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Sample records for demo poloidal coil

  1. Demonstration poloidal coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masahiko; Kawano, Katumi; Tada, Eisuke

    1989-01-01

    A new compact cryogenic cold compressor was developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in collaboration with Isikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI) in order to produce the supercritical helium below 4.2 K for Demonstration Poloidal Coils (DPC) which are forced-flow cooled type superconducting pulse coils. This compressor is one of key components for DPC test facility. The cold compressor reduces pressure in liquid helium bath, which contains liquid helium of around 3,000 l, down to 0.5 atm efficiently. Consequently, supercritical helium down to 3.5 K is produced and supplied to the DPC coils. A centrifugal compressor with dynamic gas bearing is selected as a compressor mechanism to realize high adiabatic efficiency and large flow rate. In this performance tests, the compressor was operated for 220 h at saturated condition from 0.5 to 1.0 atm without any failure. High adiabatic efficiency (more than 60 %) is achieved with wide flow range (25-65 g/s) and the design value is fully satisfied. The compressor can rotate up to 80,000 rpm at maximum then the coil supply temperature of supercritical helium is 3.5 K. (author)

  2. Development of superconducting pulsed poloidal coil in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, S.; Okuno, K.; Ando, T.; Tsuji, H.

    1990-01-01

    In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (JAERI), development work on pulsed superconductors and coils started in 1979, aiming at the demonstration of the applicability of superconducting technologies to pulsed poloidal coils in a fusion reactor. Initially our effort was concentrated mainly on the development of pool-cooled large-current pulsed conductors. Over the past ten years, superconducting technology has made great progress and the forced-flow cooled coil has assumed great importance in the development work. Now the Demo Poloidal Coil Project is in progress in JAERI, and three large forced-flow cooled coils have so far been fabricated and tested. Many improvements have been achieved in ac-loss performance and mechanical characteristics. (author)

  3. Superconducting poloidal coils for STARFIRE commercial reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Evans, K. Jr.; Turner, L.R.; Huang, Y.C.; Prater, R.; Alcorn, J.

    1979-01-01

    STARFIRE is considered to be the tenth commercial tokamak power plant. A preliminary design study on its superconducting poloidal coil system is presented. Key features of the design studies are: the elimination of the ohmic heating coil; the trade-off studies of the equilibrium field coil locations; and the development of a conceptual design for the superconducting equilibrium field coils. Described are the 100 kA cryostable conductor design, the coil structure, and evaluation of the coil forces

  4. Conceptual Design of Alborz Tokamak Poloidal Coils System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2013-04-01

    The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. One of the most important parts of tokamak design is the design of the poloidal field system. This part includes the numbers, individual position, currents and number of coil turns of the magnetic field coils. Circular cross section tokamaks have Vertical Field system but since the elongation and triangularity of plasma cross section shaping are important in improving the plasma performance and stability, the poloidal field coils are designed to have a shaped plasma configuration. In this paper the design of vertical field system and the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma, as given by the Grad-Shafranov equation will be discussed. The poloidal field coils system consists of 12 circular coils located symmetrically about the equator plane, six inner PF coils and six outer PF coils. Six outer poloidal field coils (PF) are located outside of the toroidal field coils (TF), and six inner poloidal field coils are wound on the inner legs and are located outside of a vacuum vessel.

  5. Tolerance Evaluation of Poloidal Shear Keys for ITER TF Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Youkun; Neil, M.; Cees Jong

    2006-01-01

    There are 18 ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. Unlike the other ITER coils, these coils are structurally linked. These links consist of friction between the coil legs in the central vault formed by the inner straight legs of the coils, four outer inter-coil structures (OIS) and one inner inter-coil structure (IIS). The OIS consists essentially of bands around all 18 coils to provide shear support by forming shear panels with the coil case, and the IIS consists of poloidal circular keys placed directly between the coil cases. Global analysis of the 'perfect' coil shape has shown high stresses in the IIS, in the poloidal keyways. Optimization has successfully reduced these stresses to acceptable values as regards the expected fatigue resistance. However it is necessary to confirm that the stresses are still acceptable when realistic values of geometry variations are included (i.e. the effect of coil and case tolerances). Because of the extensive mechanical links between coils the poloidal key stresses can also be affected by tolerances elsewhere in the case. As the first step in assessment of the possible variations in stresses, a substructure technique is being used to develop a local model of the key region. The result of geometry variations between individual coils is a loss in the 18 fold symmetry used to simplify previous analyses. With the new and optimized model it should be possible to relax the 18-fold symmetry, but a full analysis of all 18 coils is still not possible. Systematic ways of representing the tolerance variation in the finite element model have been developed so that parametric studies can be undertaken without a full reconstruction of the model. (author)

  6. Design and Fabrication of the KSTAR Poloidal Field Coil Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. K.; Choi, C. H.; Sa, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR magnet system consists of 16 toroidal field(TF) coils. 4 pairs of central solenoid(CS) coils, and 3 pairs of outer poloidal field(PF) coils. The TF coils are encased in a structure to enhance mechanical stability. The CS coil structure is supported on top of the TF coil structure and supplies a vertical compression of 15 MN to prevent lateral movement due to a repulsive force between the CS coils. The PF coil system is vertically symmetry to the machine mid-plane and consists of 6 coils and 80 support structures(i.e, 16 for PF5, 32 for PF6 and 32 fort PF7). All PF coil structures should absorb the thermal contraction difference between TF coil structure and PF coils due to cool down and endure the vertical and radial magnetic forces due to current charging. In order to satisfy these structural requirements. the PF5 coil structure is designed base on hinges and both of PF6 and PF7 coil structures based on flexible plates. The PF coil structures are assembled on the TF coil structure with an individual basement that is welded on the TF coil structure

  7. TEXT poloidal coil systems power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, S.H.; Brower, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    TEXT is a convertional iron core tokamak which will have a toroidal field of 3.0 Tesla produced by room temperature copper coils and a maximum plasma current pulse of 400 kA induced by a 40 turn Ohmic Heating coil. The major radius is 100 cm and the minor radius of the plasma is 28 cm. The machine is intended for basic research in tokamak plasma physics and atomic physics and is designed primarily to provide a stable hot plasma, extremely good diagnostic access, and reliable operation. The discharge pulse length will be 300 msec and the repetition period 120 seconds. Power for the toroidal field coils and for the ohmic heating supply is provided by a 100 MVA energy storage alternator. The vertical field, horizontal field, fast positioning, and discharge cleaning power supply systems are powered from the Tokamak Laboratory power mains. The ohmic heating power system consists of an SCR controlled premagnetizing supply and commutation circuit, the main ohmic heating capacitor bank to provide plasma breakdown and current rise, and an SCR controlled power supply which sustains plasma current during the 300 ms pulse. The vertical field power system uses a small capacitor bank and an SCR controlled supply. The horizontal field has a reversible SCR controlled supply, and the fast positioning coils are powered by bipolar output transistor controlled supplies. This paper describes the loads, required wave forms, and the specifications for these power supply systems

  8. Thermal-hydraulic investigations on the CEA-ENEA DEMO relevant helium cooled poloidal blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orco, G.; Polazzi, G.; Vallette, F.; Proust, E.; Eid, M.

    1994-01-01

    The CEA-ENEA design of an Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Blanket (HCSBB) for the DEMO reactor, with a breeder in tube (BIT) poloidal arrangement, is based on the use of lithium ceramic pellets, the ENEA γ-LiAlO 2 or the CEA Li 2 ZrO 3 . Due to the geometry of the DEMO reactor plasma chamber, these breeder bundles are adapted to the Vacuum Vessel with a strong poloidal curvature. This curvature influences the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the coolant flowing inside the bundle. The paper presents the CEA-ENEA first results of the experimental and theoretical programme, aiming at optimizing the breeder module thermal hydraulic design. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Finite element modeling of TFTR poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.A.; O'Toole, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Poloidal Field (PF) coils were originally analyzed to TFTR design conditions. The coils have been reanalyzed by PPPL and Grumman to determine operating limits under as-built conditions. Critical stress levels, based upon data obtained from the reanalysis of each PF coil, are needed for input to the TFTR simulation code algorithms. The primary objective regarding structural integrity has been to ascertain the magnitude and location of critical internal stresses in each PF coil due to various combinations of electromagnetic and thermally induced loads. For each PF coil, a global finite element model (FEM) of a coil sector is being analyzed to obtain the basic coil internal loads and displacements. Subsequent fine mesh local models of the coil lead stem and lead spur regions produce the magnitudes and locations of peak stresses. Each copper turn and its surrounding insulation are modeled using solid finite elements. The corresponding electromagnetic and thermal analyses are similarly modeled. A series of test beams were developed to determine the best combination of MSC/NASTRAN-type finite elements for use in PF coil analysis. The results of this analysis compare favorably with those obtained by the earlier analysis which was limited in scope

  10. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed

  11. Design of the outer poloidal field coils for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sborchia, C.; Mitchell, N.; Yoshida, K.

    1995-01-01

    The ITER poloidal field (PF) system consists of a central solenoid (CS or PF-1), which is not subject of this paper, and six ring coils using a 40 kA forced flow cooled superconductor. The coils, placed around the toroidal field (TF) system, are used to start-up the plasma with typical ramp-up times of 100 s and burn duration of 1000 s. They also provide control and shaping of the plasma, with small, frequent current variations on a 1-5 s time scale. The magnetic field produced by the coils ranges from about 4.5 to 8 T and the AC losses in the conductor are significant: the largest coils require cooling path lengths up to 1000 m as well as the use of 2 in-hand winding. The field level and high thermal loads make the use of Nb 3 Sn strand attractive. This paper describes the basic design of the six ring (outer) coils developed by the ITER Joint Central Team in collaboration with the four Home Teams. The coil structural material is provided by a thick conductor jacket and by a bonded insulation system. The forces acting on the coils during typical operational scenarios and plasma disruption/vertical instabilities have been evaluated: radial forces are self-reacted by hoop stresses in the ring coil, with tensile stresses up to 300 MPa in the conductor jacket, and the vertical forces are resisted by a discrete support system, with shear stresses up to 10 MPa in the insulation. (orig./WL)

  12. Coil development for the quasi-poloidal stellarator project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Berry, L.A.; Cole, M.J.; Fogarty, P.J.; Freudenberg, K.; Hirshman, S.P.; Lyon, J.F.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.J.; Williamson, D.; Benson, R.D.; Lumsdaine, A.; Madhukar, M.; Parang, M.; Shannon, T.; Dahlgren, F.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Neilson, G.H.; Goranson, P.; Hargrove, T.; Jones, G.; Lovett, G.

    2005-01-01

    The Quasi-Poloidal Stellarator (QPS), currently in the R and D and prototyping stage, is a low-aspect-ratio (R/a ≥ 2.3), compact stellarator experiment with a non-axisymmetric, near- poloidally-symmetric magnetic field. The QPS design parameters are = 0.95 m, = 0.3-0.4 m, B = 1 T, and a 1.5-s pulse length with 3-5 MW of ECH and ICRF heating power. The most challenging component to design and fabricate is the set of 20 nonplanar modular coils located inside the QPS vacuum tank. There are five distinct coil winding shapes, but only three types of winding forms are needed because each supports two distinct windings and both windings on the most complex coil form are the same shape. The stainless steel winding forms are machined to the required high tolerance and stranded copper cable conductor is wound on the winding forms to the highly precise shape required (to an accuracy of less than 1 mm). The windings are enclosed in a welded, stainless steel cover with stiffeners for compatibility with the QPS vacuum requirements, and the cans are then vacuum pressure impregnated with cynate ester resin to form the finished coil winding pack. Computer modeling and experimental measurements of the welding process indicate that distortion and thermal stress should be acceptable. A prototype coil using the most complex of the three winding forms is being fabricated. The coil winding form has been cast and is being machined to the required tolerance prior to winding with conductor. The machined modular coil forms will be shipped to the winding facility mounted on carts, which provide a work platform for preparing, winding, welding, and potting of the coils. The carts allow rotating the coils for optimum positioning during winding and fabrication. An overhead fixture allows supporting the spools of conductor and feeding the conductor in the correct orientation, groupings, and tensioning. An R and D program is underway that includes extensive conductor characterization and testing

  13. Poloidal field coil design for known plasma equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, C.C.; Todd, A.M.M.; Reusch, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    The technique for obtaining plasma equilibria with given boundary conditions has long been known and understood. The inverse problem of obtaining a poloidal field (PF) coil system from a given plasma equilibrium has been widely studied, however its solution has remained largely an art form. An investigation, by the writers, of this fundamentally ill-posed inverse problem has resulted in a new understanding of the requirements that solutions must satisfy. A set of interacting computer codes has been written which may be used to successfully design PF coil systems capable of supporting given plasma equilibria. It is shown that for discrete coil systems with a reasonable number of elements the standard minimization of the R M S flux error can lead to undesirable results. Examples are given to show that an additional stability requirement must be imposed on the regularization parameter to obtain correct solutions. For some equilibria, the authors find that the inverse problem admits dual solutions corresponding to two possible magnetic field configurations that fit the constraining relations on the plasma surface equally well. An additional minimization of the absolute value of the limiter flux is required to discriminate between these solutions

  14. Manufacture of the Poloidal Field Conductor Insert Coil (PFCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.; Rajainmaeki, H.; Salpietro, E.; Keefe, C.

    2006-01-01

    Within the framework of the R(and)D programme for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) the European team EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement) have been charged with the design and manufacture of the Poloidal Field Conductor Insert Coil (PFCI). The purpose of the PFCI is to test and demonstrate the performance of long length full scale NbTi conductors in ITER relevant conditions. The PFCI will be tested in the Central Solenoid Model Coil test facility at the JAEA Naka Japan. This paper details the complete manufacturing details of the PFCI including development, forming machining, pre-assembly, impregnation, final assembly and testing. The PFCI is a single layer wound solenoid of 9 turns with a transition joggle in the centre section of the winding and an intermediate joint connection between the upper termination and the main coil winding. To give the required overall dimensions to fit in the testing facility, pre-formed and machined glass resin composite filler pieces are assembled with the winding and finally Vacuum Pressure Impregnated to create a single assembly unit. The PFCI is enclosed for assembly in a support structure which consist of an upper and lower flange that each are made up by 4 machined stainless steel castings which are electrically insulated by epoxy glass sheet material and 12 tie rods which preload the complete assembly in the vertical direction while the upper flange is equipped with 4 radial restraining jacks and the lower flange is equipped with 4 sets of studs and shear keys to withstand the net vertical and lateral electromagnetic forces. The PFCI is equipped with inductive heaters, voltage taps, temperature transducers, strain gauges and other instrumentation as diagnostics to monitor the performance. The current status of the manufacture is that the coil is in the process of final impregnation and should be completed and delivered before the summer of this year. (author)

  15. Manufacture of the poloidal field conductor insert coil (PFCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, W. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Keefe, C. [Tesla Engineering, Storrington, Sussex (United Kingdom); Rajainmaeki, H. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)], E-mail: hannu.rajainmaki@tech.efda.org; Salpietro, E. [EFDA CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Within the framework of the R and D programme for international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) the European team European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) has been charged with the design and manufacture of the poloidal field conductor insert coil (PFCI). The purpose of the PFCI is to test and demonstrate the performance of long-length full-scale NbTi conductors in ITER-relevant conditions. The PFCI will be tested in the central solenoid model coil test facility at the JAEA, Naka, Japan. This paper details the complete manufacturing of the PFCI including development, forming machining, pre-assembly, impregnation, final assembly and testing. The PFCI is a single-layered wound solenoid of nine turns with a transition joggle in the centre section of the winding and an intermediate joint connection between the upper termination and the main coil winding. To give the required overall dimensions to fit in the testing facility, preformed and machined glass resin composite filler pieces are assembled with the winding and is finally vacuum pressure impregnated (VPI) to create a single assembly unit. The PFCI is enclosed for assembly in a support structure, which consists of an upper and lower flange, each made up of four electrically insulated machined stainless steel castings, and 12 tie rods preloading the complete assembly in the vertical direction. The upper flange is equipped with four radial restraining jacks and the lower flange is equipped with four sets of studs and shear keys to withstand the net vertical and lateral electromagnetic forces. The PFCI is equipped with inductive heaters, voltage taps, temperature transducers, strain gauges and other instrumentation as diagnostics to monitor the performance. The current status of the manufacture is that the coil has passed the final acceptance tests and it is in the support structure assembly stage.

  16. Toroidal field magnet and poloidal divertor field coil systems adapted to reactor requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.

    1985-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade is a tokamak experiment with external poloidal field coils, that is now under construction at IPP Garching. It can produce elongated single-null (SN), double-null (DN) and limiter (L) configurations. The SN is the reference configuration with asymmetric load distributions in the poloidal field (PF) system and the toroidal field (TF) magnet. Plasma control and stabilization requires a rigid passive conductor close to the plasma. The design principles of the coils and support structure are described. (orig.)

  17. The ASDEX upgrade toroidal field magnet and poloidal divertor field coil system adapted to reactor requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.; Blaumoser, M.; Ennen, K.; Gruber, J.; Gruber, O.; Jandl, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kollotzek, H.; Kotzlowski, H.; Lackner, E.; Lackner, K.; Larcher, T. von; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Pillsticker, M.; Poehlchen, R.; Preis, H.; Schneider, H.; Seidel, U.; Sombach, B.; Speth, E.; Streibl, B.; Vernickel, H.; Werner, F.; Wesner, F.; Wieczorek, A.

    1986-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade is a tokamak experiment with external poloidal field coils that is now under construction at IPP Garching. It can produce elongated single-null (SN), double-null (DN) , and limiter (L) configurations. The SN is the reference configuration with asymmetric load distributions in the poloidal field (PF) system and the toroidal field (TF) magnet. Plasma control and stabilization require a rigid passive conductor close to the plasma. The design principles of the coils and support structure are described. (orig.)

  18. Power supply for coil of poloidal field in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirpichev, I.V.; Spevakova, F.M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention refers to power supply systems of poloidal field winding in tokamaks. The purpose of the invention is the extension of functional capabilities of the circuit by means of use of thyristor and diode keys mounted between convertor sections

  19. Design and manufacture of the large poloidal coils for TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmels, C.; Leloup, C.; Rijnoudt, E.; Ane, J.M.; Chassain, P.; Giaccheto, A.

    1984-01-01

    After a short summary of the main features of the TORE SUPRA long pulse Tokamak poloidal field system, the manufacture process of the six larger coils is described. The hollow conductor copper cross section is almost equal to the water channel one so that the coils can withstand more than 30 s pulses at full power. The main difficulties arise from the exceptional size of these one piece coils which are up to 9 meters in diameter. (author)

  20. Control of tokamak plasma current and equilibrium with hybrid poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Ryuichi

    1982-01-01

    A control method with hybrid poloidal field system is considered, which comprehensively implements the control of plasma equilibrium and plasma current, those have been treated independently in Tokamak divices. Tokamak equilibrium requires the condition that the magnetic flux function value on plasma surface must be constant. From this, the current to be supplied to each coil is determined. Therefore, each coil current is the resultant of the component related to plasma current excitation and the component required for holding equilibrium. Here, it is intended to show a method by which the current to be supplied to each coil can easily be calculated by the introduction of hybrid control matrix. The text first considers the equilibrium of axi-symmetrical plasma and the equilibrium magnetic field outside plasma, next describes the determination of current using the above hybrid control matrix, and indicates an example of controlling Tokamak plasma current and equilibrium by the hybrid poloidal field coils. It also shows that the excitation of plasma current and the maintenance of plasma equilibrium can basically be available with a single power supply by the appropriate selection of the number of turns of each coil. These considerations determine the basic system configuration as well as decrease the installed capacity of power source for the poloidal field of a Tokamak fusion reactor. Finally, the actual configuration of the power source for hybrid poloidal field coils is shown for the above system. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. Design and fabrication of forced-flow superconducting poloidal coils for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Mizumaki, S.; Yamakoshi, T.; Kanai, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Wachi, Y.; Ushijima, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kai, T.; Takahata, K.; Yamamoto, J.; Satow, T.; Motojima, O.

    1995-01-01

    Three pairs of superconducting poloidal coils for the LHD (Large Helical Device) have been designed and fabricated using NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductors cooled with forced-flow supercritical helium (SHE). In the LHD poloidal coils, high field accuracy as well as high reliability are required. To meet these requirements, detailed field and structural analyses have been performed and key parameters including winding pattern and size and locations of conductor joints have been determined. Compact conductor joint, where NbTi filaments are directly bonded, has also been developed using the solid state bonding technique. (orig.)

  2. Structural design of the superconducting Poloidal Field coils for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment concept design uses superconducting coils made from cable-in-conduit conductor to accomplish both magnetic confinement and plasma initiation. The Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system is divided into two subsystems, the central solenoid and the outer ring coils, the latter is focus of this paper. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is excessive for a case type construction; therefore, a ''no case'' design has been chosen. This ''no case'' design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation (fiberglass/epoxy wrap) as a structural adhesive. The model integrates electromagnetic analysis and structural analysis into the finite element code ANSYS to solve the problem. PF coil design is assessed by considering a variety of coil current wave forms, corresponding to various operating modes and conditions. The structural analysis shows that the outer ring coils are within the requirements of the fatigue life and fatigue crack growth requirements. The forces produced by the Toroidal Field coils on the PF coils have little effect on the maximum stresses in the PF coils. In addition in an effort to reduce the cost of the coils new elongated PF coils design was proposed which changes the aspect ratio of the outer ring coils to reduce the number of turns in the coils. The compressive stress in the outer ring coils is increased while the tensile stress is decreased

  3. A new meshless approach to map electromagnetic loads for FEM analysis on DEMO TF coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biancolini, Marco Evangelos; Brutti, Carlo; Giorgetti, Francesco; Muzzi, Luigi; Turtù, Simonetta; Anemona, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Generation and mapping of magnetic load on DEMO using radial basis function. • Good agreement between RBF interpolation and EM TOSCA computations. • Resultant forces are stable with respect to the target mesh used. • Stress results are robust and accurate even if a coarse cloud is used for RBF interpolation. - Abstract: Demonstration fusion reactors (DEMO) are being envisaged to be able to produce commercial electrical power. The design of the DEMO magnets and of the constituting conductors is a crucial issue in the overall engineering design of such a large fusion machine. In the frame of the EU roadmap of the so-called fast track approach, mechanical studies of preliminary DEMO toroidal field (TF) coil system conceptual designs are being enforced. The magnetic field load acting on the DEMO TF coil conductor has to be evaluated as input in the FEM model mesh, in order to evaluate the stresses on the mechanical structure. To gain flexibility, a novel approach based on the meshless method of radial basis functions (RBF) has been implemented. The present paper describes this original and flexible approach for the generation and mapping of magnetic load on DEMO TF coil system.

  4. Remote replacement of TF [toroidal field] and PF [poloidal field] coils for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.; Watkin, D.C.; Hollis, M.J.; DePew, R.E.; Kuban, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium fuel in the Compact Ignition Tokamak will require applying remote handling technology for ex-vessel maintenance and replacement of machine components. Highly activated and contaminated components of the fusion devices auxiliary systems, such as diagnostics and RF heating, must be replaced using remotely operated maintenance equipment in the test cell. In-vessel remote maintenance included replacement of divertor and first wall hardware, faraday shields, and for an in-vessel inspection system. Provision for remote replacement of a vacuum vessel sector, toroidal field coil or poloidal field ring coil was not included in the project baseline. As a result of recent coil failures experienced at a number of facilities, the CIT project decided to reconsider the question of remote recovery from a coil failure and, in January of 1990, initiated a coil replacement study. This study focused on the technical requirements and impact on fusion machine design associated with remote recovery from any coil failure

  5. Development of superconducting poloidal field coils for medium and large size tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, H.-G.; Forster, S.; Hofmann, A.

    1983-01-01

    Large long pulse tokamak fusion experiments require the use of superconducting poloidal field (PF) coils. In the past not much attention has been paid to the development of such coils. Therefore a development programme has been initiated recently at KfK. In this report start with summarizing the relevant PF coil parameters of some medium and large size tokamaks presently under construction or design, respectively. The most important areas of research and development work are deduced from these parameters. Design considerations and first experimental results concerning low loss conductors, cooling concepts and structural components are given

  6. Seismic analysis of ITER fourth PF (Poloidal Field Coil) feeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Sumei; Chen, Wei; Song, Yuntao; Ni, Xiaojun; Wang, Zhongwei; Chen, Yonghua; Gong, Chenyu

    2014-01-01

    The ITER feeder systems connect the ITER magnet systems located inside the main cryostat to the cryo-plant, power-supply and control system interfaces outside the cryostat. The main purpose of the feeders is to convey the cryogenic supply and electrical power to the coils as well as house the instrumentation wiring. The PF busbar which carries 52 kA current will suffer from high Lorentz force due to the background magnetic field inspired by the coils and the self-field between every pair of busbars. Except their mechanical strength and thermal insulation performance must be achieved, the dynamic mechanism on PF structure should be assessed. This paper presents the simulation and seismic analysis on ITER 4th PF feeder including the Coil Terminal Box and S-bend Box (CTB and SBB), the Cryostat Feed-through (CFT), the In-Cryostat-Feeder (ICF), especially for the ground supports and main outer-tube firstly. This analysis aims to study seismic resistance on system design under local seismograms with floor response spectrum, the structural response vibration mode and response duration results of displacement, membrane stress, and bending stress on structure under different directions actuating signals were obtained by using the single-seismic spectrum analysis and Dead Weight analysis respectively. Based on the simulative and analytical results, the system seismic resistance and the integrity of the support structure in the 4th PF feeder have been studied and the detail design confirmed

  7. Mechanical stress analysis for the poloidal field coils of TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ane, J.M.; Perin, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Hoop stresses, up to 100 MPa, in the poloidal field coils of TORE SUPRA have to be reacted back to the main body of the coil where a conductor ends or is twisted for an interturn or an interlayer transition. The load is taken by shear stress through the insulation. Carefully designed configurations, based on 1D, 2D and 3D analysis results, limit the shear stress levels to 15 MPa. A fatigue test of a conductor termination has shown that the experimental results are in good agreement with the calculated stresses

  8. Fabrication of the new poloidal field coils for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiberger, M.; Bott, R.J.; Gallix, R.; Street, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The six new poloidal field coil assemblies manufactured by GA Technologies (GA) for DIII-D range in diameter from 3.4-5.3 m. Two of them are 55-turn field shaping coils. Each of the other four combines one turn of the ohmic heating coil and a 55-turn field shaping coil into a single unit encased in a stainless steel box beam. These four box beams, which provide support for the coils inside, are part of the overall coil and vacuum vessel support structure. They also serve as molds for vacuum impregnating the coils with epoxy. All coils are made of hollow, water-cooled copper conductor. The larger field shaping coils are designed for 20 kA, 3 sec rectangular current pulses with 40 0 C temperature rise. The ohmic heating coil turns are capable of currents of up to 110 kA. The conductor is wrapped with Kapton and fiberglass tape; Kapton provides 1000 V/turn and 28 kV coil-to-ground insulation. The fiberglass acts as wick and reinforcement for the vacuum impregnated epoxy resin which bonds the coil together. The fabrication process is described in detail and illustrated. Tools and setups used for special operations such as induction brazing, conductor winding, conductor bending, and vacuum impregnation are presented. The quality control procedures followed to guarantee sound brazed joints are explained. The electrical tests performed at several stages of fabrication, especially the 1000 V/turn impulse tests conducted before potting to facilitate fault detection and repair, are described

  9. Updating the Design of the Poloidal Field Coils for the ITER Magnet System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Mitchell, N.; Jong, C.; Bessette, D.

    2006-01-01

    The ITER superconducting coil system consists of 18 Toroidal Field coils, six Poloidal Field (PF) coils, six Central Solenoid (CS) modules, 18 Correction Coils and their feeders. The six PF coils are attached to the TF coil cases through flexible plates or sliding supports allowing radial displacements. The PF coils and CS modules provide suitable magnetic fields for plasma shaping and position control. The PF coils use NbTi superconductor, cooled by supercritical helium. This gives a substantial cost saving compared to Nb 3 Sn and the elimination of a reaction heat treatment greatly simplifies the insulation of such large diameter coils. The cable configuration is 6 sub-cables arranged around a central cooling space. The conductors have a heavy square walled stainless steel jacket. The latest parameters of conductor design are evaluated by analysis of the minimum quench energy and hotspot temperature. The PF coils are self supporting as regards the radial magnetic loads. The vertical loads on each PF coil are transmitted to the TF coil cases. Load transmission is through flexible plates for the PF2 to PF5 coils or sliding supports for the PF1 and PF6 coils with fibreslip bearing surfaces. The supports for the PF winding consist of a set of clamping plates and stud bolts. The shape of the clamping plates has been designed to minimize stresses in the winding pack insulation. Bolts are pre-tensioned to keep pressure between the winding pack and clamping plate. Because of the difficulties in replacing the PF coils, the most unreliable component (the coil insulation) is designed with extra redundancy. There are two insulation layers with a thin metal screen in between. By monitoring the voltage of the intermediate screen, it is possible to detect an incipient short, defined as a short in only one of the two insulation layers. Adjustment of the screen voltage level may allow the shot growth to the stopped once it is detected. Alternately the faulty double pancake must

  10. Estimate of thermoelastic heat production from superconducting composites in pulsed poloidal coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.K.; Gray, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    In the design of the cryogenic system and superconducting magnets for the poloidal field system in a tokamak, it is important to have an accurate estimate of the heat produced in superconducting magnets as a result of rapidly changing magnetic fields. A computer code, PLASS (Pulsed Losses in Axisymmetric Superconducting Solenoids), was written to estimate the contributions to the heat production from superconductor hysteresis losses, superconductor coupling losses, stabilizing material eddy current losses, and structural material eddy current losses. Recently, it has been shown that thermoelastic dissipation in superconducting composites can contribute as much to heat production as the other loss mechanisms mentioned above. A modification of PLASS which takes into consideration thermoelastic dissipation in superconducting composites is discussed. A comparison between superconductor thermoelastic dissipation and the other superconductor loss mechanisms is presented in terms of the poloidal coil system of the ORNL Experimental Power Reactor design

  11. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of LTS cables for the DEMO TF coil using simplified models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowska Monika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The conceptual design activities for the DEMOnstration reactor (DEMO – the prototype fusion power plant – are conducted in Europe by the EUROfusion Consortium. In 2015, three design concepts of the DEMO toroidal field (TF coil were proposed by Swiss Plasma Center (EPFL-SPC, PSI Villigen, Italian National Agency for New Technologies (ENEA Frascati, and Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA Cadarache. The proposed conductor designs were subjected to complete mechanical, electromagnetic, and thermal-hydraulic analyses. The present study is focused on the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the candidate conductor designs using simplified models. It includes (a hydraulic analysis, (b heat removal analysis, and (c assessment of the maximum temperature and the maximum pressure in each conductor during quench. The performed analysis, aimed at verification whether the proposed design concepts fulfil the established acceptance criteria, provides the information for further improvements of the coil and conductors design.

  12. Parameters of DEMO DN and JET DN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is an appendix to a study of the reactor relevance of the NET design concept. The latter study examines whether the technologies and design principles proposed for NET can be directly extrapolated to a demonstration (DEMO) reactor. The appendix presents the parameters of the DEMO and NET under the topic headings: power, geometry, plasma, toroidal and poloidal magnetic field coils, first wall engineering, divertor physics, divertor engineering, and blanket. (U.K.)

  13. Design study of superconducting coils for the fusion DEMO plant at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, T.; Koizumi, N.; Okuno, K.; Kurihara, R.; Nishio, S.; Tobita, K.

    2006-01-01

    A design study of the TF coil for the fusion DEMO plant at JAERI is in progress. A major issue is to estimate the maximum fields generated by the TF coils for three tokamak options and two conductor options. Three tokamak options are proposed varying the aspect ratio and the role of the CS coil. Two kinds of conductors using advanced superconducting materials are candidates for the TF coils: Nb 3 Al and high temperature superconductor (HTS). In order to evaluate achievable magnetic fields, a simple method was adopted to calculate mechanical properties. The estimated maximum fields are 17-20 T by the HTS conductor and 16-17 T by the Nb 3 Al conductor. There is a possibility of a 0.7 T enhancement using grading of Nb 3 Al winding

  14. Dependence of CIT [Compact Ignition Tokamak] PF [poloidal field] coil currents on profile and shape parameters using the Control Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Jardin, S.C.; Pomphrey, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plasma shaping flexibility of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) poloidal field (PF) coil set is demonstrated through MHD equilibrium calculations of optimal PF coil current distributions and their variation with poloidal beta, internal inductance, plasma 95% elongation, and 95% triangularity. Calculations of the magnetic stored energy are used to compare solutions associated with various plasma parameters. The Control Matrix (CM) equilibrium code, together with the nonlinear equation and numerical optimization software packages HYBRD, and VMCON, respectively, are used to find equilibrium coil current distributions for fixed divertor geometry, volt-seconds, and plasma profiles in order to isolate the dependence on individual parameters. A reference equilibrium and coil current distribution are chosen, and correction currents dI are determined using the CM equilibrium method to obtain other specified plasma shapes. The reference equilibrium is the κ = 2 divertor at beginning of flattop (BOFT) with a minimum stored energy solution for the coil current distribution. The pressure profile function is fixed

  15. Study on poloidal field coil optimization and equilibrium control of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinya, Kichiro; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Nishio, Satoshi

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to present general features of the poloidal field coil optimization for the ITER plasma, flexibility analysis for various plasma options and some other aspect of the equilibrium control which is required for understanding plasma operation in more detail. Double null divertor plasma was selected as a main object of the optimization. Single null divertor plasma was assumed to be an alternative, because single null divertor plasma can be operational within the amounts of the total stored energy and ampere-turns of the double null divertor plasma, if it is shaped appropriately. Plasma parameters used in the present analysis are mainly those employed in the preliminary study by the Basic Device Engineering group of the ITER design team. The most part of the optimization study, however, utilizes the parameters proposed for discussion by the Japan team before starting joint design work at Garching. Plasma shape, and solenoid coil shape and size, which maximize available flux swing with reasonable amounts of the stored energy and ampere-turns, are discussed. Location and minimum number of the poloidal field coils with adequate shaping controllability were also discussed for various plasma options. Some other aspect of the equilibrium control, such as separatrix swing, moving null point operation during plasma heating and possible range of li, were evaluated and the guideline for the engineering design was proposed. Finally, fusion power output was estimated for the different pressure profiles and combinations of the average density and temperature, and the magnetic quantities of the scrape-off region was calculated to be available for the future divertor analysis. (author)

  16. MSC/NASTRAN ''expert'' techniques developed and applied to the TFTR poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The TFTR poloidal field (PF) coils are being analyzed by PPPL and Grumman using MSC/NASTRAN as a part of an overall effort to establish the absolute limiting conditions of operation for TFTR. Each of the PF coils will be analyzed in depth, using a detailed set of finite element models. Several of the models developed are quite large because each copper turn, as well as its surrounding insulation, was modeled using solid elements. Several of the finite element models proved large enough to tax the capabilities of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC), specifically disk storage space. To allow the use of substructuring techniques with their associated data bases for the larger models, it became necessary to employ certain infrequently used MSC/NASTRAN ''expert'' techniques. The techniques developed used multiple data bases and data base sets to divide each problem into a series of computer runs. For each run, only the data required was kept on active disk space, the remainder being placed in inactive ''FILEM'' storage, thus, minimizing active disk space required at any time and permitting problem solution using the NMFECC. A representative problem using the TFTR OH-1 coil global model provides an example of the techniques developed. The special considerations necessary to obtain proper results are discussed

  17. ZEPHYR - poloidal field system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, U.

    1982-04-01

    The basics of the poloidal field system of the ZEPHYR experiment are considered. From the physical data the requirements for the poloidal field are derived. Hence an appropriate coil configuration consisting of coil locations and corresponding currents is obtained. A suitable electrical circuit feeding the coils is described. A preliminary assessment of the dynamic control of the poloidal field system is given. (orig.)

  18. MHD equilibrium methods for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] PF [poloidal field] coil design and systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1989-03-01

    Two versions of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) free-boundary equilibrium code designed to computer the poloidal field (PF) coil current distribution of elongated, magnetically limited tokamak plasmas are demonstrated and applied to the systems analysis of the impact of plasma elongation on the design point of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These notes were presented at the ITER Specialists' Meeting on the PF Coil System and Operational Scenario, held at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Garching, Federal Republic of Germany, May 24--27, 1988. 8 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Characterization of high temperature superconductor cables for magnet toroidal field coils of the DEMO fusion power plant

    CERN Document Server

    Bayer, Christoph M

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is a key technology to satisfy the basic demand for electric energy sustainably. The official EUROfusion schedule foresees a first industrial DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant for 2050. In this work several high temperature superconductor sub-size cables are investigated for their applicability in large scale DEMO toroidal field coils. Main focus lies on the electromechanical stability under the influence of high Lorentz forces at peak magnetic fields of up to 12 T.

  20. Characterization of high temperature superconductor cables for magnet toroidal field coils of the DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Christoph M.

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear fusion is a key technology to satisfy the basic demand for electric energy sustainably. The official EUROfusion schedule foresees a first industrial DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant for 2050. In this work several high temperature superconductor sub-size cables are investigated for their applicability in large scale DEMO toroidal field coils. Main focus lies on the electromechanical stability under the influence of high Lorentz forces at peak magnetic fields of up to 12 T.

  1. Comparative evaluation of remote maintenance schemes for fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu, E-mail: uto.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp; Tobita, Kenji; Someya, Youji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Hoshino, Kazuo; Nakamura, Makoto

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Various remote maintenance schemes for DEMO were comparatively assessed based on requirements for DEMO remote maintenance. • The banana shape segment transport using all vertical maintenance ports would be more probable DEMO reactor maintenance scheme. • The key engineering issues are in-vessel transferring mechanism of segment, pipe connection and conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability. - Abstract: Maintenance schemes are one of the critical issues in DEMO design, significantly affecting the configuration of in-vessel components, the size of toroidal field (TF) coil, the arrangement of poloidal field (PF) coils, reactor building, hot cell and so forth. Therefore, the maintenance schemes should satisfy many design requirements and criteria to assure reliable and safe plant operation and to attain reasonable plant availability. The plant availability depends on reliability of remote maintenance scheme, inspection of pipe connection and plasma operation. In this paper, various remote maintenance schemes for DEMO were comparatively assessed based on requirements for DEMO remote maintenance. From the view points of the reliability of inspection on hot cell, TF coil size, stored energy of PF coil and portability of segment, the banana shape segment transport using all vertical maintenance ports would be more probable DEMO reactor maintenance scheme, and it has key engineering issues such as in-vessel transferring mechanism of segment, pipe connection and conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability.

  2. Comparative evaluation of remote maintenance schemes for fusion DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tobita, Kenji; Someya, Youji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Hoshino, Kazuo; Nakamura, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Various remote maintenance schemes for DEMO were comparatively assessed based on requirements for DEMO remote maintenance. • The banana shape segment transport using all vertical maintenance ports would be more probable DEMO reactor maintenance scheme. • The key engineering issues are in-vessel transferring mechanism of segment, pipe connection and conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability. - Abstract: Maintenance schemes are one of the critical issues in DEMO design, significantly affecting the configuration of in-vessel components, the size of toroidal field (TF) coil, the arrangement of poloidal field (PF) coils, reactor building, hot cell and so forth. Therefore, the maintenance schemes should satisfy many design requirements and criteria to assure reliable and safe plant operation and to attain reasonable plant availability. The plant availability depends on reliability of remote maintenance scheme, inspection of pipe connection and plasma operation. In this paper, various remote maintenance schemes for DEMO were comparatively assessed based on requirements for DEMO remote maintenance. From the view points of the reliability of inspection on hot cell, TF coil size, stored energy of PF coil and portability of segment, the banana shape segment transport using all vertical maintenance ports would be more probable DEMO reactor maintenance scheme, and it has key engineering issues such as in-vessel transferring mechanism of segment, pipe connection and conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability.

