WorldWideScience

Sample records for demolition

  1. Decommissioning and demolition 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, I.L.

    1992-01-01

    The decommissioning and demolition of structures offshore, onshore and in nuclear works involves new technologies and industries in demolition and removal. The aim of the conference was to provide a forum to keep up to date with technological developments, to publicise new techniques and to share and discuss present and future plans. A particular feature was the multi-disciplinary approach to promote and encourage communication between different sectors of this difficult field of operations. The conference emphasised not only technical issues but also legislative, management and health and safety aspects. Papers were presented by practising engineers, contractors and research workers involved in offshore structures, buildings, power stations, contaminated sites, nuclear plant and includes specialist techniques of cutting, lifting, explosives, ground treatment and decontamination. Many valuable case histories and records based on practical experience were reported. The volume provides a reference source on the state-of-the-art in decommissioning and demolition. The ten papers relevant to the decommissioning and demolition of nuclear facilities are indexed separately. (Author)

  2. Large-Scale Residential Demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA provides resources for handling residential demolitions or renovations. This includes planning, handling harmful materials, recycling, funding, compliance assistance, good practices and regulations.

  3. Construction and Demolition Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Andersen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is the waste generated during the building, repair, remodeling or removal of constructions. The constructions can be roads, residential housing and nonresidential buildings. C&D waste has traditionally been considered without any environmental problems...... should be managed accordingly. Another reason is that it has been documented that a large fraction of C&D waste (about 90 %) can be easily recycled and thus can conserve landfill capacity. C&D waste may conveniently be divided into three subcategories: Buildings, roads and excavations. This chapter...

  4. Quality assurance and demolition: 2006 symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfeldt, S.

    2006-01-01

    The '2006 Symposium: Quality Assurance and Demolition' jointly organized by compra GmbH and Brenk Systemplanung GmbH this year again focused on quality assurance and the demolition of nuclear facilities as its main topics. The papers presented ranged from issues of clearance and disposal to demolition technologies and status reports about specific demolition projects. The sixteen presentations at the '2006 Symposium: Quality Assurance and Demolition' offered an interesting and very topical cross section of decommissioning and demolition of nuclear facilities in Germany. In 2007, the conference about similar main topics will again be held at the Schloss Bensberg Grand Hotel. (orig.)

  5. Sustainable Management of Construction and Demolition Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    This web page discusses how to sustainably manage construction and demolition materials, Information covers, what they are, and how builders, construction crews, demolition teams,and deign practitioners can divert C&D from landfills.

  6. Construction and demolition waste indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mália, Miguel; de Brito, Jorge; Pinheiro, Manuel Duarte; Bravo, Miguel

    2013-03-01

    The construction industry is one of the biggest and most active sectors of the European Union (EU), consuming more raw materials and energy than any other economic activity. Furthermore, construction waste is the commonest waste produced in the EU. Current EU legislation sets out to implement construction and demolition waste (CDW) prevention and recycling measures. However it lacks tools to accelerate the development of a sector as bound by tradition as the building industry. The main objective of the present study was to determine indicators to estimate the amount of CDW generated on site both globally and by waste stream. CDW generation was estimated for six specific sectors: new residential construction, new non-residential construction, residential demolition, non-residential demolition, residential refurbishment, and non-residential refurbishment. The data needed to develop the indicators was collected through an exhaustive survey of previous international studies. The indicators determined suggest that the average composition of waste generated on site is mostly concrete and ceramic materials. Specifically for new residential and new non-residential construction the production of concrete waste in buildings with a reinforced concrete structure lies between 17.8 and 32.9 kg m(-2) and between 18.3 and 40.1 kg m(-2), respectively. For the residential and non-residential demolition sectors the production of this waste stream in buildings with a reinforced concrete structure varies from 492 to 840 kg m(-2) and from 401 to 768 kg/m(-2), respectively. For the residential and non-residential refurbishment sectors the production of concrete waste in buildings lies between 18.9 and 45.9 kg/m(-2) and between 18.9 and 191.2 kg/m(-2), respectively.

  7. Drilling-and-blasting method of demolition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinitsyn Denis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the experience and gives the examples of dismantling and demolition of the construction structures of the buildings and facilities using the drilling-and-blasting method. The drilling-and-blasting method is widely used in construction and reconstruction. The demolition means may be classified according to impact on a material of structures to be demolished and to forces application, where, by virtue of an impact energy type, we choose the blasting method. This method is used during the complete demolition or fragmentation of concrete, reinforced concrete, masonry structures, of old buildings and facilities demolition to their base or in the intended direction. Blasting method may be used as well during the steel and reinforced concrete structures demolition to the smaller easy-to-move parts. Reviewed are the organizational-process activities, which are performed during the various structures dismantling. Given are the areas of application for the various methods of structures demolition. Given is the example of demolition of “Sevemaya” boiler house brick chimney at the territory of Murmansk DSK using the blast in confined spaces of the operating company. Subject of research: methods of construction structures demolition in alarm situations and acts of God. Objects: determination of the most efficient demolition methods in the present conditions of construction operations development. Materials and methods: the developed activities on the construction structures dismantling are given. Results: the most efficient methods and ways of construction structures demolition are defined. Conclusions: it is required for improvement of methods and ways of the structures drilling-and-blasting demolition.

  8. Concrete decontamination and demolition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, T.S.

    1980-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Environmental Control Technology, requested Nuclear Energy Services to prepare a handbook for the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of DOE-owned and commercially-owned radioactive facilities. the objective of the handbook is to provide the nuclear industry with guidance on the state-of-the-art methods and equipment available for decommissioning and to provide the means to estimate decommissioning costs and environmental impact. The methods available for concrete decontamination and demolition are summarized to provide an overview of some of the state-of-the-art techniques to be discussed at this workshop. The pertinent information on each method will include the selection factors such as the rate of performance in terms of concrete removal per unit time (cubic yards per day), manpower required by craft, unit cost (dollars per cubic yard) and the advantages and disadvantages. The methods included in this overview are those that have been routinely used in nuclear and nonnuclear applications or demonstrated in field tests. These methods include controlled blasting, wrecking ball or slab, backhoe mounted ram, flame torch, thermic lance, rock splitter, demolition compound, sawing, core stitch drilling, explosive cutting, paving breaker and power chisel, drill and spall, scarifying, water cannon and grinding

  9. Quality assurance and demolition: 2008 symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schartmann, F.; Thierfeldt, S.

    2008-01-01

    The 'Quality Assurance and Demolition Symposium, which has become a tradition established jointly by Applus RTD Deutschland GmbH (formerly compra GmbH) and Brenk Systemplanung GmbH, Aachen, was held also in 2008 with the focus on quality assurance and the demolition of nuclear facilities. The conference began with a series of lectures on knowledge and document management in general, and the use of document management systems in the nuclear field in particular. The evening lecture was presented by Axel Weis (Karlsruhe Research Center) on 'Competence Preservation in Nuclear Technology'. The 24 technical papers presented on the next 2 days of the symposium dealt with non-destructive materials testing and with special problems of radiation protection, demolition, and waste management. In 2009, the meeting will cover similar main topics and will again be held in an interesting environment, perhaps in combination with a tour of a demolition project. (orig.)

  10. Mercury-Containing Devices and Demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some items inside residential buildings contain mercury, which poses a persistent and toxic human health and environmental threat. These materials should be carefully salvaged for proper recycling to prevent mercury contamination prior to demolition.

  11. Handling construction waste of building demolition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vondráčková Terezie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Some building defects lead to their demolition. What about construction and demolition waste? According to the Waste Act 185/2001 Coll. and its amendment 223/2015 Coll., which comes into force on January 1, 2017, the production of waste has to be reduced because, as already stated in the amendment to Act No. 229/2014 Coll., the ban on landfilling of waste will apply from 2024 onwards. The main goals of waste management can thus be considered: Preventing or minimizing waste; Waste handling to be used as a secondary raw material - recycling, composting, combustion and the remaining waste to be dumped. Company AZS 98 s. r. o. was established, among other activities, also for the purpose of recycling construction and demolition waste. It operates 12 recycling centers throughout the Czech Republic and therefore we have selected it for a demonstration of the handling of construction and demolition waste in addressing the defects of the buildings.

  12. Solar One demolition and remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Solar One was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of generating electrical energy from solar power using a central receiver concept. An array of heliostats focused sunlight onto a central receiver, which superheated water to produce steam. Although Solar One was successful, the oil-based Thermal Storage System (TSS), used to store heat energy for power generation at night, was not efficient. When the TSS was demolished for the installation of a more efficient molten salt system, a major effort was made to salvage or recycle all of its equipment and materials. During TSS demolition, approximately 7 tons of aluminum shielding and 205 tons of steel were salvaged as scrap metal; 200 tons of concrete was used for erosion protection along the Mohave River banks; 150,000 gallons of oil was recycled and 100 tons of equipment was salvaged for use at other facilities. During remediation, approximately 9,000 tons of oil contaminated sand, gravel and soil was recycled into approximately 10,000 tons of asphalt concrete and used to pave a nearby 5-acre parking lot at Barstow College. This not only reduced project remediation costs, but also met environmental requirements and provided a much needed community service. Of the estimated 11,864 tons of equipment and material from the TSS, less than 1% was disposed of at a landfill

  13. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise allowable...

  14. Construction and Demolition Waste Characteristics in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The construction industry generates a lot of construction and demolition (C&D) waste which puts some challenges to its management. For example, currently, in many towns in Tanzania, there are no landfill sites for solid waste disposal; and as a consequence open air dumping sites are used. Dumping C&D waste puts ...

  15. K-25 Structural Separation and Demolition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cater, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The K-25 building is a former gaseous diffusion plant, built in 1944-1945 as part of the United States Manhattan Project. The structure was the largest structure under one roof, surpassed only by the Pentagon. Together the three wings represent about 17.8 hectare (44 acres) under roof and are generally about 18.3 meters (60 ft.) high on the outside face and approximately 12.2 meters (40 ft.) high on the inside face. The entire structure was built in the shape of a 'U', with a lateral distance of approximately one mile. It was constructed in individual building units with each unit connected using expansion joint-type connection. A single unit is approximately 24.4 meters (80 ft.) across and 122 meters (400 ft.) deep. The northern structure is connected to the eastern and western structures at the upper level floors. The four-level, U-shaped building is a steel-frame structure with corrugated cement-asbestos siding. The cell level is an elevated concrete structure supported by reinforced concrete columns located in the basement, or vault area. The vault area can be accessed at grade level from the outside perimeter. Inside the courtyard, the grade level has been raised to provide entry to the second or cell floor level. An engineering evaluation of the structure was performed to determine the condition of the structure and possibility of unplanned collapse of any portion of the structure. The evaluation included physical inspections, calculations for wind, pre-demolition loads, and evaluation of failure modes. The results of the evaluation have provided guidance for the demolition plan and the development of criteria for protection of personnel performing pre-demolition activities. Challenges include degradation of the structure that necessitated repair, dealing with changes in the code revisions from both the American Concrete Institute (ACI) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), access to areas of the structure that were not necessarily designed

  16. DEMOLITION OF HANFORD'S 232-Z WASTE INCINERATION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2006-01-01

    The 232-Z Plutonium Incinerator Facility was a small, highly alpha-contaminated, building situated between three active buildings located in an operating nuclear complex. Approximately 500 personnel worked within 250 meters (800 ft) of the structure and expectations were that the project would neither impact plant operations nor result in any restrictions when demolition was complete. Precision demolition and tight controls best describe the project. The team used standard open-air demolition techniques to take the facility to slab-on-grade. Several techniques were key to controlling contamination and confining it to the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition began; using misting systems, frequently applying fixatives, and using a methodical demolition sequence and debris load-out process. Detailed air modeling was done before demolition to determine necessary facility source-term levels, establish radiological boundaries, and confirm the adequacy of the proposed demolition approach. By only removing the major source term in equipment, HEPA filters, gloveboxes, and the like, and leaving fixed contamination on the walls, ceilings and floors, the project showed considerable savings and reduced worker hazards and exposure. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without the spread of contamination provides confidence that similar operations can be performed successfully. By removing the major source terms, fixing the remaining contamination in the building, and using controlled demolition and contamination control techniques, similar structures can be demolished cost effectively and safely

  17. Hanford Patrol Academy demolition sites closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    The Hanford Site is owned by the U.S. Government and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and serves as co-operator of the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites, the unit addressed in this paper. This document consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3 (Revision 4), and a closure plan for the site. An explanation of the Part A Form 3 submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. This Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of December 15, 1994.

  18. Green Residential Demolitions: Case Study of Vacant Land Reuse in Storm Water Management in Cleveland

    Science.gov (United States)

    The demolition process impacts how vacant land might be reused for storm water management. For five residential demolition sites (Cleveland, Ohio), an enhanced green demolition process was observed in 2012, and soil physical and hydrologic characteristics were measured predemolit...

  19. Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    From 1975 to 1991 the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites (HPADS) were used for demolition events. These demolition events were a form of thermal treatment for spent or abandoned chemical waste. Because the HPADS will no longer be used for this thermal activity, the sites will be closed. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy closure requirements of WAC 173-303-680 and for the thermal treatment closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the HPADS, the history of the waste treated, and the approach that will be followed to close the HPADS. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of WAC 173-303 or of this closure plan. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge where appropriate. Only dangerous constituents derived from HPADS operations will be addressed in this closure plan in accordance with WAC 173-303-610(2)(b)(i). The HPADS are actually two distinct soil closure areas within the Hanford Patrol Academy training area

  20. Management of construction and demolition wastes as secondary building resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhina, Lyubov; Ivanova, Irina

    2017-10-01

    The article analyzes the methods of management of construction and demolition wastes. The authors developed suggestions for improving the management system of the turnover of construction and demolition wastes. Today the issue of improving the management of construction and demolition wastes is of the same importance as problems of protecting the life-support field from pollution and of preserving biological and land resources. The authors educed the prospective directions and methods for improving the management of the turnover processes for construction and demolition wastes, including the evaluation of potential of wastes as secondary raw materials and the formation of a centralized waste management system.

  1. Demolition wastes recycling; Reciclado de residuos de construccion y demolicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, A.; Monge, G. [INGURU Constructore, S.A. (Spain)

    1995-06-01

    This paper wants to show the up-to-date situation of demolition wastes from an international point of view. On the one hand it describes the different type of demolition wastes; on the other hand it explains the kind of treatment that is more adequate to each one. (Author)

  2. Chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Ellen Fischer; Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009.......To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009....

  3. Portland blended cements: demolition ceramic waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trezza, M.A.; Zito, S.; Tironi, A.; Irassar, E.F.; Rahhal, V.F.

    2017-01-01

    Demolition ceramic wastes (DCWs) were investigated in order to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious materials in Portland Blended Cements (PBCs). For this purpose, three ceramic wastes were investigated. After characterization of the materials used, the effect of ceramic waste replacement (8, 24 and 40% by mass) was analyzed. Pozzolanic activity, hydration progress, workability and compressive strength were determined at 2, 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the ground wastes behave as filler at an early age, but as hydration progresses, the pozzolanic activity of ceramic waste contributes to the strength requirement. [es

  4. Progressively safer, cheaper demolition of Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Robert; Pennington, Norman

    2000-01-01

    Fluor Fernald, Inc. has been progressively improving Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) at the Department of Energy's Fernald Environmental Management Project by applying new technologies and better methodologies to the work. Demolition issues existed in the past that necessitated new or improved solutions to maintain worker safety, protect the environment and accomplish the work in a cost effective manner. Lessons learned from D and D of 80 structures has led to a systematic approach, which can be implemented in various D and D arenas. When facility production was halted, hold-up material and process residues remained in the process piping and components. Over 500,000 pounds of material was removed by workers who completed the tasks two years ahead of schedule, $7 million under budget and with an excellent safety record. This success was the result of detailed planning and irdision of lessons learned as work progressed from facility to facility. Work sequences were developed that reduced airborne contamination. Demolition of structures has been performed at Fernald by carefully selected and qualified subcontractors. Asbestos and lead abatement, equipment, piping and conduit removal, and structural demolition have been completed to progressively higher performance specifications developed by Fluor Fernald based on lessons learned during execution. Safety continues to be the primary consideration in performing potentially hazardous work. Technologies such as hydraulic shears have been developed and used to keep workers away from danger. A new technology, ''Cool Suits,'' has been demonstrated to help prevent heat stress when anti-contamination clothing is required in elevated temperature working conditions. For tall structures, implosion technologies have been employed with progressively improved results, Several other new technologies have been evaluated by Fluor Fernald and applied by subcontractors. The improved technologies included the oxy-gas torch

  5. Demolition of one of the old barracks

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Many people at CERN will no doubt remember having rented accommodation in the four barracks-type huts near Entrance A. The rates were certainly rock bottom but it was hardly the Ritz! Put up at the end of the 1950s, they were abandoned in favour of the Saint-Genis-Pouilly hostel and the Meyrin site hostels. As they no longer meet current safety standards, they will all ultimately have to be demolished. One of them, situated immediately below the HV power line, has just been demolished at the request of the Swiss electricity company Energie Ouest Suisse. With its demolition, a little piece of CERN's social history has gone for ever.

  6. Remediation and demolition of coke by-products plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiffler, M A; Gould, W C

    1992-08-01

    The programme undertaken by ICF Kaiser Engineers and LTV Steel Co. to clean up and demolish four closed coking plants is described, including PCB removal, asbestos abatement, pipe removal and cleaning, tank cleaning, demolition and soil bioremediation. Costs are discussed.

  7. A Sandia National Laboratories decontamination and demolition success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.R.; Barber, D.S.; Lipka, G.

    1994-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) has established a formal facility assessment, decontamination and demolition oversight process with the goal of ensuring that excess or contaminated facilities are managed in a cost-effective manner that is protective of human health and the environment. The decontamination and demolition process is designed so that all disciplines are consulted and have input from the initiation of a project. The committee consists of all essential Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) and Facilities disciplines. The interdisciplinary-team approach has provided a mechanism that verifies adequate building and site assessment activities are conducted. This approach ensures that wastes generated during decontamination and demolition activities are handled and disposed according to Department of Energy (DOE), Federal, state, and local requirements. Because of the comprehensive nature of the SNL decontamination and demolition process, the strategy can be followed for demolition, renovation and new construction projects, regardless of funding source. An overview of the SNL/NM decontamination and demolition process is presented through a case study which demonstrates the practical importance of the formal process

  8. Sustainable construction: construction and demolition waste reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río Merino, Mercedes; Izquierdo Gracia, Pilar; Weis Azevedo, Isabel Salto

    2010-02-01

    Construction activity in Europe has increased substantially in the past decade. Likewise, there has also been a commensurate rise in the generation of construction and demolition waste (C&DW). This, together with the fact that in many European countries the rate of recycling and reuse of C&DW is still quite low has engendered a serious environmental problem and a motivation to develop strategies and management plans to solve it. Due to its composition, there is a significant potential to reuse and/or recycle C&DW, and thereby, contribute to improving the sustainability of construction and development, but practical procedures are not yet widely known or practiced in the construction industry. This article (a) summarizes the different applications that are presently practiced to optimize the recovery and/or application of C&DW for reuse, and (b) proposes various measures and strategies to improve the processing of this waste. The authors suggest that to enhance environmental effectiveness, a conscious and comprehensive C&DW management plan should be implemented in each jurisdiction. More precisely, this study presents a holistic approach towards C&DW management, through which environmental benefits can be achieved through the application of new construction methods that can contribute to sustainable growth.

  9. Simulation of construction and demolition waste leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, T.G.; Jang, Y.; Thurn, L.G.

    1999-11-01

    Solid waste produced from construction and demolition (C and D) activities is typically disposed of in unlined landfills. Knowledge of C{ampersand}D debris landfill leachate is limited in comparison to other types of wastes. A laboratory study was performed to examine leachate resulting from simulated rainfall infiltrating a mixed C and D waste stream consisting of common construction materials (e.g., concrete, wood, drywall). Lysimeters (leaching columns) filled with the mixed C and D waste were operated under flooded and unsaturated conditions. Leachate constituent concentrations in the leachate from specific waste components were also examined. Leachate samples were collected and analyzed for a number of conventional water quality parameters including pH, alkalinity, total organic carbon, total dissolved solids, and sulfate. In experiments with the mixed C and D waste, high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and sulfate were detected in the leachate. C and D leachates produced as a result of unsaturated conditions exhibited TDS concentrations in the range of 570--2,200 mg/L. The major contributor to the TDS was sulfate, which ranged in concentration between 280 and 930 mg/L. The concentrations of sulfate in the leachate exceeded the sulfate secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L.

  10. THE EFFECT OF VESSEL SUPPLY ON SHIP-DEMOLITION PRICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kagkarakis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ship-demolition is one of the four main markets that form the shipping industry and plays an important role on the seaborne trade, as it mitigates imbalances between supply and demand for transportation services by adjusting the merchant fleet supply. The aim of this study is to examine whether the factors that determine the supply of vessels for demolition are capable of affecting materially the ship-demolition price formation. The availability of ships for demolition is primarily a function of the fleet’s age and the conditions on the freight and secondhand markets. The analysis is conducted on the crude tanker and the bulk carrier segments and the vector autoregressive model methodology is employed, whereby the effect of both the supply and the demand factors on the ship-demolition prices is examined. The results indicate that the supply side has limited effect on the price formation in the industry, which is driven by the demand for the steel-scrap commodity.

  11. 76 FR 35006 - Recovery Policy RP9523.4, Demolition of Private Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ...] Recovery Policy RP9523.4, Demolition of Private Structures AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS... (FEMA) is accepting comments on Recovery Policy RP9523.4, Demolition of Private Structures. DATES... guidance in determining the eligibility of demolition of private structures under the provisions of the...

  12. 200 West Ash Pit Demolition Site closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Hanford Facility is owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office. Dangerous waste and mixed waste (containing both radioactive and dangerous components) are managed and produced on the Hanford Facility. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office and serves as cooperator of the 200 West Ash Pit Demolition Site, the unit addressed in this closure plan. The 200 West Ash Pit Demolition Site Closure Plan consists of a Part A Permit Application (Revision 3) and a closure plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application revision is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and three appendices. This 200 West Ash Pit Demolition Site Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of October 15, 1992

  13. Recycling the construction and demolition waste to produce polymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Mohammad T.; Hameed, Awham M., Dr.

    2018-05-01

    The sustainable management for solid wastes of the construction and demolition waste stimulates searching for safety applications for these wastes. The aim of this research is recycling of construction and demolition waste with some different types of polymeric resins to be used in manufacturing process of polymer mortar or polymer concrete, and studying their mechanical and physical properties, and also Specify how the values of compressive strength and the density are affected via the different parameters. In this research two types of construction and demolition waste were used as aggregates replacement (i.e. waste cement/concrete debris, and the waste blocks) while the two types of polymer resins (i.e. Unsaturated polyester and Epoxy) as cement replacements. The used weight percentages of the resins were changed within (1°, 20, 25 and 30) % to manufacture this polymer concrete.

  14. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques

  15. Estimation of construction and demolition waste using waste generation rates in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, V G; Kalidindi, Satyanarayana N

    2017-06-01

    A large amount of construction and demolition waste is being generated owing to rapid urbanisation in Indian cities. A reliable estimate of construction and demolition waste generation is essential to create awareness about this stream of solid waste among the government bodies in India. However, the required data to estimate construction and demolition waste generation in India are unavailable or not explicitly documented. This study proposed an approach to estimate construction and demolition waste generation using waste generation rates and demonstrated it by estimating construction and demolition waste generation in Chennai city. The demolition waste generation rates of primary materials were determined through regression analysis using waste generation data from 45 case studies. Materials, such as wood, electrical wires, doors, windows and reinforcement steel, were found to be salvaged and sold on the secondary market. Concrete and masonry debris were dumped in either landfills or unauthorised places. The total quantity of construction and demolition debris generated in Chennai city in 2013 was estimated to be 1.14 million tonnes. The proportion of masonry debris was found to be 76% of the total quantity of demolition debris. Construction and demolition debris forms about 36% of the total solid waste generated in Chennai city. A gross underestimation of construction and demolition waste generation in some earlier studies in India has also been shown. The methodology proposed could be utilised by government bodies, policymakers and researchers to generate reliable estimates of construction and demolition waste in other developing countries facing similar challenges of limited data availability.

  16. Creation and demolition of illegal structures in Nigerian cities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examined the issue of demolition of illegal structures in Benin City. The study revealed that the poor economic condition of the country forced many landlords in the city to restructure and convert their houses into mixed uses in order to make a living. In the process many illegal structures sprang up as many ...

  17. Demolition of Building 12, an old plutonium filter facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, E.L.; Garde, R.; Valentine, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    This report discusses the decommissioning and disposal of a plutonium-contaminated air filter facility that provided ventilation for the main plutonium processing plant at Los Alamos from 1945 until 1973. The health physics, waste management, and environmental aspects of the demolition are also discussed

  18. Concrete block production from construction and demolition waste in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabai, M.M.; Cox, M.G.D.M.; Mato, R.R.A.M.; Egmond - de Wilde De Ligny, van E.L.C.; Lichtenberg, J.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    In Tanzania, construction and demolition (C&D) waste is not recycled and knowledge on how it can be recycled especially into valuable products like building materials are still limited. This study aimed at investigating the possibility of recycling the C&D waste (mainly cementitious rubble) into

  19. Decommissioning and demolition in the European Union. Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blohm-Hieber, Ute

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission pursues the environmental and energy policy goals of limiting global warming to a maximum of 2 C and, therefore, reducing CO 2 emissions by at least 20%. Nuclear power, with its present 30% contribution to the Community's electricity supply and the low CO 2 emissions of the entire fuel cycle, makes an important contribution to an energy mix matching the 3 factors of competitiveness, security of supply, and sustainability. The decision to use nuclear power plants in their respective countries for electricity production is left to each member state. As of mid-2008, 146 nuclear power plants were in operation in the European Union, while 74 had been shut down permanently. Two nuclear power plants had been demolished completely, showing that the European Community is just at the beginning of the learning curve in this field. The importance of nuclear power plant decommissioning and demolition will increase in the future as replacement capacity in nuclear power generation will become necessary. The European Commission's activities in decommissioning and demolition date from the 1990s: The provisions about environmental impact assessment and the recommendations to apply Article 37 (potential impacts on water, soil and air) of the Euratom Treaty demand a description of decommissioning and demolition of nuclear power plants. In a ruling of 2002, the European Court of Justice assigns to the Community the required competences in the fields of nuclear safety and, consequently, also decommissioning and demolition. The financial provisions necessary for these activities are covered in the Electricity Directive within the framework of the rules for a common single market in 2003. After a first status report, the Commission published recommendations about financing decommissioning and demolition in 2006. (orig.)

  20. Construction, Maintenance and Demolition of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smet, Camiel de [Hilti Corporation, P.O. Box 333, FL-9494 Schaan (Liechtenstein)

    2008-07-01

    Hilti is your reliable partner in nuclear power plant construction, maintenance and demolition worldwide. Professional advice and innovative solutions for virtually every phase of construction and supply technologically leading products and systems to increase your productivity and help to create and maintain safe and lasting plants is offered. The solutions for nuclear power plants construction, maintenance and demolition have been employed with great success in many different countries on a wide variety of projects due in no small way to their worldwide availability. An unbroken, international exchange of experience upholds a permanent innovation process. This assures our customers that they always receive products on the very latest technological standard. This paper is not intended to cover all topics related to nuclear power plants. The idea is more to give a kind of an overview. The paper covers briefly the following topics: safety (corrosion and fire), fastenings, measuring and finally decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  1. Environmental Impacts Assessment of Recycling of Construction and Demolition Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania

    .e. soil and stones, concrete, asphalt and masonry, and as such it has the potential to be used as aggregate in the construction sector. A typical application is in an unbound state as filler in road structures. This practice offers evident benefits in terms of resource savings, however it might lead......Construction and demolition waste (C&DW) is waste derived from the construction, demolition and renovation of buildings and civil infrastructure. With 900 million tons generated every year in Europe, it is the largest waste stream on the continent. C&DW is mainly constituted of mineral fractions, i...... be evaluated critically.Owing to its high toxicity and significant mobility, especially at high pH levels, Cr(VI) is one of the elements of concern found in C&DW leachates. Its fate in the sub-soil below road applications was assessed experimentally, and its vertical migration was then predicted through...

  2. Use of demolition residues construction in soil-lime bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, S.S.; Silva, C.G.; Silva, I.A.; Neves, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Besides being responsible for several environmental damage caused by its residues, the construction industry is also considered the greatest natural resources consumer. When finely ground, such residues can exhibit cementing properties, which may replace part of the lime used in the manufacture of soil-lime bricks. This study aimed to verify the viability of using demolition residues (DR) in soil-lime bricks without structural function. For this, test specimens were prepared using mixes in a 1:10 ratio of lime:soil and embedding residue in partial replacement of lime in the proportions of 25%, 50% and 75%. The test specimens were submitted to curing periods of 28 and 52 days, then it was determined the compression strength. The results showed that when embedded on moderate percentages, demolition residues construction can be used in the production of soil-lime bricks. (author)

  3. Towards a more professional demolition and dismantling industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The work of the National Economic Development Office Demolition and Dismantling Group in four areas which are crucial to the economic performance of the demolition and dismantling industry and its safety record is considered. The first concerns the availability and accessibility of information about unconventional structures and details are given of the sort of information often kept for different types of structure. Secondly, the need is stressed for guidelines for the client, particularly on the risks involved and the choice of a competent contractor. Thirdly, basic credentials which it is important for contractors to set out in order to establish a good reputation for the industry are set out. Finally, the particular case of nuclear power station decommissioning is considered with reference to the size of the market, the pioneering knowledge to be gained from the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, private sector involvement and the special techniques required. (U.K.)

  4. Construction, Maintenance and Demolition of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smet, Camiel de

    2008-01-01

    Hilti is your reliable partner in nuclear power plant construction, maintenance and demolition worldwide. Professional advice and innovative solutions for virtually every phase of construction and supply technologically leading products and systems to increase your productivity and help to create and maintain safe and lasting plants is offered. The solutions for nuclear power plants construction, maintenance and demolition have been employed with great success in many different countries on a wide variety of projects due in no small way to their worldwide availability. An unbroken, international exchange of experience upholds a permanent innovation process. This assures our customers that they always receive products on the very latest technological standard. This paper is not intended to cover all topics related to nuclear power plants. The idea is more to give a kind of an overview. The paper covers briefly the following topics: safety (corrosion and fire), fastenings, measuring and finally decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  5. Stripping demolition of reinforced concrete by electric heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Wahei; Nishita, Kiwamu; Kasai, Yoshio

    1993-01-01

    The present paper describes the procedures and results of a series of experiments the authors conducted to verify the efficiency of the electric heating method, previously proposed for so-called stripping demolition by applying electric current through reinforcing bars. In this method, a low voltage high current is run from one end to the other of a reinforcing bar or bars existing in a concrete structure, inducing intense heat in the bar(s) which in its turn brings about cracks in the surrounding concrete mass, facilitating secondary demolition by hammer picks or other means. The experiments were performed on full-scale biological shield wall mock-ups of a BWR and a small reactor. The results of the experiments are summarized as follows. (1) When electric current is applied through reinforcing bars, the bond between concrete and bars is loosened, and cracks start from one bar and progress toward other bars. Under appropriate conditions, the cracks in concrete run from the contact surface at one bar all the way to its the contact surface on another bar. (2) Cracks appear and grow only between two electrodes between which current is applied, not extending out of the area thus defined. (3) The concrete in the region closer to a current-bearing bar is intensely heated, whereas the concrete far from the bars remains nearly unheated. (4) Concrete walls after electric heating of bars disintegrates, if demolished with hammers, with the covering concrete are removed from the remaining portion of the structure together with heated bars, in shapes of flakes. (5) The reinforced concrete collapses in massive pieces of concrete, without generating much dust as is the case with the demolition of a concrete structure not heated by electricity. Results of the experiments show that the electric heating method is worth applying also to the demolition of nuclear power plants where concrete in the radioactivated surface region of shield walls needs to be stripped off in flakes

  6. Demolition of the FRJ-1 research reactor (MERLIN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Zehbe, C.; Poeppinghaus, J.; Cremer, J.

    2003-01-01

    FRJ-2 (MERLIN), the swimming pool reactor cooled and moderated by light water, was built at the then Juelich Nuclear Research Establishment (KFA) between 1958 and 1962. In the period between 1964 and 1985, it was used for. The reactor was decommissioned in 1985. Since 1996, most of the demolition work has been carried out under the leadership of a project team. The complete secondary cooling system was removed by late 1998. After the cooling loops and experimental installations had been taken out, the reactor vessel internals were removed in 2000 after the water had been drained from the reactor vessel. After the competent authority had granted a license, demolition of the reactor block, the central part of the research reactor, was begun in October 2001. In a first step, the reactor operating floor and the reactor attachment structures were removed by the GNS/SNT consortium charged with overall planning and execution of the job. This phase gave rise to approx. The reactor block proper is dismantled in a number of steps. A variety of proven cutting techniques are used for this purpose. Demolition of the reactor block is to be completed in the first half of 2003. (orig.) [de

  7. Distribution of materials in construction and demolition waste in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2011-08-01

    It may not be enough simply to know the global volume of construction and demolition waste (CDW) generated in a certain region or country if one wants to estimate, for instance, the revenue accruing from separating several types of materials from the input entering a given CDW recycling plant. A more detailed determination of the distribution of the materials within the generated CDW is needed and the present paper addresses this issue, distinguishing different buildings and types of operation (new construction, retrofitting and demolition). This has been achieved by measuring the materials from buildings of different ages within the Portuguese building stock, and by using direct data from demolition/retrofitting sites and new construction average values reported in the literature. An attempt to establish a benchmark with other countries is also presented. This knowledge may also benefit industry management, especially that related to CDW recycling, helping to optimize procedures, equipment size and operation and even industrial plant spatial distribution. In an extremely competitive market, where as in Portugal low-tech and high environmental impact procedures remain the norm in the construction industry (in particular, the construction waste industry), the introduction of a successful recycling industry is only possible with highly optimized processes and based on a knowledge-based approach to problems.

  8. 200 West Area Ash Pit Demolition Site closure plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruck, F.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Ash Pit Demolition Site had two known demolition events, the first occurred in November of 1984, and the second occurred in June of 1986. These demolition events were a form of thermal treatment for discarded explosive chemical products. Because the Ash Pit Demolition Site will no longer be used for this thermal activity, the site will be closed. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) ''Dangerous Waste Regulations'', Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 270.1. The 200 West Area Ash Pit Demolition Site Closure Plan consists of a Part A, Form 3, Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Revision 4) and a closure plan. An explanation of the Part A, Form 3, submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. This closure plan presents a description of the Ash,Pit Demolition Site, the history of the waste treated, and the approach that will be followed to close the Ash Pit Demolition Site. Because there were no radioactively contaminated chemicals involved in the demolitions, the information on radionuclides is provided for ''information only''. Remediation of any radioactive contamination is not within the scope of this closure plan. Only dangerous constituents derived from Ash Pit Demolition Site operations will be addressed in this closure plan in accordance with WAC 173-303-610(2)(b)(i)

  9. 218 E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site clean closure soil evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korematsu-Olund, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the sampling activities undertaken and the analytical results obtained in a soil sampling and analyses study performed for the 218 E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site (218 E-8 Demolition Site). The 218 E-8 Demolition Site is identified as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment unit that will be closed in accordance with the applicable laws and regulations. The site was used for the thermal treatment of discarded explosive chemical products. No constituents of concern were found in concentrations indicating contamination of the soil by 218 E-8 Demolition Site activities

  10. 22 CFR 121.11 - Military demolition blocks and blasting caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Military demolition blocks and blasting caps... blasting caps. Military demolition blocks and blasting caps referred to in Category IV(a) do not include the following articles: (a) Electric squibs. (b) No. 6 and No. 8 blasting caps, including electric...

  11. Postwar City: Importance of Recycling Construction and Demolition Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qaraghuli, Hanan; Alsayed, Yaman; Almoghazy, Ali

    2017-10-01

    Wars and armed conflicts have heavy tolls on the built environment when they take place in cities. It is not only restricted to the actually fighting which destroys or damages buildings and infrastructure, but the damage and destruction inflicts its impacts way beyond the cessation of military actions. They can even have another impact through physical segregation of city quarters through walls and checkpoints that complicates, or even terminates, mobility of citizens, goods, and services in the post-war scenario. The accumulation of debris in the streets often impedes the processes of rescue, distribution of aid and services, and other forms of city life as well. Also, the amount of effort and energy needed to remove those residual materials to their final dumping sites divert a lot of urgently needed resources. In this paper, the components of construction and demolition waste found in post-war cities are to be discussed, relating each one to its origins and potential reuses. Then the issues related to the management of construction waste and demolition debris resulting from military actions are to be discussed. First, an outlook is to be given on the historical example of Berlin and how the city was severely damaged during World War II, and how the reconstruction of the city was aided in part by the reuse of demolition debris. Then two more recent examples will be given, the cities of Baghdad in Iraq, and Homs in Syria. In Baghdad, though major military actions have ceased but not all rubble is cleared out, some security structures in the form of concrete walls separate the cities into quarters and impede city life and lie around as poorly allocated resource needed for reconstruction. While in the case of Homs, and the wider Syrian context, major military operations are still raging, making more pressure on the resources needed for reconstruction. This recycling of demolition debris can bring economic and social stability through the conservation of resources

  12. Overview regarding construction and demolition waste in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; García-González, Julia; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The construction sector comprises a number of activities that may result in environmental impacts of considerable magnitude, waste generation being one of the major negative effects of this industry due to the large streams generated. Proper knowledge of the environmental problem caused by the sector is of great importance in order to achieve an effective waste management. Thus, this paper analyse the Spanish situation regarding construction and demolition waste (CDW) compared with other European Union countries; which sets out the current figures of the CDW scenario (legislation, generation, composition, treatment and market) as well as the difficulties encountered when handling this residue.

  13. Decommissioning and demolition of the Greifswald nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterner, H.; Leushacke, D.; Rittscher, D.

    1995-01-01

    The unexpected decision to decommission the plants in Greifswald makes the management and disposal of fuels and plant waste a major issue to be solved as a precondition for decommissioning and dismantling. The decisive point in waste management is the existence of an interim store or repository of sufficient capacity to accept both the nuclear fuel and the plant waste and the considerable volumes of radioactive residues arising in dismantling. Current major activities include planning for decommissioning and demolition, and drafting of the licensing documents; removal of the fuel elements from the reactor units; construction of the northern interim store for fuel elements and residues. (orig./HP)

  14. Assessment of leaching from Construction & Demolition Waste concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste features two very important properties when considering its management options: the large amounts, and the low environmental hazardousness. Therefore, concrete waste can be recycled relatively easily: most common end-of-life option is utilization as unbound...... approaches exist, often implying unrealistic or not relevant conditions if compared to real life utilization scenarios. A modified version of the CEN/TS 14405 column percolation test has been implemented on four crushed concrete samples, with the purpose of analysing the release of chromium, one...

  15. Quality and quantity of construction and demolition waste in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Alireza; Ghorbanian, Tahereh; Yousefi, Nader; Dadashzadeh, Dariush; Khalili, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Amin; Raei, Mehdi; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    In recent years the generation rate of construction and demolition waste (C&D) has significantly augmented. The aim of this study was to assessed the quality and quantity of construction and demolition waste in Tehran (capital of Iran). Questionnaire methods were used for estimating the amount of generated C&D wastes national statistical data and typical waste generation data. In order to defining the composition of C&D waste, trucks were randomly selected and their wastes were separated and weighted. According to obtained results, about 82,646,051 m 3 of C&D waste (average 16,529,210 m 3 per year) were generated during 2011 to 2016 which only about 26% of them has been recycled. Mixing sand and cement, concrete, broken bricks and soil have the highest amount of the composition of C&D waste in Tehran that was 30, 19, 18 and 11%, respectively. Based on the results, about 2,784,158 t of the waste will generate in 2025 and this is approximately 122% higher than wastes generate in 2016. Based on MAPSA's data, 360 teams of personnel cruise and control the illegal disposals, but due to the expansion of Tehran this number of teams is inadequate and can't be effective in controlling the situation. In general, the overall condition of C&D waste management in Tehran seems undesirable and needs to be updated based on the experience of successful countries in this field.

  16. Quantum demolition filtering and optimal control of unstable systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavkin, V P

    2012-11-28

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for optimal control of quantum unstable systems is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme, we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects as in the usual case of quantum stable systems with non-demolition observation. This allows us to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation generalized to demolition observations and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. An unstable controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  17. Use of rubble from building demolition in mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, V; Giuggiolini, M; Moriconi, G

    2002-01-01

    Because of increasing waste production and public concerns about the environment, it is desirable to recycle materials from building demolition. If suitably selected, ground, cleaned and sieved in appropriate industrial crushing plants, these materials can be profitably used in concrete. Nevertheless, the presence of masonry instead of concrete rubble is particularly detrimental to the mechanical performance and durability of recycled-aggregate concrete and the same negative effect is detectable when natural sand is replaced by fine recycled aggregate fraction. An alternative use of both masonry rubble and fine recycled material fraction could be in mortars. These could contain either recycled instead of natural sand or powder obtained by bricks crushing as partial cement substitution. In particular, attention is focused on the modification that takes place when either polypropylene or stainless steel fibers are added to these mortars. Polypropylene fibers are added in order to reduce shrinkage of mortars, stainless steel fibers for improving their flexural strength. The combined use of polypropylene fibers and fine recycled material from building demolition could allow the preparation of mortars showing good performance, in particular when coupled with bricks. Furthermore, the combined use of stainless steel fibers and mortars containing brick powder seems to be an effective way to guarantee a high flexural strength.

  18. 218-E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site closure plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruck, F.R.

    1994-01-01

    The 218-E-8 Demolition Site was the site of a single demolition event in November of 1984. This demolition event was a form of thermal treatment for discarded explosive chemical products. Because the 218-E-8 Demolition Site will no longer be used for this thermal activity, the site will be closed. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) ''Dangerous Waste Regulations,'' Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 270.1. The 218-E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site Closure Plan consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3, Revision 4, and a closure plan. An explanation of the Part A Form 3, submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. This closure plan presents a description of the 218-E-8 Demolition Site, the history of the waste treated, and the approach that will be followed to close the 218-E-8 Demolition Site. Because there were no radioactively contaminated chemicals involved in t he demolitions at the 218-E-8 Borrow Pit site, the information on radionuclides is provided for ''information only.'' Remediation of any radioactive contamination is not within the scope of this closure plan. Only dangerous constituents derived from 218-E-8 Demolition Site operations will be addressed in this closure plan in accordance with WAC 173-303-610(2)(b)(i)

  19. High Flux Isotopes Reactor (HFIR) Cooling Towers Demolition Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudelek, R. E.; Gilbert, W. C.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the results of a joint initiative between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle, and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to characterize, package, transport, treat, and dispose of demolition waste from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Cooling Tower. The demolition and removal of waste from the site was the first critical step in the planned HFIR beryllium reflector replacement outage scheduled. The outage was scheduled to last a maximum of six months. Demolition and removal of the waste was critical because a new tower was to be constructed over the old concrete water basin. A detailed sampling and analysis plan was developed to characterize the hazardous and radiological constituents of the components of the Cooling Tower. Analyses were performed for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals and semi-volatile constituents as defined by 40 CFR 261 and radiological parameters including gross alpha, gross beta, gross gamma, alpha-emitting isotopes and beta-emitting isotopes. Analysis of metals and semi-volatile constituents indicated no exceedances of regulatory limits. Analysis of radionuclides identified uranium and thorium and associated daughters. In addition 60Co, 99Tc, 226Rm, and 228Rm were identified. Most of the tower materials were determined to be low level radioactive waste. A small quantity was determined not to be radioactive, or could be decontaminated. The tower was dismantled October 2000 to January 2001 using a detailed step-by-step process to aid waste segregation and container loading. The volume of waste as packaged for treatment was approximately 1982 cubic meters (70,000 cubic feet). This volume was comprised of plastic ({approx}47%), wood ({approx}38%) and asbestos transite ({approx}14%). The remaining {approx}1% consisted of the fire protection piping (contaminated with lead-based paint) and incidental metal from conduit, nails and braces/supports, and sludge from the basin. The waste

  20. Streamlining of the Decontamination and Demolition Document Preparation Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Nick; Meincke, Carol; Peek, Georgianne

    1999-01-01

    During the past five years, the Sandia National Labo- ratories Decontamination, Decommissioning, Demolition, and Reuse (D3R) Program has evolved and become more focused and efficient. Historical approaches to project documentation, requirements, and drivers are discussed detailing key assumptions, oversight authority, and proj- ect approvals. Discussion of efforts to streamline the D3R project planning and preparation process include the in- corporation of the principles of graded approach, Total Quality Management, and the Observational Method (CH2MHILL April 1989).1 Process improvements were realized by clearly defining regulatory requirements for each phase of a project, establishing general guidance for the program and combining project-specific documents to eliminate redundant and unneeded information. Proc- ess improvements to cost, schedule, and quality are dis- cussed in detail for several projects

  1. Life cycle assessment of construction and demolition waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) modelling of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) management was carried out. The functional unit was management of 1 Mg mineral, source separated C&DW, which is either utilised in road construction as a substitute for natural aggregates, or landfilled. The assessed...... of the use of C&DW. Typical uncertainties related to contaminant leaching were addressed. For most impact categories, utilisation of C&DW in road construction was preferable to landfilling; however, for most categories, utilisation resulted in net environmental burdens. Transportation represented the most...... of the impact assessment was critical for modelling the leaching impacts. Compared with the overall life cycle of building and construction materials, leaching emissions were shown to be potentially significant for toxicity impacts, compared with contributions from production of the same materials, showing...

  2. Forecasting of construction and demolition waste in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Diogo Hf; Lafayette, Kalinny Pv

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this article is to develop a computerised tool (software) that facilitates the analysis of strategies for waste management on construction sites through the use of indicators of construction and demolition waste generation. The development involved the following steps: knowledge acquisition, structuring the system, coding and system evaluation. The step of knowledge acquisition aims to provide subsidies for the representation of them through models. In the step of structuring the system, it was presented the structuring and formalisation of knowledge for the development of the system, and has two stages: the construction of the conceptual model and the subsequent instantiation of the model. The coding system aims to implement (code) the conceptual model developed in a model played by computer (digital). The results showed that the system is very useful and applicable in construction sites, helping to improve the quality of waste management, and creating a database that will support new research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Immobilization of calcium sulfate contained in demolition waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambroise, J.; Pera, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study undertaken to examine the treatment of demolition waste containing calcium sulfate by means of calcium sulfoaluminate clinker (CSA). The quantity of CSA necessary to entirely consume calcium sulfate was determined. Using infrared spectrometry analysis and X-ray diffraction, it was shown that calcium sulfate was entirely consumed when the ratio between CSA and calcium sulfate was 4. Standard sand was polluted by 4% calcium sulfate. Two solutions were investigated: ·either global treatment of sand by CSA, ·or immobilization of calcium sulfate by CSA, followed by the introduction of this milled mixture in standard sand. Regardless of the type of treatment, swelling was almost stabilized after 28 days of immersion in water

  4. The Ellweiler uranium plant - a demolition and recycling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mika, S.; Rohr, T.; Seehars, R.; Feser, A.

