items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindwall, Magnus; Barkoukis, Vassilis; Grano, Caterina; Lucidi, Fabio; Raudsepp, Lennart; Liukkonen, Jarmo; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    Using confirmatory factor analyses, we examined method effects on Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965) in a sample of older European adults. Nine hundred forty nine community-dwelling adults 60 years of age or older from 5 European countries completed the RSES as well as measures of depression and life satisfaction. The 2 models that had an acceptable fit with the data included method effects. The method effects were associated with both positively and negatively worded items. Method effects models were invariant across gender and age, but not across countries. Both depression and life satisfaction predicted method effects. Individuals with higher depression scores and lower life satisfaction scores were more likely to endorse negatively phrased items.

  14. THE POSITIVE EFFECTS OF COGNITIVE LEARNING STYLES IN ELT CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Yagcioglu

    2016-01-01

    In the EFL, ESL, ESP and in the ELT classes, students are taught their courses with different kinds of methods and approaches. Cognitive learning styles are the most essential styles in foreign language education. In this paper, the positive effects of cognitive learning styles will be handled. The benefits of these styles will be highlighted. Games on cognitive learning styles will be explained. Sample classroom activities will be shared. Useful books, videos and websites on cognitive learni...

  15. THE POSITIVE EFFECTS OF COGNITIVE LEARNING STYLES IN ELT CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Yagcioglu

    2016-01-01

    In the EFL, ESL, ESP and in the ELT classes, students are taught their courses with different kinds of methods and approaches. Cognitive learning styles are the most essential styles in foreign language education. In this paper, the positive effects of cognitive learning styles will be handled. The benefits of these styles will be highlighted. Games on cognitive learning styles will be explained. Sample classroom activities will be shared. Useful books, videos and websites on cognitive learni...

  16. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    Stason, William B.; Ritter, Grant A.; Timothy Martin; Jeffrey Prottas; Christopher Tompkins; Donald S Shepard

    2016-01-01

    Background Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or ...

  17. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration

    OpenAIRE

    Stason, William B.; Grant A Ritter; Timothy Martin; Jeffrey Prottas; Christopher Tompkins; Shepard, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or ...

  18. The Effect of Group Works and Demonstrative Experiments Based on Conceptual Change Approach: Photosynthesis and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Ayse Sert; Diken, Emine Hatun; Darcin, Emine Selcen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of group works and demonstration experiments based on conceptual change approach in the elimination of misconception about the subject of photosynthesis and respiration in plants in pre-service science teachers. This study was conducted with 78 pre-service science teachers including…

  19. Music-of-Light Stethoscope: A Demonstration of the Photoacoustic Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitichev, D. I.; Xia, W.; Hill, E.; Mosse, C. A.; Perkins, T.; Konyn, K.; Ourselin, S.; Desjardins, A. E.; Vercauteren, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a system aimed at demonstrating the photoacoustic (PA) effect for educational purposes. PA imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that requires no contrast agent and has a great potential for spine and brain lesion characterisation, breast cancer and blood flow monitoring notably in the context of fetal surgery. It relies on…

  20. The Effect of Group Works and Demonstrative Experiments Based on Conceptual Change Approach: Photosynthesis and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Ayse Sert; Diken, Emine Hatun; Darcin, Emine Selcen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of group works and demonstration experiments based on conceptual change approach in the elimination of misconception about the subject of photosynthesis and respiration in plants in pre-service science teachers. This study was conducted with 78 pre-service science teachers including…

  1. 76 FR 10038 - Determination That a Demonstration Needle Exchange Program Would be Effective in Reducing Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Determination That a Demonstration Needle Exchange Program Would be Effective in Reducing... agent for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. This determination reflects the scientific evidence supporting the important public health benefit of SSPs, and is necessary to meet the statutory...

  2. Atmospheric pressure loading effects on Global Positioning System coordinate determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, Tonie M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is observed at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude 65 deg), with a signal root mean square (RMS) of 5 mm. Out of 19 continuously operating GPS sites (with a mean of 281 daily solutions per site), 18 show a positive correlation between the GPS vertical estimates and the modeled loading displacements. Accounting for loading reduces the variance of the vertical station positions on 12 of the 19 sites investigated. Removing the modeled pressure loading from GPS determinations of baseline length for baselines longer than 6000 km reduces the variance on 73 of the 117 baselines investigated. The slight increase in variance for some of the sites and baselines is consistent with expected statistical fluctuations. The results from most stations are consistent with approximately 65% of the modeled pressure load being found in the GPS vertical position measurements. Removing an annual signal from both the measured heights and the modeled load time series leaves this value unchanged. The source of the remaining discrepancy between the modeled and observed loading signal may be the result of (1) anisotropic effects in the Earth's loading response, (2) errors in GPS estimates of tropospheric delay, (3) errors in the surface pressure data, or (4) annual signals in the time series of loading and station heights. In addition, we find that using site dependent coefficients, determined by fitting local pressure to the modeled radial displacements, reduces the variance of the measured station heights as well as or better than using the global convolution sum.

  3. Interacting effects of syllable and phrase position on consonant articulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Dani; Lee, Sungbok; Riggs, Daylen; Adams, Jason

    2005-12-01

    The complexities of how prosodic structure, both at the phrasal and syllable levels, shapes speech production have begun to be illuminated through studies of articulatory behavior. The present study contributes to an understanding of prosodic signatures on articulation by examining the joint effects of phrasal and syllable position on the production of consonants. Articulatory kinematic data were collected for five subjects using electromagnetic articulography (EMA) to record target consonants (labial, labiodental, and tongue tip), located in (1) either syllable final or initial position and (2) either at a phrase edge or phrase medially. Spatial and temporal characteristics of the consonantal constriction formation and release were determined based on kinematic landmarks in the articulator velocity profiles. The results indicate that syllable and phrasal position consistently affect the movement duration; however, effects on displacement were more variable. For most subjects, the boundary-adjacent portions of the movement (constriction release for a preboundary coda and constriction formation for a postboundary onset) are not differentially affected in terms of phrasal lengthening-both lengthen comparably.

  4. Effect of tongue thrust swallowing on position of anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaly, Tahereh; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Amini, Foroozandeh

    2009-01-01

    There is no consensus about the effect of tongue thrusting on incisor position. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the position of anterior teeth in growing children with tongue thrust swallowing. In the present study 193 subjects with an age range of 9 to 13 years participated. All the patients were examined by a trained investigator and those having tongue thrust swallowing were selected and the position of their anterior teeth was compared with a control group consisting of 36 subjects with normal occlusion. Data was analyzed by independent sample t-test. Among the 193 students who were examined in this study, 10 cases (5%) were diagnosed to be tongue thrusters. Overjet was significantly increased in tongue thrust individuals (P 0.05). The results indicated that tongue thrust may have an environmental effect on dentofacial structures. Considering the high incidence of tongue thrust in orthodontic patients, it is suggested that dental practitioners observe patients of all ages and those in all stages of orthodontic treatment for evidence of tongue thrust swallowing.

  5. Positive effects of nonnative invasive Phragmites australis on larval bullfrogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Alta Rogalski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonnative Phragmites australis (common reed is one of the most intensively researched and managed invasive plant species in the United States, yet as with many invasive species, our ability to predict, control or understand the consequences of invasions is limited. Rapid spread of dense Phragmites monocultures has prompted efforts to limit its expansion and remove existing stands. Motivation for large-scale Phragmites eradication programs includes purported negative impacts on native wildlife, a view based primarily on observational results. We took an experimental approach to test this assumption, estimating the effects of nonnative Phragmites australis on a native amphibian. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Concurrent common garden and reciprocal transplant field experiments revealed consistently strong positive influences of Phragmites on Rana catesbeiana (North American bullfrog larval performance. Decomposing Phragmites litter appears to contribute to the effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Positive effects of Phragmites merit further research, particularly in regions where both Phragmites and R. catesbeiana are invasive. More broadly, the findings of this study reinforce the importance of experimental evaluations of the effects of biological invasion to make informed conservation and restoration decisions.

  6. Polarization Position Angle Swings caused by Relativistic Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Polarization position angle swings of ~ 180° observed in extragalacticradio sources are a regular behavior of variability in polarization. They shouldbe due to some kind of physically regular process. We consider relativistic shocksproducing polarization angle swing events. Two magnetic field configurations (force-free field and homogeneous helical field) are considered to demonstrate the results.It is shown that the properties of polarization angle swings and the relationshipbetween the swings and variations in total and polarized flux density are criticallydependent on the configuration of magnetic field and the dynamical behavior of theshock. In particular, we find that in some cases polarization angle swings can occurwhen the total and polarized flux densities only vary by a very small amount. Theseresults may be useful for understanding the polarization variability with both longand short timescales observed in extragalactic radio sources.

  7. A Simple Radiological Technique for Demonstration of Incorrect Positioning of a Foley Catheter with Balloon Inflated in the Urethra of a Male Spinal Cord Injury Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a male patient with cervical spinal cord injury, the urinary bladder may go into spasm when a urethral catheter is removed and a new Foley catheter is inserted. Before the balloon is inflated, the spastic bladder may push the Foley catheter out or the catheter may slip out of a small-capacity bladder. An inexperienced health professional may inflate the balloon of a Foley catheter in the urethra without realizing that the balloon segment of the catheter is lying in the urethra instead of the urinary bladder. When a Foley balloon is inflated in the urethra, a tetraplegic patient is likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia. This is a medical emergency and requires urgent treatment. Before the incorrectly placed Foley catheter is removed, it is important to document whether the balloon has been inflated in the urinary bladder or not. The clinician should first use the always available tools of observation and palpation at the bedside without delays of transportation. A misplaced balloon will often be evident by a long catheter sign, indicating excessive catheter remaining outside the patient. Radiological diagnosis is not frequently required and, when needed, should employ the technique most readily available, which might be a body and pelvic CT without intravenous contrast. An alternative radiological technique to demonstrate the position of the balloon of the Foley catheter is described. Three milliliters of nonionic X-ray contrast medium, Ioversol (OPTIRAY 300, is injected through the side channel of the Foley catheter, which is used for inflating the balloon. Then, with a catheter-tip syringe, 30 ml of sterile Ioversol is injected through the main lumen of the Foley catheter. Immediately thereafter, an X-ray of the pelvis (including perineum is taken. By this technique, both the urinary bladder and balloon of the Foley catheter are visualized by the X-ray contrast medium. When a Foley catheter has been inserted correctly, the balloon of the

  8. Lack of immunomodulating effect of disulfiram on HIV positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørding, M; Gøtzsche, P C; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian;

    1990-01-01

    Disulfiram (Antabuse (R)) is metabolized to two molecules of diethyldithiocarbamate, which has been reported to be an immunomodulating agent. In a double blind trial, 15 HIV antibody positive homosexual men were given daily doses of 100 mg or 400 mg of disulfiram or placebo, for 4 weeks. All had...... a CD4-count below 500 X 10(6)/l and/or a pokeweed mitogen response in a lymphocyte proliferation assay less than 50% of normal controls. None suffered from opportunistic infections. No significant effect of disulfiram on immunological, haematological, biochemical or clinical variables was observed...

  9. Effects of Positive and Negative Consequences on Altruistic Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Pacheco

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of different types of consequences (positive and negative for helping and not helping, was used a preparation in which each participant had to solve arithmetical operations of different complexity to accumulate interchangeable points by a compact disc. During the task the participants could accept or refuse themselves to help a virtual peer who could not accumulate his points. The results show that participants did prefer to help their virtual peer only when negative consequences for not helping were presented. Even though the quality of the help for peer wasinferior compared to the execution shown in the participant own task.

  10. Music-of-Light Stethoscope: A Demonstration of the Photoacoustic Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitichev, D.; Xia, W; Hill, E.; Mosse, C A; Perkins, T.; Konyn, K.; Ourselin, S; Desjardins, A; Vercauteren, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a system aimed at demonstrating the photoacoustic (PA) effect for educational purposes. PA imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that requires no contrast agent and has a great potential for spine and brain lesion characterisation, breast cancer and blood flow monitoring notably in the context of fetal surgery. It relies on combining light excitation with ultrasound reception. Our brief was to present and explain PA imaging in a public-friendly way suitable for a varie...

  11. Observational learning of a baseball-pitch: the effect of different model demonstrations

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorbani, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to investigate the effects of observing different model demonstrations inclusive video, stick-figure and point-light models on observational learning of a Baseball pitch. 41 young adults performed 5 pretest trials, three blocks of 10 acquisition trials, and two retention tests of 5 trials in 10 min and one week after the last acquisition block. Kinematic pattern, movement form, and movement time of overall movement and movement phases were measured as depen...

  12. Patient position alters attenuation effects in multipinhole cardiac SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, Rachel; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn, E-mail: gwells@ottawaheart.ca [Division of Cardiology, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4W7 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Dedicated cardiac cameras offer improved sensitivity over conventional SPECT cameras. Sensitivity gains are obtained by large numbers of detectors and novel collimator arrangements such as an array of multiple pinholes that focus on the heart. Pinholes lead to variable amounts of attenuation as a source is moved within the camera field of view. This study evaluated the effects of this variable attenuation on myocardial SPECT images. Methods: Computer simulations were performed for a set of nine point sources distributed in the left ventricular wall (LV). Sources were placed at the location of the heart in both an anthropomorphic and a water-cylinder computer phantom. Sources were translated in x, y, and z by up to 5 cm from the center. Projections were simulated with and without attenuation and the changes in attenuation were compared. A LV with an inferior wall defect was also simulated in both phantoms over the same range of positions. Real camera data were acquired on a Discovery NM530c camera (GE Healthcare, Haifa, Israel) for five min in list-mode using an anthropomorphic phantom (DataSpectrum, Durham, NC) with 100 MBq of Tc-99m in the LV. Images were taken over the same range of positions as the simulations and were compared based on the summed perfusion score (SPS), defect width, and apparent defect uptake for each position. Results: Point sources in the water phantom showed absolute changes in attenuation of ≤8% over the range of positions and relative changes of ≤5% compared to the apex. In the anthropomorphic computer simulations, absolute change increased to 20%. The changes in relative attenuation caused a change in SPS of <1.5 for the water phantom but up to 4.2 in the anthropomorphic phantom. Changes were larger for axial than for transverse translations. These results were supported by SPS changes of up to six seen in the physical anthropomorphic phantom for axial translations. Defect width was also seen to significantly increase. The

  13. Experimental canine distemper infection as a means of demonstrating latent effects of subacute lead intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.J.; McLeod, S.

    1976-01-01

    Observations on the response of the body to experimental infection with distemper virus in dogs previously dosed subacutely with lead have demonstrated a latent effect of lead on several body systems. Effects which indicated a relationship to earlier treatment with lead included evidence for stimulation of haemoglobin synthesis, changes to red blood cells resulting in increased destruction, increased vulnerability of the parenchymatous cells of the liver to damage, reduction in the weight of the skeleton and thyroid, an increase in weight of the thymus and brain and histopathological changes in the thymus. 21 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  14. Experimental demonstration of CW light injection effect in upstream traffic TDM-PON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chow, Chi-Wai; Wu, Yu-Fu; Shih, Fu-Yuan; Chi, Sien

    2010-06-01

    High capacity time-division-multiplexed passive optical network (TDM-PON) is an emerging fiber access network that deploys optical access lines between a carrier's central office (CO) and a customer sites. In this investigation, we demonstrate and analyze the continuous wave (CW) upstream effect in TDM-PONs. Besides, we also propose and design a protection apparatus in each optical network unit (ONU) to avoid a CW upstream traffic in TDM-PONs due to sudden external environment change or ONU failure. When an upstream CW injection occurs in TDM access network, the protection scheme can stop the CW effect within a few ms to maintain the entire data traffic.

  15. Experimental Demonstration of Effective Medium Approximation Breakdown in Deeply Subwavelength All-Dielectric Multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Takayama, Osamu; Shkondin, Evgeniy; Malureanu, Radu; Jensen, Flemming; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the effect of anomalous breakdown of the effective medium approximation in all-dielectric deeply subwavelength thickness ($d \\sim\\lambda/160-\\lambda/30$) multilayers, as recently predicted theoretically [H.H. Sheinfux et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 243901 (2014)]. Multilayer stacks are composed of alternating alumina and titania layers fabricated using atomic layer deposition. For light incident on such multilayers at angles near the total internal reflection we observe pronounced differences in the reflectance spectra for structures with 10-nm versus 20-nm thick layers, as well as for structures with different layers ordering, contrary to the predictions of the effective medium approximation. The reflectance difference can reach values up to 0.5, owing to the chosen geometrical configuration with an additional resonator layer employed for the enhancement of the effect. Our results are important for the development of new high-precision multilayer ellipsometry methods and schemes,...

  16. Positive effects of vegetation: urban heat island and green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, T; Gaffin, S R; Dell'osso, G R

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate the positive effects of vegetation with a multi-scale approach: an urban and a building scale. Monitoring the urban heat island in four areas of New York City, we have found an average of 2 °C difference of temperatures between the most and the least vegetated areas, ascribable to the substitution of vegetation with man-made building materials. At micro-scale, we have assessed the effect of surface albedo on climate through the use of a climatological model. Then, using the CO(2) equivalents as indicators of the impact on climate, we have compared the surface albedo, and the construction, replacement and use phase of a black, a white and a green roof. By our analyses, we found that both the white and the green roofs are less impactive than the black one; with the thermal resistance, the biological activity of plants and the surface albedo playing a crucial role.

  17. Effect of the Spiroiminodihydantoin Lesion on Nucleosome Stability and Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norabuena, Erika M; Barnes Williams, Sara; Klureza, Margaret A; Goehring, Liana J; Gruessner, Brian; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Jamieson, Elizabeth R; Núñez, Megan E

    2016-04-26

    DNA is constantly under attack by oxidants, generating a variety of potentially mutagenic covalently modified species, including oxidized guanine base products. One such product is spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), a chiral, propeller-shaped lesion that strongly destabilizes the DNA helix in its vicinity. Despite its unusual shape and thermodynamic effect on double-stranded DNA structure, DNA duplexes containing the Sp lesion form stable nucleosomes upon being incubated with histone octamers. Indeed, among six different combinations of lesion location and stereochemistry, only two duplexes display a diminished ability to form nucleosomes, and these only by ∼25%; the other four are statistically indistinguishable from the control. Nonetheless, kinetic factors also play a role: when the histone proteins have less time during assembly of the core particle to sample both lesion-containing and normal DNA strands, they are more likely to bind the Sp lesion DNA than during slower assembly processes that better approximate thermodynamic equilibrium. Using DNase I footprinting and molecular modeling, we discovered that the Sp lesion causes only a small perturbation (±1-2 bp) on the translational position of the DNA within the nucleosome. Each diastereomeric pair of lesions has the same effect on nucleosome positioning, but lesions placed at different locations behave differently, illustrating that the location of the lesion and not its shape serves as the primary determinant of the most stable DNA orientation.

  18. Comparing the effects of positive and negative feedback in information-integration category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedberg, Michael; Glass, Brian; Filoteo, J Vincent; Hazeltine, Eliot; Maddox, W Todd

    2017-01-01

    Categorical learning is dependent on feedback. Here, we compare how positive and negative feedback affect information-integration (II) category learning. Ashby and O'Brien (2007) demonstrated that both positive and negative feedback are required to solve II category problems when feedback was not guaranteed on each trial, and reported no differences between positive-only and negative-only feedback in terms of their effectiveness. We followed up on these findings and conducted 3 experiments in which participants completed 2,400 II categorization trials across three days under 1 of 3 conditions: positive feedback only (PFB), negative feedback only (NFB), or both types of feedback (CP; control partial). An adaptive algorithm controlled the amount of feedback given to each group so that feedback was nearly equated. Using different feedback control procedures, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that participants in the NFB and CP group were able to engage II learning strategies, whereas the PFB group was not. Additionally, the NFB group was able to achieve significantly higher accuracy than the PFB group by Day 3. Experiment 3 revealed that these differences remained even when we equated the information received on feedback trials. Thus, negative feedback appears significantly more effective for learning II category structures. This suggests that the human implicit learning system may be capable of learning in the absence of positive feedback.

  19. Music-of-light stethoscope: a demonstration of the photoacoustic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitichev, D. I.; Xia, W.; Hill, E.; Mosse, C. A.; Perkins, T.; Konyn, K.; Ourselin, S.; Desjardins, A. E.; Vercauteren, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a system aimed at demonstrating the photoacoustic (PA) effect for educational purposes. PA imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that requires no contrast agent and has a great potential for spine and brain lesion characterisation, breast cancer and blood flow monitoring notably in the context of fetal surgery. It relies on combining light excitation with ultrasound reception. Our brief was to present and explain PA imaging in a public-friendly way suitable for a variety of ages and backgrounds. We developed a simple, accessible demonstration unit using readily available materials. We used a modulated light emitting diode (LED) torch and an electronic stethoscope. The output of a music player was used for light modulation and the chest piece of the stethoscope covered by a black tape was used as an absorbing target and an enclosed chamber. This demonstration unit was presented to the public at the Bloomsbury Festival On Light in October 2015. Our stall was visited by over 100 people of varying ages. Twenty families returned in-depth evaluation questionnaires, which show that our explanations of the photoacoustic effect were well understood. Their interest in biomedical engineering was increased.

  20. Generalized demonstration of Ramo's theorem with space charge and polarization effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Louis-André; Julien, Manuel

    2008-12-01

    Ramo's theorem provides a convenient way of simulating the currents induced through the electrodes of a radiation detector by the movement of charge carriers. The concept of weighting potential or of weighting field is the key ingredient in the calculation of the induced currents. A new demonstration of the theorem, based on energy balance, is provided that explicitly takes into account the effect of material polarization. It is shown that Ramo's theorem is valid in an arbitrary linear material and that polarization charges at interfaces between different materials or in the bulk of inhomogeneous materials must be included in calculating the weighting potentials. The use of our definition of weighting potential is also demonstrated for non-linear materials. The present proof is thus more generally valid than previous ones.

  1. Cover Your Cough! A Short and Simple Activity to Demonstrate the Antimicrobial Effect of Desiccation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Cook Easterwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Many undergraduate microbiology laboratory manuals include exercises demonstrating the antimicrobial effects of physical agents, such as UV light and heat, and chemical agents, such as disinfectants and antibiotics (3, 4. There is, however, a lack of exercises examining the effects of desiccation on bacterial growth and survival. This particular form of antimicrobial control is especially relevant today with an increased emphasis on coughing and sneezing into one’s sleeve or a tissue, where microbes will not contaminate hands and will eventually desiccate and die (2. Desiccation can have bacteriostatic or bactericidal effects depending on the species, the material on which the organism has desiccated, and the length of time. The absence of water can damage many cellular components, including enzymes, nucleic acids, and cell membranes (1. However, many prokaryotes have some degree of resistance to desiccation, with Escherichia coli surviving around 24 hours and Bacillus species surviving upwards of 300 years, though these numbers can vary due to a number of confounding factors (5. Some of these factors include the method by which desiccation occurred, whether desiccation occurred in a natural or laboratory situation, and the species itself (5. To address the effects of desiccation on bacterial growth and survival, a short, simple exercise was developed. By inoculating various materials with bacterial cultures and allowing them to air-dry for 24 hours, students can visualize the effects of desiccation by analyzing the growth, or lack thereof, when organisms are transferred to nutrient agar plates. This exercise has been used in a health professions microbiology course as well as a microbiology course for biology and biochemistry majors. It is short enough to be conducted during a standard lecture period or during a longer laboratory period in conjunction with other experiments demonstrating the effectiveness of physical agents on microbial

  2. When less is more: positive population-level effects of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Arne; van Leeuwen, Anieke; Cameron, Tom C

    2014-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies show that mortality imposed on a population can counter-intuitively increase the density of a specific life-history stage or total population density. Understanding positive population-level effects of mortality is advancing, illuminating implications for population, community, and applied ecology. Reconciling theory and data, we found that the mathematical models used to study mortality effects vary in the effects predicted and mechanisms proposed. Experiments predominantly demonstrate stage-specific density increases in response to mortality. We argue that the empirical evidence supports theory based on stage-structured population models but not on unstructured models. We conclude that stage-specific positive mortality effects are likely to be common in nature and that accounting for within-population individual variation is essential for developing ecological theory.

  3. Positive or negative Poynting effect? The role of adscititious inequalities in hyperelastic materials

    KAUST Repository

    Mihai, L. A.

    2011-08-10

    Motivated by recent experiments on biopolymer gels whereby the reverse of the usual (positive) Poynting effect was observed, we investigate the effect of the so-called \\'adscititious inequalities\\' on the behaviour of hyperelastic materials subject to shear. We first demonstrate that for homogeneous isotropic materials subject to pure shear, the resulting deformation consists of a triaxial stretch combined with a simple shear in the direction of the shear force if and only if the Baker-Ericksen inequalities hold. Then for a cube deformed under pure shear, the positive Poynting effect occurs if the \\'sheared faces spread apart\\', whereas the negative Poynting effect is obtained if the \\'sheared faces draw together\\'. Similarly, under simple shear deformation, the positive Poynting effect is obtained if the \\'sheared faces tend to spread apart\\', whereas the negative Poynting effect occurs if the \\'sheared faces tend to draw together\\'. When the Poynting effect occurs under simple shear, it is reasonable to assume that the same sign Poynting effect is btained also under pure shear. Since the observation of the negative Poynting effect in semiflexible biopolymers implies that the (stronger) empirical inequalities may not hold, we conclude that these inequalities must not be imposed when such materials are described. © 2011 The Royal Society.

  4. Demonstration of large field effect in topological insulator films via a high-κ back gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Y.; Lin, H. Y.; Yang, S. R.; Chen, K. H. M.; Lin, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Young, L. B.; Cheng, C. K.; Fanchiang, Y. T.; Tseng, S. C.; Hong, M.; Kwo, J.

    2016-05-01

    The spintronics applications long anticipated for topological insulators (TIs) has been hampered due to the presence of high density intrinsic defects in the bulk states. In this work we demonstrate the back-gating effect on TIs by integrating Bi2Se3 films 6-10 quintuple layer (QL) thick with amorphous high-κ oxides of Al2O3 and Y2O3. Large gating effect of tuning the Fermi level EF to very close to the band gap was observed, with an applied bias of an order of magnitude smaller than those of the SiO2 back gate, and the modulation of film resistance can reach as high as 1200%. The dependence of the gating effect on the TI film thickness was investigated, and ΔN2D/ΔVg varies with TI film thickness as ˜t-0.75. To enhance the gating effect, a Y2O3 layer thickness 4 nm was inserted into Al2O3 gate stack to increase the total κ value to 13.2. A 1.4 times stronger gating effect is observed, and the increment of induced carrier numbers is in good agreement with additional charges accumulated in the higher κ oxides. Moreover, we have reduced the intrinsic carrier concentration in the TI film by doping Te to Bi2Se3 to form Bi2TexSe1-x. The observation of a mixed state of ambipolar field that both electrons and holes are present indicates that we have tuned the EF very close to the Dirac Point. These results have demonstrated that our capability of gating TIs with high-κ back gate to pave the way to spin devices of tunable EF for dissipationless spintronics based on well-established semiconductor technology.

  5. Positive Effects of Massage Therapy on a Patient with Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robyn; Baskwill, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this case report was to investigate the effects of massage therapy on the sleep patterns of a woman with narcolepsy. Participant The 23-year-old woman’s primary symptoms included excessive daytime sleepiness and periodic leg movements (PLM), which were associated with her diagnoses of both narcolepsy and cataplexy. Intervention Five 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The patient’s sleep patterns were recorded each week before the treatment. A final measurement was recorded in the sixth week. The sleep patterns were monitored using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire, which included ten visual analogue scales. Results The results of this case report included an improvement in getting to sleep by 148%, an improvement in quality of sleep by 1100%, an improvement in awake following sleep by 121%, and an improvement in behaviour following wakening by 28% using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Conclusion This case report suggests that massage therapy had a positive effect on this patient with narcolepsy. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of massage therapy on narcolepsy and sleep patterns. PMID:23730398

  6. Telomeric position effect--a third silencing mechanism in eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Greg Doheny

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic chromosomes terminate in telomeres, complex nucleoprotein structures that are required for chromosome integrity that are implicated in cellular senescence and cancer. The chromatin at the telomere is unique with characteristics of both heterochromatin and euchromatin. The end of the chromosome is capped by a structure that protects the end and is required for maintaining proper chromosome length. Immediately proximal to the cap are the telomere associated satellite-like (TAS sequences. Genes inserted into the TAS sequences are silenced indicating the chromatin environment is incompatible with transcription. This silencing phenomenon is called telomeric position effect (TPE. Two other silencing mechanisms have been identified in eukaryotes, suppressors position effect variegation [Su(vars, greater than 30 members] and Polycomb group proteins (PcG, approximately 15 members. We tested a large number of each group for their ability to suppress TPE [Su(TPE]. Our results showed that only three Su(vars and only one PcG member are involved in TPE, suggesting silencing in the TAS sequences occurs via a novel silencing mechanism. Since, prior to this study, only five genes have been identified that are Su(TPEs, we conducted a candidate screen for Su(TPE in Drosophila by testing point mutations in, and deficiencies for, proteins involved in chromatin metabolism. Screening with point mutations identified seven new Su(TPEs and the deficiencies identified 19 regions of the Drosophila genome that harbor suppressor mutations. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on a subset of the new Su(TPEs confirm they act directly on the gene inserted into the telomere. Since the Su(TPEs do not overlap significantly with either PcGs or Su(vars, and the candidates were selected because they are involved generally in chromatin metabolism and act at a wide variety of sites within the genome, we propose that the Su(TPE represent a third, widely used, silencing

  7. Technology demonstration: geostatistical and hydrologic analysis of salt areas. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, P.G.; Oberlander, P.L.; Rice, W.A.; Devary, J.L.; Nelson, R.W.; Tucker, P.E.

    1982-09-01

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) requested Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to: (1) use geostatistical analyses to evaluate the adequacy of hydrologic data from three salt regions, each of which contains a potential nuclear waste repository site; and (2) demonstrate a methodology that allows quantification of the value of additional data collection. The three regions examined are the Paradox Basin in Utah, the Permian Basin in Texas, and the Mississippi Study Area. Additional and new data became available to ONWI during and following these analyses; therefore, this report must be considered a methodology demonstration here would apply as illustrated had the complete data sets been available. A combination of geostatistical and hydrologic analyses was used for this demonstration. Geostatistical analyses provided an optimal estimate of the potentiometric surface from the available data, a measure of the uncertainty of that estimate, and a means for selecting and evaluating the location of future data. The hydrologic analyses included the calculation of transmissivities, flow paths, travel times, and ground-water flow rates from hypothetical repository sites. Simulation techniques were used to evaluate the effect of optimally located future data on the potentiometric surface, flow lines, travel times, and flow rates. Data availability, quality, quantity, and conformance with model assumptions differed in each of the salt areas. Report highlights for the three locations are given.

  8. Aging and the Optimal Viewing Position Effect in Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping eLiu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Substantial evidence indicates that where readers fixate within a word affects the efficiency with which that word is recognized. Indeed, words in alphabetic languages (e.g., English, French are recognized most efficiently when fixated at their optimal viewing position (OVP, which is near the word center. However, little is known about the effects of fixation location on word recognition in non-alphabetic languages, such as Chinese. Moreover, studies to date have not investigated if effects of fixation location vary across adult age-groups, although it is well-established that older readers experience greater difficulty recognizing words due to visual and cognitive declines. Accordingly, the present research examined OVP effects by young and older adult readers when recognizing Chinese words presented in isolation. Most words in Chinese are formed from two or more logograms called characters and so the present experiment investigated the influence of fixation location on the recognition of 2-, 3-, and 4-character words (and nonwords. The older adults experienced generally greater word recognition difficulty. But whereas the young adults recognized words most efficiently when initially fixating the first character of 2-character words and second character of 3- and 4-character words, the older adults recognized words most efficiently when initially fixating the first character for words of each length. The findings therefore reveal subtle but potentially important adult age differences in the effects of fixation location on Chinese word recognition. Moreover, the similarity in effects for words and nonwords implies a more general age-related change in oculomotor strategy when processing Chinese character-strings.

  9. Aging and the optimal viewing position effect in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pingping; Liu, Danlu; Han, Buxin; Paterson, Kevin B

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that where readers fixate within a word affects the efficiency with which that word is recognized. Indeed, words in alphabetic languages (e.g., English, French) are recognized most efficiently when fixated at their optimal viewing position (OVP), which is near the word center. However, little is known about the effects of fixation location on word recognition in non-alphabetic languages, such as Chinese. Moreover, studies to date have not investigated if effects of fixation location vary across adult age-groups, although it is well-established that older readers experience greater difficulty recognizing words due to visual and cognitive declines. Accordingly, the present research examined OVP effects by young and older adult readers when recognizing Chinese words presented in isolation. Most words in Chinese are formed from two or more logograms called characters and so the present experiment investigated the influence of fixation location on the recognition of 2-, 3-, and 4-character words (and nonwords). The older adults experienced generally greater word recognition difficulty. But whereas the young adults recognized words most efficiently when initially fixating the first character of 2-character words and second character of 3- and 4-character words, the older adults recognized words most efficiently when initially fixating the first character for words of each length. The findings therefore reveal subtle but potentially important adult age differences in the effects of fixation location on Chinese word recognition. Moreover, the similarity in effects for words and nonwords implies a more general age-related change in oculomotor strategy when processing Chinese character-strings.

  10. Aging and the optimal viewing position effect in Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pingping; Liu, Danlu; Han, Buxin; Paterson, Kevin B.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that where readers fixate within a word affects the efficiency with which that word is recognized. Indeed, words in alphabetic languages (e.g., English, French) are recognized most efficiently when fixated at their optimal viewing position (OVP), which is near the word center. However, little is known about the effects of fixation location on word recognition in non-alphabetic languages, such as Chinese. Moreover, studies to date have not investigated if effects of fixation location vary across adult age-groups, although it is well-established that older readers experience greater difficulty recognizing words due to visual and cognitive declines. Accordingly, the present research examined OVP effects by young and older adult readers when recognizing Chinese words presented in isolation. Most words in Chinese are formed from two or more logograms called characters and so the present experiment investigated the influence of fixation location on the recognition of 2-, 3-, and 4-character words (and nonwords). The older adults experienced generally greater word recognition difficulty. But whereas the young adults recognized words most efficiently when initially fixating the first character of 2-character words and second character of 3- and 4-character words, the older adults recognized words most efficiently when initially fixating the first character for words of each length. The findings therefore reveal subtle but potentially important adult age differences in the effects of fixation location on Chinese word recognition. Moreover, the similarity in effects for words and nonwords implies a more general age-related change in oculomotor strategy when processing Chinese character-strings. PMID:26579039

  11. A Visual Demonstration of Solvent Effect in Chemical Kinetics through Blue Bottle Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *R. Azmat

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the study of chemical kinetics, usually solvent effect was explained to show the consequences on rate of reaction theoretically which is difficult to understand for under graduate students. The blue bottle experiment as a “one day activity” can be used to explain well visually the solvent effect through demonstration of color change. Kinetics of reduction of methylene green by sucrose and mannose in pure and aqueous methanol medium in presence of NaOH has been investigated for demonstration of solvent effect. The two sugars sucrose and mannose were selected for the experiment those acts as a reducing agents in a basic solution and reduces the methylene green into colorless form. The progress of this reduction reaction was followed by the color changes that the methylene green goes through in variable percentage of alcohol. When the bottle is shaken the oxygen in the air mixes with the solution and oxidizes the methylene green back to its intermediate state (purple. The color of the solution will gradually change and become purple (intermediate and then colorless in 5-10% methanol but in pure methanol color transition were Blue-> purple-> pink indicate the color due to the alcoholic medium. It was observed that increase in percentage in the solvent composition decrease the rate of reduction. The pink color continues due to alcoholic medium which may be attributed with the solvent effect. The observed variation in reading with solvent compositions has been interpreted in terms of interactions of media with the reacting species and the transitions state involved in this reaction.

  12. Effects of anatomical position on esophageal transit time: A biomagnetic diagnostic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodoro Cordova-Fraga; Modesto Sosa; Cados Wiechers; Jose Maria De la Roca-Chiapas; Alejandro Maldonado Moreles; Jesus BernaI-Alvarado; Raquel Huerta-Franco

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the esophageal transit time (ETT)and compare its mean value among three anatomical inclinations of the body; and to analyze the correlation of ETT to body mass index (BMI).METHODS: A biomagnetic technique was implemented to perform this study: (1) The transit time of a magnetic marker (MM) through the esophagus was measured using two fluxgate sensors placed over the chest of 14 healthy subjects; (2) the ETT was assessed in three anatomical positions (at upright,fowler,and supine positions; 90°,45° and 0°,respectively).RESULTS: ANOVA and Tuckey post-hoc tests demonstrated significant differences between ETT mean of the different positions.The ETT means were 5.2 ±1.1 s,6.1±1.5 s,and 23.6 ± 9.2 s for 90°,45° and 0°,respectively.Pearson correlation results were r = -0.716 and P < 0.001 by subjects' anatomical position,and r =-0.024 and P > 0.05 according the subject's BHI.CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that using this biomagnetic technique,it is possible to measure the ETT and the effects of the anatomical position on the ETT.

  13. The positive effect of skin transpiration in peach fruit growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Brunella; Manfrini, Luigi; Losciale, Pasquale; Zibordi, Marco; Corelli-Grappadelli, Luca

    2010-09-01

    The effect of fruit transpiration on the mechanisms driving peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) daily growth was investigated. In peach, fruit water losses increase during the season and might play a key role in determining fruit growth. Skin transpiration was reduced during the cell expansion stage by enclosing fruit in plastic bags fitted with holes. In the first year, diameter changes of bagged and control fruit were precisely monitored for 15 days, and percentage dry matter and soluble solids content were determined during the experiment and at harvest. In the second year, midday fruit water potential, daily patterns of fruit growth and of vascular and transpiration flows were monitored. Bagging reduced fruit daily growth on some days, and negatively affected both fruit dry matter percentage and soluble solids content. Fruit transpiration rate was reduced during the midday hours, thus increasing midday fruit water potential and lowering xylem inflows. In accordance with the Münch hypothesis on traslocation, these conditions likely decreased the necessary gradient needed for the transport of phloem sap to sink organs, as in the afternoon, bagged fruit showed lower phloem inflows. These data suggest that skin transpiration in peach has a positive effect on fruit growth, as it enhances fruit phloem import.

  14. POSITIVE EFFECT OF LEARNING FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN A HEALTHY ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Muhammad Diponegoro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of elderly found that almost all cognitive functions decline with age. Results of previous studies have shown that cognitive training related to everyday life (reading aloud and learning vocabularies and wisdom, namely learning intervention or therapy, can improve two cognitive function (executive functions and processing speed in elderly people. This study investigates the positive effects of learning foreign language on cognitive functions of an elderly person. This study provides sufficient evidence of learning foreign language effectiveness in a healthy elderly.  Method used is  one single case subject design. A healthy elderly was asked to read aloud and memorize several Quran chapters and verses and write Arabic verbs proposition and several nouns found it the memorized verses and put it into correct sentences. The written words are concerning daily life activity. Since the Qur’an has best structure of Arab sentence, memorizing it help to understand the Arabic sentences properly. The finding support the previous research that the elderly able to improve their cognitive processes and ability through studying foreign language. Keywords: psycholinguistic, foreign language, cognitive function, reading

  15. Direct Demonstration of the Concept of Unrestricted Effective-Medium Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Zhanna M.; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2014-01-01

    The modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index is defined as one that yields accurate values of a representative set of far-field scattering characteristics (including the scattering matrix) for an object made of randomly heterogeneous materials. We validate the concept of the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index by comparing numerically exact superposition T-matrix results for a spherical host randomly filled with a large number of identical small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie results for a homogeneous spherical counterpart. A remarkable quantitative agreement between the superposition T-matrix and Lorenz-Mie scattering matrices over the entire range of scattering angles demonstrates unequivocally that the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index is a sound (albeit still phenomenological) concept provided that the size parameter of the inclusions is sufficiently small and their number is sufficiently large. Furthermore, it appears that in cases when the concept of the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index works, its actual value is close to that predicted by the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule.

  16. Prioritizing positivity: an effective approach to pursuing happiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalino, Lahnna I; Algoe, Sara B; Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2014-12-01

    A decade of research reveals the benefits of positive emotions for mental and physical health; however, recent empirical work suggests the explicit pursuit of happiness may backfire. The present study hypothesized that the pursuit of happiness is not inherently self-defeating; in particular, individuals who seek positivity, as exemplified by how they make decisions about how to organize their day-to-day lives, may be happier. This individual difference is labeled prioritizing positivity. In a community sample of young to older adults (N = 233), prioritizing positivity predicted a host of well-being outcomes (positive emotions, depressive symptomology). In addition, people high in prioritizing positivity have greater resources, and these links are explained by more frequent experiences of positive emotions. In sum, the present study suggests that seeking happiness, although a delicate art, may be a worthwhile pursuit.

  17. Prioritizing Positivity: An Effective Approach to Pursuing Happiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalino, Lahnna I.; Algoe, Sara B.; Fredrickson, Barbara L.

    2017-01-01

    A decade of research reveals the benefits of positive emotions for mental and physical health; however, recent empirical work suggests the explicit pursuit of happiness may backfire. The present study hypothesized that the pursuit of happiness is not inherently self-defeating; in particular, individuals who seek positivity, as exemplified by how they make decisions about how to organize their day-to-day lives, may be happier. This individual difference is labeled prioritizing positivity. In a community sample of young to older adults (N = 233), prioritizing positivity predicted a host of well-being outcomes (positive emotions, depressive symptomology). In addition, people high in prioritizing positivity have greater resources, and these links are explained by more frequent experiences of positive emotions. In sum, the present study suggests that seeking happiness, although a delicate art, may be a worthwhile pursuit. PMID:25401290

  18. Implantation of juvenile human chondrocytes demonstrates no adverse effect on spinal nerve tissue in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külling, Fabrice A; Liu, Jane J; Liebenberg, Ellen; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2016-09-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a common disabling condition for millions of individuals. Injection of xenogenic juvenile chondrocytes (XJC) into the disc space has been shown to have a therapeutic potential for disc repair. In the current study, XJC were injected extra-discally on neural structures in an in vivo rat hemilaminectomy model to compare the histological and behavioral effects on XJC and fibrin glue carrier. Twenty-four rats were assigned to four groups: cells plus carrier, carrier alone, sham hemi-laminectomy, and a positive control (nerve root ligation). A right-sided hemilaminectomy was performed and the study material was placed on and around the exposed L4 nerve root and the spinal cord. Pre- and postoperatively mechanical allodynia was tested on the ipsilateral hind paw using the von Frey up-down method. The lumbar spines were harvested after 6 and 12 weeks for nerve histology and TNF-α quantification. After a brief period of hyperalgesia, the von Frey data indicate there are no adverse effects of placing XJC on spinal nerve roots in rats. However ligation of nerve root showed significant allodynia compared to the other groups. These behavioral data were supported by histological analyses. While these results need to be confirmed over a larger period of time, they suggest that XJC transplantation into the disc space shows no adverse effect on nerve tissue.

  19. "Demonstrating Masculinity" Via Intimate Partner Aggression: The Moderating Effect of Heavy Episodic Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Claire G; Leone, Ruschelle M; Gallagher, Kathryn E; Parrott, Dominic J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the mediational effect of masculine gender role stress on the relation between adherence to dimensions of a hegemonic masculinity and male-to-female intimate partner physical aggression. Men's history of heavy episodic drinking was also examined as a moderator of the proposed mediation effect. A sample of 392 heterosexual men from the southeastern United States who had been in an intimate relationship within the past year completed measures of hegemonic masculine norms (i.e., status, toughness, and antifemininity), masculine gender role stress, alcohol use patterns, and intimate partner physical aggression. Results indicated that the indirect effects of adherence to the antifemininity and toughness norms on physical aggression toward female intimate partners via masculine gender role stress were significant and marginal, respectively. A significant indirect effect of status was not detected. Moreover, subsequent analyses revealed that the indirect effects of antifemininity and toughness were significant only among men with a history of heavy episodic drinking. These findings suggest that heavy episodic drinking exacerbates a gender-relevant stress pathway for intimate partner aggression among men who adhere to specific norms of masculinity. Overall, results suggest that the proximal effect of heavy episodic drinking focuses men's attention on gender-based schemas associated with antifemininity and toughness, which facilitates partner-directed aggression as a means to demonstrate these aspects of their masculinity. Implications for the intersection between men's adherence to specific norms of hegemonic masculinity, cognitive appraisal of gender relevant situations, and characteristic patterns of alcohol consumption are discussed.

  20. Demonstrating a lack of brand/cause effects on point of sale donations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Joshua T.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Point of sale cause-related marketing has raised over $2 billion for charities over the past 30 years, yet the subject remains largely unexplored in academic literature. The subject of brand/cause fit, however, is prolific throughout extant research, with many studies showing that high congruence between a company and a charity is necessary to achieve philanthropic success. This paper challenges current marketing thinking both conceptually and empirically. Employing tests of no-effect hypotheses following the guidelines set out by Cortina and Folger (1998, it is established that, in the point of sale cause-related marketing context, the traditional effects of brand/cause fits do not apply. Across three studies involving experimental designs and over 500 respondents, the results of one-way ANOVA analyses consistently demonstrate that a low brand/cause fit can be just as effective as a high/brand cause fit. These findings contribute to a profound understanding of social efforts such as cause-related marketing may not be as simple or easily understood as was once thought.