  3. Parallel connecting poloidal coil system for a doublet tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffolo, W.E.; Chen, W.Y.; Purcell, J.R.; Wesley, J.C.

    1977-09-01

    A method has been developed for parallel connection of the ohmic heating (OH) coil. The method involves subdividing the OH-coil into a number of parallel connected subcoils, with each subcoil having about 20 turns. Each of the field shaping coils (F-coils) also contains 20 turns, so that when connected to a common power supply, the OH and F-coils are decoupled. The advantages resulting from the scheme are numerous: (1) each F-coil contains a much smaller number of turns compared with the previous design concept, thus the construction and maintenance will be easier; (2) the parallel connected OH-coils form a constant flux envelope, resulting in an inherently lower error field at the plasma and the TF coil region, and this low error field is not sensitive to the variation in location of the OH-coils; (3) the voltage and current ratings of the individual OH coil conductors are reduced; and (4) the low impedance of the OH-coil system greatly improves the possibility of using a homopolar motor generator as a means of achieving flux reversal during startup and plasma current control during the burn cycle

  4. PC-based package for interactive assessment of MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    In the assessment of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and Poloidal Field Coil (PFC) arrangement for toroidal axisymmetric geometry, the Grad-Shafranov equation must be solved, either analytically or numerically. Existing numerical tools have been developed primarily for mainframe usage and can prove cumbersome for screening assessments and parametric evaluations. The objective of this thesis was to develop a personal computer (PC)-based calculational tool for assessing MHD/PFC problems in a highly interactive mode, well suited for scoping studies. The approach adopted involves a two-step process: first the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then the PFC arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium, is determined in an interactive design environment. The PC-based system developed consists of two programs: (1) PCEQ, which solve the MHD equilibrium problem and (2) PFDE-SIGN, which is employed to arrive at a PFC arrangement. PCEQ provides an output file including, but not limited to, the following: poloidal beta, total beta, safety factors, q, on axis and on edge. PCEQ plots the following contours and/or profiles: flux, pressure and toroidal current density, safety factor, and ratio of plasma toroidal field to vacuum field

  5. Optimization of Outer Poloidal Field (PF) Coil Configurations for Inductive PF Coil-only Plasma Start-up on Spherical Tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonho Choe; Jayhyun Kim; Masayuki Ono

    2004-01-01

    The elimination of in-board ohmic heating solenoid is required for the spherical torus (ST) to function as an attractive fusion power plant. An in-board ohmic solenoid, along with the shielding needed for its insulation, increases the size and, hence, the cost of the plant. Here, we investigate using static as well as dynamic codes in ST geometries a solenoid-free start-up concept utilizing a set of out-board poloidal field coils. By using the static code, an optimization of coil positions as well as coil currents was performed to demonstrate that it is indeed possible to create a high quality multi-pole field null region while retaining significant flux (volt-seconds) needed for the subsequent current ramp-up. With the dynamic code that includes the effect of vacuum vessel eddy currents, we then showed that it is possible to maintain a large size field null region for several milliseconds in which sufficient ionization avalanche can develop in the applied toroidal electric field. Under the magnetic geometry typical of a next generation spherical torus experiment, it is shown that the well-known plasma breakdown conditions for conventional ohmic solenoid start-up of E(sub)TB(sub)T/B(sub)P ∼ (0.1-1) kV/m with V(sub)loop ∼ 6 V can be readily met while retaining significant volt-seconds ∼ 4 V-S sufficient to generate multi-MA plasma current in STs

  6. A 40 kA NbTi cable in conduit conductor for the large poloidal field coils of net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torossian, A.; Bessette, D.; Turck, B.; Kazimierzak, B.

    1990-01-01

    The main feature of this cable in conduit design is to separate the manufacture of the full length of the steel conduit (400 m) and of the cable in order to minimize the industrial risk and consequently the cost. A circular cross section for that cable seems to be the most suitable for that purpose: - axisymmetric cabling with full transposition of strands, - cable behaviour independent of the field orientation, - less deformation of subcables, - cross section remains circular when the cable is under tension and makes the slippage of the cable in the conduit easier, - butt welding of 8 m long tubes forming the conduit becomes simpler. The square external shape allows to minimize the amount of insulating material and consequently improves the overall current density of the coil. This conductor is aimed to large poloidal field coils for NET which do not require high field and in that case NbTi seems to be the best choice with regard to reliability and cost but Nb 3 Sn could be used as well. Stainless steel ribbons are inserted between subcables in order to reduce losses induced by the rapid field changes and also to improve the mechanical behaviour of the cable

  7. A personal-computer-based package for interactive assessment of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.; Steiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    A personal-computer (PC)-based calculational approach assesses magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and poloidal field (PF) coil arrangement in a highly interactive mode, well suited for tokamak scoping studies. The system developed involves a two-step process: the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then a PF coil arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium is determined in an interactive design environment. In this paper the approach is used to examine four distinctly different toroidal configurations: the STARFIRE rector, a spherical torus (ST), the Big Dee, and an elongated tokamak. In these applications the PC-based results are benchmarked against those of a mainframe code for STARFIRE, ST, and Big Dee. The equilibrium and PF coil arrangement calculations obtained with the PC approach agree within a few percent with those obtained with the mainframe code

  8. Evaluation of remote maintenance schemes by plasma equilibrium analysis in Tokamak DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tobita, Kenji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The remote maintenance schemes in DEMO reactor were evaluated by the plasma equilibrium analysis. • Horizontal sector transport maintenance scheme requires the largest total PF coil current. • The difference of total PF coil current for MHD equilibrium in between the large segmented divertor maintenance and the segmentalized divertor maintenance was about 10%. - Abstract: The remote maintenance schemes in a DEMO reactor are categorized by insertion direction, blanket segmentation, and divertor maintenance scheme, and are quantitatively evaluated by analysing the plasma equilibrium. The positions of the poloidal field (PF) coil are limited by the size of the toroidal field (TF) coil and the maintenance port layout of each remote maintenance scheme. Because the PF coils are located near the larger TF coil and far from the plasma surface, the horizontal sector transport maintenance scheme requires the largest part of total PF coil current, 25% larger than that required for separated sector transport using vertical maintenance ports with segmented divertor maintenance (SDM). In the unsegmented divertor maintenance (UDM) scheme, the total magnetic stored energy in the PF coils at plasma equilibrium is about 30% larger than that stored in the SDM scheme, but the time required for removal and installation of all the divertor cassettes in the UDM scheme is roughly a third of that required in the SDM scheme because the number of divertor cassettes in the UDM scheme is a third of that in the SDM scheme. From the viewpoint of simple maintenance operations, the merit of the UDM scheme has more merit than the SDM scheme

  9. Proposed tokamak poloidal field system development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.; Vogel, H.F.; Warren, R.W.; Weldon, D.M.

    1977-05-01

    A program is proposed to develop poloidal field components for TNS and EPR size tokamak devices and to test these components in realistic circuits. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the most difficult component, the superconducting ohmic-heating coil. Switches must also be developed for testing the coils, and this switching technology is to be extended to meet the requirements for the large scale tokamaks. Test facilities are discussed; power supplies, including a homopolar to drive the coils, are considered; and poloidal field systems studies are proposed.

  10. Westinghouse compact poloidal divertor reference design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.; Lee, A.Y.; Ruck, G.W.

    1977-08-01

    A feasible compact poloidal divertor system has been designed as an impurity control and vacuum vessel first-wall protection option for the TNS tokamak. The divertor coils are inside the TF coil array and vacuum vessel. The poloidal divertor is formed by a pair of coil sets with zero net current. Each set consists of a number of coils forming a dish-shaped washer-like ring. The magnetic flux in the space between the coil sets is compressed vertically to limit the height and to expand the horizontal width of the particle and energy burial chamber which is located in the gap between the coil sets. The intensity of the poloidal field is increased to make the pitch angle of the flux lines very large so that the diverted particles can be intercepted by a large number of panels oriented at a small angle with respect to the flux lines. They are carefully shaped and designed such that the entire surfaces are exposed to the incident particles and are not shadowed by each other. Large collecting surface areas can be obtained. Flowing liquid lithium film and solid metal panels have been considered as the particle collectors. The power density for the former is designed at 1 MW/m 2 and for the latter 0.5 MW/m 2 . The major mechanical, thermal, and vacuum problems have been evaluated in sufficient detail so that the advantages and difficulties are identified. A complete functional picture is presented

  11. The DEMO Quasisymmetric Stellarator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey B. McFadden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The NSTAB nonlinear stability code solves differential equations in conservation form, and the TRAN Monte Carlo test particle code tracks guiding center orbits in a fixed background, to provide simulations of equilibrium, stability, and transport in tokamaks and stellarators. These codes are well correlated with experimental observations and have been validated by convergence studies. Bifurcated 3D solutions of the 2D tokamak problem have been calculated that model persistent disruptions, neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs and edge localized modes (ELMs occurring in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER, which does not pass the NSTAB simulation test for nonlinear stability. So we have designed a quasiaxially symmetric (QAS stellarator with similar proportions as a candidate for the demonstration (DEMO fusion reactor that does pass the test [1]. The configuration has two field periods and an exceptionally accurate 2D symmetry that furnishes excellent thermal confinement and good control of the prompt loss of alpha particles. Robust coils are found from a filtered form of the Biot-Savart law based on a distribution of current over a control surface for the coils and the current in the plasma defined by the equilibrium calculation. Computational science has addressed the issues of equilibrium, stability, and transport, so it remains to develop an effective plan to construct the coils and build a diverter.

  12. Ceramic BOT type blanket with poloidal helium cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, A.; Daenenr, W.; Iseli, M.; Ferrari, M.; Gallina, M.; Rado, V.; Simbolotti, G.; Violante, V.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the work done and results achieved over the past two years on the ceramic breeder BOT blanket with poloidal helium cooling. A conclusive remark on the brick/plate option described previously is followed by short descriptions of the low and high performance pebble bed options elaborated as alternatives for both NET and DEMO. The results show, togethre with those about the poloidal cooling of the First Wall, good prospects for this blanket type provided that the questions connected wiht an extensive use of beryllium find a satisfactor answer. (author). 5 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  13. High current superconductors for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzone, Pierluigi, E-mail: pierluigi.bruzzone@psi.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Association Euratom – Confédération Suisse, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sedlak, Kamil; Stepanov, Boris [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Association Euratom – Confédération Suisse, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Definition of requirement for TF coil based on the input of system code. ► A TF coil and conductor design for the European DEMO project. ► Use of React and Wind method opposite to Wind and React with related advantages. ► Hybridization of winding pack, Nb/Nb{sub 3}Sn, by graded layer winding. -- Abstract: In the assumption that DEMO will be an inductively driven tokamak, the number of load cycles will be in the range of several hundred thousands. The requirements for a new generation of Nb{sub 3}Sn based high current conductors for DEMO are drafted starting from the output of system code PROCESS. The key objectives include the stability of the DC performance over the lifetime of the machine and the effective use of the Nb{sub 3}Sn strand properties, for cost and reliability reasons. A preliminary layout of the winding pack and conductors for the toroidal field magnets is presented. To suppress the mechanism of reversible and irreversible degradation, i.e. to preserve in the cabled conductor the high critical current density of the strand, the thermal strain must be insignificant and no space for micro-bending under transverse load must be left in the strand bundle. The “react-and-wind” method is preferred here, with a graded, layer wound magnet, containing both Nb{sub 3}Sn and NbTi layers. The implications of the conductor choice on the coil design and technology are highlighted. A roadmap is sketched for the development of a full size prototype conductor sample and demonstration of the key technologies.

  14. The ITER poloidal field system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesley, J [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (USA); Beljakov, V; Kavin, A; Korshakov, V; Kostenko, A; Roshal, A; Zakharov, L [Kurchatov Inst. of Atomic Energy, Moscow (USSR); Bulmer, R; Kaiser, T; Miller, J R; Pearlstein, L D [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA); Hogan, J [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Kurihara, K; Shimomura, Y; Sugihara, M; Yoshino, R [Japan Atomic Energy Resea

    1990-12-15

    The ITER poloidal field (PF) system uses superconducting coils to provide the plasma equilibrium fields, slow equilibrium control and plasma flux linkage (V-s) needed for the ITER Operations and Research Program. Double-null (DN) divertor plasmas and operation scenarios for 22 MA Physics (high-Q/ignition) and 15 MA Technology (high-fluence testing) phases are provided. For 22 MA plasmas, total PF flux swing is 333 V-s. This provides inductive current drive (CD) for start-up with 66 V-s of resistive loss and 440-s (330-s minimum) sustained burn. The PF system also allows plasma start-up and shutdown scenarios, and can maintain the plasma configuration during burn over a range of current and pressure profiles. Other capabilities include increased plasma current (25 MA with inductive CD; 28 MA with non-inductive CD assist), divertor separatrix sweeping, and semi-DN and single-null plasmas.

  15. Superconducting poloidal field magnet engineering for the ARIES-ST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberg, Leslie; Pourrahimi, S.; Schultz, J.H.; Titus, P.; Jardin, S.; Kessel, C.; Reiersen, W.

    2003-01-01

    The critical issues of the poloidal systems for the ARIES-ST design have been presented in this paper. Because of the large plasma current and the need of highly shaped plasmas, the poloidal field (PF) coils should be located inside the toroidal field in order to reduce their current. Even then, the divertor coils carry large currents. The ARIES-ST PF coils are superconducting using the internally cooled cable-in-conduit conductor. The peak self field in the divertor coils is about 15 T and the highest field in the non-divertor coils is about 6 T. The PF magnets have built-in margins that are sufficient to survive disruptions without quenching. The costing study indicates that the specific cost of the PF system is $80/kg. Detailed design and trade-off studies of ARIES-ST are presented and remaining R and D issues are identified

  16. Divertor Heat Flux Reduction by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in the LHD-Type Helical DEMO Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, N.; Sagara, A.; Goto, T.; Masuzaki, S.; Miyazawa, J., E-mail: yanagi@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: The conceptual design studies of the LHD-type helical fusion DEMO reactor, FFHR-d1, are progressing steadfastly. The LHD-type heliotron magnetic configuration equipped with the built- in helical divertors has a potential to realize low divertor heat flux in spatial average. However, the toroidal asymmetry may give more than a couple of times higher peak heat flux at some locations, as has been experimentally observed in LHD and confirmed by magnetic field-line tracing. By providing radiation dispersion accompanied with a plasma detachment, the heat flux may decrease significantly though the compatibility with a good core plasma confinement is an important issue to be explored. Whereas the engineering difficulties for developing materials to be used under the neutron environment require even further decrease of the heat flux (even though the heliotron is a unique configuration that divertor plates be largely shielded from the direct irradiation of neutrons by breeder blankets). In this respect, we proposed, in the last IAEA FEC, a new strike point sweeping scheme using a set of auxiliary helical coils, termed helical divertor (HD) coils. The HD coils carrying a few percent of the current amplitude of the main helical coils sweep the divertor strike points without altering the core plasma. Though this scheme is effective in dispersing the heat flux in the poloidal direction, the toroidal asymmetry still remains. The AC operation may also give unforeseen engineering difficulties. We here propose that the peak heat flux be mitigated using RMP fields in steady-state. The magnetic field-lines are numerically traced in the vacuum configuration and their footprints coming to the divertor regions are counted. Their fraction plotted as a function of the toroidal angle indicates that the peak heat flux be mitigated to {approx} 20 MW per square meters at 3 GW fusion power generation without having radiation dispersion when an RMP field is applied. We note that the

  17. Relevance of NET first wall concept for DEMO DN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiltie, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Design studies for the Next European Torus (NET) have produced a design concept for the first wall. This concept features poloidal water cooling, double contained in a welded steel structure which is protected by radiatively cooled tiles. In this appendix the relevance of this concept to a DEMO is examined with particular emphasis given to the ability of the cooling tube arrangement to remove the heat. A suggested modification to the arrangement of coolant tubes is suggested so that the design can operate at the higher loadings of a DEMO. (author)

  18. Tokamak DEMO-FNS: Concept of magnet system and vacuum chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizov, E. A., E-mail: Azizov-EA@nrcki.ru; Ananyev, S. S. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Belyakov, V. A.; Bondarchuk, E. N.; Voronova, A. A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (Russian Federation); Golikov, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Goncharov, P. R. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Dnestrovskij, A. Yu. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Zapretilina, E. R. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (Russian Federation); Ivanov, D. P. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Kavin, A. A.; Kedrov, I. V. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (Russian Federation); Klischenko, A. V.; Kolbasov, B. N. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Krasnov, S. V. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (Russian Federation); Krylov, A. I. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Krylov, V. A.; Kuzmin, E. G. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (Russian Federation); Kuteev, B. V. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Labusov, A. N. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (Russian Federation); and others

    2016-12-15

    The level of knowledge accumulated to date in the physics and technologies of controlled thermonuclear fusion (CTF) makes it possible to begin designing fusion—fission hybrid systems that would involve a fusion neutron source (FNS) and which would admit employment for the production of fissile materials and for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel. Modern Russian strategies for CTF development plan the construction to 2023 of tokamak-based demonstration hybrid FNS for implementing steady-state plasma burning, testing hybrid blankets, and evolving nuclear technologies. Work on designing the DEMO-FNS facility is still in its infancy. The Efremov Institute began designing its magnet system and vacuum chamber, while the Kurchatov Institute developed plasma-physics design aspects and determined basic parameters of the facility. The major radius of the plasma in the DEMO-FNS facility is R = 2.75 m, while its minor radius is a = 1 m; the plasma elongation is k{sub 95} = 2. The fusion power is P{sub FUS} = 40 MW. The toroidal magnetic field on the plasma-filament axis is B{sub t0} = 5 T. The plasma current is I{sub p} = 5 MA. The application of superconductors in the magnet system permits drastically reducing the power consumed by its magnets but requires arranging a thick radiation shield between the plasma and magnet system. The central solenoid, toroidal-field coils, and poloidal-field coils are manufactured from, respectively, Nb{sub 3}Sn, NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn, and NbTi. The vacuum chamber is a double-wall vessel. The space between the walls manufactured from 316L austenitic steel is filled with an iron—water radiation shield (70% of stainless steel and 30% of water).

  19. Models for poloidal divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.E.; Heifetz, D.; Petravic, M.

    1982-07-01

    Recent progress in models for poloidal divertors has both helped to explain current divertor experiments and contributed significantly to design efforts for future large tokamak (INTOR, etc.) divertor systems. These models range in sophistication from zero-dimensional treatments and dimensional analysis to two-dimensional models for plasma and neutral particle transport which include a wide variety of atomic and molecular processes as well as detailed treatments of the plasma-wall interaction. This paper presents a brief review of some of these models, describing the physics and approximations involved in each model. We discuss the wide variety of physics necessary for a comprehensive description of poloidal divertors. To illustrate the progress in models for poloidal divertors, we discuss some of our recent work as typical examples of the kinds of calculations being done

  20. Models for poloidal divertors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, D.E.; Heifetz, D.; Petravic, M.

    1982-07-01

    Recent progress in models for poloidal divertors has both helped to explain current divertor experiments and contributed significantly to design efforts for future large tokamak (INTOR, etc.) divertor systems. These models range in sophistication from zero-dimensional treatments and dimensional analysis to two-dimensional models for plasma and neutral particle transport which include a wide variety of atomic and molecular processes as well as detailed treatments of the plasma-wall interaction. This paper presents a brief review of some of these models, describing the physics and approximations involved in each model. We discuss the wide variety of physics necessary for a comprehensive description of poloidal divertors. To illustrate the progress in models for poloidal divertors, we discuss some of our recent work as typical examples of the kinds of calculations being done.

  1. Compact poloidal divertor reference design for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.; Lee, A.Y.; Ruck, G.W.; Lange, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A compact poloidal divertor concept has been developed for TNS tokamaks and its feasibility has been demonstrated by sufficient detailed magnetic, thermal, mechanical and vacuum analyses. This particular divertor is formed by a pair of opposing coil sets which define a magnetic flux slot where the particle burial chamber is located. The magnetic flux in the space between the coil sets is compressed vertically to limit the height and to expand the horizontal width of the particle and energy burial chamber. The intensity of the poloidal field is increased to make the pitch angle of the flux lines very large so that the diverted particles can be intercepted by a large number of panels oriented at a small angle with respect to the flux lines. Large collecting surface areas can be obtained so that the thermal load and particle flux are reduced to a practical level. Flowing lithium film and solid metal panels have been considered as the particle collector and the latter is preferred. This divertor allows for most economical use of the available space inside the TF coils and thus has minor impact on the overall size of the tokamak. The divertor design is essentially independent of the tokamak system, although analyses were performed based on TNS

  2. TPX Poloidal Field (PF) power systems simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, E.; Bronner, G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling and simulation of the PF power system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), which is required to supply pulsed DC current to the Poloidal Field (PF) superconducting coil system. An analytical model was developed to simulate the dynamics of the PF power system for any PF current scenario and thereby provide the basis for selection of PF circuit topology, in support of the major design goal of optimizing the use of the existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) facilities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab (PPPL)

  3. Breeding blanket for Demo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, E.; Giancarli, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the main design features, their rationale, and the main critical issues for the development, of the four DEMO-relevant blanket concepts presently investigated within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme

  4. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish M; Rushinski J; Myatt L; Brooks A; Dahlgren F; Chrzanowski J; Reiersen W; Freudenberg K.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements

  5. Poloidal magnetics of a divertor compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    A technique is presented for calculating bounds on the poloidal field (PF) coil currents required to constrain critical plasma shape parameters when plasma pressure and current density profiles are changed. Such considerations are important in the conceptual design of the PF coils for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) and their electrical power systems in view of the uncertainty in plasma profiles and operating scenarios. Four relatively independent coil groups are sufficient to find a coil current distribution and equilibrium satisfying a prescribed plasma major radius, minor radius, and divertor strike point coordinates. The variation in the coil current distribution with plasma profiles tends to be large for external PF systems and provides a measure by which coil configurations may be compared. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Optimization of the poloidal transformer of ignitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andritsos, F.; Angelini, A.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most critical parts of the high field Tokamak IGNITOR, is the inner poloidal transformer coil. This is due not only to the high stresses developed there but also to the large quantities of energy released and the resulting high temperature. It determines the overall cooling time of the machine and thus the maximum attainable number of pulses per year. An optimization, based on a parametric study of the transformer, was performed and configuration parameters were defined. Cooling time was the quantity to be minimized, with main constraints the maximum coil temperatures and the maximum coolant outlet velocities. The cost of the cooling plant was also taken into account. The row of the conductors adjacent to the equatorial plane, which presents the highest stresses, was modeled and checked for maximum stresses. Thermal and magnetic loading, contact nonlinearity and pretensioning were considered. 8 refs., 4 figs., 12 tabs

  7. Japanese endeavors to establish technological bases for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Hiroshi, E-mail: yamada.hiroshi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ozaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8605 (Japan); Sakamoto, Ryuichi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Sakamoto, Yoshiteru [Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Takenaga, Hidenobu [Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tanaka, Teruya [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hisashi [Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Okano, Kunihiko [Keio University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-0061 (Japan); Tobita, Kenji [Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ushigusa, Kenkichi [Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The strategy for DEMO has been discussed by a joint effort in Japan. • DEMO should be aimed at steady power generation beyond several hundred MW. • DEMO should be aimed at availability extendable to commercialization. • DEMO should be aimed at tritium breeding to fulfill self-sufficiency of fuels. • Related actions are emerging to deliberate the Japanese fusion roadmap. - Abstract: The establishment of technology bases required for the development of a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO) has been discussed by a joint effort throughout the Japanese fusion community. The basic concept of DEMO premised for investigation has been identified and the structure of technological issues to ensure the feasibility of this DEMO concept has been examined. The Joint-Core Team, which was launched along with the request by the ministerial council, has compiled analyses in two reports to clarify technology which should be secured, maintained, and developed in Japan, to share the common targets among industry, government, and academia, and to activate actions under a framework for implementation throughout Japan. The reports have pointed out that DEMO should be aimed at steady power generation beyond several hundred thousand kilowatts, availability which must be extended to commercialization, and overall tritium breeding to fulfill self-sufficiency of fuels. The necessary technological activities, such as superconducting coils, blanket, divertor, and others, have been sorted out and arranged in the chart with the time line toward the decision on DEMO. Based upon these Joint-Core Team reports, related actions are emerging to deliberate the Japanese fusion roadmap.

  8. What must Demo do?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waganer, L.M.; Najmabadi, F.; Tillack, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The US fusion demonstration plant (Demo) must satisfy certain top level requirements so that energy producers will confidently invest in a commercial fusion version for their next generation power plant. To instill that level of confidence to both the investor and the public, Demo must achieve high standards in safety, low environmental impact, reliability, and economics. This is a most difficult set of goals to meet. The public is demanding ever more strict environmental rules and regulations. The hazards of radioactive and toxic waste and emissions are becoming better understood. The difficulties of establishing and maintaining long-lived repositories are enormous. Neighborhood action groups have an aversion to large power plants in their back yards. Utilities and independent power producers are reluctant to commit to a long-term financial arrangement for a new technology. To achieve these stringent goals, the competition is continuing to improve to meet these challenges. Only the best can adapt and survive. The Demo plant is not expected to achieve all requirements demanded of the commercial power plant, but it must demonstrate values close enough to the commercial machine so that extrapolation to the commercial carries minimal risk in all key areas. Specifically, Demo must demonstrate all the major performance parameters in an integrated system similar to that of the commercial plant. It should be large enough so that all aspects of the Demo can be confidently scaled to that of the commercial plant, including the economics, reliability, availability, and operability

  9. Poloidal field system design for the ZT-H reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Gribble, R.F.; Linton, T.W.; Reass, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    This report discusses each of the following areas: (1) equilibrium specification, (2) the equilibrium winding, (3) the magnetizing winding, (4) numerical poloidal field system analysis, (5) coil cross section, turns, minimum field error, (6) coil stresses and cooling, (7) the upper structure, (8) the loads, (9) boundary conditions and method of analysis, and (10) design description

  10. Variation of the poloidal field during a disruption and consequences on the vacuum chamber, the poloidal system and the toroidal magnet (Tore II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatineau, F.; Leloup, C.; Pariente, M.

    1977-12-01

    The currents induced into the vacuum vessel and into the poloidal field coils and the overvoltages on the generators during a plasma current disruption are calculated. The subsequent applied mechanical forces and the poloidal field variations at the toroidal field conductor are deduced. The current decrease rate considered, during a disruption, ranges from d Ip/dt=0.810 9 A/s to 0.410 11 A/s [fr

  11. Equilibrium field coil concepts for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Brown, T.G.

    1981-08-01

    Methods are presented for reducing ampere-turn requirements in the EF coil system. It is shown that coil currents in an EF coil system external to the toroidal field coils can be substantially reduced by relaxing the triangularity of a D-shaped plasma. Further reductions are realized through a hybrid EF coil system using both internal and external coils. Equilibrium field coils for a poloidally asymmetric, single-null INTOR configuration are presented. It is shown that the shape of field lines in the plasma scrapeoff region and divertor channel improves as triangularity is reduced, but it does so at the possible expense of achievable stable beta values

  12. PDX toroidal field coils stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.; Smith, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A method used in the stress analysis of the PDX toroidal field coil is developed. A multilayer coil design of arbitrary dimensions in the shape of either a circle or an oval is considered. The analytical model of the coil and the supporting coil case with connections to the main support structure is analyzed using the finite element technique. The three dimensional magnetic fields and the non-uniform body forces which are a loading condition on a coil due to toroidal and poloidal fields are calculated. The method of analysis permits rapid and economic evaluations of design changes in coil geometry as well as in coil support structures. Some results pertinent to the design evolution and their comparison are discussed. The results of the detailed stress analysis of the final coil design due to toroidal field, poloidal field and temperature loads are presented

  13. Poloidal field distribution studies in tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kojyu; Nishio, Satoshi; Fujisawa, Noboru; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Saito, Seiji

    1983-01-01

    On the design studies with the INTOR plasma equilibrium and poloidal field coil configuration (PFCC) from the Phase I to the Phase II A have been obtained the following main results. Three optimized PFCCs have been obtained: the INTOR-J ''Universal'' with the optimized PFCC for the divertor configuration, the optimized PFCC for the pump limiter, and the INTOR ''Universal'' with the PFCC defined as the INTOR reference. These PFCCs satisfy with the requirements for the porthole size for the remote assembly and maintenance of the device, and the maximum flux swing and current densities of the solenoidal coils. The INTOR-J ''Universal'' will be almost the same as the INTOR ''Universal'' in the reactor size. But the optimized PFCC for the pump limiter will be a little larger than the above two configuration because of being in need of slightly larger radii on the two large coils if the plasma with 1.5 in elongation is unconditionally necessary. The total sum of absolute currents with PFCC, which is used as a parameter for its figure of merit, is found to be given in a range of 80 -- 90 MAT at high beta for the divertor configuration for both of the INTOR-J ''Universal'' and the INTOR ''Universal''. The optimized PFCC for pump limiter has 70 -- 80 MAT in its range. The INTOR-J ''Universal'' and the INTOR ''Universal'' for the pump limiter will have its larger sum than one optimized for pump limiter by several MAT. The ''EF only'' method, where the flux, psi sub(P), necessary for maintaining the plasma current on high beta is provided only by EF coils, seems to give the total sum a little less than the ''EF + OH'' method using EF and OH coils for psi sub(P). (J.P.N.)

  14. Multifarious Physics Analyses of the Core Plasma Properties in a Helical DEMO Reactor FFHR-d1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, J.; Satake, S.; Goto, T.; Seki, R.; Nunami, M.; Funaba, H.; Yamada, I.; Suzuki, C.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Yamada, H.; Sagara, A., E-mail: miyazawa@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Yokoyama, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Masaoka, Y.; Murakami, S. [Departement Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Theoretical analyses on the MHD equilibrium, the neoclassical transport, and the alpha particle transport, etc., are being carried out for a helical fusion DEMO reactor named FFHR- d1, using radial profiles extrapolated from LHD. FFHR-d1 is a heliotron type DEMO reactor of which the conceptual design activity has been launched since 2010. It is possible to sustain the burning plasma without auxiliary heating (i.e., self-ignition) in FFHR-d1, since there is no need of plasma current drive in heliotron plasmas. The device size is 4 times enlarged from LHD, i.e., the major radius of helical coil center is 15.6 m, the magnetic field strength at the helical coil center is 4.7 T, and the fusion output is {approx} 3 GW. One of the distinguished subjects in FFHR-d1 compared with the former FFHR design series is the robust similarity with LHD. The arrangement of superconducting magnet coils in FFHR-d1 is similar to that of LHD, except a pair of planar poloidal coils omitted to maximize the maintenance ports. This makes reasonable to assume a similar MHD equilibrium as observed in LHD for FFHR-d1, as long as the beta profiles in these two are similar. In FFHR-d1, radial profiles of density and temperature are determined by multiplying proper enhancement factors on those obtained in LHD, according to the DPE (Direct Profile Extrapolation) method. The enhancement factors are calculated consistently with the gyro-Bohm model. Therefore, the global confinement properties as expressed in ISS95 or ISS04 are kept in FFHR-d1. A large Shafranov shift is foreseen in FFHR-d1 due to its high-beta property. This leads to deterioration in the neoclassical transport and alpha particle confinement. Effectiveness of plasma position control and/or magnetic configuration optimization has been examined to solve this problem and to check the validity of extrapolated profiles. According to these analyses, it is concluded that the self-ignition condition can be achieved in FFHR-d1 by

  15. KT-2 poloidal-field(PF) system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jang Min; Hong, Bong Keun; Hwang, Chul Kyu; Song, Woo Sub; Kim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Kwang Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    KT-2 poloidal-field (PF) system design is described. The PF coil system is designed for both up-down symmetric double-null (DN) and up-down asymmetric single-null (SN) configurations. Three sets of `design-basis` scenarios, which describe the ohmic heating (OH), the 5MW and the high bootstrap (HIBS) baseline modes, are represented. In these cases, the power and energy required from external power supplies are calculated. 8 tabs., 54 figs., 14 refs. (Author).

  16. The ITER poloidal field system: control and power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, P.L.; Benfatto, I.; Gribov, Y.; Matsukawa, M.; Odajima, K.; Portone, A.; Roshal, A.; Bareyt, B.; Bertolini, E.; Bottereau, J.M.; Huart, M.; Maschio, A.; Bulgakov, S.; Kuchinski, V.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports the preliminary scenario of the ITER Poloidal Field (PF) system operation, the method used to evaluate the installed power, the basic structure of the circuits and finally the concepts of the preliminary design of control and power supply. The superconducting coils are energized from the HV Grid with conventional AC/DC converters. R and D is required for circuit breakers, make switches and resistors, the basic components of both the switching networks and the discharge circuits. (orig.)

  17. Design and fabrication of the PDX poloidal field solenoid utilizing fiberglass reinforced epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.S.C.

    1975-11-01

    This paper discusses the basic design of the Poloidal Field Solenoid Coil. It will be mainly concerned with the more unique features of the Solenoid such as the copper coil windings and the design of the epoxy-glass structural support mandrels. The center solenoid coil of the PDX machine consists of five different coil systems (OH No. 8, No. 9; NF No. 11; DF No. 7; EF Solenoid and CF No. 9). Three concentric fiberglass reinforced epoxy cylinders fabricated in-house will act as mandrels to support and to house the coils that will result as an integral unit

  18. Neutronic analyses of design issues affecting the tritium breeding performance in different DEMO blanket concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereslavtsev, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.pereslavtsev@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, Christian [EUROfusion – Programme Management Unit, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fischer, Ulrich [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Realistic 3D MCNP model based on the CAD engineering model of DEMO. • Automated procedure for the generation and arrangement of the blanket modules for different DEMO concepts: HCPB, HCLL, WCLL, DCLL. • Several parameters affecting tritium breeding ratio (TBR) were investigated. • A set of practical guidelines was prepared for the designers developing the individual breeding blanket concepts. - Abstract: Neutronic analyses were performed to assess systematically the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) variations in the DEMO for the different blanket concepts HCPB, HCLL, WCLL and DCLL DEMOs due to modifications of the blanket configurations. A dedicated automated procedure was developed to fill the breeding modules in the common generic model in correspondence to the different concepts. The TBR calculations were carried out using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code. The following parameters affecting the global TBR were investigated: TBR poloidal distribution, radial breeder zone depth, {sup 6}Li enrichment, steel content in the breeder modules, poloidal segmentation of the breeder blanket volume, size of gaps between blankets, thickness of the first wall and of the tungsten armour. Based on the results a set of practical guidelines was prepared for the designers developing the individual breeding blanket concepts with the goal to achieve the required tritium breeding performance in DEMO.

  19. Neutronic analyses of design issues affecting the tritium breeding performance in different DEMO blanket concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslavtsev, Pavel; Bachmann, Christian; Fischer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Realistic 3D MCNP model based on the CAD engineering model of DEMO. • Automated procedure for the generation and arrangement of the blanket modules for different DEMO concepts: HCPB, HCLL, WCLL, DCLL. • Several parameters affecting tritium breeding ratio (TBR) were investigated. • A set of practical guidelines was prepared for the designers developing the individual breeding blanket concepts. - Abstract: Neutronic analyses were performed to assess systematically the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) variations in the DEMO for the different blanket concepts HCPB, HCLL, WCLL and DCLL DEMOs due to modifications of the blanket configurations. A dedicated automated procedure was developed to fill the breeding modules in the common generic model in correspondence to the different concepts. The TBR calculations were carried out using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code. The following parameters affecting the global TBR were investigated: TBR poloidal distribution, radial breeder zone depth, "6Li enrichment, steel content in the breeder modules, poloidal segmentation of the breeder blanket volume, size of gaps between blankets, thickness of the first wall and of the tungsten armour. Based on the results a set of practical guidelines was prepared for the designers developing the individual breeding blanket concepts with the goal to achieve the required tritium breeding performance in DEMO.

  20. Plasma regimes and research goals of JT-60SA towards ITER and DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Y.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Suzuki, T.; Matsunaga, G.; Yoshida, M.; Shinohara, K.; Urano, H.; Nakano, T.; Sakurai, S.; Kawashima, H.; Barabaschi, P.; Lackner, K.; Ishida, S.; Bolzonella, T.

    2011-01-01

    The JT-60SA device has been designed as a highly shaped large superconducting tokamak with a variety of plasma actuators (heating, current drive, momentum input, stability control coils, resonant magnetic perturbation coils, W-shaped divertor, fuelling, pumping, etc) in order to satisfy the central research needs for ITER and DEMO. In the ITER- and DEMO-relevant plasma parameter regimes and with DEMO-equivalent plasma shapes, JT-60SA quantifies the operation limits, plasma responses and operational margins in terms of MHD stability, plasma transport and confinement, high-energy particle behaviour, pedestal structures, scrape-off layer and divertor characteristics. By integrating advanced studies in these research fields, the project proceeds 'simultaneous and steady-state sustainment of the key performances required for DEMO' with integrated control scenario development applicable to the highly self-regulating burning high-β high bootstrap current fraction plasmas.

  1. DEMO port plug design and integration studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossetti, G.; Boccaccini, L. V.; Cismondi, F.; Del Nevo, A.; Fischer, U.; Franke, T.; Granucci, G.; Hernández, F.; Mozzillo, R.; Strauß, D.; Tran, M. Q.; Vaccaro, A.; Villari, R.

    2017-11-01

    The EUROfusion Consortium established in 2014 and composed by European Fusion Laboratories, and in particular the Power Plant Physics and Technology department aims to develop a conceptual design for the Fusion DEMOnstration Power Plant, DEMO. With respect to present experimental machines and ITER, the main goals of DEMO are to produce electricity continuously for a period of about 2 h, with a net electrical power output of a few hundreds of MW, and to allow tritium self-sufficient breeding with an adequately high margin in order to guarantee its planned operational schedule, including all planned maintenance intervals. This will eliminate the need to import tritium fuel from external sources during operations. In order to achieve these goals, extensive engineering efforts as well as physics studies are required to develop a design that can ensure a high level of plant reliability and availability. In particular, interfaces between systems must be addressed at a very early phase of the project, in order to proceed consistently. In this paper we present a preliminary design and integration study, based on physics assessments for the EU DEMO1 Baseline 2015 with an aspect ratio of 3.1 and 18 toroidal field coils, for the DEMO port plugs. These aim to host systems like electron cyclotron heating launchers currently developed within the Work Package Heating and Current Drive that need an external radial access to the plasma and through in-vessel systems like the breeder blanket. A similar approach shown here could be in principle followed by other systems, e.g. other heating and current drive systems or diagnostics. The work addresses the interfaces between the port plug and the blanket considering the helium-cooled pebble bed and the water cooled lithium lead which are two of four breeding blanket concepts under investigation in Europe within the Power Plant Physics and Technology Programme: the required openings will be evaluated in terms of their impact onto the

  2. DEMO diagnostics and burn control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biel, W.; De Baar, M.; Dinklage, A.; Felici, F.; König, R.; Meister, H.; Treutterer, W.; Wenninger, R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the control system for a tokamak demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) faces unprecedented challenges. First, the requirements for control reliability and accuracy are more stringent than on existing fusion devices: any loss of plasma control on DEMO may result in a disruption which

  3. Introduction: Undoing the demos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Mitchell

    2017-01-01

    and usefulness of Michel Foucault’s notion of governmentality and Karl Marx’s analysis of capitalism for analysing neoliberalism; the way that neoliberalism ‘economises’ everything including politics and democracy; the nature of the state and of sovereignty, and how the left should relate to these......; and the nature of critique in its different forms (Kantian, Foucauldian, Marxist and others). These are issues that are important not only for the specific argument of Undoing the Demos, but more generally for social and political theory today....