    1999-01-01

    The uranium plant at Ellweiler, district of Birkenfeld, was used for the production and storage of uranium concentrates. The owner of the Ellweiler uranium plant (UAE), Gewerkschaft Brunhilde GmbH, ceased processing uranium ore and recycling in 1989 and has been in liquidation since September 1991. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate, had safety measures adopted in a first step, getting the plant into a safe state by former plant personnel. The entire plant was demolished in a second step. The contract for demolishing the former uranium plant was awarded to ABB Reaktor as the general contractor in August 1996. Demolition work was carried out between April 1997 and May 1999. A total of approx. 7900 Mg of material was disposed of. At present, recultivation measures are being carried out. (orig.) [de

  5. Assessment of different construction and demolition waste management approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal S. Abdelhamid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The waste generated from construction and demolition sites is considered one of the most irritating problems in Egypt. In the last 10 years some effort has been made toward solving this problem, the most outstanding is the newly issued Egyptian rating system “Green Pyramids Rating System”. It emphasizes on waste management and particularly “site provision and environment” which contributes to 75% of the management category score. However the traditional practice which is limited to dumping all the generated waste is still dominating. The absence of sustainable practices in construction sector in Egypt led to the lack in financial and environmental data. From strategic perspective, the research aims at developing a detailed procedure to evaluate two construction and demolition waste management approaches by means of Decision Matrix technique. A detailed study is introduced for the two approaches; for each approach a flow chart is developed to demonstrate its lifecycle, as well as the cost break down structure and the different stakeholders’ roles. A penetration discussion of the pros and cons for each approach was developed accordingly and came out with sixteen influencing attributes for both approaches. The previous steps paved the ground to construct a Decision Matrix to decide on one of the approaches from a strategic environmentally oriented perspective. The study relied on the detailed and deep demonstration of the two approaches to justify the assigned weight for attributes and scores for corresponding approach. From a strategic perspective, the decision came out in favor of the more environmentally friendly approach.

  6. Brownfields Recover Your Resources - Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Construction and Demolition Materials at Land Revitalization Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides background information on how the sustainable reuse of brownfield properties includes efforts to reduce the environmental impact by reusing and recycling materials generated during building construction, demolition, or renovation.

  7. Construction and Demolition Debris 2014 US Final Disposition Estimates Using the CDDPath Method

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Estimates of the final amount and final disposition of materials generated in the Construction and Demolition waste stream measured in total mass of each material....

  8. Stripping demolition of concrete by applying electric current through reinforcing bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Wahei; Kumegawa, Sadatsune

    1995-01-01

    The presence of reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete structures is an obstruction hindering the smooth progress of demolition works. The electric heating method is, on the other hand, a demolition technique of unique concept since it adopts the bars to help the demolition of reinforced concrete structures. This technique has the following advantages for demolition: 1) the more densely a structure is reinforced with bars, the greater is the effect of the electric heating, 2) demolition after heating produces little dust, and 3) electric heating of reinforcing bars causes no damage to the portions of concrete not subjected to electric current. The present paper describes the procedures and results of a series of experiments we conducted to verify the efficiency of the electric heating method. In this method, a low-voltage high-current is run through reinforcing bars existing in a concrete structure, inducing intense heat in the bars which in its turn brings about cracks in the surrounding concrete mass, facilitating secondary demolition by hammer picks or other means. The experiments were performed on full-scale biological shield wall mock-ups of a BWR and a small nuclear reactor. The experiments revealed that these excellent features of the electric heating method are worth utilizing in stripping demolition of radioactivated regions of biological shield walls in nuclear power plants. The electric heating method is currently being adopted and shows effective results in partial demolition works in diaphragm wall shafts where starting/arriving holes are to be fixed for shield machines without damaging surrounding portions. (author)

  9. Application of Updated Construction and Demolition Waste Reduction Policy to Army Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    recovering materials for reuse and recycling from demolition, new construction, and renovation and repurposing projects. In its efforts to improve the...Building contents; reuse and recycling potential (including the follow- ing specific materials, products and components that are potentially re- usable...conventional demolition. Implement deconstruction wherever markets or on-site reuse opportunities exist or are anticipated.  Page 24, 3-7 REDUCE

  10. Influence of construction and demolition waste management on the environmental impact of buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, André; Brito, Jorge de

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Environmental impacts of different demolition practices. ► “Top-down” approach to the Life Cycle Analysis methodology. ► Results based on real buildings measurements and demolition contractor activities. ► Not every type of selective demolition brings about environmental benefits. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to quantify comparable environmental impacts within a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) perspective, for buildings in which the first (Materials) and last (End of Life) life cycle stages are adjusted to several waste/material management options. Unlike most LCAs, the approach is “top-down” rather than “bottom-up”, which usually involves large amounts of data and the use of specific software applications. This approach is considered appropriate for a limited but expedient LCA designed to compare the environmental impacts of different life cycle options. Present results, based on real buildings measurements and demolition contractor activities, show that shallow, superficial, selective demolition may not result in reduced environmental impacts. Calculations actually show an increase (generally less than 5%) in most impact categories for the Materials and End of Life stages because of extra transportation needs. However, core material separation in demolition operations and its recycling and/or reuse does bring environmental benefits. A reduction of around 77% has been estimated in the climate change impact category, 57% in acidification potential and 81% in the summer smog impact (for the life cycle stages referred).

  11. Environmental impacts of manufactured gas plant demolition: examples from site remediation experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unites, D. [Atlantic Environmental Services, Inc., Colchester, CT (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Inappropriate demolition of manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites may leave a continuing legacy in the environmental record. Much of the contamination encountered at former gas plants originated from on-site disposal or from spills and leaks during operations. However, some of the greatest potential for continual release comes from inappropriately decommissioned vessels and tanks. These structures contained liquids such as tars, oils, water, and other fluids associated with by-product removal or the gas stream purification process. Inorganic `solids` constitute another, although generally minor, source of contaminants during demolition. These contaminants include: cyanide- and sulfide-containing purifier materials; asbestos from roofing, pipe lagging, etc.; mercury from controls and manometers; and lead from painted surfaces. Normal elements of decommissioning and dismantling include: purging the piping system with inert gas; removal and sale of liquids having commercial value; disposal or abandonment of non-saleable liquids; scrapping and dismantling of above-grade metal vessels; abandonment of below-grade vessels; and demolition of above-grade buildings. Depending on the time from the cessation of operations to the demolition, some steps may have been omitted. Appropriate demolition would also take into account removal and disposal of asbestos, cyanide, lead, and mercury-containing materials prior to razing structures. By employing precautions during demolition, widespread contamination can be avoided and subsequent reuse of the site can be facilitated.

  12. Recycling of construction and demolition waste in Kuwait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartam, N.; Al-Mutairi, N.; Al-Ghusain, I.; Al-Humoud, J.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' There is an increasing pressure on the construction industry to reduce costs and improve our environment. The fact is that both of these goals can be achieved at the same time. Although construction and demolition (C and D) constitutes a major type of waste in terms of volume and weight, its management and recycling efforts have not seen the light in Kuwait. The goal of this research project is to study methods leading to the minimization of the total C and D waste that is landfilled in Kuwait. This can be achieved by applying the waste management hierarchy in order of importance: 1) reduce, 2) re-use, 3) recycle, 4) incineration (energy recovery), and 5) safe disposal. This paper presents the current C and D waste disposal system in Kuwait and identifies potential problems to the environment, people and economy. Then, it investigates the recycling option to manage and control this major type of waste in an economically efficient and environmentally safe manner. There are significant volumes of potentially valuable and recoverable resources being wasted in the construction industry, and these figures are continuously growing as we are starting the new millennium. C and D waste constitutes 15%-30% of all solid waste entering landfills in various countries [Bossink 1995]; and thus it is a major type of waste. An estimated 2-3 million ton of construction and demolition waste are being only disposed of in Kuwait's landfill sites each year despite the limited available land (Industrial Investment Company, 1990). C and D waste is a target because it is both heavy and bulky, and therefore undesirable for disposal in engineered, lined landfills because of the space it consumes. On the other hand, many C and D materials have high potential for recovery and use. Recovering C and D waste can help communities reach their recycling goals, preserve valuable space in their local landfills, and create better opportunities for handling other kind of waste. Therefore

  13. Quantifying construction and demolition waste: An analytical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zezhou; Yu, Ann T.W.; Shen, Liyin; Liu, Guiwen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Prevailing C and D waste quantification methodologies are identified and compared. • One specific methodology cannot fulfill all waste quantification scenarios. • A relevance tree for appropriate quantification methodology selection is proposed. • More attentions should be paid to civil and infrastructural works. • Classified information is suggested for making an effective waste management plan. - Abstract: Quantifying construction and demolition (C and D) waste generation is regarded as a prerequisite for the implementation of successful waste management. In literature, various methods have been employed to quantify the C and D waste generation at both regional and project levels. However, an integrated review that systemically describes and analyses all the existing methods has yet to be conducted. To bridge this research gap, an analytical review is conducted. Fifty-seven papers are retrieved based on a set of rigorous procedures. The characteristics of the selected papers are classified according to the following criteria - waste generation activity, estimation level and quantification methodology. Six categories of existing C and D waste quantification methodologies are identified, including site visit method, waste generation rate method, lifetime analysis method, classification system accumulation method, variables modelling method and other particular methods. A critical comparison of the identified methods is given according to their characteristics and implementation constraints. Moreover, a decision tree is proposed for aiding the selection of the most appropriate quantification method in different scenarios. Based on the analytical review, limitations of previous studies and recommendations of potential future research directions are further suggested

  14. Development of porous ceramsite from construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Wu, Jian-Zhi; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2013-01-01

    The disposal of construction and demolition (C&D) waste has become a serious problem in China due to the rapid increase of Chinese construction industry in recent years. In the present study, typical C&D waste was employed for ceramsite fabrication so as to find a new way for its effective recycling. A novel process was developed for manufacturing high-quality porous ceramsite according to the special chemical composition and properties of C&D waste. Most importantly, a unique bloating agent was developed for the porous structure formation since it was difficult to obtain a suitable porous structure using traditional bloating agents. The effects of processing parameters such as sintering temperature, heating rate and soaking time were investigated, and the bloating mechanism for ceramsite was discussed. The C&D waste ceramsite (CDWC), with high-intensity, low density and homogeneous mechanical properties, was much more suitable for application in the construction field. This study provides a practical process for efficient recycling of the rapidly increasing quantities of C&D waste.

  15. Quantifying construction and demolition waste: an analytical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zezhou; Yu, Ann T W; Shen, Liyin; Liu, Guiwen

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying construction and demolition (C&D) waste generation is regarded as a prerequisite for the implementation of successful waste management. In literature, various methods have been employed to quantify the C&D waste generation at both regional and project levels. However, an integrated review that systemically describes and analyses all the existing methods has yet to be conducted. To bridge this research gap, an analytical review is conducted. Fifty-seven papers are retrieved based on a set of rigorous procedures. The characteristics of the selected papers are classified according to the following criteria - waste generation activity, estimation level and quantification methodology. Six categories of existing C&D waste quantification methodologies are identified, including site visit method, waste generation rate method, lifetime analysis method, classification system accumulation method, variables modelling method and other particular methods. A critical comparison of the identified methods is given according to their characteristics and implementation constraints. Moreover, a decision tree is proposed for aiding the selection of the most appropriate quantification method in different scenarios. Based on the analytical review, limitations of previous studies and recommendations of potential future research directions are further suggested. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Separability studies of construction and demolition waste recycled sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulsen, Carina; Kahn, Henrique; Hawlitschek, Gustav; Masini, Eldon A; Angulo, Sérgio C

    2013-03-01

    The quality of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW) is strictly related to the content of porous and low strength phases, and specifically to the patches of cement that remain attached to the surface of natural aggregates. This phase increases water absorption and compromises the consistency and strength of concrete made from recycled aggregates. Mineral processing has been applied to CDW recycling to remove the patches of adhered cement paste on coarse recycled aggregates. The recycled fine fraction is usually disregarded due to its high content of porous phases despite representing around 50% of the total waste. This paper focus on laboratory mineral separability studies for removing particles with a high content of cement paste from natural fine aggregate particles (quartz/feldspars). The procedure achieved processing of CDW by tertiary impact crushing to produce sand, followed by sieving and density and magnetic separability studies. The attained results confirmed that both methods were effective in reducing cement paste content and producing significant mass recovery (80% for density concentration and 60% for magnetic separation). The production of recycled sand contributes to the sustainability of the construction environment by reducing both the consumption of raw materials and disposal of CDW, particularly in large Brazilian centers with a low quantity of sand and increasing costs of this material due to long transportation distances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Environmental management of construction and demolition waste in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartam, Nabil; Al-Mutairi, Nayef; Al-Ghusain, Ibrahim; Al-Humoud, Jasem

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing pressure on the construction industry to reduce costs and improve the quality of our environment. The fact is that both of these goals can be achieved at the same time. Although construction and demolition (C&D) constitutes a major source of waste in terms of volume and weight, its management and recycling efforts have not yet seen the light in Kuwait. This study focuses on recycling efforts leading to the minimization of the total C&D waste that is currently landfilled in Kuwait. This paper presents the current status of C&D waste disposal system in Kuwait and identifies the potential problems to the environment, people and economy. Then, it investigates alternative solutions to manage and control this major type of waste in an economically efficient and environmentally safe manner. Next, the paper describes the feasibility of establishing a C&D waste recycling facility in Kuwait. It concludes by highlighting the major benefits and bottleneck problems with such a recycling facility.

  18. Environmental and economical feasibility of selective demolition project; Viabilidad ambiental y economica de un proyecto de demolicion selectiva: hacia una optima gestion de los RCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vegas, I.

    2004-07-01

    Selective demolition practices have not yet become popular in our country. Unlike conventional demolition practices, selective demolition helps to increase the amount of components to be reused or materials to be recycled. Thus, the percentage of demolition waste deposited in landfills can be reduced, and the production of recycled materials with optimum quality is fostered. Taking the case study of selective demolition carried out in the municipally of Lasarte-Oria (Basque Country-Spain) as its basis, this paper presents an economic and environmental analysis of the same. Likewise, the economic costs deriving from selective demolition are compared with analogous costs from conventional demolition with an aim to establishing the ideal frame supporting economically feasible selective demolition. (Author)

  19. 48 CFR 52.249-3 - Termination for Convenience of the Government (Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Convenience of the Government (Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements). 52.249-3 Section 52.249-3... Convenience of the Government (Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements). As prescribed in 49.502(b)(2), insert the following clause: Termination for Convenience of the Government (Dismantling...

  20. Modeling end-of-life pathways of construction and demolition debris in the United States (poster for LCM 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2013, the United States generated 530 million tons of construction and demolition debris (CDD), 90% of which was related to demolition. Despite this major contribution to national waste streams, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies and product declarations of buildings and buil...

  1. Ambivalence in Place Attachment : The Lived Experiences of Residents in Declining Neighbourhoods Facing Demolition in Shenyang, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Kleinhans, R.J.; van Ham, M.

    This paper investigates the place attachment of residents in declining neighbourhoods that are facing demolition in Shenyang, China. Through in-depth interviews with homeowners living in danwei communities, or urban villages, at the pre-demolition phase, this paper reveals the strong connection

  2. The Effects of Data Collection Method and Monitoring of Workers’ Behavior on the Generation of Demolition Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi-Wook Cha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The roles of both the data collection method (including proper classification and the behavior of workers on the generation of demolition waste (DW are important. By analyzing the effect of the data collection method used to estimate DW, and by investigating how workers’ behavior can affect the total amount of DW generated during an actual demolition process, it was possible to identify strategies that could improve the prediction of DW. Therefore, this study surveyed demolition waste generation rates (DWGRs for different types of building by conducting on-site surveys immediately before demolition in order to collect adequate and reliable data. In addition, the effects of DW management strategies and of monitoring the behavior of workers on the actual generation of DW were analyzed. The results showed that when monitoring was implemented, the estimates of DW obtained from the DWGRs that were surveyed immediately before demolition and the actual quantities of DW reported by the demolition contractors had an error rate of 0.63% when the results were compared. Therefore, this study has shown that the proper data collection method (i.e., data were collected immediately before demolition applied in this paper and monitoring on the demolition site have a significant impact on waste generation.

  3. Quantities of arsenic-treated wood in demolition debris generated by Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Brajesh; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Townsendt, Timothy G

    2007-03-01

    The disaster debris from Hurricane Katrina is one of the largest in terms of volume and economic loss in American history. One of the major components of the demolition debris is wood waste of which a significant proportion is treated with preservatives, including preservatives containing arsenic. As a result of the large scale destruction of treated wood structures such as electrical poles, fences, decks, and homes a considerable amount of treated wood and consequently arsenic will be disposed as disaster debris. In this study an effort was made to estimate the quantity of arsenic disposed through demolition debris generated in the Louisiana and Mississippi area through Hurricane Katrina. Of the 72 million cubic meters of disaster debris generated, roughly 12 million cubic meters were in the form of construction and demolition wood resulting in an estimated 1740 metric tons of arsenic disposed. Management of disaster debris should consider the relatively large quantities of arsenic associated with pressure-treated wood.

  4. Pilot-based assessment of the economics of recycling construction demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Issam M; Chehab, Ghassan R; El-Fadel, Mutasem; Tamraz, Sandy

    2013-11-01

    The significant amount of waste generated from construction demolition has become a chronic problem in many developing countries. Using data obtained from demolition contractors and various other sources, this paper proposes a framework for proper handling of construction demolition waste (CDW) to serve as a decision support tool in countries suffering from the lack of national CDW management guidelines. The framework is then demonstrated through a case study in the city of Beirut, Lebanon, and a sensitivity analysis is carried out to examine the economic feasibility of developing a recycling facility. The analysis showed that in order for a facility to be feasible, a gate fee should be charged in the presence of a market for recycled aggregates. The results confirm the significance of instigating and implementing legislation to control illegal dumping, constructing, and managing engineered landfills, and establishing markets for recycled CDW.

  5. Coal and wood fuel for electricity production: An environmentally sound solution for waste and demolition wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninks, F.W.M. [EPON, Zwolle (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    Waste wood from primary wood processing and demolition presents both a problem and a potential. If disposed in landfills, it consumes large volumes and decays, producing CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases. As an energy source used in a coal fired power plant it reduces the consumption of fossil fuels reducing the greenhouse effect significantly. Additional advantages are a reduction of the ash volume and the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. The waste wood requires collection, storage, processing and burning. This paper describes a unique project which is carried out in the Netherlands at EPON`s Gelderland Power Plant (635 MW{sub e}) where 60 000 tonnes of waste and demolition wood will be used annually. Special emphasis is given to the processing of the powdered wood fuel. Therefore, most waste and demolition wood can be converted from an environmental liability to an environmental and economic asset. (author)

  6. Coal and wood fuel for electricity production: An environmentally sound solution for waste and demolition wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninks, F W.M. [EPON, Zwolle (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    Waste wood from primary wood processing and demolition presents both a problem and a potential. If disposed in landfills, it consumes large volumes and decays, producing CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases. As an energy source used in a coal fired power plant it reduces the consumption of fossil fuels reducing the greenhouse effect significantly. Additional advantages are a reduction of the ash volume and the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. The waste wood requires collection, storage, processing and burning. This paper describes a unique project which is carried out in the Netherlands at EPON`s Gelderland Power Plant (635 MW{sub e}) where 60 000 tonnes of waste and demolition wood will be used annually. Special emphasis is given to the processing of the powdered wood fuel. Therefore, most waste and demolition wood can be converted from an environmental liability to an environmental and economic asset. (author)

  7. Trend of the research on construction and demolition waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Hongping; Shen Liyin

    2011-01-01

    Research interests in addressing construction and demolition (C and D) waste management issues have resulted in a large amount of publications during the last decade. This study demonstrates that there is no systematic examination on the research development in literature in the discipline of C and D waste management. This study presents the latest research trend in the discipline through analyzing the publications from 2000 to 2009 in eight major international journals. The analysis is conducted on the number of papers published annually, main authors' contributions, research methods and data analysis methods adopted, and research topics covered. The results exhibit an increasing research interest in C and D waste management in recent years. Researchers from developed economies have contributed significantly to the development of the research in the discipline. Some developing countries such as Malaysia and China have also been making good efforts in promoting C and D waste management research. The findings from this study also indicate that survey and case study are major methods for data collection, and the data are mostly processed through descriptive analysis. It is anticipated that more future studies on C and D waste management will be led by researchers from developing economies, where construction works will remain their major economic activities. On the other hand, more sophisticated modeling and simulating techniques have been used effectively in a number of studies on C and D waste management research, and this is considered a major methodology for future research in the discipline. C and D waste management will continue to be a hot research topic in the future, in particularly, the importance of human factors in C and D waste management has emerged as a new challenging topic.

  8. Biological sulfate removal from gypsum contaminated construction and demolition debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2013-12-15

    Construction and demolition debris (CDD) contains high levels of sulfate that can cause detrimental environmental impacts when disposed without adequate treatment. In landfills, sulfate can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under anaerobic conditions. CDD can thus cause health impacts or odor problems to landfill employees and surrounding residents. Reduction of the sulfate content of CDD is an option to overcome these problems. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate removal system to reduce the sulfate content of gypsum contaminated CDD in order to decrease the amount of solid waste, to improve the quality of CDD waste for recycling purposes and to recover sulfur from CDD. The treatment leached out the gypsum contained in CDD by water in a leaching column. The sulfate loaded leachate was then treated in a biological sulfate reducing Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor to convert the sulfate to sulfide. The UASB reactor was operated at 23 ± 3 °C with a hydraulic retention time and upflow velocity of 15.5 h and 0.1 m h(-1), respectively while ethanol was added as electron donor at a final organic loading rate of 3.46 g COD L(-1) reactor d(-1). The CDD leachate had a pH of 8-9 and sulfate dissolution rates of 526.4 and 609.8 mg L(-1) d(-1) were achieved in CDD gypsum and CDD sand, respectively. Besides, it was observed that the gypsum dissolution was the rate limiting step for the biological treatment of CDD. The sulfate removal efficiency of the system stabilized at around 85%, enabling the reuse of the UASB effluent for the leaching step, proving the versatility of the bioreactor for practical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trend of the research on construction and demolition waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongping; Shen, Liyin

    2011-04-01

    Research interests in addressing construction and demolition (C&D) waste management issues have resulted in a large amount of publications during the last decade. This study demonstrates that there is no systematic examination on the research development in literature in the discipline of C&D waste management. This study presents the latest research trend in the discipline through analyzing the publications from 2000 to 2009 in eight major international journals. The analysis is conducted on the number of papers published annually, main authors' contributions, research methods and data analysis methods adopted, and research topics covered. The results exhibit an increasing research interest in C&D waste management in recent years. Researchers from developed economies have contributed significantly to the development of the research in the discipline. Some developing countries such as Malaysia and China have also been making good efforts in promoting C&D waste management research. The findings from this study also indicate that survey and case study are major methods for data collection, and the data are mostly processed through descriptive analysis. It is anticipated that more future studies on C&D waste management will be led by researchers from developing economies, where construction works will remain their major economic activities. On the other hand, more sophisticated modeling and simulating techniques have been used effectively in a number of studies on C&D waste management research, and this is considered a major methodology for future research in the discipline. C&D waste management will continue to be a hot research topic in the future, in particularly, the importance of human factors in C&D waste management has emerged as a new challenging topic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A photogrammetric methodology for estimating construction and demolition waste composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, H.H.; Reinhart, D.R.; Townsend, T.; Seibert, S.; Medeiros, S.; Cochran, K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2002-01-01

    Manual sorting of construction, demolition, and renovation (C and D) waste is difficult and costly. A photogrammetric method has been developed to analyze the composition of C and D waste that eliminates the need for physical contact with the waste. The only field data collected is the weight and volume of the solid waste in the storage container and a photograph of each side of the waste pile, after it is dumped on the tipping floor. The methodology was developed and calibrated based on manual sorting studies at three different landfills in Florida, where the contents of twenty roll-off containers filled with C and D waste were sorted. The component classifications used were wood, concrete, paper products, drywall, metals, insulation, roofing, plastic, flooring, municipal solid waste, land-clearing waste, and other waste. Photographs of each side of the waste pile were taken with a digital camera and the pictures were analyzed on a computer using Photoshop software. Photoshop was used to divide the picture into eighty cells composed of ten columns and eight rows. The component distribution of each cell was estimated and results were summed to get a component distribution for the pile. Two types of distribution factors were developed that allow the component volumes and weights to be estimated. One set of distribution factors was developed to correct the volume distributions and the second set was developed to correct the weight distributions. The bulk density of each of the waste components were determined and used to convert waste volumes to weights. (author)

  11. A photogrammetric methodology for estimating construction and demolition waste composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, H.H. [Florida Inst. of Technology, Dept. of divil Engineering, Melbourne, Florida (United States); Reinhart, D.R.; Townsend, T.; Seibert, S.; Medeiros, S.; Cochran, K.; Chakrabarti, S

    2002-06-15

    Manual sorting of construction, demolition, and renovation (C and D) waste is difficult and costly. A photogrammetric method has been developed to analyze the composition of C and D waste that eliminates the need for physical contact with the waste. The only field data collected is the weight and volume of the solid waste in the storage container and a photograph of each side of the waste pile, after it is dumped on the tipping floor. The methodology was developed and calibrated based on manual sorting studies at three different landfills in Florida, where the contents of twenty roll-off containers filled with C and D waste were sorted. The component classifications used were wood, concrete, paper products, drywall, metals, insulation, roofing, plastic, flooring, municipal solid waste, land-clearing waste, and other waste. Photographs of each side of the waste pile were taken with a digital camera and the pictures were analyzed on a computer using Photoshop software. Photoshop was used to divide the picture into eighty cells composed of ten columns and eight rows. The component distribution of each cell was estimated and results were summed to get a component distribution for the pile. Two types of distribution factors were developed that allow the component volumes and weights to be estimated. One set of distribution factors was developed to correct the volume distributions and the second set was developed to correct the weight distributions. The bulk density of each of the waste components were determined and used to convert waste volumes to weights. (author)

  12. HAZWOPER project documents for demolition of the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This document, in support of the Waste Evaporator Facility (WEF) demolition project and contains the Project Work Plan and the Project Health and Safety Plan for demolition and partial remediation actions by ATG at the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506. Various activities will be conducted during the course of demolition, and this plan provides details on the work steps involved, the identification of hazards, and the health and safety practices necessary to mitigate these hazards. The objective of this document is to develop an approach for implementing demolition activities at the WEF. This approach is based on prior site characterization information and takes into account all of the known hazards at this facility. The Project Work Plan provides instructions and requirements for identified work steps that will be utilized during the performance of demolition, while the Health and Safety Plan addresses the radiological, hazardous material exposure, and industrial safety concerns that will be encountered.

  13. HAZWOPER project documents for demolition of the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This document, in support of the Waste Evaporator Facility (WEF) demolition project and contains the Project Work Plan and the Project Health and Safety Plan for demolition and partial remediation actions by ATG at the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506. Various activities will be conducted during the course of demolition, and this plan provides details on the work steps involved, the identification of hazards, and the health and safety practices necessary to mitigate these hazards. The objective of this document is to develop an approach for implementing demolition activities at the WEF. This approach is based on prior site characterization information and takes into account all of the known hazards at this facility. The Project Work Plan provides instructions and requirements for identified work steps that will be utilized during the performance of demolition, while the Health and Safety Plan addresses the radiological, hazardous material exposure, and industrial safety concerns that will be encountered

  14. The decommissioning and demolition of four suites of high active chemical analysis cells at DNPDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, R.M.; Spence, B.W.; Stewart, C.W.

    1987-11-01

    The decommissioning and demolition of four laboratory suites of high active cells at DNPDE is described. All four suites had suffered drain leaks of high active liquor into underfloor ducts; the options available at the time and current policy for dealing with the resultant activity deposits are given. The decommissioning procedures are detailed to provide information for future similar exercises. Features to ease demolition of such facilities and to eliminate the possibility of long term activity deposition from drain leaks are highlighted for incorporation in future designs. The waste arisings and radiation doses received during the work are tabulated. (author)

  15. Modified Brokk Demolition Machine with Remote Operator Console. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Low-Cost D and D System modifies a commercially available BROKK demolition system for remote viewing and long tether remote operation that provides a portable facility camera pod and interfaces with the Compact Remote Operator Console (TMS Tech ID 2180) to extend the applicability of the BROKK system to projects that require removal of the operator from the work area due to exposure to radiological, chemical, or industrial hazards. The modified BROKK has been integrated with the Compact Remote Operator Console to provide a true remotely operated low-cost D and D system applicable to a wide range of small D and D demolition tasks across the DOE complex

  16. Life cycle assessment of construction and demolition waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas H.; Astrup, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • LCA of C&DW utilisation in road vs. C&DW landfilling. • C&DW utilisation in road better than landfilling for most categories. • Transportation is the most important process in non-toxic impact categories. • Leaching of oxyanions is the critical process in toxic impact categories. • Modelling of Cr fate in the subsoil is highly influential to the results. - Abstract: Life cycle assessment (LCA) modelling of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) management was carried out. The functional unit was management of 1 Mg mineral, source separated C&DW, which is either utilised in road construction as a substitute for natural aggregates, or landfilled. The assessed environmental impacts included both non-toxic and toxic impact categories. The scenarios comprised all stages of the end-of-life management of C&DW, until final disposal of all residues. Leaching of inorganic contaminants was included, as was the production of natural aggregates, which was avoided because of the use of C&DW. Typical uncertainties related to contaminant leaching were addressed. For most impact categories, utilisation of C&DW in road construction was preferable to landfilling; however, for most categories, utilisation resulted in net environmental burdens. Transportation represented the most important contribution for most nontoxic impacts, accounting for 60–95 per cent of these impacts. Capital goods contributed with negligible impacts. Leaching played a critical role for the toxic categories, where landfilling had lower impacts than utilisation because of the lower levels of leachate per ton of C&DW reaching the groundwater over a 100-year perspective. Leaching of oxyanions (As, V and Sb) was critical with respect to leaching. Typical experimental uncertainties in leaching data did not have a pivotal influence on the results; however, accounting for Cr immobilisation in soils as part of the impact assessment was critical for modelling the leaching impacts. Compared

  17. Life cycle assessment of construction and demolition waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butera, Stefania, E-mail: stbu@teknologisk.dk; Christensen, Thomas H.; Astrup, Thomas F.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • LCA of C&DW utilisation in road vs. C&DW landfilling. • C&DW utilisation in road better than landfilling for most categories. • Transportation is the most important process in non-toxic impact categories. • Leaching of oxyanions is the critical process in toxic impact categories. • Modelling of Cr fate in the subsoil is highly influential to the results. - Abstract: Life cycle assessment (LCA) modelling of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) management was carried out. The functional unit was management of 1 Mg mineral, source separated C&DW, which is either utilised in road construction as a substitute for natural aggregates, or landfilled. The assessed environmental impacts included both non-toxic and toxic impact categories. The scenarios comprised all stages of the end-of-life management of C&DW, until final disposal of all residues. Leaching of inorganic contaminants was included, as was the production of natural aggregates, which was avoided because of the use of C&DW. Typical uncertainties related to contaminant leaching were addressed. For most impact categories, utilisation of C&DW in road construction was preferable to landfilling; however, for most categories, utilisation resulted in net environmental burdens. Transportation represented the most important contribution for most nontoxic impacts, accounting for 60–95 per cent of these impacts. Capital goods contributed with negligible impacts. Leaching played a critical role for the toxic categories, where landfilling had lower impacts than utilisation because of the lower levels of leachate per ton of C&DW reaching the groundwater over a 100-year perspective. Leaching of oxyanions (As, V and Sb) was critical with respect to leaching. Typical experimental uncertainties in leaching data did not have a pivotal influence on the results; however, accounting for Cr immobilisation in soils as part of the impact assessment was critical for modelling the leaching impacts. Compared

  18. Life cycle assessment of construction and demolition waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas H; Astrup, Thomas F

    2015-10-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) modelling of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) management was carried out. The functional unit was management of 1 Mg mineral, source separated C&DW, which is either utilised in road construction as a substitute for natural aggregates, or landfilled. The assessed environmental impacts included both non-toxic and toxic impact categories. The scenarios comprised all stages of the end-of-life management of C&DW, until final disposal of all residues. Leaching of inorganic contaminants was included, as was the production of natural aggregates, which was avoided because of the use of C&DW. Typical uncertainties related to contaminant leaching were addressed. For most impact categories, utilisation of C&DW in road construction was preferable to landfilling; however, for most categories, utilisation resulted in net environmental burdens. Transportation represented the most important contribution for most nontoxic impacts, accounting for 60-95 per cent of these impacts. Capital goods contributed with negligible impacts. Leaching played a critical role for the toxic categories, where landfilling had lower impacts than utilisation because of the lower levels of leachate per ton of C&DW reaching the groundwater over a 100-year perspective. Leaching of oxyanions (As, V and Sb) was critical with respect to leaching. Typical experimental uncertainties in leaching data did not have a pivotal influence on the results; however, accounting for Cr immobilisation in soils as part of the impact assessment was critical for modelling the leaching impacts. Compared with the overall life cycle of building and construction materials, leaching emissions were shown to be potentially significant for toxicity impacts, compared with contributions from production of the same materials, showing that end-of-life impacts and leaching should not be disregarded when assessing environmental impacts from construction products and materials. CO2 uptake in the C

  19. Air Dispersion Modeling for Building 3026C/D Demolition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Richard C [ORNL; Sjoreen, Andrea L [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2010-06-01

    This report presents estimates of dispersion coefficients and effective dose for potential air dispersion scenarios of uncontrolled releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) buildings 3026C, 3026D, and 3140 prior to or during the demolition of the 3026 Complex. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) AERMOD system1-6 was used to compute these estimates. AERMOD stands for AERMIC Model, where AERMIC is the American Meteorological Society-EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee. Five source locations (three in building 3026D and one each in building 3026C and the filter house 3140) and associated source characteristics were determined with the customer. In addition, the area of study was determined and building footprints and intake locations of air-handling systems were obtained. In addition to the air intakes, receptor sites consisting of ground level locations on four polar grids (50 m, 100 m, 200 m, and 500 m) and two intersecting lines of points (50 m separation), corresponding to sidewalks along Central Avenue and Fifth Street. Three years of meteorological data (2006 2008) were used each consisting of three datasets: 1) National Weather Service data; 2) upper air data for the Knoxville-Oak Ridge area; and 3) local weather data from Tower C (10 m, 30 m and 100 m) on the ORNL reservation. Annual average air concentration, highest 1 h average and highest 3 h average air concentrations were computed using AERMOD for the five source locations for the three years of meteorological data. The highest 1 h average air concentrations were converted to dispersion coefficients to characterize the atmospheric dispersion as the customer was interested in the most significant response and the highest 1 h average data reflects the best time-averaged values available from the AERMOD code. Results are presented in tabular and graphical form. The results for dose were obtained using radionuclide activities for each of the buildings provided by the customer.7

  20. OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2006-11-02

    The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

  1. 24 CFR 970.15 - Specific criteria for HUD approval of demolition requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... modifications is cost-effective to return the public housing project or portion of the project to useful life... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Specific criteria for HUD approval of demolition requests. 970.15 Section 970.15 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  2. Construction and demolition waste generation rates for high-rise buildings in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Chooi Mei; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Ho, Chin Siong

    2016-12-01

    Construction and demolition waste continues to sharply increase in step with the economic growth of less developed countries. Though the construction industry is large, it is composed of small firms with individual waste management practices, often leading to the deleterious environmental outcomes. Quantifying construction and demolition waste generation allows policy makers and stakeholders to understand the true internal and external costs of construction, providing a necessary foundation for waste management planning that may overcome deleterious environmental outcomes and may be both economically and environmentally optimal. This study offers a theoretical method for estimating the construction and demolition project waste generation rate by utilising available data, including waste disposal truck size and number, and waste volume and composition. This method is proposed as a less burdensome and more broadly applicable alternative, in contrast to waste estimation by on-site hand sorting and weighing. The developed method is applied to 11 projects across Malaysia as the case study. This study quantifies waste generation rate and illustrates the construction method in influencing the waste generation rate, estimating that the conventional construction method has a waste generation rate of 9.88 t 100 m -2 , the mixed-construction method has a waste generation rate of 3.29 t 100 m -2 , and demolition projects have a waste generation rate of 104.28 t 100 m -2 . © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. 77 FR 63732 - Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor Canal, East Chicago, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ..., Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks. This rule is not an economically significant rule and does not create an environmental risk to health or risk to safety that may.... The Captain of the Port, Sector Lake Michigan, has determined that this demolition project will pose a...

  4. 77 FR 70684 - Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor Canal, East Chicago, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... environmental risk to health or risk to safety that may disproportionately affect children. 10. Indian Tribal... the Cline Avenue bridge in East Chicago, IN. The Captain of the Port, Sector Lake Michigan, has determined that this demolition project will pose a significant risk to public safety and property. Such...

  5. 78 FR 29648 - Regulated Navigation Area; Waldo-Hancock Bridge Demolition, Penobscot River, Between Prospect and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Waldo-Hancock Bridge Demolition, Penobscot River, Between Prospect... River between Prospect and Verona, ME, under and surrounding the Waldo- Hancock Bridge in order to... Prospect and Verona, ME. (a) Location. The following area is a Regulated Navigation Area (RNA): All...

  6. Fracture analysis of cement treated demolition waste using a lattice model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xuan, D.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Molenaar, A.A.A.; Houben, L.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Fracture properties of cement treated demolition waste were investigated using a lattice model. In practice the investigated material is applied as a cement treated road base/subbase course. The granular aggregates used in this material were crushed recycled concrete and masonry. This results in six

  7. Applicability of LCA tool for building materials produced from construction and demolition waste : case of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabai, M.M.; Egmond - de Wilde De Ligny, van E.L.C.; Cox, M.G.D.M.; Mato, R.R.A.M.; Lichtenberg, J.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that about 10 million tonnes of construction and demolition (C&D) waste is generated annually in Tanzania. This waste is expected to increase even more because of population increases, urbanization, industrialization and commercialization which results in more utilization of natural

  8. Mixture optimization of cement treated demolition waste with recycled masonry and concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xuan, D.X.; Houben, L.J.M.; Molenaar, A.A.A.; Shui, Z.H,

    2011-01-01

    Due to environmental reasons and the shortage of natural resources, it is greatly valuable to recycle construction and demolition waste (CDW) as much as possible. One of effective ways to reuse more CDW is to produce a cemented road base material. The recycled CDW however is a mix of recycled

  9. Investigation of combined effect of mixture variables on mechanical properties of cement treated demolition waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xuan, D.; Houben, L.J.M.; Molenaar, A.A.A.; Shui, Z.

    2012-01-01

    One of high efficient ways to reuse the recycled construction and demolition waste (CDW) is to consider it as a road base material. The recycled CDW however is mainly a mix of recycled masonry and concrete with a wide variation in composition. This results that the mechanical properties of cement

  10. Asbestos exposure among construction workers during demolition of old houses in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakooei, Hossein; Normohammadi, Mohhammad

    2014-01-01

    Air quality in demolition practices has seldom been evaluated in Iran. Accordingly, we evaluated asbestos exposure among Tehran construction workers during the demolition of old houses. To identify possible sources of asbestos exposure, including thermal insulations, chimney pipes and cement sheets, were all sampled. This study also were taken the personal air samples to evaluate any asbestos exposure during the demolition. The asbestos fibers found in the samples were analyzed by phase-contrast optical microscopy (PCM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and polarized light microscopy (PLM) methods. Personal monitoring of asbestos fiber levels indicated a range from 0.01 to 0.15 PCM f/ml (0.02-0.42 SEM f/ml). The geometric mean concentrations were 0.07 PCM f/ml (0.20 SEM f/ml), which is considerably higher than the threshold limit value (TLV) proposed by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienist (ACGIH), which is 0.1 f/ml. The analysis showed a presence in the bulk samples only chrysotile asbestos and an absence of the other type asbestos. Therefore, it might be expected that workers who worked in the demolition of old houses will suffer from negative effects of exposing to the asbestos fibers.

  11. Strategy of Construction and Demolition Waste Management after Chemical Industry Facilities Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkinova, I. N.; Batrakova, G. M.; Vaisman, Ya I.

    2017-06-01

    Mixed waste products are generated in the process of irrelevant industrial projects’ removal if conventional techniques of their demolition and dismantling are applied. In Russia the number of unused chemical industry facilities including structures with high rate of wear is growing. In removing industrial buildings and production shops it is used conventional techniques of demolition and dismantling in the process of which mixed waste products are generated. The presence of hazardous chemicals in these wastes makes difficulties for their use and leads to the increasing volume of unutilized residues. In the process of chemical industry facilities’ removal this fact takes on special significance as a high level of hazardous chemicals in the waste composition demands for the realization of unprofitable measures aimed at ensuring environmental and industrial safety. The proposed strategy of managing waste originated from the demolition and dismantling of chemical industry facilities is based on the methodology of industrial metabolism which allows identifying separate material flows of recycled, harmful and ballast components, performing separate collection of components during removal and taking necessary preventive measures. This strategy has been tested on the aniline synthesis plant being in the process of removal. As a result, a flow of 10 wt. %, subjected to decontamination, was isolated from the total volume of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste). The considered approach allowed using the resource potential of more than 80wt. % of waste and minimizing the disposed waste volume.

  12. Energy savings from housing: Ineffective renovation subsidies vs efficient demolition and reconstruction incentives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, Maarten; Allacker, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Energy savings in the housing sector are key to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Policies to incentivize energy savings are however disparate between countries. Taking into account environmental aspects and consumer surplus, the paper uses a stylized economic model to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of three economic instruments: subsidies for renovation, subsidies for demolition and reconstruction projects and subsidies for building new houses on virgin land. The assessment also relates to differentiated value added taxes and other financial incentives such as green loans. In a counter-intuitive way, the model highlights that subsidies for renovations with minor energy gains worsen the overall energy consumption of housing due to the inducement of lock-ins with energy inefficient houses. Structural changes are needed in the use of policy instruments. First, commonly applied support schemes for renovations with minor energy savings should be abolished. Second, scarce public resources should incentivize deep renovation and demolition and reconstruction. Finally, taxes should apply on the use of virgin land to persuade households with a high willingness to pay for a new house, to invest in demolition and reconstruction. - Highlights: • Renovation subsidies worsen overall energy consumption of housing. • Renovation induces a lock-in with energy inefficient houses. • Renovation subsidies should be abolished or structurally reformed. • Policy should incentivize demolition and reconstruction projects. • Building on virgin land should be taxed.

  13. HEAVY METALS IN RECOVERED FINES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION DEBRIS RECYCLING FACILITIES IN FLORIDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major product recovered from the processing and recycling of construction and demolition (C&D) debris is screened soil, also referred to as fines. A proposed reuse option for C&D debris fines is fill material, typically in construction projects as a substitute for natural soil....

  14. Choosing a sustainable demolition waste management strategy using multicriteria decision analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussat, Nicolas; Dujet, Christiane; Mehu, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an application of the ELECTRE III decision-aid method in the context of choosing a sustainable demolition waste management strategy for a case study in the city of Lyon, France. This choice of waste management strategy takes into consideration the sustainable development objectives, i.e. economic aspects, environmental consequences, and social issues. Nine alternatives for demolition waste management were compared with the aid of eight criteria, taking into account energy consumption, depletion of abiotic resources, global warming, dispersion of dangerous substances in the environment, economic activity, employment, and quality of life of the local population. The case study concerned the demolition of 25 buildings of an old military camp. Each alternative was illustrated with different waste treatments, such as material recovery, recycling, landfilling, and energy recovery. The recommended solution for sustainable demolition waste management for the case study is a selective deconstruction of each building with local material recovery in road engineering of inert wastes, local energy recovery of wood wastes, and specific treatments for hazardous wastes

  15. Life cycle assessment and life cycle costing for demolition waste management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, M.; Miranda-Xicotencat, B.; Ita-Nagy, D.; Prado, V.; Guinée, J.B.; van Roekel, E; Huismans, R.; Rens, F.; Lotfi, Somayeh; Di Maio, F.; Di Maio, F.; Lotfi, S.; Bakker, M.; Hu, M.; Vahidi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Ninety five percent of the construction and demolition waste is recycled in the Netherlands. Most of it is used for low value applications such as road base materials; the use of secondary material in buildings is still less than 3%7. In order to recover waste for higher value applications,

  16. 78 FR 40705 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Demolition and Construction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... (Zalophus californianus), and northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) incidental to demolition and... activities by the general public. Over the last three years (2010 through 2012), an average of 1,556,184..., but because of basic year-round working condition needs for the lifeguards and the demand for...

  17. GIS-based planning system for managing the flow of construction and demolition waste in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Diogo Henrique Fernandes da; Lafayette, Kalinny Patrícia Vaz; Sobral, Maria do Carmo

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this article was to plan a network for municipal management of construction and demolition waste in Brazil with the assistance of a geographic information system, using the city of Recife as a case study. The methodology was carried out in three stages. The first was to map the illegal construction and demolition of waste disposal points across Recife and classify the waste according to its recyclability. In sequence, a method for indicating suitable areas for installation of voluntary delivery points, for small waste generators, are presented. Finally, a method for indicating suitable areas for the installation of trans-shipment and waste sorting areas, developed for large generators, is presented. The results show that a geographic information system is an essential tool in the planning of municipal construction and demolition waste management, in order to facilitate the spatial analysis and control the generation, sorting, collection, transportation, and final destination of construction and demolition waste, increasing the rate of recovery and recycling of materials.

  18. Characterizing the environmental impact of metals in construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Danfeng; Duan, Huabo; Song, Qingbin; Li, Xiaoyue; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yicheng; Shen, Weijun; Wang, Jinben

    2018-05-01

    Large quantities of construction and demolition (C&D) waste are generated in China every year, but their potential environmental impacts on the surrounding areas are rarely assessed. This study focuses on metals contained in C&D waste, characterizing the metal concentrations and their related environmental risks. C&D waste samples were collected in Shenzhen City, China, from building demolition sites, renovation areas undergoing refurbishment, landfill sites, and recycling companies (all located in Shenzhen city) that produce recycled aggregate, in order to identify pollution levels of the metals As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The results showed that (1) the metal concentrations in most demolition and renovation waste samples were below the soil environmental quality standard for agricultural purposes (SQ-Agr.) in China; (2) Cd, Cu, and Zn led to relatively higher environmental risks than other metals, especially for Zn (DM5 tile sample, 360 mg/kg; R4 tile sample, 281 mg/kg); (3) non-inert C&D waste such as wall insulation and foamed plastic had high concentrations of As and Cd, so that these materials required special attention for sound waste management; and (4) C&D waste collected from landfill sites had higher concentrations of Cd and Cu than did waste collected from demolition and refurbishment sites.

  19. Application of micro blasting technique to demolition of biological shield wall of reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontani, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Although heavily reinforced concrete structures in nuclear facilities could be dismantled effectively with the controlled blasting technique, the noises and vibrations caused by blasting were matters of concern. Recently, in the building replacement at urban areas, there are increasing cases of demolition of large reinforced concrete members below ground. Instead of applying heavy weight breakers, the micro blasting technique that enables to lower noises and vibrations has developed and applied to demolition work of large reinforced concrete members in urban areas. In this report, the features of the micro blasting technique is reviewed by comparing with existing controlled blasting technique and its applicability to demolition work of nuclear facilities is investigated. The results of those study find that it is confirmed that the micro blasting technique could be applicable to large reinforced concrete structures in nuclear facilities because of the low levels of noises and vibrations. However, it is recommended to perform mock-up tests to confirm the demolition efficiency and levels of the noises and vibrations since the rebar used in nuclear facilities is larger in diameters and in rebar ratio compared with ordinary reinforced concrete structures. (author)

  20. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for the Demolition of the Masonry Block for the 108-F Biological Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrnes, M. E.