  1. Effect of stance position on kick performance in taekwondo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevan, Isaac; Jandacka, Daniel; Falco, Coral

    2013-01-01

    In taekwondo, the stance position can potentially affect kick performance. The aim of this study was to analyse mechanical variables in the roundhouse kick in taekwondo according to three stance positions (0°, 45°, 90°). Nine experienced taekwondo athletes performed consecutive kicking trials in a random order according to these three relative positions of the feet on the ground. Measurements for the mechanical analysis were performed using two 3D force plates and an eight-camera motion capture system. The taekwondo athletes' reaction and execution times were shorter when starting from the 0° and 45° stance positions than from the 90° position (P taekwondo athletes' kicks. It is suggested that athletes should not adopt the 90° stance position because it will not enable them to achieve the best performance in the roundhouse kick.

  2. The effect of micrococcal nuclease digestion on nucleosome positioning data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ryun Chung

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase. Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent models for nucleosome positioning. As a consequence we see a need to re-evaluate whether the DNA sequence is a major determinant of nucleosome positioning in vivo. More generally, our results show that data generated after MNase digestion of chromatin requires a matched control experiment in order to determine nucleosome positions.

  3. The effect of micrococcal nuclease digestion on nucleosome positioning data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ho-Ryun; Dunkel, Ilona; Heise, Franziska; Linke, Christian; Krobitsch, Sylvia; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E; Sperling, Silke R; Vingron, Martin

    2010-12-29

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent models for nucleosome positioning. As a consequence we see a need to re-evaluate whether the DNA sequence is a major determinant of nucleosome positioning in vivo. More generally, our results show that data generated after MNase digestion of chromatin requires a matched control experiment in order to determine nucleosome positions.

  4. The Effect of Micrococcal Nuclease Digestion on Nucleosome Positioning Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ho-Ryun Chung; Ilona Dunkel; Franziska Heise; Christian Linke; Sylvia Krobitsch; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E.; Sperling, Silke R; Martin Vingron

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent mod...

  5. Optional contributions have positive effects for volunteering public goods games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qi-Qing; Li, Zhen-Peng; Fu, Chang-He; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Public goods (PG) games with the volunteering mechanism are referred to as volunteering public goods (VPG) games, in which loners are introduced to the PG games, and a loner obtains a constant payoff but not participating the game. Considering that small contributions may have positive effects to encourage more players with bounded rationality to contribute, this paper introduces optional contributions (high value or low value) to these typical VPG games-a cooperator can contribute a high or low payoff to the public pools. With the low contribution, the logit dynamics show that cooperation can be promoted in a well mixed population comparing to the typical VPG games, furthermore, as the multiplication factor is greater than a threshold, the average payoff of the population is also enhanced. In spatial VPG games, we introduce a new adjusting mechanism that is an approximation to best response. Some results in agreement with the prediction of the logit dynamics are found. These simulation results reveal that for VPG games the option of low contributions may be a better method to stimulate the growth of cooperation frequency and the average payoff of the population.

  6. Positive and negative effects of IT on cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    In the new millennium people are facing serious challenges in health care, especially with increasing non- communicable diseases (NCD). One of the most common NCDs is cancer which is the leading cause of death in developed countries and in developing countries is the second cause of death after heart diseases. Cancer registry can make possible the analysis, comparison and development of national and international cancer strategies and planning. Information technology has a vital role in quality improvement and facility of cancer registries. With the use of IT, in addition to gaining general benefits such as monitoring rates of cancer incidence and identifying planning priorities we can also gain specific advantages such as collecting information for a lifetime, creating tele medical records, possibility of access to information by patient, patient empowerment, and decreasing medical errors. In spite of the powerful role of IT, we confront various challenges such as general problems, like privacy of the patient, and specific problems, including possibility of violating patients rights through misrepresentation, omission of human relationships, and decrease in face to face communication between doctors and patients. By implementing appropriate strategies, such as identifying authentication levels, controlling approaches, coding data, and considering technical and content standards, we can optimize the use of IT. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the need for identifying positive and negative effects of modern IT on cancer registry in general and specific aspects as an approach to cancer care management.

  7. Meta-analysis of the age-related positivity effect: age differences in preferences for positive over negative information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Andrew E; Chan, Larry; Mikels, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    In contrast to long-held axioms of old age as a time of "doom and gloom," mounting evidence indicates an age-related positivity effect in attention and memory. However, several studies report inconsistent findings that raise critical questions about the effect's reliability, robustness, and potential moderators. To address these questions, we conducted a systematic meta-analysis of 100 empirical studies of the positivity effect (N = 7,129). Results indicate that the positivity effect is reliable and moderated by theoretically implicated methodological and sample characteristics. The positivity effect is larger in studies that do not constrain (vs. constrain) cognitive processing-reflecting older adults' natural information processing preferences-and in studies incorporating wider (vs. narrower) age comparisons. Analyses indicated that older adults show a significant information processing bias toward positive versus negative information, whereas younger adults show the opposite pattern. We discuss implications of these findings for theoretical perspectives on emotion-cognition interactions across the adult life span and suggest future research directions.

  8. The Fort McMurray Demonstration Project in Social Marketing: no demonstrable effect on already falling injury rates following intensive community and workplace intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Tee L; Deb, Pooja; Bertera, Robert; Ford, Lynda

    2009-10-01

    The Fort McMurray Demonstration Project in Social Marketing attempted to achieve mutually reinforcing effects from thematically coordinated educational and awareness efforts in the community as a whole and in the workplace and the inclusion of occupational safety within the framework of a community health promotion project. The study community was Fort McMurray, a small, industrial city in northern Alberta. The Mistahiai Health Region, several hundred kilometers to the west and also dominated by one city, Grande Prairie, served as the reference community. The intervention was based on media and events staged at public events, with supporting educational activities in schools and the community. It relied heavily on community-based partners and volunteers. Data on healthcare utilization of selected preventable injuries were obtained from Alberta Health for the time period 1990-1996 for the Regional Health Authorities of Northern Lights, where the only large population centre is Fort McMurray, and Mistahia. Age-adjusted aggregate injury rates were analyzed for evidence of an effect of the intervention. Severity was measured by proxy, using the number of diagnostic claims submitted for reimbursement for medical services in a given year. The communities differed in age-specific injury rates, with Fort McMurray showing higher rates for residents aged less than 55. Young adults and older adolescents showed higher levels of severity. Injury rates fell substantially and at similar rates in both communities over the five-year period. However, in both communities injury rates were already falling before the intervention in Fort McMurray began and continued to fall at about the same rate, slowing toward the end of the period. No evidence was found for an effect of the Project or for acceleration of the reduction in injury frequency in the intervention area. Over the period, fewer medical services were delivered in office settings and more in emergency rooms, in both

  9. Effects of Positive Unified Behavior Support on Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John S.; White, Richard; Algozzine, Bob; Algozzine, Kate

    2009-01-01

    "Positive Unified Behavior Support" (PUBS) is a school-wide intervention designed to establish uniform attitudes, expectations, correction procedures, and roles among faculty, staff, and administration. PUBS is grounded in the general principles of positive behavior support and represents a straightforward, practical implementation model. When…

  10. Position Effects in Play Equipment Preferences of Nursery School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Peter A.; Gramza, Anthony F.

    With reference to the need for delineation of parameters operative in children's play, the position preferences of four groups of nursery school subjects were studied in a laboratory playroom. A large and small trestle were interchanged between center and corner positions in a series of play sessions. The frequency with which the subjects used…

  11. Is Teaching Simple Surgical Skills Using an Operant Learning Program More Effective Than Teaching by Demonstration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, I Martin; Pryor, Karen W; McKeon, Theresa R

    2016-04-01

    A surgical procedure is a complex behavior that can be constructed from foundation or component behaviors. Both the component and the composite behaviors built from them are much more likely to recur if it they are reinforced (operant learning). Behaviors in humans have been successfully reinforced using the acoustic stimulus from a mechanical clicker, where the clicker serves as a conditioned reinforcer that communicates in a way that is language- and judgment-free; however, to our knowledge, the use of operant-learning principles has not been formally evaluated for acquisition of surgical skills. Two surgical tasks were taught and compared using two teaching strategies: (1) an operant learning methodology using a conditioned, acoustic reinforcer (a clicker) for positive reinforcement; and (2) a more classical approach using demonstration alone. Our goal was to determine whether a group that is taught a surgical skill using an operant learning procedure would more precisely perform that skill than a group that is taught by demonstration alone. Two specific behaviors, "tying the locking, sliding knot" and "making a low-angle drill hole," were taught to the 2014 Postgraduate Year (PGY)-1 class and first- and second-year medical students, using an operant learning procedure incorporating precise scripts along with acoustic feedback. The control groups, composed of PGY-1 and -2 nonorthopaedic surgical residents and first- and second-year medical students, were taught using demonstration alone. The precision and speed of each behavior was recorded for each individual by a single experienced surgeon, skilled in operant learning. The groups were then compared. The operant learning group achieved better precision tying the locking, sliding knot than did the control group. Twelve of the 12 test group learners tied the knot and precisely performed all six component steps, whereas only four of the 12 control group learners tied the knot and correctly performed all six

  12. ESWT and alendronate sodium demonstrate equal protective effects in osteoarthritis of the knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Chou, Wen-Yi; Hsu, Shan-Ling; Huang, Chien-Yiu; Cheng, Jai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and alendronate sodium (alendronate) in osteoarthritis (OA) of rat knees. The control group was subjected to a sham surgery and did not receive either ESWT or alendronate treatment. The OA group underwent anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and medial meniscectomy (MM) surgery and did not receive either ESWT or alendronate. The ESWT group underwent ACLT and MM surgery and received ESWT after the surgery. The alendronate group received alendronate after ACLT and MM surgery. The evaluations included radiograph, bone mineral density (BMD), serum C-telopeptide collagen II (CTX-II), cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP), alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, histopathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiographs at 12 weeks showed pronounced OA changes in the OA group. The BMD values, CTX-II, COMP, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin showed no significant difference between ESWT and alendronate groups. In histopathology, the Mankin and Safranin O scores significantly increased in the OA, ESWT and alendronate groups, but without any significant difference between the ESWT and alendronate groups. In immunohistochemical analysis, the von Willebrand factor (vWF), vascular endothelial factor (VEGF), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), and osteocalcin expressions in articular cartilage and subchondral bone showed a significant decrease in the OA group, but no difference was noted between the ESWT and alendronate groups. In conclusion, ESWT and alendronate sodium demonstrate equal protective effects from developing osteoarthritis of the knee in rats.

  13. Mitigation of microtiter plate positioning effects using a block randomization scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselle, Christopher; Verch, Thorsten; Shank-Retzlaff, Mary

    2016-06-01

    Microtiter plate-based assays are a common tool in biochemical and analytical labs. Despite widespread use, results generated in microtiter plate-based assays are often impacted by positional bias, in which variability in raw signal measurements are not uniform in all regions of the plate. Since small positional effects can disproportionately affect assay results and the reliability of the data, an effective mitigation strategy is critical. Commonly used mitigation strategies include avoiding the use of outer regions of the plate, replicating treatments within and between plates, and randomizing placement of treatments within and between plates. These strategies often introduce complexity while only partially mitigating positional effects and significantly reducing assay throughput. To reduce positional bias more effectively, we developed a novel block-randomized plate layout. Unlike a completely randomized layout, the block randomization scheme coordinates placement of specific curve regions into pre-defined blocks on the plate based on key experimental findings and assumptions about the distribution of assay bias and variability. Using the block-randomized plate layout, we demonstrated a mean bias reduction of relative potency estimates from 6.3 to 1.1 % in a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used for vaccine release. In addition, imprecision in relative potency estimates decreased from 10.2 to 4.5 % CV. Using simulations, we also demonstrated the impact of assay bias on measurement confidence and its relation to replication strategies. We outlined the underlying concepts of the block randomization scheme to potentially apply to other microtiter-based assays.

  14. Effects of litter position on mass loss and nitrogen release in the semiarid Patagonian steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, A. T.

    2007-05-01

    The patchy distribution of vegetation in arid and semiarid ecosystems results in a mosaic of microsites of soil properties and variable abiotic conditions, including the well-documented "islands of fertility", low nutrient conditions in exposed bare soil and large amounts of standing dead material. I evaluated the relative importance of litter position on mass loss and nutrient release in a variety of realistic litter positions both in vegetated, unvegetated, aerial and buried microsites in a natural semiarid steppe in Patagonia, Argentina. Position demonstrated a highly significant effect on mass loss for all litter types (P<0.0001), but surprisingly, the fastest decomposition occurred in litter that was suspended in aerial positions or buried (k=0.25 and 0.32 year-1, respectively), intermediate values for mass loss of litter in bare soil and in shrub removal patches (k=0.21 and 0.24 year-1, respectively), and markedly slowest decomposition occurring under shrub patches (k = 0.018 year-1). In contrast, nutrient release showed a very different pattern with nutrient immobilization occurring only in shrub and buried microsites while all other positions demonstrated a gradual decrease in nitrogen over time. These results support the idea that abiotic photodegradation may be an important driver affecting carbon losses in litter in positions exposed to solar radiation, while nutrient dynamics appear to be largely biotically mediated and concentrated in photoprotected areas where biotic activity dominates. Global change may differentially affect carbon and nutrient turnover due to the relative importance of abiotic and biotic factors affecting litter decomposition in semiarid ecosystems.

  15. Effect of socioeconomic position on patient outcome after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Signe B; Cesaroni, Giulia; Ottesen, Bent;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between socioeconomic position (assessed by education, employment and income) and complications following hysterectomy and assess the role of lifestyle, co-morbidity and clinical conditions on the relationship. DESIGN: Register-based cohort study. SETTING...

  16. Effects of nursing position on transformational leadership practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Susan; Gish, Mary; Rosenblum, Ruth

    2015-02-01

    This study sought to identify significant differences in nursing leadership strengths by position title. Recent reports show aspects of transformational leadership (TL) related to position, age, and educational level. This study focuses on differentiating the strength of leadership practices across the range of nursing management positions. The Leadership Practices Inventory-Self-assessment survey, and a variety of demographic questions, were used to anonymously poll voluntary members of the Association of California Nurse Leaders. Nursing positions of director level and above were strongest in leadership practices. Those at manager and below were identified as needing additional leadership development. LPI-S subscales Enable Others to Act and Model the Way were strongest. Those at the manager level and below will benefit most from additional education and training. Even upper levels of management would gain from enhancing the LPI practices of Challenge the Process and Inspire a Shared Vision.

  17. Social Anxiety and Interpretation Bias: Effect of Positive Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Qian, Mingyi; Yu, Hongyu; Sun, Yang; Li, Songwei; Yang, Peng; Lin, Muyu; Yao, Nishao; Zhang, Xilin

    2016-10-01

    This study examined how positive-scale assessment of ambiguous social stimuli affects interpretation bias in social anxiety. Participants with high and low social anxiety (N = 60) performed a facial expression discrimination task to assess interpretation bias. Participants were then randomly assigned to assess the emotion of briefly presented faces either on a negative or on a positive scale. They subsequently repeated the facial expression discrimination task. Participants with high versus low social anxiety made more negative interpretations of ambiguous facial expressions. However, those in the positive-scale assessment condition subsequently showed reduced negative interpretations of ambiguous facial expressions. These results suggest that interpretation bias in social anxiety could be mediated by positive priming rather than an outright negative bias.

  18. Canopy position has a profound effect on soybean seed composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C. Huber

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although soybean seeds appear homogeneous, their composition (protein, oil and mineral concentrations can vary significantly with the canopy position where they were produced. In studies with 10 cultivars grown over a 3-yr period, we found that seeds produced at the top of the canopy have higher concentrations of protein but less oil and lower concentrations of minerals such as Mg, Fe, and Cu compared to seeds produced at the bottom of the canopy. Among cultivars, mean protein concentration (average of different positions correlated positively with mean concentrations of S, Zn and Fe, but not other minerals. Therefore, on a whole plant basis, the uptake and allocation of S, Zn and Fe to seeds correlated with the production and allocation of reduced N to seed protein; however, the reduced N and correlated minerals (S, Zn and Fe showed different patterns of allocation among node positions. For example, while mean concentrations of protein and Fe correlated positively, the two parameters correlated negatively in terms of variation with canopy position. Altering the microenvironment within the soybean canopy by removing neighboring plants at flowering increased protein concentration in particular at lower node positions and thus altered the node-position gradient in protein (and oil without altering the distribution of Mg, Fe and Cu, suggesting different underlying control mechanisms. Metabolomic analysis of developing seeds at different positions in the canopy suggests that availability of free asparagine may be a positive determinant of storage protein accumulation in seeds and may explain the increased protein accumulation in seeds produced at the top of the canopy. Our results establish node-position variation in seed constituents and provide a new experimental system to identify genes controlling key aspects of seed composition. In addition, our results provide an unexpected and simple approach to link agronomic practices to improve human

  19. Canopy position has a profound effect on soybean seed composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanov, Alexander; DeMuro, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Although soybean seeds appear homogeneous, their composition (protein, oil and mineral concentrations) can vary significantly with the canopy position where they were produced. In studies with 10 cultivars grown over a 3-yr period, we found that seeds produced at the top of the canopy have higher concentrations of protein but less oil and lower concentrations of minerals such as Mg, Fe, and Cu compared to seeds produced at the bottom of the canopy. Among cultivars, mean protein concentration (average of different positions) correlated positively with mean concentrations of S, Zn and Fe, but not other minerals. Therefore, on a whole plant basis, the uptake and allocation of S, Zn and Fe to seeds correlated with the production and allocation of reduced N to seed protein; however, the reduced N and correlated minerals (S, Zn and Fe) showed different patterns of allocation among node positions. For example, while mean concentrations of protein and Fe correlated positively, the two parameters correlated negatively in terms of variation with canopy position. Altering the microenvironment within the soybean canopy by removing neighboring plants at flowering increased protein concentration in particular at lower node positions and thus altered the node-position gradient in protein (and oil) without altering the distribution of Mg, Fe and Cu, suggesting different underlying control mechanisms. Metabolomic analysis of developing seeds at different positions in the canopy suggests that availability of free asparagine may be a positive determinant of storage protein accumulation in seeds and may explain the increased protein accumulation in seeds produced at the top of the canopy. Our results establish node-position variation in seed constituents and provide a new experimental system to identify genes controlling key aspects of seed composition. In addition, our results provide an unexpected and simple approach to link agronomic practices to improve human nutrition and health

  20. Effect of wrist position on young adults pinch grip control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Luzia Barros de Andrade

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pinch grip is used in a large number of handling activities that require precision and control of an object. The position of the upper arm joints affects the fingers force production in order to handle the object. This study aimed to verify the influence of the wrist position in the production of maximum strength and in the control fingers grip pinch submaximum strength control. Participants were 21 right handed adults (10 male, 18-26 years old. They made two attempts of maximum force production and eight attempts of submaximal force production (four at 20% and four at 40% of maximum strength for pinch grip in three wrist positions: neutral, flexion and extension. The results showed that the production of maximum strength is higher in neutral position compared to wrist flexion and extension and higher for men compared to women. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the length of the hand and the production of maximum strength. The results also indicated that the wrist position did not interfere in the submaximum force control during this task. However, participants showed more difficulty controlling 20% than 40% of maximum strength. The present study showed evidence that the motor units used to produce grip pinch maximum strength cross the wrist joint but those used for the 20% and 40% of maximum strength are present only in the fingers and hand.

  1. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    The display market is presently dominated by the active matrix liquid crystal display (LCD). However, the active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display is argued to become the successor to the LCD, and is already beginning its way into the market, mainly in small size displays. But, for AMOLED technology to become comparable in market share to LCD, larger size displays must become available at a competitive price with their LCD counterparts. A major issue preventing low-cost large AMOLED displays is the thin-film transistor (TFT) technology. Unlike the voltage driven LCD, the OLEDs in the AMOLED display are current driven. Because of this, the mature amorphous silicon TFT backplane technology used in the LCD must be upgraded to a material possessing a higher mobility. Polycrystalline silicon and transparent oxide TFT technologies are being considered to fill this need. But these technologies bring with them significant manufacturing complexity and cost concerns. Carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) offer a unique solution to this problem (now known as the AMOLED backplane problem). The CN-VFET allows the use of organic semiconductors to be used for the semiconductor layer. Organics are known for their low-cost large area processing compatibility. Although the mobility of the best organics is only comparable to that of amorphous silicon, the CN-VFET makes up for this by orienting the channel vertically, as opposed to horizontally (like in conventional TFTs). This allows the CN-VFET to achieve sub-micron channel lengths without expensive high resolution patterning. Additionally, because the CN-VFET can be easily converted into a light emitting transistor (called the carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic light emitting transistor---CN-VOLET) by essentially stacking an OLED on top of the CN-VFET, more potential benefits can be realized. These potential benefits include, increased aperture ratio, increased OLED

  2. Breathing type and body position effects on sternocleidomastoid and suprahyoid EMG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mayo, T; Miralles, R; Barrero, D; Bulboa, A; Carvajal, D; Valenzuela, S; Ormeño, G

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of breathing type and body position on sternocleidomastoid and suprahyoid electromyographic (EMG) activity. The sample included 18 subjects with upper costal breathing type (study group) and 15 subjects with costo-diaphragmatic breathing type (control group). All individuals had natural dentition and bilateral molar support. EMG recordings at rest and while swallowing saliva were carried out by placing surface electrodes on the left sternocleidomastoid and left suprahyoid muscles. EMG activity was recorded while standing, seated upright, and in the lateral decubitus position. Upper costal breathing type subjects showed a significantly higher suprahyoid EMG activity at rest than costo-diaphragmatic subjects in all body positions studied (mixed model with unstructured covariance matrix). In the lateral decubitus position, both breathing types showed a significantly higher sternocleidomastoid EMG activity at rest and while swallowing saliva. The suprahyoid muscles demonstrated a significantly higher EMG activity at rest as well as in the lateral decubitus position (mixed model with unstructured covariance matrix). These results are relevant because sternocleidomastoid and suprahyoid muscles play an important role in controlling the head posture and mandible dynamics. The neurophysiological mechanisms involved are discussed.

  3. Issues and Feasibility Demonstration of Positioning Closed Loop Control for the CLIC Supporting System Using a Test Mock-up with Five Degrees of Freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Sosin, M; Chritin, N; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Mainaud Durand, H; Rude, V; Sterbini, G

    2012-01-01

    Since several years, CERN is studying the feasibility of building a high energy e+ e- linear collider: the CLIC (Compact LInear Collider). One of the challenges of such a collider is the pre-alignment precision and accuracy requirement on the transverse positions of the linac components, which is typically 14 μm over a window of 200 m. To ensure the possibility of positioning within such tight constraints, CERN Beams Department’s Survey team has worked intensively at developing the methods and technology needed to achieve that objective. This paper describes activities which were performed on a test bench (mock-up) with five degrees of freedom (DOF) for the qualification of control algorithms for the CLIC supporting system active-pre-alignment. Present understanding, lessons learned (“know how”), issues of sensors noise and mechanical components nonlinearities are presented.

  4. Direct effects of ethane dimethanesulphonate on epididymal function in adult rats. An in vitro demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinefelter, G.L.; Roberts, N.L.; Suarez, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that the Leydig cell toxicant ethane dimethanesulphonate (EDS) produces multiple effects on the epididymis after a single in vivo exposure. To determine whether any of the perturbations were mediated by a direct action of the compound, we used a novel system for the coculture of epididymal epithelial cells and sperm from the caput epididymidis. This system maintains the morphologic integrity and cell polarity of the epididymal epithelial cells before and during coculture, and the sperm recovered after coculture have intact plasma and acrosomal membranes. In addition, several functions required for epididymal sperm maturation are expressed, including the secretion of protein by the epididymal epithelium, the association of secreted protein with the plasma membrane of cocultured sperm, and the acquisition of progressive motility by cocultured sperm. In vitro exposure of epididymal epithelial cells and sperm to EDS results in a significant decline in protein secretion by the epithelial cells during coculture, and in particular, a dose-dependent decline in a 36- to 38-kd protein (PI 4.0 to 4.5) and a 34- to 36-kd protein (PI 4.5 to 5.0). Moreover, these and other proteins are not recovered from the sperm membrane of cocultured sperm after EDS treatment. Finally, EDS results in a dose-dependent decline in the percentage of both motile and progressively motile sperm recovered after coculture compared with that of sperm from untreated cocultures.

  5. Effect of science magic applied in interactive lecture demonstrations on conceptual understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufiq, Muhammad; Suhandi, Andi; Liliawati, Winny

    2017-08-01

    Research about the application of science magic-assisting Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILD) has been conducted. This research is aimed at providing description about the comparison of the improvement of the conceptual understanding of lesson on pressure between students who receive physics lesson through science magic-assisting ILD and students who receive physics lesson through ILD without science magic. This research used a quasi-experiment methods with Control Group Pretest-Posttest Design. The subject of the research is all students of class VIII in one of MTs (Islamic junior high school) in Pekalongan. Research samples were selected using random sampling technique. Data about students' conceptual understanding was collected using test instrument of conceptual understanding in the form of multiple choices. N-gain average calculation was performed in order to determine the improvement of students' conceptual understanding. The result of the research shows that conceptual understanding of students on lesson about pressure who received lesson with ILD using science magic is higher than students who received lesson with ILD without science magic . Therefore, the conclusion is that the application of science magic ILD is more effective to improve the conceptual understanding of lesson on pressure.

  6. Dynamic Memory Cells Using MoS2 Field-Effect Transistors Demonstrating Femtoampere Leakage Currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Chaitanya U; Xu, Weichao; Su, Yang; Robbins, Matthew C; Kim, Chris H; Koester, Steven J

    2016-09-27

    Two-dimensional semiconductors such as transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are of tremendous interest for scaled logic and memory applications. One of the most promising TMDs for scaled transistors is molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and several recent reports have shown excellent performance and scalability for MoS2 MOSFETs. An often overlooked feature of MoS2 is that its wide band gap (1.8 eV in monolayer) and high effective masses should lead to extremely low off-state leakage currents. These features could be extremely important for dynamic memory applications where the refresh rate is the primary factor affecting the power consumption. Theoretical predictions suggest that leakage currents in the 10(-18) to 10(-15) A/μm range could be possible, even in scaled transistor geometries. Here, we demonstrate the operation of one- and two-transistor dynamic memory circuits using MoS2 MOSFETs. We characterize the retention times in these circuits and show that the two-transistor memory cell reveals MoS2 MOSFETs leakage currents as low as 1.7 × 10(-15) A/μm, a value that is below the noise floor of conventional DC measurements. These results have important implications for the future use of MoS2 MOSFETs in low-power circuit applications.

  7. Clinical effectiveness of the massachusetts childhood obesity research demonstration initiative among low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveras, Elsie M; Perkins, Meghan; Anand, Shikha; Woo Baidal, Jennifer A; Nelson, Candace C; Kamdar, Neil; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Gortmaker, Steven L; Barrett, Jessica L; Davison, Kirsten K; Land, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    To examine the extent to which a clinical intervention resulted in reduced BMI z scores among 2- to 12-year-old children compared to routine practice (treatment as usual [TAU]). The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) project is a multifaceted initiative to prevent childhood obesity among low-income children. At the federally qualified community health centers (FQHCs) of two communities (Intervention Site #1 and #2), the following were implemented: (1) pediatric weight management training, (2) electronic decision supports for clinicians, (3) on-site Healthy Weight Clinics, (4) community health worker integration, and (5) healthful clinical environment changes. One FQHC in a demographically matched community served as the TAU site. Using electronic health records, we assessed BMI z scores and used linear mixed models to examine BMI z score change over 2 years in each intervention site compared to a TAU site. Compared to children in the TAU site (n = 2,286), children in Intervention Site #2 (n = 1,368) had a significant decline in BMI z scores following the start of the intervention (-0.16 units/y; 95% confidence interval: -0.21 to -0.12). No evidence of an effect was found in Intervention Site #1 (n = 111). The MA-CORD clinical interventions were associated with modest improvement in BMI z scores in one of two intervention communities compared to a TAU community. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  8. Relationship between the adjuvant and cytotoxic effects of the positive charges and polymerization in liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparri, Julieta; Speroni, Lucía; Chiaramoni, Nadia Silvia; del Valle Alonso, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    Vaccine development today encounters a main obstacle, which is the need for effective adjuvants suitable for clinical trials. Aluminum salts, discovered 70 years ago and, very recently, MF59, are the only types of adjuvants currently used in vaccines licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Liposomes represent an alternative approach to vaccine adjuvants. In this article, we describe the inflammatory response and biological effect of polymerization and the addition of positive charges in liposome formulations. Nonpolymerized cationic (NP(+)) liposomes significantly reduce metabolism in Vero cells after 24 hours. Correspondingly, both NP(+) and polymerized cationic (P(+)) liposomes reduce cell viability following a 48-hour incubation. Similar results were obtained with cells from the peritoneal cavities of mice. Paradoxically, those liposomes that presented clearly cytostatic or cytotoxic effects in vitro stimulated metabolism and had a mitogenic effect in vivo. Finally, the adjuvant effect was tested by immunization in BALB/c mice. The major effect was obtained with NP(+) liposomes. Accordingly, we also demonstrated that NP(+) liposomes injected into the dermis produced an outstanding inflammatory reaction, showing the histopathological characteristics of an inoculation granuloma. Thus, positive charge would play an important role in the immunoadjuvant effect of liposomes by conferring them cytotoxic capacity.

  9. The effect of positive interactions on temporal turnover of community composition along an environmental gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youshi Wang

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the interplay between negative and positive interactions simultaneously shapes community structure and composition. However, few studies have attempted to examine the effect of facilitation on compositional changes in communities through time. Additionally, due to the difficulties in collecting the long-term data, it would be useful to indicate the rate of temporal turnover using a readily obtainable metric. Using an individual-based model incorporating plant strategies, we examined the role of facilitation on the temporal turnover of communities located at different positions along an environmental gradient for three model scenarios: CM without facilitation; CFM-U, a unimodal relationship between facilitation and environmental severity; and CFM-L, a positively linear relationship between facilitation and environmental severity. Our results demonstrated that facilitation could increase, decrease or have no remarkable effect on temporal turnover. The specific outcome depended on the location of the focal community across the environmental gradient and the model employed. Compared with CM, the inclusion of positive interactions (i.e. CFM-U and CFM-L, at intermediate environmental stress levels (such as S = 0.7 and 0.8 resulted in lower Bray-Curtis similarity values; at other severity levels, facilitation slowed down (such as S = 0.3 and 0.4 at low to medium stress levels, and S = 0.9 at high stress levels or had only a subtle effect (such as at S = 0.1 on temporal turnover. We also found that the coefficient of variation (CV in species abundances and the rate of temporal variability showed a significant quadratic relationship. Our theoretical analysis contributes to the understanding of factors driving temporal turnover in biotic communities, and presents a potential metric (i.e. CV in species abundances assessing the consequences of ongoing environmental change on community structure.

  10. The effect of positive interactions on temporal turnover of community composition along an environmental gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youshi; Yang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Shurong; Soininen, Janne; Ai, Dexiecuo; Li, Yali; Chu, Chengjin

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the interplay between negative and positive interactions simultaneously shapes community structure and composition. However, few studies have attempted to examine the effect of facilitation on compositional changes in communities through time. Additionally, due to the difficulties in collecting the long-term data, it would be useful to indicate the rate of temporal turnover using a readily obtainable metric. Using an individual-based model incorporating plant strategies, we examined the role of facilitation on the temporal turnover of communities located at different positions along an environmental gradient for three model scenarios: CM without facilitation; CFM-U, a unimodal relationship between facilitation and environmental severity; and CFM-L, a positively linear relationship between facilitation and environmental severity. Our results demonstrated that facilitation could increase, decrease or have no remarkable effect on temporal turnover. The specific outcome depended on the location of the focal community across the environmental gradient and the model employed. Compared with CM, the inclusion of positive interactions (i.e. CFM-U and CFM-L), at intermediate environmental stress levels (such as S = 0.7 and 0.8) resulted in lower Bray-Curtis similarity values; at other severity levels, facilitation slowed down (such as S = 0.3 and 0.4 at low to medium stress levels, and S = 0.9 at high stress levels) or had only a subtle effect (such as at S = 0.1) on temporal turnover. We also found that the coefficient of variation (CV) in species abundances and the rate of temporal variability showed a significant quadratic relationship. Our theoretical analysis contributes to the understanding of factors driving temporal turnover in biotic communities, and presents a potential metric (i.e. CV in species abundances) assessing the consequences of ongoing environmental change on community structure.

  11. Effects of student ontological position on cognition of human origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Jeremy Alan

    In this study, the narratives from a hermeneutical dialectic cycle of three high school students were analyzed to understand the influences of ontological position on the learning of human origins. The interpretation of the narratives provides the reader an opportunity to consider the learning process from the perspective of worldview and conceptual change theories. Questions guiding this research include: Within a context of a worldview, what is the range of ontological positions among a high school AP biology class? To what extent does ontological position influence the learning of scientific concepts about human origins? If a student's ontological position is contradictory to scientific explanation of human origins, how will learning strategies and motivations change? All consenting students in an AP biology class were interviewed in order to select three students who represented three different ontological positions of a worldview: No Supernatural, Supernatural Without Impact, or Supernatural Impact. The issue of worldview is addressed at length in this work. Consenting students had completed the graduation requirements in biology, but were taking an additional biology course in preparation for college. Enrollment in an AP biology course was assumed to indicate that the selected students have an understanding of the concept of human origins at a comprehensive level, but not necessarily at an apprehension level, both being needed for conceptual change. Examination of the narratives reveals that students may alternate between two ontological positions in order to account for inconsistencies within a situation. This relativity enables the range of ontological positions to vary depending on concepts being considered. Not all Supernatural Impact positions conflict with biological understanding of human origins due to the ability of some to create a dichotomy between religion and school. Any comprehended concepts within this dichotomy lead to plagiaristic knowledge

  12. Effectiveness of Demonstration and Lecture Methods in Learning Concept in Economics among Secondary School Students in Borno State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Amin Umar; Bala, Dauda; Ladu, Kolomi Mutah

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the Effectiveness of Demonstration and Lecture Methods in Learning concepts in Economics among Secondary School Students in Borno state, Nigeria. Five objectives: to determine the effectiveness of demonstration method in learning economics concepts among secondary school students in Borno state, determine the effectiveness…

  13. The Effect of Positive Psychological Capital on Emotional Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idil Tamer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In modern age, positive psychological capital is as important as financial capital for organizational development and sustainability. Efficacy, hope, optimism, and resilience are the dimensions of positive psychological capital. Emotional labor is defined by Hochschild as control of self emotions at work by workers who have a high degree of contact with coworkers within the organization or with external clients, so as to create an expression, voice or body gesture which is acceptible to the clients. Emotional labor is analysized under three components: surface acting, deep acting and naturally felt emotions. This study is aimed to investigate the impact of positive psychological capital on emotional labor. So a research is conducted with the aim of exploring the relationship between the sub-dimensions of psychological capital and emotional labour.

  14. The Effect of Positive Psychological Capital on Emotional Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idil Tamer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In modern age, positive psychological capital is as important as financial capital for organizational development and sustainability. Efficacy, hope, optimism, and resilience are the dimensions of positive psychological capital. Emotional labor is defined by Hochschild as control of self emotions at work by workers who have a high degree of contact with coworkers within the organization or with external clients, so as to create an expression, voice or body gesture which is acceptible to the clients. Emotional labor is analysized under three components: surface acting, deep acting and naturally felt emotions. This study is aimed to investigate the impact of positive psychological capital on emotional labor. So a research is conducted with the aim of exploring the relationship between the sub-dimensions of psychological capital and emotional labour.

  15. A Palatable Introduction to and Demonstration of Statistical Main Effects and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Andrew N.; Marek, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Because concrete explanations in a familiar context facilitate understanding, we illustrate the concept of an interaction via a baking analogy to provide students with food for thought. The demonstration initially introduces the concepts of independent and dependent variables using a chocolate chip cookie recipe. The demonstration provides an…

  16. Effect of Dialogue on Demonstrations: Direct Quotations, Facial Portrayals, Hand Gestures, and Figurative References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavelas, Janet; Gerwing, Jennifer; Healing, Sara

    2014-01-01

    "Demonstrations" (e.g., direct quotations, conversational facial portrayals, conversational hand gestures, and figurative references) lack conventional meanings, relying instead on a resemblance to their referent. Two experiments tested our theory that demonstrations are a class of communicative acts that speakers are more likely to use…

  17. Pregnancy in HIV-Positive Patients: Effects on Vaginal Flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Vallone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high proportion of HIV-infected pregnant women present pathogenic organisms in their lower genital tract. This has been associated with the development of postpartum morbility, HIV transmission to the partner and offspring, and other gynaecological conditions, such as cervical dysplasia or cancer. Vaginal flora alterations can range from 47% in Western countries to 89% in Africa in pregnant HIV-positive patients, much higher than about 20% of the general population. Pathogen organism retrieval is high. As peripartum complications due to vaginal infections seem higher in HIV-positive patients, accurate investigation and treatment of such infections are strongly mandatory.

  18. Computational and biochemical docking of the irreversible cocaine analog RTI 82 directly demonstrates ligand positioning in the dopamine transporter central substrate-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Henry, L Keith

    2014-10-24

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4'-azido-3'-iodophenylethyl ester ([(125)I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [(125)I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors.

  19. Effects of fixation and tissue processing on immunohistochemical demonstration of specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, M M; Srivastava, S; Fredenburgh, J; Stockard, C R; Myers, R B; Grizzle, W E

    1996-09-01

    Identification of biomarkers in archival tissues using immunochemistry is becoming increasingly important for determining the diagnosis and prognosis of tumors, for characterizing preinvasive neoplastic changes in glandular tissues such as prostate, for evaluating the response of tumors and preinvasive neoplastic changes to certain therapies (i.e., as a surrogate intermediate end point), for selecting patients who are candidates for specific therapies (e.g., immunotherapy) and for retrospective studies. For detecting specific biomarkers it is important to understand the limitations imposed by the fixation methods and processing of the tissues. This study was designed to determine the effects of fixation on the detection in archival paraffin blocks of selected antigens postulated to be important in tumor biology. We evaluated the antigens TGF alpha, p185erbB-2, broad spectrum keratins, p53, and TAG-72 (B72.3). Fixatives evaluated included standard preparations of neutral buffered formalin, acid formalin, zinc formalin, alcoholic formalin, ethanol, methanol, and Bouin's fixative. We found that in general neutral buffered formalin is the poorest fixative for maintaining antigen recognition by immunohistochemistry and that no single fixative was best for all antigens. The dehydrating (coagulant) fixatives (e.g., ethanol and methanol) preserved immunorecognition of p53 and broad spectrum keratins best while the slow cross-linking fixatives (e.g., unbuffered zinc formalin) were best for demonstrating TGF alpha and p185erbB-2. Fixatives other than neutral buffered formalin produced equivalent recognition of the epitope of TAG-72 by B72.3. In formalin fixed archival tissues, only a portion of the antigen signal can be detected by routine immunohistologic methods.

  20. Disentangling the Origin of the Kok Effect Using Position Specific Glucose Labeling in Sunflower Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, P. P.; Bender, M. L.; Saenz, N.

    2015-12-01

    In plants, leaf mitochondrial respiratory CO2 release is inhibited by light. Bessel Kok first demonstrated this inhibition in 1948. Based on curves of CO2 assimilation vs irradiance, it is understood that respiration is maximal in the dark. It then frequently decreases linearly with irradiance until reaching some value around the compensation point, beyond which it is constant. CO2 released by mitochondrial respiration is the result of decarboxylation through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), the tricarboxylic acid pathway (TCAP) and the oxydative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP). The overall activity of these three reactions is reduced by light. However, their individual contributions to the Kok effect are unknown. We measured the rate of decarboxylation of glucose, position-specifically labeled with 13C, to evaluate the participation of PDH, TCAP and OPPP in the Kok effect of sunflower. Leaves were fed with labeled glucose through their transpiration stream. The δ13C of the CO2 released by the leaf was then measured as a function of irradiance. The results showed that the inhibition of the decarboxylation of carbon positions 3 and 4 in glucose is at the origin of the Kok effect. These are the positions of carbon atoms decarboxylated by PDH. In addition, the rate of decarboxylation of position 1 was not different in the light and in the dark. Thus OPPP plays no role in the Kok effect in sunflower leaves. This work improves our current understanding of leaf mitochondrial respiratory metabolism in the light. Invoking the Kok effect in plant physiology models should improve our ability to simulate carbon fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems.

  1. Mediator Effects of Positive Emotions on Social Support and Depression among Adolescents Suffering from Mobile Phone Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menglong; Jiang, Xia; Ren, Yujia

    2017-06-01

    Depression is a common mental disorder that is widely seen among adolescents suffering from mobile phone addiction. While it is well known that both positive emtions in adolescents wiotions and social support can have a positive impact by helping individuals to maintain a positive attitude, the correlation between positive emotions, social support, and depression among these adolescents remains to be investigated. This study examined the mediator effects of positive emotions on the relationship between social support and depression among adolescents suffering from mobile phone addiction. For this study, conducted in 2016, we selected 1,346 adolescent students from three middle schools (ranging from Junior Grade One to Senior Grade Three) in Hunan Province of China, to participate in the survey. Participants were selected using the stratified cluster random sampling method, and all participants remained anonymous throughout the study. Each participant completed the Self-made General Situation Questionnaire, the Social Support Rating Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the Mobile Phone Addiction Tendency Scale. There was significant positive correlation between positive emotions and social support. Both positive emotions and social support demonstrated significant negative correlation with depression. Positive emotions had partial mediator effects on the relationship between social support and depression (Pmobile phone addiction. Social support contributes to positive emoth mobile phone addiction, thereby reducing their levels of depression. These findings suggest that more support and care should be given to this particular adolescent population.

  2. Ustur whole body case 0269: demonstrating effectiveness of i.v. CA-DTPA for Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, A.C.; Sasser, L.B.; Stuit, D.B. [US Transuranium and Uranium Registries, College of Pharmacy, Washington State University, 1845 Terminal Drive, Suite 201, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Glover, S.E. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 598 Rhodes Hall, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Carbaugh, E.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as effective as promptly administered Ca-EDTA. (authors)

  3. USTUR WHOLE BODY CASE 0269: DEMONSTRATING EFFECTIVENESS OF I.V. CA-DTPA FOR PU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Anthony C.; Sasser , Lyle B.; Stuit, Dorothy B.; Glover, Samuel E.; Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2008-01-28

    This whole body donation case (USTUR Registrant) involved a single acute inhalation of an acidic Pu(NO3)4 solution in the form of an aerosol ‘mist.’ Chelation treatment with i.v. Ca-EDTA was initiated on the day of the intake, and continued intermittently over 6 months. After 2½ years with no further treatment, a course of i.v. Ca-DTPA was administered. A total of 400 measurements of 239+240Pu excreted in urine were recorded; starting on the first day (both before and during the initial Ca-EDTA chelation), and continuing for 37 years. This sampling included all intervals of chelation. In addition, 91 measurements of 239+240Pu-in-feces were recorded over this whole period. The Registrant died about 38 years after the intake, at age 79 y, with extensive carcinomatosis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. At autopsy, all major soft tissue organs were harvested for radiochemical analyses of their 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am content. Also, all types of bone (comprising about half the skeleton) were harvested for radiochemical analyses, as well as samples of skin, subcutaneous fat and muscle. This comprehensive dataset has been applied to derive ‘chelation-enhanced’ transfer rates in the ICRP Publication 67 plutonium biokinetic model, representing the behaviour of blood-borne and tissue-incorporated plutonium during intervals of therapy. The resulting model of the separate effects of i.v. Ca-EDTA and Ca-DTPA chelation shows that the therapy administered in this case succeeded in reducing substantially the long-term burden of plutonium in all body organs, except for the lungs. The calculated reductions in organ content at the time of death are approximately 40% for the liver, 60% for other soft tissues (muscle, skin, glands, etc.), 50% for the kidneys, and 50% for the skeleton. Essentially all of the substantial reduction in skeletal burden occurred in trabecular bone. This modeling exercise demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as

  4. The Effects of Positive or Neutral Communication during Acupuncture for Relaxing Effects: A Sham-Controlled Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelie Rosén

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The link between patient-clinician communication and its effect on clinical outcomes is an important clinical issue that is yet to be elucidated. Objective. Investigating if communication type (positive or neutral about the expected treatment outcome affected (i participants’ expectations and (ii short-term relaxation effects in response to genuine or sham acupuncture and investigating if expectations were related to outcome. Methods. Healthy volunteers (n=243, mean age of 42 were randomized to one treatment with genuine or sham acupuncture. Within groups, participants were randomized to positive or neutral communication, regarding expected treatment effects. Visual Analogue Scales (0–100 millimeters were used to measure treatment expectations and relaxation, directly before and after treatment. Results. Participants in the positive communication group reported higher treatment expectancy, compared to the neutral communication group (md 12 versus 6 mm, p=0.002. There was no difference in relaxation effects between acupuncture groups or between communication groups. Participants with high baseline expectancy perceived greater improvement in relaxation, compared to participants with low baseline levels (md 27 versus 15 mm, p=0.022. Conclusion. Our data highlights the importance of expectations for treatment outcome and demonstrates that expectations can be effectively manipulated using a standardized protocol that in future research may be implemented in clinical trials.