  4. Tokamak poloidal field systems. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1980-05-01

    Work is reported on the development of superconducting tokamak poloidal field systems (TPFS). Progress is discussed on the design of a 20 MJ, 50 kA, 7.5 T superconducting pulsed energy storage coil operated in a 1 to 2 s bipolar mode from +7.5 T to -7.5 T in 1982. Conductor development for the coil is presented. A facility that uses a traction motor energy transfer system to test coils in the 20 to 100 MJ energy range is discussed. Current interrupter development and testing for protection and energy transfer circuits are also presented. The 400 kJ METS coil test preparation is under way

  5. Demonstration tokamak-power-plant study (DEMO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    A study of a Demonstration Tokamak Power Plant (DEMO) has been completed. The study's objective was to develop a conceptual design of a prototype reactor which would precede commercial units. Emphasis has been placed on defining and analyzing key design issues and R and D needs in five areas: noninductive current drivers, impurity control systems, tritium breeding blankets, radiation shielding, and reactor configuration and maintenance features. The noninductive current drive analysis surveyed a wide range of candidates and selected relativistic electron beams for the reference reactor. The impurity control analysis considered both a single-null poloidal divertor and a pumped limiter. A pumped limiter located at the outer midplane was selected for the reference design because of greater engineering simplicity. The blanket design activity focused on two concepts: a Li 2 O solid breeder with high pressure water cooling and a lead-rich Li-Pb eutectic liquid metal breeder (17Li-83Pb). The reference blanket concept is the Li 2 O option with a PCA structural material. The first wall concept is a beryllium-clad corrugated panel design. The radiation shielding effort concentrated on reducing the cost of bulk and penetration shielding; the relatively low-cost outborad shield is composed of concrete, B 4 C, lead, and FE 1422 structural material

  6. Global shutdown dose rate maps for a DEMO conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leichtle, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sanz, J.; Catalan, J.P.; Juarez, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Application of R2S-method on high-resolution full torus sector mesh for DEMO. • Absorbed dose rates after shutdown for a variely of RH equipment at typical locations. • Idenification of radiation levels at several port based locations. - Abstract: For the calculations of highly reliable shutdown dose rate (SDR) maps in fusion devices like a DEMO plant, the Rigorous-2-step (R2S) method is nowadays routinely applied using high-resolution decay gamma sources from initial high-resolution neutron flux meshes activating all materials in the system. This approach has been utilized in the present paper with the objective to provide SDR results relevant for RH systems of a conceptual DEMO design developed in the EU. The primary objective was to assess specific locations of interest for RH equipment inside the vessel and along the extension of maintenance ports. To this end, a provisional DEMO MCNP model has been used, featuring HCLL-type blankets, tungsten/copper divertor, manifolds, vacuum vessel with ports and toroidal field coils. The operational scenario assumed 2.1 GW fusion power and a life-time of 20 years with plant availability of 30%, where removable parts will be extracted after 5.2 years. Results of absorbed dose rate distributions for several relevant materials are presented and discussed in terms of the different contributions from the various activated components.

  7. Global shutdown dose rate maps for a DEMO conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leichtle, D., E-mail: dieter.leichtle@f4e.europa.eu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sanz, J.; Catalan, J.P.; Juarez, R. [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia(UNED), E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, C/ Juan del Rosal 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Application of R2S-method on high-resolution full torus sector mesh for DEMO. • Absorbed dose rates after shutdown for a variely of RH equipment at typical locations. • Idenification of radiation levels at several port based locations. - Abstract: For the calculations of highly reliable shutdown dose rate (SDR) maps in fusion devices like a DEMO plant, the Rigorous-2-step (R2S) method is nowadays routinely applied using high-resolution decay gamma sources from initial high-resolution neutron flux meshes activating all materials in the system. This approach has been utilized in the present paper with the objective to provide SDR results relevant for RH systems of a conceptual DEMO design developed in the EU. The primary objective was to assess specific locations of interest for RH equipment inside the vessel and along the extension of maintenance ports. To this end, a provisional DEMO MCNP model has been used, featuring HCLL-type blankets, tungsten/copper divertor, manifolds, vacuum vessel with ports and toroidal field coils. The operational scenario assumed 2.1 GW fusion power and a life-time of 20 years with plant availability of 30%, where removable parts will be extracted after 5.2 years. Results of absorbed dose rate distributions for several relevant materials are presented and discussed in terms of the different contributions from the various activated components.

  8. Pulse coil concepts for the LCP Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Burn, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    The pulse coils described in this paper are resistive copper magnets driven by time-varying currents. They are included in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) portion of the Large Coil Program (LCP) to simulate the pulsed field environment of the toroidal coils in a tokamak reactor. Since TNS (a 150 sec, 5MA, igniting tokamak) and the Oak Ridge EPR (Experimental Power Reactor) are representative of the first tokamaks to require the technology developed in LCP, the reference designs for these machines, especially TNS, are used to derive the magnetic criteria for the pulse coils. This criteria includes the magnitude, distribution, and rate of change of pulsed fields in the toroidal coil windings. Three pulse coil concepts are evaluated on the basis of magnetic criteria and factors such as versatility of design, ease of fabrication and cost of operation. The three concepts include (1) a pair of poloidal coils outside the LCTF torus, (2) a single poloidal coil threaded through the torus, and (3) a pair of vertical axis coil windings inside the bore of one or more of the toroidal test coils

  9. Overview of the modification to the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) to produce the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuntson, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Poloidal Divertor Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has been recently transformed into the Princeton Beta Experiment. The purpose of the modification is to produce a bean-shaped plasma with beta values in excess of 10%, which is substantially above those achieved with more conventional plasma shapes. This transformation is accomplished by relocating several of the existing coils within the vacuum vessel, without a major disassembly of the device. One of the former PDX divertor coils is relocated on the mid-plane to be used as a ''pusher'' coil to create the plasma indentation. The ''pusher'' coil is protected from neutral beam impingement by watercooled graphite armor. The remaining internal PDX poloidal field coils are moved vertically to optimize the new configuration. The major new component is the set of passive stabilization coils. These coils are fabricated in segments and installed inside of the vacuum vessel. The purpose of the passive coils is to dampen the vertical instability of the bean-shaped plasma. The conversion to PBX also required reworking of internal and external poloidal coil bus leads, and the fabrication of new mechanical support structure

  10. Scoping studies for NBI launch geometries on DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, I., E-mail: ian.jenkins@ukaea.uk; Challis, C.D.; Keeling, D.L.; Surrey, E.

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • NBCD scans are done for beam energies of 1.5 MeV and 1.0 MeV in two DEMO scenarios. • NBCD scan profiles are fed into genetic algorithm to fit a target current profile. • The result gives location and power of sources to give best fit to target profile. • This method can help provide requirements for DEMO beamline geometry. - Abstract: Engineering and technical constraints on Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) in DEMO may determine the available beam energy and may also strongly impact the Neutral Beam Current Drive (NBCD) efficiency by restricting available beam tangential radii. These latter are determined by factors such as the inter-TF coil spacing, as well as the degree of required shielding. In order to illustrate how these factors may affect the contribution of NBCD on DEMO operating scenarios, scans of NBI tangency radii and elevation on two possible DEMO scenarios have been performed with two beam energies, 1.5 MeV and 1.0 MeV, in order to determine the most favourable options for NBCD efficiency. In addition, a method using a genetic algorithm has been used to seek optimised solutions of NBI source locations and powers to attempt to synthesize a target total plasma driven-current profile. It is found that certain beam trajectories may be proscribed by limitations on shinethrough onto the vessel wall. This may affect the ability of NBCD to extend the duration of a pulse in a scenario where it must complement the induced plasma current. Operating at the lower beam energy reduces the restrictions due to shinethrough and is attractive for technical reasons as it will required less development, but in the scenarios examined here this results in a spatial broadening of the NBCD profile, which may make it more challenging to achieve desired total driven-current profiles.

  11. Poloidal field electromagnetic engineering design for the TEXT upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.; Zhu, W.; Edmonds, P.H.; Solano, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    The overall design is a compromise between the requirement of maximum flexibility for plasma configuration, the technological limitations of materials and fabrication techniques, protection against failure by disruption, and the inevitable requirement of minimum cost and early completion schedules. Highlights of the design include the use of a pinned and clamped multi-turn toroidal joint, the use of an alumina dispersed high strength copper alloy and protection against the very high mechanical forces. The overall structure consists of the poloidal half windings clamped and fiber-glass epoxy glued to fiber-glass half cylinders, which are attached to the torque frame structure by vertical studs. The diverter coils require water cooling, and because of the small cross-section area available for these cooling tubes and for the coil feeds, and intricate assembly procedure has been developed

  12. Tokamak poloidal-field systems. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    The work performed in support of the FED and INTOR tokamak studies is reported at length and covers almost all the aspects of poloidal field (PF) design that were considered. The design work included magnetics, forces and fields, superconductor design, superconductor loss calculations, high field tokamak central solenoid parametric analysis, helium vapor release with bubble clearing and entrainment analysis, eddy current losses in dewars, structural support design for internally cooled cable superconductor (ICCS), research and technology development and manufacturing plans and milestones for poloidal field (PF) coils, fault conditions for shorted PF coils, design of 50 kA vapor cooled leads, and structural design of PF ring coils box frame dewars. Eddy current calculations in tokamak structure are being calculated. A computer code to perform stability analysis of ICCS is being written. Two water cooled switches, a vacuum interrupter and a bypass switch, were tested to develop improved higher current carrying capacities

  13. DEMO diagnostics and burn control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biel, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.biel@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium); Baar, Marco de [FOM-Institute DIFFER, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Dinklage, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Felici, Federico [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); König, Ralf [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Meister, Hans; Treutterer, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Wenninger, Ronald [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • An initial concept for the DEMO diagnostic and control system is presented. • A preliminary list of control functions and candidate diagnostics is developed. • Challenges regarding disruptions, power exhaust and radiation control are highlighted. • The need for introducing realistic control margins is emphasized. • On outline of the future R&D plan is presented. - Abstract: The development of the control system for a tokamak demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) faces unprecedented challenges. First, the requirements for control reliability and accuracy are more stringent than on existing fusion devices: any loss of plasma control on DEMO may result in a disruption which could damage the inner wall of the machine, while operating the device with larger margins against the operational limits would lead to a reduction of the electrical output power. Second, the performance of DEMO control is limited by space restrictions for the implementation of components (optimization of the tritium breeding rate), by lifetime issues for the front-end parts (neutron and gamma radiation, erosion and deposition acting on all components) and by slow, weak and indirect action of the available actuators (plasma shaping, heating and fuelling). The European DEMO conceptual design studies include the development of a reliable control system, since the details of the achievable plasma scenario and the machine design may depend on the actual performance of the control system. In the first phase of development, an initial understanding of the prime choices of diagnostic methods applicable to DEMO, implementation and performance issues, the interrelation with the plasma scenario definition, and the planning of necessary future R&D have been obtained.

  14. Review of fusion DEMO reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yasushi

    1996-01-01

    Fusion DEMO Reactor is defined and the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept is introduced as a typical example of a DEMO reactor. Recent DEMO reactor studies in Japan and abroad are introduced. The DREAM Reactor concept is introduced as an ultimate target of fusion research. (author)

  15. Neutronics studies for the design of the European DEMO vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flammini, Davide, E-mail: davide.flammini@enea.it [ENEA, Fusion Technical Unit, Nuclear Technologies Laboratory, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Villari, Rosaria; Moro, Fabio; Pizzuto, Aldo [ENEA, Fusion Technical Unit, Nuclear Technologies Laboratory, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bachmann, Christian [EUROfusion Consortium, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • MCNP calculation of nuclear heating, damage, helium production and neutron flux in DEMO HCLL and HCPB vacuum vessel at the inboard equatorial plane. • Study of impact of the poloidal gap between blanket modules, for several gap width, on vacuum vessel nuclear quantities. • Effect of the gap on nuclear heating result to be moderate, however high values of nuclear heating are found, even far from the gap with HCLL blanket. • Radiation damage limit of 2.75 DPA is met with a 1 cm wide gap. Helium production results very sensitive to the gap width. • Comparison between HCLL and HCPB blankets is shown for nuclear heating and neutron flux in the vacuum vessel. - Abstract: The DEMO vacuum vessel, a massive water cooled double-walled steel vessel, is located behind breeding blankets and manifolds and it will be subjected to an intense neutron and photon irradiation. Therefore, a proper evaluation of the vessel nuclear heat loads is required to assure adequate cooling and, given the significant lifetime neutron fluence of DEMO, the radiation damage limit of the vessel needs to be carefully controlled. In the present work nuclear heating, radiation damage (DPA), helium production, neutron and photon fluxes have been calculated on the vacuum vessel at the inboard by means of MCNP5 using a 3D Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) DEMO model with 1572 MW of fusion power. In particular, the effect of the poloidal gap between the breeding-blanket segments on vacuum vessel nuclear loads has been estimated varying the gap width from 0 to 5 cm. High values of the nuclear heating (≈1 W/cm{sup 3}), which might cause intense thermal stresses, were obtained in inboard equatorial zone. The effect of the poloidal gap on the nuclear heating resulted to be moderate (within 30%). The radiation damage limit of 2.75 DPA on the vessel is almost met with 1 cm of poloidal gap over DEMO lifetime. A comparison with Helium Cooled Pebble Bed blanket is also provided.

  16. A poloidal field measurement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobes, F.C.

    1989-07-01

    The poloidal field of a tokamak can be determined by observing the light emitted by He + ions injected into the plasma by a perpendicular He 0 beam. These ions will orbit in small circles located where the neutral atom became ionized, and they will remain there for a few microseconds. During this time, some of these ions will also emit light at various spectral lines. The observed spectrum of any of these lines will have a peculiar and very wide shape, and it will be offset (Doppler shifted) with respect to the natural line location. The location and width of the spectral pattern provide independent information about the components of the poloidal field which are parallel and perpendicular to the beam velocity, and this information is local to the point where the light is emitted. For a horizontal beam, these components are b x and b y , respectively. The difference in Doppler shift between two measurement points above one another (at the top and bottom of the beam) is directly proportional to δb x , which in turn is proportional to the transform on that flux surface. Thus, this technique provides a means to measure directly local values of q(r). Simulation studies indicate that accurate measurements can be made in milliseconds. 6 refs., 8 figs

  17. Tokamak poloidal-field systems. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1982-03-01

    Work on the superconducting tokamak poloidal field system (TPFS) program is being redirected. The development of the 20 MJ, 50 kA, 7.5 T superconducting programmed energy storage coil is being terminated. The superconductor for the 20 MJ coil is being processed only to an intermediate state, and manufacture of the epoxy fiberglass dewar is being stopped. Further, development of the TPFS test facility is in abeyance. Change in program emphasis arises from prospective rf plasma current driven or beam heated tokamaks with programmed coil characteristics for the poloidal field being different from those to have been simulated by the 20 MJ coil and from budgetary constraints. Work is reported on the development of the coil, conductor, nonconducting dewar, and test facility to the recent time when the program change was instigated. Work in support of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) and the Fusion Engineering Design (FED) Center is given. Analysis of the experiments on the 400 kJ METS coil test was completed

  18. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux

  19. Demo of Gaze Controlled Flying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Alexandre; Hansen, John Paulin; Scott MacKenzie, I.

    2012-01-01

    Development of a control paradigm for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) is a new challenge to HCI. The demo explores how to use gaze as input for locomotion in 3D. A low-cost drone will be controlled by tracking user’s point of regard (gaze) on a live video stream from the UAV.......Development of a control paradigm for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) is a new challenge to HCI. The demo explores how to use gaze as input for locomotion in 3D. A low-cost drone will be controlled by tracking user’s point of regard (gaze) on a live video stream from the UAV....

  20. PSO-Ensemble Demo Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of the PSO-Ensemble project (FU2101) a demo application has been created. The application use ECMWF ensemble forecasts. Two instances of the application are running; one for Nysted Offshore and one for the total production (except Horns Rev) in the Eltra area. The output...

  1. Progress on DEMO blanket attachment concept with keys and pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizvary, Zsolt; Iglesias, Daniel; Cooper, David; Crowe, Robert; Riccardo, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • DEMO blanket attachment system with keys and pins (without using bolts). • Blanket segments are preloaded by progressively designed springs. • Blanket back plate flexibility has a major impact on spring design. • Mechanical analysis of other components indicates no unresolvable issues. • Thermal analysis indicates acceptable temperatures for the support system. - Abstract: The blanket attachment has to cope with gravity, thermal and electromagnetic loads, also it has to be installed and serviced by remote handling. Pre-stressed components suffer from stress relaxation in irradiated environments such as DEMO. To circumvent this problem pre-stressed component should be either avoided or shielded, and where possible keys and pins should be used. This strategy has been proposed for the DEMO multi-module segments (MMS). The blanket segments are held by two tapered keys each, designed to allow thermal expansions while providing contact with the vacuum vessel and to resist the poloidal and radial moments the latter being dominant at 9.1 MNm inboard and 15 MNm outboard. On the top of the blanket segment there is a pin which provides vertical support. At the bottom another vertical support has to lock them in position after installation and manage the pre-load on the segments. The pre-load is required to deal with the electromagnetic loads during disruption. This is provided by a set of springs, which require shielding as they are preloaded. These are sized to cope with the force (3 MN inboard, 1.4 MN outboard) due to halo currents and the toroidal moment which can reverse. Calculations show that the flexibility of the blanket segment itself plays a significant role in defining the required support system. The blanket segment acts as a preloaded spring and it has to be part of the attachment design as well.

  2. Steady State versus Pulsed Tokamak DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orsitto, F.P., E-mail: francesco.orsitto@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA Unita Tecnica Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Todd, T. [CCFE/Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: The present report deals with a Review of problems for a Steady state(SS) DEMO, related argument is treated about the models and the present status of comparison between the characteristics of DEMO pulsed versus a Steady state device.The studied SS DEMO Models (SLIM CS, PPCS model C EU-DEMO, ARIES-RS) are analyzed from the point of view of the similarity scaling laws and critical issues for a steady state DEMO. A comparison between steady state and pulsed DEMO is therefore carried out: in this context a new set of parameters for a pulsed (6 - 8 hours pulse) DEMO is determined working below the density limit, peak temperature of 20 keV, and requiring a modest improvement in the confinement factor(H{sub IPBy2} = 1.1) with respect to the H-mode. Both parameters density and confinement parameter are lower than the DEMO models presently considered. The concept of partially non-inductive pulsed DEMO is introduced since a pulsed DEMO needs heating and current drive tools for plasma stability and burn control. The change of the main parameter design for a DEMO working at high plasma peak temperatures T{sub e} {approx} 35 keV is analyzed: in this range the reactivity increases linearly with temperature, and a device with smaller major radius (R = 7.5 m) is compatible with high temperature. Increasing temperature is beneficial for current drive efficiency and heat load on divertor, being the synchrotron radiation one of the relevant components of the plasma emission at high temperatures and current drive efficiency increases with temperature. Technology and engineering problems are examined including efficiency and availability R&D issues for a high temperature DEMO. Fatigue and creep-fatigue effects of pulsed operations on pulsed DEMO components are considered in outline to define the R&D needed for DEMO development. (author)

  3. Manufacturing of Nb3Sn Sample Conductor for CFETR Central Solenoid Model Coil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Jing Gang; Wu, Yu; Xiang, Bing Lun; Dai, Chao; Mao, Zhe Hua; Jin, Huan; Liao, Guo Jun; Liu, Fang; Xue, Tianjun; Wei, Zhou Rong; Devred, Arnaud; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) is a new tokamak device, whose magnet system includes the toroidal field, central solenoid (CS), and poloidal field coils. In order to develop the manufacturing process for the full-size CS coil, the CS model coil (CSMC) project was launched first. The

  4. RF DEMO ceramic helium cooled blanket, coolant and energy transformation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.; Leshukov, A.; Poliksha, V.; Popov, A.; Strebkov, Yu.; Borisov, A.; Shatalov, G.; Demidov, V.; Kapyshev, V.

    2004-01-01

    RF DEMO-S reactor is a prototype of commercial fusion reactors for further generation. A blanket is the main element unit of the reactor design. The segment structure is the basis of the ceramic blanket. The segments mounting/dismounting operations are carried out through the vacuum vessel vertical port. The inboard/outboard blanket segment is the modules welded design, which are welded by back plate. The module contains the back plate, the first wall, lateral walls and breeding zone. The 9CrMoVNb steel is used as structural material. The module internal space formed by the first wall, lateral walls and back plate is used for breeding zone arrangement. The breeding zone design based upon the poloidal BIT (Breeder Inside Tube) concept. The beryllium is used as multiplier material and the lithium orthosilicate is used as breeder material. The helium at 0.1 MPa is used as purge gas. The cooling is provided by helium at 10 MPa. The coolant supply/return to the blanket modules are carrying out on the two independent circuits. The performed investigations of possible transformation schemes of DEMO-S blanket heat power into the electricity allowed to make a conclusion about the preferable using of traditional steam-turbine facility in the secondary circuit. (author)

  5. Conceptual design study of the K-DEMO magnet system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keeman, E-mail: kkeeman@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sangjun; Park, Jong Sung; Lee, Chulhee; Im, Kihak; Kim, Hyung Chan; Lee, Gyung-Su [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Neilson, George; Brown, Thomas; Kessel, Charles; Titus, Peter; Zhai, Yuhu [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Perform a preliminary conceptual study for a steady-state Korean DEMO reactor. • Present a preliminary design of TF (toroidal field) magnet. • Present a preliminary design of CS (central solenoid) magnet. • Present a preliminary design of PF (toroidal field) magnet. - Abstract: As the ITER is being constructed, there is a growing anticipation for an earlier realization of fusion energy. A major design philosophy for the initiated conceptual design study for a steady-state Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) is engineering feasibility. A two-staged development plan is envisaged. K-DEMO is designed not only to demonstrate a net electricity generation and a self-sustained tritium cycle, but also to be used, in its initial stage, as a component test facility. Then, in its second stage, a major upgrade is carried out by replacing in-vessel components in order to show a net electricity generation on the order of 500 MWe. After a thorough 0-D system analysis, the major radius and minor radius are chosen to be 6.8 m and 2.1 m, respectively. In order to minimize wave deflection, a top-launch high frequency (>200 GHz) electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) system will be the key system for the current profile control. For matching the high frequency ECCD, a high toroidal field (TF) is required and can be achieved by using high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting conductor. The peak magnetic field reaches to 16 T with the magnetic field at the plasma center above 7 T. Key features of the K-DEMO magnet system include the use of two TF coil winding packs, each of a different conductor design, to reduce the construction cost and save the space for the magnet structure material.

  6. Conceptual design study of the K-DEMO magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keeman; Oh, Sangjun; Park, Jong Sung; Lee, Chulhee; Im, Kihak; Kim, Hyung Chan; Lee, Gyung-Su; Neilson, George; Brown, Thomas; Kessel, Charles; Titus, Peter; Zhai, Yuhu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Perform a preliminary conceptual study for a steady-state Korean DEMO reactor. • Present a preliminary design of TF (toroidal field) magnet. • Present a preliminary design of CS (central solenoid) magnet. • Present a preliminary design of PF (toroidal field) magnet. - Abstract: As the ITER is being constructed, there is a growing anticipation for an earlier realization of fusion energy. A major design philosophy for the initiated conceptual design study for a steady-state Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) is engineering feasibility. A two-staged development plan is envisaged. K-DEMO is designed not only to demonstrate a net electricity generation and a self-sustained tritium cycle, but also to be used, in its initial stage, as a component test facility. Then, in its second stage, a major upgrade is carried out by replacing in-vessel components in order to show a net electricity generation on the order of 500 MWe. After a thorough 0-D system analysis, the major radius and minor radius are chosen to be 6.8 m and 2.1 m, respectively. In order to minimize wave deflection, a top-launch high frequency (>200 GHz) electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) system will be the key system for the current profile control. For matching the high frequency ECCD, a high toroidal field (TF) is required and can be achieved by using high current density Nb_3Sn superconducting conductor. The peak magnetic field reaches to 16 T with the magnetic field at the plasma center above 7 T. Key features of the K-DEMO magnet system include the use of two TF coil winding packs, each of a different conductor design, to reduce the construction cost and save the space for the magnet structure material.

  7. Coil supporting device for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Minoru; Ando, Toshiro; Ota, Mitsuru; Ishimura, Masabumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To lower the bending stress exerted on coils thereby preventing the coils from deformation by branching the outer circumferential support frames of coil support frames disposed at an equal pitch circumferentially to the coils into plurality, and integrally forming them to the inner circumferential support frames. Constitution: Each of the support frames for supporting poloidal coils winding around a vacuum vessel is bisected at the radial midway so that the outer circumferential branches are disposed at an equal pitch and they are formed integrally with the inner circumferential support frames. The inner circumferential support frames are fixed by support posts on a bed and the outer circumferential support frames are mounted to the outer edge of wedge-like support posts. Accordingly, if the coils expand outwardly upon increase in the temperature, the stress exerted on the support frame can be decreased. (Yoshino, Y.)

  8. Preparation of the ITER Poloidal Field Conductor Insert (PFCI) test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanino, R.; Egorov, S.; Kim, K.; Martovetsky, N.; Nunoya, Y.; Okuno, K.; Salpietro, E.; Sborchia, C.; Takahashi, Y.; Weng, P.; Bangasco, M.; Savoldi Richard, L.; Polak, M.; Formisano, A.; Zapretilina, E.; Shikov, A.; Vedernikov, G.; Ciazynski, D.; Zani, L.; Muzzi, L.; Ricci, M.; Deela Corte, A.; Sugimoto, M.; Hamada, K.; Portone, A.; Hurd, F.; Mitchell, N.; Nijhuis, A.; Ilyin, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The Poloidal Field Conductor Insert (PFCI) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has been designed in Europe and is being manufactured at Tesla Engineering, UK, in the frame of a Task Agreement with the ITER International Team. Completion of the PFCI is expected at the beginning of 2005. Then, the coil shall be shipped to JAERI Naka, Japan, and inserted into the bore of the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil, where it should be tested in 2005 to 2006. The PFCI consists of a NbTi dual-channel conductor, almost identical to the ITER PF1 and PF6 design, about 45 m long, with a 50 mm thick square stainless steel jacket, wound in a single-layer solenoid. It should carry up to 50 kA in a field of about 6 T, and it will be cooled by supercritical He at around 4.5 K and 0.6 MPa. An intermediate joint, representative of the ITER PF joints and located at relatively high field, will be an important new item in the test configuration with respect to the previous ITER Insert Coils. The PFCI will be fully instrumented with inductive and resistive heaters, as well as with voltage taps, Hall probes, pick-up coils, temperature sensors, pressure taps, strain and displacement sensors. The test program shall be aimed at DC and pulsed performance assessment of conductor and intermediate joint, AC loss measurement, stability and quench propagation, thermalhydraulic characterization. Here we give an overview of the preparatory work towards the test, including a review of the coil manufacturing and of the available instrumentation, a discussion of the most likely test program items, and a presentation of the supporting modeling and characterization work performed so far. (authors)

  9. The DEMO wall load challenge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wenninger, R.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Bachmann, C.; Barbato, L.; Barrett, T.; Beckers, M.; Biel, W.; Boccaccini, L.; Carralero, D.; Coster, D.; Eich, T.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Firdaouss, M.; Graves, J.; Horáček, Jan; Kovari, M.; Lanthaler, S.; Loschiavo, V.; Lowry, C.; Lux, H.; Maddaluno, G.; Maviglia, F.; Mitteau, R.; Neu, R.; Pfefferle, D.; Schmid, K.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Snicker, A.; Subba, F.; Varje, J.; Zohm, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 046002. ISSN 0029-5515 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : DEMO * power loads * first wall Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa4fb4

  10. Reference data for plasma shaping and magnetic separatrix formation in the JET poloidal field system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzaro, E.; Keegan, B.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis and the design of special equilibrium configurations (plasma with separatrix boundary) can be greatly simplified by a chart of the response of the plasma to currents in the poloidal field coils. This note presents this information for some interesting cases, namely for elongated plasmas eventually transformed into double null or in single null separatrix configurations. The calculations are made using the latest edition of the JET equilibrium code ''INVERSX'' including the detailed permeability characteristics of the iron core. (author)

  11. Stochasticity about a poloidal divertor separatrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, D.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Prager, S.C.; Park, W.

    1986-10-01

    The stochasticization of the magnetic separatrix due to the presence of a helical perturbation in a poloidal divertor tokamak is illustrated by a numerical computation which traces magnetic field lines

  12. Concept for a vertical maintenance remote handling system for multi module blanket segments in DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, M.; Sykes, N.; Cooper, D.; Iglesias, D.; Bastow, R.; Loving, A.; Harman, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •A conceptual architectural model for a vertical maintenance DEMO is presented. •Novel concepts for a set of DEMO remote handling equipment are put forward. •Remote maintenance of a multi module segment blanket is found to be feasible. •The criticality of space in the vertical port is highlighted. -- Abstract: The anticipated high neutron flux, and the consequent damage to plasma-facing components in DEMO, results in the need to regularly replace the tritium breeding and radiation shielding blanket. The current European multi module segment (MMS) blanket concept favours a less invasive small port entry maintenance system over large sector transport concepts, because of the reduced impact on other tokamak systems – particularly the magnetic coils. This paper presents a novel conceptual remote maintenance strategy for a Vertical Maintenance Scheme DEMO, incorporating substantiated designs for an in-vessel mover, to detach and attach the blanket segments, and cask-housed vertical maintenance devices to open and close access ports, cut and join service connections, and extract blanket segments from the vessel. In addition, a conceptual architectural model for DEMO was generated to capture functional and spatial interfaces between the remote maintenance equipment and other systems. Areas of further study are identified in order to comprehensively establish the feasibility of the proposed maintenance system

  13. Development of a new error field correction coil (C-coil) for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.I.; Scoville, J.T.

    1995-12-01

    The C-coil recently installed on the DIII-D tokamak was developed to reduce the error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the existing coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. First results from C-coil experiments include stable operation in a 1.6 MA plasma with a density less than 1.0 x 10 13 cm -3 , nearly a factor of three lower density than that achievable without the C-coil. The C-coil has also been used in magnetic braking of the plasma rotation and high energy particle confinement experiments. The C-coil system consists of six individual saddle coils, each 60 degree wide toroidally, spanning the midplane of the vessel with a vertical height of 1.6 m. The coils are located at a major radius of 3.2 m, just outside of the toroidal field coils. The actual shape and geometry of each coil section varied somewhat from the nominal dimensions due to the large number of obstructions to the desired coil path around the already crowded tokamak. Each coil section consists of four turns of 750 MCM insulated copper cable banded with stainless steel straps within the web of a 3 in. x 3 in. stainless steel angle frame. The C-coil structure was designed to resist peak transient radial forces (up to 1,800 Nm) exerted on the coil by the toroidal and ploidal fields. The coil frames were supported from existing poloidal field coil case brackets, coil studs, and various other structures on the tokamak

  14. Effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio due to a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Fischer, U.; Dies, J.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports results of MCNP-5 calculations, with the nuclear data library FENDL-2.1, to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) due to a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna integrated in the blanket of a DEMO fusion power reactor. A preliminary design of the antenna with a reference configuration of the DEMO reactor was used together with a parametric analysis for different parameters that strongly affect the TBR. These are the type of breeding blanket (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed, Helium Cooled Lithium Lead and Water Cooled Lithium Lead), the covering ratio of the straps of the antenna (the ratio between the surface of all the straps and the projected surface of the antenna slot: 0.49, 0.72 and 0.94), the antenna radial thickness (20 cm and 40 cm), the thickness of the straps (2 cm, 4 cm and a double layer of 0.2 cm plus 2.5 cm with the composition of the First Wall), and finally the poloidal position of the antenna (0°, which is the equatorial port, 40° and 90°, which is the upper port). For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidaly at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m and a total First Wall surface of 67 m"2, the reduction of the TBR is −0.35% for a HCPB blanket concept, −0.53% for a HCLL blanket concept and −0.51% for a WCLL blanket concept. In all cases covered by the parametric analysis, the loss of TBR remains below 0.61%. Such a distributed ICRF antenna has thus only a marginal effect on the TBR for a DEMO reactor.

  15. Effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio due to a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A., E-mail: albert.garcia.hp@gmail.com [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Dies, J. [Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    This thesis reports results of MCNP-5 calculations, with the nuclear data library FENDL-2.1, to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) due to a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna integrated in the blanket of a DEMO fusion power reactor. A preliminary design of the antenna with a reference configuration of the DEMO reactor was used together with a parametric analysis for different parameters that strongly affect the TBR. These are the type of breeding blanket (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed, Helium Cooled Lithium Lead and Water Cooled Lithium Lead), the covering ratio of the straps of the antenna (the ratio between the surface of all the straps and the projected surface of the antenna slot: 0.49, 0.72 and 0.94), the antenna radial thickness (20 cm and 40 cm), the thickness of the straps (2 cm, 4 cm and a double layer of 0.2 cm plus 2.5 cm with the composition of the First Wall), and finally the poloidal position of the antenna (0°, which is the equatorial port, 40° and 90°, which is the upper port). For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidaly at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m and a total First Wall surface of 67 m{sup 2}, the reduction of the TBR is −0.35% for a HCPB blanket concept, −0.53% for a HCLL blanket concept and −0.51% for a WCLL blanket concept. In all cases covered by the parametric analysis, the loss of TBR remains below 0.61%. Such a distributed ICRF antenna has thus only a marginal effect on the TBR for a DEMO reactor.

  16. Active transfer of poloidal magnetic energy during plasma disruptions in J-TEXT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Jun; Rao, Bo; Chen, Zhongyong; Li, Xiaolong; Xu, Wendi; Pan, Yuan; Yu, Kexun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An alternative plasma disruption mitigation method by transferring partial poloidal magnetic energy out of the vacuum vessel has been presented in this paper. • This method can reduced the magnetic energy dissipated inside the vacuum vessel during disruption and mitigated the disruption damage. • This method has been experimentally verified in J-TEXT with an experiment system set up. • According to the experimental results, the magnetic energy dissipated inside the vacuum vessel during disruption can be reduced by 20% or more and the loop voltage can be reduced by 58%. - Abstract: The magnitude of the damaging effects of plasma disruptions on vacuum vessel (VV) components increases with the thermal energy and poloidal magnetic energy dissipated inside the VV. This study focuses on an alternative method, by which partial poloidal magnetic energy is transferred out of the VV. The quantity of the poloidal magnetic energy dissipated inside the VV (W_d_i_s) can be reduced with this method, and the damaging effects can be mitigated. Partial magnetic energy is transferred based on magnetic coupling by a group of energy transfer coils (ETCs) that are coupled with the plasma current. This method, which is called magnetic energy transfer (MET), has been experimentally verified in J-TEXT. W_d_i_s can be reduced by approximately 20%, and the loop voltage can be reduced by 58%. MET is established as a novel, promising, and effective plasma disruption mitigation method.

  17. Design study of fusion Demo plant at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, K.; Nishio, S.; Enoeda, M.

    2006-01-01

    Three options of fusion Demo plant are proposed characterized by functions of the center solenoid (Cs). The prime option uses a downsized CS, which does not provide sufficient V-s for plasma current ramp-up but supplies enough coil current for plasma shaping. This option produces a fusion output of 3 GW with a major radius of 5.5 m, aspect ratio of 2.6, normalized beta of 4.3 and maximum field of 16.4 T. The estimated reactor weight is lighter than that of other conventional tokamak reactors, suggesting an economic advantage. The plant uses rather conservative technologies such as Nb 3 Al superconductor, water-cooled solid breeder blanket, low activation ferritic steel as the structural material and tungsten monoblock divertor plate. The design philosophy and key issues related to the constituent technologies of the plant are described in the present paper

  18. Neoclassical poloidal and toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.B.; Diamond, P.H.; Groebner, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Explicit expressions for the neoclassical poloidal and toroidal rotation speeds of primary ion and impurity species are derived via the Hirshman and Sigmar moment approach. The rotation speeds of the primary ion can be significantly different from those of impurities in various interesting cases. The rapid increase of impurity poloidal rotation in the edge region of H-mode discharges in tokamaks can be explained by a rapid steepening of the primary ion pressure gradient. Depending on ion collisionality, the poloidal rotation speed of the primary ions at the edge can be quite small and the flow direction may be opposite to that of the impurities. This may cast considerable doubts on current L to H bifurcation models based on primary ion poloidal rotation only. Also, the difference between the toroidal rotation velocities of primary ions and impurities is not negligible in various cases. In Ohmic plasmas, the parallel electric field induces a large impurity toroidal rotation close to the magnetic axis, which seems to agree with experimental observations. In the ion banana and plateau regime, there can be non-negligible disparities between primary ion and impurity toroidal rotation velocities due to the ion density and temperature gradients. Detailed analytic expressions for the primary ion and impurity rotation speeds are presented, and the methodology for generalization to the case of several impurity species is also presented for future numerical evaluation

  19. Poloidal variation of viscous forces in the banana collisionality regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.P.; Callen, J.D.

    1992-12-01

    The poloidal variation of the parallel viscous and heat viscous forces are determined for the first time using a rigorous Chapman- Enskog-like approach that has been developed recently. It is shown that the poloidal variation is approximately proportional to the poloidal distribution of the trapped particles, which are concentrated on the outer edge (large major radius side) of the tokamak

  20. Poloidal field leakage optimization in ETE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Carlos Shinya; Montes, Antonio

    1996-12-01

    A very simple but efficient numerical algorithm is used to minimize the Ohmic coil field leakage into the plasma region of the tokamak ETE. After few interactions the code provides the positions and the current required for two pairs of compensation coils. Resulting optimum field intensity distribution is presented and commented. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Poloidal field leakage optimization in ETE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Carlos Shinya; Montes, Antonio.

    1996-01-01

    A very simple but efficient numerical algorithm is used to minimize the Ohmic coil field leakage into the plasma region of the tokamak ETE. After few interactions the code provides the positions and the current required for two pairs of compensation coils. Resulting optimum field intensity distribution is presented and commented. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Poloidal field equilibrium calculations for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalafallah, A.K.