    1999-01-01

    This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) has been prepared to clearly define the sampling and analysis activities to be performed in support of the demolition and disposition (or disposal) of the 108-F Biological Laboratory masonry block walls

  1. PROJECT EXPERIENCE REPORT DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERLIN, G.T.; ORGILL, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the preparation, operations, innovative work practices, and lessons learned associated with demolition of the 2334 Plutonium Concentration Facility. This project represented the first open-air demolition of a highly-contaminated plutonium facility at the Hanford Site. This project may also represent the first plutonium facility in the US. Department of Energy (DOE) complex to have been demolished without first decontaminating surfaces to near ''free release'' standards. Demolition of plutonium contaminated structures, if not properly managed, can subject cleanup personnel and the environment to significant risk. However, with proper sequencing and innovative use of commercially available equipment, materials, and services, this project demonstrated that a plutonium processing facility can be demolished while avoiding the need to perform extensive decontamination or to construct large enclosures. This project utilized an excavator with concrete shears, diamond circular saws, water misting and fogging equipment, commercially available fixatives and dust suppressants, conventional mobile crane and rigging services, and near real-time modeling of meteorological and radiological conditions. Following a significant amount of preparation, actual demolition of the 233-S Facility began in October 2003 and was completed in late April 2004. The knowledge and experience gained on this project are important to the Hanford Site as additional plutonium processing facilities are scheduled for demolition in the near future. Other sites throughout the DOE Complex may also be faced with similar challenges. Numerous innovations and effective work practices were implemented on this project. Accordingly, a series of ''Lessons Learned and Innovative Practices Fact Sheets'' were developed and are included as an appendix to this report. This collection of fact sheets is not intended to capture every innovative work practice and lesson learned, but rather

  2. PROJECT EXPERIENCE REPORT DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2004-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the preparation, operations, innovative work practices, and lessons learned associated with demolition of the 2334 Plutonium Concentration Facility. This project represented the first open-air demolition of a highly-contaminated plutonium facility at the Hanford Site. This project may also represent the first plutonium facility in the US. Department of Energy (DOE) complex to have been demolished without first decontaminating surfaces to near ''free release'' standards. Demolition of plutonium contaminated structures, if not properly managed, can subject cleanup personnel and the environment to significant risk. However, with proper sequencing and innovative use of commercially available equipment, materials, and services, this project demonstrated that a plutonium processing facility can be demolished while avoiding the need to perform extensive decontamination or to construct large enclosures. This project utilized an excavator with concrete shears, diamond circular saws, water misting and fogging equipment, commercially available fixatives and dust suppressants, conventional mobile crane and rigging services, and near real-time modeling of meteorological and radiological conditions. Following a significant amount of preparation, actual demolition of the 2333 Facility began in October 2003 and was completed in late April 2004. The knowledge and experience gained on this project are important to the Hanford Site as additional plutonium processing facilities are scheduled for demolition in the near future. Other sites throughout the DOE Complex may also be faced with similar challenges. Numerous innovations and effective work practices were implemented on this project. Accordingly, a series of ''Lessons Learned and Innovative Practices Fact Sheets'' were developed and are included as an appendix to this report. This collection of fact sheets is not intended to capture every innovative work practice and lesson learned, but rather to

  3. Properties of Concrete Paving Blocks and Hollow Tiles with Recycled Aggregate from Construction and Demolition Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Carlos; Miñano, Isabel; Aguilar, Miguel Ángel; Ortega, José Marcos; Parra, Carlos; Sánchez, Isidro

    2017-11-30

    In recent years there has been an increasing tendency to recycle the wastes generated by building companies in the construction industry, demolition wastes being the most important in terms of volume. The aim of this work is to study the possibility of using recycled aggregates from construction and demolition wastes in the preparation of precast non-structural concretes. To that purpose, two different percentages (15% and 30%) of natural aggregates were substituted by recycled aggregates in the manufacture of paving blocks and hollow tiles. Dosages used by the company have not been changed by the introduction of recycled aggregate. Precast elements have been tested by means of compressive and flexural strength, water absorption, density, abrasion, and slipping resistance. The results obtained show the possibility of using these wastes at an industrial scale, satisfying the requirements of the Spanish standards for these elements.

  4. An Estimation of Construction and Demolition Debris in Seoul, Korea: Waste Amount, Type, and Estimating Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seongwon; Hwang, Yongwoo

    1999-08-01

    Construction and demolition (C&D) debris is generated at the site of various construction activities. However, the amount of the debris is usually so large that it is necessary to estimate the amount of C&D debris as accurately as possible for effective waste management and control in urban areas. In this paper, an effective estimation method using a statistical model was proposed. The estimation process was composed of five steps: estimation of the life span of buildings; estimation of the floor area of buildings to be constructed and demolished; calculation of individual intensity units of C&D debris; and estimation of the future C&D debris production. This method was also applied in the city of Seoul as an actual case, and the estimated amount of C&D debris in Seoul in 2021 was approximately 24 million tons. Of this total amount, 98% was generated by demolition, and the main components of debris were concrete and brick.

  5. Properties of Concrete Paving Blocks and Hollow Tiles with Recycled Aggregate from Construction and Demolition Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodríguez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing tendency to recycle the wastes generated by building companies in the construction industry, demolition wastes being the most important in terms of volume. The aim of this work is to study the possibility of using recycled aggregates from construction and demolition wastes in the preparation of precast non-structural concretes. To that purpose, two different percentages (15% and 30% of natural aggregates were substituted by recycled aggregates in the manufacture of paving blocks and hollow tiles. Dosages used by the company have not been changed by the introduction of recycled aggregate. Precast elements have been tested by means of compressive and flexural strength, water absorption, density, abrasion, and slipping resistance. The results obtained show the possibility of using these wastes at an industrial scale, satisfying the requirements of the Spanish standards for these elements.

  6. An integrated approach for the management of demolition waste in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourmpanis, Basilis; Papadopoulos, Achilleas; Moustakas, Konstantinos; Kourmoussis, Fotis; Stylianou, Marinos; Loizidou, Maria

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the generation and management of demolition waste (DW) in Cyprus. A methodology has been developed and applied for the estimation of the quantities of the waste stream under examination, since quantitative primary data were not available. The existing situation relating to the practices applied for the management of DW was investigated and assessed. Furthermore, a multi-criteria analysis method (PROMETHEE II) was developed and applied in order to examine alternative systems that could be implemented for the management of the DW in the country. In particular, nine management systems (scenarios) were examined, evaluated and ranked according to their efficiency using seventeen individual criteria, divided into four groups (social-legislative, environmental, economic and technical). The ranking of the alternative waste management scenarios indicated that the optimum management system for possible implementation in the island included complete selective demolition procedures and transfer of mixed recyclable materials to the recycling centre and non-recyclable material to landfill.

  7. Total and respirable dust exposures among carpenters and demolition workers during indoor work in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeskov, Lilli; Hanskov, Dorte Jessing Agerby; Brauer, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within the construction industry the risk of lung disorders depends on the specific professions probably due to variations in the levels of dust exposure, and with dust levels depending on the work task and job function. We do not know the extent of exposure in the different professions...... was 3.90 (95 % confidence interval 1.13-13.5) mg/m(3). Dust exposure varied depending on work task for both professions. The dustiest work occurred during demolition, especially when it was done manually. Only few workers used personal respiratory protection and only while performing the dustiest work...... or the variation between the different work tasks. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess if there were differences in dust exposure between carpenters and demolition workers who were expected to have low and high dust exposure, respectively. METHODS: Through interviews of key persons...

  8. Gentrification in black and white: the racial impact of public housing demolition in American cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The gentrification that has transformed high-poverty neighbourhoods in US cities since the mid 1990s has been characterised by high levels of state reinvestment. Prominent among public-sector interventions has been the demolition of public housing and in some cases multimillion dollar redevelopment efforts. In this paper, the racial dimension of state-supported gentrification in large US cities is examined by looking at the direct and indirect displacement induced by public housing transformation. The data show a clear tendency towards the demolition of public housing projects with disproportionately high African American occupancy. The pattern of indirect displacement is more varied; public housing transformation has produced a number of paths of neighbourhood change. The most common, however, involve significant reductions in poverty, sometimes associated with Black to White racial turnover and sometimes not. The findings underscore the central importance of race in understanding the dynamics of gentrification in US cities.

  9. Bat Surveys of Retired Facilitiies Scheduled for Demolition by Washington Closure Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.; Lindsey, C. T.

    2011-06-30

    This project was conducted to evaluate buildings and facilities remaining in the Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition schedule for bat roost sites. The project began in spring of 2009 and was concluded in spring of 2011. A total of 196 buildings and facilities were evaluated for the presence of bat roosting sites. The schedule for the project was prioritized to accommodate the demolition schedule. As the surveys were completed, the results were provided to the project managers to facilitate planning and project completion. The surveys took place in the 300 Area, 400 Area, 100-H, 100-D, 100-N, and 100-B/C Area. This report is the culmination of all the bat surveys and summarizes the findings by area and includes recommended mitigation actions where bat roosts were found.

  10. Quantum non-demolition phonon counter with a hybrid optomechnical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiao; Zhang, KeYe; Dong, Ying; Zhang, WeiPing

    2018-05-01

    A phonon counting scheme based on the control of polaritons in an optomechanical system is proposed. This approach permits us to measure the number of phonons in a quantum non-demolition (QND) manner for arbitrary modes not limited by the frequency matching condition as in usual photon-phonon scattering detections. The performance on phonon number transfer and quantum state transfer of the counter are analyzed and simulated numerically by taking into account all relevant sources of noise.

  11. Y-12 Construction/Demolition Landfill VII: Permit application: Part 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has three major operating facilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee: the Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Operations associated with the DOE energy research and production facilities at Oak Ridge result in the production of several types of waste materials. Disposal of solid waste (as defined in the Solid Waste Processing and Disposal Rules for Tennessee) in disposal facilities operated by the Y-12 Plant is the responsibility of Y-12 Waste Management Division (MWD). The WMD is proposing to develop a facility that will include two new disposal units: one for construction/demolition waste and spoil and one for industrial solid waste. This manual describes the closure and post-closure plans for the construction/demolition waste and spoil disposal unit. This disposal unit is referred to as the Y-12 Construction/Demolition Landfill VII (CD-VII) and is to be operated by the Y-12 Plant for the DOE. This will be a Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class IV disposal unit

  12. Influence of construction and demolition waste management on the environmental impact of buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify comparable environmental impacts within a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) perspective, for buildings in which the first (Materials) and last (End of Life) life cycle stages are adjusted to several waste/material management options. Unlike most LCAs, the approach is "top-down" rather than "bottom-up", which usually involves large amounts of data and the use of specific software applications. This approach is considered appropriate for a limited but expedient LCA designed to compare the environmental impacts of different life cycle options. Present results, based on real buildings measurements and demolition contractor activities, show that shallow, superficial, selective demolition may not result in reduced environmental impacts. Calculations actually show an increase (generally less than 5%) in most impact categories for the Materials and End of Life stages because of extra transportation needs. However, core material separation in demolition operations and its recycling and/or reuse does bring environmental benefits. A reduction of around 77% has been estimated in the climate change impact category, 57% in acidification potential and 81% in the summer smog impact (for the life cycle stages referred). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An estimation framework for building information modeling (BIM)-based demolition waste by type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Chan; Hong, Won-Hwa; Park, Jae-Woo; Cha, Gi-Wook

    2017-12-01

    Most existing studies on demolition waste (DW) quantification do not have an official standard to estimate the amount and type of DW. Therefore, there are limitations in the existing literature for estimating DW with a consistent classification system. Building information modeling (BIM) is a technology that can generate and manage all the information required during the life cycle of a building, from design to demolition. Nevertheless, there has been a lack of research regarding its application to the demolition stage of a building. For an effective waste management plan, the estimation of the type and volume of DW should begin from the building design stage. However, the lack of tools hinders an early estimation. This study proposes a BIM-based framework that estimates DW in the early design stages, to achieve an effective and streamlined planning, processing, and management. Specifically, the input of construction materials in the Korean construction classification system and those in the BIM library were matched. Based on this matching integration, the estimates of DW by type were calculated by applying the weight/unit volume factors and the rates of DW volume change. To verify the framework, its operation was demonstrated by means of an actual BIM modeling and by comparing its results with those available in the literature. This study is expected to contribute not only to the estimation of DW at the building level, but also to the automated estimation of DW at the district level.

  14. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael R, Kruzic

    2008-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  15. A BIM-based system for demolition and renovation waste estimation and planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jack C.P.; Ma, Lauren Y.H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We developed a waste estimation system leveraging the BIM technology. ► The system can calculate waste disposal charging fee and pick-up truck demand. ► We presented an example scenario demonstrating this system. ► Automatic, time-saving and wide applicability are the features of the system. - Abstract: Due to the rising worldwide awareness of green environment, both government and contractors have to consider effective construction and demolition (C and D) waste management practices. The last two decades have witnessed the growing importance of demolition and renovation (D and R) works and the growing amount of D and R waste disposed to landfills every day, especially in developed cities like Hong Kong. Quantitative waste prediction is crucial for waste management. It can enable contractors to pinpoint critical waste generation processes and to plan waste control strategies. In addition, waste estimation could also facilitate some government waste management policies, such as the waste disposal charging scheme in Hong Kong. Currently, tools that can accurately and conveniently estimate the amount of waste from construction, renovation, and demolition projects are lacking. In the light of this research gap, this paper presents a building information modeling (BIM) based system that we have developed for estimation and planning of D and R waste. BIM allows multi-disciplinary information to be superimposed within one digital building model. Our system can extract material and volume information through the BIM model and integrate the information for detailed waste estimation and planning. Waste recycling and reuse are also considered in our system. Extracted material information can be provided to recyclers before demolition or renovation to make recycling stage more cooperative and more efficient. Pick-up truck requirements and waste disposal charging fee for different waste facilities will also be predicted through our system. The results

  16. A BIM-based system for demolition and renovation waste estimation and planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jack C.P., E-mail: cejcheng@ust.hk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong); Ma, Lauren Y.H., E-mail: yingzi@ust.hk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► We developed a waste estimation system leveraging the BIM technology. ► The system can calculate waste disposal charging fee and pick-up truck demand. ► We presented an example scenario demonstrating this system. ► Automatic, time-saving and wide applicability are the features of the system. - Abstract: Due to the rising worldwide awareness of green environment, both government and contractors have to consider effective construction and demolition (C and D) waste management practices. The last two decades have witnessed the growing importance of demolition and renovation (D and R) works and the growing amount of D and R waste disposed to landfills every day, especially in developed cities like Hong Kong. Quantitative waste prediction is crucial for waste management. It can enable contractors to pinpoint critical waste generation processes and to plan waste control strategies. In addition, waste estimation could also facilitate some government waste management policies, such as the waste disposal charging scheme in Hong Kong. Currently, tools that can accurately and conveniently estimate the amount of waste from construction, renovation, and demolition projects are lacking. In the light of this research gap, this paper presents a building information modeling (BIM) based system that we have developed for estimation and planning of D and R waste. BIM allows multi-disciplinary information to be superimposed within one digital building model. Our system can extract material and volume information through the BIM model and integrate the information for detailed waste estimation and planning. Waste recycling and reuse are also considered in our system. Extracted material information can be provided to recyclers before demolition or renovation to make recycling stage more cooperative and more efficient. Pick-up truck requirements and waste disposal charging fee for different waste facilities will also be predicted through our system. The results

  17. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  18. A BIM-based system for demolition and renovation waste estimation and planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jack C P; Ma, Lauren Y H

    2013-06-01

    Due to the rising worldwide awareness of green environment, both government and contractors have to consider effective construction and demolition (C&D) waste management practices. The last two decades have witnessed the growing importance of demolition and renovation (D&R) works and the growing amount of D&R waste disposed to landfills every day, especially in developed cities like Hong Kong. Quantitative waste prediction is crucial for waste management. It can enable contractors to pinpoint critical waste generation processes and to plan waste control strategies. In addition, waste estimation could also facilitate some government waste management policies, such as the waste disposal charging scheme in Hong Kong. Currently, tools that can accurately and conveniently estimate the amount of waste from construction, renovation, and demolition projects are lacking. In the light of this research gap, this paper presents a building information modeling (BIM) based system that we have developed for estimation and planning of D&R waste. BIM allows multi-disciplinary information to be superimposed within one digital building model. Our system can extract material and volume information through the BIM model and integrate the information for detailed waste estimation and planning. Waste recycling and reuse are also considered in our system. Extracted material information can be provided to recyclers before demolition or renovation to make recycling stage more cooperative and more efficient. Pick-up truck requirements and waste disposal charging fee for different waste facilities will also be predicted through our system. The results could provide alerts to contractors ahead of time at project planning stage. This paper also presents an example scenario with a 47-floor residential building in Hong Kong to demonstrate our D&R waste estimation and planning system. As the BIM technology has been increasingly adopted in the architectural, engineering and construction industry

  19. The FRJ-1 (MERLIN) research reactor: its main activity inventory has been removed by successful demolition of the reactor block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahn, B.; Printz, R.; Matela, K.; Zehbe, C.; Poeppinghaus, J.; Cremer, J.

    2004-01-01

    The FRJ-1 (MERLIN) research reactor was decommissioned in 1985 after twenty-three years of operation. Demolition of the plant was begun in 1996. The article contains a survey of the demolition steps carried out so far within the framework of three partial permits. The main activity is the demolition of the reactor core structures as a precondition for subsequent measures to ensure clearance measurements of the building. The core structures are demolished which were exposed to high neutron fluxes during reactor operation and now show the highest activity and dose rate levels, except for the core internals. For demolition and disassembly of the metal structures in this part of the plant, the tools specially designed and made include a remotely operated sawing system and a pipe cutting system for internal segmentation of the beam lines. The universal demolition tool for use also above and beyond the concrete structures has been found to be a remotely controlled electrohydraulic demolition shovel. Spreading contamination in the course of the demolition work was avoided. One major reason for this success was the fact that no major airborne contamination existed at any time as a consequence of the quality of the material demolished and also of the consistent use of technical tools. While the reactor block was being demolished, an application for clearance measurement of the reactor hall and subsequent release from the scope of the Atomic Energy Act was filed as early as in mid-2003. The fourth partial permit covering these activities is expected to be issued in the spring of 2004. (orig.)

  20. Does demolition or refurbishment of old and inefficient homes help to increase our environmental, social and economic viability?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The issue of whether to demolish or refurbish older housing has been debated for over a century. It has been an active policy area since the late 1880s, when the Government first authorised the statutory demolition of insanitary slums. In the 1960s, revulsion at the scale of 'demolition blight' and new building caused a rethink, leading to a major reinvestment in inner city neighbourhoods of older housing. In the past 5 years, debate on demolition and new building has been intensified by the Government's Sustainable Communities Plan of 2003, with its proposals for large-scale clearance and building. Environmental arguments about renovating the existing stock have gained increasing prominence as people have sought to defend their communities from demolition. The evidence on whether demolition would reduce the amount of greenhouse gases we emit into the atmosphere is unclear and disputed. This paper summarises the evidence and arguments, and attempts to clarify the most realistic, achievable route to major reductions in energy use in homes

  1. The End of the Line, Preparing the Main Plant Process Building for Demolition at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowell, L.E.; Kurasch, D.H.; Hackett, M.; Gorsuch, G.; Sullivan, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Act of 1980 authorized the Department of Energy to conduct a high-level radioactive waste management demonstration project at the site of the former Spent Fuel Reprocessing Plant in West Valley, New York to demonstrate solidification techniques to prepare high-level liquid waste for disposal. The reprocessing facility at this site was the only commercial NRC-licensed spent fuel reprocessing plant to have operated in the United States. The spent fuel reprocessing operations ended in 1972 and DoE's cleanup operations have been underway since 1982. High-level waste solidification was safely concluded in 2002 and follow-on activities at the site have been concentrated on facility decontamination and waste management and off-site disposal. Among the features that remain at the WVDP site is the highly-contaminated Main Plant Process Building (MPPB). The five-story reinforced concrete structure, which was formerly used to reprocess irradiated nuclear fuel, contains residual levels of contamination in some areas that prohibit safe human entry. DoE's long-range plans for the site include demolition of the MPPB. Current site contractor, West Valley Environmental Services LLC (WVES), while actively working to dismantle equipment and decontaminate areas inside the MPPB, has developed a conceptual two-phase plan for demolishing the structure that provides a cost-effective, lower-dose alternative to conventional demolition techniques. This paper discusses the current condition of the MPPB and the demolition-ready preparations conducted in the facility thus far. This paper also introduces the concept of a two-part surgical demolition plan that has been proposed and is being evaluated as a safe method of demolishing the structure. The practical applications that support feasibility for the demolition approach are being demonstrated through current work applications in the MPPB. The Inside-Out Demolition proposal for the MPPB is a safe

  2. Does demolition or refurbishment of old and inefficient homes help to increase our environmental, social and economic viability?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Anne [London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE (United Kingdom); Sustainable Development Commission, Room 101, 55 Whitehall, c/o 3-8 Whitehall Place, London SW1A 2HH (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    The issue of whether to demolish or refurbish older housing has been debated for over a century. It has been an active policy area since the late 1880s, when the Government first authorised the statutory demolition of insanitary slums. In the 1960s, revulsion at the scale of 'demolition blight' and new building caused a rethink, leading to a major reinvestment in inner city neighbourhoods of older housing. In the past 5 years, debate on demolition and new building has been intensified by the Government's Sustainable Communities Plan of 2003, with its proposals for large-scale clearance and building. Environmental arguments about renovating the existing stock have gained increasing prominence as people have sought to defend their communities from demolition. The evidence on whether demolition would reduce the amount of greenhouse gases we emit into the atmosphere is unclear and disputed. This paper summarises the evidence and arguments, and attempts to clarify the most realistic, achievable route to major reductions in energy use in homes. The arguments that apply to housing also apply to most other buildings and therefore to the overall built environment, which accounts for half of all carbon emissions. Three main sources of evidence have helped in the development of this paper, but there are many other studies we draw on in the discussion.

  3. Increasing the Safety in Recycling of Construction and Demolition Waste by Using Supervised Machine Learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuritcyn, P; Anding, K; Linß, E; Latyev, S M

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of the optical identification of recycled aggregates of construction and demolition waste (CDW) using methods of image processing, spectral analysis and machine learning. The classification performances in colour images shown, that we have to use other added spectral information to solve the recognition task in a satisfactory manner. In addition to investigations on a large colour image dataset first investigations in visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) spectrum were done for analysing significant characteristics in spectrum, which are useful for classification the C and D aggregates

  4. Recycling of construction and demolition waste: case study in the Port of Antwerp

    OpenAIRE

    Bergmans, Jef; Broos, Kris; Nielsen, Peter; Dierckx, Philippe; Brijsse, Yvan; Jacobs, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste (C&DW) represents one of the EU’s largest waste streams. According to the Directive 2008/98/EC on waste, at least 70 percent (by weight) of non-hazardous C&DW must be recuperated by 2020. Eurostat estimates an annual C&DW generation of 970 Mton in EU-27, representing an average value of almost 2.0 ton per inhabitant, with an average recovery rate of 47%. A case study in the Port of Antwerp (PoA) demonstrated new high grade recycling options for purified mater...

  5. Decontaminating agents and decontamination processes for nuclear industry and for plant demolition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination of surfaces of materials in nuclear facilities or in nuclear power plants under demolition can be carried out successfully if surface treatment is performed by dipping or in an ultrasonic bath by alternating between alkaline and acid baths with intermediate rinsing in demineralized water. Decontaminating aluminium surfaces sensitive to corrosion requires further treatment in an ultrasonic bath, after the first 2 ultrasonic baths, with a weak alkaline decontaminating agent. This applies alike to components to be decontaminated for re-use and parts of materials to be disposed of. The decontamination action depends on the surfaces either being free from corrosion or else showing pronounced corrosion. (orig.)

  6. An integrated life cycle inventory for demolition processes in the context of life cycle sustainability assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhilova-Kisheva, Kossara Petrova; Hu, Mingming; van Roekel, Eric

    2012-01-01

    According to the Life Cycle Assessment in Building and Construction: State-of-the-Art Report (2003), the dismantling and demolition stage of the building life cycle is only sometimes included in the Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) when doing Life Cycle Assessments (LCA). The reason that it is less...... inventoried in a traditional LCA maybe because this stage is expected to have a negligible environmental impact comparing to other stages in the life cycle of the buildings. When doing a life cycle sustainability assessment considering not only environmental but also economic and social impacts, the impacts...

  7. Chemical sulphate removal for treatment of construction and demolition debris leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-08-01

    Construction and demolition debris (CDD) is a product of construction, renovation or demolition activities. It has a high gypsum content (52.4% of total gypsum), concentrated in the CDD sand (CDDS) fraction. To comply with the posed limit of the maximum amount of sulphate present in building sand, excess sulphate needs to be removed. In order to enable reuse of CDDS, a novel treatment process is developed based on washing of the CDDS to remove most of the gypsum, and subsequent sulphate removal from the sulphate-rich CDDS leachate. This study aims to assess chemical techniques, i.e. precipitation and adsorption, for sulphate removal from the CDDS leachate. Good sulphate removal efficiencies (up to 99.9%) from the CDDS leachate can be achieved by precipitation with barium chloride (BaCl2) and lead(II) nitrate (Pb(NO3)2). Precipitation with calcium chloride (CaCl2), calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and calcium oxide (CaO) gave less efficient sulphate removal. Adsorption of sulphate to aluminium oxide (Al2O3) yielded a 50% sulphate removal efficiency, whereas iron oxide-coated sand as adsorbent gave only poor (10%) sulphate removal efficiencies.

  8. Stripping in hot mix asphalt produced by aggregates from construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, I; Pasandín, A R; Gallego, J

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the effect of water on the durability of hot asphalt mixtures made with recycled aggregates from construction and demolition debris. Indirect tensile stress tests were carried out to evaluate stripping behaviour. The mixtures tested were fabricated with 0, 20, 40 and 60% recycled aggregates. Two types of natural aggregates were used: schist and calcite dolomite. An increase in the percentage of recycled aggregates was found to produce a decrease in the tensile stress ratio of the hot asphalt mixtures. To study this phenomenon, two and three factor analyses of variance (ANOVA) were performed with indirect tensile stress being used as the dependent variable. The factors studied were the percentage of recycled aggregates (0, 20, 40 and 60%), the moisture state (dry, wet) and the type of natural aggregate (schist, calcite). On the basis of the ANOVA results, it was found that the most important factor affecting resistance was the moisture state (dry, wet) of the specimens. The percentage of recycled aggregate also affected indirect tensile stress, especially in the dry state. The type of natural aggregate did not have a significant effect on indirect tensile stress. The hot asphalt mixture specimens made with different percentages of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition debris and of natural quarry aggregates showed poor stripping behaviour. This stripping behaviour can be related to both the poor adhesion of the recycled aggregates and the high absorption of the mortar of cement adhered to them.

  9. Heavy metals in recovered fines from construction and demolition debris recycling facilities in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Timothy; Tolaymat, Thabet; Leo, Kevin; Jambeck, Jenna

    2004-10-01

    A major product recovered from the processing and recycling of construction and demolition (C&D) debris is screened soil, also referred to as fines. A proposed reuse option for C&D debris fines is fill material, typically in construction projects as a substitute for natural soil. Waste material that is reused in a manner similar to soil must first be characterized to examine potential risks to human health and the environment. In Florida, samples of C&D debris fines from 13 C&D debris recycling facilities were characterized for 11 total and leachable heavy metal concentrations. Total metal concentration results (mg/kg) were compared to existing data on background Florida soil concentrations and to Florida's risk-based soil cleanup target levels (SCTLs). All of the detected metals were found to be elevated with respect to background. The 95% upper confidence level of arsenic from 99 samples was 3.2 mg/kg; arsenic presented the greatest limitation to reuse when compared to the SCTLs. Lead was not found to pose a major problem, likely because of the relatively new building infrastructure in Florida, which results in less demolition debris and less material impacted by lead-based paint. The results of batch leaching tests conducted using simulated rainwater (mg/l) were compared directly to risk-based groundwater levels for Florida and were found not to pose a risk using existing risk assessment policies.

  10. Estimating construction and demolition debris generation using a materials flow analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, K M; Townsend, T G

    2010-11-01

    The magnitude and composition of a region's construction and demolition (C&D) debris should be understood when developing rules, policies and strategies for managing this segment of the solid waste stream. In the US, several national estimates have been conducted using a weight-per-construction-area approximation; national estimates using alternative procedures such as those used for other segments of the solid waste stream have not been reported for C&D debris. This paper presents an evaluation of a materials flow analysis (MFA) approach for estimating C&D debris generation and composition for a large region (the US). The consumption of construction materials in the US and typical waste factors used for construction materials purchasing were used to estimate the mass of solid waste generated as a result of construction activities. Debris from demolition activities was predicted from various historical construction materials consumption data and estimates of average service lives of the materials. The MFA approach estimated that approximately 610-78 × 10(6)Mg of C&D debris was generated in 2002. This predicted mass exceeds previous estimates using other C&D debris predictive methodologies and reflects the large waste stream that exists. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recycled construction and demolition concrete waste as aggregate for structural concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Wagih

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In major Egyptian cities there is a surge in construction and demolition waste (CDW quantities causing an adverse effect on the environment. The use of such waste as recycled aggregate in concrete can be useful for both environmental and economical aspects in the construction industry. This study discusses the possibility to replace natural coarse aggregate (NA with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA in structural concrete. An investigation into the properties of RCA is made using crushing and grading of concrete rubble collected from different demolition sites and landfill locations around Cairo. Aggregates used in the study were: natural sand, dolomite and crushed concretes obtained from different sources. A total of 50 concrete mixes forming eight groups were cast. Groups were designed to study the effect of recycled coarse aggregates quality/content, cement dosage, use of superplasticizer and silica fume. Tests were carried out for: compressive strength, splitting strength and elastic modulus. The results showed that the concrete rubble could be transformed into useful recycled aggregate and used in concrete production with properties suitable for most structural concrete applications in Egypt. A significant reduction in the properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC made of 100% RCA was seen when compared to natural aggregate concrete (NAC, while the properties of RAC made of a blend of 75% NA and 25% RCA showed no significant change in concrete properties.

  12. Geopolymerisation of silt generated from construction and demolition waste washing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampris, C; Lupo, R; Cheeseman, C R

    2009-01-01

    Recycling plants that size, sort and wash construction and demolition waste can produce high quality aggregate. However, they also produce up to 80ton per hour of filter cake waste containing fine (waste and normally landfilled. This research investigated the potential to form geopolymers containing silt, which would allow this problematic waste to be beneficially reused as aggregate. This would significantly improve the economic viability of recycling plants that wash wastes. Silt filter cakes have been collected from a number of aggregate washing plants operating in the UK. These were found to contain similar aluminosilicate crystalline phases. Geopolymer samples were produced using silt and silt mixed with either metakaolin or pulverised fuel ash (PFA). Silt geopolymers cured at room temperature had average 7-day compressive strengths of 18.7MPa, while partial substitution of silt by metakaolin or PFA increased average compressive strengths to 30.5 and 21.9MPa, respectively. Curing specimens for 24h at 105 degrees C resulted in a compressive strength of 39.7MPa and microstructural analysis confirmed the formation of dense materials. These strengths are in excess of those required for materials to be used as aggregate, particularly in unbound applications. The implications of this research for the management of waste silt at construction and demolition waste washing plants are discussed.

  13. Composition and leaching of construction and demolition waste: inorganic elements and organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas H; Astrup, Thomas F

    2014-07-15

    Thirty-three samples of construction and demolition waste collected at 11 recycling facilities in Denmark were characterised in terms of total content and leaching of inorganic elements and presence of the persistent organic pollutants PCBs and PAHs. Samples included (i) "clean" (i.e. unmixed) concrete waste, (ii) mixed masonry and concrete, (iii) asphalt and (iv) freshly cast concrete cores; both old and newly generated construction and demolition waste was included. PCBs and PAHs were detected in all samples, generally in non-critical concentrations. Overall, PAHs were comparable to background levels in urban environments. "Old" and "new" concrete samples indicated different PCB congener profiles and the presence of PCB even in new concrete suggested that background levels in raw materials may be an issue. Significant variability in total content of trace elements, even more pronounced for leaching, was observed indicating that the number of analysed samples may be critical in relation to decisions regarding management and utilisation of the materials. Higher leaching of chromium, sulphate and chloride were observed for masonry-containing and partly carbonated samples, indicating that source segregation and management practices may be important. Generally, leaching was in compliance with available leaching limits, except for selenium, and in some cases chromium, sulphate and antimony. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Construction and demolition waste as a source of PVC for recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestes, Sabrina Moretto Darbello; Mancini, Sandro Donnini; Rodolfo, Antonio; Keiroglo, Raquel Carramillo

    2012-02-01

    Construction and demolition waste can contain considerable amounts of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). This paper describes a study of the recycling of PVC pipes collected from such waste materials. In a sorting facility for the specific disposal of construction and demolition waste, PVC was found to represent one-third of the plastics separated by workers. Pipes were sorted carefully to preclude any possible contamination by poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) found in the waste. The material was ground into two distinct particle sizes (final mesh of 12.7 and 8 mm), washed, dried and recycled. The average formulation of the pipes was determined based on ash content tests and used in the fabrication of a similar compound made mainly of virgin PVC. Samples of recycled pipes and of compound based on virgin material were subjected to tensile and impact tests and provided very similar results. These results are a good indication of the application potential of the recycled material and of the fact that longer grinding to obtain finer particles is not necessarily beneficial.

  15. Thermal resistance and conductivity of recycled construction and demolition waste (RCDW concrete blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Julio Apolonio Callejas

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, studies to reuse construction and demolition waste are a special issue because a large amount of this material has been delivered to the public landfills and in illegal places. Some researchers have suggested reusing this material in building elements, such as bricks or blocks. It is possible to find a lot of researches in physical/mechanical characterization, while little effort has been made to characterize recycled construction and demolition waste blocks (RCDW for their thermal properties. The aim of this work was to characterize the RCDW thermal resistance and conductivity in order to provide subsidies for a building's thermal performance analysis. The hot-box method was adapted, together with measuring techniques with a heat-flow meter to determine the RCDW thermal properties. The results indicated that the RCDW block overall thermal resistance and thermal conductivity in the solid region was within the intervals of 0.33≤RT≤0.41m2KW-1 and 0.60≤l≤0.78Wm-1K-1, respectively. The lower resistance and conductivity values are justified by the presence of aggregate with a lower density and lower thermal conductivity than the natural aggregate.

  16. Recycling of rubble from building demolition for low-shrinkage concretes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, Valeria; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2010-04-01

    In this project concrete mixtures were prepared that were characterized by low ductility due to desiccation by using debris from building demolition, which after a suitable treatment was used as aggregate for partial replacement of natural aggregates. The recycled aggregate used came from a recycling plant, in which rubble from building demolition was selected, crushed, cleaned, sieved, and graded. Such aggregates are known to be more porous as indicated by the Saturated Surface Dry (SSD) moisture content. The recycled concrete used as aggregates were added to the concrete mixture in order to study their influence on the fresh and hardened concrete properties. They were added either after water pre-soaking or in dry condition, in order to evaluate the influence of moisture in aggregates on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregate. In particular, the effect of internal curing, due to the use of such aggregates, was studied. Concrete behavior due to desiccation under dehydration was studied by means of both drying shrinkage test and German angle test, through which shrinkage under the restrained condition of early age concrete can be evaluated. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of leaching tests to determine and quantify the release of inorganic contaminants in demolition waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delay, Markus; Lager, Tanja; Schulz, Horst D.; Frimmel, Fritz H.

    2007-01-01

    The changes in waste management policy caused by the massive generation of waste materials (e.g. construction and demolition waste material, municipal waste incineration products) has led to an increase in the reuse and recycling of waste materials. For environmental risk assessment, test procedures are necessary to examine waste materials before they can be reused. In this article, results of column and lysimeter leaching tests having been applied to inorganic compounds in a reference demolition waste material are presented. The results show a good agreement between the leaching behaviour determined with the lysimeter unit and the column units used in the laboratory. In view of less time and system requirements compared to lysimeter systems, laboratory column units can be considered as a practicable instrument to assess the time-dependent release of inorganic compounds under conditions similar to those encountered in a natural environment. The high concentrations of elements in the seepage water at the initial stage of elution are reflected by the laboratory column leaching tests. In particular, authorities or laboratories might benefit and have an easy-to-use, but nevertheless reliable, method to serve as a basis for decision-making

  18. Heavy metals in recovered fines from construction and demolition debris recycling facilities in Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, Timothy; Tolaymat, Thabet; Leo, Kevin; Jambeck, Jenna

    2004-01-01

    A major product recovered from the processing and recycling of construction and demolition (C and D) debris is screened soil, also referred to as fines. A proposed reuse option for C and D debris fines is fill material, typically in construction projects as a substitute for natural soil. Waste material that is reused in a manner similar to soil must first be characterized to examine potential risks to human health and the environment. In Florida, samples of C and D debris fines from 13 C and D debris recycling facilities were characterized for 11 total and leachable heavy metal concentrations. Total metal concentration results (mg/kg) were compared to existing data on background Florida soil concentrations and to Florida's risk-based soil cleanup target levels (SCTLs). All of the detected metals were found to be elevated with respect to background. The 95% upper confidence level of arsenic from 99 samples was 3.2 mg/kg; arsenic presented the greatest limitation to reuse when compared to the SCTLs. Lead was not found to pose a major problem, likely because of the relatively new building infrastructure in Florida, which results in less demolition debris and less material impacted by lead-based paint. The results of batch leaching tests conducted using simulated rainwater (mg/l) were compared directly to risk-based groundwater levels for Florida and were found not to pose a risk using existing risk assessment policies

  19. Construction and demolition waste: Comparison of standard up-flow column and down-flow lysimeter leaching tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Hyks, Jiri; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2015-01-01

    Five samples of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) were investigated in order to quantify leaching of inorganic elements under percolation conditions according to two different experimental setups: standardised up-flow saturated columns (-1TS) for Al, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, DOC, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb...

  20. Methodology to Estimate the Quantity, Composition, and Management of Construction and Demolition Debris in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report, Methodology to Estimate the Quantity, Composition and Management of Construction and Demolition Debris in the US, was developed to expand access to data on CDD in the US and to support research on CDD and sustainable materials management. Since past US EPA CDD estima...

  1. Demolition Range Noise Abatement Technique Demonstration and Evaluation for the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CALDERONE, JAMES J.; GARBIN H, DOUGLAS

    2001-01-01

    Public concern regarding the effects of noise generated by the detonation of excess and obsolete explosive munitions at U.S. Army demolition ranges is a continuing issue for the Army's demilitarization and disposal groups. Recent concerns of citizens living near the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant (MCAAP) in Oklahoma have lead the U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) to conduct a demonstration and evaluation of noise abatement techniques that could be applied to the MCAAP demolition range. With the support of the DAC, MCAAP, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), three types of noise abatement techniques were applied: aqueous foams, overburden (using combinations of sand beds and dirt coverings), and rubber or steel blast mats. Eight test configurations were studied and twenty-four experiments were conducted on the MCAAP demolition range in July of 2000. Instrumentation and data acquisition systems were fielded for the collection of near-field blast pressures, far-field acoustic pressures, plant boundary seismic signals, and demolition range meteorological conditions. The resulting data has been analyzed and reported, and a ranking of each technique's effects has been provided to the DAC

  2. Data Gap Analysis and Damage Case Studies: Risk Analyses from Construction and Demolition Debris Landfills and Recycling Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report presents an evaluation of construction and demolition (C&D) debris management in the US to update and expand upon the previous set of data to include information on more recent cases of damage and potential impacts and expand the breadth of damages beyond groundwater a...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.170 - What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... consideration should be given to designating items having possible historical or artistic value as personal... related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition? 102-75.170 Section 102-75.170 Public... As Personal Property § 102-75.170 What happens to the related personal property in a structure...

  4. Trends in demolition planning and in the cutting techniques employed; Trends bei der Rueckbauplanung und den verwendeten Schneidverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueggemann, Pascal [NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The past couple of years have seen the continuous further development of cutting techniques employed in demolishing nuclear facilities. This trend is continuing. After mostly mechanical cutting techniques had been used initially, there has been a tendency in the past few years to make increasing use of thermal cutting. Reasons for this preference are the reduced space requirement and the advantages this technique offers in remote handling because of the low weight and the small dimensions of the cutting heads, and the high flexibility in materials to be cut. This results in greater planning reliability in calculating quotations and performing the demolition work. The emissions generated by these techniques are manageable reliably at low additional expense for the required extraction and filter systems. Thermal cutting is likely to achieve wide use in dismantling and demolition of nuclear plant components also in the future. Advanced developments in computer hardware and software allow more and more detailed planning of demolition work. While, in the past, CAD had been applied only to generate two-dimensional drawings, current 3D applications allow animated representations of entire demolition scenes with high accuracy in detail. In this way, potential problems associated with handling large components or using manipulators for cutting can be detected and solved much more easily in the preparatory phase. Although current CAD use can be no substitute for mockup tests, it does help to enhance clearly reliability in planning prior to running mockup tests. (orig.)

  5. Downcycling versus recycling of construction and demolition waste: Combining LCA and LCC to support sustainable policy making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Andrea; Eyckmans, Johan; Van Acker, Karel

    2018-05-01

    Urgent solutions are needed in Europe to deal with construction and demolition waste (CDW). EU policy has contributed to significantly reducing the amount of CDW going to landfill, but most of the effort has been put in downcycling practices. Therefore, further policies are needed to stimulate high-quality recycling of CDW. The present paper presents a combined life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC) methodologies to analyse the environmental and the economic drivers in four alternative CDW end-of-life scenarios in the region of Flanders, in Belgium. The four analysed alternatives are (i) landfilling, (ii) downcycling, (iii) advanced recycling and (iv) recycling after selective demolition. LCA results show that landiflling is the scenario having the highest environmental impacts in terms of person equivalent (PE), followed by downcycling and recycling (-36%) and recycling after selective demolition (-59%). The decrease in environmental impacts is mostly due to the avoided landfilling of CDW and the recovery of materials from selective demolition. LCC results indicate that landfilling is the scenario bearing the highest total economic costs. This is due to the high landfill tax in Flanders. The recycling after selective demolition bears the second highest cost. The increase of high-quality CDW recycling can significantly reduce the overall environmental impact of the system. Implementing a high landfill tax, increasing the gate fee to the recycling plant, and boosting the sales price of recycled aggregates are the most effective drivers to facilitate a transition towards a more sustainable CDW management system. The paper demonstrates that the combined LCA and LCC results can highlight the environmental and economic drivers in CDW management. The results of the combined analysis can help policymakers to promote the aspects contributing to sustainability and to limit the ones creating a barrier. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Demolition of the FRJ-1 research reactor (MERLIN); Abbau des Reaktorblocks des Forschungsreaktors FRJ-1 (MERLIN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Zehbe, C. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Poeppinghaus, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearservice, Essen (Germany); Cremer, J. [SNT Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    FRJ-2 (MERLIN), the swimming pool reactor cooled and moderated by light water, was built at the then Juelich Nuclear Research Establishment (KFA) between 1958 and 1962. In the period between 1964 and 1985, it was used for. The reactor was decommissioned in 1985. Since 1996, most of the demolition work has been carried out under the leadership of a project team. The complete secondary cooling system was removed by late 1998. After the cooling loops and experimental installations had been taken out, the reactor vessel internals were removed in 2000 after the water had been drained from the reactor vessel. After the competent authority had granted a license, demolition of the reactor block, the central part of the research reactor, was begun in October 2001. In a first step, the reactor operating floor and the reactor attachment structures were removed by the GNS/SNT consortium charged with overall planning and execution of the job. This phase gave rise to approx. The reactor block proper is dismantled in a number of steps. A variety of proven cutting techniques are used for this purpose. Demolition of the reactor block is to be completed in the first half of 2003. (orig.) [German] Der mit Leichtwasser gekuehlte und moderierte Schwimmbad-Forschungsreaktor FRJ-2 (MERLIN) wurde von 1958 bis 1962 fuer die damalige Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (KFA) errichtet. Von 1964 bis 1985 wurde er fuer Experimente mit zunaechst 5 MW und spaeter 10 MW thermischer Leistung bei einem maximalen thermischen Neutronenfluss von 1,1.10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s genutzt. Im Jahr 1985 stellte der Reaktor seinen Betrieb ein. Die Brennelemente wurden aus der Anlage entfernt und in die USA und nach Grossbritannien verbracht. Seit 1996 erfolgen die wesentlichen Abbautaetigkeiten unter Leitung eines verantwortlichen Projektteams. Bis Ende 1998 wurde das komplette Sekundaerkuehlsystem entfernt. Dem Abbau der Kuehlkreislaeufe und Experimentiereinrichtungen folgte im Jahr 2000 der Ausbau der

  7. Hydrogen sulfide flux measurements from construction and demolition debris (C&D) landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Sangho; Reinhart, Debra R; Cooper, C David; Townsend, Timothy G; Faour, Ayman

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been identified as a principal odorous component of gaseous emissions from construction and demolition debris (C&D) landfills. Although several studies have reported the ambient concentrations of H2S near C&D landfills, few studies have quantified emission rates of H2S. One of the most widely used techniques for measuring surface gas emission rates from landfills is the flux chamber method. Flux measurements using the flux chamber were performed at five different C&D landfills from April to August, 2003. The flux rates of H2S measured in this research were between 0.192 and 1.76 mg/(m2-d).

  8. Detuned mechanical parametric amplification as a quantum non-demolition measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Clerk, A A; Doherty, A C

    2014-01-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated that the combination of continuous position detection with detuned parametric driving can lead to significant steady-state mechanical squeezing, far beyond the 3 dB limit normally associated with parametric driving. In this work, we show the close connection between this detuned scheme and quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement of a single mechanical quadrature. In particular, we show that applying an experimentally realistic detuned parametric drive to a cavity optomechanical system allows one to effectively realize a QND measurement despite being in the bad-cavity limit. In the limit of strong squeezing, we show that this scheme offers significant advantages over standard backaction evasion, not only by allowing operation in the weak measurement and low efficiency regimes, but also in terms of the purity of the mechanical state

  9. Management of construction and demolition waste; Gestion de residuos de construccion y demolicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgeno Munoz, A.

    2004-07-01

    The building sector is not considered a great pollutant although it does generate considerable amount of waste, traditionally called inert waste, as that is what it is composed of in the main, which requires specific management and for which specific rules and regulations are currently being drawn up (generally called Construction and Demolition Waste). So, far, for the mos part, they have ended up in the dump but a trend favouring recycling is the direct result of the regulations being drawn up and resultant financial criteria. The building industry will have to change its norms of conduct, it will have to start assessing waste, reduce the volume of the same and segregate properly what it generates. The former, necessarily linked with economic factors, factors relating to delivery dates and available space, will inevitably imply a change in the building sector in Spain in the medium term. (Author)

  10. Demolition, construction and excavation wastes in Copenhagen. Los residuos de demolicion, construccion y excavacion en Copenhague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, N.J.; Lauridsen, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    Demolition Waste, Construction Waste and Excavation Waste will in a modern society represent a major part of the total amount of the industrial wastes. Implementation of the Regulation for Industrial Waste in Copenhagen has resulted insignificant changes in the transportation and processing of this type of waste was typically disposed of as mixed waste on landfill sites and open dumps. Today most of this waste is sorted at the source (see figure 1) and recycled namely as secondary raw materials. This change in the disposal of construction waste etc, is due to two main factors: implementation of the regulation of commercial wastes and a significant raise in the (governmental) waste tax on specially landfilling activities. (Author)

  11. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project approach to building dismantlement and demolition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spittler, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    When remediation began at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), there were 41 buildings on site. Twenty-nine of these buildings were ancillary structures and were not used for processing radioactive material. Most of these have been torn down. The remaining 12 buildings were used for uranium and thorium processing or were major support structures, such as the laboratory. Two of the buildings were major processing operations occurred were successfully demolished in February of this year. Demolition of all structures will be complete in September of this year. To give an understanding of the magnitude of the work, the following is a description of the physical characteristics of the green salt building. This building was used to convert brown oxide (UO3) to green salt (UF4), which is the last intermediate step in purifying the mostly yellow cake feed material into uranium metal.