  5. Effect of low pull headgear on head position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in head position following the use of low pull headgear (LHG) and compare these changes with an untreated control group. Subjects and methods The test group comprised pre-treatment and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 30 males, aged 11 ± 1.5 years, who were receiving LHG therapy for correction of Class II malocclusion. Pre-observation and post-observation lateral cephalograms of 25 untreated male subjects, aged 11 ± 1.6 years, served as controls. The average treatment time for the treatment group was 12 ± 2.02 months and the average observation period for the control group was 11 ± 1.03 months. Four postural variables (NSL/CVT, NSL/OPT, CVT/HOR, OPT/HOR) were measured to evaluate the head position in all subjects pre- and post-observations. Results There was no significant difference in all the measurements concerning the head position within each group (p > 0.05). The mean differences of pre- and post-observations of 4 postural variables in the LHG group were 1.43, 0.9, −1.13, and −1.08, while those of the control group were 1.56, −0.32, −0.24, and 0.04, respectively. There was no significant difference between the headgear and control groups for any of the postural variables measured (p = 0.924, 0.338, 0.448, and 0.398, respectively). Conclusions Although postural variables showed considerable variability in both groups, head position exhibited no significant changes over a period of 11–12 months either in the control or headgear group. PMID:23960551

  6. Neural effects of positive and negative incentives during marijuana withdrawal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca M Filbey

    Full Text Available In spite of evidence suggesting two possible mechanisms related to drug-seeking behavior, namely reward-seeking and harm avoidance, much of the addiction literature has focused largely on positive incentivization mechanisms associated with addiction. In this study, we examined the contributing neural mechanisms of avoidance of an aversive state to drug-seeking behavior during marijuana withdrawal. To that end, marijuana users were scanned while performing the monetary incentive delay task in order to assess positive and negative incentive processes. The results showed a group x incentive interaction, such that marijuana users had greater response in areas that underlie reward processes during positive incentives while controls showed greater response in the same areas, but to negative incentives. Furthermore, a negative correlation between withdrawal symptoms and response in the amygdala during negative incentives was found in the marijuana users. These findings suggest that although marijuana users have greater reward sensitivity and less harm avoidance than controls, that attenuated amygdala response, an area that underlies fear and avoidance, was present in marijuana users with greater marijuana withdrawal symptoms. This is concordant with models of drug addiction that involve multiple sources of reinforcement in substance use disorders, and suggests the importance of strategies that focus on respective mechanisms.

  7. Negativity bias and task motivation: testing the effectiveness of positively versus negatively framed incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Kelly; Dhar, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    People are frequently challenged by goals that demand effort and persistence. As a consequence, philosophers, psychologists, economists, and others have studied the factors that enhance task motivation. Using a sample of undergraduate students and a sample of working adults, we demonstrate that the manner in which an incentive is framed has implications for individuals' task motivation. In both samples we find that individuals are less motivated when an incentive is framed as a means to accrue a gain (positive framing) as compared with when the same incentive is framed as a means to avoid a loss (negative framing). Further, we provide evidence for the role of the negativity bias in this effect, and highlight specific populations for whom positive framing may be least motivating. Interestingly, we find that people's intuitions about when they will be more motivated show the opposite pattern, with people predicting that positively framed incentives will be more motivating than negatively framed incentives. We identify a lay belief in the positive correlation between enjoyment and task motivation as one possible factor contributing to the disparity between predicted and actual motivation as a result of the framing of the incentive. We conclude with a discussion of the managerial implications for these findings. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. A home-based individualized information communication technology training program for older adults: a demonstration of effectiveness and value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthanat, Sajay; Vroman, Kerryellen G; Lysack, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness and value of a home-based information communication technology (ICT) training program for older adults. Thirteen older adults were provided in-home ICT training by graduate occupational therapy students using an iPad. The breadth and frequency of ICT use, perspectives on technology, and perceived independence were recorded at baseline, during the 3-month training and at follow-up, along with an end-of-study questionnaire. Non-parametric Friedman analysis was conducted to verify trends in the outcome measures. The qualitative data were examined by content analysis. Participants' breadth of ICT activities showed a significant trend across 6 months. Leisure accounted for the significant increase, while health management and social connections activities increased modestly. A positive trend in participants' perspectives on technology was evident along with a marginal increase in perceived independence. Participants' perspectives were thematically categorized as technology experiences, interactions with coach, training approach, and specific activities. As reflection of the training program's value, 12 of the 13 participants took ownership of the iPad at the end of the study. Building capacity of older adults to utilize the multifaceted potential of ICT is critical in addressing declines in health, impending disabilities, and social isolation. Implications for Rehabilitation A one-on-one home-based individualized information communication technology (ICT) training program for older adults could result in a progressive increase in the breadth of online activities carried out by them. Specifically, the increase in their usage of ICT could be expected in leisure-based online activities. Individualized training programs designed based on needs, priorities, and learning style of older adults could have a positive impact on their technological perspectives and intrinsic motivation to adopt ICT.

  9. Assessing the real-world cost-effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in HER-2/neu positive breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hedden, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    Among women with surgically removed, high-risk HER-2\\/neu-positive breast cancer, trastuzumab has demonstrated significant improvements in disease-free and overall survival. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the currently recommended 12-month adjuvant protocol of trastuzumab using a Markov modeling approach and real-world cost data.

  10. Simulated driving in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea : effects of oral appliances and continuous positive airway pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Bakker, Marije; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; de Bont, Lambert G. M.; Wijkstra, Peter J.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired simulated driving performance has been demonstrated in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) patients. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) generally improves simulated driving performance, the effects of oral-appliance (OA) therapy are unknown. The aims of this

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  12. Effect of elbow position on radiographic measurements of radio-capitellar alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Emilie; Canet, Fanny; Petit, Yvan; Laflamme, G-Yves; Athwal, George S; Rouleau, Dominique M

    2016-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of different elbow and forearm positions on radiocapitellar alignment. Fifty-one healthy volunteers were recruited and bilateral elbow radiographs were taken to form a radiologic database. Lateral elbow radiographs were taken with the elbow in five different positions: Maximal extension and forearm in neutral, maximal flexion and forearm in neutral, elbow at 90° and forearm in neutral, elbow at 90° and forearm in supination and elbow at 90° and forearm in pronation. A goniometer was used to verify the accuracy of the elbow's position for the radiographs at a 90° angle. The radiocapitellar ratio (RCR) measurements were then taken on the collected radiographs using the SliceOmatic software. An orthopedic resident performed the radiographic measurements on the 102 elbows, for a total of 510 lateral elbow radiographic measures. ANOVA paired t-tests and Pearson coefficients were used to assess the differences and correlations between the RCR in each position. Mean RCR values were -2% ± 7% (maximal extension), -5% ± 9% (maximal flexion), and for elbow at 90° and forearm in neutral -2% ± 5%, supination 1% ± 6% and pronation 1% ± 5%. ANOVA analyses demonstrated significant differences between the RCR in different elbow and forearm positions. Paired t-tests confirmed significant differences between the RCR at maximal flexion and flexion at 90°, and maximal extension and flexion. The Pearson coefficient showed significant correlations between the RCR with the elbow at 90° - maximal flexion; the forearm in neutral-supination; the forearm in neutral-pronation. Overall, 95% of the RCR values are included in the normal range (obtained at 90° of flexion) and a value outside this range, in any position, should raise suspicion for instability.

  13. Positive effects of Religious and Spiritual Coping on Bereavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yoffe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antonovsky (1987 coined the term “salutogenesis” in opposition to “pathogenesis”, with the intention to point out to cientific researchers ways and mechanisms that could promote health, well -being and life satisfaction. The area of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality began both in Europe and in the United States at the beginning of the twenth century. The research done in this field -since the last two decades- has focused on the relationships between religion, spirituality and health; and on the ways in which religious people cope with negative life events. We could think this area as a complementary one to the Positive Psychology; as both share certain common points of view about health, coping and well-being. In the field of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, Pargament and Koenig (1997 used the term “coping” -coined by Lazarus and Folkman (1986- referring to different styles of “religious coping” as “ways and mechanism by which religious people apply their religious beliefs and behaviours to prevent and /or moderate negative consequences of stressful life events, in order to solve their problems as well”. Each religion promotes ways to overcome negative life events, such as the death of loved ones. By using faith, prayers, meditations, religious rituals and beliefs about life, death and afterlife, religious persons try to cope with their grief and enhance positive feelings of emotional ,mental and spiritual well-being. Clergy of different religions are trained in religious practices, knowledge and skills to provide social support to those ones who face pain and loss. Religious groups can provide different types of emotional, practical, intelectual and spiritual support that can help diminish feelings of loneliness and grief. Being and feeling part of a religious community can promote ways to reconect to life and positive feelings that can help to overcome the grief of the death of loved ones and make

  14. Effects of positive and negative delusional ideation on memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimori, Eriko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between levels of delusional ideation (whether positive or negative delusions) and the activation and distortion of memory by using pairs of positive and negative adjectives describing personality traits where those adjectives had similar meanings. We presented one of each pair of adjectives in the learning phase. Immediately after the learning phase in Experiment 1, we asked whether each adjective had been presented. Participants with high (positive or negative) delusional ideation were more likely to indicate that they had learned adjectives that they had not actually learned. This finding suggested that non-learned positive (or negative) adjectives that were associated with learned negative (or positive) adjectives were more likely to be activated in participants prone to positive (or negative) delusional ideation. However, in Experiment 2, two forced-choice tests were conducted immediately after the learning phase. In this context, participants, regardless of their proneness to delusional ideation, could almost always correctly distinguish what had and had not been presented, suggesting that the activation of learned items was still stronger than that for non-learned items in the immediate test. As time passed, the proportion of false alarms for positive or negative adjectives was higher in the two forced-choice tests among those with high proneness to (positive or negative) delusional ideation, suggesting that participants with delusional ideation were increasingly likely to depend on internal conditions for retrieval over time. Nous avons examiné la relation entre les niveaux d'idéation illusoire (qu'elle soit positive ou négative) et l'activation et la distorsion de la mémoire, en utilisant des paires d'adjectifs positifs et négatifs à significations similaires décrivant des traits de personnalité. Nous avons présenté un membre de chaque paire d'adjectifs lors d'une phase d'apprentissage. Dans une première exp

  15. Transverse Beam Size Effects in Beam Position Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    2001-04-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The corrections to BPM signals due to a finite beam size are found analytically for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current. The results for fields can also be directly applied for calculating the beam coupling impedances of small discontinuities.

  16. Experimental study on interaction between a positive mass and a negative effective mass through a mass–spring system

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jiao; Cheng, Yong; Zhang, Hongkuan; Huang, Guoliang; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction between a positive mass and a negative effective mass through a three-mass chain connected with elastic springs, a pair of masses is designed to have an effective negative mass, and it interacts with the third positive one as if an equivalent two-mass chain. The dynamics of the equivalent two-mass chain shows that the two bodies may be self-accelerated in same direction when the effective mass becomes negative, the experiment is also conducted to demonstrate thi...

  17. United States Navy - Canadian forces solid state flight data recorder/crash position locator experiment on the B-720 controlled impact demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The operation of a radio beacon position locator during and after the remotely controlled transport aircraft is discussed. The radio beacon transmission was actuated and was picked up by the Navy P-3A chase aircraft for a short time, after which reception was lost. The pilot reported that he received a signal on both 121.5 MHz and 243 MHz for a period of approximately 5 seconds. Five minutes after the crash a portable direction finding unit located on the roof of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility, 4 miles distant from the crash, was unable to pick up the beacon transmission. The fire crews started fighting the fires approximately 90 seconds after the time of impact. Navy personnel access to the crash site was allowed on the morning of December 2, 1984. Radio beacon locator was found resting top side up, 15 feet forward and 13 feet perpendicular from the tray location the starboard side of the aircraft. An immediate inspection indicated the airfoil suffered moderate fire damage with paint peeling but not intumescing. The visual marker strobe lamp housings were intact but extensively burned such that it was impossible to see if the lamps had survived. The airfoil suffered minor structural damage, with assorted dents, etc. The extended plunger on the ARU-21 release unit indicated that the pyrotechnic deployment system operated. The radio beacon base (tray) suffered some heat and fire damage, and was charred and blackened by smoke. The frangible switch in the nose survived and the switch in the belly was recovered and found to have actuated. It is assumed that this switch fired the ARU-21 squib. There were no other release switches installed in the normally open system in the aircraft.

  18. Daytime F2-layer positive storm effect at middle and lower latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    Full Text Available Daytime F2-layer positive storm effects at middle and lower latitudes in the winter thermosphere are analyzed using AE-C, ESRO-4 neutral gas composition data, ground-based ionosonde observations and model calculations. Different longitudinal sectors marked by the storm onset as 'night-time' and 'daytime' demonstrate different F2-layer positive storm mechanisms. Neutral composition changes in the 'night-time' sector with increased [O] and [N2] absolute concentrations, while (N2/Ostorm/(N2/Oquietapprox1 at F2-layer heights, are shown to contribute largely to the background NmF2 increase at lower latitudes lasting during daytime hours. Storm-induced surges of the equatorward wind give rise to an additional NmF2 increase above this background level. The mid-latitude F2-layer positive storm effect in the 'daytime' sector is due to the vertical plasma drift increase, resulting from the interaction of background (poleward and storm-induced (equatorward thermospheric winds, but not to changes of [O] and [N2] concentrations.

  19. Effects of the Maytiv positive psychology school program on early adolescents' well-being, engagement, and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshani, Anat; Steinmetz, Sarit; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv

    2016-08-01

    As positive psychology is a nascent area of research, there are very few empirical studies assessing the impact and sustained effects of positive psychology school interventions. The current study presents a 2-year longitudinal evaluation of the effects of a school-based positive psychology program on students' subjective well-being, school engagement, and academic achievements. The study investigated the effectiveness of the Maytiv school program using a positive psychology-based classroom-level intervention with 2517 seventh- to ninth-grade students in 70 classrooms, from six schools in the center of Israel. The classes were randomly assigned to intervention and control conditions, which were comparable in terms of students' age, gender, and socio-economic status. Hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed positive intervention effects on positive emotions, peer relations, emotional engagement in school, cognitive engagement, and grade point average scores (Cohen's ds 0.16-0.71). In the control group, there were significant decreases in positive emotions and cognitive engagement, and no significant changes in peer relations, emotional engagement or school achievements. These findings demonstrate the significant socio-emotional and academic benefits of incorporating components of positive psychology into school curricula.

  20. Present or Play: The Effect of Serious Gaming on Demonstrated Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Tom; Spil, Antonius A.M.; van der Burg, Sanne; Wenzler, Ivo; Dalmolen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is one of the newest developments in the world of learning and is gaining increasing attention within the business environment. Although many practitioners claim that serious gaming has more impact on demonstrated behaviour of trainees when compared to common presentations, little

  1. Present or Play: The Effect of Serious Gaming on Demonstrated Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Tom; Spil, Ton; van der Burg, Sanne; Wenzler, Ivo; Dalmolen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is one of the newest developments in the world of learning and is gaining increasing attention within the business environment. Although many practitioners claim that serious gaming has more impact on demonstrated behaviour of trainees when compared to common presentations, little evidence exists. In this paper, the authors present…

  2. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  3. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  4. Present or Play: The Effect of Serious Gaming on Demonstrated Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Tom; Spil, Ton; van der Burg, Sanne; Wenzler, Ivo; Dalmolen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is one of the newest developments in the world of learning and is gaining increasing attention within the business environment. Although many practitioners claim that serious gaming has more impact on demonstrated behaviour of trainees when compared to common presentations, little evidence exists. In this paper, the authors present…

  5. Demonstrating the effectiveness of social franchising principles: the emptying of household ventilated improved pits: a case study from South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development Demonstrating the effectiveness of social franchising principles: the emptying of household ventilated improved pits: a case study from South Africa K. Wall, O. Ive, J. Bhagwan, F. Kirwan, W...

  6. Taking advantage of the positive side-effects of smallpox vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, A

    2004-06-01

    From the introduction of smallpox vaccination approximately 200 years ago right up to its discontinuation (1980), reports by physicians and scientists about positive side-effects such as healing of chronic skin rashes, reduced susceptibility to various infectious diseases, e.g. measles, scarlet fever and whooping cough, and even the prophylactic use of the vaccination, e.g. against syphilis, were published again and again. Comparison with the period after cessation of vaccination confirms the experiences of the above vaccinators. As early as 1956, targeted research on these observations led to evidence of the 'ring-zone phenomenon', i.e. the production of soluble antiviral substances in infected chicken embryos and cell cultures. With the help of modern immunological and bioengineering methods, it was later possible to demonstrate that these effects are based on the activation of lymphoreticular cells and the regulatory effect of certain cytokines within the context of the non-specific immune system. These findings led to the development of paramunization with paraspecific vaccines from highly attenuated animal pox viruses. During attenuation, deletions in the virus DNA occur. Attenuated animal pox strains are therefore suited for the production of vector vaccines. The fact that these vector vaccines demonstrate an especially high level of paraspecific efficacy and lack harmful effects is likewise the result of the attenuated animal pox viruses. Optimum regulation of the entire immune system leads to increased paramunity already in the first few days after vaccination and to enhanced antigen recognition and thus accelerated commencement of specific immunity.

  7. Effects of Transverse Beam Size in Beam Position Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, S S

    2001-01-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by a displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those produced by a pencil beam. The non-linearities and corrections to BPM signals due to a finite transverse beam size are calculated for an arbitrary chamber cross section. Simple analytical expressions are given for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current in a circular or rectangular chamber. Of particular interest is a general proof that in an arbitrary homogeneous chamber the beam-size corrections vanish for any axisymmetric beam current distribution.

  8. Effects of transverse beam size in beam position monitors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S. (Sergey)

    2001-01-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The non-linearities and corrections to BPM signals due to a finite transverse beam size are calculated for an arbitrary chamber cross section. Simple analytical expressions are given for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current in a circular or rectangular chamber. Of particular interest is a general proof that in an arbitrary homogeneous chamber the beam-size corrections vanish for any axisymmetric beam current distribution.

  9. EFFECTS OF TRANSFERSE BEAM SIZE IN BEAM POSITIONS MONITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.S. KURENNOY

    2001-06-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The non-linearities and corrections to BPM signals due to a finite transverse beam size are calculated for an arbitrary chamber cross section. Simple analytical expressions are given for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current in a circular or rectangular chamber. Of particular interest is a general proof that in an arbitrary homogeneous chamber the beam-size corrections vanish for any axisymmetric beam current distribution.

  10. Positive affect and learning: exploring the "Eureka Effect" in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Ragen T S; Rehn, Therese; Norling, Yezica; Keeling, Linda J

    2014-05-01

    Animals may experience positive affective states in response to their own achievements. We investigated emotional responses to problem-solving in dogs, separating these from reactions to rewards per se using a yoked control design. We also questioned whether the intensity of reaction would vary with reward type. We examined the response (behavior and heart rate) of dogs as they learned to gain access to different rewards: (1) food (2) human contact, and (3) dog contact. Twelve beagles were assigned to matched pairs, and each dog served as both an experimental and a control animal during different stages of the experiment. We trained all dogs to perform distinct operant tasks and exposed them to additional devices to which they were not trained. Later, dogs were tested in a new context. When acting as an experimental dog, access to the reward was granted immediately upon completion of trained operant tasks. When acting as a control, access to the reward was independent of the dog's actions and was instead granted after a delay equal to their matched partner's latency to complete their task. Thus, differences between the two situations could be attributed to experimental dogs having the opportunity to learn to control access to the reward. Experimental dogs showed signs of excitement (e.g., increased tail wagging and activity) in response to their achievements, whereas controls showed signs of frustration (e.g., chewing of the operant device) in response to the unpredictability of the situation. The intensity of emotional response in experimental dogs was influenced by the reward type, i.e., greatest response to food and least to another dog. Our results suggest that dogs react emotionally to problem-solving opportunities and that tail wagging may be a useful indicator of positive affective states in dogs.

  11. Effects of angling and manual handling on pike behaviour investigated by high-resolution positional telemetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baktoft, Henrik; Aarestrup, Kim; Berg, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    Human disturbances such as angling and manual handling may have long-term effects on the behaviour of pike, Esox lucius L., an ecologically important species. Using continuous high-resolution positional telemetry, this study compared the swimming activity of handled and unhandled pike in a small...... lake. Pike pre-equipped with acoustic transmitters were angled and exposed to a handling protocol including measurements of length and mass. Pike not recaptured constituted an unhandled control group. Results demonstrated that the handling protocol caused temperature-dependent changes in pike activity......, with higher temperatures leading to lower activity of the recaptured pike. The effects, however, were transitory and not detectable after 48-h post-release. These findings indicate that pike are relatively resilient to handling and quickly resume pre-handling activity...

  12. Effect of nodal positions, seasonal variations, shoot clump and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-07

    May 7, 2014 ... from M/S Shidh Seeds Sales Corporation, Dehradun, India. After removal ... the responsive optimal media for observing their effect on shoot multiplication ..... shoots/ clump size in relation with shoot numbers and shoot length.

  13. The position effect and gene theory in the studies of Soviet geneticists in the 1930s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panshin, I.B. [Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-01

    An overview of the studies performed by Soviet geneticists in the 1930s in the field of gene position effect is presented. Evidence of this phenomenon, the role of heterochromatin in the position effect, and the influence of gene position on mutability are discussed. 45 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Hall-effect thruster--Cathode coupling: The effect of cathode position and magnetic field topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Jason D.

    2009-12-01

    Hall-effect thruster (HET) cathodes are responsible for the generation of the free electrons necessary to initiate and sustain the main plasma discharge and to neutralize the ion beam. The position of the cathode relative to the thruster strongly affects the efficiency of thrust generation. However, the mechanisms by which the position affects the efficiency are not well understood. This dissertation explores the effect of cathode position on HET efficiency. Magnetic field topology is shown to play an important role in the coupling between the cathode plasma and the main discharge plasma. The position of the cathode within the magnetic field affects the ion beam and the plasma properties of the near-field plume, which explains the changes in efficiency of the thruster. Several experiments were conducted which explored the changes of efficiency arising from changes in cathode coupling. In each experiment, the thrust, discharge current, and cathode coupling voltage were monitored while changes in the independent variables of cathode position, cathode mass flow and magnetic field topology were made. From the telemetry data, the efficiency of the HET thrust generation was calculated. Furthermore, several ion beam and plasma properties were measured including ion energy distribution, beam current density profile, near-field plasma potential, electron temperature, and electron density. The ion beam data show how the independent variables affected the quality of ion beam and therefore the efficiency of thrust generation. The measurements of near-field plasma properties partially explain how the changes in ion beam quality arise. The results of the experiments show that cathode position, mass flow, and field topology affect several aspects of the HET operation, especially beam divergence and voltage utilization efficiencies. Furthermore, the experiments show that magnetic field topology is important in the cathode coupling process. In particular, the magnetic field

  15. Evaluating the effectiveness of brand-positioning strategies from a consumer perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Christoph; Diamantopoulos, Adamantios

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of the paper is to explore empirically the overall relative effectiveness of alternative positioning strategies from a consumer perspective. Design/methodology/approach - Two studies (within- and between-subjects design) are conducted aimed at evaluating the positioning...... of positioning strategy used affects the positioning success of a brand. More specifically, the study confirms normative arguments about the overall relative effectiveness of main positioning strategies by revealing that benefit-based positioning and surrogate (user) positioning generally outperform feature...... - The findings should guide brand managers in selecting the most appropriate positioning strategies for their brands in high-involvement markets such as the automobile market. Originality/value - The study sheds initial light on the overall relative effectiveness of major positioning strategies. The study...

  16. Positive effects of electronic patient records on three clinical activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    in mental workload. The physician in charge also experienced increased clarity about the importance of and responsibilities for work tasks, and reduced mental workload during ward rounds. During nursing handovers the nurses experienced fewer missing pieces of information and fewer messages to pass on after...... Purpose: To investigate the effects of a fully functional electronic patient record (EPR) system on clinicians' work during team conferences, ward rounds, and nursing handovers. Method: In collaboration with clinicians an EPR system was configured for a stroke unit and in trial use for five days...... are not to be expected to be in operational use in Denmark until at least two years from now. The EPR system was evaluated with respect to its effects on clinicians' mental workload, overview, and need for exchanging information. Effects were measured by comparing the use of electronic records with the use of paper...

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  19. Complete Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  2. Effectiveness of infliximab in refractory FDG PET-positive sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorselaars, Adriane D M; Crommelin, Heleen A; Deneer, Vera H M; Meek, Bob; Claessen, Anke M E; Keijsers, Ruth G M; van Moorsel, Coline H M; Grutters, Jan C

    2015-07-01

    Inconclusive evidence for the efficacy of infliximab in sarcoidosis hinders the global use of this potentially beneficial drug. To study infliximab efficacy in a clinical setting, we performed a prospective open-label trial in patients refractory to conventional treatment. Patients (n=56) received eight infusions of 5 mg·kg(-1) infliximab. Pulmonary function, disease activity measured by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) by positron emission tomography (PET) and quality of life were part of the clinical work-up. Infliximab levels were measured before every infusion. After 26 weeks of infliximab treatment, mean improvement in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 6.6% predicted (p=0.0007), whereas in the 6 months before start of treatment, lung function decreased. Maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) of pulmonary parenchyma on (18)F-FDG PET decreased by 3.93 (pinfliximab trough level (mean 18.0 µg·mL(-1)) and initial response was found. In conclusion, infliximab causes significant improvement in FVC in refractory (18)F-FDG PET positive sarcoidosis. Especially in pulmonary disease, high (18)F-FDG PET SUVmax values at treatment initiation predict clinically relevant lung function improvement. These results suggest that inclusion of (18)F-FDG PET is useful in therapeutic decision-making in complex sarcoidosis.

  3. Effects of positive impression management on the Psychopathic Personality Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, J F; Buffington, J K; Tomicic, T L; Riley, B D

    2001-06-01

    The Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; S. O. Lilienfeld & B. P. Andrews, 1996) is a self-report test that has shown considerable promise as a screening measure for psychopathy. A current limitation of the PPI is that no data exist regarding the impact of response sets such as positive impression management. Although the PPI contains a validity scale (Unlikely Virtues) designed to identify response biases such as "faking good," its utility has not yet been assessed. In this study a repeated measures analogue design was employed in which 186 respondents completed the PPI both under standard conditions and with specific instructions to create a favorable impression of themselves. In the "fake good" condition, participants were able to appear significantly less psychopathic, with those who obtained higher scores in the standard instruction condition showing the largest decreases in their PPI scores. Receiver Operating Characteristic analyses indicated that, although the Unlikely Virtues scale significantly differentiated between "fake good" and honest protocols (area under the curve = .73), a considerable number of misclassifications occurred. The clinical and forensic implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Diameter and position effect determination of diaphragm on hybrid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingliang; Tian, Hui; Cai, Guobiao

    2016-09-01

    This study is aimed to determine and better reveal the mixture enhancement and regression rate distribution of hybrid rocket motor with diaphragm by numerical approach. A numerical model based on the computational fluid dynamics software is built to simulate the flow and combustion inside the motor. Four firing tests of the motor, including one without diaphragm and three with diaphragm, are conducted on a standard experimental system and also used as a reference for numerical simulation, the consistency between the simulation and experiment demonstrates that the numerical approach is an effective method to study the diaphragm effect on the motor performance. The flow field characteristic and regression rate distribution inside the hybrid rocket motor are then calculated to analyze the effect of position and diameter of the diaphragm. The results indicate that the diaphragm almost have no effect on the regression rate before it. However, the regression rate after the diaphragm has a strong dependence on the position and diameter of the diaphragm. As the diameter decreases and the position moves backward, the regression rate increases larger and larger, this is mainly due to the augmentation of the eddy generated by the diaphragm, which enhances the heat feedback transferred to the grain surface. When the diameter of diaphragm located at middle of grain decreases from 50 mm to 20 mm, regression rate is increased from 0.30 mm/s to 0.57 mm/s. The use of the diaphragm does cause a combustion efficiency improvement; the maximum combustion efficiency is enhanced to 98.9% from lower than 90% of the motor with no diaphragm. The increasing amplitude displays a square relation with the diameter decrease, since the entrainment of the eddy make the reactants mix sufficiently to release more energy inside the motor.

  5. Using Mixture Regression to Identify Varying Effects: A Demonstration with Paternal Incarceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, W. Justin; Pleck, Joseph; McBride, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used techniques for identifying the varying effects of stressors involve testing moderator effects via interaction terms in regression or multiple-group analysis in structural equation modeling. The authors present mixture regression as an alternative approach. In contrast to more widely used approaches, mixture regression…

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Reading Programs: A Demonstration with Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Fiona M.; Kieffer, Michael J.; Shand, Robert; Pan, Yilin; Cheng, Henan; Levin, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the value of cost-effectiveness analysis for evaluation and decision making with respect to educational programs and discuss its application to early reading interventions. We describe the conditions for a rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis and illustrate the challenges of applying the method in practice, providing examples of programs…

  7. GABAB Receptor-Positive Modulators: Enhancement of GABAB Receptor Agonist Effects In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo effects of GABAB receptor-positive modulators suggest that they have therapeutic potential for treating central nervous system disorders such as anxiety, depression, and drug abuse. Although these effects generally are thought to be mediated by positive modulation of GABAB receptors, such modulation has been examined primarily in vitro. The present study was aimed at further examining the in vivo positive modulatory properties of the GABAB receptor-positive modulators, 2,6-di-tert-but...

  8. The effect of ozone on tannery wastewater biological treatment at demonstrative scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iaconi, Claudio; Ramadori, Roberto; Lopez, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports the results obtained during an investigation aimed at transferring to the demonstrative scale an aerobic granular biomass system (SBBGR--Sequencing Batch Biofilter Granular Reactor) integrated with ozonation for the efficient treatment of tannery wastewater. The results show that the integrated process was able to achieve high removal efficiencies for COD, TSS, TKN, surfactants and colour with residual concentrations much lower than the current discharge limits. Furthermore, the process was characterised by a very low sludge production (i.e., 0.1 kg dry sludge/m(3) of treated wastewater) with interesting repercussions on treatment costs (about 1 euro per m(3) of wastewater).

  9. Positive effects of family dinner are undone by television viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Edmunds, Lynn S; Dennison, Barbara A

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to test the independent associations of eating dinner as a family and having the television on during dinner with child feeding behaviors. Parents/guardians of children participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children in New York state were surveyed (n=1,336). Main outcome variables were frequencies of serving fruits, vegetables, and milk. Main exposure variables were the number of days per week the family ate dinner together and the number of days per week the television was on during dinner. Multiple logistic regressions assessed the association between the exposure variables and each of the main outcome measures controlling for race/ethnicity and parental educational attainment. Each night the family ate dinner together was positively associated with serving fruits (odds ratio [OR]=1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07 to 1.21) or vegetables (OR=1.15, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.23). Serving fruits (OR= 0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.99) or vegetables (OR=0.94, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.98) decreased with each night the television was on during dinner. Neither family dinner nor television on during dinner was significantly associated with serving milk. Family dinners and dinners without television on are independent predictors of servings of fruits or vegetables offered to preschool children. Because dietary habits and preferences are established early in life, parents should be counseled to promote family meal environments that support healthful eating.

  10. The Effectiveness of Positive Feedback in Teaching Speaking Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Muhsin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed at finding out the students’ responses and perceptions toward the corrective feedback given in teaching speaking activity. The research applied quantitative methods by sending questionnaires to 70 students. The students’ responses and perceptions for teacher’s corrective feedback indicated that students think their spoken error should be corrected. In addition, the students want their teacher focus more on. They also agree if their friends should correct their error. The most popular corrective feedbacks in teaching speaking are the explicit correction, elicitation, and repetition. They have an effective function in detecting the students’ mispronunciation and low accuracy and fluency. The other corrective feedback like implicit correction, recast, clarification request, and metalinguistic feedback are not favored because the percentage is lower than other corrective feedback. It indicates that not all of corrective feedback is effectively used in speaking.

  11. The Positive Effects of Parentification: An Exploratory Study among Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ruben C.W. van der Mijl; Vingerhoets, Ad J. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the relationship between parentification and choice of education: Psychology versus humanities. Additionally, we investigated the association between parentification, on the one hand, and cognitive and affective empathy as well as resilience, on the other. The rational for this study was the increasing evidence that parentification may not only induce several possible adverse effects but that it can also facilitate the development of some specific pos...

  12. Demonstration of a quasi-scalar angular Goos-Hänchen effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merano, M; Hermosa, N; Aiello, A; Woerdman, J P

    2010-11-01

    We show experimentally that the angular Goos-Hänchen (GH) effect can be easily observed, also without employing its resonant enhancement at Brewster incidence. An s-polarized beam was used to decouple the polarization from the propagation dynamics of the beam. We found that, in this case, the angular GH effect can be strongly enhanced by increasing the angular aperture of the Gaussian beam. Our experiments suggest a route toward observing the angular GH effect for true scalar waves, such as acoustic waves and quantum matter waves.

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  16. Experimental demonstration of programmable multi-functional spin logic cell based on spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Wan, C. H.; Yuan, Z. H.; Fang, C.; Kong, W. J.; Wu, H.; Zhang, Q. T.; Tao, B. S.; Han, X. F.

    2017-04-01

    Confronting with the gigantic volume of data produced every day, raising integration density by reducing the size of devices becomes harder and harder to meet the ever-increasing demand for high-performance computers. One feasible path is to actualize more logic functions in one cell. In this respect, we experimentally demonstrate a prototype spin-orbit torque based spin logic cell integrated with five frequently used logic functions (AND, OR, NOT, NAND and NOR). The cell can be easily programmed and reprogrammed to perform desired function. Furthermore, the information stored in cells is symmetry-protected, making it possible to expand into logic gate array where the cell can be manipulated one by one without changing the information of other undesired cells. This work provides a prospective example of multi-functional spin logic cell with reprogrammability and nonvolatility, which will advance the application of spin logic devices.

  17. Demonstration of a novel dispersive spectral splitting optical element for cost- effective photovoltaic conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Maragliano, Carlo; Bronzoni, Matteo; Rampino, Stefano; Fitzgerald, Eugene A; Chiesa, Matteo; Stefancich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In this letter we report the preliminary validation of a low-cost paradigm for photovoltaic power generation that utilizes a prismatic Fresnel-like lens to simultaneously concentrate and separate sunlight into continuous laterally spaced spectral bands, which are then fed into spectrally matched single-junction photovoltaic cells. A prismatic lens was designed using geometric optics and the dispersive properties of the employed material, and its performance was simulated with a ray- tracing software. After device optimization, it was fabricated by injection molding, suitable for large-scale mass production. We report an average optical transmittance of ~ 90% over the VNIR range with spectral separation in excellent agreement with our simulations. Finally, two prototype systems were tested: one with GaAsP and c-Si photovoltaic devices and one with a pair of copper indium gallium selenide based solar cells. The systems demonstrated an increase in peak electrical power output of 51% and 64% respectively under wh...

  18. Experimental Demonstration of the Stabilizing Effect of Dielectric Coatings on Magnetically Accelerated Imploding Metallic Liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, T J; Peterson, K J; Yu, E P; McBride, R D; Sinars, D B; Gomez, M R; Jennings, C A; Martin, M R; Rosenthal, S E; Schroen, D G; Sefkow, A B; Slutz, S A; Tomlinson, K; Vesey, R A

    2016-02-12

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70  μm of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR=Rin,0/Rin(z,t)] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. The inner-wall radius Rin(z,t) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130  μm over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  19. A Laboratory to Demonstrate the Effect of Thermal History on Semicrystalline Polymers Using Rapid Scanning Rate Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Kessler, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of semicrystalline polymers is essential for materials scientists and engineers. In this article, we describe a materials science laboratory to demonstrate the effect of parameters such as heating rate and isothermal annealing conditions on the thermal behavior of…

  20. A Laboratory to Demonstrate the Effect of Thermal History on Semicrystalline Polymers Using Rapid Scanning Rate Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Kessler, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of semicrystalline polymers is essential for materials scientists and engineers. In this article, we describe a materials science laboratory to demonstrate the effect of parameters such as heating rate and isothermal annealing conditions on the thermal behavior of…

  1. Light and Plants. A Series of Experiments Demonstrating Light Effects on Seed Germination, Plant Growth, and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, R. J.; And Others

    A brief summary of the effects of light on plant germination, growth and development, including photoperiodism and pigment formation, introduces 18 experiments and demonstrations which illustrate aspects of these effects. Detailed procedures for each exercise are given, the expected results outlined, and possible sources of difficulty discussed.…

  2. Investigating the effects of strategic positioning for development of modern banking services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Anvar Keivi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, there have been tremendous changes on banking services and many bank customers are able to do their daily banking activities using recent advances of technology such as internet banking, telephone banking, etc. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation on the effects of strategic positioning for development of modern banking services. The proposed study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale and distributes it among some 385 randomly selected people who live in Tehran in 2013. The questionnaire consists of seven factors including property positioning, advantage positioning, consumer positioning, user positioning, competitive advantage positioning, quality positioning and merchandise category positioning. Using Spearman correlation as well as stepwise regression technique, the study has determined positive and meaningful relationships between different components of strategy positioning development of modern banking services.

  3. [Pyoderma gangrenosum--positive effect of cyclosporin A therapy ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauze, Ewa; Lis, Anna; Kamińska-Budzińska, Grazyna; Wygledowska-Kania, Mariola; Pierzchała, Ewa; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2002-10-01

    Although pyoderma gangrenosum is a disorder known since over 70 years, it still remains a diagnostic and therapeutic problem. We describe three subjects with pyoderma gangrenosum; two were females, one was male, one case was associated with colitis ulcerosa, two were without any related disorders. Histopathologic examinations supported the diagnosis in all cases. In spite of intensive topical and systemic treatment with corticosteroids, Dapsone, Clofazimine, no sufficient effects were achieved. Cyclosporin A introduced in the dose of 5 mg/kg/d resulted in dramatic response and complete remission. Serum CyA levels, biochemical parameters of liver and kidney function, blood pressure were monitored during the therapy. No adverse events due to Cyclosporin A were observed.

  4. Evaluating the Separate and Combined Effects of Positive and Negative Reinforcement on Task Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouxsein, Kelly J.; Roane, Henry S.; Harper, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Positive and negative reinforcement are effective for treating escape-maintained destructive behavior. The current study evaluated the separate and combined effects of these contingencies to increase task compliance. Results showed that a combination of positive and negative reinforcement was most effective for increasing compliance. (Contains 1…

  5. EVALUATING THE SEPARATE AND COMBINED EFFECTS OF POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE REINFORCEMENT ON TASK COMPLIANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Bouxsein, Kelly J; Roane, Henry S; Harper, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Positive and negative reinforcement are effective for treating escape-maintained destructive behavior. The current study evaluated the separate and combined effects of these contingencies to increase task compliance. Results showed that a combination of positive and negative reinforcement was most effective for increasing compliance.

  6. Experimental Demonstration of Electromagnetic Induced Transparency and Dispersion Effects in Cs Atom Vapour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊香; 董瑞芳; 常宏; 谢常德; 彭忻墀; 肖敏

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the electromagnetically induced transparency and dispersion of a A-type three-level atomic system are experimentally measured with a vapour cell of Cs atoms. The steep dispersion at low absorption is observed. Thus a small group velocity for the probe beam is inferred from the measured dispersion curve.

  7. Demonstrating the Effectiveness of an Integrated and Intensive Research Methods and Statistics Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliske, Rebecca M.; Caldwell, Tracy L.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We developed a two-semester series of intensive (six-contact hours per week) behavioral research methods courses with an integrated statistics curriculum. Our approach includes the use of team-based learning, authentic projects, and Excel and SPSS. We assessed the effectiveness of our approach by examining our students' content area scores on the…

  8. An Effective and Economical Photometer for Classroom Demonstrations and Laboratory Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Anthony E.; Young, Colin C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple, effective, and inexpensive spectrophotometer design that may be used in a stand-alone teaching module, and to enhance various unit operations experiments. The spectrophotometers described performed as well as a commercial option at estimating cell concentration in a bioreactor and tracking a first-order reaction. Such devices…

  9. Demonstrating the Effectiveness of an Integrated and Intensive Research Methods and Statistics Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliske, Rebecca M.; Caldwell, Tracy L.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We developed a two-semester series of intensive (six-contact hours per week) behavioral research methods courses with an integrated statistics curriculum. Our approach includes the use of team-based learning, authentic projects, and Excel and SPSS. We assessed the effectiveness of our approach by examining our students' content area scores on the…

  10. Age-related positivity effects and autobiographical memory detail: evidence from a past/future source memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, David A; Korthauer, Laura E; McDonough, Ian M; Teshale, Salom; Johnson, Elizabeth L

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated whether the age-related positivity effect strengthens specific event details in autobiographical memory. Participants retrieved past events or imagined future events in response to neutral or emotional cue words. Older adults rated each kind of event more positively than younger adults, demonstrating an age-related positivity effect. We next administered a source memory test. Participants were given the same cue words and tried to retrieve the previously generated event and its source (past or future). Accuracy on this source test should depend on the recollection of specific details about the earlier generated events, providing a more objective measure of those details than subjective ratings. We found that source accuracy was greater for positive than negative future events in both age groups, suggesting that positive future events were more detailed. In contrast, valence did not affect source accuracy for past events in either age group, suggesting that positive and negative past events were equally detailed. Although ageing can bias people to focus on positive aspects of experience, this bias does not appear to strengthen the availability of details for positive relative to negative past events.

  11. Psychotherapeutical effects of stimulate positive connotation in the increase of forgiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Fernando López Pell

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents different aspects that have been related to the aptitude to forgive, emphasizing its importance for the psychotherapeutic practice in order to promote an increase of such capacity. Existing empirical evidence tends to relate forgiveness to emotional, physical and psychological well-being of the persons, and shows that the way of providing sense to the experiences influences the process of forgiveness. An alternative to increase the aptitude to forgive is proposed and results of an experimental study with 60 patients demonstrate the psychotherapeutic effects of stimulating positive connotation in the increase of forgiveness. The independent variable was the type of psychotherapeutic approach applied and the dependant variables were measured with the Aptitude to Forgive Scale (CAPER that evaluates the general predisposition of a subject to forgive, across four independent constructs: a Self, b Others, c Situation, and d Beliefs.

  12. Baca geothermal demonstration project baseline ecosystem studies of cooling tower emission effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, P.; Osterling, R.; Price, D.; Westermeier, J.

    1981-03-01

    Results of baseline studies for boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine in vegetation and soil near the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant are provided for the 1980 sampling season. Preliminary results of visual vegetation assessments and population density studies of soil invertebrate fauna are also provided. Foliage samples were collected for chemical analysis on a total of 17 plots on 5 transects. Two to five plant species were sampled at each plot. Samples were collected in June-July and September. Soil samples were collected at each plot during September. Visual vegetation inspections were conducted along each transect. Eighty-eight soil samples were collected for soil invertebrate studies. Boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine levels in vegetation were within normal range for natural vegetation and crops. Concentrations of soil arsenic and mercury were comparable to foliage concentrations. Boron concentrations were lower in soil than in foliage, whereas soil fluorine concentrations were considerably higher than foliage concentrations. With the exception of heavy insect infestations in June-July, no vegetation abnormalities were noted. Preliminary soil invertebrate analysis indicated an overall arthropod density of approximately 100,000/m/sup 2/ which appears within the normal range encountered in forest and meadow soil.

  13. Explicit demonstration of the role of Marangoni effect in the breakup of nanoscale liquid filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seric, Ivana; Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Hartnett, Chris; Fowlkes, Jason; Rack, Philip; Kondic, Lou

    2016-11-01

    We consider a breakup of bi-metal filaments deposited on a solid substrate. These filaments are exposed to laser irradiation and, while in the liquid phase, evolve by a process resembling breakup of a liquid jet governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The novel element is that the Marangoni effect, resulting from a different surface tension of the two metals from which the filament is built, is crucial in understanding the instability development. In particular, Marangoni effect may lead to the inversion of the breakup process, producing droplets at the locations where according to the Rayleigh-Plateau theory dry spots would be expected. We present experimental results carried out with Cu-Ni filaments, as well as direct numerical simulations based on a novel algorithm that includes variable surface tension in a Volume-of-Fluid based Navier-Stokes solver. These results suggest the possibility of using Marangoni effect for the purpose of self- and directed-assembly on the nanoscale. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET-1604351.