    1976-01-01

    The structure of the JET 2D Poloidal Field Analysis Package is discussed. The ability to cope with different plasma current density distributions (skin, flat or peaked), each with a range of Beta poloidal values and varying plasma shapes is a new feature of these calculations. It is possible to construct instant-by-instant pictures of equilibrium configurations for various plasma build up scenarios taking into account the level of flux in the iron core and return limbs. The equilibrium configurations are calculated for two possible sequences of plasma build up. Examples of the magnetic field calculations being carried out under contract to JET at the Rutherford Laboratory, using a 3D code, are also given

  3. Considerations on the DEMO pellet fuelling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, P.T., E-mail: peter.lang@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Day, Ch. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fable, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Igitkhanov, Y. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Köchl, F. [Association EURATOM-Ö AW/ATI, Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Mooney, R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pegourie, B. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ploeckl, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Wenninger, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); EFDA, Garching (Germany); Zohm, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Considerations are made for a core particle fuelling system covering all DEMO requirements. • Particle deposition beyond the pedestal top is needed to achieve efficient fuelling. • Conventional pellet technology enabling launching from the torus inboard side can be used. • Efforts have been taken for integrating a suitable pellet guiding system into the EU DEMO model. • In addition, further techniques bearing potential for advanced fuelling performance are considered. - Abstract: The Demonstration Fusion Power Reactor DEMO is the step foreseen to bridge the gap between ITER and the first commercial fusion power plant. One key element in the European work plan for DEMO is the elaboration of a conceptual design for a suitable core particle fuelling system. First considerations for such a system are presented in this contribution. Following the well-considered ITER solution, most analysis performed in this study assumes conventional pellet technology will be used for the fuelling system. However, taking advantage of the less compressed time frame for the DEMO project, several other techniques thought to bear potential for advanced fuelling performance are considered as well. In a first, basic analysis all actuation parameters at hand and their implications on the fuelling performance were considered. Tentative transport modeling of a reference scenario strongly indicates only particles deposited inside the plasma pedestal allow for efficient fuelling. Shallow edge fuelling results in an unbearable burden on the fuel cycle. Sufficiently deep particle deposition seems technically achievable, provided pellets are launched from the torus inboard at sufficient speed. All components required for a DEMO pellet system capable for high speed inboard pellet launch are already available or can be developed in due time with reasonable efforts. Furthermore, steps to integrate this solution into the EU DEMO model are taken.

  4. Considerations on the DEMO pellet fuelling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, P.T.; Day, Ch.; Fable, E.; Igitkhanov, Y.; Köchl, F.; Mooney, R.; Pegourie, B.; Ploeckl, B.; Wenninger, R.; Zohm, H.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Considerations are made for a core particle fuelling system covering all DEMO requirements. • Particle deposition beyond the pedestal top is needed to achieve efficient fuelling. • Conventional pellet technology enabling launching from the torus inboard side can be used. • Efforts have been taken for integrating a suitable pellet guiding system into the EU DEMO model. • In addition, further techniques bearing potential for advanced fuelling performance are considered. - Abstract: The Demonstration Fusion Power Reactor DEMO is the step foreseen to bridge the gap between ITER and the first commercial fusion power plant. One key element in the European work plan for DEMO is the elaboration of a conceptual design for a suitable core particle fuelling system. First considerations for such a system are presented in this contribution. Following the well-considered ITER solution, most analysis performed in this study assumes conventional pellet technology will be used for the fuelling system. However, taking advantage of the less compressed time frame for the DEMO project, several other techniques thought to bear potential for advanced fuelling performance are considered as well. In a first, basic analysis all actuation parameters at hand and their implications on the fuelling performance were considered. Tentative transport modeling of a reference scenario strongly indicates only particles deposited inside the plasma pedestal allow for efficient fuelling. Shallow edge fuelling results in an unbearable burden on the fuel cycle. Sufficiently deep particle deposition seems technically achievable, provided pellets are launched from the torus inboard at sufficient speed. All components required for a DEMO pellet system capable for high speed inboard pellet launch are already available or can be developed in due time with reasonable efforts. Furthermore, steps to integrate this solution into the EU DEMO model are taken.

  5. Poloidal profiles and transport during turbulent heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascheroni, P.L.

    1977-01-01

    The current penetration stage of a turbulently heated tokamak is modeled. The basic formulae are written in slab geometry since the dominant anomalous transport has a characteristic frequency much larger than the bounce frequency. Thus, the basic framework is provided by the Maxwell and fluid equations, with classical and anomalous transport. Quasi-neutrality is used. It is shown that the anomalous collision frequency dominates the anomalous viscosity and thermal conductivity, and that the convective wave transport can be neglected. For these numerical estimates, the leading term in the quasi-linear series is used. During the current penetration stage the distribution function for the particles will depart from a single Maxwellian type. Hence, the first objective was to numerically compare calculated poloidal magnetic field profiles with measured, published poloidal profiles. The poloidal magnetic field has been calculated using a code which handles the anomalous collision frequency self-consistently. The agreement is good, and it is concluded that the current penetration stage can be satisfactorily described by this model

  6. Critical Design Factors for Sector Transport Maintenance in DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utoh, H.; Someya, Y.; Tobita, K.; Asakura, N.; Hoshino, K.; Nakamura, M., E-mail: uto.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Maintenance is a critical issue for fusion DEMO reactor because the design conditions and requirements of DEMO maintenance scheme are different from that of ITER remote handling. The sector transport maintenance scheme has advantages to maintain blankets and divertors without the use of sophisticated remote handling devices including sensitive devices to radiation in the reactor. SlimCS designed in JAEA adopts the sector transport maintenance scheme in which every sector is pulled out horizontally through a port between TF coils. A critical design issue for the horizontal sector transport maintenance scheme is how to support an enormous turnover force of the toroidal field (TF) coils. We propose following two options; first option is the horizontal transport maintenance scheme in which every sector is pulled out through four horizontal ports connected with the corridor. Second option is the vertical sector transport maintenance scheme with small vertical maintenance ports (total: 6 ports). The new horizontal sector transport limited in the number of maintenance ports is a more realistic maintenance scheme, and the key engineering issue is the transferring mechanism of sector in the vacuum vessel. In the maintenance scenario, the key design factors are the cool down time in reactor and the cooling method in maintenance scheme for keeping components under operation temperature. By one-dimensional heat conduction analysis, the sector should be transported to hot cell within 40 hours in the case the cool down time is one month. In the horizontal sector transport maintenance, the maintenance time including removal of cooling piping, drain of cooling water and sector transport to hot cell is about 32 hours. Furthermore, the tritium release in the sector transport can be suppressed because the components temperature drops by forced-air cooling system. This paper mainly focuses on a sector transport maintenance scheme from the aspects of high plant availability

  7. Poloidal and toroidal heat flux distribution in the CCT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Dhir, V.K.; Taylor, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma heat flux to the Faraday shield panels of the UCLA Continuous Current Tokamak (CCT) has been measured calorimetrically in order to identify the dominant parameters affecting the spatial distribution of heat deposition. Three heating methods were investigated: audio frequency discharge cleaning, RF heating, and AC ohmic. Significant poloidal asymmetry is present in the heat flux distribution. On the average, the outer panels received 25-30% greater heat flux than the inner ones, with the ratio of maximum to minimum values attaining a difference of more than a factor of 2. As a diagnostic experiment the current to a selected toroidal field coil was reduced in order to locally deflect the toroidal field lines outward in a ripple-like fashion. Greatly enhanced heat deposition (up to a factor of 4) was observed at this location on the outside Faraday panels. The enhancement was greatest for conditions of low toroidal field and low neutral pressure, leading to low plasma densities, for which Coulomb collisions are the smallest. An exponential model based on a heat flux e-folding length describes the experimentally found localization of thermal energy quite adequately. (orig.)

  8. Initial DEMO tokamak design configuration studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Christian, E-mail: christian.bachmann@efda.org [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aiello, G. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R. [ENEA/CREATE, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Arbeiter, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Aubert, J. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Boccaccini, L.; Carloni, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Federici, G. [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Kovari, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Li Puma, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Loving, A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maione, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Mattei, M. [ENEA/CREATE, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mazzone, G. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Meszaros, B. [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Riccardo, V. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A definition of main DEMO requirements. • A description of the DEMO tokamak design configuration. • A description of issues yet to be solved. - Abstract: To prepare the DEMO conceptual design phase a number of physics and engineering assessments were carried out in recent years in the frame of EFDA concluding in an initial design configuration of a DEMO tokamak. This paper gives an insight into the identified engineering requirements and constraints and describes their impact on the selection of the technologies and design principles of the main tokamak components. The EU DEMO program aims at making best use of the technologies developed for ITER (e.g., magnets, vessel, cryostat, and to some degree also the divertor). However, other systems in particular the breeding blanket require design solutions and advanced technologies that will only partially be tested in ITER. The main differences from ITER include the requirement to breed, to extract, to process and to recycle the tritium needed for plasma operation, the two orders of magnitude larger lifetime neutron fluence, the consequent radiation dose levels, which limit remote maintenance options, and the requirement to use low-activation steel for in-vessel components that also must operate at high temperature for efficient energy conversion.

  9. A method for determining poloidal rotation from poloidal asymmetry in toroidal rotation (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrystal, C., E-mail: chrystal@fusion.gat.com [Department of Physics, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Lao, L. L.; Pace, D. C. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new diagnostic has been developed on DIII-D that determines the impurity poloidal rotation from the poloidal asymmetry in the toroidal angular rotation velocity. This asymmetry is measured with recently added tangential charge exchange viewchords on the high-field side of the tokamak midplane. Measurements are made on co- and counter-current neutral beams, allowing the charge exchange cross section effect to be measured and eliminating the need for atomic physics calculations. The diagnostic implementation on DIII-D restricts the measurement range to the core (r/a < 0.6) where, relative to measurements made with the vertical charge exchange system, the spatial resolution is improved. Significant physics results have been obtained with this new diagnostic; for example, poloidal rotation measurements that significantly exceed neoclassical predictions.

  10. Pre-conceptual studies and R and D for DEMO superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzone, Pierluigi, E-mail: pierluigi.bruzzone@psi.ch

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of DEMO parameters vs. ITER for TF coils. • Hybridization of winding pack, Nb/Nb{sub 3}Sn, by graded layer winding. • Use of react and wind method opposite to wind and react with related advantages. • Feasibility, reliability and cost competitiveness for DEMO. - Abstract: The DEMO plant will demonstrate by mid century the feasibility of electric power generation by nuclear fusion. Since 2011, conceptual design studies are coordinated by the EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) Division, with the aim of identifying requirements, propose design approaches and start R and D for the magnet system of DEMO. The input and generic boundary conditions are given by the system codes: the major radius of the tokamak is about 9 m. The proposed operating current at 13.6 T peak field is 82 kA, placing the DEMO TF conductor at substantially higher performance compared to ITER TF (68 kA/11.5 T). The innovative winding layout is a graded, layer wound with Nb{sub 3}Sn/NbTi hybridization, aiming at minimizing the size and the cost of the superconductor. Two options are considered for the Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor: one a “wind and react” cable-in-conduit (CICC) with reduced void fraction and rectangular shape. The other conductor is a “react and wind” flat cable with copper segregation and thick steel conduit assembled by longitudinal weld. The conductor designs were first drafted in 2012 and updated in 2013 based on a first round of assessments, which includes electromagnetic, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical analysis. The manufacture of full size prototype conductors is planned in 2014. The technical requirement of the DEMO superconducting magnets is highlighted in comparison to ITER and other fusion devices. The large size of the DEMO tokamak is the main challenge for the demonstration of the feasibility of power generation by fusion. Together with the technical issues, the cost of the superconducting magnets will be eventually the

  11. On the definition of a DEMO (demonstration) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, H.C.; Challender, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is an appendix to a study of the reactor relevance of the NET design concept. The latter study examines whether the technologies and design principles proposed for NET can be directly extrapolated to a demonstration (DEMO) reactor. The authors have suggested a definition of a DEMO, and listed what they considered to be the most important implications of this definition. A table of parameters is included comparing published DEMO's with typical commercial reactor and 'pre-DEMO' studies. (U.K.)

  12. Neutronic design analyses for a dual-coolant blanket concept: Optimization for a fusion reactor DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palermo, I.; Gómez-Ros, J.M.; Veredas, G.; Sanz, J.; Sedano, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dual-Coolant He/Pb15.7Li breeding blanket for a DEMO fusion reactor is studied. ► An iterative process optimizes neutronic responses minimizing reactor dimension. ► A 3D toroidally symmetric geometry has been generated from the CAD model. ► Overall TBR values support the feasibility of the conceptual model considered. ► Power density in TF coils is below load limit for quenching. - Abstract: The generation of design specifications for a DEMO reactor, including breeding blanket (BB), vacuum vessel (VV) and magnetic field coils (MFC), requires a consistent neutronic optimization of structures between plasma and MFC. This work targets iteratively to generate these neutronic specifications for a Dual-Coolant He/Pb15.7Li breeding blanket design. The iteration process focuses on the optimization of allowable space between plasma scrapped-off-layer and VV in order to generate a MFC/VV/BB/plasma sustainable configuration with minimum global system volumes. Two VV designs have been considered: (1) a double-walled option with light-weight stiffeners and (2) a thick massive one. The optimization process also involves VV materials, looking to warrant radiation impact operational limits on the MFC. The resulting nuclear responses: peak nuclear heating in toroidal field (TF) coil, tritium breeding ratio (TBR), power amplification factor and helium production in the structural material are provided.

  13. Versatile Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) on Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a new Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) engineered for a chemical engineering junior-level Heat Transfer course. This new DEMo learning tool is versatile, fairly inexpensive, and portable such that it can be positioned on student desks throughout a classroom. The DEMo system can illustrate conduction of various materials,…

  14. Tokamak poloidal field systems. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Work is reported on the development of superconducting tokamak poloidal field system (TPFS) program. Progress is discussed on the design of the 20 MJ, 50 kA, 7.5 T superconducting pulsed energy storage coil to be operated in a bipolar mode from +7.5 T to -7.5 T in an energy transfer period of 1.5 to 5 s in 1982 followed by extensive cyclic testing. The facility to conduct the tests uses a traction motor energy transfer system and a nonconducting dewar. Status of the hardware development for the TPFS program is presented. Current interrupter development and testing for protection and energy transfer circuits are also presented. The 400 kJ METS coil test results are given

  15. Mechanical impacts of poloidal eddy currents on the continuous vacuum vessel of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Sang Ryul; Yoon, Byung Joo.

    1996-11-01

    Poloidal eddy currents are induced on the continuous torus vacuum vessel by changes of the toroidal field during the machine start-up (toroidal field coil charge), shut-down (toroidal field coil discharge) and plasma disruption (plasma diamagnetism change). Analytic forms for the eddy currents flowing on the vessel, consequent pressures and forces acting on it are presented in this report. The results are applied to typical operation modes of the KT-2 tokamak. Stress analysis for two typical operation modes of toroidal field damping during a machine shut-gown and plasma energy quench during a plasma disruption were carried out using 3D FEM code (ANSYS 5.2). (author). 5 tabs., 22 figs., 9 refs

  16. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald E. Bell and Russell Feder

    2010-06-04

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  17. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Andrew, Y.; Crombe, K.

    2007-01-01

    that the carbon poloidal velocity can be an order of magnitude above the neo-classical estimate within the ITB. This significantly affects the calculated radial electric field and therefore, the E x B flow shear used for example in transport simulations. Both the Weiland model and GLF23 reproduce the onset......, location and strength of the ITB well when the experimental poloidal velocity is used while they do not predict the formation of the ITB using the neo-classical poloidal velocity in time-dependent transport simulation. The most plausible explanation for the generation of the anomalous poloidal velocity...... is the turbulence driven flow through the Reynolds stress. Both CUTIE and TRB turbulence codes show the existence of an anomalous poloidal velocity, being significantly larger than the neo-classical values. And similarly to experiments, the poloidal velocity profiles peak in the vicinity of the ITB and seem...

  18. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Ronald E.; Feder, Russell

    2010-01-01

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  19. Bounds on poloidal kinetic energy in plane layer convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, A.

    2017-12-01

    A numerical method is presented that conveniently computes upper bounds on heat transport and poloidal energy in plane layer convection for infinite and finite Prandtl numbers. The bounds obtained for the heat transport coincide with earlier results. These bounds imply upper bounds for the poloidal energy, which follow directly from the definitions of dissipation and energy. The same constraints used for computing upper bounds on the heat transport lead to improved bounds for the poloidal energy.

  20. Evaluation of EM loads distribution on DEMO blanket segments and their effect on mechanical integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maione, Ivan Alessio; Zeile, Christian; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Vaccaro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two DEMO 2015 ANSYS FEM models (for EM and structural analysis) have been implemented based on the EU-HCPB concept. • Lorentz’s forces have been calculated and their impact on the segment structure has been evaluated. • EM loads show a predominant total radial moment due to the high toroidal magnetic field (in comparison with the poloidal one). • A preliminary assessment of the primary stresses according the RCC-MRx code indicates the ability of the segments to resist the EM forces. - Abstract: This work is aimed to analyze the EM internal forces distribution on the blanket system (blankets modules and segment back supporting structure) of the EU PPPT DEMO 2015 reactor configuration. In order to validate their impact on the segment structure, an EM analysis is conducted using a simplified plasma central disruption. The calculated Lorentz’s forces distributions are then used as input for structural analyses focusing on the mechanical integrity of the segment back supporting structure. In particular, the electrical and structural assumptions used in this work are based on the HCPB blanket design developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. A preliminary assessment of the primary stresses according the design code RCC-MRx indicates the ability of the segments to resist the EM forces, where the lowest margin is given by the immediate plastic instability criterion on the inboard segment with 14%.

  1. COMPASS magnetic field coils and structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossland, R.T.; Booth, J.A.; Hayward, R.J.; Keogh, P.; Pratt, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    COMPASS is a new experimental toroidal assembly of compact design and with a wide range of physics objectives. It is required to operate either as a Tokamak or as a Reversed Field Pinch with interchangeable circular and dee-section vacuum vessels. The Toroidal field is produced by 16 rectangular coils of 4 turns with tapered conductors on the inside which nest together to form a vault to resist the centering forces. The coils are designed to produce a maximum field on axis of 2.1T which requires a current of 91 kA per turn. Two central solenoids and five pairs of coils symmetrically positioned above and below the machine equator provide the poloidal field. Both coil systems are supported form a mechanical support structure which surrounds the machine. This is primarily designed to resist out-of-plane forces on the TF coils but also acts as the base support for the PF coils and vacuum vessels. An illustration of the COMPASS Load Assembly is given and shows the D-shaped vacuum vessel, the major components and the various field windings

  2. Plasma residual poloidal rotation in TCABR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severo, J.H.F.; Nascimento, I.C.; Tsypin, V.S.; Galvao, R.M.O.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the first measurement of the radial profiles of plasma poloidal and toroidal rotation performed on the TCABR tokamak for a collisional plasma (Pfirsch-Schluter regime), using Doppler shift of carbon spectral lines, measured with a high precision optical spectrometer. The results for poloidal rotation show a maximum velocity of (4.5±1.0)·10 3 m/s at r ∼ 2/3a, (a - limiter radius), in the direction of the diamagnetic electron drift. Within the error limits, reasonable agreement is obtained with calculations using the neoclassical theory for a collisional plasma, except near the plasma edge, as expected. For toroidal rotation, the radial profile shows that the velocity decreases from a counter-current value of (20 ± 1) · 10 3 m/s for the plasma core to a co-current value of (2.0 ± 1.0) · 10 3 m/s near the limiter. An agreement within a factor 2, for the plasma core rotation, is obtained with calculations using the model proposed by Kim, Diamond and Groebner. (author)

  3. Objective Provision Tree for K-DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myung-suk; Heo, Gyunyoung; Kim, Hyoung-chan

    2014-01-01

    In current nuclear field based on technology-neutral approach, safety principles and design have been considered for Generation IV (Gen-IV) nuclear power plants in parallel. This strategy can save resource, time, and manpower while keeping achievable safety. For this reason, the studies related with safety affecting significant design parameters for planned construction or fusion plants was needed and required even though K-DEMO is staying in pre-conceptual design phase. Objective Provision Tree (OPT) is one of the tools of Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM) developed by Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) for design and assessment of Gen-IV. This is suitable tool to recognize and investigate safety issues from previous engineering experience. The purpose of this paper is to suggest multiple barriers/critical safety function and to describe the current status of the OPT for the conceptual design of K-DEMO. In this paper, critical safety functions were defined and OPT for K-DEMO was described and performed. We have carried out researches related to safety for fusion power plant in collaboration with the academies funded by NFRI during the past 4 years. As part of this research, Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM), which was used to develop GEN-IV nuclear systems, was used to determine the technical safety issues and regulatory requirements for K-DEMO. OPT is one of ISAM tools

  4. Constructing a Tibetan Demos in Exile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brox, Trine

    2012-01-01

    homeland. Two specific instances of the construction of a transnational exile demos are investigated: citizenship and political representation. The Tibetan Government-in-Exile's formalized idea of citizenship builds upon ideals of equal and loyal members who form a single unit bounded by a common cause...

  5. Efficiency of water coolant for DEMO divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetzer, Renate; Igitkhanov, Yuri; Bazylev, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, water-cooled divertor concepts have been developed for limited incident fluxes without taking into account transient power loadings. In this paper we analyzed the efficiency of water as a coolant for the particular PFC tungsten monoblock shield with a cooling tube made from Cu alloy (Cu OFHC) as a laminate adjacent to W and a low activation martensitic steel (Eurofer) as inner tube contacting the coolant. Thermal analysis is carried out by using the code MEMOS, which simulates W armour damage under the repetitive ELM heat loads. We consider cooling conditions which allow one to keep relatively high material temperatures (in the range 300–600 °C) thus minimizing Eurofer embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Expected DEMO I and DEMO II heat loads including type I ELMs are found to cause melting of the W surface during unmitigated ELMs. By mitigation of the ELMs melting of W is avoided. DEMO I operation under these conditions is save for cooling at water pressure 15.5 MPa and temperature 325 °C, while for DEMO II with mitigated ELMs the critical heat flux is exceeded and safe operation is not provided.

  6. Efficiency of water coolant for DEMO divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetzer, Renate, E-mail: renate.fetzer@kit.edu; Igitkhanov, Yuri; Bazylev, Boris

    2015-10-15

    Up to now, water-cooled divertor concepts have been developed for limited incident fluxes without taking into account transient power loadings. In this paper we analyzed the efficiency of water as a coolant for the particular PFC tungsten monoblock shield with a cooling tube made from Cu alloy (Cu OFHC) as a laminate adjacent to W and a low activation martensitic steel (Eurofer) as inner tube contacting the coolant. Thermal analysis is carried out by using the code MEMOS, which simulates W armour damage under the repetitive ELM heat loads. We consider cooling conditions which allow one to keep relatively high material temperatures (in the range 300–600 °C) thus minimizing Eurofer embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Expected DEMO I and DEMO II heat loads including type I ELMs are found to cause melting of the W surface during unmitigated ELMs. By mitigation of the ELMs melting of W is avoided. DEMO I operation under these conditions is save for cooling at water pressure 15.5 MPa and temperature 325 °C, while for DEMO II with mitigated ELMs the critical heat flux is exceeded and safe operation is not provided.

  7. European blanket development for a demo reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.; Anzidei, L.

    1994-01-01

    There are four breeding blanket concepts for a fusion DEMO reactor under development within the framework of the fusion technology programme of the European Union (EU). This paper describes the design of these concepts, the accompanying R + D programme and the status of the development. (authors). 8 figs., 1 tab

  8. Simulations with COREDIV Code of DEMO Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorski, R.; Stankiewicz, R.; Ivanova-Stanik, I., E-mail: roman.zagorski@ipplm.pl [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: The reduction of divertor target power load due to radiation of sputtered and externally seeded impurities in fusion reactor is investigated in this paper. The approach is based on integrated numerical modelling of DEMO discharges using the COREDIV code, which self-consistently solves 1D radial transport equations of plasma and impurities in the core region and 2D multifluid transport in the SOL. The model is fully self-consistent with respect to both the effects of impurities on the alpha-power level and the interaction between seeded and intrinsic impurities. The code has been already successfully benchmarked with the data from present day experiments (JET, ADEX). Calculations have been performed for inductive DEMO scenario and DEMO Steady-State configuration with tungsten walls and Ar seeding. In case of DEMO Steady-State scenario strong increase of Z{sub eff} and significant reduction of the alpha power are observed with the increase of Ar influx which is caused by the decrease of fuel ions density due to the dilution effect. It leads to the reduction of the target plate heat loads but surprisingly the radiation level remains almost constant with the increased seeding which is the result of the interplay between the energy losses and tungsten source due to sputtering processes. It has been found that the W radiation is the dominant energy loss mechanism and it accounts for 90% of all radiation losses. In case of pulsed DEMO scenario, it appears that the helium accumulation might be a serious problem. Even without seeding the resulting Z{sub eff} is very large (> 2.6) and consequently only relatively weak seeding can be applied for pulsed scenario. It is found that helium accumulation depends strongly on the transport model used for helium, if the helium diffusion is increased than the accumulation effect is mitigated. (author)

  9. Structural analysis of the NET toroidal field coils and conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.; Collier, D.; Gori, R.

    1989-01-01

    The NET toroidal field coils will utilise A15-type superconductor at 4.2 K to generate fields up to 11.5 T. The superconductor strands themselves are sensitive to strain, which causes degradation of their current carrying capacity, and thus the detailed behaviour of the coil conductor must be analysied so that the strian can be minimised. This analysis must include the manufacturing processes of the conductor as well as the normal and abnormal loperational loads. The conductor will be insulated and bonded by glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin, with limited bonding shear strength, and the overall support of the complete coil system must be designed to reduce these shear stresses. The coils will be subjected to pulse loads form the poloidal field coils, and analysis of the slip between the various coil components, such as conductors and the coil case, giving rise to frictional heating and possible loss of superconducting properties is another important factor, which has been investigated by a number of stress analyses. The manufacturing, thermal and normal magnetic loads on the coils and the analysis leading to the proposed structural design are described. In addition to the normal operating conditions, there is a range of abnormal load conditions which could result from electrical or mechanical faults on the coils. The effect of these potential faults has been analysed and the coil design modified to prevent catastrophic structural failure. (author). 13 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Poloidal ohmic heating in a multipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holly, D.J.; Prager, S.C.; Sprott, J.C.

    1982-07-01

    The feasibility of using poloidal currents to heat plasmas confined by a multipole field has been examined experimentally in Tokapole II, operating the machine as a toroidal octupole. The plasma resistivity ranges from Spitzer to about 1500 times Spitzer resistivity, as predicted by mirror-enhanced resistivity theory. This allows large powers (approx. 2 MW) to be coupled to the plasma at modest current levels. However, the confinement time is reduced by the heating, apparently due to a combination of the input power location (near the walls of the vacuum tank) and fluctuation-enhanced transport. Current-driven drift instabilities and resistive MHD instabilities appear to be the most likely causes for the fluctuations

  11. Quench detection system of the EURATOM coil for the Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noether, G.; Gauss, S.; Maurer, W.; Siewerdt, L.; Ulbricht, A.; Wuechner, F.

    1989-01-01

    A special quench detection system has been developed for the EURATOM Large Coil Task (LCT) coil. The system is based on a bridge circuit which uses a special 'two in hand' winding technique for the pancakes of the EURATOM LCT coil. The electronic circuit was designed in a fail safe way to prevent failure of the quench detector due to failure of one of its components. A method for quick balancing of the quench detection system in a large toroidal magnet system was applied. The quench detection system worked very reliably during the experimental phase of the LCT and was within the quench detection level setting of 50 mV, i.e. the system was not sensitive to poloidal field transients at or below this level. Non-electrical methods for quench detection were also investigated. (author)

  12. Induction of poloidal rotation by mean of a ponderomotive force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez T, C.; Martinell, J.

    1999-01-01

    When a plasma is radiated with a radiofrequency wave (RF) with fluxes of energy at hundred megawatts order (MW) the effect the of ponderomotive force (PM) is very important. This force applied to the plasma column can generate a rotation movement by a non-resonant mechanism. Particularly, it is known that the poloidal rotation can be induced by direct action of the PM force poloidal moment. This poloidal rotation of the plasma column can to explain the appearance of high confinement regime (H) in Tokamaks. In this work, it is analysed this mechanism, showing that if it is operated efficiently with the poloidal and parallel components of PM force then could be intensified the poloidal rotation moreover it is showed the form in which the asymptotic value of this rotation is established. (Author)

  13. On steady poloidal and toroidal flows in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClements, K. G.; Hole, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of poloidal and toroidal flows on tokamak plasma equilibria are examined in the magnetohydrodynamic limit. ''Transonic'' poloidal flows of the order of the sound speed multiplied by the ratio of poloidal magnetic field to total field B θ /B can cause the (normally elliptic) Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to become hyperbolic in part of the solution domain. It is pointed out that the range of poloidal flows for which the GS equation is hyperbolic increases with plasma beta and B θ /B, thereby complicating the problem of determining spherical tokamak plasma equilibria with transonic poloidal flows. It is demonstrated that the calculation of the hyperbolicity criterion can be easily modified when the assumption of isentropic flux surfaces is replaced with the more tokamak-relevant one of isothermal flux surfaces. On the basis of the latter assumption, a simple expression is obtained for the variation of density on a flux surface when poloidal and toroidal flows are simultaneously present. Combined with Thomson scattering measurements of density and temperature, this expression could be used to infer information on poloidal and toroidal flows on the high field side of a tokamak plasma, where direct measurements of flows are not generally possible. It is demonstrated that there are four possible solutions of the Bernoulli relation for the plasma density when the flux surfaces are assumed to be isothermal, corresponding to four distinct poloidal flow regimes. Finally, observations and first principles-based theoretical modeling of poloidal flows in tokamak plasmas are briefly reviewed and it is concluded that there is no clear evidence for the occurrence of supersonic poloidal flows.

  14. Development of thermal-hydraulic analysis methodology for multiple modules of water-cooled breeder blanket in fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Hun [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • A methodology to simulate the K-DEMO blanket system was proposed. • The results were compared with the CFD, to verify the prediction capability of MARS. • 46 Blankets in a single sector in K-DEMO were simulated using MARS-KS. • Supervisor program was devised to handle each blanket module individually. • The calculation results showed the flow rates, pressure drops, and temperatures. - Abstract: According to the conceptual design of the fusion DEMO reactor proposed by the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea, the water-cooled breeding blanket system incorporates a total of 736 blanket modules. The heat flux and neutron wall loading to each blanket module vary along their poloidal direction, and hence, thermal analysis for at least one blanket sector is required to confirm that the temperature limitations of the materials are satisfied in all the blanket modules. The present paper proposes a methodology of thermal analysis for multiple modules of the blanket system using a nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis code, MARS-KS. In order to overcome the limitations of the code, caused by the restriction on the number of computational nodes, a supervisor program was devised, which handles each blanket module separately at first, and then corrects the flow rate, considering pressure drops that occur in each module. For a feasibility test of the proposed methodology, 46 blankets in a single sector were simulated; the calculation results of the parameters, such as mass flow, pressure drops, and temperature distribution in the multiple blanket modules showed that the multi-module analysis method can be used for efficient thermal-hydraulic analysis of the fusion DEMO reactor.

  15. Induction of poloidal rotation by mean of a ponderomotive force; Induccion de rotacion poloidal por medio de una fuerza ponderomotriz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez T, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Fisica, Salazar, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52045 (Mexico); Martinell, J. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, C.P. 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    When a plasma is radiated with a radiofrequency wave (RF) with fluxes of energy at hundred megawatts order (MW) the effect the of ponderomotive force (PM) is very important. This force applied to the plasma column can generate a rotation movement by a non-resonant mechanism. Particularly, it is known that the poloidal rotation can be induced by direct action of the PM force poloidal moment. This poloidal rotation of the plasma column can to explain the appearance of high confinement regime (H) in Tokamaks. In this work, it is analysed this mechanism, showing that if it is operated efficiently with the poloidal and parallel components of PM force then could be intensified the poloidal rotation moreover it is showed the form in which the asymptotic value of this rotation is established. (Author)

  16. Energy Storage System for a Pulsed DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, J.; Cortes, M.; Mendez, P.; Maisonnier, D.; Hayward, J.

    2006-01-01

    Several designs have been proposed for DEMO, some of which will operate in pulsed mode. Since a fusion power plant will be required to deliver continuous output, this challenge must be solved. For the reference DEMO, energy storage is required at a level of 250 MWhe with a capability of delivering a power of 1 GWe. Although DEMO is scheduled to be built in about 30 years, the design of the energy storage system must be based on current technology, focusing on commercially available products and on their expected future trends. From a thorough review of the different technologies available, thermal energy storage, compressed air energy storage, water pumping, fuel cells, batteries, flywheels and ultracapacitors are the most promising solutions to energy storage for a pulsed DEMO. An outline of each of these technologies is described in the paper, showing its basis, features, advantages and disadvantages for this application. Following this review, the most suitable methods capable of storing the required energy are examined. Fuel cells are not suitable due to the power requirement. Compressed air energy storage has a lower efficiency than the required one. Thermal energy storage, based on molten salts, so more energy can be stored with a better efficiency, and water pumping are shown as the main solutions, based on existing technology. However, those are not the only solutions capable of solving our challenge. Hydrogen production, using water electrolysis, hydrogen storage and combustion in a combined cycle can achieve our energy and power requirements with an acceptable efficiency. All these solutions are studied in detail and described, evaluating their current cost and efficiency in order to compare them all. (author)

  17. Tritium extraction technologies and DEMO requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demange, D., E-mail: david.demange@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Technical Physics, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Antunes, R.; Borisevich, O.; Frances, L. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Technical Physics, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rapisarda, D. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santucci, A. [ENEA for EUROfusion, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Utili, M. [ENEA CR Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We detail the R&D plan for tritium technology of the European DEMO breeding blanket. • We study advanced and efficient extraction techniques to improve tritium management. • We consider inorganic membranes and catalytic membrane reactor for solid blankets. • We consider permeator against vacuum and vacuum sieve tray for liquid blankets. - Abstract: The conceptual design of the tritium extraction system (TES) for the European DEMO reactor is worked out in parallel for four different breeding blankets (BB) retained by EUROfusion. The TES design has to be tackled in an integrated manner optimizing the synergy with the directly interfacing inner fuel cycle, while minimizing the tritium permeation into the coolant. Considering DEMO requirements, it is most likely that only advanced technologies will be suitable for the tritium extraction systems of the BB. This paper overviews the European work programme for R&D on tritium technology for the DEMO BB, summaries the general first outcomes, and details the specific and comprehensive R&D program to study experimentally immature but promising technologies such as vacuum sieve tray or permeator against vacuum for tritium extraction from PbLi, and advanced inorganic membranes and catalytic membrane reactor for tritium extraction from He. These techniques are simple, fully continuous, likely compact with contained energy consumption. Several European Laboratories are joining their efforts to deploy several new experimental setups to accommodate the tests campaigns that will cover small scale experiments with tritium and inactive medium scale tests so as to improve the technology readiness level of these advanced processes.

  18. A Conceptual Design Study for the Error Field Correction Coil Power Supply in JT-60SA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukawa, M.; Shimada, K.; Yamauchi, K.; Gaio, E.; Ferro, A.; Novello, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual design study for the circuit configuration of the Error Field Correction Coil (EFCC) power supply (PS) to maximize the expected performance with reasonable cost in JT-60SA. The EFCC consists of eighteen sector coils installed inside the vacuum vessel, six in the toroidal direction and three in the poloidal direction, each one rated for 30 kA-turn. As a result, star point connection is proposed for each group of six EFCC coils installed cyclically in the toroidal direction for decoupling with poloidal field coils. In addition, a six phase inverter which is capable of controlling each phase current was chosen as PS topology to ensure higher flexibility of operation with reasonable cost.

  19. Numerical stress analysis of toroidal coil by three-dimensional finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hidetomo; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1977-10-01

    A structure analysis program based on finite element method for toroidal coils, developed in JAERI, and its example application to a medium-size tokamak are described. In this application, the effects of material anisotropy, poloidal field and spring constant value were studied, and also the influence of toroidal coil failure on the peak stress. The following were revealed. The effect of anisotropy on the peak stress in reinforcement must be considered. The effect of poloidal field on the peak stress is small compared with that of toroidal field. The spring constant value between coil and support does not much influence the peak stress value, The peak stress in reinforcement rises with increasing number of failed coils. In the case of 2000 nodes on the structure, CPU time with the program is about 40 min. (auth.)

  20. Nonambipolarity, orthogonal conductivity, poloidal flow, and torque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, G.W.; Perkins, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    Nonambipolar processes, such as neutral injection onto trapped orbits or ripple-diffusion loss of α-particles, act to charge a plasma. A current j/sub r/ across magnetic surfaces must arise in the bulk plasma to maintain charge neutrality. An axisymmetric, neoclassical model of the bulk plasma shows that these currents are carried by the ions and exert a j/sub r/B/sub θ/R/c torque in the toroidal direction. A driven poloidal flow V/sub θ/ = E/sub r/'c/B must also develop. The average current density is related to the radial electric field E/sub r/' = E/sub r/ + v/sub /phi//B/sub θ//c in a frame moving with the plasma via the orthogonal conductivity = σ/sub /perpendicular//E/sub r/', which has the value σ/sub /perpendicular// = (1.65ε/sup 1/2/)(ne 2 ν/sub ii//MΩ/sub θ/ 2 ) in the banana regime. If an ignited plasma loses an appreciable fraction Δ of its thermonuclear α-particles by banana ripple diffusion, then the torque will spin the plasma to sonic rotation in a time /tau//sub s/ ∼ 2/tau//sub E//Δ, /tau//sub E/ being the energy confinement time. 10 refs., 1 fig

  1. Combination of helical ferritic-steel inserts and flux-tube-expansion divertor for the heat control in tokamak DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, T.; Tokunaga, S.; Hoshino, K.; Shimizu, K.; Asakura, N.

    2015-01-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) in the H-mode operation of tokamak reactors may be suppressed/mitigated by the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP), but RMP coils are considered incompatible with DEMO reactors under the strong neutron flux. We propose an innovative concept of the RMP without installing coils but inserting ferritic steels of the helical configuration. Helically perturbed field is naturally formed in the axisymmetric toroidal field through the helical ferritic steel inserts (FSIs). When ELMs are avoided, large stationary heat load on divertor plates can be reduced by adopting a flux-tube-expansion (FTE) divertor like an X divertor. Separatrix shape and divertor-plate inclination are similar to those of a simple long-leg divertor configuration. Combination of the helical FSIs and the FTE divertor is a suitable method for the heat control to avoid transient ELM heat pulse and to reduce stationary divertor heat load in a tokamak DEMO reactor

  2. Calculation of impurity poloidal rotation from measured poloidal asymmetries in the toroidal rotation of a tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrystal, C. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92186-5608 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    To improve poloidal rotation measurement capabilities on the DIII-D tokamak, new chords for the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic have been installed. CER is a common method for measuring impurity rotation in tokamak plasmas. These new chords make measurements on the high-field side of the plasma. They are designed so that they can measure toroidal rotation without the need for the calculation of atomic physics corrections. Asymmetry between toroidal rotation on the high- and low-field sides of the plasma is used to calculate poloidal rotation. Results for the main impurity in the plasma are shown and compared with a neoclassical calculation of poloidal rotation.

  3. Calculation of impurity poloidal rotation from measured poloidal asymmetries in the toroidal rotation of a tokamak plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrystal, C; Burrell, K H; Grierson, B A; Groebner, R J; Kaplan, D H

    2012-10-01

    To improve poloidal rotation measurement capabilities on the DIII-D tokamak, new chords for the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic have been installed. CER is a common method for measuring impurity rotation in tokamak plasmas. These new chords make measurements on the high-field side of the plasma. They are designed so that they can measure toroidal rotation without the need for the calculation of atomic physics corrections. Asymmetry between toroidal rotation on the high- and low-field sides of the plasma is used to calculate poloidal rotation. Results for the main impurity in the plasma are shown and compared with a neoclassical calculation of poloidal rotation.