  12. Microstructure of Concrete with Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Waste Recycling Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Miguel; Santos Silva, António; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luís

    2016-02-01

    This paper intends to analyze the microstructure of concrete with recycled aggregates (RA) from construction and demolition waste from various Portuguese recycling plants. To that effect, several scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were performed. Various concrete mixes were evaluated in order to analyze the influence of the RA's collection point and consequently of their composition on the mixes' characteristics. Afterward all the mixes were subjected to the capillary water absorption test in order to quantitatively evaluate their porosity. Results from the SEM/EDS analysis were compared with those from capillary water absorption test. The SEM/EDS analysis showed that the bond capacity of aggregates to the new cement paste is greatly influenced by the RA's nature. On the other hand, there was an increase in porosity with the incorporation of RA.

  13. Estimation of construction and demolition waste volume generation in new residential buildings in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villoria Sáez, Paola; del Río Merino, Mercedes; Porras-Amores, César

    2012-02-01

    The management planning of construction and demolition (C&D) waste uses a single indicator which does not provide enough detailed information. Therefore the determination and implementation of other innovative and precise indicators should be determined. The aim of this research work is to improve existing C&D waste quantification tools in the construction of new residential buildings in Spain. For this purpose, several housing projects were studied to determine an estimation of C&D waste generated during their construction process. This paper determines the values of three indicators to estimate the generation of C&D waste in new residential buildings in Spain, itemizing types of waste and construction stages. The inclusion of two more accurate indicators, in addition to the global one commonly in use, provides a significant improvement in C&D waste quantification tools and management planning.

  14. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report for the Demolition of the 116-D and 116-DR Stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J. G.

    1999-01-01

    This data quality objective (DQO) summary report has been developed to support demolition and disposal of the 116-D and 116-DR stacks in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. This project-specific summary was developed to meet the requirements in BHI-EE-01, Environmental Investigations Procedures, Procedure 1.2, ''Data Quality Objectives,'' using a simplified DQO process. The pathway for disposal of the 116-D and 116-DR stacks is the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), which requires the development of a waste profile. A combination of process knowledge, history, and existing analogous data will be used to build a waste profile to dispose of the stack and plenum debris in the ERDF. Additional sample data are not necessary for waste designation. This report also addresses the Resources, Conservation, and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal closure requirements associated with the 116-DR stack

  15. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release

  16. Composition and leaching of construction and demolition waste: Inorganic elements and organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-three samples of construction and demolition waste collected at 11 recycling facilities in Denmark were characterised in terms of total content and leaching of inorganic elements and presence of the persistent organic pollutants PCBs and PAHs. Samples included (i) "clean" (i.e. unmixed...... for leaching, was observed indicating that the number of analysed samples may be critical in relation to decisions regarding management and utilisation of the materials. Higher leaching of chromium, sulphate and chloride were observed for masonry-containing and partly carbonated samples, indicating that source...... segregation and management practices may be important. Generally, leaching was in compliance with available leaching limits, except for selenium, and in some cases chromium, sulphate and antimony. © 2014 Elsevier B.V....

  17. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project approach to building dismantlement and demolition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spittler, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    When remediation began at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), there were 41 buildings on site. Twenty-nine of these buildings were ancillary structures and were not used for processing radioactive material. Most of these have been torn down. The remaining 12 buildings were used for uranium and thorium processing or were major support structures, such as the laboratory. Two of the buildings were major processing operations occurred were successfully demolished in February of this year. Demolition of all structures will be complete in September of this year. To give an understanding of the magnitude of the work, the following is a description of the physical characteristics of the green salt building. This building was used to convert brown oxide (UO3) to green salt (UF4), which is the last intermediate step in purifying the mostly yellow cake feed material into uranium metal

  18. Evaluating the performance and intellectual structure of construction and demolition waste research during 2000-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanli; Sun, Tiantian; Yang, Lie

    2017-08-01

    Construction and demolition (C&D) waste diminishes scarce land resources and endangers human health and the surrounding environment. Quantitative and visualized analysis was conducted to evaluate worldwide scientific research output on C&D waste from 2000 to 2016. The related information of 857 publications was collected from SCI-Expanded database and statistically analyzed. The number of documents about C&D waste presented a general growth during the last 17 years. Construction and Building Materials publication ranked first in the most productive journals. China and Spain acted as dominated roles comparing to other countries, and Hong Kong Polytechnic University was the institution with the largest amount of C&D waste research. Recycled aggregates, sustainable C&D waste management, and the rewarding program and commerce system were the hottest topics during 2000-2016 and in the near future according to the intellectual structure analysis.

  19. Effect of Co-Composting Cattle Manure with Construction and Demolition Waste on the Archaeal, Bacterial, and Fungal Microbiota, and on Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B.; Hao, Xiying; Topp, Edward; Yang, Hee Eun; Alexander, Trevor W.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural operations generate large quantities of manure which must be eliminated in a manner that is consistent with public health guidelines. Meanwhile, construction and demolition waste makes up about 25% of total solid municipal waste. Co-composting of manure with construction and demolition waste offers a potential means to make manure safe for soil amendment and also divert construction and demolition waste from municipal landfills. Therefore, the archaeal, bacterial, and fungal microbiota of two different types of composted cattle manure and one co-composted with construction and demolition waste, were assessed over a 99-day composting period. The microbiota of the three compost mixtures did not differ, but significant changes over time and by sampling depth were observed. Bacillus and Halocella, however, were more relatively abundant in composted manure from cattle fed dried distillers’ grains and solubles. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were enriched at day 0 and Firmicutes at day 99. The fungal genus Kernia was the most relatively abundant overall and was enriched at day 0. The concentration of 12 antimicrobial resistance determinants in the compost mixtures was also determined, and 10 of these determinants decreased significantly from days 0 to 99. The addition of construction and demolition waste did not affect the persistence of antimicrobial resistance genes or community structure of the compost microbiota and therefore co-composting construction and demolition waste with cattle manure offers a safe, viable way to divert this waste from landfills. PMID:27300323

  20. Effect of Co-Composting Cattle Manure with Construction and Demolition Waste on the Archaeal, Bacterial, and Fungal Microbiota, and on Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; Hao, Xiying; Topp, Edward; Yang, Hee Eun; Alexander, Trevor W

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural operations generate large quantities of manure which must be eliminated in a manner that is consistent with public health guidelines. Meanwhile, construction and demolition waste makes up about 25% of total solid municipal waste. Co-composting of manure with construction and demolition waste offers a potential means to make manure safe for soil amendment and also divert construction and demolition waste from municipal landfills. Therefore, the archaeal, bacterial, and fungal microbiota of two different types of composted cattle manure and one co-composted with construction and demolition waste, were assessed over a 99-day composting period. The microbiota of the three compost mixtures did not differ, but significant changes over time and by sampling depth were observed. Bacillus and Halocella, however, were more relatively abundant in composted manure from cattle fed dried distillers' grains and solubles. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were enriched at day 0 and Firmicutes at day 99. The fungal genus Kernia was the most relatively abundant overall and was enriched at day 0. The concentration of 12 antimicrobial resistance determinants in the compost mixtures was also determined, and 10 of these determinants decreased significantly from days 0 to 99. The addition of construction and demolition waste did not affect the persistence of antimicrobial resistance genes or community structure of the compost microbiota and therefore co-composting construction and demolition waste with cattle manure offers a safe, viable way to divert this waste from landfills.

  1. Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2003-01-01

    The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse

  2. Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques Applied During Structural Demolition. Topical Report August1, 1995 - October 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Williams, P.T.; Dua, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure properly and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated from a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology given site-specific conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was carried out at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University, was to conduct an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study targeted the problem of dust suppression during the demolition of nuclear facilities. The resulting data were employed to assist in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to predict dust generation during structural demolition

  3. Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2003-07-01

    The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse.

  4. Silica dust control in small-scale building/structure demolition operations using good work practice guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muianga, C V; Rice, C H; Succop, P

    2009-01-01

    Work practices can influence exposure, especially in small-scale operations conducted by mobile work crews. This study evaluated the use of information on good work practice in control guidance sheets adapted from UK Silica Essentials guidance sheets by trained workers and supervisors employed in small-scale concrete and masonry demolition operations. A one-page employee silica task-based control guidance sheet for each of four demolition tasks and multiple-page silica control guidance for supervisors were developed. Interactive, hands-on worker training on these task-based good work practice controls was developed. Training was presented to 26 participants from two demolition crews. Feedback on the training and task-based good work practice control guidance sheets was elicited. Observations of work practices were made before and after training. Participants indicated gains in knowledge and checklists were used to document skill attainment. The quality of the training and usefulness of the material/skills was rated high by trainees. Increased use of water to suppress dust and wet cleaning methods on the job were documented following the training. Additional follow-up after training is required to determine long-term impact on sustained changes in work practices, and to evaluate the need for refresher training.

  5. Silica dust control in small-scale building/structure demolition operations using good work practice guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muianga, C. V.; Rice, C. H.; Succop, P.

    2009-02-01

    Work practices can influence exposure, especially in small-scale operations conducted by mobile work crews. This study evaluated the use of information on good work practice in control guidance sheets adapted from UK Silica Essentials guidance sheets by trained workers and supervisors employed in small-scale concrete and masonry demolition operations. A one-page employee silica task-based control guidance sheet for each of four demolition tasks and multiple-page silica control guidance for supervisors were developed. Interactive, hands-on worker training on these task-based good work practice controls was developed. Training was presented to 26 participants from two demolition crews. Feedback on the training and task-based good work practice control guidance sheets was elicited. Observations of work practices were made before and after training. Participants indicated gains in knowledge and checklists were used to document skill attainment. The quality of the training and usefulness of the material/skills was rated high by trainees. Increased use of water to suppress dust and wet cleaning methods on the job were documented following the training. Additional follow-up after training is required to determine long-term impact on sustained changes in work practices, and to evaluate the need for refresher training.

  6. Investigating the determinants of contractor's construction and demolition waste management behavior in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zezhou; Yu, Ann T W; Shen, Liyin

    2017-02-01

    The abundant generation of construction and demolition (C&D) waste presents a significant challenge to the sustainable development of the construction industry in Mainland China. As the implementer of construction activities, the contractor's C&D waste management performance plays an important role in C&D waste minimization. This paper aims to investigate the determinants of the contractor's C&D waste management behavior in Mainland China. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was selected as the basis of the theoretical model. In addition, three contextual constructs (i.e., economic viability, governmental supervision, and project constraints) were introduced, formulating the initial model. Based on the initial model, eight constructs were identified and seven hypotheses were proposed. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data and a Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) analysis was employed to test the proposed hypotheses. Results showed that the C&D waste management intention is not a significant determinant of contractor's C&D waste management behavior. The most important determinant is economic viability, followed by governmental supervision as the second most important determinant. Nevertheless, the construct of project constraints is an insignificant determinant for contractor's adoption of C&D waste management behavior. The research findings imply that, in Mainland China, the government, at this stage, plays an important role in guiding and promoting the contractor to exhibit better C&D waste management behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A bi-level environmental impact assessment framework for comparing construction and demolition waste management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanbakhsh, Ardavan

    2018-04-27

    Several pioneering life cycle assessment (LCA) studies have been conducted in the past to assess the environmental impact of specific methods for managing mineral construction and demolition waste (MCDW), such as recycling the waste for use in concrete. Those studies focus on comparing the use of recycled MCDW and that of virgin components to produce materials or systems that serve specified functions. Often, the approaches adopted by the studies do not account for the potential environmental consequence of avoiding the existing or alternative waste management practices. The present work focuses on how product systems need to be defined in recycling LCA studies and what processes need to be within the system boundaries. A bi-level LCA framework is presented for modelling alternative waste management approaches in which the impacts are measured and compared at two scales of strategy and decision-making. Different functional units are defined for each level, all of which correspond to the same flow of MCDW in a cascade of product systems. For the sole purpose of demonstrating how the framework is implemented an illustrative example is presented, based on real data and a number of simplifying assumptions, which compares the impacts of a number of potential MCDW management strategies in New York City. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biological sulfate removal from construction and demolition debris leachate: effect of bioreactor configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Do, Anh Tien; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Yeh, Daniel H; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-03-30

    Due to the contamination of construction and demolition debris (CDD) by gypsum drywall, especially, its sand fraction (CDD sand, CDDS), the sulfate content in CDDS exceeds the posed limit of the maximum amount of sulfate present in building sand (1.73 g sulfate per kg of sand for the Netherlands). Therefore, the CDDS cannot be reused for construction. The CDDS has to be washed in order to remove most of the impurities and to obtain the right sulfate content, thus generating a leachate, containing high sulfate and calcium concentrations. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate reduction system for CDDS leachate treatment and compared three different reactor configurations for the sulfate reduction step: the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, inverse fluidized bed (IFB) reactor and gas lift anaerobic membrane bioreactor (GL-AnMBR). This investigation demonstrated that all three systems can be applied for the treatment of CDDS leachate. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 75-85% was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15.5h. A high calcium concentration up to 1,000 mg L(-1) did not give any adverse effect on the sulfate removal efficiency of the IFB and GL-AnMBR systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mobilization of iron and arsenic from soil by construction and demolition debris landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Sikora, Saraya; Kim, Hwidong; Dubey, Brajesh; Townsend, Timothy

    2012-05-01

    Column experiments were performed to examine (a) the potential for leachate from construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills to mobilize naturally-occurring iron and arsenic from soils underlying such facilities and (b) the ability of crushed limestone to remove these aqueous phase pollutants. In duplicate columns, water was added to a 30-cm layer of synthetic C&D debris, with the resulting leachate serially passed through a 30-cm soil layer containing iron and arsenic and a 30-cm crushed limestone layer. This experiment was conducted for two different soil types (one high in iron (10,400mg/kg) and the second high in iron (5400mg/kg) and arsenic (70mg/kg)); also monitored were control columns for both soil types with water infiltration alone. Despite low iron concentrations in the simulated C&D debris leachate, elevated iron concentrations were observed when leachate passed through the soils; reductive dissolution was concluded to be the cause of iron mobilization. In the soil containing elevated arsenic, increased iron mobilization from the soil was accompanied by a similar but delayed arsenic mobilization. Since arsenic sorbs to oxidized iron soil minerals, reductive dissolution of these minerals results in arsenic mobilization. Crushed limestone significantly reduced iron (to values below the detection limit of 0.01mg/L in most cases); however, arsenic was not removed to any significant extent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide generation in simulated construction and demolition debris landfills: impact of waste composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kenton; Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy G; Chadik, Paul; Bitton, Gabriel; Booth, Matthew

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation in construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills has been associated with the biodegradation of gypsum drywall. Laboratory research was conducted to observe H2S generation when drywall was codisposed with different C&D debris constituents. Two experiments were conducted using simulated landfill columns. Experiment 1 consisted of various combinations of drywall, wood, and concrete to determine the impact of different waste constituents and combinations on H2S generation. Experiment 2 was designed to examine the effect of concrete on H2S generation and migration. The results indicate that decaying drywall, even alone, leached enough sulfate ions and organic matter for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to generate large H2S concentrations as high as 63,000 ppmv. The codisposed wastes show some effect on H2S generation. At the end of experiment 1, the wood/drywall and drywall alone columns possessed H2S concentrations > 40,000 ppmv. Conversely, H2S concentrations were debris landfills are suggested.

  11. Characterization of concrete made with recycled aggregate from concrete demolition waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terán Gilmore, A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed: to characterize the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of recycled aggregate from construction and concrete structure demolition waste, processed before and after crushing; to characterize fresh and hardened concrete made with such recycled aggregate; and to design different doses varying the water/cement ratio, the amount of cement and the use of superplasticizing admixtures to offset the effects of absorption. The ultimate objective was to provide a broader perspective of the use of recycled aggregate in the manufacture of new concrete.El presente estudio nos permite caracterizar las propiedades físicas, químicas y mecánicas de los áridos reciclados, producto de residuos de la construcción y demolición de estructuras de hormigón, tratándolos antes y después de triturar; caracterizar el hormigón elaborado con áridos reciclados, en su estado fresco y endurecido, diseñando diferentes dosificaciones variando la relación agua/cemento, la cantidad de cemento y el uso de aditivos súper plastificantes para disminuir el efecto de la absorción; caracterización que nos permite tener una mayor perspectiva sobre el uso de áridos reciclados en la elaboración de nuevos hormigones.

  12. An empirical investigation of construction and demolition waste generation rates in Shenzhen city, South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weisheng; Yuan Hongping; Li Jingru; Hao, Jane J.L.; Mi Xuming; Ding Zhikun

    2011-01-01

    The construction and demolition waste generation rates (C and D WGRs) is an important factor in decision-making and management of material waste in any construction site. The present study investigated WGRs by conducting on-site waste sorting and weighing in four ongoing construction projects in Shenzhen city of South China. The results revealed that WGRs ranged from 3.275 to 8.791 kg/m 2 and miscellaneous waste, timber for formwork and falsework, and concrete were the three largest components amongst the generated waste. Based on the WGRs derived from the research, the paper also discussed the main causes of waste in the construction industry and attempted to connect waste generation with specific construction practices. It was recommended that measures mainly including performing waste sorting at source, employing skilful workers, uploading and storing materials properly, promoting waste management capacity, replacing current timber formwork with metal formwork and launching an incentive reward program to encourage waste reduction could be potential solutions to reducing current WGRs in Shenzhen. Although these results were derived from a relatively small sample and so cannot justifiably be generalized, they do however add to the body of knowledge that is currently available for understanding the status of the art of C and D waste management in China.

  13. Recycled blocks with improved sound and fire insulation containing construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Carlos; Solís-Guzmán, Jaime; Marrero, Madelyn; García Arenas, Celia

    2013-03-01

    The environmental problem posed by construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is derived not only from the high volume produced, but also from its treatment and disposal. Treatment plants receive C&D waste which is then transformed into a recycled mixed aggregate. The byproduct is mainly used for low-value-added applications such as land escape restoration, despite the high quality of the aggregate. In the present work, the chemical composition properties and grading curve properties of these aggregates are defined. Furthermore, the resulting recycled concrete with a high proportion of recycled composition, from 20% to 100% replacement of fine and coarse aggregate, is characterized physically and mechanically. An environmental study of the new construction material when all aggregates are substituted by C&D waste shows a low toxicity level, similar to that of other construction materials. The new material also has improved properties with respect to standard concrete such as high fire resistance, good heat insulation, and acoustic insulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of explosive demolition techniques for heavy reinforced and prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, C.C.

    1984-10-01

    This report presents the results from a research programme aimed at advancing explosive demolition techniques from the present 'rule of thumb art' to a more scientifically based set of procedures to achieve the degree of control which will be essential in a nuclear power station decommissioning. The research is directed mainly at the biological shields of early Magnox reactors and the prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) of later Magnox and Advanced Gas-cooled reactors. Relevant structures of other commercial nuclear power plants in the European Community, in particular the PCPVs of French Gas Graphite reactors and the biological shields of Light Water reactors are also considered. The bulk of the programme has been based on experiments with an extensive usage of scaled models. The programme investigated the use of buried explosive charges in cratering concrete and the use of shaped charges in stripping surface cover and drilling holes. After an initial parametric study the programme considered concrete layer stripping using multiple charges and culminated in the stripping off of an equivalent thickness of concrete, for radiation protection, from the inside walls of a complete cylindrical model of a biological shield. (author)

  15. Investigation into the Application of Construction and Demolition Waste in Urban Roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youyun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The recycling and reuse of waste materials is a topic of global concern and great international interest for those interested in sustainable development and protecting the environment. In recent decades, global production of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste has significantly increased and became a worldwide problem. This research proposes to evaluate the feasibility of using aggregate from recycled C&D waste for urban road embankment applications based on the Sanhuan road construction project in eastern Xi’an. An extensive suite of laboratory and field compaction tests were carried out to determine the physical properties and engineering characteristics of the C&D waste. The effect of curing on the strength of the C&D waste was investigated using unconfined compression strength (UCS, California bearing ratio (CBR, and deflection tests. The results show that the C&D waste has the characteristics of high strength and significant stability after simple treatment and further suggest that the use of these materials for paving urban road embankments is feasible. This study is of value for the reasonable and effective promotion of using C&D waste recycled materials in road subgrade applications.

  16. Identifying areas under potential risk of illegal construction and demolition waste dumping using GIS tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, Nissim; Portnov, Boris A

    2018-05-01

    Construction and demolition (C&D) waste, dumped illegally in ravines and open areas, contaminates soil and can cause underground water pollution and forests fires. Yet, effective monitoring of illegal C&D waste dumping and enforcing legislation against the offenders are often a difficult task due to the large size of geographic areas that need to be monitored, and limited human and financial resources available to environmental law enforcement agencies. In this study, we use Geographic Information System (GIS) tools and geo-statistical modelling to identify the areas under potentially elevated risk of illegal C&D waste dumping in the Haifa district of Israel. As our analysis shows, locational factors, significantly associated with the accumulated amount of waste in the existing illegal C&D waste sites, include: distance to the nearest main road, depth of the ravine present at the site (pwaste dumping for future monitoring. As we suggest, the proposed approach may be useful for environmental law enforcement authorities, by helping them to focus on specific sites for inspection, save resources, and act against the offenders more efficiently. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of construction materials using nano-silica and aggregates recycled from construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukharjee, Bibhuti Bhusan; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the development of novel construction materials utilising commercial grade nano-silica and recycled aggregates retrieved from construction and demolition waste. For this, experimental work has been carried out to examine the influence of nano-silica and recycled aggregates on compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, water absorption, density and volume of voids of concrete. Fully natural and recycled aggregate concrete mixes are designed by replacing cement with three levels (0.75%, 1.5% and 3%) of nano-silica. The results of the present investigation depict that improvement in early days compressive strength is achieved with the incorporation of nano-silica in addition to the restoration of reduction in compressive strength of recycled aggregate concrete mixes caused owing to the replacement of natural aggregates by recycled aggregates. Moreover, the increase in water absorption and volume of voids with a reduction of bulk density was detected with the incorporation of recycled aggregates in place of natural aggregates. However, enhancement in density and reduction in water absorption and volume of voids of recycled aggregate concrete resulted from the addition of nano-silica. In addition, the results of the study reveal that nano-silica has no significant effect on elastic modulus of concrete. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. An empirical investigation of construction and demolition waste generation rates in Shenzhen city, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weisheng; Yuan, Hongping; Li, Jingru; Hao, Jane J L; Mi, Xuming; Ding, Zhikun

    2011-04-01

    The construction and demolition waste generation rates (C&D WGRs) is an important factor in decision-making and management of material waste in any construction site. The present study investigated WGRs by conducting on-site waste sorting and weighing in four ongoing construction projects in Shenzhen city of South China. The results revealed that WGRs ranged from 3.275 to 8.791 kg/m(2) and miscellaneous waste, timber for formwork and falsework, and concrete were the three largest components amongst the generated waste. Based on the WGRs derived from the research, the paper also discussed the main causes of waste in the construction industry and attempted to connect waste generation with specific construction practices. It was recommended that measures mainly including performing waste sorting at source, employing skilful workers, uploading and storing materials properly, promoting waste management capacity, replacing current timber formwork with metal formwork and launching an incentive reward program to encourage waste reduction could be potential solutions to reducing current WGRs in Shenzhen. Although these results were derived from a relatively small sample and so cannot justifiably be generalized, they do however add to the body of knowledge that is currently available for understanding the status of the art of C&D waste management in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of brominated flame retardants in construction and demolition waste components: HBCD and PBDEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huabo; Yu, Danfeng; Zuo, Jian; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Yukui; Niu, Yongning

    2016-12-01

    The vast majority of construction material is inert and can be managed as nonhazardous. However, structures may have either been built with some environmentally unfriendly substances such as brominated flame retardants (BFRs), or have absorbed harmful elements such as heavy metals. This study focuses on end-of-life construction materials, i.e. construction and demolition (C&D) waste components. The aim was to characterize the concentration of extremely harmful substances, primarily BFRs, including hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and polybrominateddiphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Results revealed extremely high contents of HBCD and PBDEs in typical C&D waste components, particularly polyurethane foam materials. Policies should therefore be developed for the proper management of C&D waste, with priority for POP-containing debris. The first priority is to develop a classification system and procedures to separate out the harmful materials for more extensive processing. Additionally, identification and quantification of the environmental implications associated with dumping-dominated disposal of these wastes are required. Finally, more sustainable materials should be selected for use in the construction industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Emergy analysis of the recycling options for construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Shen, Li-yin; Li, Qi-ming

    2011-12-01

    Construction and demolition (C&D) waste is becoming a major contributor to environmental pollution. In Shanghai, China, the quantity of C&D waste is 2.11E+07 t/yr, which accounts for 45% of the total quantity of solid waste. There has been a growing promotion of recycling C&D waste as an effective way to solve this waste problem. However, the evaluation of the efficiency of recycling C&D waste as a potential source of resources is largely based on traditional economic analysis. The economic analysis emphasizes money instead of the harmony between economic benefit and environmental effects. There is a need for a new strategic approach to investigate the efficiency of recycling C&D waste to achieve the integration between economic, social and environmental effects. Emergy theory can be employed to analyze different recycling options for C&D waste. With reference to the Chinese construction industry, this paper demonstrates that the close-loop recycling option is better than the open-loop recycling option for C&D waste in terms of the integration of social, environmental and sustainable aspects. To evaluate different technology solutions for C&D waste recycling, the emergy theory and method is not limited to a cost-benefit balance but can include economic, social, environmental and sustainable effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A web-based Decision Support System for the optimal management of construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banias, G; Achillas, Ch; Vlachokostas, Ch; Moussiopoulos, N; Papaioannou, I

    2011-12-01

    Wastes from construction activities constitute nowadays the largest by quantity fraction of solid wastes in urban areas. In addition, it is widely accepted that the particular waste stream contains hazardous materials, such as insulating materials, plastic frames of doors, windows, etc. Their uncontrolled disposal result to long-term pollution costs, resource overuse and wasted energy. Within the framework of the DEWAM project, a web-based Decision Support System (DSS) application - namely DeconRCM - has been developed, aiming towards the identification of the optimal construction and demolition waste (CDW) management strategy that minimises end-of-life costs and maximises the recovery of salvaged building materials. This paper addresses both technical and functional structure of the developed web-based application. The web-based DSS provides an accurate estimation of the generated CDW quantities of twenty-one different waste streams (e.g. concrete, bricks, glass, etc.) for four different types of buildings (residential, office, commercial and industrial). With the use of mathematical programming, the DeconRCM provides also the user with the optimal end-of-life management alternative, taking into consideration both economic and environmental criteria. The DSS's capabilities are illustrated through a real world case study of a typical five floor apartment building in Thessaloniki, Greece. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimation of building-related construction and demolition waste in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Xiao, Jianzhuang

    2014-11-01

    One methodology is proposed to estimate the quantification and composition of building-related construction and demolition (C&D) waste in a fast developing region like Shanghai, PR China. The varieties of structure types and building waste intensities due to the requirement of progressive building design and structure codes in different decades are considered in this regional C&D waste estimation study. It is concluded that approximately 13.71 million tons of C&D waste was generated in 2012 in Shanghai, of which more than 80% of this C&D waste was concrete, bricks and blocks. Analysis from this study can be applied to facilitate C&D waste governors and researchers the duty of formulating precise policies and specifications. As a matter of fact, at least a half of the enormous amount of C&D waste could be recycled if implementing proper recycling technologies and measures. The appropriate managements would be economically and environmentally beneficial to Shanghai where the per capita per year output of C&D waste has been as high as 842 kg in 2010. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Usage of air jigging for multi-component separation of construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrós, Weslei Monteiro; Sampaio, Carlos Hoffmann; Cazacliu, Bogdan Grigore; Miltzarek, Gerson Luis; Miranda, Leonardo R

    2017-02-01

    The use of air jigging for performing multi-component separation in the treatment of mixed construction and demolition waste was studied. Sorting tests were carried out with mixtures of equal bulk volume of concrete and brick in which fixed quantities of unwanted materials - gypsum, wood and paper - were added. Experimental results have demonstrated the possibility to use air jigging to carry out both the removal of low-density contaminants and the concrete concentration in only one process step. In relation to the removal of contaminants only, the overall performance of jigging process can be comparable with that of commercial air classifiers and automatic sorting systems. Also, the initial content of contaminants seems does not have a significant effect on the separation extent. These results are of particular importance for recycling plants processing as they represent an alternative to optimize the use of air jigs. Further investigation is needed in order to evaluate the practical feasibility of such method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Urban construction and demolition waste and landfill failure in Shenzhen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Xia, Junqiang; Thompson, Julian R; Flower, Roger J

    2017-05-01

    On December 20, 2015 at 11:40 am a landslide in one of China's most advanced cities, Shenzhen, killed 73 people and damaged 33 buildings. In the absence of heavy rainfall or earthquakes, the landslide was an unexpected and profound shock to many people. According to China's Ministry of Land and Resources, the landslide was triggered by the collapse of an enormous pile of construction and demolition waste (CDW). With China's rapid urbanization, an increasing amount of CDW is being generated, especially in major cities. In total, China produces some 30% of the world's municipal solid waste and of this about 40% is CDW. To prevent landslides associated with CDW, the volume of waste dumped in landfills should be regulated. More specifically 4-Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle and recover) policies should be implemented more widely and efficiently. Although landfill will continue to be an important disposal option, proper management and careful monitoring of CDW are urgently needed to satisfy pressing safety issues. International collaboration, sharing of knowledge, and use of the latest technologies are needed so that the similar landslides can be prevented in China and elsewhere. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a hybrid model to predict construction and demolition waste: China as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yiliao; Wang, Yong; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Yixin

    2017-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste (C&DW) is currently a worldwide issue, and the situation is the worst in China due to a rapid increase in the construction industry and the short life span of China's buildings. To create an opportunity out of this problem, comprehensive prevention measures and effective management strategies are urgently needed. One major gap in the literature of waste management is a lack of estimations on future C&DW generation. Therefore, this paper presents a forecasting procedure for C&DW in China that can forecast the quantity of each component in such waste. The proposed approach is based on a GM-SVR model that improves the forecasting effectiveness of the gray model (GM), which is achieved by adjusting the residual series by a support vector regression (SVR) method and a transition matrix that aims to estimate the discharge of each component in the C&DW. Through the proposed method, future C&DW volume are listed and analyzed containing their potential components and distribution in different provinces in China. Besides, model testing process provides mathematical evidence to validate the proposed model is an effective way to give future information of C&DW for policy makers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Decontamination and demolition of concrete and metal structures during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this report is to give a concise technical description of the techniques and equipment being used or developed for the decontamination and demolition of nuclear facilities in sufficient detail to assist Member States to plan decommissioning operations and make preliminary evaluations of techniques and equipment. This report also reviews new and/or different aspects which have not been well covered previously in readily available review documents or IAEA publications. This report is an up to date review of techniques and equipment being used or developed for decontamination or dismantling work during the decommissioning of all types of nuclear facility except mining and milling sites. Although the information presented is aimed at countries initiating decommissioning programmes, it should also be useful to others who are responsible for or interested in the planning and implementation of decommissioning tasks. This report describes the relevant techniques and equipment, their areas of application and degree of development and the conditions in which they are used, when these details are known. However, this publication should be used in conjunction with other published technical information on these topics, experience gained as a result of previous decommissioning operations and the assistance of experts in the appropriate areas are required. 64 refs, 33 figs, 5 tabs

  7. Environmental risks of HBCDD from construction and demolition waste: a contemporary and future issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhiqiang; Yang, Ziliang; Fang, Yanyan; Yang, Yufei; Tang, Zhenwu; Wang, Xingrun; Die, Qingqi; Gao, Xingbao; Zhang, Fengsong; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qifei

    2015-11-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), as one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants (BFRs), is of great concern globally because of its persistence in the environment and negative impacts on humans and animals. HBCDD has been mainly used in flame-retarded expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for insulation in the construction industry. Most of these products will become a part of the construction and demolition (C&D) waste at the end of their life cycle (30-50 years) which is typically disposed of into landfills or incineration. However, the recycling of this material takes quite a low share compared with landfill and incineration. Consequently, high environmental risks will exist in these disposal approaches due to the HBCDD in C&D waste. Currently, XPS or EPS products containing HBCDD in the construction industry have not reached the end of their life cycle in most countries. Relatively little attention has been paid to this emergency issue by either the government or public. Furthermore, C&D waste is most likely disposed of by direct dumping, simple stacking, or open burning in developing countries. Therefore, this paper highlights the global environmental risks of HBCDD from C&D waste. Areas of research for key problems of HBCDD contained in C&D waste are suggested to help control and finally eliminate the impact.

  8. A study of explosive demolition techniques for heavy reinforced and prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results from a research programme aimed at advancing explosive demolition techniques from the present ''rule of thumb art'' to a more scientifically based set of procedures to achieve the degree of control which will be essential in a nuclear power station decommissioning. The research is directed mainly at the biological shields of early Magnox reactors and the prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) of later Magnox and advanced gas-cooled reactors. Relevant structures of other commercial nuclear power plants in the European Community, in particular the PCPVs of French gas graphite reactors and the biological shields of light water reactors are also considered. The bulk of the programme has been based on experiments with an extensive usage of scaled models. The programme investigated the use of buried explosive charges in cratering concrete and the use of shaped charges in stripping surface cover and drilling holes. After an initial parametric study the programme considered concrete layer stripping using multiple charges and culminated in the stripping off of an equivalent thickness of concrete, for radiation protection, from the inside walls of a complete cylindrical model of a biological shield

  9. Occurrence of organic pollutants in recovered soil fines from construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Y C; Townsend, T G

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize recovered soil fines from construction and demolition (C&D) waste recycling facilities for trace organic pollutants. Over a period of 18 months, five sampling trips were made to 14 C&D waste recycling facilities in Florida. Screened soil fines were collected from older stockpiles and newly generated piles at the sites. The samples were analyzed for the total concentration (mg/kg) of a series of volatile organic compound (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (semi-VOCs). The synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) test was also performed to evaluate the leachability of the trace organic chemicals. During the total analysis only a few volatile organic compounds were commonly found in the samples (trichlorofluoromethane, toluene, 4-isopropyltoluene, trimethylbenzene, xylenes, and methylene chloride). A total of nine VOCs were detected in the leaching test. Toluene showed the highest leachability among the compounds (61.3-92.0%), while trichlorofluoromethane, the most commonly detected compound from both the total and leaching tests, resulted in the lowest leachability (1.4-39.9%). For the semi-VOC analysis, three base-neutral semi-VOC compounds (bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, butyl benzyl phthalate, and di-n-butyl phthalate) and several PAHs (acenaphthene, pyrene, fluoranthene, and phenanthrene) were commonly detected in C&D fines samples. These compounds also leached during the SPLP leaching test (0.1-25%). No acid extractable compounds, pesticides, or PCBs were detected. The results of this study were further investigated to assess risk from land applied recovered soil fines by comparing total and leaching concentrations of recovered soil fines samples to risk-based standards. The results of this indicate that the organic chemicals in recovered soil fines from C&D debris recycling facilities were not of a major concern in terms of human risk and leaching risk to groundwater under reuse and contact scenarios.

  10. Reduced sulfur compounds in gas from construction and demolition debris landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sue; Xu, Qiyong; Booth, Matthew; Townsend, Timothy G; Chadik, Paul; Bitton, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    The biological conversion of sulfate from disposed gypsum drywall to hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the anaerobic environment of a landfill results in odor problems and possible health concerns at many disposal facilities. To examine the extent and magnitude of such emissions, landfill gas samples from wells, soil vapor samples from the interface of the waste and cover soil, and ambient air samples, were collected from 10 construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills in Florida and analyzed for H(2)S and other reduced sulfur compounds (RSC). H(2)S was detected in the well gas and soil vapor at all 10 sites. The concentrations in the ambient air above the surface of the landfill were much lower than those observed in the soil vapor, and no direct correlation was observed between the two sampling locations. Methyl mercaptan and carbonyl sulfide were the most frequently observed other RSC, though they occurred at smaller concentrations than H(2)S. This research confirmed the presence of H(2)S at C&D debris landfills. High concentrations of H(2)S may be a concern for employees working on the landfill site. These results indicate that workers should use proper personal protection at C&D debris landfills when involved in excavation, landfill gas collection, or confined spaces. The results indicate that H(2)S is sufficiently diluted in the atmosphere to not commonly pose acute health impacts for these landfill workers in normal working conditions. H(2)S concentrations were extremely variable with measurements occurring over a very large range (from less than 3 ppbv to 12,000 ppmv in the soil vapor and from less than 3 ppbv to 50 ppmv in ambient air). Possible reasons for the large intra- and inter-site variability observed include waste and soil heterogeneities, impact of weather conditions, and different site management practices.

  11. Mechanical properties of hot mix asphalt made with recycled aggregates from reclaimed construction and demolition debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taibo, J.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The mix design for asphalt mixtures containing recycled aggregates from construction and demolition debris was evaluated. The tests conducted to characterize the mechanical behaviour of these mixtures showed that the mechanical properties of mixtures with recycled and virgin aggregate are similar. The asphalt mixtures containing recycled aggregate proved to have lower resistance to water action. Nonetheless, recycled aggregate was found to be potentially usable in asphalt mixtures if higher quality materials are selected and such low resistance is corrected. This will call for expanding upon the preliminary work described in the present article.En este trabajo se dosificaron mezclas bituminosas fabricadas con áridos reciclados de residuos de construcción y demolición. Se realizaron una serie de ensayos que permitieron caracterizar el comportamiento mecánico de estas mezclas. Los parámetros mecánicos de las mezclas con áridos reciclados son similares a los de las mezclas fabricadas únicamente con áridos naturales de cantera. Sin embargo, las mezclas bituminosas con áridos reciclados tuvieron un mal comportamiento frente a la disminución de la resistencia por pérdida de cohesión por la acción del agua. No obstante, mediante la selección de materiales de mejor calidad y corrección de este mal comportamiento, existen posibilidades de utilizar áridos reciclados en mezclas bituminosas. Para ello será necesario ampliar la primera aproximación realizada en este artículo.

  12. Developments in life cycle assessment applied to evaluate the environmental performance of construction and demolition wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovea, M D; Powell, J C

    2016-04-01

    This paper provides a review of the literature that applies the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to the assessment of the environmental performance of the life cycle of construction and demolition waste (CDW) management systems. This article is focused on generating a general mapping of the literature and on identifying the best practices in compliance with LCA framework and proposing directions for future LCA studies in this field. The temporal evolution of the research in this field and the aim of the studies have grown in parallel with the legal framework related to waste and energy efficiency of buildings. Most studies have been published in Europe, followed by USA. Asia and Australia, being at an incipient application stage to the rest of the world. Topics related to "LCA of buildings, including their EoL" and "LCA of general CDW management strategies" are the most frequently analysed, followed by "LCA of EoL of construction elements" and "LCA of natural material vs recycled material". Regarding the strategies, recycling off-site and incineration, both combined with landfill for the rejected fractions, are the most commonly applied. Re-use or recycling on-site is the strategy least applied. The key aspect when LCA is applied to evaluate CDW management systems is the need to normalise which processes to include in the system boundary and the functional unit, the use of inventory data adapted to the context of the case study and the definition of a common set of appropriate impact assessment categories. Also, it is important to obtain results disaggregated by unit processes. This will allow the comparison between case studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological sulfate removal from construction and demolition debris leachate: Effect of bioreactor configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Do, Anh Tien; Annachhatre, Ajit P.; Esposito, Giovanni; Yeh, Daniel H.; Lens, Piet N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel biological technique for gypsum removal from CDD. • CDDS leachate treatment performed using different sulfate reducing bioreactors. • Gypsum in CDD can be used as a source of sulfate for sulfate reducing bacteria. • High calcium concentration (1000 mg L −1 ) did not affect the bioreactor performance. - Abstract: Due to the contamination of construction and demolition debris (CDD) by gypsum drywall, especially, its sand fraction (CDD sand, CDDS), the sulfate content in CDDS exceeds the posed limit of the maximum amount of sulfate present in building sand (1.73 g sulfate per kg of sand for the Netherlands). Therefore, the CDDS cannot be reused for construction. The CDDS has to be washed in order to remove most of the impurities and to obtain the right sulfate content, thus generating a leachate, containing high sulfate and calcium concentrations. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate reduction system for CDDS leachate treatment and compared three different reactor configurations for the sulfate reduction step: the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, inverse fluidized bed (IFB) reactor and gas lift anaerobic membrane bioreactor (GL-AnMBR). This investigation demonstrated that all three systems can be applied for the treatment of CDDS leachate. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 75–85% was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15.5 h. A high calcium concentration up to 1000 mg L −1 did not give any adverse effect on the sulfate removal efficiency of the IFB and GL-AnMBR systems

  14. Co-composting of Beef Cattle Feedlot Manure with Construction and Demolition Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiying; Hill, Brett; Caffyn, Pam; Travis, Greg; Olson, Andrew F; Larney, Francis J; McAllister, Tim; Alexander, Trevor

    2014-09-01

    With increased availability of dried distillers' grains with solubles (DDGS) as cattle feed and the need to recycle organic wastes, this research investigated the feasibility of co-composting DDGS cattle feedlot manure with construction and demolition (C&D) waste. Manure was collected from cattle fed a typical western Canadian finishing diet (CK) of 860 g rolled barley ( L.) grain, 100 g barley silage, and 40 g vitamin and mineral supplement kg dry matter (DM) and from cattle fed the same diet but (DG manure) with 300 g kg DM barley grain being replaced by DDGS. The CK and DG manures were co-composted with and without C&D waste in 13 m bins. Compost materials were turned on Days 14, 37, and 64, and terminated on Day 99. Adding C&D waste led to higher compost temperatures (0.4 to 16.3°C, average 7.2°C) than manure alone. Final composts had similar total C, total N, C/N ratios, and water-extractable K, Mg, and NO content across all treatments. However, adding C&D waste increased δC, δN, water-extractable SO, and Ca contents and decreased pH, total P (TP), water-extractable C, N, and P and most volatile fatty acids (VFA). The higher C&D compost temperatures should reduce pathogens while reduced VFA content should reduce odors. When using the final compost product, the increased SO and reduced TP and available N and P content in C&D waste compost should be taken into consideration. Increased S content in C&D compost may be beneficial for some crops grown on S-deficient soils. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. Oxidation kinetics of the combustible fraction of construction and demolition wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, N B; Lin, K S; Sun, Y P; Wang, H P

    2001-01-01

    Proper disposal of construction and demolition wastes (CDW) has received wide attention recently due to significantly large quantities of waste streams collected from razed or retrofitted buildings in many metropolitan regions. Burning the combustible fractions of CDW (CCDW) and possibly recovering part of the heat content for economic uses could be valuable for energy conservation. This paper explores the oxidation kinetics of CCDW associated with its ash characterization. Kinetic parameters for the oxidation of CCDW were numerically calculated using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and the resultant rate equations were therefore developed for illustrating the oxidation processes of CCDW simultaneously. Based on three designated heating rates, each of the oxidation processes can be featured distinctively with five different stages according to the rate of weight change at the temperature between 300 K and 923 K. In addition, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was employed, associated with a lab-scale fixed-bed incinerator for monitoring the composition of flue gas. Carbon dioxide (CO2) was found as a major component in the flue gas. The fuel analysis also included an ash composition analysis via the use of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The ash streams were identified as nonhazardous materials based on the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Overall, the scientific findings gained in this study will be helpful for supporting a sound engineering design of real-world CCDW incineration systems.

  16. Biological sulfate removal from construction and demolition debris leachate: Effect of bioreactor configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck, E-mail: som_cheng00@hotmail.com [Pollution Prevention and Resource Recovery Chair Group, UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Do, Anh Tien [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Annachhatre, Ajit P. [Environmental Engineering and Management, Asian Institute of Technology, PO Box 4, Klongluang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Esposito, Giovanni [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Yeh, Daniel H. [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Lens, Piet N.L. [Pollution Prevention and Resource Recovery Chair Group, UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Novel biological technique for gypsum removal from CDD. • CDDS leachate treatment performed using different sulfate reducing bioreactors. • Gypsum in CDD can be used as a source of sulfate for sulfate reducing bacteria. • High calcium concentration (1000 mg L{sup −1}) did not affect the bioreactor performance. - Abstract: Due to the contamination of construction and demolition debris (CDD) by gypsum drywall, especially, its sand fraction (CDD sand, CDDS), the sulfate content in CDDS exceeds the posed limit of the maximum amount of sulfate present in building sand (1.73 g sulfate per kg of sand for the Netherlands). Therefore, the CDDS cannot be reused for construction. The CDDS has to be washed in order to remove most of the impurities and to obtain the right sulfate content, thus generating a leachate, containing high sulfate and calcium concentrations. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate reduction system for CDDS leachate treatment and compared three different reactor configurations for the sulfate reduction step: the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, inverse fluidized bed (IFB) reactor and gas lift anaerobic membrane bioreactor (GL-AnMBR). This investigation demonstrated that all three systems can be applied for the treatment of CDDS leachate. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 75–85% was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15.5 h. A high calcium concentration up to 1000 mg L{sup −1} did not give any adverse effect on the sulfate removal efficiency of the IFB and GL-AnMBR systems.

  17. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-15

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and

  18. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-01

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D and D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D and D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D and D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980

  19. Soil retention of hexavalent chromium released from construction and demolition waste in a road-base-application scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Trapp, Stefan; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the retention of Cr(VI) in three subsoils with low organic matter content in laboratory experiments at concentration levels relevant to represent leachates from construction and demolition waste (C&DW) reused as unbound material in road construction. The retention mechanism appeared...... depth. However, in rigid climates and with high water infiltration through the road pavement, the reduction reaction could be so slow that Cr(VI) might migrate as deep as 200 cm under the road. The reaction parameters and the model can form the basis for systematically assessing under which scenarios Cr...

  20. Minimization and recycling of construction and demolition wastes; Minimizacion y reciclado de los residuos de construccion y demolicion (RCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huete, R.; Lopez, J.A.; Ponce, M.; Llatas, C.