  14. The Upward Spiral of Adolescents' Positive School Experiences and Happiness: Investigating Reciprocal Effects over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglbauer, Barbara; Gnambs, Timo; Gamsjager, Manuela; Batinic, Bernad

    2013-01-01

    In line with self-determination theory and Fredrickson's (2001) broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, this study adopts a positive perspective on students' school experiences and their general psychological functioning. The reciprocal effects of positive school experiences and happiness, a dimension of affective well-being, are examined…

  15. The Upward Spiral of Adolescents' Positive School Experiences and Happiness: Investigating Reciprocal Effects over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglbauer, Barbara; Gnambs, Timo; Gamsjager, Manuela; Batinic, Bernad

    2013-01-01

    In line with self-determination theory and Fredrickson's (2001) broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, this study adopts a positive perspective on students' school experiences and their general psychological functioning. The reciprocal effects of positive school experiences and happiness, a dimension of affective well-being, are examined…

  16. Effect of head position on cephalometric evaluation of the soft-tissue facial profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, R.C.; Sanderink, G.C.H.; Berkhout, W.E.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: During a cone beam CT scan, the patient is in an upright or supine position. This position depends on the brand and type of the scanner. The aims of this study are: (1) to investigate if the head position has an effect on cephalometric evaluation of the soft-tissue facial profile, compar

  17. Investigating the effects of tea, water and a positive affect induction on mood and creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einöther, S.J.L.; Baas, M.; Rowson, M.; Giesbrecht, T.

    2015-01-01

    Positive affect has been shown to be predictive of improved creativity. This study investigated the immediate effect of the tea experience on positive affect and creativity, compared to both a neutral and positive control condition. Regular tea drinkers (N = 150) were allocated to three conditions:

  18. Sentence-Position Effects on Children's Perception and Production of English Third Person Singular "-s"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundara, Megha; Demuth, Katherine; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Two-year-olds produce third person singular "-s" more accurately on verbs in sentence-final position as compared with verbs in sentence-medial position. This study was designed to determine whether these sentence-position effects can be explained by perceptual factors. Method: For this purpose, the authors compared 22- and 27-month-olds'…

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  20. ICT Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Bay, Gina

    In this demonstration we present and discuss two interrelated on-line learning resources aimed at supporting international students at Danish universities in building study skills (the Study Metro) and avoiding plagiarism (Stopplagiarism). We emphasize the necessity of designing online learning r...

  1. The Effect of Cervical Stabilizing Exercises in the Standing Position and the Supine Position on Deep Neck Muscle Strength and Endurance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    JINYEOL JEON; SUNGBUM JU; HYUNJA JEONG

    2012-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of cervical stabilizing exercises in the standing position and the supine position on the strength and endurance of deep neck muscles (DNM). [Subjects...

  2. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  3. The environmental virtual observatory pilot (EVOp): a cloud solution demonstrating effective science for efficient decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, R. J.; Emmett, B.; McDonald, A.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental managers and policy makers face a challenging future trying to accommodate growing expectations of environmental well-being, while subject to maturing regulation, constrained budgets and a public scrutiny that expects easier and more meaningful access to data and decision logic. To support such a challenge requires new tools and new approaches. The EVOp is an initiative from the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) designed to deliver proof of concept for these new tools and approaches. A series of exemplar 'big catchment science questions' are posed and the prospects for their solution are assessed. These are then used to develop cloud solutions for serving data, models, visualisation and analysis tools to scientists, regulators, private companies and the public, all of whom have different expectations of what environmental information is important. Approaches are tested regularly with users using SCRUM. The VO vision encompasses seven key ambitions: i. being driven by the need to contribute to the solution of major environmental issues that impinge on, or link to, catchment science ii. having the flexibility and adaptability to address future problems not yet defined or fully clarified iii. being able to communicate issues and solutions to a range of audiences iv. supporting easy access by a variety of users v. drawing meaningful information from data and models and identifying the constraints on application in terms of errors, uncertainties, etc vi. adding value and cost effectiveness to current investigations by supporting transfer and scale adjustment thus limiting the repetition of expensive field monitoring addressing essentially the same issues in varying locations vii. promoting effective interfacing of robust science with a variety of end users by using terminology or measures familiar to the user (or required by regulation), including financial and carbon accounting, whole life or fixed period costing, risk as probability or as

  4. Evaluating the effectiveness of brand-positioning strategies from a consumer perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Christoph; Diamantopoulos, Adamantios

    2010-01-01

    . The paper introduces an alternative approach to measure the effectiveness of positioning strategies of real brands. Moreover, the results of the paper show empirically that measuring positioning effectiveness must extend beyond capturing unidimensional brand attitude measures. Practical implications...... - The findings should guide brand managers in selecting the most appropriate positioning strategies for their brands in high-involvement markets such as the automobile market. Originality/value - The study sheds initial light on the overall relative effectiveness of major positioning strategies. The study......Purpose - The purpose of the paper is to explore empirically the overall relative effectiveness of alternative positioning strategies from a consumer perspective. Design/methodology/approach - Two studies (within- and between-subjects design) are conducted aimed at evaluating the positioning...

  5. Experimental Demonstration of Microwave Signal/Electric Thruster Plasma Interaction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Afroz J.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Curran, Frank M.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was designed and conducted in the Electric Propulsion Laboratory of NASA Lewis Research Center to assess the impact of ion thruster exhaust plasma plume on electromagnetic signal propagation. A microwave transmission experiment was set up inside the propulsion test bed using a pair of broadband horn antennas and a 30 cm 2.3 kW ion thruster. Frequency of signal propagation covered from 6.5 to 18 GHz range. The stainless steel test bed when enclosed can be depressurized to simulate a near vacuum environment. A pulsed CW system with gating hardware was utilized to eliminate multiple chamber reflections from the test signal. Microwave signal was transmitted and received between the two hours when the thruster was operating at a given power level in such a way that the signal propagation path crossed directly through the plume volume. Signal attenuation and phase shift due to the plume was measured for the entire frequency band. Results for this worst case configuration simulation indicate that the effects of the ion thruster plume on microwave signals is a negligible attenuation (within 0.15 dB) and a small phase shift (within 8 deg.). This paper describes the detailed experiment and presents some of the results.

  6. Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) in Moroccan Jews: Demonstration of a founder effect by extened haplotype analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.; Helling, S.; Prosen, L.; Kastner, D.L.; Gruberg, L.; Pras, M. (Heller Institute for Medical Research, Tel-Hashomer (Israel))

    1993-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease causing attacks of fever and serositis. The FMF gene (designated MEF') is on 16p, with the gene order 16 cen-D16S80-MEF-D16S94-D16S283-D16S291-16pter. Here the authors report the association of FMF susceptibility with alleles at D16S94, D16S283, and D16S291 among 31 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families 14 Moroccan families. For the non-Moroccans, only the allelic association at D16S94 approached statistical significance. Haplotype analysis showed that 18/25 Moroccan FMF chromosomes, versus 0/21 noncarrier chromosomes, bore a specific haplotype for D16S94-D16S283-D16S291. Among non-Moroccans this haplotype was present in 6/26 FMF chromosomes versus 1/28 controls. Both groups of families are largely descended from Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition. The strong haplotype association seen among the Moroccans is most likely a founder effect, given the recent origin and genetic isolation of the Moroccan Jewish community. The lowest haplotype frequency among non-Moroccan carriers may reflect differences both in history and in population genetics. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Effect of inhaled iloprost on the exercise function of Fontan patients: a demonstration of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jonathan; Ubeda-Tikkanen, Ana; Clair, Mathieu; Fernandes, Susan M; Graham, Dionne A; Milliren, Carly E; Daly, Kevin P; Mullen, Mary P; Landzberg, Michael J

    2013-10-03

    Exercise capacity following Fontan surgery is often depressed. An inability to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance appropriately during exercise may contribute to this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to determine whether administration of iloprost, a selective pulmonary vasodilator, would improve exercise function after Fontan procedure. Double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled, crossover trial. Patients performed two cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPX) separated by iloprost or placebo) was administered before each CPX. 18 patients aged 12-49 (median 17) years were recruited. Mild throat discomfort developed in 10/18 patients during iloprost administration; all but 1 were able to complete treatment. No symptoms developed during placebo treatments (piloprost (median increase 1.2 ml/beat; piloprost. Only 3/6 patients with peak VO2 >30 ml/kg/min had higher peak VO2 following iloprost (pIloprost improves the peak oxygen pulse and peak VO2 of patients with Fontan physiology and appears to be particularly beneficial among patients with impaired exercise function. Treatment is associated with minor side effects. These findings support the concept of pulmonary vasodilator therapy in Fontan patients with limited functional capacity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effects of a Demonstration School Program on Nuclear Energy for Elementary School Students in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, EunOk; Lee, Seung Koo; Choi, Yoon Seok [Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Advancing nuclear energy and radiation technology to drive the country forward should be based on the understanding and acceptance of the public. Korea has provided numerous types of information to increase public acceptance of nuclear energy, but it has been difficult to change adults’ perceptions and increase their acceptance of nuclear energy. As a result, social costs are rising. After a pilot program of 13 classes on understanding nuclear energy and radiation offered to elementary school students, who were expected to easily change their perceptions and to experience a relatively greater educational effect, this study analyzed changes to knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding nuclear energy. In addition, this program was the first curriculum of its kind used as a step to lay the groundwork for offering it nationally in the free semester system. Therefore, the study analyzed its appropriateness to educational purposes. A lack of research and practice on communication strategies could be responsible for the situation in Korea of low support for nuclear energy because Korea does not have public understanding even though it is a nuclear energy exporter. If Korea implemented strategic communications from this point, such efforts could reduce unnecessary social costs.

  9. Influence of oxygen tension of the metabolism of vascular smooth muscle: demonstration of a Pasteur effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnqvist, H J; Lundholm, L

    1976-01-01

    The influence of variations of oxygen tension on the metabolism of bovine mesenteric arteries was studied in vitro. Glucose uptake, lactate production, glycogen content, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CrP) and incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein were determined. The mesenteric arteries were suspended in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer which was aerated with a gas mixture containing 5% CO2,O-95% O2 and N2 to 100%. Reduction of the O2 concentration of the gas phase from 95-20% resulted in little metabolic change. A further reduction from 20-0% O2 increased the lactate production 4-fold, indicating a marked Pasteur effect. At 0% O2 the glucose uptake was moderately increased and the glycogen content was decreased. The tissue level of CrP was reduced at a low oxygen tension and at 0% O2 the ATP content was also lowered. The incorporation of leucine into proteins was reduced at 0% O2.

  10. The effect of brand positioning on costumer loyalty: An empirical study of the Iberdrola case.

    OpenAIRE

    VANESSA APAOLAZA IBÁÑEZ; PATRICK HARTMANN; FCO. JAVIER FORCADA SAINZ

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses the effect of brand positioning on customer loyalty. Based on data of a survey of clients of the energy utility Iberdrola, the study measures the loyalty effect of the company’s perceived positioningFor this purpose, a positioning model of the company and its main competitors is developed, as well as a set of loyalty indicators of the company’s clients. The regression analysis show a significant effect of the dimensions of the company’s positioning on the set of loyalty in...

  11. Effective connectivity analysis demonstrates involvement of premotor cortex during speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osnes, Berge; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Specht, Karsten

    2011-02-01

    Several reports of premotor cortex involvement in speech perception have been put forward. Still, the functional role of premotor cortex is under debate. In order to investigate the functional role of premotor cortex, we presented parametrically varied speech stimuli in both a behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. White noise was transformed over seven distinct steps into a speech sound and presented to the participants in a randomized order. As control condition served the same transformation from white noise into a music instrument sound. The fMRI data were modelled with Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) where the effective connectivity between Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale, superior temporal sulcus and premotor cortex were tested. The fMRI results revealed a graded increase in activation in the left superior temporal sulcus. Premotor cortex activity was only present at an intermediate step when the speech sounds became identifiable but were still distorted but was not present when the speech sounds were clearly perceivable. A Bayesian model selection procedure favored a model that contained significant interconnections between Heschl's gyrus, planum temporal, and superior temporal sulcus when processing speech sounds. In addition, bidirectional connections between premotor cortex and superior temporal sulcus and from planum temporale to premotor cortex were significant. Processing non-speech sounds initiated no significant connections to premotor cortex. Since the highest level of motor activity was observed only when processing identifiable sounds with incomplete phonological information, it is concluded that premotor cortex is not generally necessary for speech perception but may facilitate interpreting a sound as speech when the acoustic input is sparse.

  12. The positive effects of Midazolam on functional activity of white rat brain cells in conditions of halothane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadachkoria, Z; Dzidziguri, L; Bakuradze, E; Dzidziguri, D

    2009-05-01

    For the elimination of postoperative complications, which are evident in infants with congenital palatine and upper lip cleft after halothane anesthesia during standard premedication (Atropine, Dimedrol) the usage of agents of benzodiazepine group with anti-hypoxic effects is advised. The latter may modulate the blocked ion channels by neuromediators, which are activated by GABA and GABA receptor function. The neuro-protective ability of halothane is demonstrated. To reveal the mechanisms of positive effects using benzodiazepine group for premedication we have investigated the effects of midazolam of brain cell functional activity of experimental animals (white rats) in conditions of halothane anesthesia. For the estimation of white rat brain cells functional activity the nuclear transcriptional activity was studied (based on the intensity of [14C]-UTF inclusion), also the glutamic acid decarboxilaze activity (GAD65/67) using immunohistochemistry. It is estimated that halothane inhibits the transcription in rat brain cells. During midazolam premedication the halothane inhibitory effect on RNA synthesis is not revealed. After an hour of pseudo-operation halothane also induces proved decrease of quantity of GAD65/67 positive cells in CA3 hippocampal field. At the same time the quantity of similar cells are increased in CA1 field. The increase of GAD65/67 positive cells in CA1 is more evident during midazolam premedication. Based on the data received we can conclude that the positive effect of midazolam results in increase of GAD65/67 positive cells in CA1 hippocampal field.

  13. Earth tide effects on kinematic/static GPS positioning in Denmark and Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.C.; Knudsen, Per

    2000-01-01

    and the position of reference station. With a baseline less than 80 km, the difference of the Earth tide effects could reach more than 5 mm. So, in precise applications of GPS positioning, the Earth tide effect has to be taken into account even for a relative small local GPS network. Several examples are given...

  14. Analysing Item Position Effects due to Test Booklet Design within Large-Scale Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensinn, Christine; Kubinger, Klaus D.; Reif, Manuel; Schleicher, Eva; Khorramdel, Lale

    2011-01-01

    For large-scale assessments, usually booklet designs administering the same item at different positions within a booklet are used. Therefore, the occurrence of position effects influencing the difficulty of the item is a crucial issue. Not taking learning or fatigue effects into account would result in a bias of estimated item difficulty. The…

  15. Effect of hepatitis B immunisation in newborn infants of mothers positive for hepatitis B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Chuanfang; Gong, Yan; Brok, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of hepatitis B vaccine and immunoglobulin in newborn infants of mothers positive for hepatitis B surface antigen.......To evaluate the effects of hepatitis B vaccine and immunoglobulin in newborn infants of mothers positive for hepatitis B surface antigen....

  16. BreastDefend enhances effect of tamoxifen in estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shujie; Castillo, Victor; Welty, Matt; Alvarado, Mark; Eliaz, Isaac; Temm, Constance J; Sandusky, George E; Sliva, Daniel

    2017-02-16

    Tamoxifen (TAM) has been widely used for the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer and its combination with other therapies is being actively investigated as a way to increase efficacy and decrease side effects. Here, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of co-treatment with TAM and BreastDefend (BD), a dietary supplement formula, in ER-positive human breast cancer. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined in ER-positive human breast cancer cells MCF-7 by MTT assay, quantitation of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments and expression of cleaved PARP, respectively. The molecular mechanism was identified using RNA microarray analysis and western blotting. Tumor tissues from xenograft mouse model were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Our data clearly demonstrate that a combination of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) with BD lead to profound inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. This effect is consistent with the regulation of apoptotic and TAM resistant genes at the transcription and translation levels. Importantly, TAM and BD co-treatment significantly enhanced apoptosis, suppressed tumor growth and reduced tumor weight in a xenograft model of human ER-positive breast cancer. BD sensitized ER-positive human breast cancer cells to 4-OHT/TAM treatment in vitro and in vivo. BreastDefend can be used in an adjuvant therapy to increase the therapeutic effect of tamoxifen in patients with ER-positive breast cancer.

  17. Design of a novel integrated position sensor based on Hall effects for linear oscillating actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyi; Yan, Liang; Jiao, Zongxia

    2015-07-01

    Linear oscillating actuator provides linear reciprocate motion directly without other auxiliary components, which is suitable for high integration applications in aerospace industry. Accurate position control is essential for linear oscillating motor and relies on concise measurement of mover position. However, most position measurements are dependent on external complicated sensors, which hinders further integration of linear oscillating actuation system. In this paper, a novel position sensing system for linear oscillating actuator based on Hall effects is proposed to achieve accurate and high integration measurement simultaneously. Axial sensing magnetic field with approximately linear relationship with position is created for direct and convenient measurement. Analytical model of sensing magnetic field is set up for optimization and validated by finite element method and experimental results. Finally, sensing magnets are integrated into motor prototype for experiments. Dynamic position results are tested in experiments and prove to be effective and accurate for position sensing with short-stroke.

  18. Positive effects of bacterial diversity on ecosystem functioning driven by complementarity effects in a bioremediation context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Venail

    Full Text Available Despite their importance as ecosystem drivers, our understanding of the influence of bacterial diversity on ecosystem functioning is limited. After identifying twelve bacterial strains from two petroleum-contaminated sites, we experimentally explored the impact of biodiversity on total density by manipulating the number of strains in culture. Irrespective of the origin of the bacteria relative to the contaminant, biodiversity positively influenced total density. However, bacteria cultured in the crude oil of their origin (autochthonous reached higher densities than bacteria from another origin (allochthonous and the relationship between diversity and density was stronger for autochthonous bacteria. By measuring the relative contribution of each strain to total density we showed that the observed positive effect of increasing diversity on total density was mainly due to positive interactions among species and not the presence of a particular species. Our findings can be explained by the complex chemical composition of crude oil and the necessity of a diverse array of organisms with complementary enzymatic capacities to achieve its degradation. The long term exposure to a contaminant may have allowed different bacteria to become adapted to the use of different fractions of the crude, resulting in higher complementarity in resource use in autochthonous bacteria compared to allochthonous ones. Our results could help improve the success of bioaugmentation as a bioremediation technique by suggesting the use of a diversified set of autochthonous organisms.

  19. Strong position-dependent effects of sequence mismatches on signal ratios measured using long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulme Helen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are an important and widely used tool. Applications include capturing genomic DNA for high-throughput sequencing in addition to the traditional monitoring of gene expression and identifying DNA copy number variations. Sequence mismatches between probe and target strands are known to affect the stability of the probe-target duplex, and hence the strength of the observed signals from microarrays. Results We describe a large-scale investigation of microarray hybridisations to murine probes with known sequence mismatches, demonstrating that the effect of mismatches is strongly position-dependent and for small numbers of sequence mismatches is correlated with the maximum length of perfectly matched probe-target duplex. Length of perfect match explained 43% of the variance in log2 signal ratios between probes with one and two mismatches. The correlation with maximum length of perfect match does not conform to expectations based on considering the effect of mismatches purely in terms of reducing the binding energy. However, it can be explained qualitatively by considering the entropic contribution to duplex stability from configurations of differing perfect match length. Conclusion The results of this study have implications in terms of array design and analysis. They highlight the significant effect that short sequence mismatches can have upon microarray hybridisation intensities even for long oligonucleotide probes. All microarray data presented in this study are available from the GEO database 1, under accession number [GEO: GSE9669

  20. The upward spiral of adolescents' positive school experiences and happiness: investigating reciprocal effects over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglbauer, Barbara; Gnambs, Timo; Gamsjäger, Manuela; Batinic, Bernad

    2013-04-01

    In line with self-determination theory and Fredrickson's (2001) broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, this study adopts a positive perspective on students' school experiences and their general psychological functioning. The reciprocal effects of positive school experiences and happiness, a dimension of affective well-being, are examined over the course of an academic year. Data were collected from 215 secondary school students at 5 measurement occasions. The results of longitudinal cross-lagged structural equation modeling support the notion of an upward spiral of positive school experiences and happiness over time. Positive school experiences had a stable lagged effect on happiness, and, in turn, happiness had a lagged effect on future positive school experiences.

  1. Effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols have many significant effects on the reactivity of oxido-reduction. The effects of chlorine content and position of chlorinated phenols on their oxidation kinetics by potassium permanganate were evaluated through different kinetics studies. Since chlorine was an electron withdrawing atom, the substitution of chlorine on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by σ-electron withdrawing conductive effect; at the same time, the substitution of chlorine at ortho or para position on the aromatic ring increased the oxidation rate constant by π-electron donating conjugative effect, and the conjugative effect could counteract the negative impact of the conductive effect to some extent. On the other hand, the substitution of chlorine at ortho position on the aromatic ring decreased the oxidation rate constant by steric hindrance effect. The oxidation rate constants of phenol and chlorinated phenols studied decreased as follow order: 4-chlorophenol>2,4-dichlorophenol>phenol>2,6-dichlorophenol.

  2. The effect of loving-kindness meditation on positive emotions: a meta-analytic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglong eZENG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been suggested that loving-kindness meditation (LKM is an effective practice for promoting positive emotions, the empirical evidence in the literature remains unclear. Here, we provide a systematic review of 24 empirical studies (N = 1759 on LKM with self-reported positive emotions. The effect of LKM on positive emotions was estimated with meta-analysis, and the influence of variations across LKM interventions was further explored with subgroup analysis and meta-regression. The meta-analysis showed that (1 medium effect sizes for LKM interventions on daily positive emotions in both wait-list controlled RCTs and non-RCT studies; and (2 small to large effect sizes for the on-going practice of LKM on immediate positive emotions across different comparisons. Further analysis showed that (1 interventions focused on loving-kindness had medium effect size, but interventions focused on compassion showed small effect sizes; (2 the length of interventions and the time spent on meditation did not influence the effect sizes, but the studies without didactic components in interventions had small effect sizes. A few individual studies reported that the nature of positive emotions and individual differences also influenced the results. In sum, LKM practice and interventions are effective in enhancing positive emotions, but more studies are needed to identify the active components of the interventions, to compare different psychological operations, and to explore the applicability in clinical populations.

  3. Effect of patient position on the lordosis and scoliosis of patients with degenerative lumbar scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Han; Li, Wei-Shi; Sun, Zhuo-Ran; Jiang, Shuai; Chen, Zhong-Qiang

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of patient positions on the lordosis and scoliosis of patients with degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS).Seventy-seven patients with DLS were retrospectively analyzed. We measured lordosis and Cobb's angle on preoperative upright x-rays and magnetic resonance imagings in supine position. The lordosis and scoliosis of surgical segments in intraoperative prone position were measured on intraoperative radiographs of 20 patients to compare with that in standing position. Paired t tests were performed to investigate the parameters of the sample.From standing to supine position the whole lordosis increased (29.2 ± 15.7 degree vs. 34.9 ± 11.2 degree), and the whole scoliosis decreased (24.3 ± 11.8 degree vs. 19.0 ± 10.5 degree); 53 of 77 (68.8%) cases had increased lordosis, and 67 of 77 (87%) cases had decreased scoliosis. The lordosis of surgical segments in standing position had no difference with that in intraoprerative prone position. But in changing from supine/standing position to intraoprerative prone position, the scoliosis of surgical segments decreased (14.7 ± 9.4 degree vs. 11.4 ± 7.0 degree; 19.0 ± 11.8 degree vs. 11.4 ± 7.0 degree, respectively), and 18 of 20 (90%) cases had decreased scoliosis in intraoperative prone position than that in standing position.Compared with standing position in DLS patients, supine position increased lordosis and reduced scoliosis, and intraoperative prone position reduced scoliosis significantly. When evaluating the severity of DLS and making preoperative surgical plans, lumbar lordosis in supine position should also be evaluated in addition to upright x-ray, and the effects of different positions should be taken into consideration to reduce deviation.

  4. Short-term effects of positive expiratory airway pressure in patients being weaned from mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Mello Rieder

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility and the cardiorespiratory effects of using positive expiratory airway pressure, a physiotherapeutic tool, in comparison with a T-tube, to wean patients from mechanical ventilation. METHODS/DESIGN: A prospective, randomized, cross-over study. SETTING: Two intensive care units. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: We evaluated forty patients who met weaning criteria and had been mechanically-ventilated for more than 48 hours, mean age 59 years, including 23 males. All patients were submitted to the T-tube and Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure devices, at 7 cm H2O, during a 30-minute period. Cardiorespiratory variables including work of breathing, respiratory rate (rr, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2, heart rate (hr, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures (SAP, DAP, MAP were measured in the first and thirtieth minutes. The condition was analyzed as an entire sample set (n=40 and was also divided into subconditions: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=14 and non-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=26 categories. Comparisons were made using a t-test and Analysis of Variance. The level of significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: Our data showed an increase in work of breathing in the first and thirtieth minutes in the EPAP condition (0.86+ 0.43 and 1.02+1.3 as compared with the T-tube condition (0.25+0.26 and 0.26+0.35 (p<0.05, verified by the flow-sensor monitor (values in J/L. No statistical differences were observed when comparing the Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure and T-tube conditions with regard to cardiorespiratory measurements. The same result was observed for both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subconditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that, in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation, the use of a fixed level of Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure caused an increase in work of

  5. 大学物理课堂演示实验应定位在科学性实验%The University Physics Classroom Demonstration Experiment Should be Positioned in Scientific Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    At present , the demonstration experiment of college physics is often used to demonstrate the physical phenomenon , which doesn’t fully play the role of the demonstration experiment . Demonstration experiment should be positioned in scientific experiments .The classroom demonstration experiment design should reflect the strictness and scientific nature .The demonstration experiment not only verifies the theory knowledge , but also lets students learn the scientific analysis method and experimental method .As the main body of college physics demonstration experiment ,students should participate in the demonstration experiment operation ,data acquisition and analysis ;Teachers in the classroom is mainly to question ,inspire thinking and guide the debate , and acts as the experiment operator and guides the student .%目前大学物理课堂教学中演示实验通常用于演示物理现象,没有充分发挥出演示实验的作用。本文指出,演示实验应定位在科学性实验。为此,课堂演示实验的设计要体现出物理的严密性、科学性,在验证理论知识的同时,让学生也学会科学的分析方法与实验方法。学生应作为大学物理演示实验的主体,参与到演示实验的操作、数据采集、分析中;教师在课堂教学中主要是提出问题、启发思路和引导争论,充当实验操作员与引导学生的角色。

  6. Positive reinforcing effect of oxytocin microinjection in the rat central nucleus of amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, K; Kovács, A; Zagoracz, O; Ollmann, T; Péczely, L; Kertes, E; Lacy, D G; Lénárd, L

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) receives increasing attention since, it plays a role in various behaviors including anxiety, drug addiction, learning, social recognition, empathy, pair bonding and decreased aggression. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), part of the limbic system, plays an important role in learning, memory, anxiety and reinforcing mechanisms. CeA was shown to be rich in OT-receptors (OTR). The aim of our study was to examine the possible effects of OT and OTR antagonist in the CeA on reinforcement using the conditioned place preference test and on anxiety using the elevated plus maze test. Male Wistar rats were microinjected bilaterally with 10 ng OT or 100 ng OT (Sigma: O6379, injected in volume of 0.4μl) or 10ng OTR antagonist (Sigma: L-2540) alone, or OTR antagonist 15 min prior 10 ng OT treatment or vehicle solution into the CeA. Rats receiving 10 ng OT spent significantly more time in the treatment quadrant during the test session, while 100 ng OT treatment produced no effect. Prior treatment with the non-peptide OTR antagonist blocked the effects of OT. The antagonist in itself did not influence the place preference. The elevated plus maze test revealed that 10 ng OT significantly increased the time spent in the open arms. OTR antagonist pre-treatment could inhibit this effect and the antagonist in itself did not affect the time spent in the open arms. Our results show that in the rat CeA OT has dose-dependent, positive reinforcing and anxiolytic effects, via OTR demonstrated by the blocking effects of selective OTR antagonist.

  7. Experimental study on interaction between a positive mass and a negative effective mass through a mass–spring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Zhou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the interaction between a positive mass and a negative effective mass through a three-mass chain connected with elastic springs, a pair of masses is designed to have an effective negative mass, and it interacts with the third positive one as if an equivalent two-mass chain. The dynamics of the equivalent two-mass chain shows that the two bodies may be self-accelerated in same direction when the effective mass becomes negative, the experiment is also conducted to demonstrate this type of motion. We further show that the energy principle (Hamilton’s principle is applicable if the energy of the negative mass unit is properly characterized. The result may be relevant to composite with cells of effective negative mass, their interaction with matrix may lead to more richer unexpected macroscopic responses.

  8. Modeling and Compensation of Thermal Effects on an Ironless Inductive Position Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Danisi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto; Perriard, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The ironless inductive position sensor can be the ideal candidate for linear position sensing in harsh environment and in the presence of external magnetic fields. Starting from the validated electromagnetic characteristics, this paper presents a model of thermal effects influencing the sensor's position reading and an effective algorithm to compensate them. The compensation is performed without affecting the nominal sensor's functioning and without using additional temperature probes, which would complicate the sensor's assembly. The model constitutes the basis of this algorithm, which is then validated through experimental measurements on a custom ironless position sensor prototype.

  9. Quantitative Effects of Trunk and Head Position on the Apnea Hypopnea Index in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, Ellen R.; van Maanen, J. Peter; Hilgevoord, Anthony A.J.; Laman, D. Martin; de Vries, Nico

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that head position, separately from trunk position, is an additionally important factor for the occurrence of apnea in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Patients and Participants: Three hundred patients referred to our department because of clinically suspected OSA. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Patients underwent overnight polysomnography with 2 position sensors: one on the trunk, and one in the mid-forehead. Of the 300 subjects, 241 were diagnosed with OSA, based on an AHI > 5. Of these patients, 199 could be analyzed for position-dependent OSA based on head and trunk position sensors (AHI in supine position twice as high as AHI in non-supine positions): 41.2% of the cases were not position dependent, 52.3% were supine position dependent based on the trunk sensor, 6.5% were supine position dependent based on the head sensor alone. In 46.2% of the trunk supine position-dependent group, head position was of considerable influence on the AHI (AHI was > 5 higher when the head was also in supine position compared to when the head was turned to the side). Conclusions: The results of this study confirm our hypothesis that the occurrence of OSA may also be dependent on the position of the head. Therefore in patients with a suspicion of position-dependent OSA, sleep recording with dual position sensors placed on both trunk and head should be considered. Citation: van Kesteren ER; van Maanen JP; Hilgevoord AAJ; Laman DM; de Vries N. Quantitative effects of trunk and head position on the apnea hypopnea index in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2011;34(8):1075-1081. PMID:21804669

  10. Authoring Effective Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-22

    Russ-Eft, & Chan, 2005). BMT is based on Bandura’s social learning theory (Hogan, Hakel, & Decker, 1986). Utilizing the model provided by social ... learning theory , BMT includes processes such as modeling, a retention process, behavioral rehearsal, feedback, and methods of training transfer to

  11. Positional accommodative intraocular lens power error induced by the estimation of the corneal power and the effective lens position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Piñero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the predictability of the refractive correction achieved with a positional accommodating intraocular lenses (IOL and to develop a potential optimization of it by minimizing the error associated with the keratometric estimation of the corneal power and by developing a predictive formula for the effective lens position (ELP. Materials and Methods: Clinical data from 25 eyes of 14 patients (age range, 52-77 years and undergoing cataract surgery with implantation of the accommodating IOL Crystalens HD (Bausch and Lomb were retrospectively reviewed. In all cases, the calculation of an adjusted IOL power (P IOLadj based on Gaussian optics considering the residual refractive error was done using a variable keratometric index value (n kadj for corneal power estimation with and without using an estimation algorithm for ELP obtained by multiple regression analysis (ELP adj . P IOLadj was compared to the real IOL power implanted (P IOLReal , calculated with the SRK-T formula and also to the values estimated by the Haigis, HofferQ, and Holladay I formulas. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between P IOLReal and P IOLadj when ELP adj was used (P = 0.10, with a range of agreement between calculations of 1.23 D. In contrast, P IOLReal was significantly higher when compared to P IOLadj without using ELP adj and also compared to the values estimated by the other formulas. Conclusions: Predictable refractive outcomes can be obtained with the accommodating IOL Crystalens HD using a variable keratometric index for corneal power estimation and by estimating ELP with an algorithm dependent on anatomical factors and age.

  12. Legacy of road salt: Apparent positive larval effects counteracted by negative postmetamorphic effects in wood frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dananay, Kacey L; Krynak, Katherine L; Krynak, Timothy J; Benard, Michael F

    2015-10-01

    Road salt runoff has potentially large effects on wetland communities, but is typically investigated in short-term laboratory trials. The authors investigated effects of road salt contamination on wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) by combining a field survey with 2 separate experiments. The field survey tested whether wood frog larval traits were associated with road salt contamination in natural wetlands. As conductivity increased, wood frog larvae were less abundant, but those found were larger. In the first experiment of the present study, the authors raised larvae in outdoor artificial ponds under 4 salt concentrations and measured larval vital rates, algal biomass, and zooplankton abundance. Salt significantly increased larval growth, algal biomass, and decreased zooplankton abundance. In the second experiment, the authors raised larvae to metamorphosis in the presence and absence of salt contamination and followed resulting juvenile frogs in terrestrial pens at high and low densities. Exposure to road salt as larvae caused juvenile frogs to have greater mortality in low-density terrestrial environments, possibly because of altered energy allocation, changes in behavior, or reduced immune defenses. The present study suggests that low concentrations of road salt can have positive effects on larval growth yet negative effects on juvenile survival. These results emphasize the importance of testing for effects of contaminants acting through food webs and across multiple life stages as well as the potential for population-level consequences in natural environments.

  13. Beta-globin YAC transgenes exhibit uniform expression levels but position effect variegation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami, R; Greally, J M; Tanimoto, K; Hwang, S; Feng, Y Q; Engel, J D; Fiering, S; Bouhassira, E E

    2000-03-01

    Expression of a construct integrated at different genomic locations often varies because of position effects that have been subcategorized as stable (decreased level of expression) and variegating (decreased proportion of expressing cells). It is well established that locus control regions (LCRs) generally overcome position effects in transgenes. However, whether stable and variegated position effects are equally overcome by an intact LCR has not been determined. We report that single-copy yeast artificial chromosome transgenes containing an unmodified human beta -globin locus were not subject to detectable stable position effects but did undergo mild to severe variegating position effects at three of the four non-centromeric integration sites tested. We also find that, at a given integration site, the distance and the orientation of the LCR relative to the regulated gene contributes to the likelihood of variegating position effects, and can affect the magnitude of its transcriptional enhancement. DNase I hypersensitive site (HSS) formation varies with the proportion of expressing cells, not the level of gene expression, suggesting that silencing of the transgene is associated with a lack of HSS formation in the LCR region. We conclude that transcriptional enhancement and variegating position effects are caused by fundamentally different but inter-dependent mechanisms.

  14. GASIS demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidas, E.H. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  15. Does Subjective Left-Right Position Have a Causal Effect on Support for Redistribution?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier

    Political values have been hypothesized as causal predictors of welfare state support, with subjective position on the left-right scale often used in empirical studies to measure the individual’s core political values. Unfortunately, a major problem in existing research is that the causal effect...... of left-right position on welfare state support cannot be identified with cross-sectional data in which left-right position and welfare state support are observed simultaneously. In this paper, I propose an alternative approach based on Instrumental Variable methods which, using socioeconomic background...... characteristics as instruments for left-right position, can be used to estimate the causal effect of left-right position on support for redistribution. I analyze data on Sweden, Germany, and Norway from the two first waves of the European Social Survey and find first that left-right position is endogenous...

  16. The effect of teacher’s positive personal resource of features of students’ emotional states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Trulyaev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We reveal the psychological mechanisms of impact of the formation level of the teacher’s positive values on the academic performance of students, one of the key components of which are the emotional states of students. We describe a study aimed to test the hypothesis that the positive values and standing behind them “strong” character traits of the teacher determine the emotional states specific of his students during the lesson. The study involved 241 teachers of school subjects and 498 pupils of VI, VIII, X, XI grades of several schools in Krivoy Rog. The study demonstrated that a high level of expression of teacher’s positive values, reflected in his professional qualities, provide the appearance of positive emotional states of students. We also revealed patterns of influence of teacher’s positive personal resource on the intensity of the emotional states experienced by students during lessons.

  17. The 'Positive Effect' is present in older Chinese adults: evidence from an eye tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxin; He, Liyuan; Jia, Liping; Tian, Jing; Benson, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    The 'Positive Effect' is defined as the phenomenon of preferential cognitive processing of positive affective information, and avoidance or dismissal of negative affective information in the social environment. The 'Positive Effect' is found for older people compared with younger people in western societies and is believed to reflect a preference for positive emotional regulation in older adults. It is not known whether such an effect is Universal, and in East Asian cultures, there is a highly controversial debate concerning this question. In the current experiment we explored whether Chinese older participants showed a 'Positive Effect' when they inspected picture pairs that were either a positive or a negative picture presented with a neutral picture, or a positive and negative picture paired together. The results indicated that both groups of participants showed an attentional bias to both pleasant (more processing of) and unpleasant pictures (initial orienting to) when these were paired with neutral pictures. When pleasant and unpleasant pictures were paired together both groups showed an initial orientation bias for the pleasant picture, but the older participants showed this bias for initial orienting and increased processing measures, providing evidence of a 'Positive Effect' in older Chinese adults.

  18. Effect of Seed Position on Parental Plant on Proportion of Seeds Produced with Nondeep and Intermediate Physiological Dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juan J; Tan, Dun Y; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M

    2017-01-01

    The position in which seeds develop on the parental plant can have an effect on dormancy-break and germination. We tested the hypothesis that the proportion of seeds with intermediate physiological dormancy (PD) produced in the proximal position on a raceme of Isatis violascens plants is higher than that produced in the distal position, and further that this difference is related to temperature during seed development. Plants were watered at 3-day intervals, and silicles and seeds from the proximal (early) and distal (late) positions of racemes on the same plants were collected separately and tested for germination. After 0 and 6 months dry storage at room temperature (afterripening), silicles and seeds were cold stratified for 0-16 weeks and tested for germination. Mean daily maximum and minimum temperatures during development/maturation of the two groups of seeds did not differ. A higher proportion of seeds with the intermediate level than with the nondeep level of PD was produced by silicles in the proximal position than by those in the distal position, while the proportion of seeds with nondeep PD was higher in the distal than in the proximal position of the raceme. The differences were not due only to seed mass. Since temperature and soil moisture conditions were the same during development of the seeds in the raceme, differences in proportion of seeds with intermediate and nondeep PD are attributed to position on parental plant. The ecological consequence of this phenomenon is that it ensures diversity in dormancy-breaking and germination characteristics within a seed cohort, a probable bet-hedging strategy. This is the first demonstration of position effects on level of PD in the offspring.

  19. Effects of knee frontal plane position on pedal forces during cycling: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Diefenthaeler

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the force applied to the pedal when cycling with the knees almost touching the bicycle frame (adduction position compared to the position usually adopted by cyclists (reference position and a position of the knees away from the bicycle frame (abduction position. Six cyclists were evaluated. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2MAX was defined, and then the three different knee positions on the frontal plane were assessed. Three minutes of cycling in the reference position, adduction position and abduction position were conducted, using oxygen uptake (VO2 at which the cyclists had achieved the second ventilatory threshold. An instrumented two-dimensional pedal was used to measure the forces applied to the right pedal. The average VO2 and power output did not differ between the adduction (50.4±6.9 ml.kg-1.min-1 and 263±29 W, abduction (50.8±5.9 ml.kg-1.min-1 and 250±46 W and reference position (50.4±5.9 ml.kg-1.min-1 and 246±47 W. Pedaling cadence increased significantly during adduction (94±8 rpm and abduction (95±5 rpm compared to the reference position (89±8 rpm. The force results indicated no differences in the effective force or effectiveness index between the reference, adduction and abduction positions. Resultant force increased during adduction (284.5±44.5 N compared to the reference position (246.9±39.2 N. The results indicate that the cyclists were able to generate higher resultant force during cycling with the knees close to the bicycle frame, but were unable to effectively transmit this force to the movement.

  20. Positive peer pressure: the effects of peer monitoring on children's disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden Smith, L K; Fowler, S A

    1984-01-01

    Classroom peers can serve as powerful sources of reinforcement in increasing or maintaining both the positive and negative behaviors of their classmates. In two experiments, we examined the effectiveness of a peer-monitored token system on reducing disruption and nonparticipation during a transition period of a kindergarten class for behaviorally impaired children. Additionally, the effect of providing and subsequently withholding corrective feedback to peer mediators on the accuracy of their point awards was evaluated. Results in Experiment 1 suggest that both teacher- and peer-monitored interventions were successful in decreasing disruption and increasing participation of monitored peers. Experiment 2 further demonstrated that peer monitors could successfully initiate the token system without prior adult implementation. Analysis of the point awards in both experiments indicates that peer monitors consistently awarded points that were earned. However, when corrective feedback was withdrawn the peer monitors frequently awarded points that were not earned, i.e., they rarely withheld points for undesirable behavior. Even so, the monitored peers' disruptive behavior was maintained at low rates.

  1. High-intensity interval training has positive effects on performance in ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimo, M A; de Souza, E O; Wilson, J M; Carpenter, A L; Gilchrist, P; Lowery, R P; Averbuch, B; White, T M; Joy, J

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the well-known benefits that have been shown, few studies have looked at the practical applications of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on athletic performance. This study investigated the effects of a HIIT program compared to traditional continuous endurance exercise training. 24 hockey players were randomly assigned to either a continuous or high-intensity interval group during a 4-week training program. The interval group (IG) was involved in a periodized HIIT program. The continuous group (CG) performed moderate intensity cycling for 45-60 min at an intensity that was 65% of their calculated heart rate reserve. Body composition, muscle thickness, anaerobic power, and on-ice measures were assessed pre- and post-training. Muscle thickness was significantly greater in IG (p=0.01) when compared to CG. The IG had greater values for both ∆ peak power (p<0.003) and ∆ mean power (p<0.02). Additionally, IG demonstrated a faster ∆ sprint (p<0.02) and a trend (p=0.08) for faster ∆ endurance test time to completion for IG. These results indicate that hockey players may utilize short-term HIIT to elicit positive effects in muscle thickness, power and on-ice performance.

  2. An experimental study of the effect of green positioning on brand attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRIK HARTMANN

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Reducing the environmental impact of a product or its manufacturing process not necessarily limits the company’s activities. In the context of a green branding strategy, it might as well open new business opportunities. Ecological positioning provides a strategic tool for the active implementation of green brands. The empirical study shows that more positive attitudes are developed towards a brand positioned by environmental attributes and that these effects vary as a result of the implementation of different types of ecological positioning strategies. Although most researchers in ecological marketing recommend rational persuasion strategies, in this study the effect of an ecological positioning by emotional brand benefits appears to be even stronger than effects of rational perceptions of functional benefits for the environment.

  3. A Cross-Cultural Examination of the Positivity Effect in Memory: United States vs. China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Christie; Lin, Ziyong

    2012-01-01

    Many studies conducted in the United States (U.S.) have documented a positivity effect in aging--a tendency for older adults to remember more positive than negative information in comparison to young adults. Despite this cognitive emotional benefit, U.S. adults still hold a more negative view of aging compared to adults in Asia. We hypothesized…

  4. Seebeck effect position sensor for CO/sub 2/ laser beam alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, R.B.; Gruhn, C.R.

    1979-09-01

    A new concept for a laser position sensor is presented. The device utilizes the Seebeck effect in semiconductors. Results using a Si detector show position linearity and energy linearity of the device signal. A theoretical model explaining the operation of the device is outlined. Applications to pulsed laser beam alignment are discussed.