  4. A Fast-Track Path to DEMO Enabled by ITER and FNSF-AT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Choi, M.; Humphreys, D. A.; Kinsey, J. E.; Lao, L. L.; Snyder, P. B.; John, H. E.St.; Turnbull, A. D.; Taylor, T.S., E-mail: garofalo@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, San Diego (United States); Chan, V. S.; Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Sawan, M. E. [University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Stangeby, P. C. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility based on the Advanced Tokamak concept (FNSF-AT) [1] is a key element of a fast track plan to a commercially attractive fusion DEMO. The next step forward on the path towards fusion commercialization must be a device that complements ITER in addressing the community identified science and technology gaps to DEMO, and that enables a DEMO construction decision triggered by the achievement of Q = 10 in ITER, presently scheduled for the year 2030. This paper elucidates the logic flow leading to the FNSF-AT approach for such a next step forward, and presents the results of recent analysis resolving key physics and engineering issues. A FNSF-AT will show fusion can make its own fuel, provide a materials irradiation facility, show fusion can produce high-grade process heat and electricity. In order to accomplish these goals, the FNSF has to operate steady-state with significant duty cycle and significant neutron fluence. In FNSF-AT, advanced tokamak physics enables steady-state burning plasmas with the high fluence required for FNSF's nuclear science development objective, in the compact size required to demonstrate Tritium fuel self-sufficiency using only a moderate quantity of the limited supply of Tritium. Physics based integrated modeling has found a steady-state baseline equilibrium with good stability and controllability properties. 2-D analysis assuming ITER heat and particle diffusion coefficients in the SOL predicts peak heat flux < 10 MW/m{sup 2} at the outer divertor targets. High fidelity and high-resolution 3D neutronics calculations have also been carried out, showing acceptable cumulative end-of-life organic insulator dose levels in all the device coils, and TBR > 1 for two blanket concepts considered. This FNSF-AT baseline plasma scenario has significant margin to meet the FNSF nuclear science mission. Moreover, the facility allows the development of more advanced scenarios to close the physics gaps to DEMO

  5. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility for a fast-track path to DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garofalo, A.M., E-mail: garofalo@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Abdou, M.A. [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Canik, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chan, V.S.; Hyatt, A.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hill, D.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Morley, N.B. [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Navratil, G.A. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Sawan, M.E. [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Taylor, T.S.; Wong, C.P.C.; Wu, W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Ying, A. [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A FNSF is needed to reduce the knowledge gaps to a fusion DEMO and accelerate progress toward fusion energy. • FNSF will test and qualify first-wall/blanket components and materials in a DEMO-relevant fusion environment. • The Advanced Tokamak approach enables reduced size and risks, and is on a direct path to an attractive target power plant. • Near term research focus on specific tasks can enable starting FNSF construction within the next ten years. - Abstract: An accelerated fusion energy development program, a “fast-track” approach, requires proceeding with a nuclear and materials testing program in parallel with research on burning plasmas, ITER. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) would address many of the key issues that need to be addressed prior to DEMO, including breeding tritium and completing the fuel cycle, qualifying nuclear materials for high fluence, developing suitable materials for the plasma-boundary interface, and demonstrating power extraction. The Advanced Tokamak (AT) is a strong candidate for an FNSF as a consequence of its mature physics base, capability to address the key issues, and the direct relevance to an attractive target power plant. The standard aspect ratio provides space for a solenoid, assuring robust plasma current initiation, and for an inboard blanket, assuring robust tritium breeding ratio (TBR) >1 for FNSF tritium self-sufficiency and building of inventory needed to start up DEMO. An example design point gives a moderate sized Cu-coil device with R/a = 2.7 m/0.77 m, κ = 2.3, B{sub T} = 5.4 T, I{sub P} = 6.6 MA, β{sub N} = 2.75, P{sub fus} = 127 MW. The modest bootstrap fraction of ƒ{sub BS} = 0.55 provides an opportunity to develop steady state with sufficient current drive for adequate control. Proceeding with a FNSF in parallel with ITER provides a strong basis to begin construction of DEMO upon the achievement of Q ∼ 10 in ITER.

  6. Poloidal flux loss in a field-reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.L.; Milroy, R.D.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Poloidal flux loss has been measured in field-reversed configurations and related to anomalous resistivity near the magnetic field null. The results indicate that mechanisms in addition to the lower-hybrid drift instability are affecting transport

  7. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Andrew, Y.; Giroud, C.

    2007-01-01

    to be neo-classical. However, experimental measurements on JET show that the carbon poloidal velocity can be an order of magnitude above the predicted value by the neo-classical theory within the ITB. These large measured poloidal velocities, employed for example in transport simulations, significantly...... codes and also the Weiland model predict the existence of an anomalous poloidal velocity, peaking in the vicinity of the ITB and driven dominantly by the flow due to the Reynold's stress. It is worth noting that these codes and models treat the equilibrium in a simplified way and this affects...... the geodesic curvature effects and geodesic acoustic modes. The neo-classical equilibrium is calculated more accurately in the GEM code and the simulations suggest that the spin-up of poloidal velocity is a consequence of the plasma profiles steepening when the ITB grows, following in particular the growth...

  8. Investigation of nonplanar modular coil systems for stellarator fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmeyer, E.

    1988-12-01

    Steady-state stellarators constitute an important option for a future fusion reactor. The helical magnetic field required for plasma confinement can be produced by means of a set of modular nonplanar coils. In order to achieve optimum power density of the plasma, the magnetic flux density inside the torus is made as high as possible. State-of-the-art estimates allow values of the magnetic flux density on axis of B 0 = 4-7 T. The present report is concerned with investigations on modular nonplanar stellarator coil systems. Coil systems with poloidal periodicity l=2 and a coil system of the W VII-AS type with superposed l=0, 1, 2, 3 terms are treated. Furthermore, the parameters are simultaneously varied while keeping constant the ratios of certain magnitudes. In the parameter space of the geometric values and coil number the following quantities are evaluated: maximum magnetic flux density in the coil domain, stored magnetic energy of the coil system, magnetic force density distribution or magnetic forces, and mechanical stress distribution in the coils. Numerical methods are applied in the programme systems used for these calculations. The aim of the study is to determine an optimum regime for the above parameters. The numerical results are compared with those of analytical approximation solutions. (orig.)

  9. Poloidal asymmetries of flows in the Tore Supra tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Garbet, X.; Honoré, C.; Clairet, F.; Giacalone, J. C.; Morel, P.; Storelli, A.; Tore Supra Team

    2018-02-01

    Simultaneous measurements of binormal velocity of density fluctuations using two separate Doppler backscattering systems at the low field side and at the top of the plasma show significant poloidal asymmetry. The measurements are performed in the core region between the radii 0.7 Supra tokamak. A possible generation mechanism by the ballooned structure of the underlying turbulence, in the form of convective cells, is proposed for explaining the observation of these poloidally asymmetric mean flows.

  10. Poloidal flux requirement: Analysis and application to the Ignitor configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassi, M.

    1993-01-01

    The definitions and correlations existing between different terms used by physicists and engineers are clarified in order to deal with the assessment of the poloidal flux requirement in a fusion experiment. The theoretical formulation of both the Faraday and the Poynting methods, for the internal flux evaluation, is briefly reviewed. Heuristic expressions that allow estimates of internal flux consumption are reported for the specific case of an ignition experiment represented by the Ignitor configuration. The analytical and heuristic results for both internal and external poloidal flux requirements are checked against numerical evaluations carried out by using the TSC transport and magnetohydrodynamics code and the TEQ equilibrium code. A fairly good agreement between the different estimates is found. This suggests that simple heuristic expressions can be used to evaluate the poloidal flux requirement of future experiments, even if a detailed simulation of the plasma current penetration process is strongly recommended to correctly assess and optimize the resistive poloidal flux consumption. Finally, the poloidal flux requirement for different plasma scenarios in the Ignitor experiment is compared with the magnetic flux variation that can be delivered by the poloidal field system. 28 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs

  11. Diagnostics for plasma control on DEMO: challenges of implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.; Costley, A. E.; Morris, A. W.

    2012-01-01

    As a test fusion power plant, DEMO will have to demonstrate reliability and very long pulse/steady-state operation, which calls for unprecedented robustness and reliability of all diagnostic systems (also requiring adequate redundancy). But DEMO will have higher levels of neutron and gamma fluxes,

  12. High voltage investigations for ITER coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, S.; Fietz, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting ITER magnets will be excited with high voltage during operation and fast discharge. Because the coils are complex systems the internal voltage distribution can differ to a large extent from the ideal linear voltage distribution. In case of fast excitations internal voltages between conductor and radial plate of a TF coil can be even higher than the terminal voltage of 3.5 kV to ground which appears during a fast discharge without a fault. Hence the determination of the transient voltage distribution is important for a proper insulation co-ordination and will provide a necessary basis for the verification of the individual insulation design and the choice of test voltages and waveforms. Especially the extent of internal overvoltages in case of failures, e. g. malfunction of discharge units and / or arcing is of special interest. Transient calculations for the ITER TF coil system have been performed for fast discharge and fault scenarios to define test voltages for ITER TF. The conductor and radial plate insulation of the ITER TF Model Coil were exposed at room temperature to test voltages derived from the results from these calculations. Breakdown appeared during the highest AC voltage step. A fault scenario for the TF fast discharge system is presented where one fault triggers a second fault, leading to considerable voltage stress. In addition a FEM model of Poloidal Field Coil 3 for the determination of the parameters of a detailed network model is presented in order to prepare detailed investigations of the transient voltage behaviour of the PF coils. (author)

  13. Energy storage system for a pulsed DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, J.; Cortes, M.; Mendez, P.; Hayward, J.; Maisonnier, D.

    2007-01-01

    Several designs have been proposed for the DEMO fusion reactor. Some of them are working in a non-steady state mode. Since a power plant should be able to deliver to the grid a constant power, this challenge must be solved. Energy storage is required at a level of 250 MWh e with the capability of delivering a power of 1 GWe. A review of different technologies for energy storage is made. Thermal energy storage (TES), fuel cells and other hydrogen storage, compressed air storage, water pumping, batteries, flywheels and supercapacitors are the most promising solutions to energy storage. Each one is briefly described in the paper, showing its basis, features, advantages and disadvantages for this application. The conclusion of the review is that, based on existing technology, thermal energy storage using molten salts and a system based on hydrogen storage are the most promising candidates to meet the requirements of a pulsed DEMO. These systems are investigated in more detail together with an economic assessment of each

  14. Conception of Brownian coil

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiayuan

    2018-01-01

    This article proposes a conception of Brownian coil. Brownian coil is a tiny coil with the same size of pollen. Once immersed into designed magnetic field and liquid, the coil will be moved and deformed macroscopically, due to the microscopic thermodynamic molecular collisions. Such deformation and movement will change the magnetic flux through the coil, by which an ElectroMotive Force (EMF) is produced. In this work, Brownian heat exchanger and Brownian generator are further designed to tran...

  15. Progress in the engineering design and assessment of the European DEMO first wall and divertor plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Thomas R., E-mail: tom.barrett@ukaea.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Ellwood, G.; Pérez, G.; Kovari, M.; Fursdon, M.; Domptail, F.; Kirk, S.; McIntosh, S.C.; Roberts, S.; Zheng, S. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Boccaccini, L.V. [KIT, INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); You, J.-H. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion, PPPT, Boltzmann Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Reiser, J.; Rieth, M. [KIT, IAM, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Visca, E.; Mazzone, G. [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Arbeiter, F. [KIT, INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Domalapally, P.K. [Research Center Rez, Hlavní 130, 250 68 Husinec – Řež (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The engineering of the plasma facing components for DEMO is an extreme challenge. • PFC overall requirements, methods for assessment and designs status are described. • Viable divertor concepts for 10 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux appear to be within reach. • The first wall PFC concept will need to vary poloidally around the wall. • First wall coolant, structural material and PFC topology are open design choices. - Abstract: The European DEMO power reactor is currently under conceptual design within the EUROfusion Consortium. One of the most critical activities is the engineering of the plasma-facing components (PFCs) covering the plasma chamber wall, which must operate reliably in an extreme environment of neutron irradiation and surface heat and particle flux, while also allowing sufficient neutron transmission to the tritium breeding blankets. A systems approach using advanced numerical analysis is vital to realising viable solutions for these first wall and divertor PFCs. Here, we present the system requirements and describe bespoke thermo-mechanical and thermo-hydraulic assessment procedures which have been used as tools for design. The current first wall and divertor designs are overviewed along with supporting analyses. The PFC solutions employed will necessarily vary around the wall, depending on local conditions, and must be designed in an integrated manner by analysis and physical testing.

  16. Results of availability imposed configuration details developed for K-DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Tom, E-mail: tbrown@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Titus, Peter; Brooks, Art; Zhang, Han; Neilson, Hutch [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Im, Kihak; Kim, Keeman [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) has completed a two year study looking at key Tokamak components and configuration options in preparation of a conceptual design phase. A key part of a device configuration centers on defining an arrangement that enhances the ability to reach high availability values by defining design solutions that foster simplified maintenance operations. To maximize the size and minimize the number of in-vessel components enlarged TF coils were defined that incorporate a pair of windings within each coil to mitigate pressure drop issues and to reduce the cost of the coils. A semi-permanent shield structure was defined to develop labyrinth interfaces between double-null plasma contoured shield modules, provide an entity to align blanket components and provide support against disruption loads—with a load path that equilibrates blanket, TF and PF loads through a base structure. Blanket piping services and auxiliary systems that interface with in-vessel components have played a major role in defining the overall device arrangement—concept details will be presented along with general arrangement features and preliminary results obtained from disruption analysis.

  17. Neutronic analyses of the preliminary design of a DCLL blanket for the EUROfusion DEMO power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palermo, Iole, E-mail: iole.palermo@ciemat.es; Fernández, Iván; Rapisarda, David; Ibarra, Angel

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We perform neutronic calculations for the preliminary DCLL Blanket design. • We study the tritium breeding capability of the reactor. • We determine the nuclear heating in the main components. • We verify if the shielding of the TF coil is maintained. - Abstract: In the frame of the newly established EUROfusion WPBB Project for the period 2014–2018, four breeding blanket options are being investigated to be used in the fusion power demonstration plant DEMO. CIEMAT is leading the development of the conceptual design of the Dual Coolant Lithium Lead, DCLL, breeding blanket. The primary role of the blanket is of energy extraction, tritium production, and radiation shielding. With this aim the DCLL uses LiPb as primary coolant, tritium breeder and neutron multiplier and Eurofer as structural material. Focusing on the achievement of the fundamental neutronic responses a preliminary blanket model has been designed. Thus detailed 3D neutronic models of the whole blanket modules have been generated, arranged in a specific DCLL segmentation and integrated in the generic DEMO model. The initial design has been studied to demonstrate its viability. Thus, the neutronic behaviour of the blanket and of the shield systems in terms of tritium breeding capabilities, power generation and shielding efficiency has been assessed in this paper. The results demonstrate that the primary nuclear performances are already satisfactory at this preliminary stage of the design, having obtained the tritium self-sufficiency and an adequate shielding.

  18. Neutronic performance issues of the breeding blanket options for the European DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion—Programme Management Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Jaboulay, J.-C. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SERMA, LPEC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moro, F. [ENEA, Dipartimento Fusione e tecnologie per la Sicurezza Nucleare, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Villari, R. [ENEA, Dipartimento Fusione e tecnologie per la Sicurezza Nucleare, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Breeder blanket concepts for DEMO—design features. • Neutronic characteristics of breeder blankets. • Evaluation of Tritium breeding potential. • Evaluation of shielding performance. - Abstract: This paper presents nuclear performance issues of the HCPB, HCLL, DCLL and WCLL breeder blankets, which are under development within the PPPT (Power Plant Physics and Technology) programme of EUROfusion, with the objective to assess the potential and suitability of the blankets for the application to DEMO. The assessment is based on the initial design versions of the blankets developed in 2014. The Tritium breeding potential is considered sufficient for all breeder blankets although the initial design versions of the HCPB, HCLL and DCLL blankets were shown to require further design improvements. Suitable measures have been proposed and proven to be sufficient to achieve the required Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) ≥ 1.10. The shielding performance was shown to be sufficient to protect the super-conducting toroidal field coil provided that efficient shielding material mixtures including WC or borated water are utilized. The WCLL blanket does not require the use of such shielding materials due to a very compact blanket support structure/manifold configuration which yet requires design verification. The vacuum vessel can be safely operated over the full anticipated DEMO lifetime of 6 full power years for all blanket concepts considered.

  19. Neutronics requirements for a DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion Consortium , Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Villari, R. [ENEA UT-FUS C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Discussion and specification of neutronic requirements for a DEMO power plant. • TBR uncertainties are reviewed/discussed and design margins are elaborated. • Limits are given for radiation loads to super-conducting magnets and steel structural components. • Available DEMO results are compared to recommended limits and TBR design target. - Abstract: This paper addresses the neutronic requirements a DEMO fusion power plant needs to fulfil for a reliable and safe operation. The major requirement is to ensure Tritium self-sufficiency taking into account the various uncertainties and plant-internal losses that occur during DEMO operation. A further major requirement is to ensure sufficient protection of the superconducting magnets against the radiation penetrating in-vessel components and vessel. Reliable criteria for the radiation loads need to be defined and verified to ensure the reliable operation of the magnets over the lifetime of DEMO. Other issues include radiation induced effects on structural materials such as the accumulated displacement damage, the generation of gases such as helium which may deteriorate the material performance. The paper discusses these issues and their impact on design options for DEMO taking into account results obtained in the frame of European Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) 2013 programme activities with DEMO models employing the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB), the helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL), and the water-cooled (WCLL) blanket concepts.

  20. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table for K-DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kye Min; Kang, Myung Suk; Heo, Gyun Young; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the current status of the Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT) for the conceptual design of K-DEMO, Korean Fusion DEMO Plant. K-DEMO is to be planned as the first fusion power plant constructed in South Korea. However, several key technologies such as plasma, materials, and cooling still have large uncertainties. There are also no relevant references to facilitate the design process of K-DEMO due to its different size, commercializing purpose, and regulatory framework. It was proposed to define the phenomena of systems, components, and processes in an accident condition. In this paper, PIRT for K-DEMO was described and analysis based on this tool was performed. We have carried out researches related to safety for fusion power plant in collaboration with the academies funded by NFRI during the past 3 years. As part of this research, Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM), which was used to develop GEN-IV nuclear systems, was used to determine the technical safety issues and regulatory requirements for K-DEMO. PIRT is one of ISAM tools. It can recognize vulnerabilities of systems and identify the gaps in technical areas requiring additional research. The results through this tool are expected to contribute on detailed design for K-DEMO as guidance for regulatory requirements and safety systems in the future

  1. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table for K-DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kye Min; Kang, Myung Suk; Heo, Gyun Young [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the current status of the Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT) for the conceptual design of K-DEMO, Korean Fusion DEMO Plant. K-DEMO is to be planned as the first fusion power plant constructed in South Korea. However, several key technologies such as plasma, materials, and cooling still have large uncertainties. There are also no relevant references to facilitate the design process of K-DEMO due to its different size, commercializing purpose, and regulatory framework. It was proposed to define the phenomena of systems, components, and processes in an accident condition. In this paper, PIRT for K-DEMO was described and analysis based on this tool was performed. We have carried out researches related to safety for fusion power plant in collaboration with the academies funded by NFRI during the past 3 years. As part of this research, Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM), which was used to develop GEN-IV nuclear systems, was used to determine the technical safety issues and regulatory requirements for K-DEMO. PIRT is one of ISAM tools. It can recognize vulnerabilities of systems and identify the gaps in technical areas requiring additional research. The results through this tool are expected to contribute on detailed design for K-DEMO as guidance for regulatory requirements and safety systems in the future.

  2. Design of equilibrium field control coil system of TPE-RX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Yamane, M.; Oyabu, I.; Urata, K.; Kudough, F. [Mitsubishi Fusion Center, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Minato, T.; Kiryu, A.; Takagi, S.; Kuno, K.; Sako, K. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp. (Japan). Energy and Industrial Systems Center; Hirano, Y.; Yagi, Y.; Shimada, T.; Sekine, S.; Sakakita, H. [Electrotechnical Lab. (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    The construction of TPE-RX reversed field pinch(RFP) machine at the Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL) was complete at the end of 1997 and the coil system showed the expected performances on the test at the ETL site. In the reversed field pinch machine, the plasma is surrounded by a thick metal shell to maintain plasma equilibrium and to obtain plasma stability. We designed the coil system considering an error magnetic field which is generated by an iron core and the poloidal shell gap of the thick shell. This paper describes designs and the related studies of the equilibrium field control coil system of TPE-RX. (author)

  3. Design of equilibrium field control coil system of TPE-RX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Yamane, M.; Oyabu, I.; Urata, K.; Kudough, F.; Minato, T.; Kiryu, A.; Takagi, S.; Kuno, K.; Sako, K.

    1998-01-01

    The construction of TPE-RX reversed field pinch(RFP) machine at the Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL) was complete at the end of 1997 and the coil system showed the expected performances on the test at the ETL site. In the reversed field pinch machine, the plasma is surrounded by a thick metal shell to maintain plasma equilibrium and to obtain plasma stability. We designed the coil system considering an error magnetic field which is generated by an iron core and the poloidal shell gap of the thick shell. This paper describes designs and the related studies of the equilibrium field control coil system of TPE-RX. (author)

  4. Experimental result of poloidal limiter baking of Aditya tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, K.A.; Arambhadiya, B.G.; Bhatt, S.B.; Bora, D.

    2005-01-01

    In tokamak Aditya, Poloidal limiter function as the operational limiter and are subjected to very high particles load and heat flux during plasma discharge. In addition, Poloidal limiter is the first material surface to come in contact with the hot plasma. In plasma discharge, the impurity generations from limiter are mostly by adsorbed particles. The baking of limiter provides high degassing rate and thermal desorption of adsorbed particles of limiter to reduce impurities from the limiter tiles. The series of experiments are done with different conditions like, Baking of limiter SS ring by heating element with and without limiter tiles in atmosphere and vacuum. Than Poloidal limiter is structured with 14 numbers of graphite tiles and electrical isolated to the vessel and support structure. As a heating element and for electrical isolation, Nychrome wire and ceramic block with ceramic tubes are used. In addition, Thermo couple and two DC power supply (0-10 Ampere) are used for limiter baking. Mass analyzer gives partial pressures of different species to observe effect of limiter baking. For the period of Poloidal limiter baking in Aditya, the partial pressures of different species like hydrogen, water vapor, and oxygen are extremely increased with time duration. This paper presents series of experimental results of poloidal limiter baking. (author)

  5. Assessment of DEMO challenges in technology and physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohm, Hartmut, E-mail: zohm@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► It is very important to respect the interlinks between physics and technology when developing designs for DEMO. ► Pulsed operation of a tokamak DEMO should seriously be considered in conservative DEMO designs. ► Optimization of both plasma CD efficiency as well as wall plug efficiency of the CD system is important. ► Exhaust requirements lead to an unprecedented high level of core radiation loss by impurity seeding in DEMO. -- Abstract: The challenges that DEMO designs encounter in both technology and physics are reviewed. It is shown that it is very important to respect the interlinks between these fields when developing designs for DEMO. Examples for areas where such interlinks put very strict requirements are the development of a steady state tokamak operation scenario and the question of power exhaust taking into account the boundary conditions set by materials questions. Concerning steady state operation, we find that demands on the physics scenario are so high that pulsed operation of a tokamak DEMO should seriously be considered in conservative DEMO designs. Alternatively, the device could foresee a large fraction of externally driven current which calls for optimization of both plasma CD efficiency as well as wall plug efficiency of the CD system. In the exhaust area, a realistic estimate of the admissable time averaged peak heat flux at the target is of the order of 5 MW/m{sup 2}, leading to strict requirements for the operational scenario, which has to rely on an unprecedented high level of radiation loss by impurity seeding and the facilitation of partial detachment. Thus, exhaust scenarios along these lines have to be developed which are compatible with the confinement needs and the H-L back transition power for DEMO. In both areas, we discuss possible risk mitigation strategies based on conceptually different approaches.

  6. Structural analysis of TFTR toroidal field coil conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-10-01

    The conceptual design evaluation of the V-shaped toroidal field coils on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has been performed by detailed structural analysis with the finite element method. The innovation provided by this design and verified in this work is the capability to support toroidal field loads while simultaneously performing the function of twist restraint against the device axial torques resulting from the vertical field loads. The evaluations made for the conceptual design provide predictions for coil deflections and stresses. The results are available for the separate effects from toroidal fields, poloidal fields, and the thermal expansion of the coils as well as for the superposition of the primary loads and the primary plus thermal loads

  7. Doppler reflectometry for the investigation of poloidally propagating density perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, M.; Baldzuhn, J.; Kurzan, B.; Holzhauer, E.

    1999-01-01

    A modification of microwave reflectometry is discussed where the direction of observation is tilted with respect to the normal onto the reflecting surface. The experiment is similar to scattering where a finite resolution in k-space exists but keeps the radial localization of reflectometry. The observed poloidal wavenumber is chosen by Bragg's condition via the tilt angle and the resolution in k-space is determined by the antenna pattern. From the Doppler shift of the reflected wave the poloidal propagation velocity of density perturbations is obtained. The diagnostic capabilities of Doppler reflectometry are investigated using full wave code calculations. The method offers the possibility to observe changes in the poloidal propagation velocity of density perturbations and their radial shear with a temporal resolution of about 10μs. (authors)

  8. Neoclassical impurity transport and observations of poloidal asymmetries in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feneberg, W.; Mast, F.K.; Martin, P.; Gottardi, N.

    1986-01-01

    Bolometrically measured asymmetries of emissivity for some characteristic JET discharges are presented and are in good agreement with theoretical results of calculations worked out in the frame of neoclassical theory. Application of theory to the case of strong toroidal rotation as induced with neutral injection shows a sensitive dependance of the impurity transport perpendicular to the magnetic surfaces from the parameter of poloidal rotation. The main result is the existence of a classical flow reversal. Without any poloidal rotation of the background ions, a large inward flow of impurities for co- and counter-injection is always predicted, while poloidal rotation in the direction of the ion diamagnetic drift motion leads to a strong outward drift. (author)

  9. He-cooled divertor development for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norajitra, P.; Giniyatulin, R.; Ihli, T.; Janeschitz, G.; Krauss, W.; Kruessmann, R.; Kuznetsov, V.; Mazul, I.; Widak, V.; Ovchinnikov, I.; Ruprecht, R.; Zeep, B.

    2007-01-01

    Goal of the He-cooled divertor development for future fusion power plants is to resist a high heat flux of at least 10 MW/m 2 . The development includes the fields of design, analyses, and experiments. A helium-cooled modular jet concept (HEMJ) has been defined as reference solution, which is based on jet impingement cooling. In cooperation with the Efremov Institute, work was aimed at construction and high heat flux tests of prototypical tungsten mockups to demonstrate their manufacturability and their performances. A helium loop was built for this purpose to simulate the realistic thermo-hydraulics conditions close to those of DEMO (10 MPa He, 600 deg. C). The first high heat flux test results confirm the feasibility and the performance of the divertor design

  10. European DEMO BOT solid breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.

    1994-11-01

    The BOT (Breeder Outside Tube) Solid Breeder Blanket for a fusion DEMO reactor is presented. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. In the paper the reference blanket design and external loops are described as well as the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, tritium control and extraction, development and irradiation of the ceramic breeder material, beryllium development, ferromagnetic forces caused by disruptions, safety and reliability. An outlook is given on the remaining open questions and on the required R and D program. (orig.) [de

  11. A continuous winding scheme for superconducting tokamak coils with cable-in-conduit conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-ho; Chung, Kie-hyung; Lee, Deok Kyo

    2001-01-01

    Superconducting magnet coils are essential for steady-state or long-pulse operation of tokamaks. In an advanced tokamak, the central solenoid (CS) coils are usually divided into several pairs of modules to provide for an extra plasma shaping capability in addition to those available from the shaping (poloidal field) coils. In the conventional pancake winding scheme of superconducting coils, each coil consists of separate superconducting 'double-pancake' coils connected together in series; however, such joints are not superconducting, which is one of the major disadvantages, especially in pulsed operations. A new type of winding was adopted for the ITER CS coil, which consists of cylindrical shell 'layers' joined in series. A disadvantage of this layer winding is its inability to yield modular coils that can provide certain degree of plasma shaping. Joints can be removed in a coil winding pack with the conventional pancake winding scheme, if the conductor is sufficiently long and the winding machine is properly equipped. The compactness, however, cannot be preserved with this scheme. The winding compactness is important since the radial build of the CS coils is one of the major parameters that determine the machine size. In this paper, we present a continuous winding scheme that requires no joints, allows coil fabrication at minimum dimension, and meets the flux swing requirement and other practical aspects

  12. Ideal MHD beta-limits of poloidally asymmetric equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A.M.M.; Miller, A.E.; Grimm, R.C.; Okabayashi, M.; Dalhed, H.E. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    The ideal MHD stability of poloidally asymmetric equilibria, which are typical of a tokamak reactor design with a single-null poloidal divertor is examined. As with symmetric equilibria, stability to non-axisymmetric modes improves with increasing triangularity and ellipticity, and with lower edge safety factor. Pressure profiles optimized with respect to ballooning stability are obtained for an asymmetric shape, resulting in ..beta../sub critical/ approx. = 5.7%. The corresponding value for an equivalent symmetric shape is ..beta../sub critical/ approx. = 6.5%.

  13. Ideal MHD beta-limits of poloidally asymmetric equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, A.M.M.; Miller, A.E.; Grimm, R.C.; Okabayashi, M.; Dalhed, H.E. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    The ideal MHD stability of poloidally asymmetric equilibria, which are typical of a tokamak reactor design with a single-null poloidal divertor is examined. As with symmetric equilibria, stability to non-axisymmetric modes improves with increasing triangularity and ellipticity, and with lower edge safety factor. Pressure profiles optimized with respect to ballooning stability are obtained for an asymmetric shape, resulting in β/sub critical/ approx. = 5.7%. The corresponding value for an equivalent symmetric shape is β/sub critical/ approx. = 6.5%

  14. On the interplay between turbulence and poloidal flows in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.

    1999-01-01

    The radial profile of Reynolds stress has been measured in the plasma boundary region of tokamaks and stellarator plasmas. The electrostatic Reynolds stress (proportional to r E-tilde θ >) shows a radial gradient close to the velocity shear layer location, showing that this mechanism can drive significant poloidal flows in the plasma boundary region of fusion plasmas. The generation of poloidal flows by Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) is under investigation in toroidal plasmas. The radial gradient in the Reynolds stress increases with RF power and radial electric fields are modified at the RF resonance layer. (author)

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of tokamak plasmas with poloidal mode coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigueoka, H.; Sakanaka, P.H.

    1987-01-01

    The stability behavior with respect to internal modes is examined for a class of tokamak equilibria with non-circular cross sections. The surfaces of the constant poloidal magnetic flux ψ (R,Z) are obtained numerically by solving the Grad-Shafranov's equation with a specified shape for the outmost plasma surface. The equation of motion for ideal MHD stability is written in a ortogonal coordinate system (ψ, χ, φ). Th e stability analysis is performance numerically in a truncated set of coupled m (poloidal wave number) equations. The calculations involve no approximations, and so all parameters of the equilibrium solution can be arbitrarily varied. (author) [pt

  16. DEMO development strategy based on China FPP program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Chuanhong; Feng, K.M.; Wu, W.C.; Liu, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The DEMO in China is to demonstrate the safety, reliability and environment feasibility of the fusion power plants, while to demonstrate the prospective economic feasibility of the commercial fusion power plants. Considering that there is still a long way to go towards an economically competitive commercial power plant, DEMO in China should be an indispensable step prior to the commercial one. Two options of breeding blanket with ceramic and lead lithium breeders might be chosen as DEMO concepts under the conditions of meeting the requirement of the neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and mechanics aspects. The DEMO development strategy, related R and D activities, based on China fusion power plant (FPP) program are presented. (orig.)

  17. Advances in the physics basis for the European DEMO design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenninger, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Angioni, C.; Artaud, J.-F.; Bernert, M.; Fable, E.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Garcia, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Jenko, F.; Maget, P.; Mattei, M.; Maviglia, F.; Poli, E.; Ramogida, G.; Reux, C.; Schneider, M.; Sieglin, B.; Villone, F.; Wischmeier, M.; Zohm, H.

    2015-06-01

    In the European fusion roadmap, ITER is followed by a demonstration fusion power reactor (DEMO), for which a conceptual design is under development. This paper reports the first results of a coherent effort to develop the relevant physics knowledge for that (DEMO Physics Basis), carried out by European experts. The program currently includes investigations in the areas of scenario modeling, transport, MHD, heating & current drive, fast particles, plasma wall interaction and disruptions.

  18. Water cooling coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Ito, Y; Kazawa, Y

    1975-02-05

    Object: To provide a water cooling coil in a toroidal nuclear fusion device, in which coil is formed into a small-size in section so as not to increase dimensions, weight or the like of machineries including the coil. Structure: A conductor arranged as an outermost layer of a multiple-wind water cooling coil comprises a hollow conductor, which is directly cooled by fluid, and as a consequence, a solid conductor disposed interiorly thereof is cooled indirectly.

  19. Technology and Plasma Physics Developments needed for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.

    2006-01-01

    Although no universally agreed definition of the next step after ITER exists at present it is commonly accepted that significant progress beyond the ITER base-line operating physics modes and the technologies employed in it are needed. We first review the role of DEMO in the different proposed fusion road maps and derive from them the corresponding performance requirements. A fast track to commercial fusion implies that DEMO is already close to a first of a kind power plant in all aspects except average availability. Existing power plant studies give therefore also a good approximation to the needs of DEMO. We outline the options for achieving the needed physics progress in the different characteristic parameters, and the implications for the experimental programme of ITER and accompanying satellite devices. On the time scale of the operation of ITER and of the planning DEMO, ab-initio modelling of fusion plasmas is also expected to assume a qualitatively new role. Besides the mapping of the reactor regime of plasma physics and the integration of a burning plasma with the principal reactor technologies on ITER, the development of functional and structural materials capable of handling the high power fluxes and neutron fluences, respectively is also on the critical path to DEMO. Finally we discuss the potential contributions of other confinement concepts (stellarators and spherical tokamaks) to the design of DEMO. (author)

  20. Poloidal rotation velocity measurement in toroidal plasmas via microwave reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlichenko, O.S.; Skibenko, A.I.; Fomin, I.P.; Pinos, I.B.; Ocheretenko, V.L.; Berezhniy, V.L.

    2001-01-01

    Results of experiment modeling backscattering of microwaves from rotating plasma layer perturbed by fluctuations are presented. It was shown that auto- and crosscorrelation of reflected power have a periodicity equal to rotation period. Such periodicity was observed by microwave reflectometry in experiments on RF plasma production on U-3M torsatron and was used for measurement of plasma poloidal rotation velocity. (author)

  1. Manufacture of EAST VS In-Vessel Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Feng; Wu, Yu; Du, Shijun; Jin, Huan; Yu, Min; Han, Qiyang; Wan, Jiansheng; Liu, Bin; Qiao, Jingchun; Liu, Xiaochuan; Li, Chang; Cai, Denggang; Tong, Yunhua

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • ITER like Stainless Steel Mineral Insulation Conductor (SSMIC) used for EAST Tokamak VS In-Vessel Coil manufacture first time. • Research on SSMIC fabrication was introduced in detail. • Two sets totally four single-turn VS coils were manufactured and installed in place symmetrically above and below the mid-plane in the vacuum vessel of EAST. • The manufacture and inspection of the EAST VS coil especially the joint for the SSMIC connection was described in detail. • The insulation resistances of all the VS coils have no significant reduction after endurance test. -- Abstract: In the ongoing latest update round of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), two sets of two single-turn Vertical Stabilization (VS) coils were manufactured and installed symmetrically above and below the mid-plane in the vacuum vessel of EAST. The Stainless Steel Mineral Insulated Conductor (SSMIC) developed for ITER In-Vessel Coils (IVCs) in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (ASIPP) was used for the EAST VS coils manufacture. Each turn poloidal field VS coil includes three internal joints in the vacuum vessel. The middle joint connects two pieces of conductor which together form an R2.3 m arc segment inside the vacuum vessel. The other two joints connect the arc segment with the two feeders near the port along the toroidal direction to bear lower electromagnetic loads during operation. Main processes and tests include material performances checking, conductor fabrication, joint connection and testing, coil forming, insulation performances measurement were described herein

  2. Safety research on fusion DEMO in Japan: Toward development of safety strategy of a water-cooled DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Makoto, E-mail: nakamura.makoto@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho 039-3212, Aomori (Japan); Tobita, Kenji; Someya, Youji; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho 039-3212, Aomori (Japan); Gulden, Werner [Fusion for Energy, Garching D-85748 (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • This paper reports the current status of a safety research on water-cooled fusion DEMO in Japan. • We report analyses of two transients: (i) complete loss of decay heat removal and (ii) major ex-VV LOCA. • The MELCOR analysis has clarified the temperature histories of the DEMO components in complete loss of decay heat removal. • A strategy to reduce the pressure load to the final barrier confining radioactive materials is proposed against the major ex-VV LOCA. - Abstract: This paper reports the current status of a safety research on water-cooled fusion DEMO in Japan. A basic strategy of development of the safety guidelines is described for DEMO based on a water-cooled solid pebble bed blanket. Clarification of safety features of the DEMO in accident situations is a key issue to develop the guidelines. Recent achievements in understanding of the safety features of the water-cooled DEMO are reported. The MELCOR analysis has clarified the temperature histories of the DEMO components in a complete loss of decay heat removal event. The transient behavior of the first wall temperature is found to be essentially different from that of ITER. The pressure load to the tokamak cooling water system vault (TCWSV) is analyzed based on a simple model equation of the energy conservation. If the amount of the primary coolant is the same as that of Slim-CS, the previous small Japanese DEMO, the discharged water does not damage the TCWSV with the volume and pressure-tightness similar to those of pressurized light water reactors. It is shown that implementation of a pressure suppression system to the small TCWSV is effective to suppress the pressure load to the second confinement barrier.

  3. NCSX Trim Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish, M.; Brooks, A.; Rushinski, J.; Upcavage, R.

    2009-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory before work was stopped in 2008. The objective of this experiment was to develop the stellarator concept and evaluate it's potential as a model for future fusion power plants. Stellarator design requires very precisely positioned Modular Coils of complex shape to form 3D plasmas. In the design of NCSX, Trim Coils were required to compensate for both the positioning of the coils during assembly and the fabrication tolerances of the Modular Coils. Use of the Trim Coils allowed for larger tolerances increasing ease of assembly and decreasing overall cost. A set of Trim coils was developed to suppress the toroidal flux in island regions due to misalignment, magnetic materials, and eddy currents. The requirement imposed upon the design forced the toroidal flux in island regions below 10% of the total toroidal flux in the plasma. An analysis was first performed to evaluate candidate Trim Coil configurations iterating both the size, number, and position of the coils. The design was optimized considering both performance and cost while staying within the tight restraints presented by the space limited geometry. The final design of the Trim Coils incorporated a 48 Coil top bottom symmetric set. Fabrication costs were minimized by having only two coil types and using a planar conventional design with off the shelf commercial conductor. The Trim Coil design incorporated supports made from simple structural shapes assembled together in a way which allowed for adjustment as well as accommodation for the tolerance build up on the mating surfaces. This paper will summarize the analysis that led to the optimization of the Trim Coils set, the trim coil mechanical design, thermal and stress analysis, and the design of the supporting Trim Coil structure

  4. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  5. Development of a new lower hybrid antenna module using a poloidal power divider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maebara, S.; Imai, T.; Seki, M.; Suganuma, K.; Goniche, M.; Bibet, Ph.; Berio, S.; Brossaud, J.; Rey, G.; Tonon, G.