    1998-12-01

    We all know the damage to the environmental caused by the illegal dumping demolition waste, that causes a bad image of our cities. This damage, grows thanks to the inadequate governmental management and for the small co-operation of the owners of the wastes and we may quantify it with the necessary pressure and their impact on the environment has different aspects that should be remembered: on the economic media and on the culture. Following the recommendations of the European Union, we should place three different policies: prevention, recovery and sanitary landfilling. (Author)

  1. Study on the blasting demolition of steel construction. Part 2. Demolition work of steel tower; Tekkotsu kozobutsu no bakuha kaitai ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Koro yagura happa kaitai koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, Y.; Wada, Y.; Katsuyama, K. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Nishida, T.; Hoshino, M.; Nagano, M. [Kacoh Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-06-30

    This paper describes the blasting demolition of steel tower of iron works. The steel tower had four columns, and its dimension was 17 mtimes17 m in cross section and 77.6 m height. The total weight was about 1,724 t. The 18.4 kg V-type linear shaped charge was fixed around columns with box weld structures, and initiated using 16 seismograph electric detonators. Vibration and noise were measured during blasting and collapse of the tower. In the both case, the vibration levels were between 67 and 71 dB, which were low and under 75 dB, the standard level during specific construction works of the regulation act of vibration. The noise level was 120 dB(A) at the point 200 m away from the blasting source, which was over 85 dB(A), the standard level. The collapse process of steel tower was simulated using discontinuous deformation analysis. The results agreed well with those from the actual collapse. The steel tower landed about 6 seconds after the initiation, and it took about 15 seconds to complete the collapse. Before the demolition, the 6 t parts of forefeet of two columns in the collapse direction were cut and removed by blasting. Thus, the collapse was controlled in the given direction. 5 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. A Quantum Non-Demolition Parity measurement in a mixed-species trapped-ion quantum processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Matteo; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Flühmann, Christa; Mehta, Karan; Home, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Quantum non-demolition measurements of multi-qubit systems are an important tool in quantum information processing, in particular for syndrome extraction in quantum error correction. We have recently demonstrated a protocol for quantum non-demolition measurement of the parity of two beryllium ions by detection of a co-trapped calcium ion. The measurement requires a sequence of quantum gates between the three ions, using mixed-species gates between beryllium hyperfine qubits and a calcium optical qubit. Our work takes place in a multi-zone segmented trap setup in which we have demonstrated high fidelity control of both species and multi-well ion shuttling. The advantage of using two species of ion is that we can individually manipulate and read out the state of each ion species without disturbing the internal state of the other. The methods demonstrated here can be used for quantum error correcting codes as well as quantum metrology and are key ingredients for realizing a hybrid universal quantum computer based on trapped ions. Mixed-species control may also enable the investigation of new avenues in quantum simulation and quantum state control. left the group and working in a company now.

  3. A change in strategy for a CERCLA Removal Action Demolition Project in progress results in overall project enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertin, M.; Nichols, R.M.; Edwards, D.T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses changes made in a demolition project at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), a site on the National Priorities list (NPL), owned by the Department of Energy. The project, to demolish fourteen uranium ore silos and their structure, was based on a Removal Action Work Plan, submitted and approved by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), that integrated Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements to remove the source of contamination and threat to public health and the environment. After the demolition contractor defaulted at 30% complete, completion of the project by the USEPA deadline was threatened. The recovery plan included re-evaluation of project documents in addition to the schedule. It was determined that re-interpretation of the removal action criteria, including design and Removal Action Work Plan, would eliminate road-blocks, and optimize resources, resulting in project completion by the original deadline even after lost-time in mobilizing another contractor. This presentation will discuss the open-quotes lessons learnedclose quotes by the project team and illustrate how simplification of construction methods resulted in enhancements to the environmental controls, improved material handing, and created a safer work environment

  4. Assessing metal contamination from construction and demolition (C&D) waste used to infill wetlands: using Deroceras reticulatum (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, John A; Mc Donnell, Rory J; Gormally, Michael J; Williams, Chris D; Henry, Tiernan; Morrison, Liam

    2014-11-01

    Large quantities of construction and demolition waste (C&D) are produced globally every year, with little known about potential environmental impacts. In the present study, the slug, Deroceras reticulatum (Mollusca: Gastropoda) was used as the first biomonitor of metals (Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Ti, Tl, V and Zn) on wetlands post infilling with construction and demolition (C&D) waste. The bioaccumulation of As, Ba, Cd, Co, Sb, Se and Tl were found to be significantly elevated in slugs collected on C&D waste when compared to unimproved pastures (control sites), while Mo, Se and Sr had significantly higher concentrations in slugs collected on C&D waste when compared to known contaminated sites (mining locations), indicating the potential hazardous nature of C&D waste to biota. Identifying exact sources for these metals within the waste can be problematic, due to its heterogenic nature. Biomonitors are a useful tool for future monitoring and impact studies, facilitating policy makers and regulations in other countries regarding C&D waste infill. In addition, improving separation of C&D waste to allow increased reuse and recycling is likely to be effective in reducing the volume of waste being used as infill, subsequently decreasing potential metal contamination.

  5. Re-use of construction and demolition residues and industrial wastes for the elaboration or recycled eco-efficient concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan Valdes, A.; Medina Martinez, C.; Guerra Romero, M. I.; Llamas Garcia, B.; Moran del Pozo, J. M.; Tascon Vegas, A.

    2010-01-01

    Production of residues from industries and construction and demolition sectors has increased during last years. The total amount of debris produced according to different estimations reaches values close to 42 million tonnes yr - 1. Much of this waste has been thrown to landfill, without considering its potential for reuse, recycling or valuation. The aim of this research is to describe some of the physical and mechanical properties of different laboratory-mixed concretes, using various proportions of additional materials recovered from industrial waste and demolition rubble. The added materials are included either as admixtures (forestry residues, cork dust, steel fibre) or in partial substitution of natural aggregates (wire from electrical residues, tyre rubber, white ceramic, sanitary porcelain or shale). The laboratory tests have followed the standard En protocols. Assay results were variable according to the nature of the material added to the mix: organic materials and shale, despite the steel fibre reinforcement, reduce the compression strength, but are suitable for the manufacture of lightweight concrete for agricultural pavements, with certain flexion resistance and a relatively good behaviour to impact. The substitution of natural aggregates with ceramic and porcelain wastes produces a significant increase in compression resistance, making them suitable for the manufacture of concrete with characteristic resistances above 40 MPa, which can be used both for structures or other agricultural elements: separators, feeders, slat floors. As a conclusion can be stated the possibility of reuse these wastes for the production of structural or non-structural concrete, with different applications in agricultural engineering. (Author) 36 refs.

  6. Environmental assessment for the salvage/demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    This environmental assessment has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the US Department of Energy's proposed action: the salvage/demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants and steam distribution piping. Impact information will be used by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. The proposed action involves the salvage and demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Are, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping, equipment, and ancillary facilities. Activities include the salvaging and recycling of all materials, wastes, and equipment where feasible, with waste minimization efforts utilized

  7. The NEA co-operative programme on decommissioning decontamination and demolition of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berton, Marie-Anne; Estivie, David; Cantrel, Eric; Moeller, Joerg; Ondaro, Manuel; Ooms, Bart; Wittenauer, Stefan; Burton, Bob

    2011-01-01

    In response to growing interest in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency set up the Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning in 1985. Its basic scope is to facilitate the exchange of scientific and technical information between major decommissioning projects. Participation in the Programme has expanded significantly over the years to include organisations from 13 countries. Currently, about 60 projects participate in the Programme. The Programme is executed under an agreement between the participating organisations and companies. A progress report is issued every five years on the CPD and includes a brief description of each project. The most recent report is entitled A Decade of Progress. The projects are divided into two groups: reactor projects (60%) and fuel facility projects (40%). A complete list of the different projects and their country of residence can be found in Annex 1. Many of the early projects in the Programme focused on experimental or prototype plants, however, a number of projects for the decommissioning of commercial facilities (power generation, fuel and reprocessing plants) have recently joined the Programme. Limited feedback on concrete clean-up operations has been available until now due to the lengthy time frame of decommissioning projects and the fact that building demolition occurs in the very late stages of the project. Some of the early projects in the Programme are now complete or nearing completion, making available significant data and experience. This experience and lessons learnt can be applied to the further development of decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) clean-up processes. This report aims to supplement the previous NEA report dedicated to decontamination techniques and to provide project engineers and/or project leaders involved in concrete infrastructure clean-up with: - Guidelines for setting up appropriate and adequate strategies, taking into consideration the international

  8. Deriving a Planting Medium from Solid Waste Compost and Construction, Demolition and Excavation Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajalla, Nadim; Assaf, Eleni; Bashour, Issam; Talhouk, Salma

    2014-05-01

    Lebanon's very high population density has been increasing since the end of the war in the early 1990s reaching 416.36 people per square kilometer. Furthermore, the influx of refugees from conflicts in the region has increased the resident population significantly. All these are exerting pressure on the country's natural resources, pushing the Lebanese to convert more forest and agricultural land into roads, buildings and houses. This has led to a building boom and rapid urbanization which in turn has created a demand for construction material - mainly rock, gravel, sand, etc. nearly all of which were locally acquired through quarrying to the tune of three million cubic meters annually. This boom has been followed by a war with Israel in 2006 which resulted in thousands of tonnes of debris. The increase in population has also led to an increase in solid waste generation with 1.57 million tonnes of solid waste generated in Lebanon per year. The combination of construction, demolition and excavation (CDE) waste along with the increase in solid waste generation has put a major stress on the country and on the management of its solid waste problem. Compounding this problem are the issues of quarries closure and rehabilitation and a decrease in forest and vegetative cover. The on-going research reported in this paper aims to provide an integrated solution to the stated problem by developing a "soil mix" derived from a mélange of the organic matter of the solid waste (compost), the CDE waste, and soil. In this mix, native and indicator plants are planted (in pots) from which the most productive mix will be selected for further testing at field level in later experiments. The plant species used are Matiolla, a native Lebanese plant and Zea mays, which is commonly known used as an indicator plant due to its sensitivity to environmental conditions. To ensure sustainability and environmental friendliness of the mix, its physical and chemical characteristics are monitored

  9. Dehomed: the impacts of house demolitions on the well-being of women from the unrecognized Bedouin-Arab villages in the Negev/Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Nora; Feder-Bubis, Paula

    2014-09-01

    Thirty-five Bedouin-Arab villages in South Israel are regarded illegal settlements by the state. Consequently, the residents׳ homes are subject to demolition. Based on 12 semi-structured multiple-participant interviews, this paper examines the house demolitions׳ impacts on women, in the context of gendered constructions of social roles and space. It highlights that the marginalized position of Arab-Bedouin women - as women in a patriarchal community, as members of a minority within Israeli society, and as residents of an "invisible" settlement - contributes to the devastating effects of the house demolitions. In particular, the study׳s results show that the house demolitions inflict severe personal and collective trauma, amplified by women׳s primary role as mothers. Paradoxically, the very same role also becomes a source of resilience and political resistance, as women act to defend a sense of home and restore family life in the face of state violence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Innovative probabilistic risk assessment applications: barrier impairments and fracture toughness. 2. Demolition Debris and Tornado Missile Hazard During Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calhoun, David; Shepherd, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    During their operating lives, nuclear power plants typically maintain a high level of control over the amount of debris that is allowed to accumulate at the plant site. Although primarily intended to reduce the potential for fire damage, some plants also rely on these controls to limit the damage that could be caused during a tornado from missiles generated from loose debris. Demolition work associated with power plant decommissioning inevitably increases the quantity of debris. When bulk commodities such as piping and electrical distribution components are demolished, they are subject to various staging, handling, and storage processes before they can be released from the site. The demolition of plant structures dramatically increases the quantity of loose steel and concrete debris. For the foreseeable future, all plants that undertake decommissioning will have spent-fuel assemblies present on the plant site during the demolition project whether the spent fuel remains stored in a spent-fuel pool or is transferred to an independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI). Under present regulations, protection from tornado missiles would be required for both types of spent-fuel storage. In addition, a small proportion of decommissioning plants will have operating units in close proximity. Licensing commitments for tornado missile protection may mandate controls on the production or storage of demolition debris. This paper presents a case study of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (Fig. 1). Tornado missile protection licensing commitments from three types of facilities will be in force during the decommissioning of San Onofre Unit 1 (Unit 1): 1. Unit 1, under a possession-only license; 2. an ISFSI that will eventually store spent fuel from Unit 1; 3. San Onofre Operating Unit 2 (Unit 2) and San Onofre Operating Unit 3 (Unit 3). Together, these three facilities illustrate the range of impacts that licensing commitments designed for tornado protection may

  11. Acoustic and vibrational tests of effects induced on building by the demolition of the 'Ponte del Barco' Firenze - Toscana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stragapede, Francesco; Biannucci, Roberto; Pascini, Lando Umberto; Leonasi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    For demolition of Ponte del Barco, the Torrente Mugnone overpass at the Parco delle Cascine of Firenze, were checked up entities in the field of energy and vibrational noise produced during activities on sensitive lens, considering the building located near the structure being demolished. The vibrations to the building have been checked with reference to noise thresholds of disturbance to the person (UNI 9614) and resentment/damage to the building (UNI 9 9 16). Evaluation of transient vibration actions on the building were examined during the demolition of the structure, carried out using excavator CAT 320 D LN equipped with concrete crusher, and handling stages of demolition material using excavator ZAX 2 40 Hitachi equipped with a shovel. The tests were conducted with Symphonie type level meter (class 1 REF. EN60651/94 and EN60804/9 4) and oriented velocimeters n. 4 recording stations using GEOBOX of Sara Electr. Instr. The noise level was compared with the acoustic limits of the area and the intensity of vibration induced on sensitive building was related to thresholds of disturbance to the person and damage to structures, ensuring that in the course of the demolition operations were the conditions of security of operators in the area and the absence of damage to the buildings. Based on the findings from the analysis, the acoustic activity of demolition of the Bridge in Florence took place within the acoustic limits of exemption of localization activities (class IV – area of intense human activity). The exceeded the thresholds of vibrational disturbance to the person was checked, in reference UNI 9614; the exceeded the thresholds for structural damage was not checked, in reference to UNI 9916. The attendance of the necessary staff for testing acoustic and vibrational did not affect any sensitive subject even in the presence of the excess of noise and vibration thresholds of disturbance to the person.

  12. Construction demolition wastes, Waelz slag and MSWI bottom ash: a comparative technical analysis as material for road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegas, I; Ibañez, J A; San José, J T; Urzelai, A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study is to analyze the technical suitability of using secondary materials from three waste flows (construction and demolition waste (CDW), Waelz slag and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash), under the regulations and standards governing the use of materials for road construction. A detailed technical characterization of the materials was carried out according to Spanish General Technical Specifications for Road Construction (PG3). The results show that Waelz slag can be adequate for using in granular structural layers, while CDW fits better as granular material in roadbeds. Likewise, fresh MSWI bottom ash can be used as roadbed material as long as it does not contain a high concentration of soluble salts. This paper also discusses the adequacy of using certain traditional test methods for natural soils when characterizing secondary materials for use as aggregates in road construction.

  13. Construction quality assurance report for the Y-12 Construction/Demolition Landfill VII (CDL VII), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, P.M.

    1994-11-01

    This Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report provides documentation that Bid Option 2 of the Y-12 Plant Construction Demolition Landfill 7 (CDL-7) was constructed in substantial compliance with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved design, as indicated and specified in the permit drawings, approved changes, and specifications. CDL-7 is located in Anderson County on the south side of Chestnut Ridge, approximately 0.5 miles south of the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report applies specifically to the limits of excavation for Area No. 1 portions of the perimeter maintenance road and drainage channel and Sedimentation Pond No. 3. A partial ''As-Built'' survey was performed and is included

  14. Performance estimation for concretes made with recycled aggregates of construction and demolition waste of some Brazilian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Eduardo Bezerra Cabral

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to verify the influence of composition variability of recycled aggregates (RA of construction and demolition wastes (CDW on the performance of concretes. Performance was evaluated building mathematical models for compressive strength, modulus of elasticity and drying shrinkage. To obtain such models, an experimental program comprising 50 concrete mixtures was carried out. Specimens were casted, tested and results for compressive strength, modulus of elasticity and drying shrinkage were statistically analyzed. Models inputs are CDW composition observed at seven Brazilian cities. Results confirm that using RA from CDW for concrete building is quite feasible, independently of its composition, once compressive strength and modulus of elasticity still reached considerable values. We concluded the variability presented by recycled aggregates of CDW does not compromise their use for concrete building. However, this information must be used with caution, and experimental tests should always be performed to certify concrete properties.

  15. Methodology of environmental diagnosis for construction and demolition waste landfills: a tool for planning and making decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, E; Calvo, F; Ramos, A F; Zamorano, M

    2005-11-01

    Current legislation in the European Union regarding landfills provides measures, procedures and guidance to prevent or reduce, insofar as possible, negative effects on the environment. This means that Member States must take measures so that landfills cannot operate unless the operator first presents a plan for the site, which includes the implementation of improvements considered necessary by the engineer for compliance with regulations. Researchers at the University of Granada have developed a method to ascertain the degree of environmental impact that a construction and demolition waste landfill may produce on its immediate surroundings. This methodology is based on environmental indexes; its objective is to give crucial information concerning possible environmental problems produced by a landfill. The data thus obtained will permit the elaboration of guidelines for improvements in the location, design, and operation of landfills, or in extreme cases, their dosing, sealing, and rehabilitation.

  16. Re-use of construction and demolition residues and industrial wastes for the elaboration or recycled eco-efficient concretes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan Valdes, A.; Medina Martinez, C.; Guerra Romero, M. I.; Llamas Garcia, B.; Moran del Pozo, J. M.; Tascon Vegas, A.

    2010-07-01

    Production of residues from industries and construction and demolition sectors has increased during last years. The total amount of debris produced according to different estimations reaches values close to 42 million tonnes yr{sup -}1. Much of this waste has been thrown to landfill, without considering its potential for reuse, recycling or valuation. The aim of this research is to describe some of the physical and mechanical properties of different laboratory-mixed concretes, using various proportions of additional materials recovered from industrial waste and demolition rubble. The added materials are included either as admixtures (forestry residues, cork dust, steel fibre) or in partial substitution of natural aggregates (wire from electrical residues, tyre rubber, white ceramic, sanitary porcelain or shale). The laboratory tests have followed the standard EN protocols. Assay results were variable according to the nature of the material added to the mix: organic materials and shale, despite the steel fibre reinforcement, reduce the compression strength, but are suitable for the manufacture of lightweight concrete for agricultural pavements, with certain flexion resistance and a relatively good behaviour to impact. The substitution of natural aggregates with ceramic and porcelain wastes produces a significant increase in compression resistance, making them suitable for the manufacture of concrete with characteristic resistances above 40 MPa, which can be used both for structures or other agricultural elements: separators, feeders, slat floors. As a conclusion can be stated the possibility of reuse these wastes for the production of structural or non-structural concrete, with different applications in agricultural engineering. (Author) 36 refs.

  17. Emissions of toxic pollutants from co-combustion of demolition and construction wood and household waste fuel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo, Mar; Ortuño, Núria; Persson, Per-Erik; Conesa, Juan A; Jansson, Stina

    2018-07-01

    Four different types of fuel blends containing demolition and construction wood and household waste were combusted in a small-scale experimental set-up to study the effect of fuel composition on the emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls (PCBs), chlorobenzenes (PCBzs), chlorophenols (PCPhs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Two woody materials, commercial stemwood (ST) and demolition and construction wood (DC) were selected because of the differences in their persistent organic pollutants (POPs), ash and metals content. For household waste, we used a municipal solid waste (MSW) and a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) from MSW with 5-20 wt% and up to 5 wt% food waste content respectively. No clear effect on the formation of pollutants was observed with different food waste content in the fuel blends tested. Combustion of ST-based fuels was very inefficient which led to high PAH emissions (32 ± 3.8 mg/kg fuel ). The use of DC clearly increased the total PCDD and PCDF emissions (71 ± 26 μg/kg fuel ) and had a clear effect on the formation of toxic congeners (210 ± 87 ng WHO 2005 -TEQ/kg fuel ). The high PCDD and PCDF emissions from DC-based fuels can be attributed to the presence of material contaminants such as small pieces of metals or plastics as well as timber treated with chromated copper arsenate preservatives and pentachlorophenol in the DC source. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Demolition to Green-Field conditions of the FRJ-1 (MERLIN) research reactor. Successes and hurdles in the demolition of a research reactor of the megawatt class; Der Rueckbau des Forschungsreaktors FRJ-1 (MERLIN) bis zur 'Gruenen Wiese'. Erfolge und Huerden beim Rueckbau eines Forschungsreaktors der Megawatt-Klasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahn, Burkhard; Printz, Rudolf; Matela, Karel; Zehbe, Carsten; Stauch, Bernhard; Zander, Iven [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    The Juelich-1 Research Reactor (FRJ-1), also referred to as MERLIN (Medium Energy Research Light Water Moderated Industrial Nuclear Reactor), was a light-water moderated and cooled swimming pool reactor of British design. The cornerstone in the erection of the reactor building was laid on June 11, 1958. Reactor operation was started on February 23, 1962. The plant was last run at a thermal power of 10 MW and shut down for good in 1985 after 23 years of operation. After the fuel elements had been removed and most of the experimental installations dismantled, some first steps towards demolition were taken in 1995. Demolition on a large scale began in 1996. September 8, 2008 was a special day: On the area of the former reactor hall, an oak tree was planted as a symbol of the 'green field' and of the original oak wood which had to make way for the construction of reactors in Juelich. An oak tree now stands in the place of the reactor unit. Was that all? It was not, for there were ancillary systems, operations, utility and hygiene buildings which had to be pulled down. Decontamination and clearance measurements were completed. The application for clearance was prepared and completed. Conventional demolition was started in 2009. After completion of that step, the last chapter about demolition of the FRJ-1 research reactor has been written, and the book can be closed. (orig.)

  19. An evaluation of the composition of soil cement bricks with construction and demolition waste - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v33i2.9377

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Anderson da Silva Segantini

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development requires the existence of a production network that includes the reuse of construction waste for new materials. Current analysis investigates an optimal soil-cement composition made up of construction and demolition waste for the manufacture of pressed bricks. Soil-cement bricks were manufactured from construction and demolition wastes (CDW, A-4 classified fine sandy soil and cement CP II Z 32. Laboratory tests, comprising test compaction, optimum water content and maximum dry specific weight, consistency limits, grain size distribution and linear shrinkage, were made to characterize the materials researched. Compressive strength and absorption tests were also undertaken in different combinations of composition. Results showed that the application of CDW improved soil-cement qualities and reduced shrinkage of the material used.

  20. Ceramic and mixed construction and demolition wastes (CDW): a technically viable and environmentally friendly source of coarse aggregates for the concrete manufacture

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Desirée

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, it is widely recognized that construction and demolition wastes (CDW) pose a significant environmental problem. However, in spite of the interest that the topic of their reutilization in the construction industry has aroused among worldwide researchers, the actual practice regarding the use of recycled aggregates from CDW is limited to low level applications (mostly as unbound materials). This fact is especially true for recycled aggregates containing ceramic materials, which are co...

  1. Contact arc metal cutting (CAMC), a young cutting technique has matured. Successful use under water in the demolition of the Karlsruhe multipurpose research reactor (MFZR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanke, D.; Bienia, H.; Loeb, A.; Thoma, M.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.; Suessdorf, W.; Kremer, G.; Ruemenapp, T.

    2006-01-01

    Dismantling radiologically burdened large components is among the most complex and difficult jobs in the demolition of nuclear installations. The technologies used and their safe operation play a key role in demolition. Dismantling highly activated components as a rule requires shielding by water. As a consequence, the techniques employed must be designed for use under water. A variety of technologies are available for these applications. One established mechanical cutting method is water abrasive suspension jet cutting (WASS). Because of the small cutting nozzle employed, this highly flexible cutting technique can be used nearly anywhere together with different guiding systems. In the course of disassembly under water of the MZFR, plasma cutting has been found to be a reliable and efficient technique for remote operation. Contact arc metal cutting is a thermal cutting technique allowing all electrically conducting materials, including those with claddings, to be cut nearly irrespective of their component geometries. The methods, technology, possible uses, and practical operation of contact arc metal cutting in the demolition of the MZFR are covered in this article. (orig.)

  2. Responding To Changes in the Decommissioning Plans for Demolition of a Former Active Handling Building at The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Establishment Winfrith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2006-01-01

    The full decommissioning of the former Active Handling Building A59 at Winfrith in Dorset is being carried out by RWE NUKEM Limited under contract from the site owners and nuclear site licence holder, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA). Following recent government changes, the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has now set up contracts with UKAEA for delivery of the site clean-up programme. The building contains two heavily shielded suites of caves originally used to carry out remote examination of irradiated nuclear fuel elements together with other supporting facilities. The original intention was to demolish the caves ahead of the building but after detailed consideration it was concluded that demolition of the building in advance of the caves was more operationally effective. As a result, the original decommissioning plan had to be reworked to reflect these changes. The paper briefly explains how this situation arose and the means by which the problems experienced were overcome by a complete revision to the decommissioning programme. The updated plan has been adopted by UKAEA and work is now proceeding apace to clear the building of redundant items, to complete decontamination of all remaining areas and facilities and to carry out detailed radiological surveys to confirm that the building structure is clean and ready for demolition. Both cave lines have been completely decontaminated to low residual levels of activity and are essentially ready for controlled demolition. This paper describes some of the significant tasks undertaken during the past year with particular reference to the decommissioning techniques that gave the greatest success and the limitations of others originally considered. Some of these processes were aimed at minimising the volume of low level waste (LLW) generated by using standard off-the-shelf equipment to remove contamination from ∼5 Ton concrete blocks recovered from both cave line structures. A

  3. The FRJ-1 (MERLIN) research reactor: its main activity inventory has been removed by successful demolition of the reactor block; Forschungsreaktor FRJ-1 (MERLIN) - Das Hauptaktivitaetsinventar ist durch erfolgreichen Rueckbau des Reaktorblocks entfernt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahn, B.; Printz, R.; Matela, K.; Zehbe, C. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Poeppinghaus, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany); Cremer, J. [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    The FRJ-1 (MERLIN) research reactor was decommissioned in 1985 after twenty-three years of operation. Demolition of the plant was begun in 1996. The article contains a survey of the demolition steps carried out so far within the framework of three partial permits. The main activity is the demolition of the reactor core structures as a precondition for subsequent measures to ensure clearance measurements of the building. The core structures are demolished which were exposed to high neutron fluxes during reactor operation and now show the highest activity and dose rate levels, except for the core internals. For demolition and disassembly of the metal structures in this part of the plant, the tools specially designed and made include a remotely operated sawing system and a pipe cutting system for internal segmentation of the beam lines. The universal demolition tool for use also above and beyond the concrete structures has been found to be a remotely controlled electrohydraulic demolition shovel. Spreading contamination in the course of the demolition work was avoided. One major reason for this success was the fact that no major airborne contamination existed at any time as a consequence of the quality of the material demolished and also of the consistent use of technical tools. While the reactor block was being demolished, an application for clearance measurement of the reactor hall and subsequent release from the scope of the Atomic Energy Act was filed as early as in mid-2003. The fourth partial permit covering these activities is expected to be issued in the spring of 2004. (orig.)

  4. Soil retention of hexavalent chromium released from construction and demolition waste in a road-base-application scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Stefania; Trapp, Stefan; Astrup, Thomas F; Christensen, Thomas H

    2015-11-15

    We investigated the retention of Cr(VI) in three subsoils with low organic matter content in laboratory experiments at concentration levels relevant to represent leachates from construction and demolition waste (C&DW) reused as unbound material in road construction. The retention mechanism appeared to be reduction and subsequent precipitation as Cr(III) on the soil. The reduction process was slow and in several experiments it was still proceeding at the end of the six-month experimental period. The overall retention reaction fit well with a second-order reaction governed by actual Cr(VI) concentration and reduction capacity of the soil. The experimentally determined reduction capacities and second-order kinetic parameters were used to model, for a 100-year period, the one-dimensional migration of Cr(VI) in the subsoil under a layer of C&DW. The resulting Cr(VI) concentration would be negligible below 7-70 cm depth. However, in rigid climates and with high water infiltration through the road pavement, the reduction reaction could be so slow that Cr(VI) might migrate as deep as 200 cm under the road. The reaction parameters and the model can form the basis for systematically assessing under which scenarios Cr(VI) from C&DW could lead to an environmental issue for ground- and receiving surface waters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Does Disposing of Construction and Demolition Debris in Unlined Landfills Impact Groundwater Quality? Evidence from 91 Landfill Sites in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jon T; Jain, Pradeep; Smith, Justin; Townsend, Timothy G; Tolaymat, Thabet M

    2015-08-04

    More than 1,500 construction and demolition debris (CDD) landfills operate in the United States (U.S.), and U.S. federal regulations do not require containment features such as low-permeability liners and leachate collection systems for these facilities. Here we evaluate groundwater quality from samples collected in groundwater monitoring networks at 91 unlined, permitted CDD landfills in Florida, U.S. A total of 460,504 groundwater sample results were analyzed, with a median of 10 years of quarterly or semiannual monitoring data per site including more than 400 different chemical constituents. Downgradient concentrations of total dissolved solids, sulfate, chloride, iron, ammonia-nitrogen, and aluminum were greater than upgradient concentrations (p < 0.05). At downgradient wells where sulfate concentrations were greater than 150 mg/L (approximately 10% of the maximum dissolved sulfate concentration in water, which suggests the presence of leachate from the landfill), iron and arsenic were detected in 91% and 43% of samples, with median concentrations of 1,900 μg/L and 11 μg/L, respectively. These results show that although health-based standards can be exceeded at unlined CDD landfills, the magnitude of detected chemical concentrations is generally small and reflective of leached minerals from components (wood, concrete, and gypsum drywall) that comprise the bulk of discarded CDD by mass.

  6. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility's process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-2 1). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases

  7. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility's process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases

  8. Quality assessment for recycling aggregates from construction and demolition waste: An image-based approach for particle size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Bianconi, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Baglioni, Stefano; Marionni, Moreno

    2016-02-01

    The size distribution of aggregates has direct and important effects on fundamental properties of construction materials such as workability, strength and durability. The size distribution of aggregates from construction and demolition waste (C&D) is one of the parameters which determine the degree of recyclability and therefore the quality of such materials. Unfortunately, standard methods like sieving or laser diffraction can be either very time consuming (sieving) or possible only in laboratory conditions (laser diffraction). As an alternative we propose and evaluate the use of image analysis to estimate the size distribution of aggregates from C&D in a fast yet accurate manner. The effectiveness of the procedure was tested on aggregates generated by an existing C&D mechanical treatment plant. Experimental comparison with manual sieving showed agreement in the range 81-85%. The proposed technique demonstrated potential for being used on on-line systems within mechanical treatment plants of C&D. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Gypsum and organic matter distribution in a mixed construction and demolition waste sorting process and their possible removal from outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, A; Tojo, Y; Matsuo, T; Matsuto, T; Yamada, M; Asakura, H; Ono, Y

    2010-03-15

    With insufficient source separation, construction and demolition (C&D) waste becomes a mixed material that is difficult to recycle. Treatment of mixed C&D waste generates residue that contains gypsum and organic matter and poses a risk of H(2)S formation in landfills. Therefore, removing gypsum and organic matter from the residue is vital. This study investigated the distribution of gypsum and organic matter in a sorting process. Heavy liquid separation was used to determine the density ranges in which gypsum and organic matter were most concentrated. The fine residue that was separated before shredding accounted for 27.9% of the waste mass and contained the greatest quantity of gypsum; therefore, most of the gypsum (52.4%) was distributed in this fraction. When this fine fraction was subjected to heavy liquid separation, 93% of the gypsum was concentrated in the density range of 1.59-2.28, which contained 24% of the total waste mass. Therefore, removing this density range after segregating fine particles should reduce the amount of gypsum sent to landfills. Organic matter tends to float as density increases; nevertheless, separation at 1.0 density could be more efficient. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cavity Exciton-Polariton mediated, Single-Shot Quantum Non-Demolition measurement of a Quantum Dot Electron Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Shruti; McMahon, Peter; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-03-01

    The quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement of a single electron spin is of great importance in measurement-based quantum computing schemes. The current single-shot readout demonstrations exhibit substantial spin-flip backaction. We propose a QND readout scheme for quantum dot (QD) electron spins in Faraday geometry, which differs from previous proposals and implementations in that it relies on a novel physical mechanism: the spin-dependent Coulomb exchange interaction between a QD spin and optically-excited quantum well (QW) microcavity exciton-polaritons. The Coulomb exchange interaction causes a spin-dependent shift in the resonance energy of the polarized polaritons, thus causing the phase and intensity response of left circularly polarized light to be different to that of the right circularly polarized light. As a result the QD electron's spin can be inferred from the response to a linearly polarized probe. We show that by a careful design of the system, any spin-flip backaction can be eliminated and a QND measurement of the QD electron spin can be performed within a few 10's of nanoseconds with fidelity 99:95%. This improves upon current optical QD spin readout techniques across multiple metrics, including fidelity, speed and scalability. National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430, Japan.

  11. System Dynamic Analysis of Impacts of Government Charges on Disposal of Construction and Demolition Waste: A Hong Kong Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Sheung Au

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of reducing the amount of construction and demolition (C&D waste disposed to landfills, many countries and municipalities have introduced increasingly stringent C&D waste disposal charges (CDWDC but the level of CDWDC is often determined without a clear understanding of its broad and complex impacts. Against this background, this paper aims to propose a system dynamics (SD model that can help predict CDWDC’s environmental implications as well as its financial implications. Specifically, the proposed model explains complex causal relationships between variables such as the level of CDWDC, the amount of C&D waste disposed to landfills, the government’s revenues from CDWDC as well as the costs of supplying and operating landfills over time. For a case study, the developed model is customized and calibrated with actual data from Hong Kong, where the remaining capacities of existing landfills are limited and the need for supplying more landfills is imminent. The simulation analysis with the model predicts that the current charging levels may not be high enough to effectively control the amount of C&D waste disposed to landfills or to compensate for the costs to the government of supplying additional landfills. The analysis also predicts how much illegal dumping may increase as the level of CDWDC increases. This case study illustrates that the proposed SD model can help policy makers to see the potential impacts of increased CDWDC on the amount of C&D waste disposed to landfills, government costs and the amount of illegal dumping of C&D waste; and can therefore help them to determine the most appropriate level of CDWDC.

  12. A dynamic model for assessing the effects of management strategies on the reduction of construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongping; Chini, Abdol R; Lu, Yujie; Shen, Liyin

    2012-03-01

    During the past few decades, construction and demolition (C&D) waste has received increasing attention from construction practitioners and researchers worldwide. A plethora of research regarding C&D waste management has been published in various academic journals. However, it has been determined that existing studies with respect to C&D waste reduction are mainly carried out from a static perspective, without considering the dynamic and interdependent nature of the whole waste reduction system. This might lead to misunderstanding about the actual effect of implementing any waste reduction strategies. Therefore, this research proposes a model that can serve as a decision support tool for projecting C&D waste reduction in line with the waste management situation of a given construction project, and more importantly, as a platform for simulating effects of various management strategies on C&D waste reduction. The research is conducted using system dynamics methodology, which is a systematic approach that deals with the complexity - interrelationships and dynamics - of any social, economic and managerial system. The dynamic model integrates major variables that affect C&D waste reduction. In this paper, seven causal loop diagrams that can deepen understanding about the feedback relationships underlying C&D waste reduction system are firstly presented. Then a stock-flow diagram is formulated by using software for system dynamics modeling. Finally, a case study is used to illustrate the validation and application of the proposed model. Results of the case study not only built confidence in the model so that it can be used for quantitative analysis, but also assessed and compared the effect of three designed policy scenarios on C&D waste reduction. One major contribution of this study is the development of a dynamic model for evaluating C&D waste reduction strategies under various scenarios, so that best management strategies could be identified before being implemented

  13. Construction and demolition waste: Comparison of standard up-flow column and down-flow lysimeter leaching tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Stefania; Hyks, Jiri; Christensen, Thomas H; Astrup, Thomas F

    2015-09-01

    Five samples of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) were investigated in order to quantify leaching of inorganic elements under percolation conditions according to two different experimental setups: standardised up-flow saturated columns (<4mm particle size) and unsaturated, intermittent down-flow lysimeters (<40mm particle size). While standardised column tests are meant primarily to provide basic information on characteristic leaching properties and mechanisms and not to reproduce field conditions, the lysimeters were intended to mimic the actual leaching conditions when C&DW is used in unbound geotechnical layers. In practice, results from standardised percolation tests are often interpreted as estimations of actual release from solid materials in percolation scenarios. In general, the two tests yielded fairly similar results in terms of cumulative release at liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S) 10l·kgTS; however, significant differences were observed for P, Pb, Ba, Mg and Zn. Further differences emerged in terms of concentration in the early eluates (L/S<5l·kg(-1)TS) for Al, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, DOC, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Si, Zn. Observed differences between tests are likely to be due to differences in pH related to crushing and exposure of fresh particle surfaces, as well as in equilibrium conditions. In the case of C&DW, the standardised column tests, which are more practical, are considered to acceptably describe cumulative releases at L/S 10l·kg(-1)TS in percolation scenarios. However, when the focus is on estimation of initial concentrations for (for example) risk assessment, data from standardised column tests may not be fully applicable, and data from lysimeters may be used for validation purposes. Se, Cr and, to a lesser extent, SO4 and Sb were leaching from C&DW in critical amounts compared with existing limit values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clearance of buildings for demolition: ways to clearance on the standing structure for covered surfaces and inaccessible areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thraenert, S.; Riemann, T.

    2014-01-01

    In general terms, the TUV NORD Nuclear services encompass safety assessments, design reviews, documentation re-views and inspections. They reflect the full scope of a technical service provider in the nuclear field. In the domestic market, these services are provided for the regulator, whereas in the international market any party involved in a nuclear project is a potential customer of TUV NORD Nuclear. This implies that TUV NORD Nuclear is offering consultancy, engineering and inspection services. Regarding the clearance of buildings for demolition, there are two different possible ways for the radiological characterization. The first option is a characterization on the standing structure before demolition and the second option is the characterization of the building rubble after demolition. According to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance, buildings of decommissioned nuclear sites have to be preferentially cleared on the standing structure. If compliance with the surface specific clearance levels is achieved on the standing structure, usually the cleared buildings can be demolished and the resulting rubble may be used without any further radiological considerations. In the case of the former nuclear power plant Wuergassen the majority of the building rubble is scheduled to stay on site to serve as backfill for the building pit. As such a scenario was not considered in the radiological considerations of, e.g., the German Radiation Protection Ordinance, an additional dose calculation was carried out for Wuergassen NPP basing on its radiological characteristics to directly prove compliance with the de-minimis-concept. The radiation controlled area (RCA) of Wuergassen NPP comprises an area of about 140.000 m 2 . This area is more or less easily accessible to characterization and decontamination using, if necessary, scaffoldings or lifting platforms. Up to the beginning of 2013, compliance with the surface specific clearance levels was verified on the standing

  15. Use of filler limestone and construction and demolition residues for remediating soils contaminated with heavy metals: an assessment by means of plant uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banegas, Ascension; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Agudo, Ines; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    A greenhouse trial was carried out to evaluate the assimilation of heavy metals by three types of horticultural plants (lettuce, broccoli and alfalfa), different parts of which are destined for human and animal consumption (leaves, roots, fruits). The plants were cultivated in four types of soil, one uncontaminated (T1), one soil collected in the surrounding area of Sierra Minera (T2), the third being remediated with residues coming from demolition and construction activities (T3) and the four remediated with filler limestone (T4). To determine the metal content, soil samples were first ground to a fine powder using an agate ball mill. Fresh vegetable samples were separated into root and aboveground biomass and then lyophilized. The DTPA-extractable content was also determined to calculate the bioavailable amount of metal. Finally, the translocation factor (TF) and bioconcentration factor (BCF) were calculated. Arsenic levels were obtained by using atomic fluorescence spectrometry with an automated continuous flow hydride generation (HG-AFS) spectrometer and Cd, Pb and Zn was determined by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) or flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Samples of the leached water were also obtained and analyzed. According to our results, the retention of the studied elements varies with the type of plant and is strongly decreased by the incorporation of filler limestone and/or construction and demolition residues to the soils. This practice represents a suitable way to reduce the risk posed to the biota by the presence of high levels of heavy metal in soil.

  16. Nanomaterials in construction and demolition - how can we assess the risk if we don't know where they are?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Wendy; Gibb, Alistair; Goodier, Chris; Bust, Phil; Jin, Jie; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    This research, funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health in the United Kingdom, has used a combination of literature review, web searching and unstructured interviews with a range of industry professionals to compile a list of products used in construction and the built environment which might contain nanomaterials. Samples of these products have been analysed using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X- Ray Spectroscopy to investigate whether nanomaterials are actually present and to what extent. Preliminary results of this testing are presented here. It is concluded that there is a discrepancy between the academic literature and the reality regarding the current application of nanomaterials in the construction industry and the built environment. There are also inaccuracies and deficiencies in the information provided by manufacturers which makes it difficult to accurately assess the location and application of nanomaterials within the industry. Further testing is planned to evaluate the risk of nanoparticle release from nano-enabled building products at their end of life by reproducing common demolition and recycling processes such as crushing, grinding, burning and melting. Results of this will form the basis of practical guidance for the construction, demolition and recycling industries to help them identify where particular protection or control measures may be appropriate as well as providing reassurance where no additional action is required. (paper)

  17. Developing a Planting Medium from Solid Waste Compost and Construction and Demolition Rubble for Use in Quarry Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The combination of construction, demolition and excavation (CDE) waste along with the increase in solid waste generation has put a major stress on Lebanon and on the management of its solid waste. Compounding this problem are the issues of quarries closure and rehabilitation and a decrease in forest and vegetative cover. This research aims to provide an integrated solution to the stated problem by developing a "soil mix" derived from a mélange of the organic matter of the solid waste (compost), the CDE waste, and soil. Excavation and construction debris were ground to several sizes and mixed with compost and soil at different ratios. Replicates of these mixes and a set of control (regular soil) were used. In this mix, native and indicator plants are planted (in pots). The plant species used are Mathiolla crassifolia and Zea mays (Corn). Results have shown successful growth of both corn and Mathiolla seedlings in the mixes with higher amounts of construction rubble and compost i.e. Rubble: Soil: Compost Ratio of 2:1:1 and 1:0:1. However treatments with no compost and with less quantities of rubble demonstrated the inability of the soil used to sustain plant growth alone (1:1:1 and 1:1:0). Last but not least, the control consisting of soil only ended up being the weakest mix with yellow corn leaves and small Mathiolla seedlings fifty days after planting and fertilizing. Additionally, soil analysis, rubble and compost analysis were conducted. The samples were tested for heavy metals, nutrient availability and values of pH and EC. No contamination has been reported and an abundance of macronutrients and micronutrients was documented for the soil and compost. High alkalinity is due to the presence of concrete and the high percentage of Calcium Carbonate in Lebanese soils. Accordingly, the most adequate mixes for planting are treatments A (2:1:1) and B (1:0:1) and they should be pursued for a pilot scale study to test their potential use in quarry rehabilitation and

  18. Mass, energy and material balances of SRF production process. Part 2: SRF produced from construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Kärki, Janne

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the fraction of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) complicated and economically not feasible to sort out for recycling purposes is used to produce solid recovered fuel (SRF) through mechanical treatment (MT). The paper presents the mass, energy and material balances of this SRF production process. All the process streams (input and output) produced in MT waste sorting plant to produce SRF from C&D waste are sampled and treated according to CEN standard methods for SRF. Proximate and ultimate analysis of these streams is performed and their composition is determined. Based on this analysis and composition of process streams their mass, energy and material balances are established for SRF production process. By mass balance means the overall mass flow of input waste material stream in the various output streams and material balances mean the mass flow of components of input waste material stream (such as paper and cardboard, wood, plastic (soft), plastic (hard), textile and rubber) in the various output streams of SRF production process. The results from mass balance of SRF production process showed that of the total input C&D waste material to MT waste sorting plant, 44% was recovered in the form of SRF, 5% as ferrous metal, 1% as non-ferrous metal, and 28% was sorted out as fine fraction, 18% as reject material and 4% as heavy fraction. The energy balance of this SRF production process showed that of the total input energy content of C&D waste material to MT waste sorting plant, 74% was recovered in the form of SRF, 16% belonged to the reject material and rest 10% belonged to the streams of fine fraction and heavy fraction. From the material balances of this process, mass fractions of plastic (soft), paper and cardboard, wood and plastic (hard) recovered in the SRF stream were 84%, 82%, 72% and 68% respectively of their input masses to MT plant. A high mass fraction of plastic (PVC) and rubber material was found in the reject material

  19. Evaluating the effect of vehicle impoundment policy on illegal construction and demolition waste dumping: Israel as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, Nissim; Hareli, Shlomo; Portnov, Boris A

    2014-08-01

    Construction and demolition (C&D) waste dumped alongside roads and in open areas is a major source of soil and underground water pollution. Since 2006, Israeli ministry for environmental protection enacted a policy of vehicle impoundment (VI) according to which track drivers caught while dumping C&D waste illegally have their vehicles impounded. The present study attempted to determine whether the VI policy was effective in increasing the waste hauling to authorized landfill sites, thus limiting the number of illegal unloads of C&D waste at unauthorized landfill sites and in open areas. During the study, changes in the ratio between the monthly amount of C&D waste brought to authorized landfills sites and the estimated total amount of C&D waste generated in different administrative districts of Israel were examined, before and after the enactment of the 2006 VI policy. Short questionnaires were also distributed among local track drivers in order to determine the degree of awareness about the policy in question and estimate its deterrence effects. According to the study's results, in the district of Haifa, in which the VI policy was stringently enacted, the ratio between C&D waste, dumped in authorized landfill sites, and the total amount of generated C&D waste, increased, on the average, from 20% in January 2004 to 35% in October 2009, with the effect attributed to the number of vehicle impoundments being highly statistically significant (t=2.324; p0.1). The analysis of the questionnaires, distributed among the local truck drivers further indicated that the changes observed in the district of Haifa are not coincident and appeared to be linked to the VI policy's enactment. In particular, 62% of the truck drivers, participated in the survey, were aware of the policy and 47% of them personally knew a driver whose vehicle was impounded. Furthermore, the drivers estimated the relative risk of being caught for unloading C&D waste in unauthorized sites, on the average, as

  20. A managed approach to achieve a safe, cost effective, and environmentally sound demolition of a plutonium-238 contaminated building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Ralph R.; Geichman, Jack R.; Keener, Douglas E.; Farmer, Billy M.