  5. The Relative Position Priming Effect Depends on Whether Letters Are Vowels or Consonants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunabeitia, Jon Andoni; Carreiras, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The relative position priming effect is a type of subset priming in which target word recognition is facilitated as a consequence of priming the word with some of its letters, maintaining their relative position (e.g., "csn" as a prime for "casino"). Five experiments were conducted to test whether vowel-only and consonant-only…

  6. Effects of Positive Reframing and Paradoxical Directives in Counseling for Negative Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Robert G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Explored the effects of two paradoxical directives on negative emotions. Subjects received either positive reframing or no reframing statements and either paradoxical or nonparadoxical directives. Positive reframing produced greater reduction in negative emotions than no reframing though negative emotions were reduced in all conditions. The two…

  7. The Effects of Implementing a Positive Behavior Intervention Support Program on Office Discipline Referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cheryl Denise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention Support) program had a positive significant effect in decreasing office discipline referrals in a local elementary school. A sample independent t-Test was used to examine data on the school's average office discipline referrals for two years…

  8. The Effects of Positive and Negative Mood on Cognition and Motivation in Multimedia Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Tze Wei; Tan, Su-Mae

    2016-01-01

    The Cognitive-Affective Theory of Learning with Media framework posits that the multimedia learning process is mediated by the learner's mood. Recent studies have shown that positive mood has a facilitating effect on multimedia learning. Though literature has shown that negative mood encourages an individual to engage in a more systematic,…

  9. Documenting the Implementation and Effects of Positive Behavior Support in an Alternative Educational Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphson, S. Lillian

    2013-01-01

    Positive behavior support (PBS) is a preventative and proactive system of managing behavior that is being used in the United States and other countries. Positive behavior support has been successfully implemented in typical school settings for students with and without disabilities. However, research documenting the implementation and effects of…

  10. The effect of intra-uterine breech position on postnatal motor functions of the lower limbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sival, D A; Prechtl, H F; Sonder, G H; Touwen, B C

    1993-01-01

    The effect of intra-uterine movement restriction on the development of motor functions was studied longitudinally by comparing infants born after uncomplicated breech position (n = 13) with control infants (vertex position, n = 5-10). Before birth, fetal leg posture was studied at regular intervals

  11. THE EFFECT OF INTRAUTERINE BREECH POSITION ON POSTNATAL MOTOR FUNCTIONS OF THE LOWER-LIMBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sival, DA; PRECHTL, HFR; SONDER, GHA; TOUWEN, BCL

    1993-01-01

    The effect of intra-uterine movement restriction on the development of motor functions was studied longitudinally by comparing infants born after uncomplicated breech position (n = 13) with control infants (vertex position, n = 5-10). Before birth, fetal leg posture was studied at regular intervals

  12. The Effects of Implementing a Positive Behavior Intervention Support Program on Office Discipline Referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cheryl Denise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention Support) program had a positive significant effect in decreasing office discipline referrals in a local elementary school. A sample independent t-Test was used to examine data on the school's average office discipline referrals for two years…

  13. Effect of upright position on tonsillar level in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan K.L.; Leung, Joyce H.Y.; Chu, Winnie C.W. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Shatin (China); Griffith, James F. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Shatin (China); The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Shatin, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Lam, T.P.; Ng, Bobby K.W.; Cheng, Jack C.Y. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shatin (China)

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an upright position on cerebellar tonsillar level in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Twenty-five patients with clinically diagnosed AIS and 18 normal controls were examined in both supine and upright positions using 0.25T MRI. The position of the inferior cerebellar tonsil tip relative to a reference line connecting the basion to the opisthion (BO line) was measured in millimetres. None of the 18 normal control subjects had cerebellar tonsillar descent below the BO line in either supine or the upright position. Forty-eight percent of AIS patients had tonsillar descent in the upright position, compared to 28 % in the supine position. In the upright position, cerebellar tonsillar position was lower in AIS patients than in normal subjects (mean -0.7 ± 1.5 vs. +2.1 ± 1.7, p < 0.00001). AIS patients also had a large degree of tonsillar excursion between upright and supine positions compared to normal subjects (mean -1.9 ± 2.3 vs. -0.1 ± 0.2, p < 0.00001). When considering the theoretical likelihood that a low tonsillar position may affect spinal cord function, one should bear in mind that tonsillar descent in AIS is significantly greater in the upright position. (orig.)

  14. An experimental test for lineage-specific position effects on alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Mark L.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    1998-01-01

    Independent transgene insertions differ in expression based on their location in the genome; these position effects are of interest because they reflect the influence of genome organization on gene regulation. Position effects also represent potentially insurmountable obstacles to the rigorous functional comparison of homologous genes from different species because (i) quantitative variation in expression of each gene across genomic positions (generalized position effects, or GPEs) may overwhelm differences between the genes of interest, or (ii) divergent genes may be differentially sensitive to position effects, reflecting unique interactions between each gene and its genomic milieu (lineage-specific position effects, or LSPEs). We have investigated both types of position-effect variation by applying our method of transgene coplacement, which allows comparisons of transgenes in the same position in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report an experimental test for LSPE in Drosophila. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes of D. melanogaster and Drosophila affinidisjuncta differ in both tissue distribution and amounts of ADH activity. Despite this striking regulatory divergence, we found a very high correlation in overall ADH activity between the genes of the two species when placed in the same genomic position as assayed in otherwise Adh-null adults and larvae. These results argue against the influence of LSPE for these sequences, although the effects of GPE are significant. Our new findings validate the coplacement approach and show that it greatly magnifies the power to detect differences in expression between transgenes. Transgene coplacement thus dramatically extends the range of functional and evolutionary questions that can be addressed by transgenic technology. PMID:9861000

  15. Aging and emotional memory: the co-occurrence of neurophysiological and behavioral positivity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; van Strien, Jan W

    2009-06-01

    The positivity effect is a trend for adults to increasingly process positive and/or decreasingly process negative information compared with other information with advancing age. The positivity effect has been observed with behavioral measures, such as in attention and memory tests, and with measures of neurophysiological activity, such as in amygdala activation and the late positive potential (LPP). In this study, it was investigated whether these behavioral and neurophysiological positivity effects co-occur. The electroencephalogram of younger (19-26 years) and older (65-82 years) adults was recorded while they encoded unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant pictures for retrieval in free and cued recall tests. Positivity effects occurred in the late LPP amplitude (700-1,000 ms) and in the free recall test, with negativity biases in younger adults and no biases in older adults. The occurrence of a valence bias in the LPP was substantially but nonsignificantly correlated with the occurrence of a similar valence bias in memory in the older adults. In conclusion, neurophysiological and behavioral positivity effects appear to co-occur, a finding that awaits expansion using different neurophysiological and behavioral measures.

  16. Glucosamine Supplementation Demonstrates a Negative Effect On Intervertebral Disc Matrix in an Animal Model of Disc Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Lloydine; Vo, Nam; Coehlo, J. Paulo; Dong, Qing; Bechara, Bernard; Woods, Barrett; Hempen, Eric; Hartman, Robert; Preuss, Harry; Balk, Judith; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Laboratory based controlled in vivo study Objective To determine the in vivo effects of oral glucosamine sulfate on intervertebral disc degeneration Summary of Background Data Although glucosamine has demonstrated beneficial effect in articular cartilage, clinical benefit is uncertain. A CDC report from 2009 reported that many patients are using glucosamine supplementation for low back pain (LBP), without significant evidence to support its use. Because disc degeneration is a major contributor of LBP, we explored the effects of glucosamine on disc matrix homeostasis in an animal model of disc degeneration. Methods Eighteen skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups: control, annular puncture, glucosamine, and annular puncture+glucosamine. Glucosamine treated rabbits received daily oral supplementation with 107mg/day (weight based equivalent to human 1500mg/day). Annular puncture surgery involved puncturing the annulus fibrosus (AF) of 3 lumbar discs with a 16G needle to induce degeneration. Serial MRIs were obtained at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 20 weeks. Discs were harvested at 20 weeks for determination of glycosaminoglycan(GAG) content, relative gene expression measured by RT-PCR, and histological analyses. Results The MRI index and NP area of injured discs of glucosamine treated animals with annular puncture was found to be lower than that of degenerated discs from rabbits not supplemented with glucosamine. Consistent with this, decreased glycosaminoglycan was demonstrated in glucosamine fed animals, as determined by both histological and GAG content. Gene expression was consistent with a detrimental effect on matrix. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the net effect on matrix in an animal model in vivo, as measured by gene expression, MRI, histology, and total proteoglycan is anti-anabolic. This raises concern over this commonly used supplement, and future research is needed to establish the clinical relevance of these

  17. Effect of Positive Reinforcement on Visual Academic Performance with a Partially Sighted Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, H. Lee

    1977-01-01

    The effects of positive reinforcement on an 8-year-old partially sighted girl's visual academic performance were assessed, using a multiple baseline design that involved tasks of matching and of counting number sets. (Author/DLS)

  18. Position displacement effect on the doses in the peripheral head regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortesniemi, M.; Seppaelae, T.; Bjugg, H. [Helsinki Univ., Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Seren, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Auterinen, I. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Parkkinen, R. [STUK Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Savolainen, S. [Helsinki Univ. Hospital, Departments of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-10-01

    Patient positioning is a challenging task in BNCT-treatments due to the use of multiple fields and a static horizontal beam construction. Positioning accuracy of 5 mm is required for acceptable dose delivery within appropriate limits of dose uncertainty (up to 10% of point dose in target volume). The aim of this study was to determine if a patient head position creating a clear gap between the beam port and the head would have a significant effect on the doses to the peripheral regions of the head, e.g. to the eyes. The gamma dose rates were measured in a water filled ellipsoidal phantom with an ionisation chamber (IC). Mn activation wires were used to determine the Mn-55(n, {gamma}) reaction rates. Twelve measurement points were chosen in the phantom and two phantom positions were applied. According to this study the 35 mm position change and the resulting gap has an obvious effect on the peripheral doses in BNCT. The Mn activation reaction rates were on the average 80% higher in the deviation position than in the reference position. Increasing depth from the surface inside the phantom diminished the gamma dose difference between the two positions. Scattering environment changes with position displacement and resulting gap causes differences in neutron fluences and gamma doses. (author)

  19. A Demonstration Project in New York and Virginia: Retrofitting Cost-Effective Roll-over Protective Structures (CROPS) on Tractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard, D L; McKenzie, E A; Cantis, D; May, J; Sorensen, J; Bayes, B; Madden, E; Wyckoff, S; Stone, B; Maass, J

    2015-07-01

    The NIOSH cost-effective roll-over protective structure (CROPS) demonstration project sought to determine whether three prototype roll-over protective structures (ROPS) designed to be retrofitted on Ford 8N, Ford 3000, Ford 4000, and Massey Ferguson 135 tractors could be installed in the field and whether they would be acceptable by the intended end users (farmers). There were a total of 50 CROPS. demonstrators (25 in New York and 25 in Virginia), with 45 observers attending the New York CROPS demonstrations and 36 observers attending the Virginia CROPS demonstrations, for a total of 70 participants in New York and 61 in Virginia. The oldest retrofitted tractors were 77 to 62 years old, while the newest retrofitted tractors were 40 to 37 years old. The most frequently retrofitted tractor in the CROPS demonstration project was a Ford 3000 series tractor (n = 19; 38%), followed by Ford 4000 (n = 11; 22%), Massey Ferguson 135 (n = 11; 22%), and Ford 8N (n = 9; 18%). A major issue of CROPS retrofitting was the rear wheel fenders. The effort involved in disassembling the fenders (removing the old bolts was often faster by cutting them with a torch), modifying the fender mounting brackets, and then reinstalling the fenders with the CROPS generally required the most time. In addition, various other semi-permanent equipment attachments, such as front-end loaders, required additional time and effort to fit with the CROPS. Demonstrators were asked to rank the reasons why they had not retrofitted their tractors with ROPS until they had enrolled in the CROPS demonstration program. ROPS "cost too much" was ranked as the primary reason for participants in both states (80% for New York and 88% for Virginia). The second highest ranked reasons were "ROPS wasn't available" for Virginia (80%) and "hassle to find ROPS" for New York (69%). The third highest ranked reasons were "not enough time to find ROPS" for New York (67%) and "hassle to find ROPS" for Virginia (79%). All

  20. Onset of mobility limitations in old age: the combined effect of socioeconomic position and social relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Charlotte Juul; Avlund, Kirsten; Lund, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: to examine the combined effect of cohabitation status and social participation, respectively, and socioeconomic position on onset of mobility limitations in a prospective study among older Danes. Design and methods: logistic regression analyses with combined exposure variables were perfo......: the study suggests that future interventions to increase social participation might alleviate the negative effects on mobility experienced by older people in low socioeconomic position, perhaps especially among older males....

  1. Position sense and reaction angle after eccentric exercise: the repeated bout effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, V; Nikolaidis, M G; Giakas, G; Jamurtas, A Z; Owolabi, E O; Koutedakis, Y

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the effects of a repeated eccentric exercise on position sense and muscle reaction angle. Fourteen healthy women underwent an isokinetic exercise session on their knee flexors, which was repeated after 4 weeks. Muscle damage indices, position sense and joint reaction angle of the knee were examined before, immediately after, as well as at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7 days after exercise. The second exercise bout induced significantly lesser effects in all muscle damage indices as well as lesser disturbances in position sense and reaction angle when compared to the first one. The main finding of this study is that position sense and joint reaction angle to release of the lower limbs may adapt in response to a repeated bout of eccentric exercise, leading to less disturbances in position sense and reaction angle after the second bout of exercise.

  2. Attentional control mediates the effect of social anxiety on positive affect☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Amanda S.; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present studies was to examine whether attentional control, a self-regulatory attentional mechanism, mediates the effect of social anxiety on positive affect. We tested this mediation in two studies using undergraduate students selected to represent a broad range of severity of social anxiety. Self-report assessments of social anxiety, attentional control, and positive affect were collected in a cross-sectional design (Study 1) and in a longitudinal design with three assessment points (Study 2). Results of both studies supported the hypothesized mediational model. Specifically, social anxiety was inversely related to attentional control, which itself positively predicted positive affect. This mediation remained significant even when statistically controlling for the effects of depression. Additionally, the hypothesized model provided superior model fit to theoretically-grounded equivalent models in both studies. Implications of these findings for understanding diminished positive affect in social anxiety are discussed. PMID:23254261

  3. Positive Effects of Bilingualism:Divergent Thinking and Its Implications for Language Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Bing-jie

    2014-01-01

    The issue of bilingualism has been widely explored in the past decades, showing that there are multiple positive effects of“additive bilingualism”. Such positive factors are closely linked with children’s cognitive development and intelligence. This paper gives a detailed review on how bilingualism plays a role in children’s divergent thinking ability. Fully taking advantage of such positive effects in language education should be a significant part for bilingual education and foreign language programs. Thus, this paper further discusses the educational implications of these theoretic findings, suggesting that an additive bilingual envi⁃ronment should be cultivated through multiple ways of curriculum and program planning.

  4. Effects of Obesity on Transcriptomic Changes and Cancer Hallmarks in Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Phan, Liem; Zhang, Fanmao; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Shin, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Hyun Ho; Chen, Jiun-Sheng; Zhao, Ruiying; Chen, Jian; Gully, Chris; Carlock, Colin; Qi, Yuan; Zhang, Ya; Wu, Yun; Esteva, Francisco J.; Luo, Yongde; McKeehan, Wallace L.; Ensor, Joe; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Pusztai, Lajos; Fraser Symmans, W.; Lee, Mong-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity increases the risk of cancer death among postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast cancer, but the direct evidence for the mechanisms is lacking. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate direct evidence for the mechanisms mediating this epidemiologic phenomenon. Methods We analyzed transcriptomic profiles of pretreatment biopsies from a prospective cohort of 137 ER+ breast cancer patients. We generated transgenic (MMTV-TGFα;A y /a) and orthotopic/syngeneic (A y /a) obese mouse models to investigate the effect of obesity on tumorigenesis and tumor progression and to determine biological mechanisms using whole-genome transcriptome microarrays and protein analyses. We used a coculture system to examine the impact of adipocytes/adipokines on breast cancer cell proliferation. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Functional transcriptomic analysis of patients revealed the association of obesity with 59 biological functional changes (P cancer hallmarks. Gene enrichment analysis revealed enrichment of AKT-target genes (P = .04) and epithelial–mesenchymal transition genes (P = .03) in patients. Our obese mouse models demonstrated activation of the AKT/mTOR pathway in obesity-accelerated mammary tumor growth (3.7- to 7.0-fold; P obesity-induced secretion of adipokines and breast tumor formation and growth (0.5-fold, P = .04; 0.3-fold, P breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Metformin suppress adipocyte-induced cell proliferation and adipocyte-secreted adipokines in vitro. Conclusions Adipokine secretion and AKT/mTOR activation play important roles in obesity-accelerated breast cancer aggressiveness in addition to hyperinsulinemia, estrogen signaling, and inflammation. Metformin and everolimus have potential for therapeutic interventions of ER+ breast cancer patients with obesity. PMID:24957076

  5. Effects of obesity on transcriptomic changes and cancer hallmarks in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Phan, Liem; Zhang, Fanmao; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Shin, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Hyun Ho; Chen, Jiun-Sheng; Zhao, Ruiying; Chen, Jian; Gully, Chris; Carlock, Colin; Qi, Yuan; Zhang, Ya; Wu, Yun; Esteva, Francisco J; Luo, Yongde; McKeehan, Wallace L; Ensor, Joe; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Pusztai, Lajos; Fraser Symmans, W; Lee, Mong-Hong; Yeung, Sai-Ching Jim

    2014-07-01

    Obesity increases the risk of cancer death among postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, but the direct evidence for the mechanisms is lacking. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate direct evidence for the mechanisms mediating this epidemiologic phenomenon. We analyzed transcriptomic profiles of pretreatment biopsies from a prospective cohort of 137 ER+ breast cancer patients. We generated transgenic (MMTV-TGFα;A (y) /a) and orthotopic/syngeneic (A (y) /a) obese mouse models to investigate the effect of obesity on tumorigenesis and tumor progression and to determine biological mechanisms using whole-genome transcriptome microarrays and protein analyses. We used a coculture system to examine the impact of adipocytes/adipokines on breast cancer cell proliferation. All statistical tests were two-sided. Functional transcriptomic analysis of patients revealed the association of obesity with 59 biological functional changes (P cancer hallmarks. Gene enrichment analysis revealed enrichment of AKT-target genes (P = .04) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes (P = .03) in patients. Our obese mouse models demonstrated activation of the AKT/mTOR pathway in obesity-accelerated mammary tumor growth (3.7- to 7.0-fold; P obesity-induced secretion of adipokines and breast tumor formation and growth (0.5-fold, P = .04; 0.3-fold, P breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Metformin suppress adipocyte-induced cell proliferation and adipocyte-secreted adipokines in vitro. Adipokine secretion and AKT/mTOR activation play important roles in obesity-accelerated breast cancer aggressiveness in addition to hyperinsulinemia, estrogen signaling, and inflammation. Metformin and everolimus have potential for therapeutic interventions of ER+ breast cancer patients with obesity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Serial position effects in free memory recall--An ERP-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiswede, Daniel; Rüsseler, Jascha; Münte, Thomas F

    2007-05-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by recalled and non-recalled words were recorded from 18 female subjects to investigate primacy and recency effects in free memory recall. The typical pattern of a serial position curve (SPC) was obtained with words presented at first and final positions in a list recalled better than words presented in the middle of a list. A marked positivity is seen in the ERPs for words on Primacy, but not on Recency positions at frontocentral electrodes. In contrast, ERP amplitudes on parietal electrodes resemble the SPC seen in behavioral data: P300 amplitude is largest for words on Primacy and Recency positions and attenuated on Plateau positions. Furthermore, subjects with a clear Primacy effect in behavioral data show a distinct frontal positive slow wave for Primacy words only, whereas subjects without a clear primacy effect show a frontal "difference due to subsequent memory" (DM) effect for Primacy and Plateau words. These results are discussed in the framework of working memory and distinctiveness.

  7. Effects of nasal continuous positive-airway pressure on nutritive swallowing in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Anne; Catelin, Céline; Ahmed, Mohamed Amine Hadj; Samson, Nathalie; Bonneau, Pauline; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    Current knowledge suggests that, to be successful, oral feeding in preterm infants should be initiated as soon as possible, often at an age where immature respiration still requires ventilatory support in the form of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). While some neonatologist teams claim great success with initiation of oral feeding in immature infants with nCPAP, others strictly wait for this ventilatory support to be no longer necessary before any attempt at oral feeding, fearing laryngeal penetration and tracheal aspiration. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to provide a first assessment of the effect of various levels of nCPAP on bottle-feeding in a neonatal ovine model, including feeding safety, feeding efficiency, and nutritive swallowing-breathing coordination. Eight lambs born at term were surgically instrumented 48 h after birth to collect recordings of electrical activity of laryngeal constrictor muscle, electrocardiography, and arterial blood gases. Two days after surgery, lambs were bottle-fed under five randomized nCPAP conditions, including without any nCPAP or nasal mask and nCPAP of 0, 4, 7, and 10 cmH(2)O. Results revealed that application of nCPAP in the full-term lamb had no deleterious effect on feeding safety and efficiency or on nutritive swallowing-breathing coordination. The present study provides a first and unique insight on the effect of nCPAP on oral feeding, demonstrating its safety in newborn lambs born at term. These results open the way for further research in preterm lambs to better mimic the problems encountered in neonatology.

  8. The Older Adult Positivity Effect in Evaluations of Trustworthiness: Emotion Regulation or Cognitive Capacity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Boshyan, Jasmine; Ward, Noreen; Gutchess, Angela; Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    2017-01-01

    An older adult positivity effect, i.e., the tendency for older adults to favor positive over negative stimulus information more than do younger adults, has been previously shown in attention, memory, and evaluations. This effect has been attributed to greater emotion regulation in older adults. In the case of attention and memory, this explanation has been supported by some evidence that the older adult positivity effect is most pronounced for negative stimuli, which would motivate emotion regulation, and that it is reduced by cognitive load, which would impede emotion regulation. We investigated whether greater older adult positivity in the case of evaluative responses to faces is also enhanced for negative stimuli and attenuated by cognitive load, as an emotion regulation explanation would predict. In two studies, younger and older adults rated trustworthiness of faces that varied in valence both under low and high cognitive load, with the latter manipulated by a distracting backwards counting task. In Study 1, face valence was manipulated by attractiveness (low /disfigured faces, medium, high/fashion models' faces). In Study 2, face valence was manipulated by trustworthiness (low, medium, high). Both studies revealed a significant older adult positivity effect. However, contrary to an emotion regulation account, this effect was not stronger for more negative faces, and cognitive load increased rather than decreased the rated trustworthiness of negatively valenced faces. Although inconsistent with emotion regulation, the latter effect is consistent with theory and research arguing that more cognitive resources are required to process negative stimuli, because they are more cognitively elaborated than positive ones. The finding that increased age and increased cognitive load both enhanced the positivity of trustworthy ratings suggests that the older adult positivity effect in evaluative ratings of faces may reflect age-related declines in cognitive capacity rather

  9. The Older Adult Positivity Effect in Evaluations of Trustworthiness: Emotion Regulation or Cognitive Capacity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Boshyan, Jasmine; Ward, Noreen; Gutchess, Angela; Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    2017-01-01

    An older adult positivity effect, i.e., the tendency for older adults to favor positive over negative stimulus information more than do younger adults, has been previously shown in attention, memory, and evaluations. This effect has been attributed to greater emotion regulation in older adults. In the case of attention and memory, this explanation has been supported by some evidence that the older adult positivity effect is most pronounced for negative stimuli, which would motivate emotion regulation, and that it is reduced by cognitive load, which would impede emotion regulation. We investigated whether greater older adult positivity in the case of evaluative responses to faces is also enhanced for negative stimuli and attenuated by cognitive load, as an emotion regulation explanation would predict. In two studies, younger and older adults rated trustworthiness of faces that varied in valence both under low and high cognitive load, with the latter manipulated by a distracting backwards counting task. In Study 1, face valence was manipulated by attractiveness (low /disfigured faces, medium, high/fashion models’ faces). In Study 2, face valence was manipulated by trustworthiness (low, medium, high). Both studies revealed a significant older adult positivity effect. However, contrary to an emotion regulation account, this effect was not stronger for more negative faces, and cognitive load increased rather than decreased the rated trustworthiness of negatively valenced faces. Although inconsistent with emotion regulation, the latter effect is consistent with theory and research arguing that more cognitive resources are required to process negative stimuli, because they are more cognitively elaborated than positive ones. The finding that increased age and increased cognitive load both enhanced the positivity of trustworthy ratings suggests that the older adult positivity effect in evaluative ratings of faces may reflect age-related declines in cognitive capacity

  10. Situational factors affecting sleep paralysis and associated hallucinations: position and timing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyne, J A

    2002-06-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) entails a period of paralysis upon waking or falling asleep and is often accompanied by terrifying hallucinations. Two situational conditions for sleep paralysis, body position (supine, prone, and left or right lateral decubitus) and timing (beginning, middle, or end of sleep), were investigated in two studies involving 6730 subjects, including 4699 SP experients. A greater number of individuals reported SP in the supine position than all other positions combined. The supine position was also 3-4 times more common during SP than when normally falling asleep. The supine position during SP was reported to be more prevalent at the middle and end of sleep than at the beginning suggesting that the SP episodes at the later times might arise from brief microarousals during REM, possibly induced by apnea. Reported frequency of SP was also greater among those consistently reporting episodes at the beginning and middle of sleep than among those reporting episodes when waking up at the end of sleep. The effects of position and timing of SP on the nature of hallucinations that accompany SP were also examined. Modest effects were found for SP timing, but not body position, and the reported intensity of hallucinations and fear during SP. Thus, body position and timing of SP episodes appear to affect both the incidence and, to a lesser extent, the quality of the SP experience.

  11. Effectiveness of Positive Hypothesis Testing in Inductive and Deductive Rule Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin; Bonner; Altermatt

    1999-02-01

    In a positive hypothesis test a person generates or examines evidence that is expected to have the property of interest if the hypothesis is correct, whereas in a negative hypothesis test a person generates or examines evidence that is not expected to have the property of interest if the hypothesis is correct. Two experiments assessed the effectiveness of positive versus negative hypothesis tests on inductive and deductive rule learning problems. In Experiment 1 problem solvers induced a rule by proposing hypotheses and selecting evidence in the eight conditions of a factorial design defined by instructions to use a positive or negative hypothesis test on each of trials 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15. Instructions to use positive tests resulted in more examples, fewer strategic hypotheses, and a higher weighted score for five types of hypotheses than instructions to use negative tests. In Experiment 2 problem solvers identified 1 of a possible 1296 correct rules in the deductive rule learning game Mastermind. When problems were classified in the 16 possible combinations of positive or negative hypothesis tests on trials 2, 3, 4, and 5 there were fewer trials to solution for positive tests on each of the four trials and fewer trials to solution with increasing positive tests. We conclude that positive hypothesis tests are generally more effective than negative hypothesis tests in both inductive and deductive rule learning. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. Humanizing HIV/AIDS and its (re)stigmatizing effects: HIV public 'positive' speaking in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Mark; Sarangi, Srikant

    2009-01-01

    Social stigma has been inextricably linked with HIV and AIDS since the epidemic erupted in the early 1980s. The stigma that has built up around HIV and AIDS is generally regarded as having a negative impact on the quality of life of HIV-positive people and on general prevention efforts. Current attempts to combat HIV-related stigma focus on increasing the acceptance of HIV among the stigmatizing public and stigmatized individuals alike. In this, the global HIV-positive community is being increasingly called upon to ;humanize' the virus, not least through public displays of HIV 'positive' health and public ;positive' speaking. This article critically explores the constitutive effects and inherent power relations of HIV Positive Speakers' Bureaus (PSBs) as a platform for such a display. Adopting a post-structuralist discourse analytic approach, we explore accounts of positive-speaking and HIV health from HIV-related non-government organizations in India and in PSB training manuals. In particular, we highlight ways in which positive-speaking in India can be seen to have significant (re)stigmatizing effects by way of ambivalent and hyper-real configurations of HIV 'positive' identity and life.

  13. Short Communication. Effect of phosphorus nutrition and grain position within maize cob on grain phosphorus accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamamad Nadeem

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional status of grains may vary due to external nutrient supply and their position within parent maize cob. Phosphorus (P is the least mobile nutrient in the soil and therefore newly growing seedlings are largely dependent on the stored grain P contents which are accumulated during the crop maturity period. Objective of this study was to access the effects of different P applications and grain positions on P and dry matter contents in grains. Phosphorus application and grain position has significant (p<0.05 effects on P contents in grains whereas dry weight and P content are highly correlated. Grain weight and P contents decreased linearly from base to apical position possibly due to flow of nutrients from base towards apical position within cob. Significantly higher grain dry weight (0.35±0.01 g and P contents (962±57 µg P are recorded in high P application (92.50 kg ha-1 rate on base position whereas minimum grain dry weight (0.14±0.01 g and P contents (219±11 µg P were recorded on apical grain position in low P application (5.60 kg ha-1 rate. The results suggest that for better seedling P nutrition especially in soils of low inherent P, maize grains should be selected from base or middle position where maximum dry weight and P contents are concentrated to support the seedlings to reach at growth at which roots are capable of external P uptake.

  14. Evaluation of post-antibiotic effect in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Tavella

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the postantibiotic effect (PAE is a well recognized phenomenon, the mechanism by which it is induced has not fully elucidated yet. It has been suggested that PAE is the time required by bacteria to synthesize proteins or mRNA characterized by a short half-life that are consumed during antibiotic treatment.This phenomenon is widely studied on Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods, while information about Gram-positive rods and Gram-negative cocci are scanty.To gain new insights on the PAE, this study was addressed to evaluated the time required by Moraxella catarrhalis and Lactobacillus planctarum to resume their physiological growth rate after exposure to various antibiotics. Methods PAE was estimated in accordance with the method of Craig and Gudmundsson using the following drugs: penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefalotin, ceftazidime, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, gentamycin and azithromycin. Log-phase bacteria were exposed to drug at a concentration corresponding to 4 times the MIC value for 1h.The drug was inactivated by 1:1000 dilution. Bacterial counts were determined at time zero, immediately after drug dilution, and at each hour after removal for 6 - 7h by a pour-plate technique. The PAE was defined as the difference in time required by test and control cultures to increase by 1 log in CFU number. Results All drugs tested induced a PAE on the strains studied. M. catarrhalis registered PAE values ranging between 0,5 (gentamycin and 2 (ceftazidime, imipenem and azithromycin.With respect to L. plantarum a PAE between 0,8 (cefalotin and 3 hours (ciprofloxacin were detected. Conclusion. These findings demonstrated that all the drugs tested were able to induce a PAE on the strains tested.This observation differs from that observed on Gram-negative rods characterised by negative PAE values induced by penicillins and cephalosporins.This results might reflect the different target of these compounds on these Gram-positive rods or the

  15. Demonstrating the effectiveness of social franchising principles: The emptying of household vips: A case study from Goven Mbeki village

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Wall4_2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 19771 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Wall4_2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 DEMONSTRATING... THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SOCIAL FRANCHISING PRINCIPLES: THE EMPTYING OF HOUSEHOLD VIPS A CASE STUDY FROM GOVEN MBEKI VILLAGE *K WALL 1, O IVE 2, J BHAGWAN 3, F KIRWAN 4, W BIRKHOLTZ 5, N LUPUWANA 6, E SHAYLOR 7 Key words: faecal sludge, schools, franchising...

  16. Operational Temperature Effect on Positioning Accuracy of a Single-Axial Moving Carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Ying Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the ambient environmental temperature effect on the positioning accuracy of a periodically-moving carrier. The moving carrier was operated in an environmental chamber in which the operational temperature could be controlled by an air conditioning system. Different operational temperature modes, including a stable environment, a rise in temperature, a decline in temperature, summer daytime hours, and winter nighttime hours in terms of seasonal climate change in Taiwan, were generated within the environmental chamber by an air conditioning system to investigate the operational temperature’s effect on positioning accuracy. From the experimental measurements of a periodically-moving carrier, it is found that the operational temperature conditions can significantly affect the positioning accuracy of the moving carrier, especially in the case of an operational temperature decline. Under stable operational conditions, the positioning accuracy of the moving carrier can be considerably improved. In comparison to the case of an operational temperature decline, the positioning accuracy improvement can reach 29.6%. Moreover, the effect of the temperature distributions within the chamber on the positioning accuracy was further investigated. It was found that, with a parallel flow pattern in the chamber, the positioning accuracy can be further enhanced.

  17. Are Age Effects in Positivity Influenced by the Valence of Distractors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Maryam; von Hippel, William; Henry, Julie D; Becker, Stefanie I

    2015-01-01

    An age-related 'positivity' effect has been identified, in which older adults show an information-processing bias towards positive emotional items in attention and memory. In the present study, we examined this positivity bias by using a novel paradigm in which emotional and neutral distractors were presented along with emotionally valenced targets. Thirty-five older and 37 younger adults were asked during encoding to attend to emotional targets paired with distractors that were either neutral or opposite in valence to the target. Pupillary responses were recorded during initial encoding as well as a later incidental recognition task. Memory and pupillary responses for negative items were not affected by the valence of distractors, suggesting that positive distractors did not automatically attract older adults' attention while they were encoding negative targets. Additionally, the pupil dilation to negative items mediated the relation between age and positivity in memory. Overall, memory and pupillary responses provide converging support for a cognitive control account of positivity effects in late adulthood and suggest a link between attentional processes and the memory positivity effect.

  18. PEPTIDE SOLUBILITY, STRUCTURE AND CHARGE POSITION EFFECT ON ADSORPTION BY ALUMINIUM HYDROXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Trujillo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Solubility, structure and position of charges in a peptide antigen sequence can be mentioned as being amongst the basic features of adsorption. In order to study their effect on adsorption, seven analogue series were synthesized from a MSP-1 peptide sequence by systematically replacing each one of the positions in the peptide sequence by aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, alanine, asparagine, glutamine or lysine. Such modifications in analogue peptide sequences showed a non-regular tendency regarding solubility and adsorption data. Aspartic acid and Glutamic acid analogue series showed great improvements in adsorption, especially in peptides where Lysine in position 6 and Arginine in position 13 were replaced. Solubility of position 5 analogue was greater than the position 6 analogue in Aspartic acid series; however, the position 6 analogue showed best adsorption results whilst the Aspartic acid in position 5 analogue showed no adsorption in the same conditions. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance structural analysis revealed differences in the -helical structureextension between these analogues. The Aspartic acid in position 6, located in the polar side of the helix, may allow this analogueto fit better onto the adsorption regions suggesting that the local electrostatic charge is responsible for this behavior.

  19. Effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Seko, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yui

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes, in order to prevent lower back pain and develop exercise therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy adults (mean age: 23.2 years) participated in the study. During flexion-extension exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually to a flexed position from an upright posture while sitting and standing, and then returned to and maintained an upright (re-upright) position. In the extension-flexion exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually from an upright posture to an extended position, and back while maintaining an upright (re-upright) position. Lumbar spinal muscle activity and hemodynamic changes were evaluated during both exercises. [Results] During the flexion and extension exercises, increased trunk-flexion angle caused increased muscle activity, decreased oxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus muscle, and increased deoxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus and lumbar erector spinae muscles. Moreover, the muscle activities were nearly the same in the re-upright and upright positions, and total hemoglobin also increased. [Conclusion] In both standing and sitting positions, holding the trunk in a flexed position causes ischemic hemodynamic changes in the multifidus muscle; however, the hyperemic response when returning the trunk to an extended position may improve circulation.

  20. Turn down the volume or change the channel? Emotional effects of detached versus positive reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Michelle N; Levenson, Robert W

    2012-09-01

    Cognitive reappraisal, or changing one's interpretation of an event in order to alter the emotional response to it, is thought to be a healthy and an effective emotion regulation strategy. Although researchers recognize several distinct varieties of reappraisal, few studies have explicitly compared the effects of multiple reappraisal strategies on emotional responding. The present study compares the effects of detached and positive reappraisal on thought content, subjective emotional experience, physiological reactivity, and facial expressions of emotion while viewing film clips evoking sadness and disgust. Although both forms of reappraisal reduced overall emotional responding to unpleasant stimuli, the effects of detached reappraisal were stronger in this regard, and positive reappraisal was more likely to maintain subjective experience and facial expression of stimulus-appropriate positive emotions. The two reappraisal strategies also produced somewhat different profiles of physiological responding. Differences between detached and positive reappraisal with respect to subjective experience and facial expression were more pronounced among men than women; the reverse was true for differences with respect to physiological responding. Beyond these effects on individual emotion response systems, detached and positive reappraisal also had somewhat different effects on coherence in change across response systems. Implications for our understanding of emotion regulation processes, and for emotion theory more broadly, are discussed.

  1. Turn Down the Volume or Change the Channel?: Emotional Effects of Detached Versus Positive Reappraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Michelle N.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive reappraisal, or changing one’s interpretation of an event in order to alter the emotional response to it, is thought to be a healthy and effective emotion regulation strategy. Although researchers recognize several distinct varieties of reappraisal, few studies have explicitly compared the effects of multiple reappraisal strategies on emotional responding. The present study compares the effects of detached and positive reappraisal on thought content, subjective emotional experience, physiological reactivity, and facial expressions of emotion while viewing film clips evoking sadness and disgust. While both forms of reappraisal reduced overall emotional responding to unpleasant stimuli, the effects of detached reappraisal were stronger in this regard, and positive reappraisal was more likely to maintain subjective experience and facial expression of stimulus-appropriate positive emotions. The two reappraisal strategies also produced somewhat different profiles of physiological responding. Differences between detached and positive reappraisal with respect to subjective experience and facial expression were more pronounced among men than women; the reverse was true for differences with respect to physiological responding. Beyond these effects on individual emotion response systems, detached and positive reappraisal also had somewhat different effects on coherence in change across response systems. Implications for our understanding of emotion regulation processes, and for emotion theory more broadly, are discussed. PMID:22746676

  2. A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation versus relaxation training: effects on distress, positive states of mind, rumination, and distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shamini; Shapiro, Shauna L; Swanick, Summer; Roesch, Scott C; Mills, Paul J; Bell, Iris; Schwartz, Gary E R

    2007-02-01

    Although mindfulness meditation interventions have recently shown benefits for reducing stress in various populations, little is known about their relative efficacy compared with relaxation interventions. This randomized controlled trial examines the effects of a 1-month mindfulness meditation versus somatic relaxation training as compared to a control group in 83 students (M age = 25; 16 men and 67 women) reporting distress. Psychological distress, positive states of mind, distractive and ruminative thoughts and behaviors, and spiritual experience were measured, while controlling for social desirability. Hierarchical linear modeling reveals that both meditation and relaxation groups experienced significant decreases in distress as well as increases in positive mood states over time, compared with the control group (p differences between meditation and relaxation on distress and positive mood states over time. Effect sizes for distress were large for both meditation and relaxation (Cohen's d = 1.36 and .91, respectively), whereas the meditation group showed a larger effect size for positive states of mind than relaxation (Cohen's d =.71 and .25, respectively). The meditation group also demonstrated significant pre-post decreases in both distractive and ruminative thoughts/behaviors compared with the control group (p mindfulness meditation's effects on reducing distress were partially mediated by reducing rumination. No significant effects were found for spiritual experience. The data suggest that compared with a no-treatment control, brief training in mindfulness meditation or somatic relaxation reduces distress and improves positive mood states. However, mindfulness meditation may be specific in its ability to reduce distractive and ruminative thoughts and behaviors, and this ability may provide a unique mechanism by which mindfulness meditation reduces distress.

  3. Effect of a hybrid maneuver in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Wanees M A; Gad El-Mawla, Ebtessam K; Chedid, Ahmed E F; Mustafa, Ahmed H A

    2015-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common disorder of the vestibular system of the inner ear, which is a vital part of maintaining balance. Although the efficacy of the Epley maneuver-also known as the canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM)-is well established, data comparing CRM versus a hybrid treatment are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a hybrid treatment, the Gans repositioning maneuver (GRM) either with or without postmaneuver restrictions, compared with CRM on treatment of posterior canal BPPV (PC-BPPV). Study design was a randomized controlled trial. A total of 45 patients (30 males and 15 females) with unilateral PC-BPPV were randomly allocated to one of three equal groups on the basis of the date of the first visit with matched assignment for gender: a GRMR group (GRM with postmaneuver restrictions), a GRM group, and a CRM group. Patients received weekly administration of the maneuver until resolution of symptoms. The Dix-Hallpike test was performed before treatment at every appointment, and finally after 1 mo from the last maneuver. Nystagmus duration and vertigo intensity were recorded. The supine roll test was performed in case the Dix-Hallpike test was negative to test otoconial migration. Data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t-tests with a Bonferroni correction, and the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. All patients showed improvement within the groups, and PC-BPPV symptoms were resolved by an average of 2, 1.7, and 1.6 maneuvers for GRMR, GRM, and CRM, respectively, with no statistical differences among the three groups (p > 0.05). Only two patients had recurrence, and one patient had horizontal BPPV at 1 mo follow-up. We demonstrated that the GRM as a new treatment is effective in treating PC-BPPV with no benefits to postmaneuver restrictions. American Academy of Audiology.

  4. Brand Positioning - A Marketing Resource and an Effective Tool for Small and Medium Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliuta Costel NEGRICEA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to acquire an effective competitive advantage on the market, the product/ brand must be understood by the prospects in a certain way. The outcome of positioning is the depiction of a clear image in the prospect’s mind of what the product can offer or mean. A clear position in the prospect’s mind should be one of the most important goals in marketing. The marketing endeavor in any company should be focused on achieving a desired position in a prospect’s mind. A marketer must be able to distinguish between real positioning options and wishful thinking, because the barrier between these two is very thin and could lead to success or failure. A strong brand and an enduring position should be planned and attained together by any Small and Medium Enterprise, because they can differentiate the survivors from the perished, the winners from the losers, and the leaders from the pursuers.

  5. Domain identification moderates the effect of positive stereotypes on Chinese American women's math performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Carmel S; Meyer, Oanh L; Dhindsa, Manveen; Zane, Nolan

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether an individual difference factor, math domain identification, moderated performance following positive stereotype activation. We hypothesized that positive stereotype activation would improve performance for those more math identified (compared to a control condition), but would hinder performance for those less math identified. We examined 116 Chinese American women (mean age = 19 years). Participants were assigned to the positive stereotype activation condition or to the control condition before completing a math test. Positive stereotype activation led more math identified participants to perform significantly better than the control condition, whereas it led less math identified participants to perform significantly worse than the control condition. Domain identification moderates the effect of positive stereotype activation. Educators should consider how testing situations are constructed, especially when test takers do not identify highly with the domain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Effective use of simple computer programmes and clay models to demonstrate the planning and operative steps for teaching and presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Krishnarao Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Presenting and demonstrating a surgical procedure in the current era is difficult without good intraoperative pictures and videos. A long, complex, multi-staged surgery is better illustrated by detailed intraoperative images at various stages. Although desirable, it may be difficult due to various reasons. Material and Methods: A simple method of preparing illustrations with pictures/diagrams created on PowerPoint and clay models to recreate the missing links in clinical photographs has been proposed. Results: It is a simple technique with a moderate learning curve. Once familiar with technique, one can effectively use the technique to convey the details in much more clear manner. Conclusion: It is a simple and effective way of communicating through digital images, and gives the audience a 3 dimensional idea about the concept.

  7. Characterization of the positive and negative inotropic effects of acetylcholine in the human myocardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X.Y. Du (Xiaoyi); R.G. Schoemaker (Regien); E. Bos (Egbert); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn the human isolated myocardium, acetylcholine (10−9 to 10−3 M) elicited a biphasic inotropic effect (a decrease in the lower and an increase in the higher concentration range) in atrial and a positive inotropic effect in ventricular trabeculae. However, under conditions of raised

  8. The effect of altered road markings on speed and lateral position : a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidse, R.J. Driel, C.J.G. van & Goldenbeld, C.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of a meta-analysis of a number of small-scale studies into the effects of changed road markings on the speed and lateral position of motor vehicles. It was examined whether predictions can be made about the general effects of altered road markings. Several kinds of

  9. Challenges Women Face in Leadership Positions and Organizational Effectiveness: An Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmuti, Dean; Jia, Heather; Davis, Henry H.

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to discover working public thoughts about roles of United States women in leadership positions and to test the relationship between managerial leadership styles and organizational effectiveness. A survey of perceptions of leadership roles and effectiveness distributed 700 randomly selected entities from industries in the…

  10. Whole-School Positive Behaviour Support: Effects on Student Discipline Problems and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiselli, James K.; Putnam, Robert F.; Handler, Marcie W.; Feinberg, Adam B.

    2005-01-01

    Many students attending public schools exhibit discipline problems such as disruptive classroom behaviour, vandalism, bullying, and violence. Establishing effective discipline practices is critical to ensure academic success and to provide a safe learning environment. In this article, we describe the effects of whole-school positive behaviour…

  11. Experimental demonstration of a trophic cascade in the Galápagos rocky subtidal: Effects of consumer identity and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witman, Jon D; Smith, Franz; Novak, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In diverse tropical webs, trophic cascades are presumed to be rare, as species interactions may dampen top-down control and reduce their prevalence. To test this hypothesis, we used an open experimental design in the Galápagos rocky subtidal that enabled a diverse guild of fish species, in the presence of each other and top predators (sea lions and sharks), to attack two species of sea urchins grazing on benthic algae. Time-lapse photography of experiments on natural and experimental substrates revealed strong species identity effects: only two predator species-blunthead triggerfish (Pseudobalistes naufragium) and finescale triggerfish (Balistes polylepis)-drove a diurnal trophic cascade extending to algae, and they preferred large pencil urchins (Eucidaris galapagensis) over green urchins (Lytechinus semituberculatus). Triggerfish predation effects were strong, causing a 24-fold reduction of pencil urchin densities during the initial 21 hours of a trophic cascade experiment. A trophic cascade was demonstrated for pencil urchins, but not for green urchins, by significantly higher percent cover of urchin-grazed algae in cages that excluded predatory fish than in predator access (fence) treatments. Pencil urchins were more abundant at night when triggerfish were absent, suggesting that this species persists by exploiting a nocturnal predation refuge. Time-series of pencil urchin survivorship further demonstrated per capita interference effects of hogfish and top predators. These interference effects respectively weakened and extended the trophic cascade to a fourth trophic level through behavioral modifications of the triggerfish-urchin interaction. We conclude that interference behaviors capable of modifying interaction strength warrant greater attention as mechanisms for altering top-down control, particularly in speciose food webs.

  12. Analysis of the effect of swimmer's head position on swimming performance using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaïdi, H; Taïar, R; Fohanno, S; Polidori, G

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this numerical work is to analyze the effect of the position of the swimmer's head on the hydrodynamic performances in swimming. In this initial study, the problem was modeled as 2D and in steady hydrodynamic state. The geometry is generated by the CAD software CATIA and the numerical simulation is carried out by the use of the CFD Fluent code. The standard k-epsilon turbulence model is used with a specific wall law. Three positions of the head were studied, for a range of Reynolds numbers about 10(6). The obtained numerical results revealed that the position of the head had a noticeable effect on the hydrodynamic performances, strongly modifying the wake around the swimmer. The analysis of these results made it possible to propose an optimal position of the head of a swimmer in underwater swimming.