    1997-03-01

    A realistic antenna module using a poloidal divider for lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiment, is modelled and fabricated. In this antenna module test II, three types of poloidal dividers, which split the power in 3, are tested. (author)

  6. Poloidal rotation driven by electron cyclotron resonance wave in tokamak plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The poloidal electric filed, which is the drive field of poloidal rotation, has been observed and increases obviously after the injection of electron cyclotron resonance wave in HL-2A experiment, and the amplitude of the poloidal electric field is in the order of 103 V/m. Through theoretical analysis using Stringer rotation model, the observed poloidal electric field is of the same order as the theoretical calculation value. In addition, the magnetic pump damping which would damp the poloidal rotation is calculated numerically and the calculation results show that the closer to the core plasmas, the stronger the magnetic pump damping will be. Meanwhile, according to the value of the calculated magnetic pump damping, the threshold of the poloidal electric field which could overcome magnetic pump damping and drive poloidal rotation in tokamak plasmas is given out. Finally, the poloidal rotation velocity over time at different minor radius is studied theoretically.

  7. A tokamak with nearly uniform coil stress based on virial theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, H.

    2002-01-01

    A novel tokamak concept with a new type of toroidal field (TF) coils and a central solenoid (CS) whose stress is much reduced to a theoretical limit determined by the virial theorem has been devised. Recently, we had developed a tokamak with force-balanced coils (FBCs) which are multi-pole helical hybrid coils combining TF coils and a CS coil. The combination reduces the net electromagnetic force in the direction of major radius. In this work, we have extended the FBC concept using the virial theorem. High-field coils should accordingly have same averaged principal stresses in all directions, whereas conventional FBC reduces stress in the toroidal direction only. Using a shell model, we have obtained the poloidal rotation number of helical coils which satisfy the uniform stress condition, and named the coil as virial-limited coil (VLC). VLC with circular cross section of aspect ratio A=2 reduces maximum stress to 60% compared with that of TF coils. In order to prove the advantage of VLC concept, we have designed a small VLC tokamak Todoroki-II. The plasma discharge in Todoroki-II will be presented. (author)

  8. Extension and comparison of neoclassical models for poloidal rotation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Several neoclassical models for the calculation of poloidal rotation in tokamaks were rederived within a common framework, extended to include additional physics and numerically compared. The importance of new physics phenomena not usually included in poloidal rotation calculations (e.g., poloidal electric field, VxB force resulting from enhanced radial particle flow arising from the ionization of recycling neutrals) was examined. Extensions of the Hirshman-Sigmar, Kim-Diamond-Groebner, and Stacey-Sigmar poloidal rotation models are presented

  9. Biomaterials Made from Coiled-Coil Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conticello, Vincent; Hughes, Spencer; Modlin, Charles

    The development of biomaterials designed for specific applications is an important objective in personalized medicine. While the breadth and prominence of biomaterials have increased exponentially over the past decades, critical challenges remain to be addressed, particularly in the development of biomaterials that exhibit highly specific functions. These functional properties are often encoded within the molecular structure of the component molecules. Proteins, as a consequence of their structural specificity, represent useful substrates for the construction of functional biomaterials through rational design. This chapter provides an in-depth survey of biomaterials constructed from coiled-coils, one of the best-understood protein structural motifs. We discuss the utility of this structurally diverse and functionally tunable class of proteins for the creation of novel biomaterials. This discussion illustrates the progress that has been made in the development of coiled-coil biomaterials by showcasing studies that bridge the gap between the academic science and potential technological impact.

  10. Neutronic analysis of a dual He/LiPb coolant breeding blanket for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalan, J.P.; Ogando, F.; Sanz, J.; Palermo, I.; Veredas, G.; Gomez-Ros, J.M.; Sedano, L.

    2011-01-01

    A conceptual design of a DEMO fusion reactor is being developed under the Spanish Breeding Blanket Technology Programme: TECNO F US based on a He/LiPb dual coolant blanket as reference design option. The following issues have been analyzed to address the demonstration of the neutronic reliability of this conceptual blanket design: power amplification capacity of the blanket, tritium breeding capability for fuel self-sufficiency, power deposition due to nuclear heating in superconducting coils and material damage (dpa, gas production) to estimate the operational life of the steel-made structural components in the blanket and vacuum vessel (VV). In order to optimize the shielding of the coils different combinations of water and steel have been considered for the gap of the VV. The used neutron source is based on an axi-symmetric 2D fusion reaction profile for the given plasma equilibrium configuration. MCNPX has been used for transport calculations and ACAB has been used to handle gas production and damage energy cross sections.

  11. Development of a master model concept for DEMO vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozzillo, Rocco; Marzullo, Domenico; Tarallo, Andrea [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Bachmann, Christian [EUROfusion PMU, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Di Gironimo, Giuseppe, E-mail: peppe.digironimo@gmail.com [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The present work concerns the development of a first master concept model for DEMO vacuum vessel. • A parametric-associative CAD master model concept of a DEMO VV sector has been developed in accordance with DEMO design guidelines. • A proper CAD design methodology has been implemented in view of the later FEM analyses based on “shell elements”. - Abstract: This paper describes the development of a master model concept of the DEMO vacuum vessel (VV) conducted within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium. Starting from the VV space envelope defined in the DEMO baseline design 2014, the layout of the VV structure was preliminarily defined according to the design criteria provided in RCC-MRx. A surface modelling technique was adopted and efficiently linked to the finite element (FE) code to simplify future FE analyses. In view of possible changes to shape and structure during the conceptual design activities, a parametric design approach allows incorporating modifications to the model efficiently.

  12. Development of a master model concept for DEMO vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozzillo, Rocco; Marzullo, Domenico; Tarallo, Andrea; Bachmann, Christian; Di Gironimo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The present work concerns the development of a first master concept model for DEMO vacuum vessel. • A parametric-associative CAD master model concept of a DEMO VV sector has been developed in accordance with DEMO design guidelines. • A proper CAD design methodology has been implemented in view of the later FEM analyses based on “shell elements”. - Abstract: This paper describes the development of a master model concept of the DEMO vacuum vessel (VV) conducted within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium. Starting from the VV space envelope defined in the DEMO baseline design 2014, the layout of the VV structure was preliminarily defined according to the design criteria provided in RCC-MRx. A surface modelling technique was adopted and efficiently linked to the finite element (FE) code to simplify future FE analyses. In view of possible changes to shape and structure during the conceptual design activities, a parametric design approach allows incorporating modifications to the model efficiently.

  13. Comparison study on neutronic analysis of the K-DEMO water cooled ceramic breeder blanket using MCNP and ATTILA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Sung, E-mail: jspark@nfri.re.kr; Kwon, Sungjin; Im, Kihak

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A comparison study of main parameter calculations: neutron wall loading (NWL), tritium breeding ratio (TBR), and nuclear heating, on a Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) neutronic analysis model using MCNP and ATTILA was performed to investigate the feasibility of using ATTILA. • The calculation results of this study indicates that ATTILA showed close agreement with MCNP within ranges (3.3–28%). • Partly high discrepancy (17–28%) results between two codes existed to the nuclear heating calculation in high attenuating materials and radially thick structure regions. • The rest of the results showed small differences of NWL calculation (3.3%) and TBR distribution (3.9%). • ATTILA could be acceptable for K-DEMO neutronic analysis considering discrepancy (3.3–28%). - Abstract: A comparison study of main parameter calculations: neutron wall loading (NWL), tritium breeding ratio (TBR), and nuclear heating, on a Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) neutronic analysis model using MCNP and ATTILA was performed to investigate the feasibility of using ATTILA for the main parameter calculations. The model was created by commercial CAD program (Pro-Engineer™) as a 22.5° sector of tokamak consisting of major components such as blankets, shields, divertors, vacuum vessels (VV), toroidal field (TF) coils, and others, which was directly imported into ATTILA by Parasolid file. The discretizing in space, angle, and energy variables were refined for application of the K-DEMO neutronic analysis model through an iterative process since these variables greatly impact on accuracy, solution times, and memory consumptions in ATTILA. The main parameter calculations using ATTILA and the result of comparison studies indicate that the NWL distributions by two codes were almost agreed within discrepancy of 3.3%; the TBR distribution using ATTILA was slightly bigger than MCNP with a difference 3.9%; the nuclear heating values on TF coils and VV

  14. The design study of the JT-60SU device. No. 3. The superconductor-coils of JT-60SU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushigusa, Kenkichi; Mori, Katsuharu; Nakagawa, Syouji

    1997-03-01

    The superconducting coil systems and the cryogenic system for the JT-60 Super Upgrade (JT-60SU) has been designed. Both Nb 3 Al and NbTi as a superconducting wire material are employed in the toroidal coils (D-shaped 18 coils) to realize a high field magnet with a low cost. Significant reduction of the coil weight (150 tons/coil) without losing the coil rigidity has been achieved by connecting two toroidal coils with shear panels. Validity of this design is confirmed by the detailed structural analysis and thermohydraulic analysis. The poloidal coil system consists of 4 central solenoid coils with (NbTi) 3 Sn and 6 outer equilibrium field coils with NbTi. This system has an enough capability to supply the flux of 170Vs to produce a 10MA discharge with 200s of flat-top and to make various plasma configurations. The construction procedure of the poloidal coil system is also established under the constraint of the JT-60 site. Two sets of race-track shaped superconducting coils mounted on the top of the machine is designed to compensate the error field inside the vessel by supplying helical (m=2/n=1) magnetic field. By using cryogenic system with a 36kW of cooling capacity, the total cold weight of around 4000tons can be cooled down to 4.5K within one month, and steady heat load of 6.5kW and transient heat load of 9.0MJ can be removed within 30 minutes of discharge repetition rate. (author)

  15. Superconducting magnetic coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  16. Predictions of the poloidal asymmetries and transport frequencies in KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, C., E-mail: cbae@nfri.re.kr; Lee, S. G.; Terzolo, L. [National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Stacey, W. M. [Fusion Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    The extended neoclassical rotation theory formulated in Miller flux surface geometry enables unprecedented neoclassical calculations of the poloidal asymmetries in density, rotation velocities, electrostatic potential along the flux surfaces, and of the inertial (Reynolds stress) and gyroviscous transport frequencies, which are strong functions of these asymmetries. This paper presents such calculations of the poloidal asymmetries and non-negligible inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies in two KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 094006 (2011)] Neutral Beam Injection H-mode discharges. The in-out asymmetries in the velocities are an order of magnitude larger than their up-down asymmetries. The magnitudes of the predicted inertial and gyroviscous transport frequencies depend on the magnitudes of the density and velocity asymmetries. The neoclassically predicted density asymmetries are shown to correspond with the reported measurements in tokamaks and the predicted carbon toroidal velocities agree very well with the measurements in KSTAR.

  17. Cooling and dehumidifying coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    The operating features of cooling and dehumidifying coils and their constructional details are discussed. The heat transfer relations as applicable to the boiling refrigerant and a single phase fluid are presented. Methods of accounting for the effect of moisture condensation on the air side heat transfer coefficient and the fin effectiveness are explained. The logic flow necessary to analyze direct expansion coils and chilled water coils is discussed

  18. The JET divertor coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.R.; Froger, C.; Sborchia, C.

    1989-01-01

    The divertor coil is mounted inside the Jet vacuum vessel and is able to carry 1 MA turns. It is of conventional construction - water cooled copper, epoxy glass insulation -and is contained in a thin stainless steel case. The coil has to be assembled, insulated and encased inside the Jet vacuum vessel. A description of the coil is given, together with technical information (including mechanical effects on the vacuum vessel), an outline of the manufacture process and a time schedule. (author)

  19. Disruption-induced poloidal currents in the tokamak wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Induction effects during disruptions and rapid transient events in tokamaks. • Plasma-wall electromagnetic interaction. • Flux-conserving evolution of plasma equilibrium. • Poloidal current induced in the vacuum vessel wall in a tokamak. • Complete analytical derivations and estimates. - Abstract: The poloidal current induced in the tokamak wall during fast transient events is analytically evaluated. The analysis is based on the electromagnetic relations coupled with plasma equilibrium equations. The derived formulas describe the consequences of both thermal and current quenches. In the final form, they give explicit dependence of the wall current on the plasma pressure and current. A comparison with numerical results of Villone et al. [F. Villone, G. Ramogida, G. Rubinacci, Fusion Eng. Des. 93, 57 (2015)] for IGNITOR is performed. Our analysis confirms the importance of the effects described there. The estimates show that the disruption-induced poloidal currents in the wall should be necessarily taken into account in the studies of disruptions and disruption mitigation in ITER.

  20. Initial results from the Tokapole-II poloidal divertor device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, A.P.; Dexter, R.N.; Groebner, R.J.; Holly, D.J.; Lipschultz, B.; Phillips, M.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sprott, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The latest in a series of internal-ring devices, called Tokapole II, has recently begun operation at the University of Wisconsin. Its purpose is to permit the study of the production and confinement of hot, dense plasmas in either a toroidal octupole (with or without toroidal field) or a tokamak with a four-node poloidal divertor. The characteristics of the device and the results of its initial operation are described here. Quantitative measurements of impurity concentration and radiated power have been made. Poloidal divertor equilibria of square and dee shapes have been produced, and an axisymmetric instability has been observed with the inverse dee. Electron cyclotron resonance heating is used to initiate the breakdown near the axis and to control the initial influx of impurities. A 2-MW RF source at the second harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency is available and has been used to double the ion temperature when operated at low power with an unoptimized antenna. Initial results of operation as a pure octupole with poloidal Ohmic heating suggest a tokamak-like scaling of density (n proportional to Bsub(p)) and confinement time (tau proportional to n). (author)

  1. Disruption-induced poloidal currents in the tokamak wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovitov, V.D., E-mail: Pustovitov_VD@nrcki.ru [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Pl. Kurchatova 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409, Russia (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Induction effects during disruptions and rapid transient events in tokamaks. • Plasma-wall electromagnetic interaction. • Flux-conserving evolution of plasma equilibrium. • Poloidal current induced in the vacuum vessel wall in a tokamak. • Complete analytical derivations and estimates. - Abstract: The poloidal current induced in the tokamak wall during fast transient events is analytically evaluated. The analysis is based on the electromagnetic relations coupled with plasma equilibrium equations. The derived formulas describe the consequences of both thermal and current quenches. In the final form, they give explicit dependence of the wall current on the plasma pressure and current. A comparison with numerical results of Villone et al. [F. Villone, G. Ramogida, G. Rubinacci, Fusion Eng. Des. 93, 57 (2015)] for IGNITOR is performed. Our analysis confirms the importance of the effects described there. The estimates show that the disruption-induced poloidal currents in the wall should be necessarily taken into account in the studies of disruptions and disruption mitigation in ITER.

  2. Issues and strategies for DEMO in-vessel component integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, C.; Arbeiter, F.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Coleman, M.; Federici, G.; Fischer, U.; Kemp, R.; Maviglia, F.; Mazzone, G.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Roccella, R.; Taylor, N.; Villari, R.; Villone, F.; Wenninger, R.; You, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    In the frame of the EUROfusion Consortium activities were launched in 2014 to develop a concept of a DEMO reactor including a large R&D program and the integrated design of the tokamak systems. The integration of the in-vessel components (IVCs) must accommodate numerous constraints imposed by their operating environment, the requirements for precise alignment, high performance, reliability, and remote maintainability. This makes the development of any feasible design a major challenge. Although DEMO is defined to be a one-of-a-kind device there needs to be in addition to the development of the IVC design solutions a remarkable emphasis on the optimization of these solutions already at the conceptual level. Their design has a significant impact on the machine layout, complexity, and performance. This paper identifies design and technology limitations of IVCs, their consequences on the integration principles, and introduces strategies currently considered in the DEMO tokamak design approach.

  3. Comparative study of cost models for tokamak DEMO fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Tetsutarou; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Ban, Kanae; Kondo, Takuya; Tobita, Kenji; Goto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Cost evaluation analysis of the tokamak-type demonstration reactor DEMO using the PEC (physics-engineering-cost) system code is underway to establish a cost evaluation model for the DEMO reactor design. As a reference case, a DEMO reactor with reference to the SSTR (steady state tokamak reactor) was designed using PEC code. The calculated total capital cost was in the same order of that proposed previously in cost evaluation studies for the SSTR. Design parameter scanning analysis and multi regression analysis illustrated the effect of parameters on the total capital cost. The capital cost was predicted to be inside the range of several thousands of M$s in this study. (author)

  4. Issues and strategies for DEMO in-vessel component integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, C., E-mail: christian.bachmann@euro-fusion.org [EUROfusion PMU, Garching (Germany); Arbeiter, F.; Boccaccini, L.V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Coleman, M.; Federici, G. [EUROfusion PMU, Garching (Germany); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Kemp, R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maviglia, F. [EUROfusion PMU, Garching (Germany); Mazzone, G. [ENEA Dipartimento Fusione e Sicurezza Nucleare C. R. Frascati – via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Roccella, R. [ITER Organization, St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Taylor, N. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Villari, R. [ENEA Dipartimento Fusione e Sicurezza Nucleare C. R. Frascati – via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Villone, F. [ENEA-CREATE Association, DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridiona (Italy); Wenninger, R. [EUROfusion PMU, Garching (Germany); You, J.-H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    In the frame of the EUROfusion Consortium activities were launched in 2014 to develop a concept of a DEMO reactor including a large R&D program and the integrated design of the tokamak systems. The integration of the in-vessel components (IVCs) must accommodate numerous constraints imposed by their operating environment, the requirements for precise alignment, high performance, reliability, and remote maintainability. This makes the development of any feasible design a major challenge. Although DEMO is defined to be a one-of-a-kind device there needs to be in addition to the development of the IVC design solutions a remarkable emphasis on the optimization of these solutions already at the conceptual level. Their design has a significant impact on the machine layout, complexity, and performance. This paper identifies design and technology limitations of IVCs, their consequences on the integration principles, and introduces strategies currently considered in the DEMO tokamak design approach.

  5. Fault Analysis of ITER Coil Power Supply System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Ho; Jun, Tao; Benfatto, Ivone

    2009-01-01

    The ITER magnet coils are all designed using superconductors with high current carrying capability. The Toroidal Field (TF) coils operate in a steadystate mode with a current of 68 kA and discharge the stored energy in case of quench with using 9 interleaved Fast Discharge Units (FDUs). The Central Solenoid (CS) coils and Poloidal Field (PF) coils operate in a pulse mode with currents of up to 45 kA and require fast variation of currents inducing more than 10 kV during normal operation on the coil terminals using Switching Network (SN) systems (CSs, PF1 and 6) and Booster and VS converters (PF2 to 5), which are series connected to Main converters. SN and FDU systems comprise high current DC circuit breakers and resistors for generating high voltage (SN) and to dissipate magnetic energy (FDUs). High transient voltages can arise due to the switching operation of SN and FD and the characteristics of resistors and stray components of DC distribution systems. Also, faults in power supply control such as shorts or grounding faults can produce higher voltages between terminals and between terminal and ground. Therefore, the design of the coil insulation, coil terminal regions, feeders, feed throughs, pipe breaks and instrumentation must take account of these high voltages during normal and abnormal conditions. Voltage insulation level can be defined and it is necessary to test the coils at higher voltages, to be sure of reliable performance during the lifetime of operation. This paper describes the fault analysis of the TF, CS and PF coil power supply systems, taking account of the stray parameter of the power supply and switching systems and inductively coupled superconducting coil models. Resistor grounding systems are included in the simulation model and all fault conditions such as converter hardware and software faults, switching system hardware and software faults, DC short circuits and single grounding faults are simulated. The occurrence of two successive faults

  6. A preliminary conceptual design study for Korean fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keeman, E-mail: kkeeman@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan; Oh, Sangjun; Lee, Young Seok; Yeom, Jun Ho; Im, Kihak; Lee, Gyung-Su [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Neilson, George; Kessel, Charles; Brown, Thomas; Titus, Peter [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Perform a preliminary conceptual study for a steady-state Korean DEMO reactor. ► Present design guidelines and requirements of Korean DEMO reactor. ► Present a preliminary design of TF (toroidal field) and CS (central solenoid) magnet. ► Present a preliminary result of the radial build scheme of Korean DEMO reactor. -- Abstract: As the ITER is being constructed, there is a growing anticipation for an earlier realization of fusion energy, so called fast-track approach. Korean strategy for fusion energy can be regarded as a fast-track approach and one special concept discussed in this paper is a two-stage development plan. At first, a steady-state Korean DEMO Reactor (K-DEMO) is designed not only to demonstrate a net electricity generation and a self-sustained tritium cycle, but also to be used as a component test facility. Then, at its second stage, a major upgrade is carried out by replacing in-vessel components in order to show a net electric generation on the order of 300 MWe and the competitiveness in cost of electricity (COE). The major radius is designed to be just below 6.5 m, considering practical engineering feasibilities. By using high performance Nb{sub 3}Sn-based superconducting cable currently available, high magnetic field at the plasma center above 8 T can be achieved. A design concept for TF magnets and radial builds for the K-DEMO considering a vertical maintenance scheme, are presented together with preliminary design parameters.

  7. First Trial of Real-time Poloidal Beta Control in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyunsun; Hahn, S. H.; Bak, J. G.; Walker, M. L.; Woo, M. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, Y. J.; Bae, Y. S.; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    Sustaining the plasma in a stable and a high performance condition is one of the important control issues for future steady state tokamaks. In the 2014 KSTAR campaign, we have developed a real-time poloidal beta (βp) control technique and carried out preliminary experiments to identify its feasibility. In the control system, the βp is calculated in real time using the measured diamagnetic loop signal (DLM03) with coil pickup corrections, and compared with the target value leading to the change of the neutral beam (NB) heating power using a feedback PID control algorithm. To match the required power of NB which is operated with constant voltage, the duty cycles of the modulation were adjusted as the ratio of the required power to the maximum achievable one. This paper will present the overall procedures of the βp control, the βp estimation process implemented in the plasma control system, and the analysis on the preliminary experimental results. This work is supported by the KSTAR research project funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning of Korea.

  8. A preliminary systems assessment of the Starlite Demo candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.

    1995-01-01

    The Starlite project has evaluated the following five tokamaks as candidates for the US Demo Power Plant: (1) steady state, first stability regime; (2) pulsed, first stability regime; (3) steady state, second stability regime; (4) steady state, reversed shear; and (5) steady state, low aspect ratio. Systems analysis of these candidates has played an important role in the selection of a reversed-shear tokamak for further conceptual design as a US Demo Power Plant. The cost-based systems analysis that led to the selection of a reversed-shear tokamak is described herein

  9. Structural analysis of superconducting coils for fusion reactors taking into account the slip between conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, R.E.; Schrefler, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    A finite element formulation of friction effects for multilayered superconductors based on partially bonded beam systems is shown. The stiffness matrix of superconductor elements is derived, which takes into account the effects of friction between conductors. Examples relating to superconductors proposed for the NET toroidal and poloidal field coils show that the effects of slip are not negligible and should be taken into account in a structural analysis of the coil system. Also parametric studies with varying widths and heights of the insulation layer are shown

  10. Active internal corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.; Dahl, P.

    1986-01-01

    Trim or corrector coils to correct main magnet field errors and provide higher multipole fields for beam optics purposes are a standard feature of superconducting magnet accelerator systems. This paper describes some of the design and construction features of powered internal trim coils and a sampling of the test results obtained

  11. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Berry, L.A.; Boozer, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  12. Liquid rope coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribe, N.M.; Habibi, M.; Bonn, D.

    2012-01-01

    A thin stream or rope of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a steadily rotating helical coil. Tabletop laboratory experiments in combination with a numerical model for slender liquid ropes reveal that finite-amplitude coiling can occur in four distinct regimes

  13. Industrial engineering studies for the manufacture of the ITER PF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libeyre, P.; Decool, P.; Guerin, O.; Perrella, M.; Bourquard, A.

    2007-01-01

    Industrial studies have been carried out in Europe to prepare the manufacture of the five poloidal field (PF) coils, which will be manufactured on the ITER site. A first study, carried out by Ansaldo Superconduttori, addressed the manufacturing sequence, assuming the manufacture of the PF coils inside the two buildings which will further host the cryogenic system. A second study, carried out by Alstom investigated how to achieve the manufacture of some crucial points. A new layout of the manufacturing line was proposed, aiming at manufacture of the PF2-6 coils within 36 months. A recent study performed by Alstom, assumes the manufacture of the PF coils in a single dedicated building, releasing so the constraint of meeting the deadline fixed in ITER reference scheme by the starting point of installation of the cryogenic components

  14. On tungsten technologies and qualification for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J. van der; Hegeman, H.; Wouters, O.; Luzginova, N.; Jonker, B.; Van der Marck, S.; Opschoor, J.; Wang, J.; Dowling, G.; Stuivenga, M.; Carton, E.

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are considered prime candidates for the in-vessel components directly facing the plasma. For example, in the HEMJ helium cooled divertor design tiles may be operated at temperatures up to 1700 deg. C, supported by a structure partially consisting of tungsten at temperatures from 600 to 1000 deg. C, and connected to a HT steel structure. The tungsten armoured primary wall is operated at 500-900 deg. C. Irradiation doses will be few tens dpa at minimum, but FPR requirements for plants availability will stretch these targets. Recently injection moulding technology was developed for pure tungsten and representative parts were manufactured for ITER monobloc divertors and DEMO HEMJ thimbles. The major advantages for this technology are the efficient use of material feedstock/resources and the intrinsic possibility to produce near-finished product, avoiding machining processes that are costly and may introduce surface defects deteriorating the component in service performance. It is well suited for mass-manufacturing of components as well known in e.g. lighting industries. To further qualify this material technology various specimen types were produced with processing parameters identical to the components, and tested successfully, showing the high potential for implementation in (fusion) devices. Furthermore, the engineering approach can clearly be tailored away from conventional design and manufacturing technologies based on bulk materials. The technology is suitable for shaping of new W-alloys and W-ODS variants as well. Basically this technology allows a particular qualification trajectory. There is no need to produce large batches of material during the material development and optimization stage. For the verification of irradiation behaviour in the specific neutron spectra, there is a further attractive feature to use e.g. isotope tailored powders to adjust to available irradiation facilities like MTR's. In addition the ingrowth of transmutation

  15. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  16. Change of manufacturing technique for the W7-X nonplanar coil cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehring, M.; Schaefer, P.; Herrmann, K.D.; Scheller, H.

    2001-01-01

    The geometry of the coil cases of the nonplanar coil system for the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) experiment (Sapper, The superconducting magnet system for the W7-X stellarator. Proceedings 12th Topical Meeting on the Fusion Technology) was changed to a more complex shape compared to the DEMO Coil case (Kronhardt et al., 1998. Proceedings of the 20th SOFT (1998) 731-734). Therefore the manufacturing technique developed for the DEMO Coil case cannot be used for the series production of 50 coils. For the final design of the coil cases, investigations were performed to find a technique suitable for manufacturing the cases within the required geometrical tolerances and mechanical characteristics. In order to qualify the manufacturing technique a complete half case was cast and machined afterwards. The casting procedure was optimised with respect to the geometrical accuracy and the mechanical characteristics at 4.2 K. Measurements of the yield strength, the tensile strength, the elongation, and the Young's modulus were performed at room- and cryo-temperature (4 and 7 K). The influence of the heat treatment, the annealing temperature and the size of the casting on the mechanical values is shown. The requirements on the stainless steel are a yield strength of 800 MPa at 4 K and an elongation at fracture of >25%. The magnetic permeability has to be <1.01. Furthermore the welding properties of the case material were investigated. The development program showed that casting of complete case half shells is a feasible manufacturing technique for the series production of the Wendelstein 7-X nonplanar coil cases

  17. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Akers, R.J.; Allan, S.Y.; Appel, L.C.; Ben Ayed, N.; Challis, C.D.; Chapman, I.T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.J.; Cox, M.; Abel, I.G.; Barnes, M.; Allan, A.; Barratt, N.C.; Asunta, O.; Bradley, J.W.; Canik, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cecconello, M.

    2013-01-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis of the pedestal highlights the potential roles of micro-tearing modes and kinetic ballooning modes for the pedestal formation. Mitigation of edge localized modes (ELM) using resonant magnetic perturbation has been demonstrated for toroidal mode numbers n = 3, 4, 6 with an ELM frequency increase by up to a factor of 9, compatible with pellet fuelling. The peak heat flux of mitigated and natural ELMs follows the same linear trend with ELM energy loss and the first ELM-resolved T i measurements in the divertor region are shown. Measurements of flow shear and turbulence dynamics during L–H transitions show filaments erupting from the plasma edge whilst the full flow shear is still present. Off-axis neutral beam injection helps to strongly reduce the redistribution of fast-ions due to fishbone modes when compared to on-axis injection. Low-k ion-scale turbulence has been measured in L-mode and compared to global gyro-kinetic simulations. A statistical analysis of principal turbulence time scales shows them to be of comparable magnitude and reasonably correlated with turbulence decorrelation time. T e inside the island of a neoclassical tearing mode allow the analysis of the island evolution without assuming specific models for the heat flux. Other results include the discrepancy of the current profile evolution during the current ramp-up with solutions of the poloidal field diffusion equation, studies of the anomalous Doppler resonance compressional Alfvén eigenmodes, disruption mitigation studies and modelling of the new divertor design for MAST Upgrade. The novel 3D electron Bernstein synthetic imaging shows promising first data sensitive to the edge current profile and flows

  18. Large coil task and results of testing US coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1986-01-01

    The United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland have collaborated since 1978 in development of superconducting toroidal field coils for fusion reactor applications. The United States provided a test facility nd three coils; the other participants, one coil each. All coils have the same interface dimensions and performance requirements (stable at 8 T), but internal design was decided by each team. Two US coil teams chose bath-cooled NbTi, 10-kA conductors. One developed a Nb 3 Sn conductor, cooled by internal flow, rated at 18 kA. All US coils have diagnostic instrumentation and imbedded heaters that enable stability tests and simulated nuclear heating experiments. In single-coil tests, each coil operated at full current in self-field (6.4 T). In six-coil tests that began in July 1986, one US coil and the Japanese coil hve been successfully operated at full current at 8 T. The other coils have operated as background coils while awaiting their turn as test coil. Coil tests have been informative and results gratifying. The facility has capably supported coil testing and its operation has provided information that will be useful in designing future fusion systems. Coil capabilities beyond nominal design points will be determined

  19. Scoping the parameter space for demo and the engineering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W R.

    1999-01-01

    In our IFE development plan, we have set a goal of building an Engineering Test Facility (ETF) for a total cost of $2B and a Demo for $3B. In Mike Campbell s presentation at Madison, we included a viewgraph with an example Demo that had 80 to 250 MWe of net power and showed a plausible argument that it could cost less than $3B. In this memo, I examine the design space for the Demo and then briefly for the ETF. Instead of attempting to estimate the costs of the drivers, I pose the question in a way to define R ampersand D goals: As a function of key design and performance parameters, how much can the driver cost if the total facility cost is limited to the specified goal? The design parameters examined for the Demo included target gain, driver energy, driver efficiency, and net power output. For the ETF; the design parameters are target gain, driver energy, and target yield. The resulting graphs of allowable driver cost determine the goals that the driver R ampersand D programs must seek to meet

  20. Configuration management of the EU DEMO conceptual design data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meszaros, Botond; Shannon, Mark; Marzullo, Domenico; Woodley, Colin; Rowe, Steve; Di Gironimo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Description of the selection of the DEMO Product Data Management tool. • Introduction of the DEMO configuration management philosophy for the CAD design data. • Description of the enabling tools and systems of the configuration management. - Abstract: The EUROfusion Consortium is setting up – as part of the EU Fusion Roadmap – the framework for the implementation of the (pre)conceptual design phase of the DEMO reactor. Configuration management needs have been identified as one of the key elements of this framework and is the topic of this paper, in particular the configuration of the CAD design data. The desire is to keep the definition and layout of the corresponding systems “light weight” and relatively easy to manage, whilst simultaneously providing a level of detail in the definition of the design configuration that is fit for the purpose of a conceptual design. This paper aims to describe the steps followed during the definition of the configuration management system of the DEMO design data in terms of (i) the identification of the appropriate product data management system, (ii) the description of the philosophy of the configuration management of the design data, and (iii) the introduction of the most important enabling processes.

  1. Design and development of ceramic breeder demo blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoeda, M.; Sato, S.; Hatano, T.

    2001-01-01

    Ceramic breeder blanket development has been widely conducted in Japan from fundamental researches to project-oriented engineering scaled development. A long term R and D program has been launched in JAERI since 1996 as a course of DEMO blanket development. The objectives of this program are to provide engineering data base and fabrication technologies of the DEMO blanket, aiming at module testing in ITER currently scheduled to start from the beginning of the ITER operation as a near-term target. Two types of DEMO blanket systems, water cooled blanket and helium cooled blanket, have been designed to be consistent with the SSTR (Steady State Tokamak Reactor) which is the reference DEMO reactor design in JAERI. Both of them utilize packed small pebbles of breeder Li 2 O or Li 2 TiO 3 as a candidate) and neutron multiplier (Be) and rely on the development of advanced structural materials (a reduced activation ferritic steel F82H) compatible with high temperature operation. (author)

  2. Configuration management of the EU DEMO conceptual design data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meszaros, Botond; Shannon, Mark [EUROfusion Consortium, PPPT Department, Garching, Boltzmannstr. 2 (Germany); Marzullo, Domenico [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Woodley, Colin; Rowe, Steve [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Di Gironimo, Giuseppe [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Description of the selection of the DEMO Product Data Management tool. • Introduction of the DEMO configuration management philosophy for the CAD design data. • Description of the enabling tools and systems of the configuration management. - Abstract: The EUROfusion Consortium is setting up – as part of the EU Fusion Roadmap – the framework for the implementation of the (pre)conceptual design phase of the DEMO reactor. Configuration management needs have been identified as one of the key elements of this framework and is the topic of this paper, in particular the configuration of the CAD design data. The desire is to keep the definition and layout of the corresponding systems “light weight” and relatively easy to manage, whilst simultaneously providing a level of detail in the definition of the design configuration that is fit for the purpose of a conceptual design. This paper aims to describe the steps followed during the definition of the configuration management system of the DEMO design data in terms of (i) the identification of the appropriate product data management system, (ii) the description of the philosophy of the configuration management of the design data, and (iii) the introduction of the most important enabling processes.

  3. Japanese perspective of fusion nuclear technology from ITER to DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Takatsu, Hideyuki

    2007-01-01

    The world fusion community is now launching construction of ITER, the first nuclear-grade fusion machine in the world. In parallel to the ITER program, Broader Approach (BA) activities are to be initiated in this year by EU and Japan, mainly at Rokkasho BA site in Japan, as complementary activities to ITER toward DEMO. The BA activities include IFMIFEVEDA (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility-Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities) and DEMO design activities with generic technology R and Ds, both of which are critical to the rapid development of DEMO and commercial fusion power plants. The Atomic Energy Commission of Japan reviewed on-going third phase fusion program and issued the results of the review, 'On the policy of Nuclear Fusion Research and Development' in November 2005. In this report, it is anticipated that the ITER will be made operational in a decade and the programmatic objective can be met in the succeeding seven or eight years. Under this condition, the report presents a roadmap toward the DEMO and beyond and R and D items on fusion nuclear technology, indispensable for fusion energy utilization, are re-aligned. In the present paper, Japanese view and policy on ITER and beyond is summarized mainly from the viewpoints of nuclear fusion technology, and a minimum set of R and D elements on fusion nuclear technology, essential for fusion energy utilization, is presented. (orig.)

  4. Application of the integrated blanket-coil concept (IBC) to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Steiner, D.; Mohanti, R.; Duggan, W.

    1987-01-01

    A novel concept is proposed for combining the blanket and coil functions of a fusion reactor into a single component and several unique applications to fusion reactor embodiments are identified. The proposed concept takes advantage of the fact that lithium is a good electrical conductor in addition to being a unique tritium-breeding material capable of energy recovery and transport at high temperatures. This concept, designated the ''integrated-blanket-coil (IBC) concept'' has the potential for: allowing fusion reactor embodiments which are easier to maintain; making fusion reactors more compact with an intrinsic ultra-high mass power density (net kW/sub E//metric tonne); and enhancing the tritium breeding potential for special coil applications such as ohmic heating and bean identation. By assuming a sandwich construction for the IBC walls (i.e., a layered combination of a thin wall of structural material, insulator and structural materials) the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-induced pressure drops and associated pressure stresses are modest and well below design limits. Possible unique applications of the IBC concept have been investigated and include the IBC concept applied to the poloidal field (PF) coils, toroidal field (TF) coils, divertor coils, ohmic heating (OH) coils, and identation coils for bean shaping

  5. Commercial applications for COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  6. Open coil traction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibhute, Pavankumar Janardan

    2012-01-01

    Sliding mechanics have become a popular method for space closure, with the development of preadjusted edgewise appliances. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and extensively evaluated for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness is enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low load deflection rate/force decay. With the advent of nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) springs in orthodontics, load deflection rates have been markedly reduced. To use Ni-Ti springs, clinicians have to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. The open coil traction system, or open coil retraction spring, is developed utilizing Ni-Ti open coil springs for orthodontic space closure. This article describes the fabrication and clinical application of the open coil traction system, which has a number of advantages. It sustains a low load deflection rate with optimum force magnitude, and its design is adjustable for a desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (ie, it cannot be overactivated, and the decompression limit of the open coil is controlled by the operator). The open coil traction system can be offset from the mucosa to help reduce soft tissue impingement.

  7. Numerical estimation on balance coefficients of central difference averaging method for quench detection of the KSTAR PF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Sub; An, Seok Chan; Ko, Tae Kuk; Chu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A quench detection system of KSTAR Poloidal Field (PF) coils is inevitable for stable operation because normal zone generates overheating during quench occurrence. Recently, new voltage quench detection method, combination of Central Difference Averaging (CDA) and Mutual Inductance Compensation (MIK) for compensating mutual inductive voltage more effectively than conventional voltage detection method, has been suggested and studied. For better performance of mutual induction cancellation by adjacent coils of CDA+MIK method for KSTAR coil system, balance coefficients of CDA must be estimated and adjusted preferentially. In this paper, the balance coefficients of CDA for KSTAR PF coils were numerically estimated. The estimated result was adopted and tested by using simulation. The CDA method adopting balance coefficients effectively eliminated mutual inductive voltage, and also it is expected to improve performance of CDA+MIK method for quench detection of KSTAR PF coils

  8. Energy deposition on the FTU poloidal limiter during disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciotti, M.; Franzoni, G.; Maddaluno, G.

    1994-01-01

    The first results of the program for the characterization of the thermal flux on the FTU poloidal limiter during disruptions are presented. Data on power fluxes are obtained by using an infrared detector and a set of thermocouples. Two peaks in the limiter thermal load, corresponding to the thermal (up to 500 MW/m2) and magnetic quenches, are well resolved by the infrared detector allowing the time correlation with other first diagnostic measurements. The dependence on the main plasma parameters of the intensity and time evolution of the thermal flux to the limiter is discussed

  9. Axisymmetric stability of vertically asymmetric tokamaks at large beta poloidal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Fishman, H.; Okabayashi, M.; Todd, A.M.M.

    1981-09-01

    The stability of high-β vertically asymmetric tokamak equilibria to rigid displacements is investigated analytically. It is found that vertical stability at large beta poloidal is mainly determined by a coupling between the shape of the plasma surface and the Shafranov shift of the magnetic axis. To the lowest order, symmetric components of the plasma surface shape are found to be the critical destabilizing elements. Asymmetric components have little effect. The inclusion of higher order terms in the high β tokamak expansion leads to further destabilization. Qualitative agreement between these analytic results and numerical stability calculations using the PEST code is demonstrated

  10. Poloidal variations in toroidal fusion reactor wall power loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.C.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    A geometric formulation is developed by the authors for determining poloidal variations in bremmstrahlung, cyclotron radiation, and neutron wall power loadings in toroidal fusion devices. Assuming toroidal symmetry and utilizing a numerical model which partitions the plasma into small cells, it was generally found that power loadings are highest on the outer surface of the torus, although variations are not as large as some have predicted. Results are presented for various plasma power generation configurations, plasma volume fractions, and toroidal aspect ratios, and include plasma and wall blockage effects

  11. Poloidal polarimeter for current density measurements in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, A.J.H.; Graswinckel, M.F.; Cavinato, M.; Giudicotti, L.; Zilli, E.; Gil, C.; Koslowski, H.R.; McCarthy, P.; Nyhan, C.; Prunty, S.; Spillane, M.; Walker, C.