    1992-01-01

    DOE's Mound Plant has the problem of demolishing a former plutonium-238 processing facility, the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building. The building is located within 200 feet of a major public road and golf course. Previous removal efforts on appendages to the building used the technique of tenting small segments and used labor intensive segment-by-segment removal with expendable hand tools. This approach was very slow and costly, but offered good environmental control of radioactive contamination. It was realized that this method, when applied to the entire structure of the building, would not only be very costly, but would also be of high risk to worker safety and worker exposure to contamination. The new approach to overcome these problems is to dismantle the building structure using a rotating grapple to hold sections of the building structure while a portable rotating shear cuts the steel beams into appropriate lengths for loading directly into large waste containers. By the former method, the cut jagged steel would be size reduced with hand tools and loaded into waste containers manually. The additional handling has a high probability of producing minor, yet potentially contaminated, skin lacerations. The shear and grapple method eliminates this hazard. To apply this safer and more cost effective technology, Mound had to assure that the method would be environmentally sound and that neither onsite workers or the general public would be exposed to radioactivity. The Annex was decontaminated to as low as reasonably possible and the contaminated interior painted. However, there were numerous areas where contamination could be trapped. Mound conducted a formal sampling of these areas and had the results modeled for potential release during demolition. The results of this sampling and modeling effort showed that the building could be dismantled using this technology without producing a harmful effect on the environment. Application of this managed approach to the

  1. A dynamic model for assessing the effects of management strategies on the reduction of construction and demolition waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Hongping; Chini, Abdol R.; Lu Yujie; Shen Liyin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We proposes a model for projecting C and D waste reduction of construction projects. ► The model can simulate effects of various management strategies on waste reduction. ► The model integrates all essential variables that affect C and D waste reduction. ► By using the model, best strategies could be identified before being implemented. - Abstract: During the past few decades, construction and demolition (C and D) waste has received increasing attention from construction practitioners and researchers worldwide. A plethora of research regarding C and D waste management has been published in various academic journals. However, it has been determined that existing studies with respect to C and D waste reduction are mainly carried out from a static perspective, without considering the dynamic and interdependent nature of the whole waste reduction system. This might lead to misunderstanding about the actual effect of implementing any waste reduction strategies. Therefore, this research proposes a model that can serve as a decision support tool for projecting C and D waste reduction in line with the waste management situation of a given construction project, and more importantly, as a platform for simulating effects of various management strategies on C and D waste reduction. The research is conducted using system dynamics methodology, which is a systematic approach that deals with the complexity – interrelationships and dynamics – of any social, economic and managerial system. The dynamic model integrates major variables that affect C and D waste reduction. In this paper, seven causal loop diagrams that can deepen understanding about the feedback relationships underlying C and D waste reduction system are firstly presented. Then a stock-flow diagram is formulated by using software for system dynamics modeling. Finally, a case study is used to illustrate the validation and application of the proposed model. Results of the case study not only

  2. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report for the Demolition of the Masonry Block for the 108-F Biological Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrnes, M. E.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this data quality objectives (DQO) process is to support decision-making activities as they pertain to the demolition and disposition (or disposal) of the uncoated 108-F Biological Laboratory masonry block walls. The objective of DQO Step 1 is to use the information gathered from the DQO scoping process and other relevant information to clearly and concisely state the problem to be resolved. The free-form text sections included in this step are intended to define the project objectives and assumptions, present the project issues, summarize the facility background information, and provide a concise statement of the problem. The tables provided in this section are designed to document the personnel involved in the DQO process, identify the contaminants of concern, and summarize the key information needed to support the writing of the problem statement. The purpose of DQO Step 2 is to define the principal study question (PSQ) that needs to be resolved to address the problem identified in DQO Step 1 and to define the alternative actions that would result from the resolution of the PSQ. The PSQ and alternative actions are combined into a decision statement that expresses a choice among alternative actions. The purpose of DQO Step 3 is to identify the type of data needed to resolve the decision statement identified in DQO Step 2, as well as the analytical performance requirements (e.g., practical quantitation limit [PQL] requirement, precision, and accuracy) for the data. If it is determined that the required data do not already exist, the data may either be derived from computational or surveying/sampling and analysis methods. The primary objective of DQO Step 4 is for the DQO Team to identify the geographic (spatial) and temporal boundaries of the facility under investigation, as well as practical constraints (i.e., hindrances or obstacles) that must be taken into consideration in the surveying design. Implementing this step ensures that the surveying

  3. Mitigation of Hexavalent Chromium in Storm Water Resulting from Demolition of Large Concrete Structure at the East Tennessee Technology Park - 12286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, Ronnie; Brown, Bridget; Hale, Timothy B.; Hensley, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert T.; Patel, Madhu [Tetra Tech, Inc. (United States); Emery, Jerry A. [Energy Solutions, Inc. (United States); Gaston, Clyde [LATA-SHARP Remediation Services - LSRS (United States); Queen, David C. [U.S. DOE-ORO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding was provided to supplement the environmental management program at several DOE sites, including the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Demolition of the ETTP K-33 Building, the largest building to be demolished to date in Oak Ridge, was awarded to LSRS in FY-2010 under the ARRA program. The K-33 building was an 82 foot tall 2-story structure covering approximately 32 acres. Once this massive building was brought down to the ground, the debris was segregated and consolidated into piles of concrete rubble and steel across the remaining pad. The process of demolishing the building, tracking across concrete debris with heavy equipment, and stockpiling the concrete rubble caused it to become pulverized. During and after storm events, hexavalent chromium leached from the residual cement present in the large quantities of concrete. Storm water control measures were present to preclude migration of contaminants off-site, but these control measures were not designed to control hexavalent chromium dissolved in storm water from reaching nearby receiving water. The following was implemented to mitigate hexavalent chromium in storm water: - Steel wool was distributed around K-33 site catch basins and in water pools as an initial step in addressing hexavalent chromium. - Since the piles of concrete were too massive and unsafe to tarp, they were placed into windrows in an effort to reduce total surface area. - A Hach colorimetric field meter was acquired by the K-33 project to provide realtime results of hexavalent chromium in site surface water. - Three hexavalent chromium treatment systems were installed at three separate catch basins that receive integrated storm water flow from the K-33 site. Sodium bisulfite is being used as a reducing agent for the immobilization of hexavalent chromium while also assisting in lowering pH. Concentrations initially were 310 - 474 ppb of hexavalent chromium in

  4. Use of engineered nanomaterials in the construction industry with specific emphasis on paints and their flows in construction and demolition waste in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié, Ingrid; Caballero-Guzman, Alejandro; Hiltbrunner, David; Nowack, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    One sector where the use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is supposed to offer novel or improved functionalities is the construction industry. During the renovation or demolition of buildings, ENMs contained in former construction materials will enter recycling systems or become construction waste. Currently, information about ENM flows in these processes is insufficient. The potential for the release of ENMs from this waste into the environment is unknown, as are the environmental impacts. To evaluate whether there is currently any nano-relevant construction and demolition waste (C&DW) originating from buildings, we evaluated the sources and flows of ENMs in C&DW and identified their potential exposure pathways. A survey of business representatives of Swiss companies in this sector found that ENMs are mainly used in paints and cement. The most frequently used ENMs in the Swiss housing construction industry are nano-TiO2, nano-SiO2, nano-ZnO, and nano-Ag. Using a bottom-up, semi-quantitative approach, we estimated the flows of ENMs contained in paints along the product's life cycle from buildings to recycling and landfill. The flows of ENMs are determined by their associated flows of building materials. We estimated an annual amount of ENMs used in paints of 14t of TiO2, 12t of SiO2, 5t of ZnO, and 0.2t of Ag. The majority of ENMs contained in paints in Switzerland enter recycling systems (23t/y), a smaller amount is disposed directly in landfills (7t/y), and a tiny fraction of ENM waste is incinerated (0.01t/y). Our results allow a qualitative determination of the potential release of ENMs into technical or environmental compartments, with the highest potential release expected during recycling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Consequences of the EU basic safety standards. Omission of the clearance for demolition/disposal with respect to the deconstruction projects of WAK GmbH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmann, S.

    2013-01-01

    The WAK GmbH's task is to decommission the nuclear installation projects at the KIT Campus Nord. These include the former Reprocessing Plant (WAK-Anlage), the Multi-purpose Research Reactor (MZFR), Research Reactor 2 (FR2), Compact Sodium-cooled Nuclear Reactor Facility (KNK), the Hot Cells (HZ) and some more small research facilities of the KIT. The buildings should be released by paragraph 29 German Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV) after the demolition of the process-engineering equipment. For this the clearance levels for 'demolition of buildings' Annex III Tab. 1 Column 10 (StrlSchV) must be reached, depth profiles were sampled on order to estimate how much material of the walls has to be removed to reach the values of the clearance levels. In a proposal (10926/12 ATO 90 SOC 501 SAN 149) on the basis of new scientific knowledge the EU plans to introduce clearance levels from the IAEA - ''Application of the Concepts of Exclusion, Exemption and Clearance RS-G-1.7''. In the proposal there are only clearance levels for an unrestricted release. Clearance levels for specific purpose (Annex III Tab. 1 Column 9a - 9d, 10 and 10a StrlSchV) are not named. A worst case scenario has been made what the possible effects are if the unrestricted release in the proposal of the basic safety standards from EU is guilty for every material. An estimation were done how much material and how much volume of building rubbish has to be removed to reach these new resulted clearance. Based on these volumes the caused additional financial costs for the final disposal for the WAK GmbH were calculated. (orig.)

  6. The Walls Come Tumbling Down: Decontamination and Demolition of 29 Manhattan Project and Cold War-Era Buildings and Structures at Los Alamos National Laboratory-12301

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloupka, Allan B.; Finn, Kevin P.; Parsons, Duane A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    approximately 18,580 m{sup 2} (200,000 ft{sup 2}). The initially approved baseline for the ARRA D and D Project was to remove 22 buildings and structures that included approximately 14,680 m{sup 2} (158,000 ft{sup 2}) of footprint. By employing efficiencies during subcontracting, demolition, and waste segregation, the savings allowed an additional 1,580 m{sup 2} (17,000 ft{sup 2}) of footprint to be removed using ARRA funds. Additionally, the lessons learned from this experience were used to apply NNSA funding to the removal of six additional non-contaminated buildings and structures. In the end, 29 buildings and structures, including stacks, cooling towers and tanks, were removed from the mesa. The entire DP East area was cleared of buildings and sub-grade structures and the soils cleaned to residential standards. The total footprint reduction at TA-21 as a result of this effort was in excess of 17,650 m{sup 2} (190,000 ft{sup 2}). The use of a Laboratory self-performance team to start demolition of non-contaminated structures resulted in steady work performance early in the project while subcontracts were being put in place to perform more complicated abatement and contaminated demolition activities. Most importantly, there were no serious worker injuries and the minor injuries recorded were those common to construction type activities. Extensive monitoring along the site boundary demonstrated that no hazardous chemicals or radioactive contamination were released and radiological dose to the public was negligible. The ARRA demolition activities were completed six months in advance of the deadline for employing ARRA funds. Additionally, over 17,585 m{sup 3} (23,000 yds{sup 3}) of building demolition debris was safely removed from DP Mesa. All of the major buildings have been removed, unencumbered access to the SWMUs that are required to be cleaned up by the Consent Order with the state of New Mexico, has been achieved, and a significant portion of the mesa has been prepared to

  7. Economic viability of demolition recycled wastes used during the construction of the subfloor of a building located in the east side of the city of São Paulo

    OpenAIRE

    Paschoalin Filho, João Alexandre; Storopoli, João Henrique; Duarte, Eric Brum Lima

    2014-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/2236117013750The civil construction industry is responsible for a considerable environmental impact, whether the demand for natural raw materials or the generation of waste from its activities. The Resolution 307 of 5 July 2002 of the National Environmental Council classified construction and demolition wastes into different classes according to their physical characteristics, and forms to submit its disposal. This resolution highlights that construction waste can´t ...

  8. Comparison of scenarios for the integrated management of construction and demolition waste by life cycle assessment: A case study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Carmenlucia Santos Giordano; Rosado, Laís Peixoto

    2016-10-01

    Brazil, as a result of economic development and strengthening of the construction industry in recent years, is generating an increasing amount of construction and demolition waste (CDW). Hence, environmental assessment of the management systems is vital. A life cycle assessment (LCA) is presented of CDW management in a medium-sized municipality located in the southeast region of Brazil, where the impacts of leaching were not considered due to absence of consistent data. Six different proposed scenarios for the current CDW management situation have been considered. These scenarios comprised the combined use of landfilling, sorting, and recycling, and the use of CDW as paving material for landfill roads, in different percentages. Considering 0.8 ton of waste as the functional unit, the life cycle inventory was performed using primary data obtained from field survey and secondary data from the database Ecoinvent version 3.1, and from the literature. The method CML 2 baseline 2001 was used for environmental impacts evaluation. The results highlight that recycling is beneficial when efficient CDW sorting takes place at construction sites, avoiding the transport of refuse to sorting and recycling facilities, and the distance between the generation source and the recycling unit is within 30 km. Thus, our results are helpful to ensure that the decision-making processes are based on environmental and technical aspects, and not only on economic and political factors, and also provide data and support for other LCA studies on CDW. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Landfill disposal of CCA-treated wood with construction and demolition (C&D) debris: arsenic, chromium, and copper concentrations in leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambeck, Jenna R; Townsend, Timothy G; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2008-08-01

    Although phased out of many residential uses in the United States, the disposal of CCA-treated wood remains a concern because significant quantities have yet to be taken out of service, and it is commonly disposed in landfills. Catastrophic events have also led to the concentrated disposal of CCA-treated wood, often in unlined landfills. The goal of this research was to simulate the complex chemical and biological activity of a construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfill containing a realistic quantity of CCA-treated wood (10% by mass), produce leachate, and then evaluate the arsenic, copper, and chromium concentrations in the leachate as an indication of what may occur in a landfill setting. Copper concentrations were not significantly elevated in the control or experimental simulated landfill setting (alpha = 0.05). However, the concentrations of arsenic and chromium were significantly higher in the experimental simulated landfill leachate compared to the control simulated landfill leachate (alpha = 0.05, p debris can impact leachate quality which, in turn could affect leachate management practices or aquifers below unlined landfills.

  10. Portland blended cements: demolition ceramic waste management; Cementos Portland con adiciones: manejo de residuos cerámicos de demolición.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trezza, M.A.; Zito, S.; Tironi, A.; Irassar, E.F.; Rahhal, V.F.

    2017-07-01

    Demolition ceramic wastes (DCWs) were investigated in order to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious materials in Portland Blended Cements (PBCs). For this purpose, three ceramic wastes were investigated. After characterization of the materials used, the effect of ceramic waste replacement (8, 24 and 40% by mass) was analyzed. Pozzolanic activity, hydration progress, workability and compressive strength were determined at 2, 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the ground wastes behave as filler at an early age, but as hydration progresses, the pozzolanic activity of ceramic waste contributes to the strength requirement. [Spanish] Se estudiaron residuos cerámicos de demolición (DCWs) a fin de determinar su potencial uso como materiales cementicios suplementarios en cementos mezcla (PBC). Para este propósito, se investigaron tres residuos cerámicos. Luego de la caracterización de los materiales a utilizar, se analizó el efecto del reemplazo por residuos cerámico (8, 24 y 40% en peso). Se estudió la actividad puzolánica, el progreso de la hidratación, la trabajabilidad y la resistencia a compresión a 2, 7 y 28 días. Los resultados mostraron que los residuos molidos se comportaron como fillers a edades tempranas, pero con el progreso de la hidratación, la actividad puzolánica de los residuos cerámicos contribuye a los requerimientos de resistencia.

  11. A Dynamic Model for Construction and Demolition (C&D Waste Management in Spain: Driving Policies Based on Economic Incentives and Tax Penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Calvo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the recent Spanish legislation, the amount of non-hazardous construction and demolition waste (C&D waste by weight must be reduced by at least 70% by 2020. However, the current behavior of the stakeholders involved in the waste management process make this goal difficult to achieve. In order to boost changes in their strategies, we firstly describe an Environmental Management System (EMS based on regulation measures and economic incentives which incorporate universities as a key new actor in order to create a 3Rs model (Reduce, Reuse and Recycle in the C&D waste management with costs savings. The target areas are focused mainly on producer responsibility, promotion of low-waste building technologies and creation of green jobs to fulfill three main objectives: valorization of inert wastes, elimination of illegal landfills and stimulation of demand for recycled C&D wastes. To achieve this latter goal, we have also designed a simulation model—using the Systems Dynamic methodology—to assess the potential impact of two policies (incentives and tax penalties in order to evaluate how the government can influence the behavior of the firms in the recycling system of C&D waste aggregates. This paper finds a broader understanding of the socioeconomic implications of waste management over time and the positive effects of these policies in the recycled aggregates market in order to achieve the goal of 30% C&D waste aggregates in 12 years or less.

  12. Risk assessment by percolation leaching tests of extensive green roofs with fine fraction of mixed recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Galvín, Adela P; Ayuso, Jesús; Jiménez, José Ramón; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Peña, Adolfo

    2018-03-19

    Extensive green roofs are urban construction systems that provide thermal regulation and sound proofing for the buildings involved, in addition to providing an urban heat island mitigation or water retention. On the other hand, policies towards reduction of energy consumption, a circular economy and sustainability are core in the European Union. Motivated by this, an experimental study was carried out to evaluate the environmental risk assessment according to release levels of polluting elements on leachates of different green roof substrate mixtures based on recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste through (i) the performance in laboratory of two procedures: compliance and percolation tests and (ii) an upscaled experimental leaching test for long-term on-site prediction. Four plots were built on a building roof and covered with autochthonous Mediterranean plants in Córdoba, South of Spain. As growing substrate, four mixtures were used of a commercial growing substrate with different proportions of a fine mixed recycled aggregate ranging from 0 to 75% by volume. The results show that these mixtures were classified as non-hazardous materials according to legal limits of the Landfill Directive 2003/33/CE. The release levels registered in extensive green roofs were lower compared to the laboratory test data. This shows how laboratory conditions can overestimate the potential pollutant effect of these materials compared to actual conditions.

  13. Spatial distribution of organic pollutants in industrial construction and demolition waste and their mutual interaction on an abandoned pesticide manufacturing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng; Zhao, Xin; Sun, Yanqiu; Ma, Jianli; Gao, Xiaofeng; Xie, Tian; Xu, Dongsheng; Yu, Yi; Zhao, Youcai

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive field investigation of organic pollutants was examined in industrial construction and demolition waste (ICDW) inside an abandoned pesticide manufacturing plant. Concentrations of eight types of pesticides, a metabolite and two intermediates were studied. The ICDW was under severe and long-term contamination by organophosphorus, intermediates and pyrethroid pesticide with mean concentrations of 23,429, 3538 and 179.4 mg kg(-1), respectively. FT-IR analysis suggested that physical absorption and chemical bonding were their mutual interaction forms. Patterns of total pesticide spatial distribution showed good correlations with manufacturing processes spreading all over the plant both in enclosed workshops and in residues randomly dumped outside, while bricks and coatings were the most vulnerable to pollutants. Ultimately the fate of the OPPs was diversified as the immersion of ICDW in water largely transferred the pollutants into aquatic systems while exposure outside did not largely lead to pesticide degradation. The adoption of centralized collections for the disposal of wastes could only eliminate part of the contaminated ICDW, probably due to lack of knowledge and criteria. Correlation matrix and cluster analysis indicated that regulated disposal and management of polluted ICDW was effective, thus presenting the requirement for its appropriate disposal.

  14. Quality Assessment of Mixed and Ceramic Recycled Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Wastes in the Concrete Manufacture According to the Spanish Standard †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; García-González, Julia; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Pozo, Julia Mª Morán-del; Guerra-Romero, Manuel I

    2014-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste (CDW) constitutes an increasingly significant problem in society due to the volume generated, rendering sustainable management and disposal problematic. The aim of this study is to identify a possible reuse option in the concrete manufacturing for recycled aggregates with a significant ceramic content: mixed recycled aggregates (MixRA) and ceramic recycled aggregates (CerRA). In order to do so, several tests are conducted in accordance with the Spanish Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08) to determine the composition in weight and physic-mechanical characteristics (particle size distributions, fine content, sand equivalent, density, water absorption, flakiness index, and resistance to fragmentation) of the samples for the partial inclusion of the recycled aggregates in concrete mixes. The results of these tests clearly support the hypothesis that this type of material may be suitable for such partial replacements if simple pretreatment is carried out. Furthermore, this measure of reuse is in line with European, national, and regional policies on sustainable development, and presents a solution to the environmental problem caused by the generation of CDW. PMID:28788164

  15. Quality Assessment of Mixed and Ceramic Recycled Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Wastes in the Concrete Manufacture According to the Spanish Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; García-González, Julia; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia Mª; Guerra-Romero, Manuel I

    2014-08-13

    Construction and demolition waste (CDW) constitutes an increasingly significant problem in society due to the volume generated, rendering sustainable management and disposal problematic. The aim of this study is to identify a possible reuse option in the concrete manufacturing for recycled aggregates with a significant ceramic content: mixed recycled aggregates (MixRA) and ceramic recycled aggregates (CerRA). In order to do so, several tests are conducted in accordance with the Spanish Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08) to determine the composition in weight and physic-mechanical characteristics (particle size distributions, fine content, sand equivalent, density, water absorption, flakiness index, and resistance to fragmentation) of the samples for the partial inclusion of the recycled aggregates in concrete mixes. The results of these tests clearly support the hypothesis that this type of material may be suitable for such partial replacements if simple pretreatment is carried out. Furthermore, this measure of reuse is in line with European, national, and regional policies on sustainable development, and presents a solution to the environmental problem caused by the generation of CDW.

  16. Quality Assessment of Mixed and Ceramic Recycled Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Wastes in the Concrete Manufacture According to the Spanish Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée Rodríguez-Robles

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Construction and demolition waste (CDW constitutes an increasingly significant problem in society due to the volume generated, rendering sustainable management and disposal problematic. The aim of this study is to identify a possible reuse option in the concrete manufacturing for recycled aggregates with a significant ceramic content: mixed recycled aggregates (MixRA and ceramic recycled aggregates (CerRA. In order to do so, several tests are conducted in accordance with the Spanish Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08 to determine the composition in weight and physic-mechanical characteristics (particle size distributions, fine content, sand equivalent, density, water absorption, flakiness index, and resistance to fragmentation of the samples for the partial inclusion of the recycled aggregates in concrete mixes. The results of these tests clearly support the hypothesis that this type of material may be suitable for such partial replacements if simple pretreatment is carried out. Furthermore, this measure of reuse is in line with European, national, and regional policies on sustainable development, and presents a solution to the environmental problem caused by the generation of CDW.

  17. Comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) of construction and demolition (C&D) derived biomass and U.S. northeast forest residuals gasification for electricity production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Philip; Gardner, Kevin H; Jambeck, Jenna R

    2013-04-02

    With the goal to move society toward less reliance on fossil fuels and the mitigation of climate change, there is increasing interest and investment in the bioenergy sector. However, current bioenergy growth patterns may, in the long term, only be met through an expansion of global arable land at the expense of natural ecosystems and in competition with the food sector. Increasing thermal energy recovery from solid waste reduces dependence on fossil- and biobased energy production while enhancing landfill diversion. Using inventory data from pilot processes, this work assesses the cradle-to-gate environmental burdens of plasma gasification as a route capable of transforming construction and demolition (C&D) derived biomass (CDDB) and forest residues into electricity. Results indicate that the environmental burdens associated with CDDB and forest residue gasification may be similar to conventional electricity generation. Land occupation is lowest when CDDB is used. Environmental impacts are to a large extent due to coal cogasified, coke used as gasifier bed material, and fuel oil cocombusted in the steam boiler. However, uncertainties associated with preliminary system designs may be large, particularly the heat loss associated with pilot scale data resulting in overall low efficiencies of energy conversion to electricity; a sensitivity analysis assesses these uncertainties in further detail.

  18. Environmental analysis of a construction and demolition waste recycling plant in Portugal--Part I: energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    This work is a part of a wider study involving the economic and environmental implications of managing construction and demolition waste (CDW), focused on the operation of a large scale CDW recycling plant. This plant, to be operated in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (including the Setúbal peninsula), is analysed for a 60 year period, using primary energy consumption and CO2eq emission impact factors as environmental impact performance indicators. Simplified estimation methods are used to calculate industrial equipment incorporated, and the operation and transport related impacts. Material recycling--sorted materials sent to other industries, to act as input--is taken into account by discounting the impacts related to industrial processes no longer needed. This first part focuses on calculating the selected impact factors for a base case scenario (with a 350 tonnes/h installed capacity), while a sensitivity analysis is provided in part two. Overall, a 60 year global primary energy consumption of 71.4 thousand toe (tonne of oil equivalent) and a total CO2eq emission of 135.4 thousand tonnes are expected. Under this operating regime, around 563 thousand toe and 1465 thousand tonnes CO2eq could be prevented by replacing raw materials in several construction materials industries (e.g.: ferrous and non-ferrous metals, plastics, paper and cardboard). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Media Mobilization, Demolition-Resistant Families, and Contentious Politics.Reanalysis of the Event of Yihuang%媒介动员、钉子户与抗争政治 宜黄事件再分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕德文

    2012-01-01

    宜黄事件具有某种标志性意义,它颠覆了当代中国抗争政治的刻板印象,创造了一个新的抗争政治类型。宜黄事件原本是一个普通的钉子户抗争事件,在进入媒体的视野之前,它只是底层政治的一部分,当事人采用的基本上属于"弱者的武器"的方式,并且是地方性的、特殊的和双轨的,显著性和协同性都不高。由于媒介动员将政策的内在张力呈现于公众视野,钉子户利用这一政治机遇结构,不断创新了抗争表演,从而使宜黄事件发生了规模转变和极化,最终使事件发展成为一场要求保护弱势群体利益,发动制度变革的专业化社会运动的一部分,宜黄事件也就具有了普适性的、模式化的和自主的特征。宜黄事件的遣散是因为钉子户和媒体的抗争目标出现了竞争,而并非明确的适度制度化所致,这是当代中国国家建设中"反体制"的体制重建的一部分。%The contention event of Yihuang in September, 2010 is of great significance because it has changed the contention routine in contemporary China by adopting a new type of contentious politics. Before it became the media focus, Yihuang event was just another ordinary occurrence of residents resisting demolition of their houses, a part of the subaltern politics. The main contention strategies taken by the families under the order to move typically including negotiation with the local government in charge of demolition, intercepting visits to appeal, and seeking media attention. These are "weapons of the weak", parochial, local-specific, and bifurcated~ therefore, of low salience and poor coordination, usually unsuccessful to achieve contention objectives. This time, the Zhong family adopted an extreme contention means of self-immolation. Since the occurrence of this event, the large-scale involvement of the media has presented the inherent tension of policies to the public, and the demolition

  20. Characterization and environmental risk assessment of heavy metals in construction and demolition wastes from five sources (chemical, metallurgical and light industries, and residential and recycled aggregates).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaofeng; Gu, Yilu; Xie, Tian; Zhen, Guangyin; Huang, Sheng; Zhao, Youcai

    2015-06-01

    Total concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd, and Ni) were measured among 63 samples of construction and demolition (C&D) wastes collected from chemical, metallurgical and light industries, and residential and recycled aggregates within China for risk assessment. The heavy metal contamination was primarily concentrated in the chemical and metallurgical industries, especially in the electroplating factory and zinc smelting plant. High concentrations of Cd were found in light industry samples, while the residential and recycled aggregate samples were severely polluted by Zn. Six most polluted samples were selected for deep research. Mineralogical analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and X-ray diffraction (XRD), combined with element speciation through European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction, revealed that a relatively slight corrosion happened in the four samples from electroplating plants but high transfer ability for large quantities of Zn and Cu. Lead arsenate existed in the acid extractable fraction in CI7-8 and potassium chromium oxide existed in the mobility fraction. High concentration of Cr could be in amorphous forms existing in CI9. The high content of sodium in the two samples from zinc smelter plants suggested severe deposition and erosion on the workshop floor. Large quantities of Cu existed as copper halide and most of the Zn appeared to be zinc, zinc oxide, barium zinc oxide, and zincite. From the results of the risk assessment code (RAC), the samples from the electroplating factory posed a very high risk of Zn, Cu, and Cr, a high risk of Ni, a middle risk of Pb, and a low risk of Cd. The samples from the zinc smelting plant presented a high risk of Zn, a middle risk of Cu, and a low risk of Pb, Cr, Cd, and Ni.

  1. Improving the Quality of Mixed Recycled Coarse Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Waste Using Heavy Media Separation with Fe3O4 Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heonchan Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objectives of this study are to investigate the feasibility of a heavy media separation process with magnetite (Fe3O4 suspension for upgrading the quality of mixed recycled coarse aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW in Korea and to determine a range of effective operating density of Fe3O4 suspension for producing high-quality RCA acceptable to structural concrete applications. For the purposes, six 200 kg recycled coarse aggregates (RCAs samples were collected from a conventional recycling plant in Korea. Subsequently, the samples were processed by a heavy media separation process using Fe3O4 suspensions with various densities from 2.65 g/cm3 to 2.40 g/cm3 with an interval of 0.05 g/cm3. Next, a series of tests was performed in the laboratory to evaluate properties of finished sink and float products from the HMS processes, including oven-dry density, absorption capacity, and physical durability. Furthermore, compressive strength of concrete cylinders (150 mm by 300 mm made of the finished sink products from Fe3O4 suspensions with three different densities (2.4, 2.5, and 2.6 g/cm3 was tested in this study. As a result, it was demonstrated that the HMS process using Fe3O4 suspension with a density ranging between 2.40 and 2.65 g/cm3 was effective for upgrading mixed CDW RCAs in Korea to high-quality RCAs acceptable for structural concrete applications.

  2. Linking environmental protection in practice. Advantages of a systematical method of sustainable building, from initiative to demolition; Aansluitende milieuzorg in de praktijk. Voordelen van een systematische aanpak van duurzaam bouwen, van initiatief tot sloop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Based on the results of four building projects the advantages of a systematical method (so-called linking environmental protection or in Dutch 'aansluitende milieuzorg') for sustainable construction of buildings are discussed. By formulating sound agreements and making sure that every party involved in the building process knows its tasks, responsibilities and competencies the whole process from initiative to demolition can be streamlined. By applying the right tools in every phase of the project the environmental effectiveness will be optimal.

  3. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m 2 . In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition

  4. Mixing Construction, Demolition and Excavation Waste and Solid Waste Compost for the Derivation of a Planting Medium for Use in the Rehabilitation of Quarries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Eleni

    2015-04-01

    Lebanon's very high population density has been increasing since the end of the civil war in the early 1990s reaching 416.36 people per square kilometer. Furthermore, the influx of refugees from conflicts in the region has increased the resident population significantly. All these are exerting pressure on the country's natural resources, pushing the Lebanese to convert more forest and agricultural land into roads, buildings and houses. This has led to a building boom and rapid urbanization which in turn has created a demand for construction material - mainly rock, gravel, sand, etc. nearly all of which are locally acquired through quarrying to the tune of three million cubic meters annually. This boom has been interrupted by a war with Israel in 2006 which resulted in thousands of tonnes of debris. The increase in population has also led to an increase in solid waste generation with 1.57 million tonnes of solid waste generated in Lebanon per year. The combination of construction, demolition and excavation (CDE) waste along with the increase in solid waste generation has put a major stress on the country and on the management of its solid waste. Compounding this problem are the issues of quarries closure and rehabilitation and a decrease in forest and vegetative cover. The on-going research reported in this paper aims to provide an integrated solution to the stated problem by developing a "soil mix" derived from a mélange of the organic matter of the solid waste (compost), the CDE waste, and soil. Excavation and construction debris were ground to several sizes and mixed with compost and soil at different ratios. Replicates of these mixes and a set of control (regular soil) were used. In this mix, native and indicator plants are planted (in pots) from which the most productive mix will be selected for further testing at field level in later experiments. The plant species used are Mathiolla crassifolia, a native Lebanese plant and Zea mays (Corn), which is commonly

  5. Reverse logistics applied to building companies. Demolition stage = Logística inversa aplicada a las empresas de edificación. Fase de demolición.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes del Río Merino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The building activity entails a series of environmental impacts that negatively affect the environment if they are not managed effectively. This negative impact is mainly caused because this activity consumes a large amount of natural resources and energy, modifies the land and soil, and a huge amount of waste throughout the building life cycle. In this sense, it is necessary to implement new management processes to reduce the environmental impact. Reverse logistics is a methodology widely implemented in other industrial sectors and has obtained interesting results in terms of improving waste reduction and resource consumption. In this article, some of the results obtained in a research project aiming to develop a new management system for the demolition stage of a building, which incorporate good practices used in other industrial sectors implementing reverse logistics in their processes. In order to obtain this objective, a bibliographical and documentary review on good practices of reverse logistics applied to the industry was developed, selecting the most suitable ones for the construction sector. Moreover, a series of processes are proposed to incorporate in a Quality Management System of a construction company. Resumen La actividad edificatoria conlleva una serie de repercusiones medioambientales que afectan de forma negativa si no se gestionan de una forma eficaz. Esto es así porque en gran parte de dicha actividad se utilizan una gran cantidad de recursos naturales, se modifican los terrenos para la construcción de edificios, se genera un elevado consumo de energía y se deposita una ingente cantidad de residuos durante todo el ciclo de vida de los edificios. En este sentido, es necesario implementar nuevos procesos de gestión que reduzcan dicho impacto medioambiental. La logística inversa es una metodología ampliamente utilizada por otros sectores industriales habiendo obtenido resultados interesantes en cuanto a la mejora de la

  6. Hydraulic separation through differential acceleration applied to the sector of construction and demolition waste (C and Dw); Separacion hidraulica mediante equipos de aceleracion diferencial aplicada al sector de los residuos de construccion y demolicion (RCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fueyo, L.; Gomez Limon, D.; Rodriguez Avello, A.

    2012-11-01

    To maximize the recovery of by-products and materials contained in construction and demolition waste, given that only about 65% of these are potentially recoverable, laboratory research has been conducted at the Madrid School of Mining Engineering (E.T.S. de Ignorers de Minas) into new techniques capable of enhancing the quality of some of these recovered products to meet the criteria required by the market. This study examines the hydraulic separators currently in use in many C and D waste processing plants in Spain and introduces the application of hydraulic gravity separators (jigs) prior to magnetic separation. These separating techniques are employed in industrial mineral and rock processing. (Author) 10 refs.

  7. Diagnosis of the inadequate disposal of construction and demolition waste in Vitória de Santo Antão, Pernambuco | Diagnóstico da eliminação inadequada de resíduos de construção e demolição em Vitória de Santo Antão, Pernambuco

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle M.G. Lorena; Ana P.X.G. Bezerra; Fabricio A. Gabriel; Maria C. da Silva; Gessica P. A. Marinho; Romildo M. Holanda

    2017-01-01

    Construction and Demolition Waste (C&DW), also known as rubble, are increasingly frequent and visible in today's society, due to the large volume generated in construction and its irregular deposition. As potential polluters of the environment, C&DW directly affect the environmental conditions of water bodies and the sanitation of urban areas. In this context, the objective of this work was to diagnose by mapping the presence of irregular deposition of construction residues on urban roads in ...

  8. Residuos de la construcci??n y demolici??n (RCD) cer??micos y mixtos: una fuente de ??ridos gruesos t??cnicamente viable y medioambientalmente respetuosa para la producci??n de hormig??n = Ceramic and mixed construction and demolition wastes (CDW): A technically viable and environmentally friendly source of coarse aggregates for the concrete manufacture

    OpenAIRE

    Rodr??guez Robles, Desir??e

    2017-01-01

    553 p. Nowadays, it is widely recognized that construction and demolition wastes (CDW) pose a significant environmental problem. However, in spite of the interest that the topic of their reutilization in the construction industry has aroused among worldwide researchers, the actual practice regarding the use of recycled aggregates from CDW is limited to low level applications (mostly as unbound materials). This fact is especially true for recycled aggregates containing ceramic materials, wh...

  9. Programmatic agreement among the USDOE/RL Operations Office, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the WA State Historic Preservation Office for the maintenance, deactivation, alteration and demolition of the built environment on the Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    This Programmatic Agreement (PA) addresses the built environment (i.e., buildings and structures) constructed during the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era periods of Hanford's operational history. As such it encompasses the years 1943 through 1990. The identification, evaluation, and treatment of buildings and historic archeological remains on the Hanford Site predating 1943 will be accomplished through Sections 800.4 through 800.6 of the Council's regulations. This PA will be in effect from the date of signature until September 30, 2000. Completion of the Sitewide Treatment Plan established under this PA satisfies all Section 106 requirements for identification, evaluation, and treatment necessary for all undertakings, up to and including demolition which may affect Manhattan Project and Cold War Era properties. This PA may be extended if the Sitewide Treatment Plan has not been completed by the end of FY 2000. Identification, evaluation, and treatment of properties constructed on the Hanford Site after 1990 will be handled pursuant to the regulations in effect at the time such properties are eligible for review

  10. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Asbestos-Containing Materials (ACM) and Demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are specific federal regulatory requirements that require the identification of asbestos-containing materials (ACM) in many of the residential buildings that are being demolished or renovated by a municipality.

  12. Building with materials from demolition projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, S.P.G.; Hermans, K.; Shu-Ming, xx; Che-Ming Chiang, xx; Chun-Ta Tzeng, xx; Kuang-Sheng Liu, xx; Nien-Tsu Chen, xx; Yi-Pin Lin, xx; Emmitt, S.

    2013-01-01

    Students of Eindhoven University of Technology have developed a sustainable and innovative hikers’ cabin, called "Trek-In" for SNK, a Dutch coordinating organization of natural campsites. By now, three Trek-Ins are in commercial use, while SNK intends to exploit over 100 Trek-Ins in the coming

  13. Diagnosis of the inadequate disposal of construction and demolition waste in Vitória de Santo Antão, Pernambuco | Diagnóstico da eliminação inadequada de resíduos de construção e demolição em Vitória de Santo Antão, Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle M.G. Lorena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Construction and Demolition Waste (C&DW, also known as rubble, are increasingly frequent and visible in today's society, due to the large volume generated in construction and its irregular deposition. As potential polluters of the environment, C&DW directly affect the environmental conditions of water bodies and the sanitation of urban areas. In this context, the objective of this work was to diagnose by mapping the presence of irregular deposition of construction residues on urban roads in the city of Vitória de Santo Antão-PE. It was visited in the district of Matriz, totaling 44 streets in the month of June 2016, mapping the locations of irregular deposition by buildings and the size of the work. As a result, it was possible to diagnose the presence of 64 points of clusters of residues in front of the buildings, which are considered to be irregular, since there were no technical personnel responsible for the construction or license plate issued by the municipality in 95% of the points. The works were considered as small, mostly renovations. Likewise, the quantification and the georeferencing of C&DW become essential to enable effective measures in the final deposition and reduction of waste generation. The fulfillment of legal norms is also a factor that contributes to the conservation of the environment, guarantees the urban water flow and does not compromise the landscape of the municipality. As a result of this survey, there is an urgent need to implement a management plan for C&DW in the city of Vitória de Santo Antão.

  14. KONTEC 2013. 11{sup th} international symposium on 'Conditioning of radioactive operational and decommissioning waste' and 11{sup th} BMBF status report on 'Decommissioning and demolition of nuclear facilities'; KONTEC 2013. 11. internationales Symposium 'Konditionierung radioaktiver Betriebs- und Stilllegungsabfaelle' einschliesslich 11. Statusbericht des BMBF 'Stilllegung und Rueckbau kerntechnischer Anlagen'. Veranstaltungsbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2013-06-15

    KONTEC 2013 was held in Dresden on 13 to 15 March 2013. The 11{sup th} event organized under this heading dealt with the subjects of 'Conditioning of Radioactive Operational and Decommissioning Waste' and 'Decommissioning and Demolition of Nuclear Facilities' including the R and D Status Report by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) on the same subject. The conference was attended by an international audience from 19 countries. The program included plenary sessions on these 4 key topics: - Disposal of Radioactive Residues from Nuclear Facilities' Operation and Decommissioning. - Decommissioning and Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities. - Facilities and Systems for the Conditioning of Operational and Decommissioning Wastes. - Transport, Interim and Final Storage of Non-heat Generating Wastes (i.e. Konrad). These sessions were accompanied by poster sessions and short presentations under the heading of 'Kontec Direct.' The best presentations of the categories Plenary Session Presentation, Poster Presentation and Kontec-Direct have been awarded. In detail, 'Dismantling of Russian nuclear powered submarines' by Detlef Mietann, 'Requalification of 'Old Packages' for the Konrad Repository Described for the Model Case of Packages from Storage Annex A and Repackaging of Containers Holding Compacts in Hall 2 of the GNS Plant' by Martina Koessler, Sebastian Schwall and Pascal Budriks, and 'Electrochemical process development for cleaning organic, C-14-labelled waste solutions' by Hans-Juergen Friedrich. (orig.)

  15. Determining the depth of hydro demolition using Lidar methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Missouri S&T was contracted to conduct research on the effectiveness of using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to assess several : highway bridges in rural Missouri. The assessment was to be based on the principle that sound concrete has a different de...

  16. What Next for Wood Construction/Demolition Debris?

    OpenAIRE

    Martin A. Hubbe

    2014-01-01

    Residents in localities throughout the world voluntarily participate in the routine recycling of household wastes, such as paper, metals, and plastics containers. But when a house in their neighborhood gets built or torn down, most of the debris – including wood waste – gets landfilled. Such a waste of material suggests that there are opportunities to add value to these under-utilized resources. The great variability, as well as contamination, pose major challenges. It is recommended that rec...

  17. 26 CFR 1.165-3 - Demolition of buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transaction entered into for profit, real property is purchased with the intention of demolishing either... the land and buildings under § 1.167(a)-5. In any event, the portion of the purchase price which may... the purchase price which is allocated to the buildings in accordance with this subparagraph shall not...

  18. Abrasive water jets for controlled demolition and dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abudaka, M.; Crofton, P.S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Abrasive water jets offer an efficient high speed cutting tool for hard materials such as reinforced concrete, tool steel and armour plate. Cutting by abrasive water jets is often described as a cold cutting operation since no heat is developed and any increase in local temperature is immediately cooled by the water jet. Moreover no sparks are generated to ignite a potentially inflammable atmosphere. Mass flow rates of water and abrasive are small (typically 4 litres/min.water and 1 kg/min abrasive) and hence are easy to collect and to dispose of. For these reasons abrasive water jets offer certain advantages in cutting difficult materials in hazardous environments such as in the nuclear industry, offshore oil rigs and petrochemical plant. Available portable cutting systems are described and the advantages of using abrasive water jets are discussed as well as some of the parameters involved in the cutting operation. Finally a description is presented of some typical applications of abrasive water jet cutting. (author)

  19. M112 Demolition Block Pack-Out Line Modernization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    1 - Continue to use hot water bath, replacing the steam heating source from the Line B fuel-oil fired boiler with an electric boiler located at l...are manually placed in carriers on an overhead monorail conveyor at the Tipper Tie operation and automatically conveyed through the dip tank. Air...bagged pellets are then manually removed from the overhead monorail , dried with a hand towel, and placed in a holding tray for manual placement into

  20. Towards net-zero construction and demolition waste

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Waste is defined in the National Environment Management: Waste Act as: “Any substance, whether or not that substance can be reduced, re-used, recycled and recovered – a) That is surplus, unwanted, rejected, discarded, abandoned or disposed of; b...

  1. Demolition of RC structures by applying electric current through rebars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Wahei; Nishita, Itaru; Kasai, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, the dismantling works of reinforced concrete structures increased rapidly. On the other hand, in urban districts, the strict restriction of noise, vibration and dust is carried out, and the development of no vibration, no noise construction method is desired. The dismantling method by electrically heating reinforcing bars was developed for separating the surface layer of concrete radioactivated and contaminated in the dismantling works of nuclear power stations, but it can be applied also to the dismantling of general reinforced concrete structures. As the method of electrically heating reinforcing bars, there are direct electrifying method and induction heating method, and here, the direct electrifying method is discussed. When large current is passed directly through reinforcing bars in concrete as electric resistors, their temperature rises rapidly to about 450 deg C. As the result, the surrounding concrete cracks and loses the adhesion due to the dehydration. By striking lightly, the concrete separates, thus dismantling becomes easy. The preparation, electrode terminals, heating temperature, the cracking of concrete, the secondary breaking after heating, dust in dismantling and broken pieces, and the features and the fields of application of this method are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DEMOLITION OF THE HITCH DEVICES ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Artemchuk

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of statistical research of wear of automatic coupler body butts and thrust plates of electric locomotives are presented in the article. Due to the increased wear the mentioned elements require special attention.

  3. Environmental Assessment for Demolition of Buildings 5303 and 5312

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Land Use ANSI S3.23-1980. Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics and Biomechanics . 1981. Assessment of Community Noise Response to High-Energy...entirely renovated since its original construction. In 1950, a covered platform, stair , and door were added to the northeast side of the building. Several...transformation into the housing office. A replacement for the rear entrance porch and stairs , with an awning, was completed in 1995; new windows and

  4. A survey on the construction and demolition waste in Mongolia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troiani, T.; Lotfi, Somayeh; Di Maio, F.; Lotfi, S.; Bakker, M.; Hu, M.; Vahidi, A.

    2017-01-01

    n many developing countries, the rapid growth of town and cities has generated a rising levels of waste and illegal dumps have become a serious issue. The booming construction industry in Mongolia has resulted in the production of massive amounts of CDW which is one of the largest waste streams. In

  5. Caçambas coletoras de resíduos da construção e demolição no contexto do mobiliário urbano: uma questão de saúde pública e ambiental Containers for construction and demolition waste as urban furnishing: an environmental and public health issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Maria de Araujo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de caçambas metálicas em áreas públicas para acondicionar resíduos da construção e demolição-RCD tem sido incrementada, em cidades brasileiras, a partir da década de 1990, contribuindo para o adensamento do mobiliário urbano e modificando a paisagem urbana. Este equipamento é utilizado para confinar os resíduos de modo a impedir sua dispersão no ambiente, facilitar sua coleta e transporte e evitar a exposição de moradores e transeuntes. A despeito dessas vantagens, as caçambas representam um perigo ao ambiente e à saúde pública. Com objetivo de verificar a interferência das caçambas nas ruas e calçadas e identificar situações de risco, foi realizado um estudo de campo envolvendo 58 caçambas estacionadas em 5 diferentes bairros da cidade de São Paulo. Aspectos como localização e disposição, identificação e uso de pintura reflexiva para prevenção de acidentes com veículos automotivos e conteúdo da caçamba foram observados. Os resultados indicaram a presença de não-conformidades, na maioria dos casos observados, como: localização inadequada, pintura reflexiva não existente ou apagada, quantidade excessiva de resíduos, presença de matéria orgânica ou resíduos perigosos, objetos cortantes ou pontiagudos extrapolando os limites da caçamba, dentre outros. Conclui-se que é necessário desenvolver uma abordagem integrada e ecossistêmica para estes elementos do mobiliário urbano, de modo a contemplar, além da questão de gerenciamento dos RCD, aspectos de saúde pública e ambiental e, ao mesmo tempo, preservar os valores estéticos e a paisagem urbana. Dessa forma, o emprego de caçambas coletoras de RCD pode trazer benefícios que contribuam para a qualidade de vida nas cidades brasileiras.The use of metallic waste containers in public areas for storage of construction and demolition wastes-C&D debris was introduced in Brazilian cities in the 1990's, becoming a piece of urban

  6. Organizacija inžinjerijskih radova pri rušenju deonice puta / Organization of engineering works during demolition of a road section / Организация инженерных работ по демонтажу участков дорог

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad V. Kovačević

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prilikom upotrebe minsko-eksplozivnih sredstava za rušenje elemenata, materijala i objekata jako je bitna organizacija izvođenja radova prilikom pripreme i u toku izvođenja samog rušenja. Za izvođenje ovih radova u Vojsci Srbije postoje specijalizovane i namenske jedinice. Radi se o jedinicama jedne od specijalnosti u okviru roda inžinjerije, pionirske specijalnosti, koje egzistiraju u okviru inžinjerijskih bataljona, odnosno brigada KoV. Organizacija inžinjerijskih radova zapravo predstavlja iznalaženje najcelishodnijeg rešenja u pogledu upotrebe pokretnih stvari, ali i naprezanja ljudstva, pri rušenju konkretnog objekta – deonice puta. Pri tome veliki problem predstavlja literatura, a posebno norme za izvođenje radova, jer izuzev nekoliko skripti za internu upotrebu, sve se svodi na literaturu iz sedamdesetih ili početak osamdesetih godina prošlog veka. Posebno je razrađena primena mera zaštite prilikom upotrebe eksploziva. / When using explosive ordnance for the demolition of elements, materials and facilities, organization is very important in the preparation of works as well as during demolition itself. In the Army of Serbia, for this kind of works, there are specialized expert units within Land Forces engineering battalions or brigades. The organization of the engineering work given in the article is a purposeful solution, regarding the use of movable property and stress imposed on people as well, when performing demolition of a concrete structure - road section. Lack of literature is a big drawback, especially lack of norms for demolition works. Except for some unofficial lectures for internal use, most of the literature dates back to the seventies or early eighties. A special emphasis in this paper is given to the application of protective measures in the use of explosives. / В процессе применения минно-взрывных средств для сноса элементов, материалов

  7. 77 FR 49741 - Cranes and Derricks in Construction: Demolition and Underground Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ..., subpart CC, to replace the earlier rule (Sec. 1926.550) for all construction work.\\1\\ In proposing the new... derricks used in construction work. For most construction work, the final rule replaced a prior cranes and... construction work. Through this proposed rule, OSHA is proposing to apply the updated requirements to that work...

  8. 77 FR 49722 - Cranes and Derricks in Construction: Demolition and Underground Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... underground construction work. Therefore, when OSHA promulgates a new final rule, states and territories with... used in construction work. For most construction work, the final rule replaced a prior cranes and... construction work. Through this direct final rule, OSHA is applying the updated requirements to that work. With...