  13. Save the last dance II: unwanted serial position effects in figure skating judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruine de Bruin, Wändi

    2006-11-01

    Serial position effects may occur whenever options are judged in sequence, as is the case in figure skating competitions. International figure skating competitions consist of at least two rounds, with serial position being randomized in the first round. Figure skaters with better scores in the first round perform later in the second round. Despite the initial randomization of serial position, figure skaters who perform later in the first round receive better scores in first and in the second round. The findings presented here replicate those of Bruine de Bruin (2005) [Save the last dance for me: unwanted serial position effects in jury evaluations. Acta Psychologica, 118, 245-260], using a larger dataset, and addressing potential concerns about Bruine de Bruin's analyses.

  14. Dynamic Effects of Anchor Positional Tolerance on Tension Moored Floating Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher; Pakrashi, Vikram; Murphy, Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    For water depths greater than 60m floating wind turbines will become the most economical option for generating offshore wind energy. Tension mooring stabilised units are one type of platform being considered by the offshore wind energy industry. The complex mooring arrangement used by this type of platform means that the dynamics are greatly effected by offsets in the positioning of the anchors. This paper examines the issue of tendon anchor position tolerances. The dynamic effects of three positional tolerances are analysed in survival state using the time domain FASTLink. The severe impact of worst case anchor positional offsets on platform and turbine survivability is shown. The worst anchor misposition combinations are highlighted and should be strongly avoided. Novel methods to mitigate this issue are presented.

  15. The effects of positive emotion priming on self-reported reckless driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman-Ben-Ari, Orit

    2012-03-01

    Five studies examined the effects of positive emotion priming on the willingness to drive recklessly. In all five, young drivers were exposed to one of the following primes of positive affect: a positive mood story; happy memories; an exciting film; a relaxing film; or thoughts on the meaning in life. Following the prime, the participants were asked to report on their willingness to drive recklessly. The responses were compared to those of groups exposed either to neutral affect, another kind of positive affect, or negative affect priming. In two of the studies, participants were also asked to report on their driving styles (risky, anxious, angry, or careful) as a second dependent variable. Positive affect, especially in the form of arousal, was found to be related to higher willingness to drive recklessly. Although men tended to report higher intentions to drive recklessly, men and women did not react differently to the emotional induction. Most interestingly, positive emotions of a relaxing nature, as well as thinking about the meaning in life, lowered the willingness to engage in risky driving. The discussion emphasizes the importance of looking for new ways to use positive emotions effectively in road safety interventions, and considers the practical implications of the studies.

  16. Brand Positioning - A Marketing Resource and an Effective Tool for Small and Medium Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Iliuta Costel NEGRICEA; Tudor EDU

    2012-01-01

    In order to acquire an effective competitive advantage on the market, the product/ brand must be understood by the prospects in a certain way. The outcome of positioning is the depiction of a clear image in the prospect’s mind of what the product can offer or mean. A clear position in the prospect’s mind should be one of the most important goals in marketing. The marketing endeavor in any company should be focused on achieving a desired position in a prospect’s mind. A marketer must be able t...

  17. Adults with dyslexia demonstrate large effects of crowding and detrimental effects of distractors in a visual tilt discrimination task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizan Cassim

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that adults with dyslexia (AwD are disproportionately impacted by close spacing of stimuli and increased numbers of distractors in a visual search task compared to controls [1]. Using an orientation discrimination task, the present study extended these findings to show that even in conditions where target search was not required: (i AwD had detrimental effects of both crowding and increased numbers of distractors; (ii AwD had more pronounced difficulty with distractor exclusion in the left visual field and (iii measures of crowding and distractor exclusion correlated significantly with literacy measures. Furthermore, such difficulties were not accounted for by the presence of covarying symptoms of ADHD in the participant groups. These findings provide further evidence to suggest that the ability to exclude distracting stimuli likely contributes to the reported visual attention difficulties in AwD and to the aetiology of literacy difficulties. The pattern of results is consistent with weaker and asymmetric attention in AwD.

  18. Adults with dyslexia demonstrate large effects of crowding and detrimental effects of distractors in a visual tilt discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Rizan; Talcott, Joel B; Moores, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that adults with dyslexia (AwD) are disproportionately impacted by close spacing of stimuli and increased numbers of distractors in a visual search task compared to controls [1]. Using an orientation discrimination task, the present study extended these findings to show that even in conditions where target search was not required: (i) AwD had detrimental effects of both crowding and increased numbers of distractors; (ii) AwD had more pronounced difficulty with distractor exclusion in the left visual field and (iii) measures of crowding and distractor exclusion correlated significantly with literacy measures. Furthermore, such difficulties were not accounted for by the presence of covarying symptoms of ADHD in the participant groups. These findings provide further evidence to suggest that the ability to exclude distracting stimuli likely contributes to the reported visual attention difficulties in AwD and to the aetiology of literacy difficulties. The pattern of results is consistent with weaker and asymmetric attention in AwD.

  19. Angular and positional dependence of Purcell effect for layered metal-dielectric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubaydullin, A. R.; Mazlin, V. A.; Ivanov, K. A.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Balocco, C.

    2016-04-01

    We study the angular dependence of the spontaneous emission enhancement of a dipole source inserted into a layered metal-dielectric metamaterial. We analyse the dependence of Purcell effect from the position of the dipole in the layered hyperbolic media. We analyse the impact of the complex structure of eigenmodes of the system operating in hyperbolic regime. We have shown that the spontaneous emission rate of the dipole emitter depends on its position, which mainly affect the interaction with Langmuir modes.

  20. Social Networks in Later Life: Weighing Positive and Negative Effects on Health and Well-Being

    OpenAIRE

    Rook, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    Social networks provide a mix of positive and negative experiences. Network members can provide help in times of need and day-to-day companionship, but they can also behave in ways that are inconsiderate, hurtful, or intrusive. Researchers must grapple with these dualities in order to develop a comprehensive understanding of how social network ties affect health and well-being. This article provides an overview of research that has examined the health-related effects of positive and negative ...

  1. EFFECT OF ONE MONTH RESIDENTIAL YOGA PROGRAM ON MEASURING THE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE ATTITUDE

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwini H. R.; Sony Kumari

    2015-01-01

    The Effectiveness of One Month Residential Yoga Program on Measuring the Positive and Negative Attitude among 50 participants was examined. The participants were divided into two groups -Yoga and Control group. Yoga Group comprising of both Male and Female attended one month Residential yoga program where they followed a strict schedule of 10 hours per day. Result indicated that Yoga Program contributed significantly in improving positive attitude and reducing in negative attitude in healthy ...

  2. The Effect of Fatigued External Rotator Muscles of the Shoulder on the Shoulder Position Sense

    OpenAIRE

    Naoya Iida; Fuminari Kaneko; Nobuhiro Aoki; Yoshinari Sakaki

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of fatigue in shoulder external rotator muscles on position sense of shoulder abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. The study included 10 healthy subjects. Shoulder position sense was measured before and after a fatigue task involving shoulder external rotator muscles. The fatigue task was performed using an isokinetic machine. To confirm the muscle fatigue, electromyography (EMG) was recorded, and an integrated EMG and median power fr...

  3. Effects of box handle position and carrying range on bi-manual carrying capacity for females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Swei-Pi; Loiu, Yi; Chien, Te Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a psychophysical approach to examine the effects on carrying capacity for bi-manual carrying tasks involving different handle positions and carrying ranges. A total of 16 female subjects participated in the experiment in groups of two people, and each group of subjects performed the tasks in a random order with 12 different combinations of carrying task. The independent variables are handle position (upper, middle, lower) and carrying range (F-F: floor height carried to floor height, F-W: floor height carried to waist height, W-W: waist height carried to waist height, W-F: waist height carried to floor height), the dependent variable is the maximum acceptable carried weight (MAWC), heart rate (HR), and the rating of perceived exertion (RPE). The results show that the handle position has a significant effect on MAWC and overall RPE but no significant effect on HR. Carrying range has a significant effect on the MAWC and HR, but no significant effect on overall HR. The handle position and carrying range have a significant interaction on the MAWC and HR. The RPE for different body parts shows significant differences, and the hands feel the most tired. Overall, this study confirms that the lower handle position with the W-W carrying range is the best combination for a two-person carrying task.

  4. Last but not Least: Additional Positional Effects on Citation and Readership in arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Haque, Asif-ul; 10.1002/asi.21428

    2010-01-01

    We continue investigation of the effect of position in announcements of newly received articles, a single day artifact, with citations received over the course of ensuing years. Earlier work [arXiv:0907.4740, arXiv:0805.0307] focused on the "visibility" effect for positions near the beginnings of announcements, and on the "self-promotion" effect associated to authors intentionally aiming for these positions, with both found correlated to a later enhanced citation rate. Here we consider a "reverse-visibility" effect for positions near the ends of announcements, and on a "procrastination" effect associated to submissions made within the 20 minute period just before the daily deadline. For two large subcommunities of theoretical high energy physics, we find a clear "reverse-visibility" effect, in which articles near the ends of the lists receive a boost in both short-term readership and long-term citations, almost comparable in size to the "visibility" effect documented earlier. For one of those subcommunities, ...

  5. Indirect Effects of Attributional Style for Positive Events on Depressive Symptoms Through Self-Esteem During Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueger, Sandra Yu; George, Rachel

    2017-04-01

    Research on adolescent depression has overwhelmingly focused on risk factors, such as stressful negative events and cognitive vulnerabilities, but much important information can be gained by focusing on protective factors. Thus, the current study aimed to broaden understanding on adolescent depression by considering the role of two positive elements as protective factors, attributional style for positive events and self-esteem, in a model of depression. The sample included 491 middle school students (52 % female; n = 249) with an age range from 12 to 15 years (M = 13.2, SD = .70). The sample was ethnically/racially diverse, with 55 % White, 22 % Hispanic, 10 % Asian American, 3 % African American, and 10 % Biracial/Other. Correlational analyses indicated significant cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between an enhancing attributional style (internal, stable, global attributions for positive events), self-esteem and depressive symptoms. Further, prospective analyses using bootstrapping methodology demonstrated significant indirect effects of an enhancing attributional style on decreases in depressive symptoms through its effects on self-esteem. These findings highlight the importance of considering attributional style for positive events as a protective factor in the developmental course of depressive symptoms during early adolescence.

  6. Crowdedness mediates the effect of social identification on positive emotion in a crowd: a survey of two crowd events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Novelli

    Full Text Available Exposure to crowding is said to be aversive, yet people also seek out and enjoy crowded situations. We surveyed participants at two crowd events to test the prediction of self-categorization theory that variable emotional responses to crowding are a function of social identification with the crowd. In data collected from participants who attended a crowded outdoor music event (n = 48, identification with the crowd predicted feeling less crowded; and there was an indirect effect of identification with the crowd on positive emotion through feeling less crowded. Identification with the crowd also moderated the relation between feeling less crowded and positive emotion. In data collected at a demonstration march (n = 112, identification with the crowd predicted central (most dense location in the crowd; and there was an indirect effect of identification with the crowd on positive emotion through central location in the crowd. Positive emotion in the crowd also increased over the duration of the crowd event. These findings are in line with the predictions of self-categorization theory. They are inconsistent with approaches that suggest that crowding is inherently aversive; and they cannot easily be explained through the concept of 'personal space'.

  7. The perceived position of moving objects: transcranial magnetic stimulation of area MT+ reduces the flash-lag effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Gerrit W; Ward, Jamie; Nijhawan, Romi; Whitney, David

    2013-01-01

    How does the visual system assign the perceived position of a moving object? This question is surprisingly complex, since sluggish responses of photoreceptors and transmission delays along the visual pathway mean that visual cortex does not have immediate information about a moving object's position. In the flash-lag effect (FLE), a moving object is perceived ahead of an aligned flash. Psychophysical work on this illusion has inspired models for visual localization of moving objects. However, little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms. Here, we investigated the role of neural activity in areas MT+ and V1/V2 in localizing moving objects. Using short trains of repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) or single pulses at different time points, we measured the influence of TMS on the perceived location of a moving object. We found that TMS delivered to MT+ significantly reduced the FLE; single pulse timings revealed a broad temporal tuning with maximum effect for TMS pulses, 200 ms after the flash. Stimulation of V1/V2 did not significantly influence perceived position. Our results demonstrate that area MT+ contributes to the perceptual localization of moving objects and is involved in the integration of position information over a long time window.

  8. A novel approach to delayed-start analyses for demonstrating disease-modifying effects in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu-Seifert

    Full Text Available One method for demonstrating disease modification is a delayed-start design, consisting of a placebo-controlled period followed by a delayed-start period wherein all patients receive active treatment. To address methodological issues in previous delayed-start approaches, we propose a new method that is robust across conditions of drug effect, discontinuation rates, and missing data mechanisms. We propose a modeling approach and test procedure to test the hypothesis of noninferiority, comparing the treatment difference at the end of the delayed-start period with that at the end of the placebo-controlled period. We conducted simulations to identify the optimal noninferiority testing procedure to ensure the method was robust across scenarios and assumptions, and to evaluate the appropriate modeling approach for analyzing the delayed-start period. We then applied this methodology to Phase 3 solanezumab clinical trial data for mild Alzheimer's disease patients. Simulation results showed a testing procedure using a proportional noninferiority margin was robust for detecting disease-modifying effects; conditions of high and moderate discontinuations; and with various missing data mechanisms. Using all data from all randomized patients in a single model over both the placebo-controlled and delayed-start study periods demonstrated good statistical performance. In analysis of solanezumab data using this methodology, the noninferiority criterion was met, indicating the treatment difference at the end of the placebo-controlled studies was preserved at the end of the delayed-start period within a pre-defined margin. The proposed noninferiority method for delayed-start analysis controls Type I error rate well and addresses many challenges posed by previous approaches. Delayed-start studies employing the proposed analysis approach could be used to provide evidence of a disease-modifying effect. This method has been communicated with FDA and has been

  9. Design of a Doppler Effect Demonstrator%多普勒效应演示仪设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 陈海忠; 裴明旭; 朱小芹

    2012-01-01

    This paper is focused on the design of a circuit which can emit ultrasonic waves to demonstrate Doppler effect. With high frequency, good direction, high transmission power, and non-disturbance, the circuit which can demonstrate Doppler effect within limited space is easily made with low cost, has the appending function of fine ranging etc. It is proved that the change of frequency is approximately 120 Hz to 240 Hz when the speed of ultrasonic wave is 340 m/s and the speed of moving objects is in the range of 1 m/s to 2 m/s. Therefore, the human ears can easily feel the Doppler effect.%根据多普勒效应基本原理,利用超声波作为信号源制作了多普勒效应演示仪.利用40 kHz超声波作为信号源,具有频率高、方向性好、发射功率高、不易受干扰等优点,能够在有限的教室空间里实现多普勒效应演示.理论证明,速度为340 m/s的超声波,当物体的运动速度在1~2 m/s变化时,差频的变化范围约为120 ~240 Hz,人耳就能很容易感受到多普勒效应.同时,该仪器还具有制作简单、易携带的优点,并自带测距、测速等附加功能.

  10. Effects of Herceptin on circulating tumor cells in HER2 positive early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J-L; Yao, Q; Chen Y Wang, J-H; Wang, H; Fan, Q; Ling, R; Yi, J; Wang, L

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the changes in peripheral blood circulating tumor cells in HER2-positive early breast cancer before and after Herceptin therapy, and to explore the effects of the HER2 gene and Herceptin on circulating tumor cells. CK19 mRNA expression in peripheral blood was evaluated by qRT-PCR as an index of circulating tumor cells in 15 cases of HER-2-positive breast cancer and 18 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer before, and after chemotherapy as well. Ten cases of HER2-positive breast cancer continued on Herceptin therapy for 3 months after chemotherapy, and their peripheral blood was again drawn and assayed for CK-19 mRNA expression. Preoperatively, all cases of HER2-positive cancer were positive for CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood, but 6 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer were positive (33.3%), where there was a substantial difference between the two groups. After 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, CK19 positive rates in cases of HER2-positive and -negative breast cancer reduced by 93.3 and 11.1%, respectively, with a significant difference still existing. After 3 months of Herceptin therapy, expression of CK19 mRNA declined considerably in 10 cases of HER2 positive breast cancer (113.66 ± 88.65 vs 63.35 ± 49.27, P = 0.025). HER-2 gene expression closely correlated with circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of early breast cancer patients. Moreover, Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody for HER2, can reduce the number of circulating tumor cells, which can be an early predictive factor for Herceptin therapy effectiveness against breast cancer.

  11. The Effect of Relaxation and Positive Self-Talk on Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiyaee Asadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is characterized by recurrent, moderate-to-severe affective, physical, and behavioral symptoms that develop during the luteal menstrual cycle and disappear within a few days of menstruation. Objectives This article aims to identify the effects of relaxation, positive self-talk, and a combination of relaxation and positive self-talk on premenstrual syndrome. Methods In this quasi-experimental study, 80 women with PMS disorder were selected using a simple random sampling method, in Hamadan, west of Iran. They were randomly divided into four groups. The first and second groups underwent positive self-talk and relaxation, respectively. The third group experienced positive self-talk and relaxation at the same time. The fourth group did not receive any treatment. The duration of treatment was 8 one-hour sessions. Data were collected using a PMS symptom severity questionnaire. All groups were followed up for six months after the intervention. Finally, data analysis was performed using SPSS version 18 for ANCOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results The results showed that compared to the control group, relaxation (23.2 and positive self-talk (21.25 treatment methods alone can reduce PMS (P < 0.001. On the other hand, a combined (relaxation + positive self-talk treatment method (13.75 was more effective in reducing PMS compared to relaxation or positive self-talk alone. Conclusions It seems that psychological therapy based on relaxation and positive self-talk can be significantly effective in reducing PMS.

  12. The effect of precipitation on the transmission of Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus in nature: a complex effect on antibody-positive rate to JE virus in sentinel pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro; Shibasaki, Ken-ichi; Kotaki, Akira; Hijioka, Yasuaki; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2013-05-03

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of the most important mosquito-borne viral diseases in Asia. Pigs are a natural host and the amplifier of JE virus. The sero-conversion rate to JE virus in sentinel pigs reflects the activity of JE virus in the region. We analyzed whether precipitation has any effect on the sero-conversion rate to JE virus in sentinel pigs. Linear regression analysis was performed to determine the correlations between the levels of precipitation and sero-conversion rates to JE virus, in the entire year and during summertime over the period of 32 years from 1969 to 2000. The levels of the annual and summertime precipitation demonstrated statistically significant positive correlations with sero-conversion rates for the whole of the country and for some regions in Japan. The levels of the summertime precipitation, on the other hand, demonstrated statistically significant inverse correlations with the sero-conversion rates in other regions. Further, the levels of precipitation during preceding 10-day periods from days 1-40 before blood collection showed inverse correlation with antibody-positive rates in some regions. The results indicate that the relationship between the annual and summertime precipitation, and the sero-conversion rate to JE virus is complex; both positive and inverse effects are demonstrated depending on the regions.

  13. Towards a conceptual framework demonstrating the effectiveness of audiovisual patient descriptions (patient video cases: a review of the current literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Damian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological advances have enabled the widespread use of video cases via web-streaming and online download as an educational medium. The use of real subjects to demonstrate acute pathology should aid the education of health care professionals. However, the methodology by which this effect may be tested is not clear. Methods We undertook a literature review of major databases, found relevant articles relevant to using patient video cases as educational interventions, extracted the methodologies used and assessed these methods for internal and construct validity. Results A review of 2532 abstracts revealed 23 studies meeting the inclusion criteria and a final review of 18 of relevance. Medical students were the most commonly studied group (10 articles with a spread of learner satisfaction, knowledge and behaviour tested. Only two of the studies fulfilled defined criteria on achieving internal and construct validity. The heterogeneity of articles meant it was not possible to perform any meta-analysis. Conclusions Previous studies have not well classified which facet of training or educational outcome the study is aiming to explore and had poor internal and construct validity. Future research should aim to validate a particular outcome measure, preferably by reproducing previous work rather than adopting new methods. In particular cognitive processing enhancement, demonstrated in a number of the medical student studies, should be tested at a postgraduate level.

  14. Semiclassical Method to Schr(o)dinger Equation with Position-Dependent Effective Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gang; XUAN Pei-Cai; CHEN Zi-Dong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, two novel semiclassical methods including the standard and supersymmetric WKB quantization conditions are suggested to discuss the Schrodinger equation with position-dependent effective mass. From a proper coordinate transformation, the formalism of the Schrodinger equation with position-dependent effective mass is mapped into isospectral one with constant mass and therefore for a given mass distribution and physical potential function the bound state energy spectrum can be determined easily by above method associated with a simple integral formula. It is shown that our method can give the analytical results for some exactly-solvable quantum systems.

  15. Evaluation of barriers contributing in the demonstration of an effective nurse-patient communication in educational hospitals of Jahrom, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar Jahromi, Marzieh; Ramezanli, Somayeh

    2014-06-30

    Establishing an effective communication with patients is an essential aspect of nursing care. Nurse-patient communication has a key role in improving nursing care and increasing patient's satisfaction of health care system. The study aimed at evaluation of barriers contributing in the demonstration of an effective nurse-patient communication from their viewpoint. This was cross-sectional study, carried out in 2014, with a sample of 200 nurses and patients drawn from two educational hospitals in jahrom city. Data were collected by using two questionnaire structured by the researchers. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 16). The results of this study showed that the greatest barriers of nurse-patient communication were characteristics of nursing job with an average score of 71.05 ± 10.18. The most communication barriers from patients viewpoint including: heavy work load of the nurses, age , sex and language difference between patient and nurse and the spicy morality of nurses. It is concluded that overcome barriers to communication and support are needed to enable nurses to communicate therapeutically with patients in order to achieve care that is effective and responsive to their needs.

  16. Short communication: Proteins in heat-processed skim milk powder have no positive effects on bone loss of ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, M; Kong, Y; Wang, C; Gao, H; Han, X; Yi, H; Zhang, L

    2011-06-01

    Milk has positive effects on bone growth. However, the effect of skim milk powder (SMP) on bone properties has not been reported. This study investigated the effect of SMP on bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Forty female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and another 10 rats received a sham operation. The OVX rats were randomly separated into 4 groups: OVX control, OVX SMP1 (SMP at 0.04 g/d), OVX SMP2 (SMP at 0.20 g/d), and OVX SMP3 (SMP at 0.40 g/d). Skim milk powder was supplied in the rat diet for 12 wk, and the rats were gavaged once per day. The effects of SMP on calcium content and bone mineral density of femur were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, respectively. Compared with the control, SMP at all dose levels tested had no particular effect on weight:length, calcium content, or bone mineral density of femurs. It was demonstrated that SMP (0.04 to 0.40 g/d) had no positive effect on bone loss in OVX rats, probably because the heat treatment used during SMP processing caused a loss of biological activity in the protein.

  17. Effects on lung stress of position and different doses of perfluorocarbon in a model of ARDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aguilar, Josefina; Lucangelo, Umberto; Albaiceta, Guillermo M; Nahum, Avi; Murias, Gastón; Cañizares, Rosario; Oliva, Joan Carles; Romero, Pablo V; Blanch, Lluís

    2015-05-01

    We determined whether the combination of low dose partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorocarbons (PFC) and prone positioning improved lung function while inducing minimal stress. Eighteen pigs with acute lung injury were assigned to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) or PLV (5 or 10 ml/kg of PFC). Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) trials in supine and prone positions were performed. Data were analyzed by a multivariate polynomial regression model. The interplay between PLV and position depended on the PEEP level. In supine PLV dampened the stress induced by increased PEEP during the trial. The PFC dose of 5 ml/kg was more effective than the dose 10 ml/kg. This effect was not observed in prone. Oxygenation was significantly higher in prone than in supine position mainly at lower levels of PEEP. In conclusion, MV settings should take both gas exchange and stress/strain into account. When protective CMV fails, rescue strategies combining prone positioning and PLV with optimal PEEP should improve gas exchange with minimal stress.

  18. Defending or Challenging the Status Quo: Position Effects on Biased Intergroup Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma A. Bäck

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The default ideological position is status quo maintaining, and challenging the status quo is associated with increased efforts and risks. Nonetheless, some people choose to challenge the status quo. Therefore, to challenge the status quo should imply a strong belief in one’s position as the correct one, and thus efforts may be undertaken to undermine the position of others. Study 1 (N = 311 showed that challengers undermined, by ascribing more externality and less rationality, the position of defenders to a larger extent than defenders did of challengers’ position. Studies 2 (N = 135 and 3 (N = 109 tested if these effects were driven by the implied minority status of the challenging position. Results revealed no effects of experimentally manipulated numerical status, but challengers were again more biased than defenders. Study 3 also revealed that challengers felt more negatively toward their opponents (possibly due to greater social identification with like-minded others, and these negative emotions in turn predicted biased attributions. Results are important as they add to the understanding of how intergroup conflict may arise, providing explanations for why challengers are less tolerant of others’ point of view.

  19. Are positive and negative reinforcement "different"? Insights from a free-operant differential outcomes effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoon, Michael A; Critchfield, Thomas S; Merrill, Dustin; Newland, M Christopher; Schneider, W Joel

    2017-01-01

    Although theoretical discussions typically assume that positive and negative reinforcement differ, the literature contains little unambiguous evidence that they produce differential behavioral effects. To test whether the two types of consequences control behavior differently, we pitted money-gain positive reinforcement and money-loss-avoidance negative reinforcement, scheduled through identically programmed variable-cycle schedules, against each other in concurrent schedules. Contingencies of response-produced feedback, normally different in positive and negative reinforcement, were made symmetrical. Steeper matching slopes were produced compared to a baseline consisting of all positive reinforcement. This free-operant differential outcomes effect supports the notion that that stimulus-presentation positive reinforcement and stimulus-elimination negative reinforcement are functionally "different." However, a control experiment showed that the feedback asymmetry of more traditional positive and negative reinforcement schedules also is sufficient to create a "difference" when the type of consequence is held constant. We offer these findings as a small step in meeting the very large challenge of moving negative reinforcement theory beyond decades of relative quiescence.

  20. How much nutrients could biochar-related positive priming effect provide to crops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiven, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    From a carbon mass balance perspective, positive priming effect is usually seen as a counter balancing effect of the global change mitigation potential of biochar. However, the decomposition of the native organic matter due to the inputs of another source of carbon can be also seen as a possible source of nutrients for the crop on the short scale. The direction of priming effect reported in several recent publications, i.e. positive during the first months / years, and then negative on the longer term, indicate that this nutrient mining may be an aspect to look at when it comes to crop yield improvement effect due to biochar. In this presentation, I will review the existing knowledge about this nutrient priming effect and try to quantify it importance.

  1. The effect of eccentric exercise on position sense and joint reaction angle of the lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, V; Nikolaidis, M G; Giakas, G; Jamurtas, A Z; Pappas, A; Koutedakis, Y

    2007-04-01

    Impaired position sense and impaired joint reaction angle of the lower limbs after muscle-damaging activities is a serious functional limitation that may lead to an increased risk of injury, particularly in older populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether position sense and joint reaction angle to release can be affected by eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Twelve women underwent an isokinetic exercise session of the lower limb. Isometric peak torque, delayed-onset muscle soreness, serum creatine kinase, position sense, and knee joint reaction angle to release were examined before, immediately after, and 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. Due to the effect of eccentric exercise, subjects persistently placed their lower limb at a more extended position, representing a shorter knee extensor muscle. Eccentric exercise increased the knee reaction angle of the lower limb after release from 0 degrees and 15 degrees but not from 30 degrees and 45 degrees . Position sense and joint reaction to release were similarly affected by eccentric exercise and independently of visual feedback. Position sense was impaired only immediately post-exercise (probably due to muscle fatigue), whereas impairment of the reaction angle to release persisted up to 3 days post-exercise (probably due to muscle damage). Attenuation of position sense and joint reaction angle of the lower limbs after damaging activities is a serious functional limitation that may lead to an increase risk of injury, particularly in older populations.

  2. Effects of Positioning Aids on Understanding the Relationship Between a Mobile Map and the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Kässi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Positioning technologies such as GPS enable mobile map applications to display a symbol representing an estimation of a user’s location on a mobile map, therefore acting as a positioning aid. Previous research on the cognitive processes involved in map reading suggests that map readers need at least two map–environment points (objects that are visualized on the map and perceived in the environment for determining their location on a map. Hence, the positioning aid alone does not provide enough information for self-location. Using a field experiment, we assessed the effect of representing the user’s location on a map on the cognitive processes involved in self-location. The results show that positioning aids guide the search for map–environment points and narrow the area on the map that must be scanned for self-location.

  3. The Effectiveness of Positive Coping Program on Reduction of Addiction Potential in Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nematollahi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to study the effectiveness of positive coping program on reduction of addiction potential in dormitory girl students. Method: The research method was semi experimental method namely: pre test-post test with witness group. In selection of sample, first addiction potential scale administered among 160 dormitory girl students, and 20 of them who were scored higher than cutoff score on addiction potential scale selected and divided to two experimental and witness groups. Experimental group received 10 sessions training which each session was 90 minutes. Positive coping program was based on three components of Bob Murray’s theory namely: social relationships, goal setting and spirituality. After finishing of training Post test were administered in both experimental and witness groups. Results: The results showed positive coping training was significantly reduced students’ addiction potential. Conclusion: The training of positive coping can be affect on reduction of girl students’ addiction potential.

  4. Preclinical and Clinical Studies Demonstrate That the Proprietary Herbal Extract DA-5512 Effectively Stimulates Hair Growth and Promotes Hair Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Young Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The proprietary DA-5512 formulation comprises six herbal extracts from traditional oriental plants historically associated with therapeutic and other applications related to hair. Here, we investigated the effects of DA-5512 on the proliferation of human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs in vitro and on hair growth in C57BL/6 mice and conducted a clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of DA-5512. DA-5512 significantly enhanced the viability of hDPCs in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05, and 100 ppm of DA-5512 and 1 μM minoxidil (MXD significantly increased the number of Ki-67-positive cells, compared with the control group (p<0.05. MXD (3% and DA-5512 (1%, 5% significantly stimulated hair growth and increased the number and length of hair follicles (HFs versus the controls (each p<0.05. The groups treated with DA-5512 exhibited hair growth comparable to that induced by MXD. In clinical study, we detected a statistically significant increase in the efficacy of DA-5512 after 16 weeks compared with the groups treated with placebo or 3% MXD (p<0.05. In conclusion, DA-5512 might promote hair growth and enhance hair health and can therefore be considered an effective option for treating hair loss.

  5. ANTITUMOR EFFECT OF SARCNU IN A 06-METHYLGUANINE-DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE POSITIVE HUMAN GLIOMA XENOGRAFT MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To assess whether novel analogue of nitrosoureas, 2-chloroethyl-3-sarcosinamide-1-nitrosourea (SarCNU), has antitumor effect to 06-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) positive tumors in vivo. Methods: MGMT positive human glioma cell line SF-767 xenografts in nude mice were treated with SarCNU. The antitumor efficacy of SarCNU was compared with the results of 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) treatment with or without 06-benzylguanine (06-BG) preadministration. Results: Since the SF-767 is MGMT strongly positive, BCNU treatment alone did not result in a satisfactory anticancer effect. As expected, 06-BG by depleting MGMT activity, significantly enhanced BCNU antitumor efficacy (p<0.001). More interestingly, SarCNU treatment alone had a better antitumor effect than 06-BG plus BCNU treatment (F=51.7, p=0.00036). Conclusion: Since SarCNU enters cells via extraneuronal monoamine transporter (EMT), the enhanced antitumor activity of SarCNU in this MGMT positive human tumor xenograft model may be due to the presence of EMT in SF-767.SarCNU may be used as an alternative treatment for MGMT positive tumors, specifically for tumors expressing EMT.

  6. The effects of anxiety on affective learning and serial position recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Samantha J; Everhart, D Erik; Durham, Thomas W; Walker, Marianna; Golden, Jean; Demaree, Heath A

    2008-09-01

    Sixty-five college-aged adults participated in a study that examined the effects of trait and state anxiety on learning positive and negative emotional words from the Affective Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AAVL). Self-reported state and trait anxiety were measured via Speilberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Each participant completed the five learning trials and delayed recall trial of the positive and negative word lists; order of administration for the word lists was counterbalanced across participants. Using ANOVA, initial analyses revealed significant effects for order of administration of the positive and negative word lists. ANCOVAs (using state and trait anxiety as covariates) yielded a significant interaction involving serial position, trial, and state anxiety as well as an interaction involving serial position, trial, and trait anxiety. Post hoc analyses did not support a priori hypotheses. However, state anxiety was associated with decreased word recall on the first learning trial. The results of this study indicate that state anxiety is initially associated with decreased performance when learning emotional words. However, these initial effects dissipate with subsequent learning trials. Implications for task performance are discussed.

  7. Effect of head position on cephalometric evaluation of the soft-tissue facial profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeveen, RC; Sanderink, GCH; Berkhout, WER

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: During a cone beam CT scan, the patient is in an upright or supine position. This position depends on the brand and type of the scanner. The aims of this study are: (1) to investigate if the head position has an effect on cephalometric evaluation of the soft-tissue facial profile, comparing the recordings in natural head position (NHP) and supine head position (SHP) and (2) to investigate if age, gender and body mass index (BMI) are contributing factors to the effect of the head position. Methods: 90 subjects were photographed in profile both in NHP and in SHP. 12 soft-tissue angular and linear cephalometric values were calculated. Two-way random intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to determine observer reliability. Paired t-tests and linear regression analyses were performed to investigate the differences between the head positions and the influence of age, gender and BMI. Results: Intraobserver reliability was generally high. Paired t-tests showed significant changes as a result of head positioning (p < 0.0001) in 9 of the 12 measurements. These differences were small and clinically not relevant, except for the “lower face—throat angle”. Regression analysis revealed no relevant influence of age, gender and BMI. Conclusions: Cephalometric soft-tissue evaluation from a recording in SHP is generally reliable, except for the throat–chin area where a clinically relevant difference was found. The contour of the submandibular tissues in SHP causes the chin to appear more prominently. This can cause incorrect orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. PMID:23412462

  8. A model for the training effects in swimming demonstrates a strong relationship between parasympathetic activity, performance and index of fatigue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Chalencon

    Full Text Available Competitive swimming as a physical activity results in changes to the activity level of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. However, the precise relationship between ANS activity, fatigue and sports performance remains contentious. To address this problem and build a model to support a consistent relationship, data were gathered from national and regional swimmers during two 30 consecutive-week training periods. Nocturnal ANS activity was measured weekly and quantified through wavelet transform analysis of the recorded heart rate variability. Performance was then measured through a subsequent morning 400 meters freestyle time-trial. A model was proposed where indices of fatigue were computed using Banister's two antagonistic component model of fatigue and adaptation applied to both the ANS activity and the performance. This demonstrated that a logarithmic relationship existed between performance and ANS activity for each subject. There was a high degree of model fit between the measured and calculated performance (R(2=0.84±0.14,p<0.01 and the measured and calculated High Frequency (HF power of the ANS activity (R(2=0.79±0.07, p<0.01. During the taper periods, improvements in measured performance and measured HF were strongly related. In the model, variations in performance were related to significant reductions in the level of 'Negative Influences' rather than increases in 'Positive Influences'. Furthermore, the delay needed to return to the initial performance level was highly correlated to the delay required to return to the initial HF power level (p<0.01. The delay required to reach peak performance was highly correlated to the delay required to reach the maximal level of HF power (p=0.02. Building the ANS/performance identity of a subject, including the time to peak HF, may help predict the maximal performance that could be obtained at a given time.

  9. Effects of Increased Physiological Arousal on Upper Extremity Positional Awareness in Healthy Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kovacs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of increased physiological arousal on the ability to perceive upper extremity positional awareness in healthy young adults. Approach: Thirty-eight participants were pre- and post-tested for upper extremity positional awareness using a manual kinesthesiometer. Participants in the experimental group underwent a combination of the Stroop color-word task and timed arithmetic problems to produce a state of physiological arousal. Heart rate and blood pressure measurements were taken during data collection to assess levels of physiological arousal. Pre-and post-test absolute error scores for each participant were compared. Results: ANCOVA revealed a significant time effect (pConclusion: The results suggested positional awareness is altered under a state of elevated physiological arousal and that these results may have significant implications for individuals performing various types of motor skills.

  10. The effect of the formyl group position upon asymmetric isomeric diarylethenes bearing a naphthalene moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renjie Wang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Three new isomeric asymmetric diarylethenes with a naphthyl moiety and a formyl group at the para, meta or ortho position of the terminal benzene ring were synthesized. Their photochromism, fluorescent-switch, and electrochemical properties were investigated. Among these diarylethenes, the one with a formyl group at the ortho position of benzene displayed the largest molar absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yield. The cyclization quantum yields of these compounds increased in the order of para para > ortho. Additionally, all of these diarylethenes functioned as effective fluorescent switches in both solution and PMMA films. Cyclic voltammograms proved that the formyl group and its position could effectively modulate the electrochemical behaviors of these diarylethene derivatives.

  11. Effect of reactor's positions on polymerization and degradation in an ultrasonic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Chiaki

    2008-03-01

    Ultrasonic generators are used as emulsifiers and efficient alternative initiators in polymerization processes. In this study, the effects of reactor's position on the emulsion polymerization of styrene under indirect ultrasonic irradiation were investigated, along with the effects of reactor's position on chemical and physical degradation. Both polymer yield and molecular weight were influenced by the position of the reactor. The ultrasonic irradiation could be divided into three stages, and the molecular weight of the polymer was influenced by polymerization and degradation processes. It was found that the extent of radical generation estimated by KI oxidation dosimetry and the shock wave index obtained from studies of degradation of standard polymer were useful for controlling the characteristics of the polymer generated.

  12. Serum antibodies from a subset of horses positive for Babesia caballi by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrate a protein recognition pattern that is not consistent with infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awinda, Peter O; Mealey, Robert H; Williams, Laura B A; Conrad, Patricia A; Packham, Andrea E; Reif, Kathryn E; Grause, Juanita F; Pelzel-McCluskey, Angela M; Chung, Chungwon; Bastos, Reginaldo G; Kappmeyer, Lowell S; Howe, Daniel K; Ness, SallyAnne L; Knowles, Donald P; Ueti, Massaro W

    2013-11-01

    Tick-borne pathogens that cause persistent infection are of major concern to the livestock industry because of transmission risk from persistently infected animals and the potential economic losses they pose. The recent reemergence of Theileria equi in the United States prompted a widespread national survey resulting in identification of limited distribution of equine piroplasmosis (EP) in the U.S. horse population. This program identified Babesia caballi-seropositive horses using rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1)-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), despite B. caballi being considered nonendemic on the U.S. mainland. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of RAP-1-cELISA as a single serological test to determine the infection status of B. caballi in U.S. horses. Immunoblotting indicated that sera from U.S. horses reacted with B. caballi lysate and purified B. caballi RAP-1 protein. Antibody reactivity to B. caballi lysate was exclusively directed against a single ∼50-kDa band corresponding to a native B. caballi RAP-1 protein. In contrast, sera from experimentally and naturally infected horses from regions where B. caballi is endemic bound multiple proteins ranging from 30 to 50 kDa. Dilutions of sera from U.S. horses positive by cELISA revealed low levels of antibodies, while sera from horses experimentally infected with B. caballi and from areas where B. caballi is endemic had comparatively high antibody levels. Finally, blood transfer from seropositive U.S. horses into naive horses demonstrated no evidence of B. caballi transmission, confirming that antibody reactivity in cELISA-positive U.S. horses was not consistent with infection. Therefore, we conclude that a combination of cELISA and immunoblotting is required for the accurate serodiagnosis of B. caballi.

  13. 5 CFR 316.703 - Effect on tenure of position change of status quo employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... status quo employees. 316.703 Section 316.703 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Into the Competitive Service § 316.703 Effect on tenure of position change of status quo employees. (a) A status quo employee who is promoted, demoted, or reassigned becomes: (1) An indefinite...

  14. Negativity and positivity effects in person perception and inference: Ability versus morality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Martijn; R. Spears; J. van der Pligt; E. Jakobs

    1992-01-01

    Examined, in 2 experiments involving 190 undergraduates, negativity and positivity effects in trait inferences and impression formation. In Exp 1, Ss made trait inferences of actors in different behavioral instances. Results support the prediction that negative behavior is more informative for judgm

  15. Serial position effects scoring in the assessment of memory in Alzheimer's disease and major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, Karel Jozef

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to validate serial position effects (SPE’S) scoring in the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). The RAVLT is a much used clinical method for assessing memory performance, but the method of scoring obfuscates that two memory processes underlie free recall. This

  16. Using the Effective Behavior Supports Survey to Guide Development of Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Stephen P.

    2006-01-01

    As the use of school-based positive behavior support (PBS) spreads nationwide, the development of assessment strategies to identify intervention priorities becomes more critical. This study addresses the validity of the Effective Behavior Supports Survey (Lewis & Sugai, 1999) by examining reliability, determining whether rating differences exist…

  17. Effect of Items Direction (Positive or Negative) on the Reliability in Likert Scale. Paper-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Showkeen Bilal Ahmad; Qasem, Mamun Ali Naji; Bhat, Mehraj Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper an attempt was made to analyze the effect of items direction (positive or negative) on the Alpha Cronbach reliability coefficient and the Split Half reliability coefficient in Likert scale. The descriptive survey research method was used for the study and sample of 510 undergraduate students were selected by used random sampling…

  18. The effect of emphasis and position on word identification by adult cochlear implant listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, David Jackson; Magnusson, Lennart; Jönsson, Radoslava

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of emphasis and word position on word identification by postlingually deafened adult cochlear implant (CI) listeners (n = 20). These participants performed an identification task where Swedish (quasi-) minimal pairs were drawn from sentences and presented in a carri...

  19. Effects of Positive Affect on Risk Perceptions in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Claudia M.; Silbereisen, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Affective influences may play a key role in adolescent risk taking, but have rarely been studied. Using an audiovisual method of affect induction, two experimental studies examined the effect of positive affect on risk perceptions in adolescence and young adulthood. Outcomes were risk perceptions regarding drinking alcohol, smoking a cigarette,…

  20. The differential effects of position, ad and reader characteristics on readers' processing of newspaper ads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.G.; Neijens, P.C.; Heath, R.

    2013-01-01

    Building on previous research on the processing of newspaper ads, this comprehensive field study, with 26,556 newspaper readers and 290 unique advertisements, investigated the combined effects of position in the newspaper, ad characteristics and reader characteristics. The results show a

  1. An Extension of the Effects of Praising Positive Qualifying Autoclitics on the Frequency of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheyab, Mahmoud; Pritchard, Josh; Malady, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we reinforced tacts with positive qualifying autoclitics for reading and evaluated the subsequent effect on the allocation of reading behavior. Participants were four typically developing children between 9 and 12 years of age whose primary language was Arabic. We exposed each participant to pre- and posttreatment sessions to…

  2. NEGATIVITY AND POSITIVITY EFFECTS IN PERSON PERCEPTION AND INFERENCE : ABILITY VERSUS MORALITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARTIJN, C; SPEARS, R; VAN DER PLIGT, J; JAKOBS, E

    1992-01-01

    The present paper deals with negativity and positivity effects in trait inferences and impression formation. In the first experiment we tested the suggestion of Skowronski and Carlston (1987) that in the domain of morality negative information is more diagnostic, will therefore receive more weight a

  3. Muscle force is determined also by muscle relative position: isolated effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Huub; Baan, Guus C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Effects on force of changes of the position of extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) relative to surrounding tissues were investigated in rat. Connective tissue at the muscle bellies of tibialis anterior (TA), extensor hallucis longus (EHL) and EDL was left intact, to allow myofascial force

  4. Position and orientation estimation of fixed dipole emitters using an effective Hermite point spread function model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallinga, S.; Rieger, B.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a method for determining the position and orientation of fixed dipole emitters based on a combination of polarimetry and spot shape detection. A key element is an effective Point Spread Function model based on Hermite functions. The model offers a good description of the shape variation

  5. EFFECT OF POSITIVE EXPIRATORY PRESSURE BREATHING IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC-FIBROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSCHANS, CP; VANDERMARK, TW; DEVRIES, G; PIERS, DA; BEEKHUIS, H; DANKERTROELSE, JE; POSTMA, DS; KOETER, GH

    The effect of positive expiratory pressure breathing, alone and in combination with coughing, was investigated in eight patients with cystic fibrosis. Functional residual capacity and total lung capacity was measured with a body plethysmograph before, during, and immediately after breathing with

  6. The Effect of Positive Peer Reinforcement on Psychological Measures and Guitar Songleading Performance in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of positive peer reinforcement on self-reported psychological measures and songleading performance in beginning guitar students. No differences were found between the control group (n = 21) and the experimental group (n = 20) concerning psychological measures of self-esteem, stress, and…

  7. Analytic Study of the Tadoma Method: Effects on Hand Position of Segmental Speech Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Charlotte M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Small-set segmental identification experiments were conducted with three deaf-blind subjects who were highly experienced users of the Tadoma method. Systematic variations in the positioning of the hand on the speaker's face for Tadoma produced systematic effects on percent-correct scores, information transfer, and perception of individual…

  8. The positive and negative health effects of alcohol- and the public health implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the negative and the positive effects of alcohol on health are reviewed. It is first of all established facts that a high alcohol intake implies an increased risk of a large number of health outcomes, such as dementia, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, cirrhosis, upper digestive...