    2004-01-01

    One of the systems envisaged for measuring the current density profile in the ITER is a 118 μm poloidal polarimeter system. The proposed system has two independent views: one fan of chords observes the plasma via an equatorial port and a second fan views down from an upper port. This article will present the status of the on-going work and will address issues as sensitivity and accuracy, refraction, Gaussian beam ray-tracing, alignment, and calibration as well as some specific design details

  12. The poloidal OHM's law and a profile constraint in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, S.E.; Zanza, V.

    1991-01-01

    Explicit use of the poloidal Ohm's law, together with the radial plasma velocity (obtained from the distribution of plasma sources), leads to a very general constraint on the possible radial profiles of plasma density and temperature. The constraint does not require any ad hoc assumption; it can place severe restrictions on the allowed profiles and is independent of energy and particle transport; also, it may be the underlying principle of profile consistency. The constraint is discussed in the framework of neoclassical theory, using results from the Frascati tokamak. (author). 23 refs, 7 figs

  13. Massively Clustered CubeSats NCPS Demo Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.; Young, David; Kim, Tony; Houts, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Technologies under development for the proposed Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) will require an un-crewed demonstration mission before they can be flight qualified over distances and time frames representative of a crewed Mars mission. In this paper, we describe a Massively Clustered CubeSats platform, possibly comprising hundreds of CubeSats, as the main payload of the NCPS demo mission. This platform would enable a mechanism for cost savings for the demo mission through shared support between NASA and other government agencies as well as leveraged commercial aerospace and academic community involvement. We believe a Massively Clustered CubeSats platform should be an obvious first choice for the NCPS demo mission when one considers that cost and risk of the payload can be spread across many CubeSat customers and that the NCPS demo mission can capitalize on using CubeSats developed by others for its own instrumentation needs. Moreover, a demo mission of the NCPS offers an unprecedented opportunity to invigorate the public on a global scale through direct individual participation coordinated through a web-based collaboration engine. The platform we describe would be capable of delivering CubeSats at various locations along a trajectory toward the primary mission destination, in this case Mars, permitting a variety of potential CubeSat-specific missions. Cameras on various CubeSats can also be used to provide multiple views of the space environment and the NCPS vehicle for video monitoring as well as allow the public to "ride along" as virtual passengers on the mission. This collaborative approach could even initiate a brand new Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) program for launching student developed CubeSat payloads beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) on future deep space technology qualification missions. Keywords: Nuclear Propulsion, NCPS, SLS, Mars, CubeSat.

  14. Coil spring venting arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed

  15. Experimental study of poloidal flow effect on magnetic island dynamics in LHD and TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narushima, Y.; Sakakibara, S.; Castejon, F.

    2010-11-01

    The dynamics of a magnetic island are studied by focusing on the poloidal flows in the helical devices LHD and TJ-II. The temporal increment of the ExB poloidal flow prior to the magnetic island transition from growth to healing is observed. The direction of the poloidal flow is in the electron-diamagnetic direction in LHD and in the ion-diamagnetic direction in TJ-II. From the magnetic diagnostics, it is observed that a current structure flowing in the plasma moves ∼π rad poloidally in the electron-diamagnetic direction during the transition in LHD experiments. These experimental observations from LHD and TJ-II show that the temporal increment of the poloidal flow is followed by the transition (growth to healing) of the magnetic island regardless of the flow direction and clarify the fact that significant poloidal flow affects the magnetic island dynamics. (author)

  16. A web application for poloidal field analysis on HL-2M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, X.M., E-mail: songxm@swip.ac.cn; Pan, W.; Chen, L.Y.; Song, X.; Li, X.D.

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • An original way to develop web application with a new framework (jQuery + PHP + Matlab) is introduced. • A convenient but powerful application for electromagnetic calculation is implemented. • The web application can run in any popular browser, on any hardware and in any operating system. • No any plugin is needed; no any maintenance is required. - Abstract: Recently, many web tools [1–3] in fusion society have been designed and demonstrated, which has been proved to be powerful and convenient to fusion researchers. Many physicists and engineers need a tool to compute the poloidal magnetic field for some purposes (for example, the calibration of magnetic probes for EFIT, the field null structure analysis for control, the design of some plasma diagnostic systems), so to develop a powerful and convenient web application for the calculation of magnetic field and magnetic flux produced by PF coils is very important. In this paper, a web application tool for poloidal field analysis on HL-2M with a totally original framework is presented. This web application is full of dynamic and interactive interface, and can run in any popular browser (IE, safari, firefox, opera), on any hardware (smart phone, PC, ipad, Mac) and operating system (ios, android, windows, linux, Mac OS). No any plugins is needed. The three layers (jQuery + PHP + Matlab) of this framework are introduced. The front top client layer is developed by jQuery code. The middle layer, which plays a role of a bridge to connect the server and client through socket communication, is developed by PHP code. The behind server layer is developed by Matlab, which compute the magnetic field or magnetic flux through a Special Function called Complete Elliptic Integral, and returns the results in the client favorite way, either by table or by JPG image. The field null structure and the vertical and radial field structure calculated by this tool are introduced with details. The idea to design a web

  17. A web application for poloidal field analysis on HL-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, X.M.; Pan, W.; Chen, L.Y.; Song, X.; Li, X.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An original way to develop web application with a new framework (jQuery + PHP + Matlab) is introduced. • A convenient but powerful application for electromagnetic calculation is implemented. • The web application can run in any popular browser, on any hardware and in any operating system. • No any plugin is needed; no any maintenance is required. - Abstract: Recently, many web tools [1–3] in fusion society have been designed and demonstrated, which has been proved to be powerful and convenient to fusion researchers. Many physicists and engineers need a tool to compute the poloidal magnetic field for some purposes (for example, the calibration of magnetic probes for EFIT, the field null structure analysis for control, the design of some plasma diagnostic systems), so to develop a powerful and convenient web application for the calculation of magnetic field and magnetic flux produced by PF coils is very important. In this paper, a web application tool for poloidal field analysis on HL-2M with a totally original framework is presented. This web application is full of dynamic and interactive interface, and can run in any popular browser (IE, safari, firefox, opera), on any hardware (smart phone, PC, ipad, Mac) and operating system (ios, android, windows, linux, Mac OS). No any plugins is needed. The three layers (jQuery + PHP + Matlab) of this framework are introduced. The front top client layer is developed by jQuery code. The middle layer, which plays a role of a bridge to connect the server and client through socket communication, is developed by PHP code. The behind server layer is developed by Matlab, which compute the magnetic field or magnetic flux through a Special Function called Complete Elliptic Integral, and returns the results in the client favorite way, either by table or by JPG image. The field null structure and the vertical and radial field structure calculated by this tool are introduced with details. The idea to design a web

  18. Extending the self-assembly of coiled-coil hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robson Marsden, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Of the various biomolecular building blocks in use in nature, coiled-coil forming peptides are amongst those with the most potential as building blocks for the synthetic self-assembly of nanostructures. Native coiled coils have the ability to function in, and influence, complex systems composed of

  19. Structural analyses of ITER toroidal field coils under fault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, C.T.J.

    1992-04-01

    ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is intended to be an experimental thermonuclear tokamak reactor testing the basic physics performance and technologies essential to future fusion reactors. The magnet system of ITER consists essentially of 4 sub-systems, i.e. toroidal field coils (TFCs), poloidal field coils (PFCs), power supplies, and cryogenic supplies. These subsystems do not contain significant radioactivity inventories, but the large energy inventory is a potential accident initiator. The aim of the structural analyses is to prevent accidents from propagating into vacuum vessel, tritium system and cooling system, which all contain significant amounts of radioactivity. As part of design process 3 conditions are defined for PF and TF coils, at which mechanical behaviour has to be analyzed in some detail, viz: normal operating conditions, upset conditions and fault conditions. This paper describes the work carried out by ECN to create a detailed finite element model of 16 TFCs as well as results of some fault condition analyses made with the model. Due to fault conditions, either electrical or mechanical, magnetic loading of TFCs becomes abnormal and further mechanical failure of parts of the overall structure might occur (e.g. failure of coil, gravitational supports, intercoil structure). The analyses performed consist of linear elastic stress analyses and electro-magneto-structural analyses (coupled field analyses). 8 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  20. Radial transport of poloidal momentum in ASDEX Upgrade in L-mode and H-mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Mehlmann, F.; Naulin, Volker

    2012-01-01

    A reciprocating probe was used for localized measurements of the radial transport of poloidal momentum in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). The probe measured poloidal and radial electric field components and density. We concentrate on three components of the momentum transport: ......: Reynolds stress, convective momentum flux and triple product of the fluctuating components of density, radial and poloidal electric field. For the evaluation we draw mainly on the probability density functions (PDFs)....

  1. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  2. Design of the dummy coil for magnet power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang-Hwan; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Jin, Jong-Kook; Lee, Dong-Keun; Kong, Jong-Dea; Joung, Nam-Young; Kim, Sang-Tae; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Yang-Soo; Kwon, Myeun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • It is necessary to confirm safety of the MPS on a dummy coil before the operating it. • We selected and designed the water cooling type dummy coil to test on the MPS's rating (12.5 kA) test. • For the design of the dummy coil, we considered requirements about electrical, structural and water cooling. • We will test as the rating power after MPS upgrade and that test will do before every KSTAR campaign. -- Abstract: It is necessary to test it on a dummy coil, before using a magnet power supply (MPS) to energize a Poloidal Field (PF) coil in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The dummy coil should accept the same large current from the MPS as the PF coil and be within the capability of the utilities located at the KSTAR site. Therefore a coil design based on the characteristics of the MPS and other restrictive conditions needed to be made. There are three requirements to be met in the design: an electrical requirement, a structural requirement, and a water cooling requirement. The electrical requirement was that the coil should have an inductance of 40 mH. For the structural requirement, the material should be non magnetic. The coil support structure and water cooling manifold were made of SUS 304. The water cooling requirement was that there should be sufficient flow rate so that the temperature rise ΔT should not exceed 12 °C for operation at 12.5 kA for 5 min. Square cross-section hollow conductor with dimensions of 38.1 mm × 38.1 mm was used with a 25.4 mm center hole for cooling water. However, as a result of tests, it was found that the electrical and structural requirements were satisfied but that the water cooling was over designed. It is imperative that the verification will be redone for a test with 12.5 kA for 5 min

  3. Design of the dummy coil for magnet power supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: kch2004@nfri.re.kr; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Jin, Jong-Kook; Lee, Dong-Keun; Kong, Jong-Dea; Joung, Nam-Young; Kim, Sang-Tae; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Yang-Soo; Kwon, Myeun

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • It is necessary to confirm safety of the MPS on a dummy coil before the operating it. • We selected and designed the water cooling type dummy coil to test on the MPS's rating (12.5 kA) test. • For the design of the dummy coil, we considered requirements about electrical, structural and water cooling. • We will test as the rating power after MPS upgrade and that test will do before every KSTAR campaign. -- Abstract: It is necessary to test it on a dummy coil, before using a magnet power supply (MPS) to energize a Poloidal Field (PF) coil in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The dummy coil should accept the same large current from the MPS as the PF coil and be within the capability of the utilities located at the KSTAR site. Therefore a coil design based on the characteristics of the MPS and other restrictive conditions needed to be made. There are three requirements to be met in the design: an electrical requirement, a structural requirement, and a water cooling requirement. The electrical requirement was that the coil should have an inductance of 40 mH. For the structural requirement, the material should be non magnetic. The coil support structure and water cooling manifold were made of SUS 304. The water cooling requirement was that there should be sufficient flow rate so that the temperature rise ΔT should not exceed 12 °C for operation at 12.5 kA for 5 min. Square cross-section hollow conductor with dimensions of 38.1 mm × 38.1 mm was used with a 25.4 mm center hole for cooling water. However, as a result of tests, it was found that the electrical and structural requirements were satisfied but that the water cooling was over designed. It is imperative that the verification will be redone for a test with 12.5 kA for 5 min.

  4. LHC bending magnet coil

    CERN Multimedia

    A short test version of coil of wire used for the LHC dipole magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair.

  5. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  6. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of low-Z element radiation in the PDX tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, K.; Suckewer, S.; Wong, S.K.

    1983-06-01

    Vertical poloidal asymmetries of hydrogen isotopes and low-Z impurity radiation in the PDX tokamak may be caused by poloidally asymmetric sources of these elements at gas inlet valves, limiters or vacuum vessel walls, asymmetric magnetic field geometry in the region beyond the plasma boundary, or by ion curvature drifts. Low ionization states of carbon (C II- C IV) are more easily influenced by edge conditions than is CV. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of CV are correlated with the direction of the toroidal field. The magnitude of the asymmetry agrees with the predictions of a quasifluid neoclassical model. Experimental data and numerical simulations are presented to investigate different models of impurity poloidal asymmetries.

  7. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of low-Z element radiation in the PDX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, K.; Suckewer, S.; Wong, S.K.

    1983-06-01

    Vertical poloidal asymmetries of hydrogen isotopes and low-Z impurity radiation in the PDX tokamak may be caused by poloidally asymmetric sources of these elements at gas inlet valves, limiters or vacuum vessel walls, asymmetric magnetic field geometry in the region beyond the plasma boundary, or by ion curvature drifts. Low ionization states of carbon (C II- C IV) are more easily influenced by edge conditions than is CV. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of CV are correlated with the direction of the toroidal field. The magnitude of the asymmetry agrees with the predictions of a quasifluid neoclassical model. Experimental data and numerical simulations are presented to investigate different models of impurity poloidal asymmetries

  8. Measurement of toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation in TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, B.P.; Joye, B.; Marchal, B.

    1991-01-01

    With optimal observation geometry we have measured both the toroidal and poloidal rotation velocities in the edge and in the bulk of the TCA plasma. Regular calibration and correction for variations in the spectrometer temperature permitted a measurement with an error of ∼0.5 km/s which is an order of magnitude smaller than the range of measured velocities. In general, changes in the velocities are observed to be stronger and faster in the plasma edge than in the plasma bulk. With increasing density, the toroidal velocity is observed to change sign and follow the plasma density, while the poloidal velocity increases. These two effects lead to an increase in the absolute value of the radial electric field. With very strong gas puffing, the toroidal velocity is observed to again reverse and tend to zero, an effect which is stronger as the gradient of the density ramp is increased. Comparison between gas puffing and high power AWH does not show a significant difference in the radial electric field that could be responsible for the large associated density rise, which still remains unexplained. (author) 4 figs., 2 refs

  9. Arbitrary poloidal gyroradius effects in tokamak pedestals and transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Catto, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    A technique is developed and applied for analyzing pedestal and internal transport barrier (ITB) regions in a tokamak by formulating a special version of gyrokinetics. In contrast to typical gyrokinetic treatments, canonical angular momentum is taken as the gyrokinetic radial variable rather than the radial guiding center location. Such an approach allows strong radial plasma gradients to be treated, while retaining zonal flow and neoclassical (including orbit squeezing) behavior and the effects of turbulence. The new, nonlinear gyrokinetic variables are constructed to higher order than is typically the case. The nonlinear gyrokinetic equation obtained is capable of handling such problems as collisional zonal flow damping with radial wavelengths comparable to the ion poloidal gyroradius, as well as zonal flow and neoclassical transport in the pedestal or ITB. This choice of gyrokinetic variables allows the toroidally rotating Maxwellian solution of the isothermal tokamak limit to be recovered. More importantly, we prove that a physically acceptable solution for the lowest order ion distribution function in the banana regime anywhere in a tokamak and, in particular, in the pedestal must be nearly this same isothermal Maxwellian solution. That is, the ion temperature variation scale must be much greater than the poloidal ion gyroradius. Consequently, in the banana regime the background radial ion temperature profile cannot have a pedestal similar to that of plasma density

  10. Studies of a poloidal divertor reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarff, J.S.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Dexter, R.N.; Prager, S.C.; Sprott, J.C.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt has been made to form a reversed field pinch (RFP) in a poloidal divertor configuration which position the plasma far from a conducting wall. In this configuration, the plasma is localized within a magnetic separatrix formed by the combination of toroidal currents in the plasma and four internal aluminum rings. Plasmas were formed with plasma current /approximately/135 kA, toroidal field reversal lasting /approximately/1 msec, line-averaged density /approximately/1--2 /times/ 10 13 cm/sup /minus/3/ and central electron temperature /approximately/55 eV, but a large asymmetry in the magnetic field (δB/B /approximately/40%) onset at about the time the toroidal field reversed at the wall. Symmetric, poloidal divertor RFP equilibria were not formed. This behavior might be expected based on linear MHD stability analysis of a cylindrical plasma bounded by a large vacuum region and distant conducting wall. The symmetric equilibrium before the asymmetry develops and the asymmetry itself are described. 15 refs., 3 figs

  11. Characterisation of the core poloidal flow at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebschy, Alexander [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); McDermott, Rachael M.; Geiger, Benedikt; Cavedon, Marco; Dunne, Michael G.; Dux, Ralph; Fischer, Rainer; Kappatou, Athina; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Viezzer, Eleonora [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Plasma rotation has a strong influence on the transport of heat, particles, and momentum in fusion plasmas via a variety of mechanisms, for example, by the stabilization of modes and the suppression of plasma turbulence. In tokamaks, the toroidal rotation (u{sub tor}) is essentially a free parameter that is usually dominated by the external momentum input from neutral beams used to heat the plasma. The poloidal rotation (u{sub pol}), on the other hand, is strongly damped and is predicted to remain at Neoclassical (NC) levels of a few km/s. Measuring the inboard-outboard asymmetry of u{sub tor} with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy enables an indirect measurement of u{sub pol} and, hence, the measurement of the complete plasma flow on a flux surface. In order to characterise the nature of u{sub pol} at ASDEX Upgrade a poloidal rotation database has been built that contains a large variation in the parameters that, according to NC theory, drive u{sub pol}; namely, the main ion temperature and density gradients and collisionality. Initial results from this database and a detailed comparison of u{sub pol} to NC theory in interesting plasma scenarios, are presented in this poster.

  12. Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators.

  13. On modular stellarator reactor coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, F.; Harmeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H.

    1985-01-01

    Modular twisted coils are discussed which produce magnetic fields of the Advanced Stellarator WENDELSTEIN VII-AS type. Reducing the number coils/FP offers advantage for maintenance of coils, but increases the magnetic ripple and B m /B o . Computation of force densities within the coils of ASR and ASB yield local maximum values of about 80 and 180 MN/m 3 , respectively. A system of mutual coil support is being developed. Twisted coils in helical arrangement provide a reactor-sized HELIAC system. In order to reduce the magnetic ripple, a large number of 14 coils/FP in special arrangement is used

  14. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.; Punchard, W.F.B.

    1977-01-01

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 18 0 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  15. Development, simulation and testing of structural materials for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laesser, R.; Baluc, N.; Boutard, J.-L.; Diegele, E.; Gasparotto, M.; Riccardi, B.; Dudarev, S.; Moeslang, A.; Pippan, R.; Schaaf, B. van der

    2006-01-01

    In DEMO the structural and functional materials of the in-vessel components will be exposed to a very intense flux of fusion neutrons with energies up to 14 MeV creating displacement cascades and gaseous transmutation products. Point defects and transmutations will induce new microstructures leading to changes in mechanical and physical properties such as hardening, swelling, loss of fracture toughness and creep strength. The kinetics of microstructural evolution depends on time, temperature and defect production rates. The structural materials to be used in DEMO should have very special properties: high radiation resistance up to the dose of 100 dpa, low residual activation, high creep strength and good compatibility with the cooling media in as wide a temperature operational window as possible for the achievement of high thermal efficiency. The most promising materials are: Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steels (Eurofer and F82H), Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) RAFM and RAF steels, SiC fibres reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiCf/SiC), tungsten (W) and W-alloys. Each of these materials has its advantages and drawbacks and will be best used under certain conditions. Presently the best studied group of materials are the RAFM steels. They require the smallest extrapolation for use in DEMO but also offer the lowest upper temperature limit of operation (550 o C) and thus the lowest thermal efficiency. The other materials foreseen for more advanced breeder blanket and divertor concepts require intense fundamental R(and)D and testing before their acceptance, whereas the so-called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) will be constructed using RAFM steel and tested in ITER. Validation of the DEMO structural materials will be done in IFMIF, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, which will produce neutron damage and transmutation products very similar to those characterising a fusion device and will allow accelerated testing with damage rates

  16. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Woolley, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new coil protection calculator (CPC) is presented in this paper. It is now being developed for TFTR's magnetic field coils will replace the existing coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPC will permit operation up to the actual coil limits by accurately and continuously computing coil parameters in real-time. The improvement will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates

  17. Coil winding pack FE-analysis for a HELIAS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, F.; Egorov, K.; Bykov, V.

    2011-01-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP) a reference design is being created of an upgraded five-periodic HELIAS type stellarator reactor which evolves from Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) by scaling of the coil centre line geometries by a factor of four. This reactor type was extensively investigated at IPP with regard to physical characteristics and to some extent also to engineering issues. The upgrade concerns an increase of the induction at the plasma axis and correspondingly at the superconductor. The aim is to develop the reactor concept to a stage and such detail that major engineering problems are unveiled, and relevant comparisons with other concepts, including tokamaks, can be drawn in view of upcoming decisions concerning a DEMO reactor. Even though progress in plasma physics, and in particular future results of W7-X and other machines - particularly of ITER - will probably lead to somewhat different coil shapes, no principal changes of the reference design are expected. In this paper the option of a roll-formed square coil cable jacket is investigated. Detailed structural FE analysis of the coil winding pack demonstrates the feasibility of such a conductor which appears to be the most economical option. It also allows sufficient space for a cable current density very similar to that of the ITER TF coil with a similar overall winding pack cross section of ∼0.5 m 2 . Already existing Nb 3 Sn conductors could thus be safely applied in such a HELIAS reactor. Obvious progress of superconductor technology, particularly concerning Nb 3 Al, will be beneficial concerning savings of conductor material, ease of manufacture, higher operation temperature, etc.

  18. Field load and displacement boundary condition computer program used for the finite element analysis and design of toroidal field coils in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The design evaluation of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been performed by structural analysis with the finite element method. The technique employed has been simplified with supplementary computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element computer program. Significant automation has been provided by computer codes in three areas of data input. These are the definition of coil geometry by a mesh of node points, the definition of finite elements via the node points and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The computer programs by name that have been used to perform the above functions are PDXNODE, ELEMENT and PDXFORC. The geometric finite element modeling options for toroidal field coils provided by PDXNODE include one-fourth or one-half symmetric sections of circular coils, oval shaped coils or dee-shaped coils with or without a beveled wedging surface. The program ELEMENT which defines the finite elements for input to the finite element computer code can provide considerable time and labor savings when defining the model of coils of non-uniform cross-section or when defining the model of coils whose material properties are different in the R and THETA directions due to the laminations of alternate epoxy and copper windings. The modeling features provided by the program ELEMENT have been used to analyze the PLT and the TFTR toroidal field coils with integral support structures. The computer program named PDXFORC is described. It computes the node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil from the vector crossproduct of the coil current and the magnetic field. The model can be of one-half or one-fourth symmetry to be consistent with the node model defined by PDXNODE, and the magnetic field is computed from toroidal or poloidal coils

  19. Reel success creating demo reels and animation portfolios

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Are you an animator looking to get your foot in the door to the top studios?It's tough if you don't have a demo reel and portfolio that reflects your unique style and incredible talents.  The reception of that reel will make or break you; so it's no wonder that creating a demo reel can be such a daunting task.  Reel Success by Cheryl Cabrera can help.  This book guides you into putting the right content into your portfolio, how to cater to the right audience, and how to harness the power of social media and network effectively.  Accompanied by case studies of actual students

  20. DEMO and fusion power plant conceptual studies in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonnier, David; Cook, Iau; Pierre, Sardain; Lorenzo, Boccaccini; Luigi, Di Pace; Luciano, Giancarli; Prachai, Norajitra; Aldo, Pizzuto

    2006-01-01

    Within the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) four fusion power plant 'models' have been developed. Two of these models were developed considering limited extrapolations both in physics and in technology. For the two other models, advanced physics scenarios have been identified and combined with advanced blanket concepts that allow higher thermodynamic efficiencies of the power conversion systems. For all the PPCS models, systems analyses were used to integrate the plasma physics and technology constraints to produce self-consistent plant parameter sets. The broad features of the conclusions of previous studies on safety, environmental impact and economics have been confirmed for the new models and demonstrated with increased confidence. The PPCS also helps in the definition of the objectives and in the identification of the design drivers of DEMO, i.e. the device between the next step (ITER) and a first-of-a-kind reactor. These will constitute the basis of the European DEMO Conceptual Study that has recently started

  1. RAMI analysis for DEMO HCPB blanket concept cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongiovanni, Danilo N., E-mail: danilo.dongiovanni@enea.it [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati (Italy); Pinna, Tonio [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati (Italy); Carloni, Dario [KIT, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) – KIT (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) preliminary assessment for HCPB blanket concept cooling system. • Reliability block diagram (RBD) modeling and analysis for HCPB primary heat transfer system (PHTS), coolant purification system (CPS), pressure control system (PCS), and secondary cooling system. • Sensitivity analysis on system availability performance. • Failure models and repair models estimated on the base of data from the ENEA fusion component failure rate database (FCFRDB). - Abstract: A preliminary RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) assessment for the HCPB (helium cooled pebble bed) blanket cooling system based on currently available design for DEMO fusion power plant is presented. The following sub-systems were considered in the analysis: blanket modules, primary cooling loop including pipework and steam generators lines, pressure control system (PCS), coolant purification system (CPS) and secondary cooling system. For PCS and CPS systems an extrapolation from ITER Test Blanket Module corresponding systems was used as reference design in the analysis. Helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) system reliability block diagrams (RBD) models were implemented taking into account: system reliability-wise configuration, operating schedule currently foreseen for DEMO, maintenance schedule and plant evolution schedule as well as failure and corrective maintenance models. A simulation of plant activity was then performed on implemented RBDs to estimate plant availability performance on a mission time of 30 calendar years. The resulting availability performance was finally compared to availability goals previously proposed for DEMO plant by a panel of experts. The study suggests that inherent availability goals proposed for DEMO PHTS system and Tokamak auxiliaries are potentially achievable for the primary loop of the HCPB concept cooling system, but not for the secondary loop. A

  2. LTS and HTS high current conductor development for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzone, Pierluigi; Sedlak, Kamil; Uglietti, Davide; Bykovsky, Nikolay; Muzzi, Luigi; De Marzi, Gainluca; Celentano, Giuseppe; Della Corte, Antonio; Turtù, Simonetta; Seri, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Design and R&D for DEMO TF conductors. • Wind&react vs. react&wind options for Nb_3Sn high grade TF conductors. • Progress in the manufacture of short length Nb_3Sn proptotypes. • Design and prototype manufacture for high current HTS cabled conductors. - Abstract: The large size of the magnets for DEMO calls for very large operating current in the forced flow conductor. A plain extrapolation from the superconductors in use for ITER is not adequate to fulfill the technical and cost requirements. The proposed DEMO TF magnets is a graded winding using both Nb_3Sn and NbTi conductors, with operating current of 82 kA @ 13.6 T peak field. Two Nb_3Sn prototypes are being built in 2014 reflecting the two approaches suggested by CRPP (react&wind method) and ENEA (wind&react method). The Nb_3Sn strand (overall 200 kg) has been procured at technical specification similar to ITER. Both the Nb_3Sn strand and the high RRR, Cr plated copper wire (400 kg) have been delivered. The cabling trials are carried out at TRATOS Cavi using equipment relevant for long length production. The completion of the manufacture of the two 20 m long prototypes is expected in the end of 2014 and their test is planned in 2015 at CRPP. In the scope of a long term technology development, high current HTS conductors are built at CRPP and ENEA. A DEMO-class prototype conductor is developed and assembled at CRPP: it is a flat cable composed of 20 twisted stacks of coated conductor tape soldered into copper shells. The 10 kA conductor developed at ENEA consists of stacks of coated conductor tape inserted into a slotted and twisted Al core, with a central cooling channel. Samples have been manufactured in industrial environment and the scalability of the process to long production lengths has been proven.

  3. Reliability and availability requirements analysis for DEMO: fuel cycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinna, T.; Borgognoni, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO) will be a fusion reactor prototype designed to demonstrate the capability to produce electrical power in a commercially acceptable way. Two of the key elements of the engineering development of the DEMO reactor are the definitions of reliability and availability requirements (or targets). The availability target for a hypothesized Fuel Cycle has been analysed as a test case. The analysis has been done on the basis of the experience gained in operating existing tokamak fusion reactors and developing the ITER design. Plant Breakdown Structure (PBS) and Functional Breakdown Structure (FBS) related to the DEMO Fuel Cycle and correlations between PBS and FBS have been identified. At first, a set of availability targets has been allocated to the various systems on the basis of their operating, protection and safety functions. 75% and 85% of availability has been allocated to the operating functions of fuelling system and tritium plant respectively. 99% of availability has been allocated to the overall systems in executing their safety functions. The chances of the systems to achieve the allocated targets have then been investigated through a Failure Mode and Effect Analysis and Reliability Block Diagram analysis. The following results have been obtained: 1) the target of 75% for the operations of the fuelling system looks reasonable, while the target of 85% for the operations of the whole tritium plant should be reduced to 80%, even though all the tritium plant systems can individually reach quite high availability targets, over 90% - 95%; 2) all the DEMO Fuel Cycle systems can reach the target of 99% in accomplishing their safety functions. (authors)

  4. Poloidal asymmetries in the scrape-off layer plasma of the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.

    1987-01-01

    Large poloidal asymmetries in density, electron temperature, radial density e-folding length and floating potential have been measured in the plasma existing between the limiter radius and the wall of the Alcator C tokamak. Typically, variations in density by factors of about 4-20 and variations in radial density e-folding length by factors of about 3-8 are recorded in discharges which are bounded by poloidally symmetric ring limiters. These poloidal asymmetries show that pressure is a function of poloidal angle on open magnetic flux surfaces in this region of the plasma. Observations of toroidally symmetric MARFE (multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge) phenomena further imply that density and perhaps pressure are also a function of poloidal angle on closed flux surfaces existing just inside the limiter radius. The magnitude of these poloidal asymmetries and their dependence on poloidal angle persists independent of machine parameters (central plasma density, plasma current, toroidal field, MARFE versus non-MARFE discharges). Analysis of the data indicates that these asymmetries are caused by poloidal variations in perpendicular particle and heat transport in both the main plasma and the scrape-off layer. A number of possible asymmetric perpendicular transport processes in the scrape-off layer plasma are examined, including diffusion and E-vectorxB-vector plasma convection. (author)

  5. The ITER poloidal field configuration and operation scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribov, Y.; Portone, A.; Mondino, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    The ITER Poloidal Field (PF) system must satisfy the following requirements. (1) ITER must have a well-controlled, single null divertor magnetic configuration with nominal plasma current 21MA and moderate plasma elongation k95 < 1.65. (2) For a variety of plasma scenarios the ITER PF system must provide: inductive breakdown and start-up in an expanding-aperture limiter configuration near the outboard first wall; an inductive current ramp-up to the nominal plasma current with a reasonable assumption of resistive loss during current ramp-up; a pulse length of 1,000s for ignition and inductively-sustained burn at nominal plasma current; plasma shutdown (following fusion power termination) in a similar contracting-aperture limiter configuration. The present design of the PF system can satisfy the ITER requirements within specified limitations

  6. Stability of tokamak magnetic configuration with a poloidal divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazaeva, A.V.; Bykov, V.E.; Georgievskii, A.V.; Kaminskii, A.O.; Peletminskaya, V.G.; Pyatov, V.H.

    1979-02-01

    This paper investigates instabilities in the preseparatrix region of a tokamak magnetic configuration with a poloidal divertor with respect to perturbations produced by various irregularities in the manufacturing of tokamak magnetic systems. A computer solution, a system of differential equations describing the behavior of a force line, showed that small perturbation amplitudes may be the cause of the stochastic instability of force lines in the preseparatrix region. This instability is responsible for a number of demands on the accuracy in the manufacturing of tokamak magnetic systems. In particular, the misalignment in the divertor ring must not be larger than 0.5 0 , its displacement must be less than Δ/R = 10 -2 (Δ/R -2 ). This study can be used in the design of large thermonuclear installations

  7. Stability and heating of a poloidal divertor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, A.P.; Dexter, R.N.; Holly, D.T.; Lipschultz, B.; Osborne, T.H.; Prager, S.C.; Shepard, D.A.; Sprott, J.C.; Witherspoon, F.D.

    1981-01-01

    Five experimental studies - two stability and three heating investigations - have been carried out on Tokapole II, a tokamak with a four-node poloidal divertor. After a brief description of the machine, discharges are described with q approximately 0.6 over most of the cross-section without degradation of confinement, observation of axisymmetric instability in dee, inverse-dee and square equilibria, high-power fast-wave ion-cyclotron resonance heating, studies of spatial shear Alfven wave resonances for heating, and reduction of the start-up loop voltage by approximately 60% by microwave pre-ionization at electron-cyclotron resonance. Work on axisymmetric instability and studies of pre-ionization have been described in detail elsewhere and are therefore only briefly mentioned. (author)

  8. Power transport to the poloidal divertor experiment scoop limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Budny, R.; Fonck, R.

    1987-01-01

    Power transport to the Poloidal Divertor Experiment graphite scoop limiter was measured during both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges by observing its front face temperatures using an infrared camera. Measurements were made as a function of a plasma density, current, position, fueling mode, and heating power for both co- and counter-neutral beam injection. The measured thermal load on the scoop limiter was 25 to 50%. of the total plasma heating power. The measured peak front face midplane temperature was 1500 0 C, corresponding to a peak surface power density of 3 kW/cm/sup 2/. This power density implies an effective parallel power flow of 54 kW/cm/sup 2/ in agreement with the radial power distribution extrapolated from television Thomson scattering and calorimetry measurements

  9. Extraction of Poloidal Velocity from Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, W.M.; Burrell, K.H.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Baylor, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach has been implemented on DIII-D to allow the correct determination of the plasma poloidal velocity from charge exchange spectroscopy measurements. Unlike usual techniques, the need for detailed atomic physics calculations to properly interpret the results is alleviated. Instead, the needed atomic physics corrections are self-consistently determined directly from the measurements, by making use of specially chosen viewing chords. Modeling results are presented that were used to determine a set of views capable of measuring the correction terms. We present the analysis of a quiescent H-mode discharge, illustrating that significant modifications to the velocity profiles are required in these high ion temperature conditions. We also present preliminary measurements providing the first direct comparison of the standard cross-section correction to the atomic physics calculations

  10. Stability and heating of a poloidal divertor tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddle, A. P.; Dexter, R. N.; Holly, D. T.; Lipschultz, B.; Osborne, T. H.; Prager, S. C.; Shepard, D.A., Sprott, J.C.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    1980-06-01

    Five experimental studies - two stability and three heating investigations - have been carried out on Tokapole II, a Tokamak with a four node poloidal divertor. First, discharges have been attained with safety factor q as low as 0.6 over most of the column without degradation of confinement, and correlation of helical instability onset with current profile shape is being studied. Second, the axisymmetric instability has been investigated in detail for various noncircular cross-sectional shapes, and results have been compared with a numerical stability code adapted to the Tokapole machine. Third, application of high power fast wave ion cyclotron resonance heating doubles the ion temperature and permits observation of heating as a function of harmonic number and spatial location of the resonance. Fourth, low power shear Alfven wave propagation is underway to test the applicability of this heating method to tokamaks. Fifth, preionization by electron cyclotron heating has been employed to reduce the startup loop voltage by approx. 60%.

  11. Axisymmetric stability of vertically asymmetric Tokamaks at large beta poloidal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K.; Fishman, H.; Okabayashi, M. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Todd, A.M.M. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1983-11-01

    The rigid-mode stability of high-..beta.. vertically asymmetric Tokamak equilibria with quasi-uniform current profile is investigated analytically using toroidicity-shaping double expansion method. It is found that vertical stability at large beta poloidal is mainly determined by a coupling between the shape of the plasma surface and the Shafranov shift of the magnetic axis. To the lowest order, symmetric components of the plasma surface shape are found to be the critical destabilizing elements. Asymmetric components have little effect. The inclusion of higher order terms in the high-..beta.. Tokamak expansion leads to further destabilization. These analytic insights are qualitatively confirmed by numerical stability calculations using the PEST code with parabolic safety-factor profile.

  12. DEMO concepts and their roles within the fusion programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Minh Quang

    2007-01-01

    In the past years, the international fusion community has developed models of fusion power plants, which were extremely useful in showing the key advantages of fusion energy and pointing out he areas of development. The present view is that between ITER and such power plants (even of ''first of kind'' type), there is a need for one or two intermediate steps. The need to have a ''fast rack'' towards such a fusion reactor, suggested that the steps after ITER, which are usually considered to be a Demonstration power plant followed by a Prototypical one, could be combines into one known as a DEMO. DEMO would then be a device capable of producing electricity, paving the way towards fusion power plants which would be economically viable. This talk outlines the DEMO concepts as the necessary physics and technological extrapolation from the envisaged future steps (ITER, IFMIF) are discussed. It attempts to provide a coverage of the different concepts developed by various countries, The key issues, as foreseen today, and their implications for the programme are highlighted. (orig.)

  13. Objectives and status of EUROfusion DEMO blanket studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccaccini, L.V., E-mail: lorenzo.boccaccini@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Aiello, G.; Aubert, J. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion, PPPT, Garching (Germany); Barrett, T. [CCFE, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Del Nevo, A. [ENEA CR Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy); Demange, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Forest, L. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hernandez, F.; Norajitra, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Porempovic, G. [Fuziotech Engineering Ltd (Hungary); Rapisarda, D. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sardain, P. [CEA/IRFM, 13115 Saint-Paul-lès-Durance (France); Utili, M. [ENEA CR Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy); Vala, L. [Centrum výzkumu Řež, 250 68 Husinec-Řež (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Short description of the new Breeding Blanket Project in the EUROfusion consortium for the design of the EU PPPT DEMO: objectives. • Presentation of the design approach used in the development of the Breeding Blanket design: requirements. • Breeding Blanket design; in particular the four blanket concepts included in the study are presented, recent results highlighted and the status discussed. • Auxiliary systems and related R&D programme: in particular the work areas addressed in the Project (Tritium Technology, Pb-Li and Solid Breeders Technology, First Wall Design and R&D, Manufacturing) are presented, recent results highlighted and the status discussed. - Abstract: The design of a DEMO reactor requires the design of a blanket system suitable of reliable T production and heat extraction for electricity production. In the frame of the EUROfusion Consortium activities, the Breeding Blanket Project has been constituted in 2014 with the goal to develop concepts of Breeding Blankets for the EU PPPT DEMO; this includes an integrated design and R&D programme with the goal to select after 2020 concepts on fusion plants for the engineering phase. The design activities are presently focalized around a pool of solid and liquid breeder blanket with helium, water and PbLi cooling. Development of tritium extraction and control technology, as well manufacturing and development of solid and PbLi breeders are part of the programme.