  9. Demolition, Documentary and the Politics of Minjian on Contemporary Chinese Screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Edwards

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available China’s transformation in the reform era has been most immediately experienced by many ordinary citizens in spatial terms, as existing urban communities have been dispersed and their environments levelled, to be replaced by ‘spaces of flows’ that prioritise speed, mobility and circulation. A wide range of Chinese films have represented this experience from the perspective of existing urban communities. This article argues that in certain ‘unofficial’ documentaries produced outside China’s state-sanctioned channels of production and distribution, using small, highly mobile digital video cameras, an engagement with grassroots communities has opened up a new space on screen, in which a critical questioning of the developmental ethos driving contemporary China becomes evident. A close analysis of Ou Ning’s Meishi Street (2006, Shu Haolun’s Nostalgia (2006 and Du Haibin’s A Young Patriot (2015 will illustrate how the unofficial spaces of localised, grassroots cultures (minjian are represented in these works as sites of resistance to the coercive imposition of a globalised modernity on Chinese cities.

  10. ALKALI-ACTIVATED CEMENT MORTARS CONTAINING RECYCLED CLAY-BASED CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Puertas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of clay-based waste as an aggregate for concrete production is an amply studied procedure. Nonetheless, research on the use of this recycled aggregate to prepare alkaline cement mortars and concretes has yet to be forthcoming. The present study aimed to determine: the behaviour of this waste as a pozzolan in OPC systems, the mechanical strength in OPC, alkali-activated slag (AAS and fly ash (AAFA mortars and the effect of partial replacement of the slag and ash themselves with ground fractions of the waste. The pozzolanic behaviour of clay-based waste was confirmed. Replacing up to 20 % of siliceous aggregate with waste aggregate in OPC mortars induced a decline in 7 day strength (around 23 wt. %. The behaviour of waste aggregate in AAMs mortars, in turn, was observed to depend on the nature of the aluminosilicate and the replacement ratio used. When 20 % of siliceous aggregate was replaced by waste aggregate in AAS mortars, the 7 day strength values remained the same (40 MPa. In AAFA mortars, waste was found to effectively replace both the fly ash and the aggregate. The highest strength for AAFA mortars was observed when they were prepared with both a 50 % replacement ratio for the ash and a 20 % ratio for the aggregate.

  11. Factors affecting temporal H2S emission at construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy

    2014-02-01

    Odor problems associated with H2S emissions often result in odor complaints from nearby residents of C&D debris landfills, especially in the early morning. As part of a field study conducted on H2S removal ability using different cover materials, daily and seasonal H2S emissions through a soil cover layer were monitored at a C&D debris landfill to investigate factors affecting H2S emissions. H2S emission rates were not a constant, but varied seasonally, with an average emission rate of 4.67×10(-6)mgm(-2)s(-1). During a the 10-month field study, as the H2S concentration increased from 140ppm to about 3500ppm underneath the cover soil in the testing cell, H2S emissions ranged from zero to a maximum emission rate of 1.24×10(-5)mgm(-2)s(-1). Continuous emission monitoring indicated that H2S emissions even changed over time throughout the day, generally increasing from morning to afternoon, and were affected by soil moisture and temperature. Laboratory experiments were also conducted to investigate the effects of H2S concentration and cover soil moisture content on H2S emissions. The results showed that increased soil moisture reduced H2S emissions by retarding H2S migration through cover soil and dissolving H2S into soil water. The field study also indicated that due to atmospheric dispersion, high H2S emissions may not cause odor problems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Organizations Working to Reduce the Disposal of Construction and Demolition (C&D) Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organizations with available resources and services related to reducing, reducing, and recycling C&D Materials? This table is a great place to start! Use the three tabs below to easily sort the data and best meet your needs.

  13. Replacement or reuse? The choice between demolition and life cycle extension from a sustainable viewpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, A.F.; van der Flier, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    What is better: renovation or new construction? Following the plenary debate on the ENHR 2007 conference in Rotterdam we continued our search for the answer to this question. The choice between reuse and replacement of existing buildings is a vital but very difficult one, involving a wide range of

  14. An integrated building demolition and waste planning model for the Fernald Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampshire, L.H.; Clark, T.R.; Frost, M.L.; Reising, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Fernald DOE site will begin full-scale remediation of buildings under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) during the 1995 fiscal year pursuant to a signed Record of Decision. This effort is currently estimated to cost $350 million and span a minimum duration of 8 years, if funding is not a constraint. The identification of the most viable sequence and schedule for the effort involved the development of an integrated planning model and the commissioning of a sitewide planning team. The resulting work product represents the best combination of assumptions and calculations possible at this time and provides information necessary for compliance with the CERCLA Remedial Design documentation requirements for the over 230 component structures governed by the decision. Sequence and integrated schedule development for the decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) of Fernald structures has involved evaluation of current and future utilization of structures, availability of waste storage and staging space, the needs and impacts of other on-going Fernald projects, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste management and remediation projects, the layout of site utilities, site hydrology, and the potential sizing, location, and construction rates for an on-property disposal cell

  15. Demolition of Munitions Storage Area Facilities. Right Size Project 10-0192C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    valuable, these resources also provide essential aesthetic, recreational, and socioeconomic benefits to society. The analysis focuses on plant and animal...community type, Ponderosa pine/snowberry, ( pinus ponderosa/symphocarpus albus) is listed as a rare community type by the state of Washington and occurs in...asphalt and/or concrete planned for removal may contain petroleum based materials from leaking equipment parked on these structures. Oils /tars may

  16. Environmental Assessment Building 5745, Historical Building Demolition, Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 2d Civil Engineer Squadron (2 CES/CEAO),Barksdale AFB,LA,71110 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...Housing, Unaccompanied 26 0.1 VOQ, VAQ, BAQ, dormitories, transient facilities Outdoor Recreation 142 0.6 Softball fields, tennis courts, football field

  17. Environmental Assessment, Buildings 4133 and Building 4143, Historic Building Demolitions, Barksdale Air Foce Base, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Civil Engineer Center (AFCEC),JBSA Lackland,TX,78236 8... PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT...Recreation 142 0.6 Softball fields, tennis courts, football field, parks/picnic areas, FamCamp, pools, golf course Open Space 16,450 75.0 Conservation

  18. 76 FR 32313 - Safety Zone; Chelsea St. Bridge Demolition, Chelsea River, Chelsea, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... preamble as being available in the docket are part of docket USCG-2011-0420 are available online by going... barges, work vessels, and construction equipment, and large pieces of debris falling into the water that...

  19. Structural recycled concrete: utilization of recycled aggregate from construction and demolition wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaejos Gutierrez, P.; Sanchez de Juan, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to present the main results of CEDEX research works concerning the use of recycled aggregates for structural concretes. By way of conclusion, recommendations on the requirements of the recycled aggregates have been established, providing information about the influence of these aggregates on the properties of structural concrete. (Author)

  20. Attenuation of hydrogen sulfide at construction and demolition debris landfills using alternative cover materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy; Reinhart, Debra

    2010-04-01

    The attenuation of H(2)S emissions by various landfill cover materials was evaluated using both laboratory and field experiments. The results demonstrated that cover materials consisting of selected waste products (compost and yard trash) and soils amended with quicklime and calcium carbonate effectively attenuated H(2)S emissions and detectable H(2)S emissions were only encountered in a testing plot using a sandy soil cover (average emission rate was 4.67x10(-6)mgm(-2)s(-1)). H(2)S concentration profiles in the cover materials indicated that H(2)S was removed as it migrated through the cover materials. At the same depth in the testing area, the H(2)S concentration in the sandy soil field plot was always higher than that of other testing plots because the sand (a) demonstrated less ability to remove H(2)S and (b) exhibited a higher H(2)S concentration at the base of the cover. Laboratory experiments confirmed these observations, with a combination of physical adsorption, chemical reactions, and biological oxidation, accounting for the enhanced removal. In addition to removal, the results suggest that some of the cover materials reduced H(2)S generation by creating less favorable conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., high pH and temperature). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 77 FR 66541 - Safety Zone; Alliance Road Bridge Demolition; Black Warrior River, Locust Fork; Birmingham, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... authority under section 4(a) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). This provision... Department of Homeland Security Management Directive 023-01 and Commandant Instruction M16475.lD, which guide...

  2. 24 CFR 970.27 - De minimis exception to demolition requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... demolished unit must be used for meeting the service or other needs of public housing residents (use of space to construct a laundry facility, community center, child care facility, office space for a general...

  3. 78 FR 23837 - Cranes and Derricks in Construction: Underground Construction and Demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. 651 et seq.) is ``to assure so far as possible every working man and woman... rope and the cage or skip shall be compatible with the type of wire rope used for hoisting. (vi) Spin...

  4. Characterization Report for the Demolition and Remodel of B151 Rooms 1318, 1322 and 1326

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, Jenna L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Won, Geoffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-31

    In support of a remodel for rooms 1318, 1322, and 1326 in building 151, the Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) team has worked to develop a detailed characterization of contaminants in each room. This report serves as a summary of the results for all radioactive material and Industrial Hygiene (IH) metals sampling performed of accessible areas.

  5. Microwave demolition tool for mounting on a long range manipulator (EMIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wace, P.F.; Hamblin, C.; Shute, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the CEC's supported programme on the Development of Decommissioning Technologies, AEA Technology agreed to collaborate with KfK Karlsruhe who were developing the EMIR, a remote handling device, and testing it to deploy tools suitable for use in decommissioning applications. The AEA undertook to develop and supply a microwave tool for evaluation. The programme aims were: to produce a microwave tool that could be deployed by EMIR; to evaluate the manoeuvrability of such a device; to determine the manoeuvrability of EMIR when deploying the microwave tool; to measure the microwave leakage. The tool was successfully developed to time and budget and has been interfaced with EMIR at Karlsruhe. A short series of tests has been carried out, positioning the tool against a concrete test piece. Satisfactory results were obtained and these have established the practical working and design parameters for tools of this type and have shown that EMIR is capable of deploying a tool weighing 660 kg. (author)

  6. Final Environmental Assessment: Demolition/Restoration of Ipswich Antenna Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    sourc--es \\ Veta quantified b y using fual oU e onsu.mption from the-last full yesr of use ( CY20 1 0). Buildings S-3, S-5, and S-15 ware haated b y #2...the environment. E nvironmental Consequences Environmental analyses focused on the following areas: land use, socioeconomics, utilities...the wetland as possib I e . In addition the Conservation Commission may impose additional requirements such as: staking the wetland boundaries

  7. Annex I.G. Demolition of the G1 stack at Marcoule by toppling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The G1 stack at Marcoule was constructed during the first half of 1956 as a ventilation outlet for the G1 reactor, which is cooled by air. After the G1 reactor was decommissioned, the G1 stack served as a ventilation outlet for two new nuclear facilities on the site. Being no longer in compliance with regulations and having many inadequacies and uncertainties in terms of the prestressed concrete, the stack posed a potential damage risk in extreme wind or in the event of an earthquake. In 1994 it was decided that a new stack would be built to act as an outlet for the existing nuclear facilities, and that the old one would be demolished. The G1 stack was 100 m in height, 10 m in diameter and constructed with 24 vertically stacked concrete rings consisting of nine prefabricated sections, each 3.6 m in height. It was capped by a metal deflector (about 6 m in height and weighing 50 t). The inside consisted of nine semicircular tubes constructed of steel sheet metal weighing 120 t. The base of the stack consisted of the foundation, a plate and a base plate which were constructed at the site. The barrel sections were prefabricated. Construction lasted from January 1956 to June 1956. At the base, the cylindrical portion of the stack widened to form three feet extending to a depth of 7.5 m. The base plate of the stack was formed onsite to the height of 16.7 m and then prestressed using cables. A repair carried out in 1964 included adding a concrete lining of the initial rings of the cylinder up to a level of 22.1 m. Additional prestressing with the base plate and repair of the horizontal and vertical prestressing of the barrel were also carried out, leaving only 22 rings and 43 visible cables. The total mass of the stack was 2170 t, including: - Concrete: cylinder 800 t, base plate 1200 t; - Steel: internal structures 120 t, deflector 50 t. The main radiological risk was the presence of traces of tritium. The radioactive inventory for the entire stack was estimated in 2000 to be 0.2 TBq. Samples were taken during the project and calculations confirmed lower values of the order of 0.1 TBq as a realistic inventory

  8. Use of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste in geotechnical applications: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Rafaela; Silva, Rui Vasco; Brito, Jorge de; Dhir, Ravindra

    2016-03-01

    The use of recycled aggregates (RA) in construction constitutes a significant step towards a more sustainable society and also creates a new market opportunity to be exploited. In recent years, several case-studies have emerged in which RA were used in Geotechnical applications, such as filling materials and in unbound pavement layers. This paper presents a review of the most important physical properties of different types of RA and their comparison with natural aggregates (NA), and how these properties affect their hydraulic and mechanical behaviour when compacted. Specifically, the effects of compaction on grading size distribution curves and density are analysed, as well as the consequences of particle crushing on the resilient modulus, CBR and permeability. The paper also contains an analysis of the influence of incorporating different RA types on the performance of unbound road pavement layers as compared with those built with NA by means of the International Roughness Index and deflection values. The results collected from the literature indicate that the performance of most RA is comparable to that of NA and can be used in unbound pavement layers or in other applications requiring compaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clearance of radioactive materials during reactor dismantling. Permanent enclosure instead of demolition and renaturation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    During reactor dismantling besides high-level radioactive wastes a large amount of low-level contaminated steel and concrete has to be disposed. In case that radioactivity falls below defined dose limits (10 micro Sv/person and year) these materials may be disposed in domestic waste landfill or in municipal incineration facilities. The issue is discussed in detail including the fact that many power plants are dismantled at the same time so that the contaminated materials might accumulate. Another issue is the occupational safety of contract workers during dismantling. The permanent enclosure could avoid this environmental contamination of decommissioned power plants might also be less expensive.

  10. Final Environmental Assessment Addressing Building Demolition at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    take, capture, or kill ; attempt to take, capture, or kill ; possess, offer to or sell, barter, purchase, deliver, or cause to be shipped, exported...captured, killed , taken, shipped, transported, or carried contrary to the laws from where it was obtained; and import from Canada any bird, part, nest, or... mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), curved-billed thrasher (Toxostoma curvirostre), lark sparrow (Chordestes grammacus), black-throated sparrow

  11. 78 FR 25958 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Demolition and Construction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... stock under the MMPA. Further information on the biology and local distribution of these marine mammal... harassment, is at or above 90 dB re 20 [micro]Pa for harbor seals and at or above 100 dB re 20 [micro]Pa for... threshold for Level B harassment, is at or above 90 dB re 20 [micro]Pa for harbor seals and at or above 100...

  12. Environmental Assessment for Building 88 Interior Demolition, Pearl Harbor Naval Complex, O'ahu, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    ...) and ancillary equipment from the interior of Building 88, a former lubricating oil storage facility, and the related exposed piping underneath Mike wharves M3 and M4 at Merry Point, Pearl Harbor Naval Complex...

  13. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Demolition and Consolidation, Maxwell Air Force Base, Montgomery County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    51 3.11.2.2 SANITARY SEWER ...............................................................51 3.11.2.3 ELECTRICITY...72 4.2.11.2 SANITARY SEWER ...............................................................73 4.2.11.3...loam or sandy clay soils. The majority of the installation consists of the Amite-Cahaba association which is deep, well-drained, fine sandy loam

  14. Demolition and removal of radioactively contaminated concrete soil: Aerosol control and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Grace, A.C. III

    1995-12-01

    From 1963 to 1985, two concrete-lined ponds were used to reduce the volume of radioactive liquids from the Institute`s research programs. Following withdrawal of the {open_quotes}hot ponds{close_quotes} from active use, the residual sludges and plastic liners of the ponds were removed and shipped to a radioactive waste disposal site. From 1987 to 1994, the concrete structures remained undisturbed pending environmental restoration on the site. Restoration began in 1994 and was completed in 1995. Restoration involved mechanical breakup and removal of the concrete structures and removal of areas of contaminated soils from the site. This report describes the design and results of the aerosol control and monitoring program that was conducted to ensure protection of workers and the environment during the restoration process. The aerosol control and monitoring strategy developed for remediation of the ITRI hot ponds was successful both in preventing dispersion of radioactive dusts and in demonstrating that exposures of workers and offsite releases were within statutory limits.

  15. Estimation of a Decommissioning Program Considering the Reuse of Demolition Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiichi Sakata; Sachio Ozaki; Michihiko Hironaga; Daisuke Ogane; Tatsuo Usui; Yutaka Kono

    2002-01-01

    As for a decommissioning job in Japan decontamination and dismantling including safety store are executed during the prior period of the total project. The reprocessing and disposal of dismantling wastes as well recycling is to be practiced during the succeeding period. An expert system proposed in this paper has a faculty of furnishing motivations for decommissioning planners by correlative estimations of the project between its prior part and the succeeding recycle part of total process. This paper presents both a summarized configuration and an algorithm of the proposed model and indicates some contents of essential data bases (D/B) to be prepared as well some additional data to embody an assumed scenario for recycling. The proposed model provides the useful outputs concerning commercial cost, required procedures or licenses, regional encouragement, obstacles to be surmounted and so on. These outputs are available to explain the outline of the project both to inside and to outside of a plant corporate entity by combining each other. Simulated cases for concrete structures in non-controlled areas bring some information about both feasibility and comparisons of assumed recycling scenarios taking account of quality requirements in relevant technical standards, ordinances and the ability of reprocessing facilities. (authors)

  16. Chaperones and the Proteasome System: Regulating the Construction and Demolition of Striated Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Carlisle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein folding factors (chaperones are required for many diverse cellular functions. In striated muscle, chaperones are required for contractile protein function, as well as the larger scale assembly of the basic unit of muscle, the sarcomere. The sarcomere is complex and composed of hundreds of proteins and the number of proteins and processes recognized to be regulated by chaperones has increased dramatically over the past decade. Research in the past ten years has begun to discover and characterize the chaperones involved in the assembly of the sarcomere at a rapid rate. Because of the dynamic nature of muscle, wear and tear damage is inevitable. Several systems, including chaperones and the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS, have evolved to regulate protein turnover. Much of our knowledge of muscle development focuses on the formation of the sarcomere but recent work has begun to elucidate the requirement and role of chaperones and the UPS in sarcomere maintenance and disease. This review will cover the roles of chaperones in sarcomere assembly, the importance of chaperone homeostasis and the cooperation of chaperones and the UPS in sarcomere integrity and disease.

  17. Property booms and bubbles: a demolition strategy - towards a tabula rasa?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen-Jansen, L.; Lloyd, G.

    2012-01-01

    There is a tendency to perversity in the effects of public policy for the built environment at large and with respect to specific sectors. This review paper addresses the unanticipated effects arising from the land and property development incentives which prevailed before the current economic

  18. Environmental Assessment of Demolition Activities at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Setophaga ruticilla), broad- winged hawk (Buteo platypterus), cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota), bank swallow ( Riparia riparia ), black vulture...Explosive safety-quantity distance (QD) zones are designated areas designed to safeguard the base population and civilian community from potential...explosions. These clear zones include the area within a safety arc surrounding an explosive storage facility. The QD zones at Dover AFB encompass

  19. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2007-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility was used in the early to mid-1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles in the immediate area. Identified as Corrective Action Unit 115, the TCA facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model, identified in the Data Quality Objective process. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. Key lessons learned from the project included: (1) Targeted preliminary investigation activities provided a more solid technical approach, reduced surprises and scope creep, and made the working environment safer for the D and D worker. (2) Early identification of risks and uncertainties provided opportunities for risk management and mitigation planning to address challenges and unanticipated conditions. (3) Team reviews provided an excellent mechanism to consider all aspects of the task, integrated safety into activity performance, increase team unity and ''buy-in'' and promoted innovative and time saving ideas. (4) Development of CED protocols ensured safety and control. (5) The same proven D and D strategy is now being employed on the larger ''sister'' facility, Test Cell C

  20. Final Environmental Assessment Addressing New Construction and Demolition at Beale Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    architecture, or prehistory , and includes both publicly and privately owned properties. The NRHP list is administered by the National Park Service...Warning System (PAVE PAWS) facility (Beale AFB 2011c). The immediate area’s early prehistory is not well known. By roughly 500 A.D., the region was

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF MUD/DIRT CARRYOUT ONTO PAVED ROADS FROM CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION ACTIVITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report characterizes fugitive dust generated by vehicular traffic on paved streets and highways resulting from mud/dirt carryout from unpaved areas as a primary source of PM-10 (particles = or < 10 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter), and evaluates three technologies for eff...

  2. 40 CFR 61.150 - Standard for waste disposal for manufacturing, fabricating, demolition, renovation, and spraying...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... materials covered by this paragraph do not have to be sealed in leak-tight containers or wrapping but may be... site owners or operators at the same time as the asbestos-containing waste material is delivered to the disposal site. (3) For waste shipments where a copy of the waste shipment record, signed by the owner or...

  3. Environmental Assessment: Demolition of Munitions Storage Area Facilities at Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CO Carbon Monoxide cpm Counts per Minute CRM Cultural Resource Manager...newspaper advertisement in the Rapid City Journal announcing the availability of the Draft EA for a 30-day public and agency review to facilitate...Ellsworth Air Force Base Munitions Storage Area Environmental Assessment Page 2-5 public involvement in the project. This advertisement was published one

  4. Sustainable mangement of construction and demolition waste: generation, recovery and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, C.; Sánchez-Palencia Ramos, Francisco Javier; Setién, J.; Polanco, J. A.; Ballester, F.

    2009-01-01

    4 pages, 4 figures, 5 tables.-- En: 1st Spanish National Conference on Advances in Materials Recycling and Eco – Energy Madrid, 12-13 November 2009.-- Editors: F. A. López, F. Puertas, F. J. Alguacil and A. Guerrero.

  5. The State of the Practice of Construction and Demolition Material Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The C&D recovery industry continues to grow. Some components (e.g., concrete) are commonly recovered for existing economic reasons. Other elements―especially those with low market value and that frequently require processing to separate them from the rest of the C&D stream―remain...

  6. Leaching behaviour of copper slag, construction and demolition waste and crushed rock used in a full-scale road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidelöw, Sofia; Mácsik, Josef; Carabante, Ivan; Kumpiene, Jurate

    2017-12-15

    The leaching behaviour of a road construction with fayalitic copper slag, recycled concrete and crushed rock as sub-base materials was monitored over ten years. All studied materials used in the road construction, including crushed rock, contained concentrations of several elements exceeding the guideline values recommended by the Swedish EPA for total element concentrations for waste materials used in constructions. Despite that, leaching from the road construction under field conditions in general was relatively low. The leachates from the recycled materials contained higher concentrations of several constituents than the leachates from the reference section with crushed rock. The leaching of the elements of interest (Cr, Mo, Ni, Zn) reached peak concentrations during the second and fourth (Cu) years and decreased over the observation period to levels below the Swedish recommended values. Carbonation of the concrete aggregates caused a substantial but short-term increase in the leaching of oxyanions such as chromate. The environmental risks related to element leaching are highest at the beginning of the road life. Ageing of materials or pre-treatment through leaching is needed prior to their use in construction to avoid peak concentrations. Also, the design of road constructions should be adjusted so that recycled materials are covered with low-permeability covers, which would minimize the exposure to atmospheric precipitation and weathering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of alternative landfill cover soils for attenuating hydrogen sulfide from construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Cristine; Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy; Bitton, Gabriel; Booth, Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) generated from C&D debris landfills has emerged as a major environmental concern due to odor problems and possible health impacts to landfill employees and surrounding residents. Research was performed to evaluate the performance of various cover materials as control measures for H(2)S emissions from C&D debris landfills. Twelve laboratory-scale simulated landfill columns containing gypsum drywall were operated under anaerobic conditions to promote H(2)S production. Five different cover materials were placed on top of the waste inside duplicate columns: (1) sandy soil, (2) sandy soil amended with lime, (3) clayey soil, (4) fine concrete (particle size less than 2.5 cm), and (5) coarse concrete (particle size greater than 2.5 cm). No cover was placed on two of the columns, which were used as controls. H(2)S concentrations measured from the middle of the waste layer ranged from 50,000 to 150,000 ppm. The different cover materials demonstrated varying H(2)S removal efficiencies. The sandy soil amended with lime and the fine concrete were the most effective for the control of H(2)S emissions. Both materials exhibited reduction efficiencies greater than 99%. The clayey and sandy soils exhibited lower reduction efficiencies, with average removal efficiencies of 65% and 30%, respectively. The coarse concrete was found to be the least efficient material as a result of its large particle size.

  8. BIM based system of automatic generation of the quantification of construction and demolition waste. Weighted transfers of measurement methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Mercader Moyano, Pilar; Ramírez de Arellano Agudo, Antonio; Cózar Cózar, Elías; Ruesga Díaz, Daniel José

    2017-01-01

    La gestión sostenible de los residuos se ha convertido en una preocupación creciente, y se considera en la actualidad una de las prácticas más efectivas para solventar los problemas que genera el sector de la construcción. Este artículo presenta una metodología de medición de los residuos de construcción y demolición (RCD) mediante el método de transferencias ponderadas de la medición, permitiendo usar cualquier Base de Datos de Costes de Construcción. Además, al contrario que otros estudi...

  9. Environmental Assessment for Vandenberg Gate Complex Construction, Dorm Construction and Demolition at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    existing boundary line were examined for suitability for the Vandenberg Gate Complex construction. Essentially these “on-base” alternatives looked at the...together for purposes of estimating emissions (HAFB 2014d). Hanscom AFB also operates 13 small oil fired boilers ranging in size from 0.1 MMBtu/hr...located between the road and Hanscom AFB housing. The wooded buffer is composed primarily of a mixture of white pine ( Pinus strobus), red maple (Acer

  10. Heritage is also about demolition and disinheritance : power, ideology and popular identification in decisions about the Palast der Republik, Berlin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashworth, G.J.; Amoeda, R; Lira, S; Pinheiro, C

    2010-01-01

    The creation of heritage is a contemporary decision in response to perceived contemporary needs. Governments have taken an increasing role in the selection, management and interpretation of heritage sites. Inevitably therefore official heritage will implicitly or explicitly be both a reflection of

  11. A study of design features of civil works of nuclear installations facilitating their eventual refurbishing, renewal, dismantling or demolition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paton, A.A.; Benwell, P.; Irwin, T.F.; Hunter, I.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes a study that has been carried out to identify civil engineering features which could be incorporated in future gas cooled and light water cooled nuclear power plants to facilitate their decommissioning. The report reviews the problems likely to be met in decommissioning present day nuclear power plants and concludes that there is a number of such features which could be introduced in future designs to overcome or eliminate the problems. The report identifies and describes these features and recommends that further work be carried out to confirm their feasibility. The study briefly considered the possibility of refurbishing nuclear plants and concluded that this is not a realistic option in present circumstances. (author)

  12. Warfare Ecology on an Underwater Demolition Range: Acoustic Observations of Marine Life and Shallow Water Detonations in Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Lee H.

    Most studies investigating the effects of military-associated anthropogenic noise concentrate on deep sea or open ocean propagation of sonar and its effect on marine mammals. In littoral waters, U.S. military special operations units regularly conduct shallow water explosives training, yet relatively little attention has been given to the potential impact on nearshore marine ecosystems from these underwater detonations. This dissertation research focused on the Pu'uloa Underwater Detonation Range off the coast of O`ahu, and examined multiple aspects of the surrounding marine ecosystem and the effects of detonations using acoustic monitoring techniques. The soundscape of a nearshore reef ecosystem adjacent to the UNDET range was characterized through analysis of passive acoustic recordings collected over the span of 6 years. Snapping shrimp were the predominant source of noise, and a diel pattern was present, with increased sound energy during the night hours. Results revealed a difference of up to 7dB between two Ecological Acoustic Recorder locations 2.5km apart along the 60ft isobath. Passive acoustic recording files were searched visually and aurally for odontocete whistles. Whistles were detected in only 0.6% of files analyzed, indicating this area is not frequently transited by coastal odontocete emitting social sounds. The study also opportunistically captured a humpback whale singing during a detonation event, during which the animal showed no obvious alteration of its singing behavior. Four separate underwater detonation events were recorded using a surface deployed F-42C transducer, and the resulting analysis showed no measurable drop in the biologically produced acoustic energy in reaction to the explosive events. Coral reef fishes were recorded visually and acoustically during detonation events at a known distance and bearing from a known explosive sound source. Individual fish behavioral responses to the explosion varied, and a sharp uptick in fish vocalizations was recorded immediately following the blast, with rapid (within 30s) return to baseline visual and acoustic behavior. The results and conclusions of these studies are placed within the broader context of warfare ecology as an emerging scientific discipline.

  13. Environmental Assessment for Demolition and Construction of Military Personnel Support Facilities Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Randolph Avenue, between Truman and Eileen Streets.  Dormitory Campus 2 located on the west side of the Base between Sherman and Lowry Avenues and...Rhinocheilus lecontei SS K desert massasauga Sistrurus catenatus spp. edwardsii SS K gray vireo Vireo vicinior ST K burrowing owl Athene cunicularia...Street.  NCO Academy located east of the flight line south of Biggs Avenue and north of Randolph Avenue, between Truman and Eileen Streets.  Dormitory

  14. Correlation analysis between sulphate content and leaching of sulphates in recycled aggregates from construction and demolition wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbudo, Auxi; Galvín, Adela P; Agrela, Francisco; Ayuso, Jesús; Jiménez, Jose Ramón

    2012-06-01

    In some recycled aggregates applications, such as component of new concrete or roads, the total content of soluble sulphates should be measured and controlled. Restrictions are usually motivated by the resistance or stability of the new structure, and in most cases, structural concerns can be remedied by the use of techniques such as sulphur-resistant cements. However, environmental risk assessment from recycling and reuse construction products is often forgotten. The purpose of this study is to analyse the content of soluble sulphate on eleven recycled aggregates and six samples prepared in laboratory by the addition of different gypsum percentages. As points of reference, two natural aggregates were tested. An analysis of the content of the leachable amount of heavy metals regulated by European regulation was included. As a result, the correlation between solubility and leachability data allow suggest a limiting gypsum amount of 4.4% on recycled aggregates. This limit satisfies EU Landfill Directive criteria, which is currently used as reference by public Spanish Government for recycled aggregates in construction works. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Environmental Assessment for Demolition and Disposal of Base Buildings and Facilities on Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-26

    shallow bedrock or several hundred feet of ancient sand, silt and clay lakebed deposits. Soil refers to the uppermost layers of surficial geologic...Some soils have a silt or clay component especially around the lakebeds where clay predominates. All soils at Edwards AFB have low organic carbon...Not Completed Completed 3-Jun-11 Initial survey completed. Confirmatory survey required. FY14 14 (A4) Sanitary Latrine (1965

  16. Reuse and recycling of construction and demolition according to the directive 2008/98/EC on waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    With the approval of the current framework directive amending the definitions of recovery in article 3.15 is to legitimize the doctrine of the function or purpose useful to define the operatins of valorization and disposal, in this sense, ''valorization'' means any operation the principal result of which is waste serving a useful purpose by replacing other materials that would otherwise have been used to fulfill a particular function, or that the waste is prepared to fulfill that function, in the installation or the economy in general.

  17. In situ pilot test for bioremediation of energetic compound-contaminated soil at a former military demolition range site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugnia, Louis B; Manno, Dominic; Drouin, Karine; Hendry, Meghan

    2018-05-04

    Bioremediation was performed in situ at a former military range site to assess the performance of native bacteria in degrading hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT). The fate of these pollutants in soil and soil pore water was investigated as influenced by waste glycerol amendment to the soil. Following waste glycerol application, there was an accumulation of organic carbon that promoted microbial activity, converting organic carbon into acetate and propionate, which are intermediate compounds in anaerobic processes. This augmentation of anaerobic activity strongly correlated to a noticeable reduction in RDX concentrations in the amended soil. Changes in concentrations of RDX in pore water were similar to those observed in the soil suggesting that RDX leaching from the soil matrix, and treatment with waste glycerol, contributed to the enhanced removal of RDX from the water and soil. This was not the case with 2,4-DNT, which was neither found in pore water nor affected by the waste glycerol treatment. Results from saturated conditions and Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure testing, to investigate the environmental fate of 2,4-DNT, indicated that 2,4-DNT found on site was relatively inert and was likely to remain in its current state on the site.

  18. Environmental Assessment: Demolition of McGuire Central Heat Plant at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    insulation, boiler, holding tank and duct coverings, floor tiles , window caulking/glazing, and corrugated building siding. The asbestos insulation and...facility, with the Bulk Fuel Storage area and the golf course located between them. BOMARC is located several miles from the proposed solar sites...Architectural Resources The Central Heat Plant was constructed in 1956. It is a flat- roofed building originally rectangular in form, and is now L-shaped. The

  19. Environmental Assessment: Proposed Construction, Demolition, and Other Actions at the 126th Air Refueling Wing Illinois Air National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-05

    FIFRA Federal Insecticide , Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act FONSI Finding of No Significant Impact FY fiscal year HAP High Accident Potential HAZMAT...approximately 30 to 40 percent open (Scott AFB 2005b). The understory of the Riparian Forest is relatively sparse; however, stinging nettle and white heath...waste laws and regulations. Federal Insecticide , Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) of 1996 (7 USC 136 et seq.). FIFRA provides federal control

  20. Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment: Demolition and Abandonment of Atlas and Titan Facilities Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-13

    compliance with Federal Insecticide , Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and 40 CFR 159-189 Pesticide Programs. AFI 32-7020 The Environmental...oak and stinging nettle ), animals (i.e., insects, spiders, and snakes), and disease vectors (i.e., ticks, rodents), exist at and around the...Francisco. Hamilton, M. Colleen, Wendy Nettles , and Clayton G. Lebow 2004 SLC-4 to SLC-6 Waterline Replacement Project, CA-SBA-1145/H Treatment Plan

  1. The production of construction and demolition waste material and the use of recycled aggregates in Havana, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elier Pavón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se realiza un análisis de la generación de Residuos de Construcción y Demolición (RCD para el período de 1999 a 2010 en La Habana, Cuba y se define su posible uso en la fabricación de áridos reciclados para la producción de mortero y hormigón. Para la definición de las posibles aplicaciones de los RCD como agregados en la producción de mortero y hormigón, se analizaron las características de los residuos, así como el estudio de las tecnologías disponibles actualmente en la provincia para su tratamiento. Basado en los resultados experimentales, se determinó que los áridos finos reciclados de composición mixta cumplían con los mínimos requisitos exigido por las normas cubanas. Todos los morteros producidos con áridos reciclados finos obtuvieron una resistencia a compresión de 5.2 MPa a los 28 días, que es el mínimo establecido para morteros tipo III, por lo que pueden ser utilizados en la producción de morteros de albañilería. El árido grueso reciclado originado de elementos de hormigón prefabricado puede ser utilizado en la producción de hormigón estructural para ambientes de baja y media agresividad, con sustituciones de 50% y 100%, respectivamente, de árido natural por reciclado.

  2. Final Environmental Assessment: Construction of Maintenance and Storage Facility, Perimeter Fence Upgrade and Demolition of Three Buildings and Two Structures Gila River Air Force Space Surveillance Station Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Estrella mountain range is approximately six miles west of the Installation and the Sacaton mountain range lie approximate- ly six miles to the southeast...Structures 3-4 Figure 5. Geological Map of Gila River AFSSS and Vicinity Sierra Estrella Range Sacaton Range EA — Construct Maintenance & Storage

  3. Environmental Assessment Construction of Antenna Parts Storage Facility and Demolition of Hazardous Materials Storage Shed and Oil Change Pit, Jordan Lake Air Force Space Surveillance Station, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    other conifers. The most common deciduous trees are hickory, sweet gum, and several species of oak. Jordan Lake AFSSS is covered with native and non...this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information... eastern border with Georgia and 136 miles from the northern border of Cullman County to the Alabama River in southern Autauga County. Elmore County

  4. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of a segmental concrete bridge scheduled for demolition, with a focus on condition assessment and corrosion detection of internal tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The service life and durability of prestressed concrete in bridges are vulnerable to corrosion damages due to many factors such as construction, material, and environment. To ensure public safety, it is important to inspect these structures and to de...

  5. Gestión del medio ambiente urbano. Residuos que se generan en la actividad de la construcción. Directiva U.E "Demolition waste"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanet Sallán, Luis

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of polluting agents that falls and degrades the environment, is increasing from day to day. A lot of them have a common origin: they are residues generated by the man during his daily activity. The construction sector, one of the most important engines of the economy, also plays a main role at time to generate residues. However, in Spain, until nowadays, the worry for its treatment, new use or, at least, right spilt, has been nearly inexistent. The possible E.C. Directive that could be published this year, treats the problematic that has been generated by the waste produced by the construction activity and plans the necessity of its right treatment. This paper shows the right way that could be followed.

    El número de agentes contaminantes que inciden y degradan el Medio Ambiente se multiplica día tras día. Una gran mayoría de ellos tienen un origen común: son residuos generados por el hombre en su actividad cotidiana. El sector de la construcción, uno de los principales motores de la economía, interpreta también un papel protagonista a la hora de generar residuos. Sin embargo, en España y hasta la fecha, la preocupación por su tratamiento, reutilización o, cuando menos, correcto vertido, ha sido prácticamente inexistente. La posible Directiva comunitaria que, a este respecto, podría ver la luz el presente año 1996, aborda en profundidad la problemática generada por los residuos producidos en la actividad de la construcción y plantea la necesidad de su adecuado tratamiento. Este artículo esboza lo que debiera ser el camino a seguir.

  6. Final Environmental Assessment: Perimeter Fence Upgrade and Demolition of Two Sheds and Two Water Tanks, Lake Kickapoo Air Force Space Surveillance Station, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    conglomerates of the Nocona and Archer City Formations. Quaternary gravels, terrace deposits, and alluvium are present along the major drainages in the...packings, gaskets, resilient floor covering, pliable sealants and mastics and asphalt roofing products containing more than one percent asbestos...flooring and roofing materials. Less commonly used as a building material since the mid-1970s, asbestos is still in use or distribution in certain

  7. WITHDRAWN: A case-study of critical success factors for construction and demolition waste management: the pearl river delta region of china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingkuang; Wang, Yousong

    2012-08-28

    This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities

  9. Final Environmental Assessment Addressing 21st Explosive Ordinance Disposal Weapons of Mass Destruction Facilities Demolition and Expansion at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    allow for these UMMCA and MILCON projects. High-energy radiography and containment foaming operations would continue on these two shot pads, as...Sheets. Employer responsibilities include review of potentially hazardous workplaces ; monitoring exposure to workplace chemical, physical, and biological

  10. Structural recycled concrete: utilization of recycled aggregate from construction and demolition wastes; Hormigon reciclado estructural: utilizacion de arido reciclado procedente de escombros de hormigon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaejos Gutierrez, P.; Sanchez de Juan, M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to present the main results of CEDEX research works concerning the use of recycled aggregates for structural concretes. By way of conclusion, recommendations on the requirements of the recycled aggregates have been established, providing information about the influence of these aggregates on the properties of structural concrete. (Author)

  11. Environmental Assessment for Housing Demolition, Construction, Renovation, and Leasing Bethel Manor, Lighter-Than-Air, and Heavier-Than-Air Military Family Housing Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    L. Raymer , and T. Hanby. 1992. Archaeological Site Survey and Testing, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. Prepared by New South Associates...Matthew C. Goss, GS-11 1 CES/CEV 37 Sweeney Boulevard Langley AFB, VA 23665 Matthew.goss@langley.af.mil FROM: Robert Munson, Planning...Virginia Erosion & Sediment Control Handbook, Third Edition, 1992. Thank you for the opportunity to comment on this project. Sincerely, Robert

  12. Local Strongmen At The Village Level: The Conflict Of The Demolition Of The First Raja Brawijaya ‘Petilasan’ At Sudimoro Village, Jombang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirojul Huda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Having been enacted since 2014, the Act No. 6/2014 has given a spirit and a huge authority to the villages in developing their potential resources. Unfortunately, those special authorities have not been fcollowed by the leadership’s capacity of the village’s head. This paper attempts to analyze the rise of local actors so-called local strongmen at the village level. This study uses Sidel (1999 perspective on how to seek local strongmen in local area at Sudimoro Village, Megaluh District in Jombang Regency. In case, the head of Sudimoro village produces a despotic action by unloading and dredging the historical land where there was a petilasan from King of Majapahit, well-known as Raja Brawijaya 1. Then, this action eventually triggered a conflict in the middle of its society and has been solved after the hall of cultural heritage of the government of Jombang Regency has intervened. This paper concluded that the high of authority and power would potentially rise the new local strongmen at the village level. Therefore, the existence of the principle of recognition and subsidiarity owned by the village is only used by a few local elites for their interests without any accountability and accessibility for the society.

  13. Clearance of radioactive materials during reactor dismantling. Permanent enclosure instead of demolition and renaturation?; Freigabe radioaktiven Materials beim AKW-Abriss. Dauerhafter Einschluss statt Rueckbau?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-07-01

    During reactor dismantling besides high-level radioactive wastes a large amount of low-level contaminated steel and concrete has to be disposed. In case that radioactivity falls below defined dose limits (10 micro Sv/person and year) these materials may be disposed in domestic waste landfill or in municipal incineration facilities. The issue is discussed in detail including the fact that many power plants are dismantled at the same time so that the contaminated materials might accumulate. Another issue is the occupational safety of contract workers during dismantling. The permanent enclosure could avoid this environmental contamination of decommissioned power plants might also be less expensive.

  14. Final Environmental Assessment for Decommissioning and Demolition of the Central Heat Plant, GHLN 09-1010B F. E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    could either be accomplished by installing a solar heating panel on the roof of each of the 104 buildings or having a solar photovoltaic array...Prior to 1981 , ACMs were used extensively in plaster, wall board, joint compound, felt material , roofing material , floor tile , mastic, piping...5 5.4. Alternative D-lnstall Solar Heating Panels or Solar Photovoltaic Array ......................... 5 5.5. Alternative E

  15. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

  16. Calculation of additional costs in 2010 - for the demolition of the Swedish nuclear power plants and disposal of residues; Beraekning av merkostnader 2010 - foer rivning av de svenska kaernkraftsverken och omhaendertagande av restprodukter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewitz, Erica; Schoultz, Christian; Wetzel, Carina

    2010-09-15

    This report describes the SSM's calculation of additional costs for fee proposal for 2012-2014. The calculation is made pursuant to the Financing Act and includes all additional costs until the residue from the Swedish nuclear power plants is disposed of. According to current calculations, this should be done in 2069. Estimates of such a long time means a great deal of uncertainty and SSM uses, like SKB, the successive calculation method to estimate an expected value and tax association uncertainty. As a starting point for analysis, the SSM has made estimates of the future costs broken down into paragraphs in paragraph 2 Financing Act. The estimates were made after discussions within the organization and representatives of relevant external organizations. Assuming a total annual cost per worker of 1.24 million gave these estimates a total cost of over three billion. It should be emphasized that this sum is only a starting point for analysis and applies in particular circumstances. These circumstances critically reviewed the analysis and the reasonableness of assessments made by a analysis group. The analysis took place for 2.5 days in spring 2010. The analysis group consisted of 17 people including nine from the SSM. Lores Borg and Steen Lichtenberg were moderators. Via a brainstorming process, the analysis group presented a number of uncertainties and made a three-part assessment of their impact on the overall results (minimum, most likely and maximum). The result of the analysis: average in the 2010 monetary value was assessed to 4.24 billion Swedish crowns with a standard deviation of 920 million Swedish crowns. These values are undiscounted

  17. Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Finding of No Practicable Alternative (FONPA): Construct of a New Fire Station, Demolition of Buildings 530 and 606 and Relocation of the Hazardous Cargo Area at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-18

    vegetated (grass) buffer with a perimeter filter strip. Palustrine emergent marsh (PEM) wetlands are characterized by erect, rooted , herbaceous...Rosa woodsii) are common in the under story in this area. Wood nettle (Laportea canadensis), stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), beggars’ ticks (Bidens

  18. Construction of a New Fire Station, Demolition of Buildings 530 and 606 and Relocation of the Hazardous Cargo Area at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Finding of No Significant Impact (FOSNI). Finding of No Practical Alternative(FONPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-23

    wetlands are characterized by erect, rooted , herbaceous hydrophytes, excluding mosses and lichens. This vegetation is present for most of the growing...highly invasive exotic species), chokecherry and wood rose (Rosa woodsii) are common in the under story in this area. Wood nettle (Laportea canadensis...stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), beggars’ ticks (Bidens frondosa) and waterleaf (Hydrophyllum viginianum) are typical forbes. A prairie

  19. Reuse and recycling of construction and demolition according to the directive 2008/98/EC on waste; Reutilizacion y reciclado de residuos de construccion y demolicion segun la directiva 2008/98/CE sobre residuos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, F.J.

    2010-07-01

    With the approval of the current framework directive amending the definitions of recovery in article 3.15 is to legitimize the doctrine of the function or purpose useful to define the operatins of valorization and disposal, in this sense, 'valorization' means any operation the principal result of which is waste serving a useful purpose by replacing other materials that would otherwise have been used to fulfill a particular function, or that the waste is prepared to fulfill that function, in the installation or the economy in general.

  20. Some attempts of the State to remedy (via pecuniary compensation for the demolition of property the consequences of which the Courts have declared null and void the building licences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Enrique Flores Domínguez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The unorganized growth in urban planning in Spain in the last decade of the 20 century and the beginning of the 21st century has provoked diverse negative consequences for the public interest and specially for the large number of foreigners that have been affected by the serious problem of having declared void and null, building licenses for their properties which were bought in good faith, only to discover that they are obliged to demolish such properties.Our planning laws contemplate a possible compensation for the cancelation of a building license, except in the case of fraud, error or negligence on behalf of the injured party. But along with this demand for the replacement of the integral property of the injured party, it raises the constitutional demand to carry out the decisions of the Courts in its full terms, which corresponds exclusively to the judicial power, as well as to proceed to its execution.To reconcile all the parties involved, we will show the various legal initiatives which have been taken by the different autonomous regions, which have been declared void and null by the Constitutional Court, basically due to the fact that regional parliaments have not got legal powers to regulate process law and additionally, because such initiatives would limit the exclusive faculties of the judges to execute their own decisions. The State also has adopted legal measures which are relevant in criminal and public process laws, so as to try and give a response to this problem. We will demonstrate and show the difficulties in applying such measures, specially the public process law area.

  1. Durabilidade de tijolos solo-cal incorporados com resíduos de demolição da construção civil Durability of soil-lime bricks embedded with demolition construction residues

    OpenAIRE

    Suélen Silva Figueiredo; Cibelle Guimarães Silva; Gelmires A. Neves

    2011-01-01

    A incorporação dos resíduos de demolição da construção civil (RD) em tijolos solo-cal, substituindo parte do aglomerante, torna-se possível devido às propriedades cimentantes que esses resíduos podem apresentar quando finamente moídos. Essa pesquisa objetiva avaliar a durabilidade de tijolos solo-cal incorporados com resíduos de demolição da construção civil. Para o desenvolvimento dessa pesquisa foram confeccionados corpos-de-prova utilizando o traço 1:10 em massa, em proporção de cal:solo e...

  2. Lead exposure during demolition of a steel structure coated with lead-based paints: II. Reversible changes in the conduction velocity of the motor nerves in transiently exposed workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijser, H.; Hoogendijk, E.M.G.; Hooisma, J.; Twisk, D.A.M.