  9. Effects of Modality and Pace on Achievement, Mental Effort, and Positive Affect in Multimedia Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmirli, Serkan; Kurt, Adile Askim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of instruction given with different multimedia modalities (written text + animation or narration + animation) on the academic achievement, cognitive load, and positive affect in different paces (learner-paced or system-paced); 97 freshmen university students divided into four groups taught in…

  10. Serial position effects scoring in the assessment of memory in Alzheimer's disease and major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, Karel Jozef

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to validate serial position effects (SPE’S) scoring in the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). The RAVLT is a much used clinical method for assessing memory performance, but the method of scoring obfuscates that two memory processes underlie free recall. This

  11. The pharmacological effect of positive KCNQ (Kv7) modulators on dopamine release from striatal slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majbrit M; Lange, Sofie Cecilie; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt;

    2011-01-01

    Retigabine is an anti-epileptic drug that inhibits neuronal firing by stabilizing the membrane potential through positive modulation of voltage-dependent KCNQ potassium channels in cortical neurons and in mesencephalic dopamine (DA) neurons. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of ...

  12. Direct and Collateral Effects of Positive Reinforcement, Response Cost, and Mixed Contingencies for Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Sam F.; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    1978-01-01

    The relative effects of positive reinforcement, response cost, and the two contingencies combined when used as contingencies for correct academic responses were compared on the dependent measures of accuracy of academic performance and level of on-task behavior. All three contingency systems increased academic performance and on-task behavior.…

  13. Effect of pediatric physical therapy on deformational plagiocephaly in children with positional preference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.; L'Hoir, Monique P.; Helders, Paul J. M.; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of pediatric physical therapy on positional preference and deformational plagiocephaly. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Bernhoven Hospital, Veghel, the Netherlands. Participants: Of 380 infants referred to the examiners at age 7 weeks, 68 (17.9%) met crit

  14. Broken symmetry can yield a positive effective G in conformal gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    We modify the action of Mannheim's conformally invariant model by changing the sign of two coefficients. This breaks conformal symmetry, but results in a cosmology that has a positive effective G and at the same time retains one of the main advantages of the Mannheim model, a possible solution of the cosmological constant problem.

  15. Effects of Parent-Child Relationship on the Primary School Children's Non-Violence Position Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeeva, Roza A.; Kalimullin, Aydar M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research was to identify and test experimentally the impact of parent-child relationship on the formation of the primary school children non-violence position. During the research the effectiveness of the correctional and development program "Together with my mom" was verified to promote parent-child interaction, as well…

  16. Prediction of positive food effect: Bioavailability enhancement of BCS class II drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Siddarth; Polli, James E

    2016-06-15

    High-throughput screening methods have increased the number of poorly water-soluble, highly permeable drug candidates. Many of these candidates have increased bioavailability when administered with food (i.e., exhibit a positive food effect). Food is known to impact drug bioavailability through a variety of mechanisms, including drug solubilization and prolonged gastric residence time. In vitro dissolution media that aim to mimic in vivo gastrointestinal (GI) conditions have been developed to lessen the need for fed human bioequivalence studies. The objective of this work was to develop an in vitro lipolysis model to predict positive food effect of three BCS Class II drugs (i.e., danazol, amiodarone and ivermectin) in previously developed lipolysis media. This in vitro lipolysis model was comparatively benchmarked against FeSSIF and FaSSIF media that were modified for an in vitro lipolysis approach, as FeSSIF and FaSSIF are widely used in in vitro dissolution studies. The in vitro lipolysis model accurately predicted the in vivo positive food effect for three model BCS class II drugs. The in vitro lipolysis model has potential use as a screening test of drug candidates in early development to assess positive food effect.

  17. Understanding the positive and negative effects of emotional expressions in organizations: EASI does it

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kleef, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions have a pervasive impact on organizational behavior. They do not just influence people’s own actions; when expressed, emotions may also exert influence on other organization members who perceive the expressions. Sometimes emotional expressions have ‘symmetrical’ effects, in that positive

  18. The differential effects of position, ad and reader characteristics on readers' processing of newspaper ads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.G.; Neijens, P.C.; Heath, R.

    2013-01-01

    Building on previous research on the processing of newspaper ads, this comprehensive field study, with 26,556 newspaper readers and 290 unique advertisements, investigated the combined effects of position in the newspaper, ad characteristics and reader characteristics. The results show a differentia

  19. The effect of positive and negative movie alcohol portrayals on transportation and attitude toward the movie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koordeman, R.; Anschutz, D.J.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effects of alcohol portrayals on transportation and attitude toward a movie. In addition, we examined whether positive and negative movie alcohol portrayals affect transportation into and attitude toward the movie. Methods: A within-subject design was used in whic

  20. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Positive Youth Development Program for Secondary Students in Macau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Luk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A well-tested comprehensive Chinese positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S. developed in Hong Kong has been modified and adapted for use in Macau. This program aims to help adolescent school children develop positively and to be better prepared for their future. The present study investigated the effectiveness of the Tier 1 Program of “P.A.T.H.S.” for Secondary 2 students of two pilot schools. Since there were “repeating” and “transferring” students joining the program, the effectiveness of the program on these particular groups of participants was also examined. The subjective outcome evaluations including participants' perceptions of the program, program instructors, benefits from the program, and overall satisfaction were positive. Although the longitudinal data from the objective outcome evaluation did not show any notable improvement, the overall effect of the program was found to be positive to the new comers in the junior secondary years. The existing evaluation findings suggest that the Secondary 2 program is especially effective to those newly joining the program. In view of the paucity of youth studies in Macau, the present study can contribute to evidence-based youth work and provide baseline data for the program to be evaluated in the Secondary 3 periods in the future.

  1. Understanding the positive and negative effects of emotional expressions in organizations: EASI does it

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kleef, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions have a pervasive impact on organizational behavior. They do not just influence people’s own actions; when expressed, emotions may also exert influence on other organization members who perceive the expressions. Sometimes emotional expressions have ‘symmetrical’ effects, in that positive exp

  2. Comparison of the Frequency and Effectiveness of Positive and Negative Reinforcement Practices in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, Hukam; Ali, Riasat; Janjua, Muhammad Zaigham Qadeer; Shahzad, Saqib; Khan, Muhammad Saeed

    2010-01-01

    The major purpose of the study was to compare the frequency and effectiveness of positive and negative reinforcement practices deployed by teachers in boys' and girls' secondary schools in urban and rural areas. It was hypothesized that there would be no difference in use of reward and punishment by teachers in secondary schools in urban and rural…

  3. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a positive youth development program for secondary students in Macau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Andrew L; Leong, K M; Au, Annah M L

    2012-01-01

    A well-tested comprehensive Chinese positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S.) developed in Hong Kong has been modified and adapted for use in Macau. This program aims to help adolescent school children develop positively and to be better prepared for their future. The present study investigated the effectiveness of the Tier 1 Program of "P.A.T.H.S." for Secondary 2 students of two pilot schools. Since there were "repeating" and "transferring" students joining the program, the effectiveness of the program on these particular groups of participants was also examined. The subjective outcome evaluations including participants' perceptions of the program, program instructors, benefits from the program, and overall satisfaction were positive. Although the longitudinal data from the objective outcome evaluation did not show any notable improvement, the overall effect of the program was found to be positive to the new comers in the junior secondary years. The existing evaluation findings suggest that the Secondary 2 program is especially effective to those newly joining the program. In view of the paucity of youth studies in Macau, the present study can contribute to evidence-based youth work and provide baseline data for the program to be evaluated in the Secondary 3 periods in the future.

  4. Positive Side Effects of a Job-Related Training Program for Older Adults in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate empirically positive side effects of a job-related training program on older adults' self-esteem, depression, and social networks. A total of 70 older adults participated in the study after completing the Older Paraprofessional Training Program developed and provided by the Continuing Education…

  5. Highly productive forage legume stands show no positive biodiversity effect on yield and N2-fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamala, Nawa Raj; Eriksen, Jørgen; Carlsson, Georg

    2017-01-01

    derived most (around 85%) of their N from atmospheric N fixation (%Ndfa). However, no positive effect of species diversity was found in any of the mixtures. Species composition of the forage legume mixtures affected the amount of N from N fixation by affecting DM production and N accumulation...

  6. NEGATIVITY AND POSITIVITY EFFECTS IN PERSON PERCEPTION AND INFERENCE : ABILITY VERSUS MORALITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARTIJN, C; SPEARS, R; VAN DER PLIGT, J; JAKOBS, E

    1992-01-01

    The present paper deals with negativity and positivity effects in trait inferences and impression formation. In the first experiment we tested the suggestion of Skowronski and Carlston (1987) that in the domain of morality negative information is more diagnostic, will therefore receive more weight

  7. Short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, and clinical parameters in patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Büyükturan, Öznur; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 90 patients (112 knees) with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomized into a kinesio tape group (n=45) or placebo kinesio tape group (n=45). Baseline isokinetic quadriceps muscle tests and measurements of joint position sense were performed in both groups. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale, kinesiophobia with the Tampa kinesiophobia scale, and symptoms and functional limitations with the Kujala pain scale. Measurements were repeated 2 days after kinesio tape application. [Results] No differences were found between baseline isokinetic muscle measurements and those taken 2 days after application. However, significant improvements were observed in the kinesio tape group, with regard to joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations after treatment. Examination of the differences between pre- and post-treatment values in both groups revealed that the kinesio tape group demonstrated greater improvements compared to the placebo kinesio tape group. [Conclusion] Although short-term kinesio tape application did not increase hamstring muscle strength, it may have improved joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and daily limitations.

  8. Short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, and clinical parameters in patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Büyükturan, Öznur; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 90 patients (112 knees) with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomized into a kinesio tape group (n=45) or placebo kinesio tape group (n=45). Baseline isokinetic quadriceps muscle tests and measurements of joint position sense were performed in both groups. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale, kinesiophobia with the Tampa kinesiophobia scale, and symptoms and functional limitations with the Kujala pain scale. Measurements were repeated 2 days after kinesio tape application. [Results] No differences were found between baseline isokinetic muscle measurements and those taken 2 days after application. However, significant improvements were observed in the kinesio tape group, with regard to joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations after treatment. Examination of the differences between pre- and post-treatment values in both groups revealed that the kinesio tape group demonstrated greater improvements compared to the placebo kinesio tape group. [Conclusion] Although short-term kinesio tape application did not increase hamstring muscle strength, it may have improved joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and daily limitations. PMID:27512259

  9. Measurement of positive and negative Goos--Hänchen effects for metallic gratings near Wood anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, C; Chauvat, D; Emile, O; Bretenaker, F; Le Floch, A; Dutriaux, L

    2001-05-15

    Large Goos-Hänchen effects are isolated for reflection on a metallic grating. These shifts occur in the vicinity of Wood anomalies. Depending on the nature of the anomaly, these displacements are found to be either positive or, contrary to the usual GH effect, clearly negative. Those shifts, associated with forward and backward leaky surface waves, are as large as plus or minus tens of wavelengths for a classic metallic grating.

  10. Effects of tongue position and lung volume on voluntary maximal tongue protrusion force in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboisky, Julian P; Luu, Billy L; Butler, Jane E; Gandevia, Simon C

    2015-01-15

    Maximal voluntary protrusion force of the human tongue has not been examined in positions beyond the incisors or at different lung volumes. Tongue force was recorded with the tongue tip at eight positions relative to the incisors (12 and 4mm protrusion, neutral and 4, 12, 16, 24 and 32mm retraction) at functional residual capacity (FRC), total lung capacity (TLC) and residual volume (RV) in 15 healthy subjects. Maximal force occurred between 12mm and 32mm retraction (median 16mm). Maximum force at FRC was reproducible at the optimal tongue position across sessions (P=0.68). Across all positions at FRC the average force was highest at 24mm retraction (28.3±5.3N, mean±95% CI) and lowest at 12mm protrusion (49.1±4.6% maximum; Ptongue positions, maximal force was on average 9.3% lower at FRC than TLC and RV (range: 4.5-12.7% maximum, P<0.05). Retracted positions produce higher-force protrusions with a small effect of lung volume.

  11. Body position effects on EMG activity of sternocleidomastoid and masseter muscles in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, R; Palazzi, C; Ormeño, G; Giannini, R; Verdugo, F; Valenzuela, S; Santander, H

    1998-04-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the effects of body position on integrated electromyographic (IEMG) activity of sternocleidomastoid and masseter muscles in 20 healthy subjects. EMG recordings at rest and during swallowing of saliva and maximal voluntary clenching were performed by placing surface electrodes on the sternocleidomastoid and masseter muscles (contralateral to the habitual side of sleeping of each subject), in the following body positions: standing, seated, supine, and lateral decubitus position. Significant higher EMG activities were recorded in the sternocleidomastoid muscle in the lateral decubitus position, whereas significant lower EMG activities were recorded in the masseter muscle in the supine position. This finding supports the idea that there may exist a differential modulation of the motor neuron pools of the sternocleidomastoid and masseter muscles of peripheral and/or central origin. Significant differences in the EMG pattern as well as in the levels of EMG activities upon variations in body positions were observed between healthy subjects and patients with myogenic craniomandibular dysfunction reported by Palazzi, et al.

  12. Evaluating the Effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) Satellite Clock Error via GPS Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyamoorthy, Dinesh; Shafii, Shalini; Amin, Zainal Fitry M.; Jusoh, Asmariah; Zainun Ali, Siti

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock error using GPS simulation. Two conditions of tests are used; Case 1: All the GPS satellites have clock errors within the normal range of 0 to 7 ns, corresponding to pseudorange error range of 0 to 2.1 m; Case 2: One GPS satellite suffers from critical failure, resulting in clock error in the pseudorange of up to 1 km. It is found that increase of GPS satellite clock error causes increase of average positional error due to increase of pseudorange error in the GPS satellite signals, which results in increasing error in the coordinates computed by the GPS receiver. Varying average positional error patterns are observed for the each of the readings. This is due to the GPS satellite constellation being dynamic, causing varying GPS satellite geometry over location and time, resulting in GPS accuracy being location / time dependent. For Case 1, in general, the highest average positional error values are observed for readings with the highest PDOP values, while the lowest average positional error values are observed for readings with the lowest PDOP values. For Case 2, no correlation is observed between the average positional error values and PDOP, indicating that the error generated is random.

  13. Sexual function and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea : A randomized clinical trial evaluating the effects of oral-appliance and continuous positive airway pressure therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud; Stel, Anna-Lucia; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Wijkstra, Peter J.; van Driel, Mels F.; de Bont, Lambert G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. The obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is associated with sexual dysfunction. Although successful treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been demonstrated to improve sexual function, the effects of oral-appliance therapy are unknown. Aim. The aims

  14. Does the age-related positivity effect in autobiographical recall reflect differences in appraisal or memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, Emily; Ross, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Two studies examined the extent to which the age-related positivity effect in autobiographical recall is the result of age differences in appraisal and memory. In Study 1, older and younger participants reported 1 pleasant and 1 unpleasant event for 5 days. Participants attempted to recall those events a week later. In Study 2, older and younger participants imagined that positive, negative, and neutral hypothetical events had occurred either to themselves or to an acquaintance and were later asked to recall those events. In Study 1, younger adults reported a complete set of positive and negative events. Older adults reported a pleasant event each day, but 38% did not report an unpleasant event on at least 1 day. A week later, older and younger adults were equally likely to recall the events they had reported. In Study 2, older adults who imagined events happened to themselves rated events as more positive in valence than younger adults did. Older and younger adults were equally likely to remember pleasant and unpleasant events at the end of the study. The data suggest that the age-related positivity effect resides in the appraisal rather than the recall of autobiographical events. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The effect of patient position during trauma surgery on fat embolism syndrome: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A Syed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of supine versus lateral position on clinical signs of fat embolism during orthopedic trauma surgery. Dogs served as the current study model, which could be extended and/or serve as a basis for future in vivo studies on humans. It was hypothesized that there would be an effect of position on clinical signs of fat embolism syndrome in a dog model. Materials and Methods: 12 dogs were assigned to supine ( n = 6 and lateral ( n = 6 position groups. Airway pressures, heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary artery wedge pressure, right atrial pressure, arterial and venous blood gases, white blood count, platelet count and neutrophil count were obtained. Dogs were then subjected to pulmonary contusion in three areas of one lung. Fat embolism was generated by reaming one femur and tibia, followed by pressurization of the canal. Results: No difference was found in any parameters measured between supine and lateral positions at any time (0.126 > P < 0.856. Conclusions: The position of trauma patients undergoing reamed intramedullary nailing did not alter the presentation of the features of the lung secondary to fat embolism.

  16. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  17. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  18. Effect of sitting postures and shoulder position on the cervicocephalic kinesthesia in healthy young males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Zafar, Hamayun; Iqbal, Zaheen; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2016-06-01

    Information about head orientation, position, and movement with respect to the trunk relies on the visual, vestibular, extensive muscular, and articular proprioceptive system of the neck. Various factors can affect proprioception since it is the function of afferent integration, and tuning of muscular and articular receptors. Pain, muscle fatigue, and joint position have been shown to affect proprioceptive capacity. Thus, it can be speculated that changes in body posture can alter the neck proprioception. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of body posture on cervicocephalic kinesthetic sense in healthy subjects. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility was measured by the kinesthetic sensibility test in healthy young adults while in (a) habitual slouched sitting position with arms hanging by the side (SS), (b) habitual slouched sitting position with arms unloaded (supported) (SS-AS), and (c) upright sitting position with arms hanging by the side (US) during maximum and 30 degree right, left rotations, flexion, and extension. Thirty healthy male adults (mean age 27.83; SD 3.41) volunteered for this study. The least mean error was found for the SS-AS position (0.48; SD 0.24), followed by SS (0.60; SD 0.43) and US (0.96; SD 0.71), respectively. For all test conditions, there was significant difference in mean absolute error while head repositioning from maximum and 30 degree rotation during SS and SS-AS positions (p affect the proprioception function of the neck. Supporting the upper extremities in such a way that their weight is unloaded, which leads to reduction in the tension between the neck and shoulder girdle, can improve cervicocephalic kinesthetic sense in both the horizontal and vertical planes. The findings of this study can be implemented in people who have to do repeated arm and neck movements, by using ergonomically effective chairs with proper arm supports. This might help in prevention and treatment of neck pain.

  19. Parallel effects of processing fluency and positive affect on familiarity-based recognition decisions for faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin eDuke

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available According to attribution models of familiarity assessment, people can use a heuristic in recognition-memory decisions, in which they attribute the subjective ease of processing of a memory probe to a prior encounter with the stimulus in question. Research in social cognition suggests that experienced positive affect may be the proximal cue that signals fluency in various experimental contexts. In the present study, we compared the effects of positive affect and fluency on recognition-memory judgments for faces with neutral emotional expression. We predicted that if positive affect is indeed the critical cue that signals processing fluency at retrieval, then its manipulation should produce effects that closely mirror those produced by manipulations of processing fluency. In two experiments, we employed a masked-priming procedure in combination with a Remember-Know paradigm that aimed to separate familiarity- from recollection-based memory decisions. In addition, participants performed a prime-discrimination task that allowed us to take inter-individual differences in prime awareness into account. We found highly similar effects of our priming manipulations of processing fluency and of positive affect. In both cases, the critical effect was specific to familiarity-based recognition responses. Moreover, in both experiments it was reflected in a shift towards a more liberal response bias, rather than in changed discrimination. Finally, in both experiments, the effect was found to be related to prime awareness; it was present only in participants who reported a lack of such awareness on the prime-discrimination task. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that points not only to a role of fluency, but also of positive affect in familiarity assessment. As such they are consistent with the idea that fluency itself may be hedonically marked.

  20. The effect of textile-based inductive coil sensor positions for heart rate monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hye Ran; Lee, Young-Jae; Gi, Sunok; Khang, Seonah; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lim, Min-Gyu; Park, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jeong-Whan

    2014-02-01

    In the research related to heart rate measurement, few studies have been done using magnetic-induced conductivity sensing methods to measure the heart rate. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the position of a textile-based inductive coil sensor on the measurement of the heart rate. In order to assess the capability of the textile-based inductive coil sensor and the repeatability of measured cardiac muscle contractions, we proposed a new quality index based on the morphology of measured signals using a textile-based inductive coil sensor. We initially explored eight potential positions of the inductive sensor in a pilot experiment, followed by three sensor positions in the main experiment. A simultaneously measured electrocardiography (ECG) signal (Lead II) which was used as a reference signal for a comparison of the R-peak location with signals obtained from selected positions of the textile-based inductive coil sensor. The result of the main experiment indicated that the total quality index obtained from the sensor position 'P3', which was located 3 cm away from the left side from the center front line on the chest circumference line, was the highest (QI value = 1.30) among the three positions across all the subjects. This finding led us to conclude that (1) the position of the textile-based inductive coil sensor significantly affected the quality of the measurement results, and that (2) P3 would be the most appropriate position for the textile-based inductive coil sensor for heart rate measurements based on the magnetic-induced conductivity sensing principle.

  1. The effect of positive and negative mood on motivation to succeed of elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summani Ekici

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary, the aim of the present study was to determine the effect of positive and negative mood on motivation of elite athletes in terms of the level of education, sports experience, and age.The motivational levels of the athletes were measured using the Success Motivation Scale in Sports developed by Willis (1982 and adapted to Turkish by Tiryaki and Gödelek (1997. Positive and negative mood was measured using the Positive and Negative Affect Scale developed by Watson et al. (1988. The study included 440 voluntary participants (260 male and 180 female randomly selected from 10 different sports. The average age and sport experience of the participants were 21.8 yrs. (SD=3.9 and 9.6 yrs. (SD=4.8, respectively. Results showed apositive correlation between athletes’ sports experience and intrinsic motivation (r=.148, p<.01 and positive mood (r=.216, p<.01. Furthermore, there was a significant difference between athletes’ positive mood level and negative mood level. No significant difference was found in athletes’ motivation level as a function of education. On the other hand, there was a significant difference in athletes’ motivation and positive mood level in terms of sport participated in (p<.05. However, there was no significant difference in athletes’ negative mood level in terms of sex (p>.05. Finally, there was a positive relation between extrinsic motivation and each of intrinsic motivation (r=.496, success motivation (r=.877 and positive mood (r=.366, while there was a negative relation with negative mood (r= -.174.

  2. Effect of Head Position on Facial Soft Tissue Depth Measurements Obtained Using Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Jodi M; Stephan, Carl N; Gregory, Laura S; MacGregor, Donna M

    2016-01-01

    Facial soft tissue depth (FSTD) studies employing clinical computed tomography (CT) data frequently rely on depth measurements from raw 2D orthoslices. However, the position of each patient's head was not standardized in this method, potentially decreasing measurement reliability and accuracy. This study measured FSTDs along the original orthoslice plane and compared these measurements to those standardized by the Frankfurt horizontal (FH). Subadult cranial CT scans (n = 115) were used to measure FSTDs at 18 landmarks. Significant differences were observed between the methods at eight of these landmarks (p < 0.05), demonstrating that high-quality data are not generated simply by employing modern imaging modalities such as CT. Proper technique is crucial to useful results, and maintaining control over head position during FSTD data collection is important. This is easily and most readily achieved in CT techniques by rotating the head to the FH plane after constructing a 3D rendering of the data.

  3. The Integrated Demonstration Instrument of Peltier Effect and Seebeck Effect%珀尔帖效应与塞贝克效应综合演示仪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文娟; 薛德宽; 黄兴洲; 位浩杰; 刘冰

    2015-01-01

    A Peltier and Seebeck effects integrated demonstrator Design, which overcomes theflaws of traditional demonstrator only demonstrating an effect. DS18B20 temperature sensor and WH7016M temperature controller are used to control the cooling temperature,displaying cooling temperature on the computer by Lab-VIEW software. The voltmeter and ammeter show the voltage and current when TEC cooling and power genera-tion. It overcomes the weakness of other demonstrators not quantitative demonstration and only showing one effect. It also realizes the function of temperature change displayed by computer graphics. This instrument is a simple,stable performance,which achieves good results in the classroom demonstration.%设计制作了珀尔帖效应与塞贝克效应综合演示仪。采用 DS18B20温度传感器和WH7016M温度控制器控制制冷温度,利用LabVIEW软件在电脑上显示制冷温度变化曲线。通过电压表电流表显示温差半导体制冷和发电时的电压电流。该演示仪既克服了以往此类演示仪不能定量演示且只能演示一种效应的缺点,又实现了温度变化用计算机图形演示的功能。该仪器操作简单、性能稳定、效果明显,在课堂演示中取得了良好的效果。

  4. The Effect of Body Position on Physiological Factors that Contribute to Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Simon A.; Edwards, Bradley A.; Wellman, Andrew; Turton, Anthony; Skuza, Elizabeth M.; Berger, Philip J.; Hamilton, Garun S.

    2015-01-01

    Study objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) resolves in lateral sleep in 20% of patients. However, the effect of lateral positioning on factors contributing to OSA has not been studied. We aimed to measure the effect of lateral positioning on the key pathophysiological contributors to OSA including lung volume, passive airway anatomy/collapsibility, the ability of the airway to stiffen and dilate, ventilatory control instability (loop gain), and arousal threshold. Design: Non-randomized single arm observational study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients/participants: 20 (15M, 5F) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-treated severe OSA patients. Interventions: Supine vs. lateral position. Measurements: CPAP dial-downs performed during sleep to measure: (i) Veupnea: asleep ventilatory requirement, (ii) passive V0: ventilation off CPAP when airway dilator muscles are quiescent, (iii) Varousal: ventilation at which respiratory arousals occur, (iv) active V0: ventilation off CPAP when airway dilator muscles are activated during sleep, (v) loop gain: the ratio of the ventilatory drive response to a disturbance in ventilation, (vi) arousal threshold: level of ventilatory drive which leads to arousal, (vii) upper airway gain (UAG): ability of airway muscles to restore ventilation in response to increases in ventilatory drive, and (viii) pharyngeal critical closing pressure (Pcrit). Awake functional residual capacity (FRC) was also recorded. Results: Lateral positioning significantly increased passive V0 (0.33 ± 0.76L/min vs. 3.56 ± 2.94L/min, P Turton A, Skuza EM, Berger PJ, Hamilton GS. The effect of body position on physiological factors that contribute to obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1469–1478. PMID:25761982

  5. Effect of sugar positions in ginsenosides and their inhibitory potency on Na+/K+-ATPase activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronald JY CHEN; Tse-yu CHUNG; Feng-yin LI; Nan-hei LIN; Jason TC TZEN

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether ginsenosides with various sugar attachments may act as active components responsible for the cardiac therapeutic effects of ginseng and sanqi (the roots of Panax ginseng and Panax notoginseng) via the same molecular mechanism triggered by cardiac glycosides, such as ouabain and digoxin. Methods: The structural similarity between ginsenosides and ouabain was analyzed. The inhibitory potency of ginseno-sides and ouabain on Na+/K+-ATPase activity was examined and compared. Molecular modeling was exhibited for the docking of ginsenosides to Na+/K+-ATPase. Results: Ginsenosides with sugar moieties attached only to the C-3 position of the steroid-like structure, equivalent to the sugar position in cardiac glycosides, and possessed inhibitory potency on Na+/K+-ATPase activity. However, their inhibi-tory potency was significantly reduced or completely abolished when a monosaccharide was linked to the C-6 or C-20 posi-tion of the steroid-like structure; replacement of the monosaccharide with a disaccharide molecule at either of these posi-tions caused the disappearance of the inhibitory potency. Molecular modeling and docking confirmed that the difference in Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitory potency among ginsenosides was due to the steric hindrance of sugar attachment at the C-6 and C-20 positions of the steroid-like structure. Conclusion: The cardiac therapeutic effects of ginseng and sanqi should be at least partly attributed to the effective inhi-bition of Na+/K+-ATPase by their metabolized ginsenosides with sugar moieties attached only to the C-3 position of the steroid-like structure.

  6. Study of the effect of temperature on the positioning accuracy of the pneumatic muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laski, Pawel Andrzej; Blasiak, Slawomir; Takosoglu, Jakub Emanuel; Pietrala, Dawid Sebastian; Bracha, Gabriel Filip; Zwierzchowski, Jaroslaw; Nowakowski, Lukasz; Borkowski, Krzysztof; Blasiak, Malgorzata

    The article concerns experimental studies of the effect of temperature on the positioning accuracy of pneumatic muscles. It presents results of experimental studies in the form of thermal images from thermal imaging camera. Pneumatic artificial muscles have unique operational characteristics and because of that they are used in industrial production processes, where classic drives do not work. During operation of muscles with large frequencies above 60 Hz, one can observe a significant increase in temperatures on the bladder surface. The article concerns a study aimed at the determination of the maximum temperature which can be achieved and whether it affects the accuracy of their positioning.

  7. The acute effects of nicotine on positive and negative affect in adolescent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassel, Jon D; Evatt, Daniel P; Greenstein, Justin E; Wardle, Margaret C; Yates, Marisa C; Veilleux, Jennifer C

    2007-08-01

    Although adolescent cigarette smoking remains a critical public health concern, little is known about the reinforcing mechanisms governing smoking in this vulnerable population. To assess predictions derived from both positive and negative reinforcement models of drug use, the authors measured the acute effects of nicotine, as administered via tobacco cigarettes, on both positive and negative affect in a group of 15- to 18-year-old smokers. A matched group of nonsmokers served as a comparison group. Findings revealed that whereas adolescents who smoked a cigarette experienced reductions in both positive and negative affect, the observed reductions in negative affect were moderated by nicotine content of the cigarette (high yield vs. denicotinized), level of nicotine dependence, level of baseline craving, and smoking expectancies pertinent to negative affect regulation. Nonsmokers experienced no change in affect over the 10-min assessment period, and no interaction effects were observed for positive affect. Overall, the findings conform to a negative reinforcement model of nicotine effects and strongly suggest that, even among young light smokers, nicotine dependence and resultant withdrawal symptomatology may serve as motivating factors governing smoking behavior.

  8. Personal resources and negative and positive effects of traumatic events in a group of medical rescuers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ogińska-Bulik

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of the research was to investigate the role of personal resources, such as optimism and sense of selfefficacy in both negative (posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms and positive (posttraumatic growth – PTG effects of experienced trauma in a group of emergency service representatives. Material and Methods: Data of 100 medical rescue workers, mostly men (59% who have experienced traumatic events in their worksite were analyzed. The age of the participants ranged from 24 to 60 years (mean = 37.43; standard deviation = 8.73. Polish versions of the Impact of Event Scale – Revised and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory were used to assess the negative and positive effects of experienced events. Optimism was assessed by the Life Orientation Test and sense of self-efficacy by the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. Results: The obtained results revealed that optimism is negatively associated with symptoms of PTSD in men, and sense of self-efficacy – positively with the severity of growth after trauma in women. Conclusions: The analyzed personal resources play a diverse role in the emergence of negative and positive effects of experienced traumatic events, depending on the gender of the respondents. Med Pr 2016;67(5:635–644

  9. [Effects of land use type and slope position on soil physical properties in loess tableland area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Wen-Zhao; Wang, Qiu-Xian

    2008-06-01

    Soil samples under different land use types and at different slope positions in the Wangdonggou watershed of loess tableland area were collected to determine their particle composition, bulk density (pb), and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and the effects of land use type and slope position on the soil physical properties were studied in virtue of the variation coefficient and non-parameter tests. The results showed that the physical properties of soil varied in horizontal direction and vertical profile, however at the same slope position or under the same land use type, the pb and particle composition were similar. In horizontal direction, Ks varied strongly, slit content and pb varied weakly, and clay and sand contents varied medially. In vertical profile, soil particles had a continuous distribution, but pb and Ks varied greatly in 0-25 cm layer. With the slope degree descended, soil contained more clay and had a higher pb, and Ks increased. At upper and middle slopes, soil physical properties were similar, and thus, could be merged into one in related researches. There was a significant difference in soil physical properties between grassland and other land use types, which was mainly due to the effects of slope position, but the soil physical properties in farmland and orchard were similar, indicating the important effects of human activities.

  10. Assessing the effects of positive feedback and reinforcement in the introduction phase of an ergonomic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, David L; Mirka, Gary A

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to change is common in ergonomic interventions, often resulting in negative consequences when the intervention's effectiveness is studied. A lab-based study assessed the effects of positive reinforcement during the intervention process. On Day 1 all participants performed a simple screw-driving task that placed stress on the cervicobrachial region through static loading. On Day 2 a control group received basic information about ergonomics and then performed the task using an ergonomic intervention that has been shown to reduce loading on these muscle groups. The experimental group received the same basic information but also received positive reinforcement while performing the task with the ergonomic intervention. Subjective task assessment surveys and body-part discomfort surveys were administered, and these, along with speed of performance, were assessed in both groups. The results showed a significantly (p positive subjective impression of the intervention for the feedback group than for the control group (29%-57% improvement) with no real changes in either the performance or discomfort levels. Applications of this research include improving workers' acceptance of ergonomic interventions in industrial and other settings. The reinforcement technique evaluated in this paper has yielded consistently positive effects in our ongoing ergonomic intervention research.

  11. Reciprocal Effects of Positive Future Expectations, Threats to Safety, and Risk Behavior Across Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Dana M; Epstein, Marina; Nurius, Paula S; Gorman-Smith, Deborah; Henry, David B

    2016-09-12

    We examined the reciprocal relationships among positive future expectations, expected threats to future safety, depression, and individual substance use and delinquency using 4 waves of data (N = 248-338) from African American and Latino adolescent male participants in the Chicago Youth Development Study. Individual positive future expectations and expected threats to safety were assessed at each wave and modeled as latent constructs. Individual substance use and delinquency were assessed at each wave and represented as ordinal variables ranging from low to high. Categorical autoregressive cross-lagged structural models were used to examine the hypothesized reciprocal relationships between both aspects of future expectations construct and risk behavior across adolescence. Analyses show that future expectations has important effects on youth substance use and involvement in delinquency, both of which in turn decrease positive expectations and increase expectation of threats to future safety across adolescence. Similarly, low positive expectations for the future continued to predict increased substance use and involvement in delinquency. The expected threats to safety construct was significantly correlated with delinquency within time. These effects are observed across adolescence after controlling for youth depression and race. Findings support the reciprocal effects hypothesis of a negative reinforcing cycle in the relationships between future expectations and both substance use and involvement in delinquent behavior across adolescence. The enduring nature of these relationships underscores the importance of future expectation as a potential change mechanism for intervention and prevention efforts to promote healthy development; vulnerable racial and ethnic minority male adolescents may especially benefit from such intervention.

  12. The Positive Effects of Trait Emotional Intelligence during a Performance Review Discussion – A Psychophysiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Mikko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Performance review discussions of real manager–subordinate pairs were examined in two studies to investigate the effects of trait emotional intelligence (EI) on dyad member’s felt and expressed emotions. Altogether there were 84 managers and 122 subordinates in two studies using 360 measured and self-reported trait EI. Facial electromyography, and frontal electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry were collected continuously. Manager’s high trait EI was related to increased positive valence emotional facial expressions in the dyad during the discussions. The managers also had more EEG frontal asymmetry indicating approach motivation, than the subordinates. In addition, actor and partner effects and actor × partner interactions, and interactions between the role and actor or partner effect of trait EI were observed. Both actor and partner trait EI were related to more positive self-reported emotional valence. The results imply that trait EI has a role in organizational social interaction.

  13. Demonstration of DFT-spread 256QAM-OFDM signal transmission with cost-effective directly modulated laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Yu, Jianjun; Fang, Yuan; Dong, Ze; Li, Xinying; Chen, Lin

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrated a 256-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (256QAM) direct-detection optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DDO-OFDM) transmission system utilizing a cost-effective directly modulated laser (DML). Intra-symbol frequency-domain averaging (ISFA) is applied to suppress in-band noise while the channel response estimation and Discrete Fourier Transform-spread (DFT-spread) is used to reduce the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the transmitted OFDM signal. The bit-error ratio (BER) of 15-Gbit/s 256QAM-OFDM signal has been measured after 20-km SSMF transmission that is less than 7% forward-error-correction (FEC) threshold of 3.8 × 10(-3) as the launch power into fiber is set at 6dBm. For 11.85-Gbit/s 256QAM-OFDM signal, with the aid of ISFA-based channel estimation and PAPR reduction enabled by DFT-spread, the BER after 20-km SSMF transmission can be improved from 6.4 × 10(-3) to 6.8 × 10(-4) when the received optical power is -6dBm.

  14. Pressure effect in the X-ray intrinsic position resolution in noble gases and mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Azevedo, C.D.R.

    2016-01-01

    A study of the gas pressure effect in the position resolution of an interacting X- or gamma-ray photon in a gas medium is performed. The intrinsic position resolution for pure noble gases (Argon and Xenon) and their mixtures with CO2 and CH4 were calculated for several gas pressures (1-10bar) and for photon energies between 5.4 and 60.0 keV, being possible to establish a linear match between the intrinsic position resolution and the inverse of the gas pressure in that energy range. In order to evaluate the quality of the method here described, a comparison between the available experimental data and the calculated one in this work, is done and discussed. In the majority of the cases, a strong agreement is observed.

  15. Effect of orthographic processes on letter-identity and letter-position encoding in dyslexic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eReilhac

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to identify letters and encode their position is a crucial step of the word recognition process. However and despite their word identification problem, the ability of dyslexic children to encode letter-identity and letter-position within strings was not systematically investigated. This study aimed at filling this gap and further explored how letter identity and letter position encoding is modulated by letter context in developmental dyslexia. For this purpose, a letter-string comparison task was administered to French dyslexic children and two chronological-age (CA and reading-age (RA-matched control groups. Children had to judge whether two successively and briefly presented 4-letter-strings were identical or different. Letter-position and letter-identity were manipulated through the transposition (e.g., RTGM vs. RMGT or substitution of two letters (e.g., TSHF vs. TGHD. Non-words, pseudo-words and words were used as stimuli to investigate sub-lexical and lexical effects on letter encoding. Dyslexic children showed both substitution and transposition detection problems relative to CA controls. A substitution advantage over transpositions was only found for words in dyslexic children whereas it extended to pseudo-words in RA controls and to all type of items in CA controls. Letters were better identified in the dyslexic group when belonging to orthographically familiar strings. Letter position encoding was very impaired in dyslexic children who did not show any word context effect in contrast to CA controls. Overall, the current findings point to a strong letter identity and letter position encoding disorder in developmental dyslexia.

  16. Effect of The Swimmer’s Head Position on Passive Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortesi Matteo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the head position on passive drag with a towing-line experiment in a swimming pool. The tests were performed on ten male swimmers with regional level swimming skills and at least 10 years of competitive swimming experience. They were towed underwater (at a depth of 60 cm at three speeds (1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 m/s and in two body positions (arms above the swimmer’s head and arms alongside the body. These two body positions were repeated while the swimmer’s head was positioned in three different ways: head-up, head-middle and head-down in relation to the body’s horizontal alignment. The results showed a reduction of 4-5.2% in the average passive drag at all speeds when the head was down or aligned to the swimmer’s arms alongside the body, in comparison to the head-up position. A major significant decrease of 10.4-10.9% (p < 0.05 was shown when the head was down or aligned at the swimmer’s arms above the swimmer’s head. The passive drag tended to decrease significantly by a mean of 17.6% (p < 0.001 for all speeds examined with the arms alongside the body position rather than with the arms above the head position. The swimmer’s head location may play an important role in reducing hydrodynamic resistance during passive underwater gliding.

  17. The effect of head and neck positions on oropharyngeal swallowing: a clinical and electrophysiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, C; Keskin, A; Kiylioglu, N; Kirazli, Y; On, A Y; Tarlaci, S; Aydoğdu, I

    2001-09-01

    To determine the clinical usefulness of an electrophysiologic method for evaluating dysphagia and to identify the effects of various head and neck positions on oropharyngeal swallowing. Experimental, with control group. An electromyography laboratory. Patients with neurogenic dysphagia (n = 51) and healthy controls (n = 24). Patients were divided into 2 groups: those patients with unilateral lower cranial lesions (n = 9) and those without laterality in the function of the oropharyngeal muscles (n = 42). Subjects were instructed to swallow doses of water, gradually increasing in quantity from 1 to 25 mL under 5 conditions: neutral, chin up, chin tucked, head rotated right, and head rotated left. Change in dysphagia limit through specified head and neck postures. Oropharyngeal swallowing was evaluated by laryngeal movements that were detected by a piezoelectric sensor and electromyography of the submental muscle complex. Laryngeal sensor signals occurring within 8 seconds of a swallow were accepted as a sign of the dysphagia limit. In the control group, dysphagia limit did not change significantly with changes in head and neck postures, except for the chin-up posture (p Dysphagia limit improved significantly (p dysphagia limit occurred in 50% of patients in chin-tuck position, but in the chin-up position, 55% of the patients experienced a significant (p dysphagia limit. The electrophysiologic method of measuring dysphagia limit confirms neurogenic dysphagia and its severity in the neutral head position. Changes in head and neck positions do not significantly alter dysphagia limit in unimpaired subjects except for the chin-up position. Although the results obtained were not compared with other techniques (eg, videofluoroscopy), this simple electrophysiologic method for describing dysphagia limit may have a place in the evaluation of dysphagia and its variability in various head and neck positions.

  18. Effect of working position on vertical motion straightness of open hydrostatic guideways in grinding machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Jun; Wang, Zhiwei; Xue, Fei; Chen, Yaolong

    2016-08-01

    Hydrostatic guideways have various applications in precision machine tools due to their high motion accuracy. The analysis of motion straightness in hydrostatic guideways is generally ignoring the external load on the slider. A variation force also exists, caused by the different working positions, together with the dead load of the slider and that of other auxiliary devices. The effect of working position on vertical motion straightness is investigated based on the equivalent static model, considering the error averaging effort of pressured oil film in open hydrostatic guideways. Open hydrostatic guideways in LGF1000 are analyzed with this approach. The theoretical results show that the slider has maximum vertical motion straightness when the working position is closer the guiderail of Y axis. The vertical motion straightness reaches a minimum value as the working position is located at the center of the two guiderails on the Y axis. The difference between the maximum and minimum vertical motion straightness is 34.7%. The smaller vertical motion straightness is attributed to the smaller spacing of the two pads centers, along the Y direction. The experimental results show that the vertical motion straightness is 4.15 μm/1200 mm, when the working position is located in the middle of the X beam, and 5.08 μm/1200 mm, when the working position is approaching the Y guiderails, denoting an increase of 18.3%. The changing trends of the measured results validate the correctness of the theoretical model. The research work can be used to reveal the variation law of accuracy of the open hydrostatic guideways, under different working positions, to predict the machining precision, and provides the basis for an error compensation strategy for gantry type grinding machines.

  19. Effect of working position on vertical motion straightness of open hydrostatic guideways in grinding machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Jun; Wang, Zhiwei; Xue, Fei; Chen, Yaolong

    2017-01-01

    Hydrostatic guideways have various applications in precision machine tools due to their high motion accuracy. The analysis of motion straightness in hydrostatic guideways is generally ignoring the external load on the slider. A variation force also exists, caused by the different working positions, together with the dead load of the slider and that of other auxiliary devices. The effect of working position on vertical motion straightness is investigated based on the equivalent static model, considering the error averaging effort of pressured oil film in open hydrostatic guideways. Open hydrostatic guideways in LGF1000 are analyzed with this approach. The theoretical results show that the slider has maximum vertical motion straightness when the working position is closer the guiderail of Y axis. The vertical motion straightness reaches a minimum value as the working position is located at the center of the two guiderails on the Y axis. The difference between the maximum and minimum vertical motion straightness is 34.7%. The smaller vertical motion straightness is attributed to the smaller spacing of the two pads centers, along the Y direction. The experimental results show that the vertical motion straightness is 4.15 μm/1200 mm, when the working position is located in the middle of the X beam, and 5.08 μm/1200 mm, when the working position is approaching the Y guiderails, denoting an increase of 18.3%. The changing trends of the measured results validate the correctness of the theoretical model. The research work can be used to reveal the variation law of accuracy of the open hydrostatic guideways, under different working positions, to predict the machining precision, and provides the basis for an error compensation strategy for gantry type grinding machines.