    1987-01-01

    In a group of workers exposed to high levels of lead during five months nerve conduction velocity parameters were evaluated at the termination of exposure, and also three and fifteen months later. At the termination of exposure the mean blood lead level was 4.0 ??mol/l, and motor conduction

  3. 基于PPP模式的建筑垃圾资源化产业研究%RESEARCH ON THE CONSTRUCTION WASTE DEMOLITION-RECYCLING INDUSTRY BASED ON THE PUBIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊兴华; 高晶晶; 薛振华

    2017-01-01

    为解决建筑垃圾资源化产业项目融资不足、管理困难的难题,提出在建筑垃圾产业中引入PPP模式可实现政府和企业“双赢”的效果.经过对比分析,BOO是最适合建筑垃圾处理产业项目的模式.通过对建筑垃圾资源化产业PPP运行模式和效益分析,得出PPP模式应用于建筑垃圾资源化产业项目是切实可行的.%To solve the deficient financing and difficult management problems for the construction waste recycling industry project,it is presented that the introduction of PPP model into construction waste industry can achieve a win-win effect between government and enterprises.After the comparison and analysis,boo is found to be the most suitable for construction waste disposal mode of industrial projects.Based on the operation modes and the analysis on the benefit of the construction waste resource industry PPP model,it is concluded that the application of the PPP model to construction waste recycling industry project is feasible.

  4. Investigation about the ecotown-enterprise for establishing recycling system of non-radioactive waste arising from power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hironaga, Michihiko; Nishiuchi, Tatsuo; Ozaki, Yukio; Yamamoto, Kimio

    2004-01-01

    About 95% of demolition wastes generated by decommissioning nuclear power plants are below the clearance level, i.e., the wastes can be dealt with as industrial wastes. On that case, rational processing, disposal, and reuse are expectable. However, even if the demolition waste is below a clearance level, it seems to be difficult to be immediately accepted in general society with the demolition wastes. Therefore, it is important to establish the technology for an effective recycle system of demolition wastes, and to reuse demolition wastes as much as possible, resulting in recognition of the value by the society. On the other hand, as for recycling of industrial waste, the recycling enterprise is promoted in the domestic self-governing body in response to the 'eco-town enterprise' which is recommended by the government. This report investigates the system and subjects of a 'eco-town enterprise' for recycling demolition wastes. (author)

  5. 100 Area D4 Project Building Completion Report May 2006 - June 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. G. Ison

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) and the demolition of the 153-N, 1515-N, 1516-N, 1517-N, 1518-N, 1519-N, 1331-N, 1332-N, and 181-NC facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The D and D and demolition of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and removal of the remaining slabs

  6. 75 FR 60745 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the vacated CMR Building would undergo decommissioning, decontamination, and demolition. (While the... air, water, soil, visual resources and viewsheds. 2. Potential impacts to plants and animals, and to...

  7. DEMOLISHING A COLD-WAR-ERA FULE-STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLOYD, E.R.; STEVENS, J.M.; DAGAN, E.B.; ORGILL, T.K.; GREEN, M.A.; LARSON, C.H.; ZINSLI, L.C.

    2009-01-01

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the KE Basin within six months of turnover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team applied open-air demolition techniques to bring the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives during the demolition; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovative approach that made demolition easier was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building and portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple-layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by using heavy equipment to remove the CAB during demolition. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or

  8. 75 FR 42598 - Modification of Restricted Area R-3404; Crane, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ...-28632; Airspace Docket No. 07-ASW-3] RIN 2120-AA66 Modification of Restricted Area R-3404; Crane, IN... Restricted Area R-3404 at Crane, IN, in support of U.S. Navy ordnance demolition activities. The FAA is...) Crane's Demolition Range. DATES: Effective date 0901 UTC, September 23, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  9. 300 Area D4 Project 4th Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. S. Smith

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of nine buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate

  10. 300 Area D4 Project 2nd Quarter FY06 Building Completion Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David S.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of 16 buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  11. 300 Area D4 Project 3rd Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of five buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  12. Mud Brick Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Runa

    2012-01-01

    In the seemingly endless circle of demolition and illegal rebuilding hand-made mud bricks produced from the soil of contested territory become an act of resistance. In June 2011, the Palestinian village Fasayel encountered the Israeli military’s demolition of 21 of the village’s built structures....

  13. 76 FR 57957 - Notice of Availability of a Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Replacement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... resources such as: geological conditions, hydraulic processes, construction noise, traffic/pedestrian... Final EIS/EIR consisted of the demolition of Buildings B and C and the construction of a new SWFSC..., construction of the SWFSC building at the preferred site is underway. Demolition of Buildings B and C at the...

  14. Cost-Benefit Analysis on Countermeasures for Health Risk by Exposure to Asbestos in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinaga, Aiichiro; Hihara, Hidemi; Tatsuno, Makoto

    This study examines asbestos mitigation countermeasures by predicting air concentrations of asbestos, and then cost-benefit analyses is performed. A comparative study was conducted on three cases as follows; case one, demolition by machine & landfill, case two, demolition by hand & landfill, and case three demolition by hand & vitrification treatment. The results showed that if demolition by machine is continued, the risk is greater than 10-4 of upper acceptable risk for 2020. However, if demolition is conducted by hand, the risk is under 10-4 for 2010. And also, the risk will be less than 10-5 of the safety level for environmental standards until 2030. The results show that vitrification deletes the risk on future management at a landfill site, however at a higher cost.

  15. Final characterization report for the 108-F Biological Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    This report provides a compilation of characterization data for the 108-F Biological Laboratory collected during the period of May 7, 1996 through August 29, 1996. The 108-F Biology Laboratory is located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The characterization activities were organized and implemented to evaluate the radiological status of the laboratory and to identify hazardous materials. This report reflects the current conditions and status of the laboratory. Information in this report is intended to be utilized to prepare an accurate cost estimate for building demolition, to aid in planning decontamination and demolition activities, and allow proper disposal of demolition debris

  16. Brokk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrucelli, C.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, the removal of concrete by hand-held breaking methods is a laborious, time consuming and often hazardous job. Laborers are frequently exposed to unhealthy amounts of noise, dust, vibrations and, when engaged in vertical or overhead demolition, tremendous danger from falling debris. Introduction of the Brokk 250 remote controlled demolition robot has provided a dimension of safety and performance previously unattainable with manual methods or with traditional carriers of mounted breakers. The rig has demonstrated its versatility in a number of diverse applications such as concrete demolition, rock breaking and scaling, slag removal in kilns and furnaces, dredging and loading

  17. Improvement of the material and transport component of the system of construction waste management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyshak, Mikhail; Lunyakov, Mikhail

    2017-10-01

    Relevance of the topic of selected research is conditioned with the growth of construction operations and growth rates of construction and demolition wastes. This article considers modern approaches to the management of turnover of construction waste, sequence of reconstruction or demolition processes of the building, information flow of the complete cycle of turnover of construction and demolition waste, methods for improvement of the material and transport component of the construction waste management system. Performed analysis showed that mechanism of management of construction waste allows to increase efficiency and environmental safety of this branch and regions.

  18. Assessment of the environmental consequences of demolishing two Russian nuclear submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Norway has financed the demolition of two Russian Viktor II nuclear submarines through the Government's plan of action for nuclear issues. The British company Enviros Consulting has made an independent assessment of the environmental consequences of the project, which has been evaluated by the Foreign Department in cooperation with The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The consequence assessment has examined the health, environment and safety aspects of the entire demolition process, from towing the submarine to delivering the rubbish at the destination site. From Russian documentation and by visiting the shipyards it has been concluded that the demolition has been carried out in agreement with Russian law and in accordance with international instructions

  19. Cenário do gerenciamento dos resíduos da construção e demolição (RCD em Uberaba-MG / Scenario of waste management of construction and demolition (CDW in Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Arcanjo da Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Em alguns municípios, os resíduos da construção civil representam 60% do montante de lixo que é gerado nos centros urbanos. A cidade de Uberaba convive com significativos impactos ambientais provocadospela não gestão dos resíduos construtivos. No município, existem áreas altamente degradadas pela destinação inadequada dos Resíduos da Construção e Demolição (RCD ou Resíduos da Construção Civil (RCC. A falta de gerenciamento desses resíduos afeta a cidade nos aspectos econômico, sociais e principalmente ambientais. Neste trabalho, foram levantados os principais impactos ambientais que ocorreram devido à falta de gestão dos RCD na cidade de Uberaba. Foram abordados alguns pontos como: a eficiência dos “ecopontos”, degradação da área da Pedreira de Léa e riscos para a saúde pública da cidade. Ainda foram discutidos os motivos que levam à não gestão dos RCD e o que tem sido feito para que futuramente esta gestão venha ser implantada. Este trabalho foi composto por revisão bibliográfica associada a visitas in loco das áreas afetadas pela destinação inadequada dos RCD. Desta forma, este trabalho propôs soluções para redução dos impactos ambientais causados pelos RCD gerenciados de maneira inadequada em Uberaba, visando obter melhorias para a saúde pública e contribuindo para a sustentabilidade ambiental da cidade..

  20. Recycling in SA – How does the National Domestic Waste Collection Standards affect consumers?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available -packaging materials that are recyclable include: textiles, scrap metal, used oils, tyres, old household appliances, batteries, car bodies, electronic equipment (e.g. computers, cell phones, video games etc.) and construction and demolition waste. Biodegradable...

  1. Pop / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2002-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Chicago "The Chicago Story: Complete Greatest Hits", Ryan Adams "Demolition", Elvis Presly "Elvis - 30 No.1 Hits", Komet +/vs. Bovine Life "Reciprocess +/vs. 1",, Cassius "Au Reve", Bowling For Soup "Drunk Enough To Dance", Atomic Kitten "Feels So Good"

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 1, Calculations, Final design for construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Volume one contains calculations for: embankment design--embankment material properties; Union Carbide site--bedrock contours; vicinity properties--origin of contamination; North Continent and Union Carbide sites contaminated materials--excavation quantities; and demolition debris--quantity estimate

  3. Allegheny County Asbestos Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Current asbestos permit data issued by the County for commercial building demolitions and renovations as required by the EPA. This file is updated daily and can be...

  4. Designing for second generation value - future proofing constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhard, Søren Munch; Wandahl, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Lifecycle consideration in terms of environmental impact and total cost of buildings attract increased focus in construction. Here, total cost and environmental impact both involves: erection, operation, maintenance, demolition, and disposal of the building. The mindset of Lean Construction...

  5. Designing for second generation value – Future proofing construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhard, Søren; Wandahl, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Lifecycle consideration in terms of environmental impact and total cost of buildings attract increased focus in construction. Here total cost and environmental impact both involves: erection, operation, maintenance, demolition, and disposal of the building. The mindset of Lean Construction...

  6. Quality Assurance program plan - plutonium stabilization and handling project W-460

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHULTZ, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) identifies Project Quality Assurance (QA) program requirements for all parties participating in the design, procurement, demolition, construction, installation, inspection and testing for Project W-460

  7. Utilization of Wastes as an Alternative Energy Source for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-04-19

    Apr 19, 2013 ... converting solid waste to energy source, ranging from very simple systems of ... defined by modern systems of waste management, notably: -. Municipal Waste; Household Waste,. Commercial Waste and Demolition Waste.

  8. Plaadid / Tiia Teder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Teder, Tiia, 1959-

    2002-01-01

    Uutest plaatidest "Chiled Classics", Rullnokad "Ruulib täiega", JJ72 "I To Sky", Styrenes "Terry Riley: In C", "Everything But The Girl", Ryan Adams "Demolition", Bon Jovi "Bounce", Slum Village "Trinity"

  9. Sustainable management of C&D waste - reducing the source to ozone depletion and global warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) are produced. Buildings in many countries are thermally insulated by insulation foam containing large amounts of fluorocarbons (chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) or hydrofluoro-carbons (HCFCs), which are ...

  10. Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) for infrastructure elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    With a growing demand for new construction and the need to replace infrastructure stretched beyond its service life, society faces the : problem of an ever-growing production of construction and demolition waste. The Federal Highway Administration (F...

  11. ABUJA SUSTAINABLE SPATIAL HOUSING DESIGN: A SPATIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bons

    2017-02-02

    Feb 2, 2017 ... poor communities and settlements in Abuja metropolis. The demolition exercises .... Juvenile delinquency and crime have become ... today emerged out of this colonial impact (Okonkwo, 2013). However, in whichever form the ...

  12. 38 CFR Appendix A to Part 200 - Categorical Exclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sustainable or “green” procurement) to support operations and infrastructure, including routine utility... complex, office building in downtown area, row house or vacant lot in an urban area). A.4(e) Demolition...

  13. Deterioration of J-bar reinforcement in abutments and piers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-31

    Deterioration and necking of J-bars has been reportedly observed at the interface of the footing and stem wall during the demolition : of older retaining walls and bridge abutments. Similar deterioration has been reportedly observed between the pier ...

  14. Architectural impact assessment of dwellings on portion 9 of the farm La Mercy 15124 for Dube Tradeport Corporation

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This report investigates the impact a number of buildings, intended for demolition in the 1970s, would have from a heritage point of view. The houses lie in the path of the King Shaka International Airport runway.

  15. DOJ News Release: Local Contractor Pleads Guilty To Defrauding City Of Sacramento Of Stimulus Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. — US Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner announced today that Peter Scott, President of Advantage Demolition and Engineering (ADE), 47, of Roseville, pleaded guilty today to two counts of submitting false contractor bonds.

  16. Analysis of the Lifecycle Impacts and Potential for Avoided Impacts Associated with Single Family Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how recovering construction and demolition materials from single-family homes and reusing them in building and road construction and other applications helps offset the environmental impacts associated with single-family homes.

  17. Impacts of Fire Ecology Range Management (FERM) on the Fate and Transport of Energetic Materials on Testing and Training Ranges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foote, Eric

    2006-01-01

    .... One such practice may be prescribed or controlled burning, which is used on military training ranges for a variety of purposes including safety clearance prior to detection and demolition of unexploded ordnance (UXO...

  18. Huria: Journal of the Open University of Tanzania - Vol 23, No 1 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Construction and Demolition Waste Characteristics in Tanzania · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. SMM Sabai, JJ Lichtenberg, ELC Egmond, M. V. M Florea, HJH Brouwers, 1-19 ...

  19. Environmental Assessment for Ford Island Conference Center, Pearl Harbor Naval Complex, O'ahu, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    ... (formerly the Ford Island Theater), a historic property, at Ford Island, Oahu, Hawaii. The Proposed Action would have an adverse effect on Building 89 due to its partial demolition and alterations to the interior...

  20. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations, landfills and recycling facilities for construction and demolition materials, electronics, household hazardous waste, metals, tires, and vehicles in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin.In this update, facilities in the 7 states that border the EPA Region 5 states were added to assist interstate disaster debris management. Also, the datasets for composters, construction and demolition recyclers, demolition contractors, and metals recyclers were verified and source information added for each record using these sources: AGC, Biocycle, BMRA, CDRA, ISRI, NDA, USCC, FEMA Debris Removal Contractor Registry, EPA Facility Registry System, and State and local listings.

  1. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations, landfills and recycling facilities for construction and demolition materials, electronics, household hazardous waste, metals, tires, and vehicles in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin.In this update, facilities in the 7 states that border the EPA Region 5 states were added to assist interstate disaster debris management. Also, the datasets for composters, construction and demolition recyclers, demolition contractors, and metals recyclers were verified and source information added for each record using these sources: AGC, Biocycle, BMRA, CDRA, ISRI, NDA, USCC, FEMA Debris Removal Contractor Registry, EPA Facility Registry System, and State and local listings.

  2. Dissecting the fuel element replacement machine in the NPP Muehlheim-Kaerlich using a wire saw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Melanie; Ambos, Frank; Platt, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    By the end of 2000 the NPP Muehlheim-Kaerlich is decommissioned and has to be dismantled. The authors describe the demolition of the fuel element replacement machine. The work is aimed to declassify the waste without restraints for conventional disposal. Within 7 weeks the component has to be dissected using a wire saw. The authors describe the concept and its adaptation to the boundary conditions and experiences during the realization of the demolition concept.

  3. Use of explosives in pipeline construction work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, M J

    1976-08-01

    Explosives are an essential tool in Great Britain's pipeline-construction industry, with applications on dry land and under water, in trench blasting and tunneling for road and service crossings, demolition of unwanted sections, and removal of coatings. Nobels Explosive Co. Ltd. describes basic explosives operations as pertaining to the requirements of rock trenching, submarine operations, thrust-bore and tunneling operations, demolitions, and precision blasting.

  4. 18th Annual NDIA SOLIC Symposium and Exhibition - Warfare in the Seams: Defense and Industry Partnering to Win the Long War. Volume 1. Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-28

    The second objective is to create several content rich Darknet environments that offer e-mail, file sharing, chat, instant messenger, and streaming...video services. A Darknet is a private virtual network where users connect only to people they trust.8 The Demolition Node: The demolition node’s...objective is to remotely destroy or disable all extremists’ websites, chat rooms, Darknets , etc. The Cyber-herding Process: Phase One: The

  5. Irradiated concrete maze is confronted by robotics. [Uncertainties of nuclear reactor decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, A

    1984-09-01

    Nuclear reactor decommissioning and demolition are discussed. Three stages of the process are defined, and three options are described, depending on the rate at which the stages of the process are carried out. The options are: immediate decommissioning and demolition within 10 to 15 years of shutdown; partial deferment, the final stage being deferred for 10 to 100 years; total deferment, the second and third stages being deferred for 50 years or more. The possibilities and problems of designing a task-specific robot to carry out decommissioning are discussed. It is pointed out that specialist demolition will be needed. The problem of massive amounts of radioactive waste disposal is considered. The large unknown cost of the operation, and the desirability of getting experience in the problems involved, are discussed.

  6. Laser beam cutting method. Laser ko ni yoru kaitai koho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsumizu, A. (Obayashi Corp., Osaka (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    In this special issue paper concerning the demolition of concrete structures, was introduced a demolition of concrete structures using laser, of which practical application is expected due to the remarkable progress of generating power and efficiency of laser radiator. The characteristics of laser beam which can give a temperature of one million centigrade at the irradiated spot, the laser radiator consisting of laser medium, laser resonator and pumping apparatus, and the laser kinds for working, such as CO{sub 2} laser, YAG laser and CO laser, were described. The basic constitution of laser cutting equipment consisting of large generating power radiator, beam transmitter, beam condenser, and nozzle for working was also illustrated. Furthermore, strong and weak points in the laser cutting for concrete and reinforcement were enumerated. Applications of laser to cutting of reinforced and unreinforced concrete constructions were shown, and the concept and safety measure for application of laser to practical demolition was discussed. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Life cycle assessment of the end-of-life phase of a residential building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Pierluca; Arena, Noemi; Di Gregorio, Fabrizio; Arena, Umberto

    2017-02-01

    The study investigates the potential environmental impacts related to the end-of-life phase of a residential building, identified in a multifamily dwelling of three levels, constructed in the South of Italy by utilizing conventional materials and up-to-date procedures. An attributional life cycle assessment has been utilised to quantify the contributions of each stage of the end-of-life phase, with a particular attention to the management of the demolition waste. The investigation takes into account the selective demolition, preliminary sorting and collection of main components of the building, together with the processes of sorting, recycling and/or disposal of main fractions of the demolition waste. It quantifies the connections between these on-site and off-site processes as well as the main streams of materials sent to recycling, energy recovery, and final disposal. A sensitivity analysis has been eventually carried out by comparing the overall environmental performances of some alternative scenarios, characterised by different criteria for the demolition of the reference building, management of demolition waste and assessment of avoided burdens of the main recycled materials. The results quantify the advantage of an appropriate technique of selective demolition, which could increase the quality and quantity of residues sent to the treatment of resource recovery and safe disposal. They also highlight the contributions to the positive or negative environmental impact of each stage of the investigated waste management system. The recycling of reinforcing steel appears to play a paramount role, accounting for 65% of the total avoided impacts related to respiratory inorganics, 89% of those for global warming and 73% of those for mineral extraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Construction Waste Recycling Technologies: How to Define and Assess Their Economic, Environmental and Social Effects by the use of Input-Output Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhilova-Kisheva, Kossara Petrova; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2012-01-01

    aggregates that due to the less quality are used mainly in road construction and less in buildings. Within the EU FP7 project Advanced Technologies for the Production of Cement and Clean Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Waste (C2CA), an innovative technology for CDW recycling to clean aggregates......Concrete is one of the most important building materials and it entails a big environmental impact making recycling relevant from an environmental perspective. Recycling of construction and demolition waste (CDW) containing concrete is being performed in the Netherlands resulting in recycled...

  9. Hak Pemegang Hak Guna Bangunan Untuk Membangun Hotel Dengan Merobohkan Bangunan Cagar Budaya (Studi Kasus Hotel Amaris Di Kota Yogyakarta)

    OpenAIRE

    Wd, I.P. Antama Wisnu

    2017-01-01

    The holder’s of Building Rights Title had the rights to built a hotel on the demolition of cultural heritage (study case in Amaris Hotel of Yogyakarta). This research aims to determine the rights of the holder’s Building Rights Title to built a hotel on the demolition of cultural heritage. In this legal writing, the researcher used normative legal research which focused on the positive legal norms consist of legislation. The type of data used include the primary legal materials, secondary ...

  10. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-B-3, 184-B Coal Pit Dumping Area, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-028

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-07

    The 126-B-3 waste site is the former coal storage pit for the 184-B Powerhouse. During demolition operations in the 1970s, the site was used for disposal of demolition debris from 100-B/C Area facilities. The site has been remediated by removing debris and contaminated soils. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  11. Industrial Wastes as Alternative Mineral Addition in Portland Cement and as Aggregate in Coating Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Kamilla Almeida; Nazário, Bruna Inácio; Oliveira, Antonio Pedro Novaes de; Hotza, Dachamir; Raupp-Pereira, Fabiano

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation study of wastes from pulp and paper as well as construction and demolition industries for application in cement-based materials. The alternative raw materials were used as a source of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and as pozzolanic material (water-reactive SiO2) in partial replacement of Portland cement. In addition to the hydraulic binder, coating mortars were composed by combining the pulp and paper fluidized bed sand residue with construction and demolition wa...

  12. Evaluation of Masonry Mortars Made with Mixed Recycled Aggregates by Different Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Iván Martínez Herrera; Miren Etxeberria Larrañaga; Elier Pavón de la Fé; Nelson Díaz Brito

    2012-01-01

    Havana produces over 1000 m3 of construction and demolition waste (CDW) per day. Most of these residues are of a mixed composition; they come either from collapsing buildings in disrepair or demolition that are not performed selectively. From the CDW, there are usually two ways to produce recycled aggregates; one is by sifting the debris through a 5mm sieve which is a practice widely used by residents in cities and the other from is by crushing the coarse fractions in recycled aggregate produ...

  13. L’impatto umano dell’Urban renewal: antropologia come risposta a un malessere urbano - The social impact of urban renewal: anthropology as an answer to an urban unease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Portelli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retracing the contemporary history of a peripheral neighbourhood of Barcelona undergoing a process of complete demolition, the author reflects on the “structural homology” between the spatial configuration and the social order, a complexity that ethnography is able to capture and share with planners and other professionals. Repensar Bonpastor is a multidisciplinary device with which an independent group of architects, urban planners and anthropologists faced the difficulties of elaborating a collective alternative to the demolitions and forced evictions that are disrupting the social life of this stigmatized neighbourhood, through socializing the difficulties of the inhabitants with a wider community.

  14. Climate-neutral buildings are possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, Bjoern

    2002-01-01

    Buildings account for considerable climatic loads throughout their construction, use and demolition. This is because of the emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from the production and transport of materials, the energy consumption of the house and, finally, the treatment of the waste material from the demolition. Furthermore, there are issues related to carbon binding, re-cycling and heat value. The author asserts that, if these issues are considered during the design phase, the total climate load of the building can be reduced and sometimes even eliminated

  15. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-B-3, 184-B Coal Pit Dumping Area. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-028

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    The 126-B-3 waste site is the former coal storage pit for the 184-B Powerhouse. During demolition operations in the 1970s, the site was used for disposal of demolition debris from 100-B/C Area facilities. The site has been remediated by removing debris and contaminated soils. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  16. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25 R-MAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25, Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 3110, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOE/NV--891-VOL I-Rev. 1, dated July 2003, provides details of demolition, waste disposal, and use restriction (UR) modification for Corrective Action Unit 113, Area 25 R-MAD Facility. Demolition was completed on July 15, 2010, when the last of the building debris was disposed. Final field activities were concluded on August 30, 2010, after all equipment was demobilized and UR signs were posted. This work was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  17. Rock & Roll : Waste seperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beunder, L.; Rem, P.C.; Van Den Berg, R.

    2000-01-01

    Five hundred tonnes of glass, 1 million tonnes of plastic,14 million tonnes of building and demolition waste, 7 million tonnes of household waste, 3 million tonnes of packaging, 3.5 million tonnes of paper and board, and 300,000 old cars. All part of the annual harvest of waste materials in the

  18. Multi-criteria assessment of socio-environmental aspects in shrinking cities. Experiences from eastern Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schetke, Sophie; Haase, Dagmar

    2008-01-01

    Demographic change and economic decline produce modified urban land use pattern and densities. Compared to the beginning of the 90s after the German reunification, nowadays massive housing and commercial vacancies followed by demolition and perforation come to pass in many cities of the former GDR. In consequence, a considerable surplus of urban brownfields has been created. Furthermore, the decline in the urban fabric affects social infrastructure and urban greenery of local neighbourhoods. Here, urban planning enters into 'uncharted territory' since it needs to assess the socio-environmental impact of shrinkage. In order to carry out such an evaluation quantitatively, a multi-criteria assessment scheme (MCA) was developed and applied. Firstly, we identified infrastructure and land use changes related to vacancy and demolition. Secondly, demolition scenarios for the coming 20 years were applied in order to give an idea for a long-term monitoring approach at the local district level. A multi-criteria indicator matrix quantifies the socio-environmental impact on both urban greenery and residents. Using it, we set demolition scenarios against urban 'quality of life' targets. Empirical evidence comes from Leipzig, in eastern Germany, a representative case study for urban shrinkage processes. The results show that shrinkage implies socio-environmental changes of residential livelihoods, however, does not simply increase or decrease the overall urban quality of life. The integrated assessment of all indicators identifies environmental and social opportunities, as well as the challenges a shrinking city is faced with

  19. Radiological and hazardous material characterization report for the south portion of the 313 Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of the characterization was to determine the extent of radiological contamination and presence of hazardous materials, to allow the preparation of an accurate cost estimate, and to plan for pre-demolition cleanup work to support building isolation. The scope of services for the project included the following tasks: Records Review and Interviews; Site Reconnaissance; Radiological Survey; and Sampling and Analysis

  20. 77 FR 72370 - Notice of Regulatory Waiver Requests Granted for the Third Quarter of Calendar Year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... additional 90 days to finish expending its CDBG-R funds. Contact: Steve Johnson, Office of Block Grant... job loss. The City explained that there are a high number of properties requiring immediate demolition... population and job loss. With the additional funds, the City advised that it would target the University Park...

  1. 75 FR 34004 - State Cemetery Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... economic, environmental, public health and safety, and other advantages; distributive impacts; and equity... that alter any cost of the project, use of space, or functional layout; and it will not enter into a... requirements: (1) Site development and environmental plans must include locations of structures, demolition...

  2. Decommissioning of the Northrop TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozens, George B.; Woo, Harry; Benveniste, Jack; Candall, Walter E.; Adams-Chalmers, Jeanne

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the administrative and operational aspects of decommissioning and dismantling the Northrop Mark F TRIGA Reactor, including: planning and preparation, personnel requirements, government interfacing, costs, contractor negotiations, fuel shipments, demolition, disposal of low level waste, final survey and disposition of the concrete biological shielding. (author)

  3. The Controlled Ruin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mo Michelsen Stochholm

    2016-01-01

    Building on partial demolition, The Controlled Ruin constituted an attempt to compress and subsequently stretch the inherent matter of time in the natural decay process. Given that the rapid incipient stages of decay that follow in the aftermath of abandonment are often considered unsightly...

  4. 24 CFR 970.31 - Replacement units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Replacement units. 970.31 Section... PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.31 Replacement units. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, replacement public housing units may be built on the original public...

  5. ADR : The use of Advanced Dry Recovery in recycling fine moist granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, W.

    2017-01-01

    Effective recycling of municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ashes (MSWI-BA) and construction and demolition wastes (CDW) has proven to be a challenge, despite the high potential for recovering valuable metals in MSWI-BA and reducing the carbon footprint of the construction industry. The

  6. 40 CFR 63.7575 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monitor relative particulate matter loadings. Biomass fuel means unadulterated wood as defined in this... 51.24. Firetube boiler means a boiler that utilizes a containment shell that encloses firetubes..., lignite, anthracite, biomass, construction/demolition material, salt water laden wood, creosote treated...

  7. Analysis of Removal Alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, M.B.

    1996-08-01

    This engineering study was developed to evaluate different options for decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) at the Savannah River Site. This document will be placed in the DOE-SRS Area reading rooms for a period of 30 days in order to obtain public input to plans for the demolition of HWCTR

  8. Die Gezi-Park-Proteste in der Türkei 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Akbal, Gül

    2015-01-01

    The uprising in Turkey 2013 that started with protests against the demolition of the Gezi Park soon became a nation-wide movement for more democracy. The author describes the movement and discusses it in the context of civil resistance movements.

  9. ELMIA Energy and Future 88. Conference E5. Nuclear power phaseout and storage of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The conference comprised lectures on the following subjects: - How to maintain availability, quality and safety during the phaseout period to the year 2010. - Demolition of nuclear power plants. - Storage of nuclear waste. - Estimate of risks in a long perspective. - Financing of the phaseout. Separate abstracts were prepared for four sections of this report. (O.S.)

  10. Estimation of regional building-related C&D debris generation and composition: case study for Florida, US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Kimberly; Townsend, Timothy; Reinhart, Debra; Heck, Howell

    2007-01-01

    Methodology for the accounting, generation, and composition of building-related construction and demolition (C&D) at a regional level was explored. Six specific categories of debris were examined: residential construction, nonresidential construction, residential demolition, nonresidential demolition, residential renovation, and nonresidential renovation. Debris produced from each activity was calculated as the product of the total area of activity and waste generated per unit area of activity. Similarly, composition was estimated as the product of the total area of activity and the amount of each waste component generated per unit area. The area of activity was calculated using statistical data, and individual site studies were used to assess the average amount of waste generated per unit area. The application of the methodology was illustrated using Florida, US approximately 3,750,000 metric tons of building-related C&D debris were estimated as generated in Florida in 2000. Of that amount, concrete represented 56%, wood 13%, drywall 11%, miscellaneous debris 8%, asphalt roofing materials 7%, metal 3%, cardboard 1%, and plastic 1%. This model differs from others because it accommodates regional construction styles and available data. The resulting generation amount per capita is less than the US estimate - attributable to the high construction, low demolition activity seen in Florida.

  11. Disposition of TA-33-21, a plutonium contaminated experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, E.J.; Garde, R.; Valentine, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    The report discusses the decontamination, demolition and disposal of a plutonium contaminated experimental physics facility which housed physics experiments with plutonium from 1951 until 1960. The results of preliminary decontamination efforts in 1960 are reported along with health physics, waste management, and environmental aspects of final disposition work accomplished during 1974 and 1975. (auth)

  12. 77 FR 41774 - Notice of Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... Resources Ecological resources would not be affected since the construction and demolition activities are on... for the Construction and Operation of a Radiological Work and Storage Building AGENCY: Department of...) announces the availability of a Final Environmental Assessment (EA) for construction and operation of a...

  13. 44 CFR 206.226 - Restoration of damaged facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Register of Historic Properties. If an applicable standard requires repair in a certain manner, costs... reconstruction. Demolition and removal of the old facility is also an eligible cost. (3) When relocation is.... (d) Standards. For the costs of Federal, State, and local repair or replacement standards which...

  14. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    There have been several other translations of Marais's work as well, from Sarah. Goldblatt herself with ..... Marais, understandably he skirted details of this demolition job, and continued to do ... disdaining to use my thunder” (592–93). With all ...

  15. Ethnic Tourism and the Big Song: Public Pedagogies and the Ambiguity of Environmental Discourse in Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinting

    2017-01-01

    The article examines two forms of public pedagogies in a rural region of Southwest China-tourism and ethnic songs-to illustrate their contested roles in transforming local relations with natural and built environment. While tourism development daily alters the village landscape by spatial intervention, demolition, and construction, the…

  16. Hazard identification checklist: Occupational safety and health issues associated with green building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Ustailieva, E.

    2013-01-01

    This checklist accompanies the e-fact on the same topic and aims to help identify the potential hazards to workers’ safety and health associated with the planning and construction of green buildings, their maintenance, renovation (retrofitting), demolition, and on-site waste collection. It also

  17. Characterization plan for the Hanford Generating Plant (HGP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marske, S.G.

    1996-09-01

    This characterization plan describes the sample collection and sample analysis activities to characterize the Hanford Generating Plant and associated solid waste management units (SWMUs). The analytical data will be used to identify the radiological contamination in the Hanford Generating Plant as well as the presence of radiological and hazardous materials in the SWMUs to support further estimates of decontamination interpretation for demolition

  18. Life-Cycle Energy and GHG Emissions for New and Recovered Softwood Framing Lumber and Hardwood Flooring Considering End-of-Life Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Bergman; Robert H. Falk; Hongmei Gu; Thomas R. Napier; Jamie Meil

    2013-01-01

    Within the green building fields is a growing movement to recover and reuse building materials in lieu of demolition and land fill disposal. However, they lack life-cycle data to help quantify environmental impacts. This study quantifies the primary energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions released from the production of wood recovered from an old house and from new...

  19. Housing obsolescene in practice : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, A.F.; van der Flier, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Obsolescence is a serious threat for built property. As an often used demolition motive, obsolescence can be regarded as the last phase of the life span of buildings. From a sustainable viewpoint, life cycle extension is necessary to minimize waste. But there are more considerations to carefully

  20. Housing obsolescence in practice : Model implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, A.F.; Van der Flier, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Obsolescence is a serious threat for built property. As an often used demolition motive, obsolescence can be regarded as the last phase of the life span of buildings. From a sustainable viewpoint, life cycle extension is necessary to minimize waste. But there are more considerations to carefully

  1. Waste Tax 1987-1996

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. S.; Dengsøe, N.; Brendstrup, S.

    The report gives an ex-post evaluation of the Danish waste tax from 1987 to 1996. The evaluation shows that the waste tax has had a significant impact on the reductions in taxable waste. The tax has been decisive for the reduction in construction and demolition waste, while for the heavier...

  2. 75 FR 64718 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Test Site including decontamination, closure, re-use and/or demolition. Purpose of the Soils Committee: The purpose of the Committee is to focus on issues related to soil contamination at the Nevada Test... Industrial Sites and Soils Committees of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB...

  3. 76 FR 5365 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Industrial Sites and Soils Committees of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB... sites at the Nevada National Security Site including decontamination, closure, re-use and/or demolition. Purpose of the Soils Committee: The purpose of the Committee is to focus on issues related to soil...

  4. 75 FR 71677 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Industrial Sites and Soils Committees of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB... sites at the Nevada Test Site including decontamination, closure, re-use and/or demolition. Purpose of the Soils Committee: The purpose of the Committee is to focus on issues related to soil contamination...

  5. Environmental problems of construction wastes: State of the art. Legislation; Problematica medioambiental de los residuos de construccion. Situacion actual. Legislacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Justicia, A.

    1999-07-01

    In spite of their nature of inert, the Residuals of Construction and Demolition expounds grave environmental problems. It also represents an squander of reusable materials. This article tries to give a global vision of the environmental problem of the administration of these residuals, as well as the juridical instruments that exist in the material in Spain. (Author)

  6. Single-shot LIBS spectral quality for waste particles in open air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, H.; Bakker, M.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the ability of LIBS to produce quality spectra from small particles of concrete demolition waste using single-shot spectra collected in open air. The 2–8?mm materials are rounded river gravel, green glass shards, and plastic flakes. Considered are focal length, air, moisture,

  7. Assessment of Soil, Surface-Water, and Ground-Water Contamination at Selected Sites at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phelan, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    .... From shortly after World War II into the 1970's, chemical-warfare agents, high-explosive munitions, and industrial chemicals were tested and disposed of at J-Field by open-pit burning and by high-explosive demolition...

  8. 24 CFR 970.5 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... equity investment) upon the satisfaction of all contingencies or conditions. PHA Plan—Means the PHA's... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 970.5 Section 970.5... HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.5 Definitions. ACC, or annual...

  9. 75 FR 38547 - Notice of Realty Action: Non-Competitive (Direct) Sale of Public Lands and Termination of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... construction and demolition (C&D) landfill. In addition, this notice will terminate the Recreational and Public... absence of any adverse comments, this realty action will become the final determination of the Department..., planning and environmental documents, and the mineral report is available for review in the BLM Upper Snake...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.402 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... performing any tasks usually associated with commercial diving such as: Placing or removing heavy objects underwater; inspection of pipelines and similar objects; construction; demolition; cutting or welding; or the... pressure vessel connected to the outlet of a compressor and used as an air reservoir. Working pressure: The...

  11. A numerical technique to design blast noise mitigation measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, F. van den; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    Large weapons, such as armor, artillery or demolitions, create a high-energy blast wave. It has a low frequency content, typically between 15 and 125 Hz, and can propagate over large distances. As a result it is a relative important cause for annoyance. Mitigation measures need to be close to the

  12. Nanotechnologies for sustainable construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Andersen, Maj Munch

    2009-01-01

    This chapter aims to highlight key aspects and recent trends in the development and application of nanotechnology to facilitate sustainable construction, use and demolition of buildings and infrastructure structures, ‘nanoconstruction’. Nanotechnology is not a technology but a very diverse...

  13. Beyond Draining the Swamp: Urban Development and Counterterrorism in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    specialist Mohammed Haddy. “When a breadwinner is sick, leaders come to the family with a doctor, take care of the family, and provide all that they need...Socioeconomic Development: Not Just Demolition but Rebuilding Community While this analysis looks at Morocco’s urban policies in light of today’s

  14. Superheater fouling in a BFB boiler firing wood-based fuel blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, A.F.; Haasnoot, K.; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Four different fuel blends have been fired in a 28 MWel BFB. Wood pellets (test 0) were not problematic for about ten years, contrary to a mixture of demolition wood, wood cuttings, compost overflow, paper sludge and roadside grass (test 1) which caused excessive fouling at a superheater bundle

  15. Prospects of effective microorganisms technology in wastes treatment in Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emad A Shalaby

    2011-01-01

    Sludge dewatering and treatment may cost as much as the wastewater treatment. Usually large proportion of the pollutants in wastewater is organic. They are attacked by saprophytic microorganisms, i.e. organisms that feed upon dead organic matter. Activity of organisms causes decomposition of organic matter and destroys them, where the bacteria convert the organic matter or other constituents in the wastewater to new cells, water, gases and other products. Demolition activities, including renovation/remodeling works and complete or selective removal/demolishing of existing structures either by man-made processes or by natural disasters, create an extensive amount of wastes. These demolition wastes are characterized as heterogeneous mixtures of building materials that are usually contaminated with chemicals and dirt. In developing countries, it is estimated that demolition wastes comprise 20% to 30% of the total annual solid wastes. In Egypt, the daily quantity of construction and demolition (C&D) waste has been estimated as 10 000 tones. That is equivalent to one third of the total daily municipal solid wastes generated per day in Egypt. The zabbaliin have since expanded their activities and now take the waste they collect back to their garbage villages where it is sorted into recyclable components: paper, plastics, rags, glass, metal and food. The food waste is fed to pigs and the other items are sold to recycling centers. This paper summarizes the wastewater and solid wastes management in Egypt now and future.

  16. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.

  17. Quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, S.; Giacobino, S.; Zinn-Justin, J.

    1997-01-01

    This course is dedicated to present in a pedagogical manner the recent developments in peculiar fields concerned by quantum fluctuations: quantum noise in optics, light propagation through dielectric media, sub-Poissonian light generated by lasers and masers, quantum non-demolition measurements, quantum electrodynamics applied to cavities and electrical circuits involving superconducting tunnel junctions. (A.C.)

  18. 48 CFR 52.236-13 - Accident Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident Prevention. 52....236-13 Accident Prevention. As prescribed in 36.513, insert the following clause: Accident Prevention... contracts for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements, the Contractor shall— (1...

  19. Sustainable neighbourhood transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruis, V.; Visscher, H.; Kleinhans, R.; Delft Centre for Sustainable Urban Areas, OTB Research Institute for Housing, Urban and Mobility Studies

    2006-01-01

    Urban renewal through the large-scale restructuring of post-war neighbourhoods is a major challenge throughout Europe in the decades ahead, Current urban restructuring programmes in the Netherlands focus on the demolition and replacement of the existing housing stock, The motivation behind this

  20. Albania: Vortices of Imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mema, Fatmir

    2004-01-01

    The transition to a market economy in Albania is a relatively long and complex process. It is characterized by the demolition of old structures and the establishment of new ones, often in parallel, until a new, completely different economic system emerges. During this difficult and innovative process, a myriad of interconnected problems have…

  1. Woody residues and solid waste wood available for recovery in the United States, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. McKeever; Robert H. Falk

    2004-01-01

    Large amounts of woody residues and solid wood waste are generated annually in the United States from the extraction of timber from forests, from forestry cultural operations, in the conversion of forest land to nonforest uses, in the initial processing of roundwood timber into usable products, in the construction and demolition of buildings and structures, and in the...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.854 - Removal of walls, masonry sections, and chimneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., girders, and similar structural supports shall be cleared of all loose material as the masonry demolition... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Removal of walls, masonry sections, and chimneys. 1926.854....854 Removal of walls, masonry sections, and chimneys. (a) Masonry walls, or other sections of masonry...

  3. Ceramic residue for producing cements, method for the production thereof, and cements containing same

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez de Rojas, María Isabel; Frías, Moisés; Asensio, Eloy; Medina Martínez, César

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a ceramic residue produced from construction and demolition residues, as a puzzolanic component of cements. The invention also relates to a method for producing said ceramic residues and to another method of producing cements using said residues. This type of residue is collected in recycling plants, where it is managed. This invention facilitates a potential commercial launch.

  4. The influence of parent concrete and milling intensity on the properties of recycled aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotfi, Somayeh; Rem, P.C.; Deja, J; Mroz, R; Di Maio, F.; Lotfi, S.; Bakker, M.; Hu, M.; Vahidi, A.

    2017-01-01

    The C2CA concrete recycling process consists of a combination of smart demolition, gentle grinding of the crushed concrete in an autogenous mill, and a novel dry classification technology called ADR to remove the fines. The` main factors in the C2CA process which influence the properties of Recycled

  5. Infrastructure: Healthy buildings for the NHI

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Jager, Peta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Information base of shared data and support data (BIM or Building Information Model) 10.4 Decommissioning 10.5 Deconstruction 10.6 Recycling 10.7 Demolition 10.1 Disposal preparation 10.2 Transfer 10.3 Reinstatement 0.1 Portfolio strategy 0...

  6. From reactive to proactive management of the South African healthcare estate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Jager, Peta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available and support data (BIM or Building Information Model) 10.4 Decommissioning 10.5 Deconstruction 10.6 Recycling 10.7 Demolition 10.1 Disposal preparation 10.2 Transfer 10.3 Reinstatement 0.1 Portfolio strategy 0.2 Portfolio requirements 0.3 Project initiation 1...

  7. BIM uses for reversible building design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Marc Casper; Durmisevic, Elma; Durmisevic, Elma

    2017-01-01

    The construction industry urgently needs new approaches to design buildings that can be incorporated in the circular economy. Buildings are still predominantly conceived as static structures with one end-of-life option, demolition, which typically results in excessive amounts of waste. To cut waste,

  8. 77 FR 56817 - Notice of Public Hearings for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Medical Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... buildings (Buildings 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8) and construction of a single 5-story replacement facility in the... clinics; incorporate evidence-based design; include expansion of technology; and allow for operational... regulation. 2. MFD--demolition of five hospital buildings, construction of a single 5-story replacement...

  9. The acoustic source strength of high-energy blast waves: combining measurements and a non-linear model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Berg, F. van der

    2010-01-01

    In the densely populated area of the Netherlands, the objective of the Netherlands Ministry of Defence is to find an optimal balance between military training and the impact on the surrounding civilian community. A special case concerns large weapons, such as artillery or demolitions, which create

  10. Transformation of Abandonment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mo Michelsen Stochholm

    2015-01-01

    the controlled ruin will play the role of catalyst of the disclosing of hidden narratives and through decay in the end turn Figure 2 Transformation process: Controlled ruin 2014, Thisted Municipality, Denmark into nature. The demolition process is simply slowed down. Similarly to the mechanisms in a mourning...

  11. Cumulative metal leaching from utilisation of secondary building materials in river engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuven, R.S.E.W.; Willems, FH

    2004-01-01

    The present paper estimates the utilisation of bulky wastes (minestone, steel slag, phosphorus slag and demolition waste) in hydraulic engineering structures in Dutch parts of the rivers Rhine, Meuse and Scheldt over the period 1980-2025. Although they offer several economic, technical and

  12. 36 CFR 1010.8 - Actions that normally require an EIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... impact on the environment, an EA is not required, and the Trust will prepare or direct the preparation of... or actions may significantly affect the environment and therefore require an EIS are described in 40...(b)(9); (2) Approval, funding, construction, and/or demolition in preparation for construction of any...

  13. Refiring bricks at 540ºC : Hot masonry and magnetic separation close the brick recycling process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, K; Hendriks, C.; Van der Graaf, A.

    2004-01-01

    For many decades, stony debris from building and demolition sites was reused as road building material. Until recently there was no need to look for other uses for this mixture of concrete and masonry rubble. However, now that our supplies of marl and gravel (two of the three ingredients of mortar

  14. Study Concerning Characterization of Some Recycled Concrete Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robu Ion

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Using recycled concrete aggregates (RCA is a matter of high priority in the construction industry worldwide. In countries like the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, USA, Japan, France recycled concrete aggregates obtained from demolition are valorized up to 90%, mainly for road construction and less in the manufacture of new concrete.

  15. 233S Decommissioning Project Environmental Control Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoric, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    This Environmental Control Plan is for the 233S Decommissioning activities conducted under the removal action report for the 233S Decontamination and Demolition Project. The purpose of this ECP is to identify environmental requirements for the 233S project. The ECP is a compilation of existing environmental permit conditions, regulatory requirements, and environmental requirements applicable to the specific project or functional activity

  16. 44 CFR 63.9 - Sale while claim pending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sale while claim pending. 63.9 Section 63.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT... pending. If a claimant sells a structure prior to its demolition or relocation, no benefits are payable to...

  17. Closing the loop of EOL concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotfi, Somayeh; Rem, P.C.; Di Maio, F.; Teklay, Abraham; Hu, M.; van Roekel, E; van der Stelt, H; Di Maio, F.; Lotfi, S.; Bakker, M.; Hu, M.; Vahidi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Production of waste materials, via industrial and human activities, creates big environmental and economic problems but also opportunities to recover valuable resources. EU28 currently generates 461 million tons per year of ever more complex Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW) with average

  18. From nuclear installation to greenfield site. SCK-CEN develops a new measurement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses a new measurement method that has been developed by the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK-CEN in conjunction with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. This measurement technique is based on on-site gamma ray spectrometry in combination with modelling and is employed for directing the flow of demolition materials in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities.

  19. Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltsee, G.

    1998-01-01

    This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris

  20. Urban wood: Fuel from landscapers and land fills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Wood recovered from urban landscaping, construction and building demolition has become an important fuel for several new power plants. Sources, composition, and requirements for fuel preparation, handling, firing and emissions control are described from experience at several plants. Urban wood waste fuels are suitable for steam and power generation if precautions are taken to process the fuel and provide uniform flow to the boiler