  20. Effect of The Swimmer’s Head Position on Passive Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Matteo; Gatta, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the head position on passive drag with a towing-line experiment in a swimming pool. The tests were performed on ten male swimmers with regional level swimming skills and at least 10 years of competitive swimming experience. They were towed underwater (at a depth of 60 cm) at three speeds (1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 m/s) and in two body positions (arms above the swimmer’s head and arms alongside the body). These two body positions were repeated while the swimmer’s head was positioned in three different ways: head-up, head-middle and head-down in relation to the body’s horizontal alignment. The results showed a reduction of 4–5.2% in the average passive drag at all speeds when the head was down or aligned to the swimmer’s arms alongside the body, in comparison to the head-up position. A major significant decrease of 10.4–10.9% (p < 0.05) was shown when the head was down or aligned at the swimmer’s arms above the swimmer’s head. The passive drag tended to decrease significantly by a mean of 17.6% (p < 0.001) for all speeds examined with the arms alongside the body position rather than with the arms above the head position. The swimmer’s head location may play an important role in reducing hydrodynamic resistance during passive underwater gliding. PMID:26839604

  1. Effects of aeration position on organics, nitrogen and phosphorus removal in combined oxidation pond-constructed wetland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoou; Tian, Yimei; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Sen; Wu, Qing; Yan, Lijian

    2015-12-01

    Given that few studies investigated the effects of aeration position (AP) on the performance of aerated constructed wetlands, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of AP on organics, nitrogen and phosphorus removal in lab-scale combined oxidation pond-constructed wetland (OP-CW) systems. Results showed that middle aeration allowed the CW to possess more uniform oxygen distribution and to achieve greater removals of COD and NH3-N, while the CW under bottom aeration and surface aeration demonstrated more distinct stratification of oxygen distribution and surface aeration brought about better TN removal capacity for the OP-CW system. However, no significant influence of artificial aeration or AP on TP removal was observed. Overall, AP could significantly affect the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen by influencing the oxygen diffusion paths in aerated CWs, thereby influencing the removal of pollutants, especially organics and nitrogen, which offers a reference for the design of aerated CWs.

  2. The effect of motivation and positive affect on ego depletion: Replenishment versus release mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ze; Li, Jian; Zhang, Bo; Li, Ye; Zhang, Houcan

    2015-11-12

    In this study, 2 experiments were conducted to investigate whether motivation and positive affect can alleviate ego depletion and to elucidate their possible mechanisms. In Experiment 1, a crossing-out-letter task was adapted to reach an ego depletion state for Chinese participants. Participants were then randomly assigned to the extrinsic motivation group, the positive affect group or the depletion control group. After the experimental treatment, a dumbbell task was used to measure participants' remaining self-regulatory resources. The results showed that participants in the motivation and positive affect groups performed better on the dumbbell task than participants in the depletion control group. Experiment 2 was similar to Experiment 1 except that participants were asked to perform an additional unexpected dumbbell task after a neutral video following the above procedure. The results of Experiment 1 were replicated; however, participants' performance on the additional dumbbell task differed. The positive affect group performed better than the depletion control group, indicating an increase in self-regulatory resources and thus supporting the replenishment effect of positive affect. No significant difference was found between the motivation group and the depletion control group.

  3. The Effect of Fatigued External Rotator Muscles of the Shoulder on the Shoulder Position Sense

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    Naoya Iida

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of fatigue in shoulder external rotator muscles on position sense of shoulder abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. The study included 10 healthy subjects. Shoulder position sense was measured before and after a fatigue task involving shoulder external rotator muscles. The fatigue task was performed using an isokinetic machine. To confirm the muscle fatigue, electromyography (EMG was recorded, and an integrated EMG and median power frequency (MDF during 3 sec performed target torque were calculated. After the fatigue task, the MDF of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased. This indicates that the infraspinatus muscle was involved in the fatigue task. In addition, the shoulder position sense of internal and external rotation significantly decreased after the fatigue task. These results suggest that the fatigue reduced the accuracy of sensory input from muscle spindles. However, no significant difference was observed in shoulder position sense of abduction before and after the fatigue task. This may be due to the fact that infraspinatus muscle did not act as prime movers in shoulder abduction. These results suggest that muscle fatigue decreased position sense during movements in which the affected muscles acted as prime movers.

  4. Effects of Alu elements on global nucleosome positioning in the human genome

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    Yamashita Riu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the genome sequence-specific positioning of nucleosomes is essential to understand various cellular processes, such as transcriptional regulation and replication. As a typical example, the 10-bp periodicity of AA/TT and GC dinucleotides has been reported in several species, but it is still unclear whether this feature can be observed in the whole genomes of all eukaryotes. Results With Fourier analysis, we found that this is not the case: 84-bp and 167-bp periodicities are prevalent in primates. The 167-bp periodicity is intriguing because it is almost equal to the sum of the lengths of a nucleosomal unit and its linker region. After masking Alu elements, these periodicities were greatly diminished. Next, using two independent large-scale sets of nucleosome mapping data, we analyzed the distribution of nucleosomes in the vicinity of Alu elements and showed that (1 there are one or two fixed slot(s for nucleosome positioning within the Alu element and (2 the positioning of neighboring nucleosomes seems to be in phase, more or less, with the presence of Alu elements. Furthermore, (3 these effects of Alu elements on nucleosome positioning are consistent with inactivation of promoter activity in Alu elements. Conclusions Our discoveries suggest that the principle governing nucleosome positioning differs greatly across species and that the Alu family is an important factor in primate genomes.

  5. The effect of aging on the anatomic position of the thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bann, Darrin V; Kim, Yesul; Zacharia, Thomas; Goldenberg, David

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid disease is common among elderly patients, frequently necessitating thyroid gland examination, imaging, and surgery. However, no prior studies have determined the effect of age on the anatomic position of the thyroid gland in the anterior neck. We hypothesized that the thyroid gland resides at a more caudal position in the neck in elderly patients as compared to younger patients. Head and neck CT scans were collected from 122 atraumatic patients without thyroid disease aged 18-39 years, 40-59 years, 60-79 years, and 80+ years. Measurements of thyroid gland position and other aspects of head and neck anatomy were conducted in the mid-sagittal plane. The distance between the thyroid gland and the sternal notch decreased from 45 ± 10.4 mm in the 18-39 age group to 30.8 ± 9 mm in the 80+ age group (P thyroid gland position was dependent on changes in cervical spine height, hyoid bone to hard palate distance, and tracheal angle (P = 1.7 × 10(-11) ; r(2)  = 0.37). Clinicians should be aware of the more caudad positioning of the gland when planning surgery or screening for thyroid disease in the elderly. Clin. Anat. 30:205-212, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Testing the effect of medical positive reinforcement training on salivary cortisol levels in bonobos and orangutans.

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    Verena Behringer

    Full Text Available The management of captive animals has been improved by the establishment of positive reinforcement training as a tool to facilitate interactions between caretakers and animals. In great apes, positive reinforcement training has also been used to train individuals to participate in simple medical procedures to monitor physical health. One aim of positive reinforcement training is to establish a relaxed atmosphere for situations that, without training, might be very stressful. This is especially true for simple medical procedures that can require animals to engage in behaviours that are unusual or use unfamiliar medical devices that can be upsetting. Therefore, one cannot exclude the possibility that the training itself is a source of stress. In this study, we explored the effects of medical positive reinforcement training on salivary cortisol in two groups of captive ape species, orangutans and bonobos, which were familiar to this procedure. Furthermore, we successfully biologically validated the salivary cortisol assay, which had already been validated for bonobos, for orangutans. For the biological validation, we found that cortisol levels in orangutan saliva collected during baseline conditions were lower than in samples collected during three periods that were potentially stressful for the animals. However, we did not find significant changes in salivary cortisol during medical positive reinforcement training for either bonobos or orangutans. Therefore, for bonobos and orangutans with previous exposure to medical PRT, the procedure is not stressful. Thus, medical PRT provides a helpful tool for the captive management of the two species.

  7. Testing the effect of medical positive reinforcement training on salivary cortisol levels in bonobos and orangutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Verena; Stevens, Jeroen M G; Hohmann, Gottfried; Möstl, Erich; Selzer, Dieter; Deschner, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The management of captive animals has been improved by the establishment of positive reinforcement training as a tool to facilitate interactions between caretakers and animals. In great apes, positive reinforcement training has also been used to train individuals to participate in simple medical procedures to monitor physical health. One aim of positive reinforcement training is to establish a relaxed atmosphere for situations that, without training, might be very stressful. This is especially true for simple medical procedures that can require animals to engage in behaviours that are unusual or use unfamiliar medical devices that can be upsetting. Therefore, one cannot exclude the possibility that the training itself is a source of stress. In this study, we explored the effects of medical positive reinforcement training on salivary cortisol in two groups of captive ape species, orangutans and bonobos, which were familiar to this procedure. Furthermore, we successfully biologically validated the salivary cortisol assay, which had already been validated for bonobos, for orangutans. For the biological validation, we found that cortisol levels in orangutan saliva collected during baseline conditions were lower than in samples collected during three periods that were potentially stressful for the animals. However, we did not find significant changes in salivary cortisol during medical positive reinforcement training for either bonobos or orangutans. Therefore, for bonobos and orangutans with previous exposure to medical PRT, the procedure is not stressful. Thus, medical PRT provides a helpful tool for the captive management of the two species.

  8. Body position effects on sternocleidomastoid and masseter EMG pattern activity in patients undergoing occlusal splint therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormeño, G; Miralles, R; Santander, H; Casassus, R; Ferrer, P; Palazzi, C; Moya, H

    1997-10-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the effects of body position on electromyographic (EMG) activity of sternocleidomastoid and masseter muscles, in 15 patients with myogenic cranio-cervical-mandibular dysfunction undergoing occlusal splint therapy. EMG activity was recorded by placing surface electrodes on the sternocleidomastoid and masseter muscles (contralateral to the habitual sleeping side of each patient). EMG activity at rest and during swallowing of saliva and maximal voluntary clenching was recorded in the following body positions: standing, supine and lateral decubitus. In the sternocleidomastoid muscle significant higher EMG activities at rest and during swallowing were recorded in the lateral decubitus position, whereas during maximal voluntary clenching EMG activity did not change. In the masseter muscle significant higher EMG activity during maximal voluntary clenching in a standing position was observed, whereas EMG activity at rest and during swallowing did not change. The opposite pattern of EMG activity supports the idea that there may exist a differential modulation of the motor neuron pools of the sternocleidomastoid and masseter muscles, of peripheral and/or central origin. This suggests that the presence of parafunctional habits and body position could be closely correlated with the clinical symptomatology in these muscles in patients with myogenic craniomandibular dysfunction.

  9. Effect of the Lower Boundary Position of the Fourier Equation on the Soil Energy Balance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙菽芬; 张霞

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the effect of the lower boundary position selection for the Fourier equation on heat transfer and energy balance in soil is evaluated. A detailed numerical study shows that the proper position of the lower boundary is critical when solving the Fourier equation by using zero heat flux as the lower boundary condition. Since the position defines the capacity of soil as a heat sink or source, which absorbs and stores radiation energy from the sky in summer and then releases the energy to the atmosphere in winter, and regulates the deep soil temperature distribution, the depth of the position greatly influences the heat balance within the soil as well as the interaction between the soil and the atmosphere. Based on physical reasoning and the results of numerical simulation, the proper depth of the position should be equal to approximately 3 times of the annual heat wave damping depth. For most soils, the proper lower boundary depth for the Fourier equation should be around 8 m to 15 m, depending on soil texture.

  10. The effect of different foot and hand set-up positions on backstroke start performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Karla; de Jesus, Kelly; Abraldes, J Arturo; Mourão, Luis; Borgonovo-Santos, Márcio; Medeiros, Alexandre I A; Gonçalves, Pedro; Chainok, Phornpot; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Vaz, Mário A P; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2016-11-01

    Foot and hand set-up position effects were analysed on backstroke start performance. Ten swimmers randomly completed 27 starts grouped in trials (n = 3) of each variation, changing foot (totally immersed, partially and totally emerged) and hand (lowest, highest horizontal and vertical) positioning. Fifteen cameras recorded kinematics, and four force plates collected hands and feet kinetics. Standardised mean difference and 95% confidence intervals were used. Variations with feet immersed have shown lower vertical centre of mass (CM) set-up position (0.16 m), vertical impulse exerted at the hands, horizontal and vertical impulse exerted at the feet (0.28, 0.41, 0.16 N/BW.s, respectively) than feet emerged with hands horizontal and vertically positioned. Most variations with feet partially emerged exhibited higher and lesser vertical impulse exerted at hands than feet immersed and emerged (e.g. vertical handgrip, 0.13, 0.15 N/BW.s, respectively). Variation with feet emerged and hands on the lowest horizontal handgrip depicted shorter horizontal (0.23, 0.26 m) and vertical CM positioning at flight (0.16, 0.15 m) than the highest horizontal and vertical handgrip, respectively. Start variations have not affected 15-m time. Variations with feet partially or totally emerged depicted advantages, but focusing on the entry and underwater biomechanics is relevant for a shorter start time.

  11. Effect of pods' position on the protein content in soybean grains at low latitude

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    Paulo Victor Gomes Sales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Soybean grains have a high protein content, which can vary depending on various factors, as the pods' position throughout the plant. In this sense, aiming to study the effect of pods' position on the main stem of the plant for grades of soybean proteins, It has been accomplished in the years 2010 and 2011, a trial with ten soybean cultivars in the experimental area of the Federal University of Tocantins in Palmas. The experimental area was randomized blocks with 30 treatments and three replications. Treatments were arranged in one a split plot, being allocated in Ten cultivars plots (BRS Valuable, P98Y51, P98Y70, P99R03, M8527RR, M8925RR, M9144RR, M8867RR, and TMG103RR, and the sub plots In the pods' position on the plant (upper third, intermediate, and basal third. According to the results, we can conclude that there is variability among the pods' position. The grains located in the median and apical plant showed a trend of higher protein content. Cultivar P98Y70 showed the highest protein value. In the sampling grain for protein quantitation, it is recommended to use grains of pods located at the same position of the plant.

  12. Stability of Positively Charged Nanoemulsion Formulation Containing Steroidal Drug for Effective Transdermal Application

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    Stephanie Da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper emphasizes the formation of a positively charged nanoemulsion system for steroid drugs (hydrocortisone. It is believed that positively charged nanoemulsion provides more effective penetration of the skin. Therefore in our study we focused on the incorporation of phytosphingosine which serves as a positively charged cosurfactant in the nanoemulsion system. Negatively charged nanoemulsions were formulated mainly for comparison. Freshly prepared formulations were formed with particle size less than 300 nm and showed good stability over time. The oil-in-water nanoemulsion also showed good viscosity, conductivity, and pH values. From TEM micrograph, particle size showed consistent results with the measurement using photon correlation spectroscopy. It was concluded that both positively and negatively charged nanoemulsions showed good stability and have great potential in transdermal delivery system. Though, further investigation of the drug release and drug penetration of both positively and negatively charged nanoemulsions will be studied to further prove the efficacy of nanoemulsion with hydrocortisone as a delivery system for dermal application.

  13. The word concreteness effect occurs for positive, but not negative, emotion words in immediate serial recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chi-Shing; Altarriba, Jeanette

    2009-02-01

    The present study examined the roles of word concreteness and word valence in the immediate serial recall task. Emotion words (e.g. happy) were used to investigate these effects. Participants completed study-test trials with seven-item study lists consisting of positive or negative words with either high or low concreteness (Experiments 1 and 2) and neutral (i.e. non-emotion) words with either high or low concreteness (Experiment 2). For neutral words, the typical word concreteness effect (concrete words are better recalled than abstract words) was replicated. For emotion words, the effect occurred for positive words, but not for negative words. While the word concreteness effect was stronger for neutral words than for negative words, it was not different for the neutral words and the positive words. We conclude that both word valence and word concreteness simultaneously contribute to the item and order retention of emotion words and discuss how Hulme et al.'s (1997) item redintegration account can be modified to explain these findings.

  14. Decreasing the effective radiation dose in pediatric craniofacial CT by changing head position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, Ryne A. [Oregon Health and Science University, School of Medicine, Portland, OR (United States); Kuang, Anna A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Portland, OR (United States); Schwartz, Daniel L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Psychiatry, Portland, OR (United States); Selden, Nathan R. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Neurological Surgery, Portland, OR (United States); Stevens, Donna M. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Portland, OR (United States); Bardo, Dianna M.E. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Neuroradiology, Portland, OR (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Children are exposed to ionizing radiation during pre- and post-operative evaluation for craniofacial surgery. The primary purpose of the study was to decrease effective radiation dose while preserving the diagnostic quality of the study. In this prospective study 49 children were positioned during craniofacial CT (CFCT) imaging with their neck fully extended into an exaggerated sniff position, parallel to the CT gantry, to eliminate the majority of the cervical spine and the thyroid gland from radiation exposure. Image-quality and effective radiation dose comparisons were made retrospectively in age-matched controls (n = 49). When compared to CT scans reviewed retrospectively, the prospective examinations showed a statistically significant decrease in z-axis length by 16% (P < 0.0001) and delivered a reduced effective radiation dose by 18% (P < 0.0001). The subjective diagnostic quality of the exams performed in the prospective arm was maintained despite a slight decrease in the quality of the brain windows. There was statistically significant improvement in the quality of the bone windows and three-dimensional reconstructed images. Altering the position of the head by extending the neck during pediatric craniofacial CT imaging statistically reduces the effective radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic quality of the images. (orig.)

  15. Positive effects of television content on emotional and social behavior of children

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    Popović-Ćitić Branislava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the dominance of studies with various aspects of the negative impact of television content as their subject of interest is evident in the field of theoretical and empirical analysis of the impact of television content on the development of children and youth, while the consideration of positive impact was mostly beyond the systematic interest of scientists and researchers. Even though the general assessment is that viewing prosocial television content may result in positive changes in social and emotional behavior of young people, research studies committed to the positive effects of television content on emotional and social behavior of children are scarce and insufficiently perceive the character and nature of the impact of television on the development of emotions and prosocial behavior during childhood. Based on the critical review of the findings of a number of foreign empirical studies, this article summarizes the research evidence of the positive effects of television content on emotional empathy, altruism, learning about emotions, social interaction and acceptance of diversity, with presentation of conclusions about potential mediator factors that may interact with the influences of television portrayals.

  16. The effect of fatigue on knee position sense is not dependent upon the muscle group fatigued.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fernando; Venâncio, João; Quintas, Pedro; Oliveira, José

    2011-08-01

    Muscle fatigue could have a greater impact on position sense when antagonists of the movement are fatigued. Hence, this study aimed to compare the effects of antagonist and agonist exercise-induced muscle fatigue on knee joint position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study included 40 subjects. Knee position sense and muscle strength were measured before and after two exercise protocols consisting of 30 consecutive maximal concentric/eccentric contractions of the knee extensors or flexors on the isokinetic dynamometer at an angular velocity of 180°/s (3.14 rad/s). Both exercise protocols increased the absolute angular error (F(1.78) = 39.89, P knee extensors protocol from 2.0 ± 1.3° to 3.5 ± 2.0°, knee flexors protocol from 2.1 ± 1.2° to 3.7 ± 2.2°), and no differences were detected between protocols (F(1.78) = 0.034, P = 0.855). No changes were observed in the relative angular error. Muscle fatigue affects knee position sense, and the deleterious effect is not different depending upon the muscle group fatigued. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of No on spontaneous acrosome reaction in AsAb positive rat spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhanW; NiJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of NO on the spontaneous acrosome reaction in antisperm antibody (AsAb) positive rat spermatozoa.Methods:The rat model of AsAb was set up by artificial immunization.The level of AsAb in blood serum was determined by TAT and ELISA.Rat spermatozoa was visualized by staining the acrosome with Coomassie brilliant blue.The NO concentration in rat spermatozoa was assayed by HPLC.Results:The percentage of acrosome reaction,NO concentration,superoxide dismutase(SOD) and Na+-K+ ATPase activity in AsAb positive rat spermatozoa were significantly decreased compared with the control group.Low dose of NO(SNP 10-9-10-8mol/L) increased the percentage of acrosome reaction and SOD activity,but had no effect on Na+-K+ATPase activity.High dose of NO(SNP 10-6-10-4mol/L) decreased the three items.Conclusion:The decrease in acrosome reaction in positive AsAb rat spermatozoa might be related to a decrease in NO and increase in O2-.(the SOD activity was decreased)in sperm.A low dose of NO might increase the percentage of acrosome reaction in AsAb positive rat by inhibiting the superoxide,while a high dose of NO was harmful to sperm function.

  18. Modifying the Functional Movement Screen Deep Squat Test: The Effect of Foot and Arm Positional Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillian, Danny J; Rynders, Zach G; Trudeau, Tyler R

    2016-04-01

    The functional movement screen (FMS) was developed as an evaluation tool for assessing the fundamental movement patterns believed to be prerequisites for functional activity. However, some of the FMS component movements, such as the deep overhead squat test (DST), likely represent novel motor challenges on which poor performance might reflect inexperience with the task rather than a movement impairment. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of positional variations on DST scores in a population of young, healthy adults. We hypothesized that self-selecting foot positioning, removal of an overhead component, or changing both aspects of the DST would result in improvement in FMS scores. Twenty healthy subjects completed 4 squatting conditions in a counterbalanced sequence to eliminate carry over effects: DST, modified squat with hands at chest level and feet in the DST position (DSTO), modified squat with arms in the DST position and self-selected foot placement (DSTF), and modified squat with hands at chest level and self-selected foot placement (DSTB). A Friedman's analysis of variance and Wilcoxon signed-ranks' post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between all squat conditions (p = 0.036), between DSTB-DST groups (p DST groups (p = 0.004), and DSTO-DSTB groups (p = 0.046). Each modified squat condition had an average score higher than the DST. These findings suggest that the FMS DST might underestimate an individual's ability to squat during functional tasks that involve self-selected foot and arm placement.

  19. Effects of Electrode Position on Spatiotemporal Auditory Nerve Fiber Responses: A 3D Computational Model Study

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    Soojin Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A cochlear implant (CI is an auditory prosthesis that enables hearing by providing electrical stimuli through an electrode array. It has been previously established that the electrode position can influence CI performance. Thus, electrode position should be considered in order to achieve better CI results. This paper describes how the electrode position influences the auditory nerve fiber (ANF response to either a single pulse or low- (250 pulses/s and high-rate (5,000 pulses/s pulse-trains using a computational model. The field potential in the cochlea was calculated using a three-dimensional finite-element model, and the ANF response was simulated using a biophysical ANF model. The effects were evaluated in terms of the dynamic range, stochasticity, and spike excitation pattern. The relative spread, threshold, jitter, and initiated node were analyzed for single-pulse response; and the dynamic range, threshold, initiated node, and interspike interval were analyzed for pulse-train stimuli responses. Electrode position was found to significantly affect the spatiotemporal pattern of the ANF response, and this effect was significantly dependent on the stimulus rate. We believe that these modeling results can provide guidance regarding perimodiolar and lateral insertion of CIs in clinical settings and help understand CI performance.

  20. Positive emotional context eliminates the framing effect in decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassotti, Mathieu; Habib, Marianne; Poirel, Nicolas; Aïte, Ania; Houdé, Olivier; Moutier, Sylvain

    2012-10-01

    Dual-process theories have suggested that emotion plays a key role in the framing effect in decision-making. However, little is known about the potential impact of a specific positive or negative emotional context on this bias. We investigated this question with adult participants using an emotional priming paradigm. First, participants were presented with positive or negative affective pictures (i.e., pleasant vs. unpleasant photographs). Afterward, participants had to perform a financial decision-making task that was unrelated to the pictures previously presented. The results revealed that the presentation framed in terms of gain or loss no longer affected subjects' decision-making following specific exposure to emotionally pleasant pictures. Interestingly, a positive emotional context did not globally influence risk-taking behavior but specifically decreased the risk propensity in the loss frame. This finding confirmed that a positive emotional context can reduce loss aversion, and it strongly reinforced the dual-process view that the framing effect stems from an affective heuristic belonging to intuitive System 1.

  1. Effectiveness of a positive psychology intervention combined with cognitive behavioral therapy in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario-Josefa Marrero

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design and implement a positive intervention combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy to enhance subjective and psychological well-being and other positive functioning constructs in a convenience sample. Participants analysed were 48 university students (mean age 22.25, 25 assigned nonrandomized to intervention condition and 23 to no-treatment waiting-list control condition. All participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention to test the treatment program effectiveness. Repeated-measures ANCOVAs, controlling baseline differences between the two groups, indicated that the intervention group reported greater social support after the intervention period than the waiting-list control group. Within-group differences were found for happiness, selfacceptance, positive relations with others, optimism, and self-esteem in the intervention group; these differences did not appear in the waiting-list control group. These findings suggest the limited capacity of this intervention program for improving well-being through positive activities combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy. Future research should analyse what kind of activities could be more effective in promoting well-being depending on the characteristics of participants.

  2. Investigating the position isomerism effect of dihydroxybenzoic acid compounds by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Hao, Guohui; Zhao, Rongjiao; Hong, Zhi

    2012-03-01

    Far-infrared vibrational absorption of a series of dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) compounds with different substituted hydroxy group at different positions have been investigated using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) at room temperature. The experimental results show large difference among absorption spectra of different DHBA (2,3-DHBA, 2,4-DHBA, 2,5-DHBA, 2,6-DHBA) compounds in 0.2 ~ 2.0 THz region, which probably originated from the difference of intra-molecular and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds due to the presence of two hydroxyl group in different positions with respect to the carboxylic group in different DHBAs. All the experimental DHBAs vibrational modes showed distinct fingerprint absorption in THz region and theorectical calculation based on density functional theory (DFT) was carried out to assist the analysis and assignment of the vibrational modes. The results indicate that THz-TDS technology can not only give a new experimental method to identify and characterize the position isomerism effect of hydroxyl group between such different kinds of DHBAs from molecule-level, but also provide a useful suggestion for further assessing the possible relationships between the DHBAs vibrational properties and the effects of the substituted hydroxy group position to better know their biochemical activities in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic fields.

  3. Shoe cleat position during cycling and its effect on subsequent running performance in triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viker, Tomas; Richardson, Matt X

    2013-01-01

    Research with cyclists suggests a decreased load on the lower limbs by placing the shoe cleat more posteriorly, which may benefit subsequent running in a triathlon. This study investigated the effect of shoe cleat position during cycling on subsequent running. Following bike-run training sessions with both aft and traditional cleat positions, 13 well-trained triathletes completed a 30 min simulated draft-legal triathlon cycling leg, followed by a maximal 5 km run on two occasions, once with aft-placed and once with traditionally placed cleats. Oxygen consumption, breath frequency, heart rate, cadence and power output were measured during cycling, while heart rate, contact time, 200 m lap time and total time were measured during running. Cardiovascular measures did not differ between aft and traditional cleat placement during the cycling protocol. The 5 km run time was similar for aft and traditional cleat placement, at 1084 ± 80 s and 1072 ± 64 s, respectively, as was contact time during km 1 and 5, and heart rate and running speed for km 5 for the two cleat positions. Running speed during km 1 was 2.1% ± 1.8 faster (P < 0.05) for the traditional cleat placement. There are no beneficial effects of an aft cleat position on subsequent running in a short distance triathlon.

  4. Combined effects of socioeconomic position, smoking, and hypertension on risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordahl, Helene; Osler, Merete; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva; Overvad, Kim; Diderichsen, Finn; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-09-01

    Combined effects of socioeconomic position and well-established risk factors on stroke incidence have not been formally investigated. In a pooled cohort study of 68 643 men and women aged 30 to 70 years in Denmark, we examined the combined effect and interaction between socioeconomic position (ie, education), smoking, and hypertension on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence by the use of the additive hazards model. During 14 years of follow-up, 3613 ischemic strokes and 776 hemorrhagic strokes were observed. Current smoking and hypertension were more prevalent among those with low education. Low versus high education was associated with greater ischemic, but not hemorrhagic, stroke incidence. The combined effect of low education and current smoking was more than expected by the sum of their separate effects on ischemic stroke incidence, particularly among men: 134 (95% confidence interval, 49-219) extra cases per 100 000 person-years because of interaction, adjusted for age, cohort study, and birth cohort. There was no clear evidence of interaction between low education and hypertension. The combined effect of current smoking and hypertension was more than expected by the sum of their separate effects on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence. This effect was most pronounced for ischemic stroke among women: 178 (95% confidence interval, 103-253) extra cases per 100 000 person-years because of interaction, adjusted for age, cohort study, and birth cohort. Reducing smoking in those with low socioeconomic position and in those with hypertension could potentially reduce social inequality stroke incidence. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Effectiveness of a Positive Youth Development Program for Secondary 1 Students in Macau: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Luk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid change to society after the opening of the gaming licensure by the government and the potential attraction to youth caused by the casinos, a well-tested and comprehensive adolescent development program previously established in Hong Kong was adopted and modified to be used in Macau. It is expected to help our adolescents achieve positive growth and be better prepared for future challenges. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the modified positive youth development program for Secondary 1 Students in Macau. Specifically, two research questions will be asked: (1 How does the positive youth development program affect positive growth for youth in Macau?; and (2 Is youth growth related to different factors such as gender, age, family financial condition, and parents' marital status? A mixed research method with a quantitative approach using a pre- and post-test pre-experimental design, and a qualitative approach using a focus group for the participants is carried out. The study sample included 232 Secondary 1 Students in two schools. The objective outcome evaluation showed that, overall, 123 (53% of the participants had significant improvement on the total scores of the Chinese Positive Youth Development Scale (CPYDS and the two composite scores. However, there were some increases in the behavioral intention of alcohol drinking and participation in gambling activities. The “happiness of the family life” was found to have significant differences in the score of the CPYDS, which was shown to be the factor related to youth growth. The focus group interviews revealed that both positive and negative feedback was obtained from the discussion; however, the majority of the participants perceived benefits to themselves from the program. With reference to the principle of triangulation, the present study suggests that, based on both quantitative and qualitative evaluation findings, it should be concluded that there is

  6. Effectiveness of a positive youth development program for secondary 1 students in Macau: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Andrew L; Au, Annah M L; Leong, K M; Zhu, Michelle M X; Lau, G B; Wong, Tammy C P; Lei, Nancy W I

    2011-05-26

    With the rapid change to society after the opening of the gaming licensure by the government and the potential attraction to youth caused by the casinos, a well-tested and comprehensive adolescent development program previously established in Hong Kong was adopted and modified to be used in Macau. It is expected to help our adolescents achieve positive growth and be better prepared for future challenges. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the modified positive youth development program for Secondary 1 Students in Macau. Specifically, two research questions will be asked: (1) How does the positive youth development program affect positive growth for youth in Macau?; and (2) Is youth growth related to different factors such as gender, age, family financial condition, and parents' marital status? A mixed research method with a quantitative approach using a pre- and post-test pre-experimental design, and a qualitative approach using a focus group for the participants is carried out. The study sample included 232 Secondary 1 Students in two schools. The objective outcome evaluation showed that, overall, 123 (53%) of the participants had significant improvement on the total scores of the Chinese Positive Youth Development Scale (CPYDS) and the two composite scores. However, there were some increases in the behavioral intention of alcohol drinking and participation in gambling activities. The "happiness of the family life" was found to have significant differences in the score of the CPYDS, which was shown to be the factor related to youth growth. The focus group interviews revealed that both positive and negative feedback was obtained from the discussion; however, the majority of the participants perceived benefits to themselves from the program. With reference to the principle of triangulation, the present study suggests that, based on both quantitative and qualitative evaluation findings, it should be concluded that there is positive evidence

  7. Building trust in e-banking and its effect on positive word-of-mouth advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shaemi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, new technologies have changed the way of serving customers in many service organizations including banking industry. The importance of websites and their exclusive characteristics in presenting various kinds of services to the bank customers has increased. This paper presents a compound model to investigate the effect of traditional and online elements on customers' trust in electronic banking and word of mouth advertisement. For this purpose, a standard questionnaire based on Likert segmentation has been used and 384 customers of Shiraz Mellat bank branches have been tested, randomly. Using structural equation modeling, the study shows that both traditional characteristics of bank and website characteristics rather have positive effects on customers’ trust in electronic banking, which increase word of mouth advertising, positively.

  8. Effectiveness of Positive Couple Therapy on Life Satisfaction of Mothers of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bolghanabadi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Satisfaction with life has a vital role in human’s well being and health. The aim of this study was investigate to effectiveness of the positive couple therapy on improving satisfaction with life of mothers of children with special needs. Materials and methods: The research method was semi-experimental with pretest/posttest/follow-up design with control group. Among mothers with special needs children of Mashhad were recruited 20 subjects through purposely method and were assigned in experimental and control groups randomly (10 subjects in each group. For gathering data, satisfaction with life questionnaire was used. Results: Findings showed that life satisfaction of mothers with special needs children who received intervention had increased. Conclusion: Couple therapy with positive approach has been effective on increasing the life satisfaction of mothers with special needs children of Mashhad.

  9. Evidence that the positive inotropic effects of the alkylxanthines are not due to adenosine receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, M. G.; Keddie, J. R.; Torr, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    We investigated the possibility that the positive inotropic effects of the alkylxanthines are due to adenosine receptor blockade. The potency of 8-phenyltheophylline, theophylline and enprofylline as adenosine antagonists was assessed in vitro, using the guinea-pig isolated atrium, and in vivo, using the anaesthetized dog. The order of potency of the alkylxanthines as antagonists of the negative inotropic response to 2-chloroadenosine in vitro, and of the hypotensive response to adenosine in vivo was 8-phenyltheophylline greater than theophylline greater than enprofylline. The order of potency of the alkylxanthines as positive inotropic and chronotropic agents in the anaesthetized dog was enprofylline greater than theophylline greater than 8-phenyltheophylline. The results of this study indicate that the inotropic effects of the alkylxanthines in the anaesthetized dog are not due to adenosine receptor blockade. PMID:6322898

  10. A Potential Role for mu-Opioids in Mediating the Positive Effects of Gratitude

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    Max Henning

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gratitude is a complex emotional feeling associated with universally desirable positive effects in personal, social, and physiological domains. Why or how gratitude achieves these functional outcomes is not clear. Toward the goal of identifying its' underlying physiological processes, we recently investigated the neural correlates of gratitude. In our study, participants were exposed to gratitude-inducing stimuli, and rated each according to how much gratitude it provoked. As expected, self-reported gratitude intensity correlated with brain activity in distinct regions of the medial pre-frontal cortex associated with social reward and moral cognition. Here we draw from our data and existing literature to offer a theoretical foundation for the physiological correlates of gratitude. We propose that mu-opioid signaling (1 accompanies the mental experience of gratitude, and (2 may account for the positive effects of gratitude on social relationships, subjective wellbeing, and physiological health.

  11. A Potential Role for mu-Opioids in Mediating the Positive Effects of Gratitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Max; Fox, Glenn R.; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Gratitude is a complex emotional feeling associated with universally desirable positive effects in personal, social, and physiological domains. Why or how gratitude achieves these functional outcomes is not clear. Toward the goal of identifying its' underlying physiological processes, we recently investigated the neural correlates of gratitude. In our study, participants were exposed to gratitude-inducing stimuli, and rated each according to how much gratitude it provoked. As expected, self-reported gratitude intensity correlated with brain activity in distinct regions of the medial pre-frontal cortex associated with social reward and moral cognition. Here we draw from our data and existing literature to offer a theoretical foundation for the physiological correlates of gratitude. We propose that mu-opioid signaling (1) accompanies the mental experience of gratitude, and (2) may account for the positive effects of gratitude on social relationships, subjective wellbeing, and physiological health. PMID:28680408

  12. Dynamic metabolism modelling of urban water services--demonstrating effectiveness as a decision-support tool for Oslo, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, G; Sægrov, Sveinung; Brattebø, Helge

    2014-09-15

    Urban water services are challenged from many perspectives and different stakeholders demand performance improvements along economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainability. In response, urban water utilities systematically give more attention to criteria such as water safety, climate change adaptation and mitigation, environmental life cycle assessment (LCA), total cost efficiency, and on how to improve their operations within the water-energy-carbon nexus. The authors of this paper collaborated in the development of a 'Dynamic Metabolism Model' (DMM). The model is developed for generic use in the sustainability assessment of urban water services, and it has been initially tested for the city of Oslo, Norway. The purpose has been to adopt a holistic systemic perspective to the analysis of metabolism and environmental impacts of resource flows in urban water and wastewater systems, in order to offer a tool for the examination of future strategies and intervention options in such systems. This paper describes the model and its application to the city of Oslo for the analysis time period 2013-2040. The external factors impacting decision-making and interventions are introduced along with realistic scenarios developed for the testing, after consultation with officials at the Oslo Water and Wastewater Works (Norway). Possible interventions that the utility intends to set in motion are defined and numerically interpreted for incorporation into the model, and changes in the indicator values over the time period are determined. This paper aims to demonstrate the effectiveness and usefulness of the DMM, as a decision-support tool for water-wastewater utilities. The scenarios considered and interventions identified do not include all possible scenarios and interventions that can be relevant for water-wastewater utilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Demonstrating the effects of phonological similarity and frequency on item and order memory in Down syndrome using process dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth; Jarrold, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    It is important to distinguish between memory for item information and memory for order information when considering the nature of verbal short-term memory (vSTM) performance. Although other researchers have attempted to make this distinction between item and order memory in children, none has done so using process dissociation. This study shows that such an approach can be particularly useful and informative. Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) tend to experience a vSTM deficit. These two experiments explored whether phonological similarity (Experiment 1) and item frequency (Experiment 2) affected vSTM for item and order information in a group of individuals with DS compared with typically developing (TD) vocabulary-matched children. Process dissociation was used to obtain measures of item and order memory via Nairne and Kelley's procedure (Journal of Memory and Language, 50 (2004) 113-133). Those with DS were poorer than the matched TD group for recall of both item and order information. However, in both populations, phonologically similar items reduced order memory but enhanced item memory, whereas high-frequency items resulted in improvements in both item and order memory-effects that are in line with previous research in the adult literature. These results indicate that, despite poorer vSTM performance in DS, individuals experience phonological coding of verbal input and a contribution of long-term memory knowledge to recall. These findings inform routes for interventions for those with DS, highlighting the need to enhance both item and order memory. Moreover, this work demonstrates that process dissociation is applicable and informative for studying special populations and children.

  14. Analysis of skewed GPS position estimates: Effects of coupling local topography and atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materna, K.; Herring, T.

    2013-12-01

    Error in modeling atmospheric delay is one of the limiting factors in the accuracy of GPS position determination. In regions with uneven topography, atmospheric delay phenomena can be especially complicated. Current delay models used in analyzing daily GPS data from the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) are successful in achieving millimeter-level accuracy at most locations; however, at a subset of stations, the time-series for position estimates contain an unusually large number of outliers. In many cases these outliers are oriented in the same direction. The stations which exhibit asymmetric outliers occur in various places across the PBO network, but they are especially numerous in California's Mammoth Lakes region, which served as a case study for this presentation. The phenomenon was analyzed by removing secular trends and variations with periods longer than 75 days from the signal using a median filter. We subsequently calculated the skewness of the station position residuals in north, east and up directions. In the cases examined, typical position outliers are 5-15 mm. In extreme cases, skewed position residuals, not related to snow on antennas, can be as large as 20 mm. We examine the causes of the skewness through site-by-site comparisons with topographic data and numerical weather models. Analysis suggests that the direction of the skewness is generally parallel to the local topographic gradient at a scale of several kilometers, and that outlier data points occur when certain atmospheric conditions are met. The results suggest that a coupling between the atmosphere and local topography is responsible for the phenomenon of skewed residuals. In this presentation, we examine the characteristics of the sites that we have analyzed in detail. From these analyses, we postulate possible parameterizations of the atmospheric and topographic effects that could be incorporated into geodetic analysis programs, thus allowing the inhomogeneous atmospheric delays to be

  15. Effect of Akimbo Versus Raised Arm Positioning on Breast and Cardiopulmonary Dosimetry in Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Denniston

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, radiotherapy (RT-related late toxicities are a prime concern during treatment planning. This is the first study to examine whether arm positioning (raised versus akimbo result in differential cardiopulmonary and breast doses in patients undergoing mediastinal RT. METHODS: Two treatment plans were made for each patient (akimbo/arms-raised; treatment was per Children’s Oncology Group AHOD0031 protocol, including AP/PA fields. The anterior midline T6-T7 disc space was used as an anatomic reference of midline. Heart/lungs were contoured for each setup. For females, breasts were also contoured and nipple positions identified. Volumetric centers of contoured organs were defined and three-dimensional distances from midline were computed. Analyzed dosimetric parameters included V5 (volume receiving ≥5 Gy, V10, V15, V20, and mean dose. Statistics were performed using the Mann-Whitney test.RESULTS: Fifteen (6 female, 9 male pediatric HL patients treated with mediastinal RT were analyzed. The median lateral distance from the breast center/nipple to midline with arms akimbo was larger than that with arms raised (8.6 vs. 7.7cm left breast, p=0.04; 10.7 vs. 9.2cm left nipple, p=0.04; 8.7 vs. 7.0cm right breast, p=0.004; 9.9 vs. 7.9cm, p=0.007 right nipple. Raised arm position was associated with a median 2.8/3.0cm decrease in breast/nipple separation, respectively. There were no significant differences in craniocaudal breast/nipple position based on arm positioning (p>0.05. Increasing breast volume was correlated with larger arm position-related changes in breast/nipple separation (r=0.74, p=0.06 / r=0.85, p=0.02. Akimbo positioning lowered median breast V5, V10, V15, and mean dose (p0.05. Arm position had no significant effect on cardiopulmonary doses.CONCLUSIONS: Akimbo arm positioning may be advantageous to decrease breast doses in female pediatric HL patients undergoing mediastinal RT, especially in the

  16. The Effects of Life Events and Socioeconomic Position in Childhood and Adulthood on Successful Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Almar A L; Aartsen, Marja J; Deeg, Dorly J H; Huisman, Martijn

    2017-03-01

    Building on social stress theory, this study has 2 aims. First, we aim to estimate the effects of stressful life events in childhood and adulthood on Successful Aging (SA). Second, we examine how unequal exposure to such life events between individuals with different socioeconomic position (SEP) contributes to socioeconomic inequalities in SA. We used 16-year longitudinal data from 2,185 respondents aged 55-85 years in 1992 in the Dutch nationally representative Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. Measurement of SA was based on earlier work, in which we integrated trajectories in 9 indicators of functioning into an index of SA. Using path analysis, we investigated direct and indirect effects of parental and adulthood SEP as well as of self-reported childhood and adulthood life events on SA. Almost all included life events had negative direct effects on SA. Parental SEP had no direct effect on SA, whereas adulthood SEP had. Higher Parental SEP increased the likelihood of parental problems and parental death in childhood, resulting in negative indirect effects on SA. Higher adulthood SEP had both positive and negative indirect effects on SA, through increasing the likelihood of divorce and unemployment, but decreasing the likelihood of occupational disability. SEP and particular stressful life events are largely, but not entirely independent predictors of SA. We found that high and low SEP may increase exposure to particular events that negatively affect SA. Findings suggest that low (childhood) SEP and stressful life events are interrelated factors that may limit individual opportunities to age successfully.

  17. Position-effect variegation revisited: HUSHing up heterochromatin in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Timms, Richard T.; Tchasovnikarova, Iva A.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Wiley via http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bies.201500184 Much of what we understand about heterochromatin formation in mammals has been extrapolated from forward genetic screens for modifiers of position-effect variegation (PEV) in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The recent identification of the HUSH (Human Silencing Hub) complex suggests that more recent evolutionary developments contribute to the mechanisms unde...

  18. The Effect of Positive and Negative Feedback on Risk-Taking across Different Contexts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel B Losecaat Vermeer

    Full Text Available Preferences for risky choices have often been shown to be unstable and context-dependent. Though people generally avoid gambles with mixed outcomes, a phenomenon often attributed to loss aversion, contextual factors can impact this dramatically. For example, people typically prefer risky options after a financial loss, while generally choosing safer options after a monetary gain. However, it is unclear what exactly contributes to these preference shifts as a function of prior outcomes, as these gain/loss outcomes are usually confounded with participant performance, and therefore it is unclear whether these effects are driven purely by the monetary gains or losses, or rather by success or failure at the actual task. Here, we experimentally separated the effects of monetary gains/losses from performance success/failure prior to a standard risky choice. Participants performed a task in which they experienced contextual effects: 1 monetary gain or loss based directly on performance, 2 monetary gain or loss that was randomly awarded and was, crucially, independent from performance, and 3 success or failure feedback based on performance, but without any monetary incentive. Immediately following these positive/negative contexts, participants were presented with a gain-loss gamble that they had to decide to either play or pass. We found that risk preferences for identical sets of gambles were biased by positive and negative contexts containing monetary gains and losses, but not by contexts containing performance feedback. This data suggests that the observed framing effects are driven by aversion for monetary losses and not simply by the positive or negative valence of the context, or by potential moods resulting from positive or negative contexts. These results highlight the specific context dependence of risk preferences.

  19. Existence and nonexistence of positive solutions of semilinear elliptic equation with inhomogeneous strong Allee effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-qi LIU; Yu-wen WANG; Jun-ping SHI

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study a semilinear elliptic equation defined on a bounded smooth domain. This type of problem arises from the study of spatial ecology model, and the growth function in the equation has a strong Allee effect and is inhomogeneous. We use variational methods to prove that the equation has at least two positive solutions for a large parameter if it satisfies some appropriate conditions. We also prove some nonexistence results.

  20. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation in the Treatment of Elderly Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    N. Saki; Bayat, A; S. Nikakhlagh; F. Memari; G. Mirmomeni

    2011-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Vertigo in the elderly is relatively common, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy is an important therapeutic option in treating patients with significant balance deficits. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on vertigo symptoms in elderly patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Materials & Methods: In a cross sectional analytic design, 46 patients older than 60 ye...