  14. Model improvements for tritium transport in DEMO fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santucci, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.santucci@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione – ENEA C. R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Tosti, Silvano [Unità Tecnica Fusione – ENEA C. R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Franza, Fabrizio [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • T inventory and permeation of DEMO blankets have been assessed under pulsed operation. • 1-D model for T transport has been developed for the HCLL DEMO blanket. • The 1-D model evaluated T partial pressure and T permeation rate radial profiles. - Abstract: DEMO operation requires a large amount of tritium, which is directly produced inside the reactor by means of Li-based breeders. During its production, recovering and purification, tritium comes in contact with large surfaces of hot metallic walls, therefore it can permeate through the blanket cooling structure, reach the steam generator and finally the environment. The development of dedicated simulation tools able to predict tritium losses and inventories is necessary to verify the accomplishment of the accepted tritium environmental releases as well as to guarantee a correct machine operation. In this work, the FUS-TPC code is improved by including the possibility to operate in pulsed regime: results in terms of tritium inventory and losses for three pulsed scenarios are shown. Moreover, the development of a 1-D model considering the radial profile of the tritium generation is described. By referring to the inboard segment on the equatorial axis of the helium-cooled lithium–lead (HCLL) blanket, preliminary results of the 1-D model are illustrated: tritium partial pressure in Li–Pb and tritium permeation in the cooling and stiffening plates by assuming several permeation reduction factor (PRF) values. Future improvements will consider the application of the model to all segments of different blanket concepts.

  15. A computational study of operating regimes for poloidal divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Heifetz, D.; Post, D.

    1982-01-01

    We have identified three theoretical operating regimes for poloidal divertors. These regimes are determined by the geometry of the divertor and the input energy and particle fluxes, and are characterized by the divertor plasma density and temperature. A fully self-consistent two-dimensional model for the plasma and neutral atom and molecule transport was used to study poloidal divertor operation. Extensions of our previous calculations important to this study were the inclusion of parallel electron and ion thermal conduction. We find that the key physics in divertor operation is the neutral recycling near the neutralizer plate. This can be parametrized by R = GAMMAsub(P)/GAMMAsub(O), the ratio of particle flux striking the neutralizer plate to the particle flux entering the divertor. Values of R approx. equal to 1 can be produced by large pumping rates near the neutralizer plates resulting in low neutral recycling and a high temperature, low density divertor plasma. By decreasing the pumping near the neutralizer plate, R can be raised to an intermediate value of 5-10, the plasma temperature lowered by the same factor, and the density raised by a factor of 10-30. In this regime, escape of the neutrals back to the main plasma is virtually blocked. By further restricting the pumping, R can be raised to twenty or more, thereby lowering the temperature by a factor of twenty or more and raising the density by a factor of ninety or more. Such high density regimes have been observed on D-III and appear to offer the most promise for impurity control and particle control on large reactor experiments such as INTOR or FED. In this paper, we explore the range 3 < R < 16. (orig.)

  16. Superconducting coil protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    The protection system is based on a two-phase construction program. Phase I is the development of a reliable hardwired relay control system with a digital loop utilizing firmware and a microprocessor controller. Phase II is an expansion of the digital loop to include many heretofore unmonitored coil variables. These new monitored variables will be utilized to establish early quench detection and to formulate confirmation techniques of the quench detection mechanism. Established quench detection methods are discussed and a new approach to quench detection is presented. The new circuit is insensitive to external pulsed magnetic fields and the associated induced voltages. Reliability aspects of the coil protection system are discussed with respect to shutdowns of superconducting coil systems. Redundance and digital system methods are presented as related topics

  17. Neutronics Design of Helical Type DEMO Reactor FFHR-d1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Sagara, A.; Goto, T.; Yanagi, N.; Masuzaki, S.; Tamura, H.; Miyazawa, J.; Muroga, T., E-mail: teru@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Neutronics design study has been performed in a newly started conceptual design activity for a helical type DEMO reactor FFHR-d1. Features of the FFHR-d1 design are enlargement of the basic configurations of reactor components and extrapolation of plasma parameters from those of the helical type plasma experimental machine Large Helical Device (LHD) to achieve the highest feasibility. From the neutronics point of view, a blanket space of FFHR-d1 is severely limited at the inboard of the torus. This is due to the core plasma position shifting to the inboard side under the confinement condition extrapolated from LHD. The first step of the neutronics investigation using the MCNP code has been performed with a simple torus model simulating thin inboard blanket space. A Flibe+Be/Ferritic steel breeding blanket showed preferable performances for both tritium breeding and shielding, and has been adapted as a reference blanket system for FFHR-d1. The investigations indicate that a combination of a 15 cm thick breeding blanket, 55 cm thick WC+B4C shield, i.e., the blanket space of 70 cm, could suppress the fast neutron flux and nuclear heating in the helical coils to the design targets for the neutron wall loading of 1.5 MW/m{sup 2}. Since the outboard side can provide a large space for a 60 cm thick breeding blanket, a fully-covered tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 1.31 has been obtained in the simple torus model. The neutronics design study has proceeded to the second step using a 3-D helical reactor model. The most important issue in the 3-D neutronics design is a compatibility with the helical divertor design. To achieve a higher TBR and shielding performance, the core plasma has to be covered by the breeding blanket layers as possible. However, the dimensions of the blanket layers are limited by magnetic field lines connecting an edge of the core plasma and divertor pumping ports. After repeating modification of the blanket configuration, the global TBR of 1

  18. ITER Side Correction Coil Quench model and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollet, S.; Bessette, D.; Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J. L.; Gauthier, F.; Lacroix, B.

    2016-12-01

    Previous thermohydraulic studies performed for the ITER TF, CS and PF magnet systems have brought some important information on the detection and consequences of a quench as a function of the initial conditions (deposited energy, heated length). Even if the temperature margin of the Correction Coils is high, their behavior during a quench should also be studied since a quench is likely to be triggered by potential anomalies in joints, ground fault on the instrumentation wires, etc. A model has been developed with the SuperMagnet Code (Bagnasco et al., 2010) for a Side Correction Coil (SCC2) with four pancakes cooled in parallel, each of them represented by a Thea module (with the proper Cable In Conduit Conductor characteristics). All the other coils of the PF cooling loop are hydraulically connected in parallel (top/bottom correction coils and six Poloidal Field Coils) are modeled by Flower modules with equivalent hydraulics properties. The model and the analysis results are presented for five quench initiation cases with/without fast discharge: two quenches initiated by a heat input to the innermost turn of one pancake (case 1 and case 2) and two other quenches initiated at the innermost turns of four pancakes (case 3 and case 4). In the 5th case, the quench is initiated at the middle turn of one pancake. The impact on the cooling circuit, e.g. the exceedance of the opening pressure of the quench relief valves, is detailed in case of an undetected quench (i.e. no discharge of the magnet). Particular attention is also paid to a possible secondary quench detection system based on measured thermohydraulic signals (pressure, temperature and/or helium mass flow rate). The maximum cable temperature achieved in case of a fast current discharge (primary detection by voltage) is compared to the design hot spot criterion of 150 K, which includes the contribution of helium and jacket.

  19. NET model coil test possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, J.; Gruenhagen, A.; Herz, W.; Jentzsch, K.; Komarek, P.; Lotz, E.; Malang, S.; Maurer, W.; Noether, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Vogt, A.; Zahn, G.; Horvath, I.; Kwasnitza, K.; Marinucci, C.; Pasztor, G.; Sborchia, C.; Weymuth, P.; Peters, A.; Roeterdink, A.

    1987-11-01

    A single full size coil for NET/INTOR represents an investment of the order of 40 MUC (Million Unit Costs). Before such an amount of money or even more for the 16 TF coils is invested as much risks as possible must be eliminated by a comprehensive development programme. In the course of such a programme a coil technology verification test should finally prove the feasibility of NET/INTOR TF coils. This study report is almost exclusively dealing with such a verification test by model coil testing. These coils will be built out of two Nb 3 Sn-conductors based on two concepts already under development and investigation. Two possible coil arrangements are discussed: A cluster facility, where two model coils out of the two Nb 3 TF-conductors are used, and the already tested LCT-coils producing a background field. A solenoid arrangement, where in addition to the two TF model coils another model coil out of a PF-conductor for the central PF-coils of NET/INTOR is used instead of LCT background coils. Technical advantages and disadvantages are worked out in order to compare and judge both facilities. Costs estimates and the time schedules broaden the base for a decision about the realisation of such a facility. (orig.) [de

  20. The pre-compression system of the toroidal field coils in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaster, J.; Ferrari, M.; Jong, C.; Vollmann, T.

    2007-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) coils of ITER will undergo out-of-plane forces caused by the poloidal fields required to confine the plasma. These forces will be supported against overturning moments by links between the coils. In turn, these links consist of the inner intercoil structure (IIC), which is composed of two pairs (placed at the top and bottom part of the inboard leg) of four sets of poloidal shear keys inserted in slots between adjacent coils, and the outer intercoil structure (OIS) formed by four bands of shear panels on the outboard leg. The magnetic forces during energization of ITER would cause at IIC locations at toroidal gap between adjacent TF coils of 0.35 mm; during plasma operation this value could reach >1 mm causing a loosening of the keys and intensifying stress concentrations. This undesired effect will be suppressed by the application of a centripetal force of 70 MN/coil (35 MN at both the bottom and top part of the inboard leg of each of the 18 TF coils) that will be provided by two sets of three glass fibre/epoxy composite rings submitted to a toroidal hoop force of 100 MN/set. The calculated maximum stress in the rings will occur during the installation phase at room temperature, where the maximum radial elongation (∼25 mm) is required, and it reaches 1/5 of the composite presently estimated ultimate stress. The imposed elongation to reach that force and the lower Young's modulus of the composite compared with that of stainless steel will ease component tolerances and/or settlement effects in the final assembly. The paper describes the evolution in the design of the pre-compression system, from the conceptual phase when two circular cross-sections rings were considered to the present definitive one with three rectangular cross-section rings

  1. The Pre-compression System of the Toroidal Field Coils in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaster, J.; Jong, C.; Vollmann, T.; Ferrari, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Toroidal Field (TF) coils of ITER will undergo out-of-plane forces caused by the machine poloidal fields required to maintain the toroidal stability of the plasma. These forces will be supported against overturning moments by links between the coils. In turn, these links consist of the Inner Intercoil Structure (IIC), which are composed by 2 sets of 4 poloidal shear keys inserted in slots between adjacent coils placed at the top and bottom part of the inboard leg, and the Outer Intercoil Structure (OIS) formed by 4 bands of shear panels at the outboard leg. The magnetic forces during energization of ITER would cause at IIC locations a toroidal gap between adjacent TF coils of 0.35 mm; during plasma operation this value could reach >1 mm causing a loosening of the keys and intensifying stress concentrations. This undesired effect will be suppressed by the application of a centripetal force of 70 MN per coil (35 MN at both the bottom and top part of the inboard leg of each of the 18 TF coils) that will be provided by 2 sets of 3 fibre-glass epoxy composite rings submitted to a toroidal hoop force of 100 MN per set. The calculated maximum stress in the rings will occur during the installation phase at room temperature, where the maximum radial elongation (∼ 25 mm) is required, and it will be less than 30% of its ultimate stress. The imposed elongation to reach that force and the lower Young modulus of the composite compared with the stainless steel one will ease component tolerances and/or settlement effects in the final assembly. (author)

  2. Analysis and test to predict the fatigue life of the ISX-B toroidal field coils' finger joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, J.A.; Ojalvo, I.U.; Raynor, G.E.; Zatz, I.J.; Johnson, N.E.; Walls, J.C.; Nelson, B.E.; Cain, W.D.; Walstrom, P.L.; Pearce, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A new and more rigorous structural evaluation of the ISX toroidal field (TF) coil fingers joints was undertaken to assess the effects of high-/beta/ operation of ISX-B. A new poloidal field (PF) coil set which allows high-/beta/ operation and produces larger out-of-plane loads on the TF coils was installed as part of the change to ISX-B. It was determined that the iron core significantly affects the out-of-plane load distribution and forces were calculated using the GFUN-3D code which considers 3-D iron core effects. These loads were applied to a half-symmetric finite element NASTRAN code model in which the TF coils were modeled as a string of beam elements. 8 refs

  3. Trim coil power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisler, R.; Peeler, H.; Zajicek, W.

    1985-01-01

    The 18 trim coil power supplies have been constructed and are now in place in the K500 pit and pit mezzanine. Final wiring of the primary power and control power is proceeding along with installation of cooling water supplies. The supplies are expected to be ready for final testing into resistive loads at the beginning of June, 1985

  4. Eccentric Coil Test Facility (ECTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, P.B.; Walstrom, P.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for testing superconducting coils under some conditions peculiar to tokamak systems is given. A primary element of the proposed facility is a large 25 MJ background solenoid. Discussions of the mechanical structure, the stress distribution and the thermal stability for this coil are included. The systems for controlling the facility and diagnosing test coil behavior are also described

  5. Modular coils: a promising toroidal-reactor-coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.; Furth, H.P.; Johnson, J.L.; Ludescher, C.; Weimer, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    The concept of modular coils originated from a need to find reactor-relevant stellarator windings, but its usefulness can be extended to provide an externally applied, additional rotational transform in tokamaks. Considerations of (1) basic principles of modular coils, (2) types of coils, (3) types of configurations (general, helically symmetric, helically asymmetric, with magnetic well, with magnetic hill), (4) types of rotational transform profile, and (5) structure and origin of ripples are given. These results show that modular coils can offer a wide range of vacuum magnetic field configurations, some of which cannot be obtained with the classical stellarator or torsatron coil configuration

  6. Mechanical design and construction qualification program on ITER correction coils structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foussat, A., E-mail: arnaud.foussat@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Weiyue, Wu; Jing, Wei; Shuangsong, Du [Academy of Science Institute of Plasma Physics, PO 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sgobba, S. [European Center for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hongwei, Li [China International Nuclear Fusion Energy Program Execution Center, Ministry of Science and Technology, 15B Fuxing Rd., Beijing 100862 (China); Libeyre, Paul; Jong, Cornelis; Klofac, Kamil; Mitchell, Neil [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-04-01

    The ITER Magnet system consists of 4 main coils sub-systems, i.e. 18 toroidal field coils (TFC), a central solenoid (CS), 6 poloidal field coils (PF) and 3 sets of correction coils (CC). The ITER fusion project has selected the stainless steel 316LN as main material for the magnet structure. The CC contribute to reducing the range of magnetic error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the other coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. During plasma operation, a large number of loading condition scenarios have been considered and structural analysis performed on key items like Cable-In-Conduit Conductor and the coil case. The results obtained are used for both static and fatigue structural assessment defining the present baseline design. For the construction of the structural cases, welding techniques such as GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and techniques resulting in low distortion and shrinkage like EBW (Electron Beam Welding) or Laser Beam Welding (LBW) with filler metal wire have been selected. Those methods are considered for future qualifications to guarantee proper weld parameters and specified weld properties. In order to determine the strength and fracture toughness of 316LN stainless steel welds with respect to design criteria, some mechanical tests have been carried out at 7 K (or 77 K), and room temperature.

  7. Optimization of Coil Element Configurations for a Matrix Gradient Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroboth, Stefan; Layton, Kelvin J; Jia, Feng; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jurgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2018-01-01

    Recently, matrix gradient coils (also termed multi-coils or multi-coil arrays) were introduced for imaging and B 0 shimming with 24, 48, and even 84 coil elements. However, in imaging applications, providing one amplifier per coil element is not always feasible due to high cost and technical complexity. In this simulation study, we show that an 84-channel matrix gradient coil (head insert for brain imaging) is able to create a wide variety of field shapes even if the number of amplifiers is reduced. An optimization algorithm was implemented that obtains groups of coil elements, such that a desired target field can be created by driving each group with an amplifier. This limits the number of amplifiers to the number of coil element groups. Simulated annealing is used due to the NP-hard combinatorial nature of the given problem. A spherical harmonic basis set up to the full third order within a sphere of 20-cm diameter in the center of the coil was investigated as target fields. We show that the median normalized least squares error for all target fields is below approximately 5% for 12 or more amplifiers. At the same time, the dissipated power stays within reasonable limits. With a relatively small set of amplifiers, switches can be used to sequentially generate spherical harmonics up to third order. The costs associated with a matrix gradient coil can be lowered, which increases the practical utility of matrix gradient coils.

  8. Poloidal rotation induced by injecting lower hybrid waves in tokamak plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Yiming; Gao Qingdi; Shi Bingren

    2001-01-01

    The poloidal rotation of the magnetized edge plasma in tokamak driven by the ponderomotive force which is generated by injecting lower hybrid wave (LHW) electric field has been studied. The LHW is launched from a waveguide in the plasma edge, and by Brambilla's grill theory, analytic expressions for the wave electric field in the slab model of an inhomogeneous cold plasma have been derived. It is shown that a strong wave electric field will be generated in the plasma edge by injecting LH wave of the power in MW magnitude, and this electric field will induce a poloidal rotation with a sheared poloidal velocity

  9. TFTR Mirnov coil analysis at plasma start-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, T.R.; Buchenauer, D.A.; Coonrod, J.; McGuire, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The methods for finding poloidal and toroidal numbers of MHD oscillations from Mirnov coils are reviewed and modified. Examples of various MHD phenomena occurring during start-up on TFTR are illustrated. It is found that the MHD mode structure best fits a model with the toroidal correction included. A new algorithm which finds m,n numbers can accommodate toroidal effects which are manifested in the phase data. The algorithm can find m,n numbers with a given toroidal correction parameter lambda', (lambda' = 0 → cylindrical). This algorithm is also used to find the optimal value of lambda' automatically, eliminating the need for ''guesswork.'' The algorithm finds the best parameters to the fit much faster than more conventional computational techniques. 9 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Design study of ITER-like divertor target for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crescenzi, Fabio; Bachmann, C.; Richou, M.; Roccella, S.; Visca, E.; You, J.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ‘DEMO’ is a near-term Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS). • The ITER-like design concept represents a promising solution also for DEMO plasma facing units. • The optimization of PFUs aims to enhance the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the component. • The optimized geometry was evaluated by ITER SDC-IC criteria and in terms of low cycle fatigue (LCF). - Abstract: A near-term water-cooled target solution has to be evaluated together with the required technologies and its power exhaust limit under ‘DEMO’ conditions. The ITER-like design concept based on the mono-block technology using W as armour material and the CuCrZr-IG as structural material with an interlayer of pure copper represents a promising solution also for DEMO. This work reports the design study of an “optimized” ITER-like Water Cooled Divertor able to withstand a heat flux of 10 MW m"−"2, as requested for DEMO operating conditions. The optimization of plasma facing unit (PFU) aims to enhance the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the component by varying some geometrical parameters (monoblock size, interlayer thickness and, tube diameter and thickness). The optimization was performed by means of the multi-variable optimization algorithms using the FEM code ANSYS. The coolant hydraulic conditions (inlet pressure, temperature and velocity) were fixed for simplicity. This study is based on elastic analysis and 3 dimensional modelling. The resulting optimized geometry was evaluated on the basis of the ITER SDC-IC criteria and in terms of low cycle fatigue (LCF). The margin to the critical heat flux (CHF) was also estimated. Further design study (taking into account the effect of neutron radiation on the material properties) together with mock-up fabrication and high-heat-flux (HHF) tests are foreseen in next work programmes.

  11. Design study of ITER-like divertor target for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crescenzi, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.crescenzi@enea.it [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Bachmann, C. [EFDA, Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Richou, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Roccella, S.; Visca, E. [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); You, J.-H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ‘DEMO’ is a near-term Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS). • The ITER-like design concept represents a promising solution also for DEMO plasma facing units. • The optimization of PFUs aims to enhance the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the component. • The optimized geometry was evaluated by ITER SDC-IC criteria and in terms of low cycle fatigue (LCF). - Abstract: A near-term water-cooled target solution has to be evaluated together with the required technologies and its power exhaust limit under ‘DEMO’ conditions. The ITER-like design concept based on the mono-block technology using W as armour material and the CuCrZr-IG as structural material with an interlayer of pure copper represents a promising solution also for DEMO. This work reports the design study of an “optimized” ITER-like Water Cooled Divertor able to withstand a heat flux of 10 MW m{sup −2}, as requested for DEMO operating conditions. The optimization of plasma facing unit (PFU) aims to enhance the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the component by varying some geometrical parameters (monoblock size, interlayer thickness and, tube diameter and thickness). The optimization was performed by means of the multi-variable optimization algorithms using the FEM code ANSYS. The coolant hydraulic conditions (inlet pressure, temperature and velocity) were fixed for simplicity. This study is based on elastic analysis and 3 dimensional modelling. The resulting optimized geometry was evaluated on the basis of the ITER SDC-IC criteria and in terms of low cycle fatigue (LCF). The margin to the critical heat flux (CHF) was also estimated. Further design study (taking into account the effect of neutron radiation on the material properties) together with mock-up fabrication and high-heat-flux (HHF) tests are foreseen in next work programmes.

  12. Poloidal field system for the ITER hard design option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.; Pillsbury, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, a collaborative design by the US, EC, Japan, and the USSR of a tokamak fusion reactor that will demonstrate the physics and test the technology needed for commercial fusion reactors. In 1990, the ITER team completed a Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) in which a candidate design was shown to meet the specified goals of the ITER activity at a conceptual level. The four parties have agreed to an Engineering Design Activity (EDA) that includes the necessary additional design and analysis, along with the R and D needed to construct ITER with confidence. The CDA design includes a toroidal field (TF) magnet system that provides the main containment field and a poloidal field (PF) system used to control plasma current and position. The PF system is also used as transformer primary to induce and sustain current in the plasma. Since the volt-seconds available for full-current plasma burn are less than 10% of the total available volt-seconds from the PF system, an area of concern in the CDA design is that unfavorable plasma conditions could compromise the ability of the physics base case design to achieve long pulse burns. A High Aspect Ratio Design (HARD) was conceived as an alternative design option with a much larger bore in the central solenoid to enhance ITER's capabilities for long-burn operation

  13. Characterization of the core poloidal flow at ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebschy, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    An essential result from neoclassical (NC) theory is that the fluid poloidal rotation (upol) of the main ions is strongly damped by magnetic pumping and, therefore, expected to be small (theory has been found at both DIII-D and TCV. This is qualitatively consistent with the edge results from both Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). At AUG thanks to an upgrade of the core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics, the core upol can be evaluated through the inboard-outboard asymmetry of the toroidal rotation with an accuracy of 0.5 - 1 km / s . This measurement also provides the missing ingredient to evaluate the core (E-> × B->) velocity (uE-> × B->) via the radial force balance equation. At AUG the core upol (0.35 × B-> determined from CXRS and the perpendicular velocity measured from turbulence propagation. The difference between these two quantities is the turbulent phase velocity. The gathered dataset indicates that the transition in the turbulence regime occurs after the saturation of the energy confinement time. The author thankfully acknowledges the financial support from the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers through the Helmholtz Young Investigators Group program.

  14. Poloidal ULF oscillations in the dayside magnetosphere: a Cluster study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. I. Eriksson

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Three ULF wave events, all occurring in the dayside magnetopshere during magnetically quiet times, are studied using the Cluster satellites. The multi-point measurements obtained from Cluster are used to determine the azimuthal wave number for the events by means of the phase shift and the azimuthal separation between the satellites. Also, the polarisation of the electric and magnetic fields is examined in a field-aligned coordinate system, which, in turn, gives the mode of the oscillations. The large-inclination orbits of Cluster allow us to examine the phase relationship between the electric and magnetic fields along the field lines. The events studied have large azimuthal wave numbers (m~100, two of them have eastward propagation and all are in the poloidal mode, consistent with the large wave numbers. We also use particle data from geosynchronous satellites to look for signatures of proton injections, but none of the events show any sign of enhanced proton flux. Thus, the drift-bounce resonance instability seems unlikely to have played any part in the excitation of these pulsations. As for the drift-mirror instability we conclude that it would require an unreasonably high plasma pressure for the instability criterion to be satisfied.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Wave propagation – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Instruments and techniques

  15. PHASE RELATIONSHIPS OF SOLAR HEMISPHERIC TOROIDAL AND POLOIDAL CYCLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraközy, J., E-mail: murakozy.judit@csfk.mta.hu [Debrecen Heliophysical Observatory (DHO), Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences H-4010 Debrecen P.O.B. 30, H-4010 (Hungary)

    2016-08-01

    The solar northern and southern hemispheres exhibit differences in their intensities and time profiles of the activity cycles. The time variation of these properties was studied in a previous article covering the data from Cycles 12–23. The hemispheric phase lags exhibited a characteristic variation: the leading role was exchanged between hemispheres every four cycles. The present work extends the investigation of this variation using the data of Staudacher and Schwabe in Cycles 1–4 and 7–10 as well as Spörer’s data in Cycle 11. The previously observed variation cannot be clearly recognized using the data of Staudacher, Schwabe, and Spörer. However, it is more interesting that the phase lags of the reversals of the magnetic fields at the poles follow the same variations as those of the hemispheric cycles in Cycles 12–23, i.e., one of the hemispheres leads in four cyles and the leading role jumps to the opposite hemisphere in the next four cycles. This means that this variation is a long-term property of the entire solar dynamo mechanism, for both the toroidal and poloidal fields, which hints at an unidentified component of the process responsible for the long-term memory.

  16. Poloidal and toroidal plasmons and fields of multilayer nanorings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garapati, K. V.; Salhi, M.; Kouchekian, S.; Siopsis, G.

    2017-01-01

    Composite and janus type metallodielectric nanoparticles are increasingly considered as a means to control the spatial and temporal behavior of electromagnetic fields in diverse applications such as coupling to quantum emitters, achieving invisibility cloaks, and obtaining quantum correlations between qubits. We investigate the surface modes of a toroidal nanostructure and obtain the canonical plasmon dispersion relations and resonance modes for arbitrarily layered nanorings. Unlike particle plasmon eigenmodes in other geometries, the amplitudes of the eigenmodes of tori exhibit a distinct forward and backward coupling. We present the plasmon dispersion relations for several relevant toroidal configurations in the quasistatic limit and obtain the dominant retarded dispersion relations of a single ring for comparison, discuss mode complementarity and hybridization, and introduce two new types of toroidal particles in the form of janus nanorings. The resonance frequencies for the first few dominant modes of a ring composed of plasmon supporting materials such as gold, silver, and aluminum are provided and compared to those for a silicon ring. A generalized Green's function is obtained for multilayer tori allowing for calculation of the scattering response to interacting fields. Employing the Green's function, the scalar electric potential distribution corresponding to individual poloidal and toroidal modes in response to an arbitrarily polarized external field and the field of electrons is obtained. The results are applied to obtain the local density of states and decay rate of a dipole near the center of the torus.

  17. Poloidal and toroidal plasmons and fields of multilayer nanorings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, K. V.; Salhi, M.; Kouchekian, S.; Siopsis, G.; Passian, A.

    2017-04-01

    Composite and janus type metallodielectric nanoparticles are increasingly considered as a means to control the spatial and temporal behavior of electromagnetic fields in diverse applications such as coupling to quantum emitters, achieving invisibility cloaks, and obtaining quantum correlations between qubits. We investigate the surface modes of a toroidal nanostructure and obtain the canonical plasmon dispersion relations and resonance modes for arbitrarily layered nanorings. Unlike particle plasmon eigenmodes in other geometries, the amplitudes of the eigenmodes of tori exhibit a distinct forward and backward coupling. We present the plasmon dispersion relations for several relevant toroidal configurations in the quasistatic limit and obtain the dominant retarded dispersion relations of a single ring for comparison, discuss mode complementarity and hybridization, and introduce two new types of toroidal particles in the form of janus nanorings. The resonance frequencies for the first few dominant modes of a ring composed of plasmon supporting materials such as gold, silver, and aluminum are provided and compared to those for a silicon ring. A generalized Green's function is obtained for multilayer tori allowing for calculation of the scattering response to interacting fields. Employing the Green's function, the scalar electric potential distribution corresponding to individual poloidal and toroidal modes in response to an arbitrarily polarized external field and the field of electrons is obtained. The results are applied to obtain the local density of states and decay rate of a dipole near the center of the torus.

  18. An exploratory study on the gaps and pathways to the Korean fusion DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyuck Jong; Heo, Gyunyoung; Kim, Hyung Chan; Yeom, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung; Lee, Young-seok; Kwon, Myeun; Lee, Gyung-Su; Kim, Yong-soo; Kim, Eunbae; Lee, Chul-sik

    2012-01-01

    With the vision of being an early demonstrator of fusion energy, the strategic plans for the Fusion DEMO program of Korea (K-DEMO program) has been developed. A staged development of the K-DEMO plant was considered in the strategic plans as to verify technical feasibility in the first stage and economic feasibility in the second stage. The top-tier design requirements and assumptions of the first stage K-DEMO plant are defined and postulated. With these requirements and assumptions, the desired and current status of nuclear fusion technologies are compared to identify the gaps to be filled to design, fabricate, construct, and operate it. The pathways from KSTAR, ITER to K-DEMO plant have also been studied to identify R and D activities for K-DEMO program that are to go in parallel with KSTAR and ITER are extracted from the pathways. Cross-cutting with the fusion R and D activities of the other countries and utilizing the commonalities with the existing systems are discussed with the provision of open-innovation strategy that is one of the key strategies of K-DEMO program. The priority of the R and D activities of K-DEMO program is qualitatively determined in consideration of the gaps, cross-cutting, and risks associated with the R and D investments.

  19. The Role of Community Colleges in Advancing Upward Mobility: A Demos Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a short background on Demos, a public policy organization that works on issues of political and economic inequality. Demos views community colleges as a linchpin in the American higher education system, and it has worked over several years to research ways to increase state support for higher education and direct support…

  20. Demos as an Explanatory Lens in Teacher Educators' Elusive Search for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomidoy, Eleni M.; Brock, Cynthia H.; Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Pennington, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    Borrowing insights from the Ancient Greek ideal conceptions of a democratic civic space (demos), this article examines the applicability of this framework to four teacher educators' journey to implement social justice in their programs. It is proposed that the three constitutive dimensions of demos (freedom of speech, equality to vote and hold…

  1. Overview of EU activities on DEMO liquid metal breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giancarli, L.; Proust, E.; Malang, S.; Reimann, J.; Perujo, A.

    1994-01-01

    The present paper gives an overview of both design and experimental activities within the European Union (EU) concerning the development of liquid metal breeder blankets for DEMO. After several years of studies on breeding blankets, two blanket concepts are presently considered, both using the eutectic Pb-17Li: the dual-coolant concept and the water-cooled concept. The analysis of such concepts has permitted to identify the experimental areas where further data are required. Tritium control and MHD-issues are, at present, the activities on which is devoted the greatest effort within the EU. (authors). 4 figs., 4 tabs., 39 refs

  2. Constitutional Crowdsourcing to Reconcile Demos with Aristos and Nomos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abat Ninet, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    it is framed, been liberal democracies or authoritarian states. Derrida stated there is a sort of “semantic indeterminacy” at the core of democracy and that constitutional crowdsourcing is a way to intervene in this indeterminacy. The Icelandic example enlightened that there is a way to mediate between....... The final segment of the paper aims to obtain different elements to improve the constitutional crowdsourcing to be considered in future constituent processes around the world. From a formal perspective the paper simulates a judgment between a Plaintiff Demos (representing “We the People” the entitled...

  3. Časopis Demos (Internationale Ethnographische und Folkloristische Informationen) v novém tisíciletí

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Woitsch, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 6, - (2003), s. 74-78 ISSN 1210-1109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z9058907 Keywords : journal Demos * history of the journal Demos * new developments in publishing of the journal Demos Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  4. Supporting device for Toroidal coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Takao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the response of a toroidal coil supporting device upon earthquakes and improve the earthquake proofness in a tokamak type thermonuclear device. Constitution: Structural materials having large longitudinal modulus and enduring great stresses, for example, stainless steels are used as the toroidal coil supporting legs and heat insulating structural materials are embedded in a nuclear reactor base mats below the supporting legs. Furthermore, heat insulating concretes are spiked around the heat insulating structural materials to prevent the intrusion of heat to the toroidal coils. The toroidal coils are kept at cryogenic state and superconductive state for the conductors. In this way, the period of proper vibrations of the toroidal coils and the toroidal coil supporting structures can be shortened thereby decreasing the seismic response. Furthermore, since the strength of the supporting legs is increased, the earthquake proofness of the coils can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Neutronic performance optimization study of Indian fusion demo reactor first wall and breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swami, H.L.; Danani, C.

    2015-01-01

    In frame of design studies of Indian Nuclear Fusion DEMO Reactor, neutronic performance optimization of first wall and breeding blanket are carried out. The study mainly focuses on tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and power density responses estimation of breeding blanket. Apart from neutronic efficiency of existing breeding blanket concepts for Indian DEMO i.e. lead lithium ceramic breeder and helium cooled solid breeder concept other concepts like helium cooled lead lithium and helium-cooled Li_8PbO_6 with reflector are also explored. The aim of study is to establish a neutronically efficient breeding blanket concept for DEMO. Effect of first wall materials and thickness on breeding blanket neutronic performance is also evaluated. For this study 1 D cylindrical neutronic model of DEMO has been constructed according to the preliminary radial build up of Indian DEMO. The assessment is being done using Monte Carlo based radiation transport code and nuclear cross section data file ENDF/B- VII. (author)

  6. Resonance parallel viscosity in the banana regime in poloidally rotating tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaing, K.C.; Hsu, C.T.; Dominguez, N.

    1994-01-01

    Parallel viscosity in the banana regime in a poloidally (ExB) rotating tokamak plasma is calculated to include the effects of orbit squeezing and to allow the poloidal ExB Mach number M p to have a value of order unity. Here, E is the electric field and B is the magnetic field. The effects of orbit squeezing not only modify the size of the particle orbit, but also change the fraction of poloidally trapped particles. Resonance between the particle parallel (to B) speed u and the poloidal component of the ExB velocity can only occur for those particles with energy (v/v t ) 2 >M 2 p (with v the particle speed and v t the thermal speed). Thus, the resonance parallel plasma viscosity in the banana regime decreases exponentially with M 2 p when M 2 p ≥1, and has a local maximum of M 2 p ∼1

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of a plasma confined in a convex poloidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellsten, T.

    1976-11-01

    A plasma confined in a purely poloidal magnetic field with a finite pressure at the boundary and surrounded by a conducting wall can be stabilized against magnetohydrodynamic perturbations even in absence of shear and minimum-average-B properties. To achieve large pressure gradients the average magnetic field has to decrease rapidly outwards. The theory is applied to a 'Spherator' configuration with a purely poloidal magnetic field. (Auth.)

  8. First measurement of poloidal-field-induced Faraday rotation in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, W.; Association Euratom-CEA sur la Fusion, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92

    1978-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements using a ferrite modulation technique were performed on one channel of the 337 μm-interferometer on TFR. The experiment is intended as a preparatory step towards poloidal-field determination on the basis of the Faraday effect in a multi-channel configuration. The technical feasibility of precise Faraday rotation measurements under machine conditions is demonstrated. The measured rotation is unambiguously due to the poloidal magnetic field and agrees fairly with what can be estimated. (author)

  9. ITER, the 'Broader Approach', a DEMO fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeschitz, G.; Bahm, W.

    2007-01-01

    Fusion is a very promising future energy option, which is characterized by almost unlimited fuel reserves, favourable safety features and environmental sustainability. The aim of the worldwide fusion research is a fusion power station which imitates the process taking place in the sun and thus gains energy from the fusion of light atomic nuclei. The experimental reactor ITER which will be built in Cadarache, France, marks a breakthrough in the worldwide fusion research: For the first time an energy multiplication factor of at least 10 will be achieved, the factor by which the fusion power exceeds the external plasma heating. Partners in this project are the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation, USA, China, South Korea and India as well as Brazil as associated partner. The facility is supposed to demonstrate a long burning, reactor-typical plasma and to test techniques such as plasma heating, plasma confinement by superconducting magnets, fuel cycle as well as energy transition, tritium breeding and remote handling technologies. The next step beyond ITER will be the demonstration power station DEMO which requires further developments in order to create the basis for its design and construction. The roadmap to fusion energy is described. It consists of several elements which are needed to develop the knowledge required for a commercial fusion reactor. The DEMO time schedule depends on the efforts in terms of personnel and budget resources the society is willing to invest in fusion taking into account the long term energy supply and its environmental impact. (orig.)

  10. An FPGA computing demo core for space charge simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jinyuan; Huang, Yifei

    2009-01-01

    In accelerator physics, space charge simulation requires large amount of computing power. In a particle system, each calculation requires time/resource consuming operations such as multiplications, divisions, and square roots. Because of the flexibility of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), we implemented this task with efficient use of the available computing resources and completely eliminated non-calculating operations that are indispensable in regular micro-processors (e.g. instruction fetch, instruction decoding, etc.). We designed and tested a 16-bit demo core for computing Coulomb's force in an Altera Cyclone II FPGA device. To save resources, the inverse square-root cube operation in our design is computed using a memory look-up table addressed with nine to ten most significant non-zero bits. At 200 MHz internal clock, our demo core reaches a throughput of 200 M pairs/s/core, faster than a typical 2 GHz micro-processor by about a factor of 10. Temperature and power consumption of FPGAs were also lower than those of micro-processors. Fast and convenient, FPGAs can serve as alternatives to time-consuming micro-processors for space charge simulation.

  11. Enhancing the DEMO divertor target by interlayer engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, T.R.; McIntosh, S.C.; Fursdon, M.; Hancock, D.; Timmis, W.; Coleman, M.; Rieth, M.; Reiser, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The European ‘near-term’ DEMO forsees a water-cooled divertor. • Divertor targets typically use an interlayer between the armour and structure. • Engineering the properties of the interlayer can yield large gains in performance. • A response surface based design search and optimisation method is used. • A new design passes linear-elastic code rules up to applied heat flux of 18 MW/m"2. - Abstract: A robust water-cooled divertor target plate solution for DEMO has to date remained elusive. Common to all contemporary concepts is an interlayer at the boundary between the tungsten armour and the cooling structure. In this paper we show by design optimisation that an effectively designed interlayer can produce dramatic gains in power handling. By engineering the interlayer as part of the design study, it is found that divertor performance is enhanced by either a low conductivity ‘Thermal Break’ interlayer or an ‘Ultra-Compliant’ interlayer. For a 10 MW/m"2 surface heat flux we find that a thermal conductivity of 15 W/mK and elastic modulus of 1 GPa are effective. A design is proposed which passes linear-elastic code rules up to an applied heat flux of 18 MW/m"2.

  12. Enhancing the DEMO divertor target by interlayer engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, T.R., E-mail: tom.barrett@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); McIntosh, S.C.; Fursdon, M.; Hancock, D.; Timmis, W.; Coleman, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rieth, M.; Reiser, J. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The European ‘near-term’ DEMO forsees a water-cooled divertor. • Divertor targets typically use an interlayer between the armour and structure. • Engineering the properties of the interlayer can yield large gains in performance. • A response surface based design search and optimisation method is used. • A new design passes linear-elastic code rules up to applied heat flux of 18 MW/m{sup 2}. - Abstract: A robust water-cooled divertor target plate solution for DEMO has to date remained elusive. Common to all contemporary concepts is an interlayer at the boundary between the tungsten armour and the cooling structure. In this paper we show by design optimisation that an effectively designed interlayer can produce dramatic gains in power handling. By engineering the interlayer as part of the design study, it is found that divertor performance is enhanced by either a low conductivity ‘Thermal Break’ interlayer or an ‘Ultra-Compliant’ interlayer. For a 10 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux we find that a thermal conductivity of 15 W/mK and elastic modulus of 1 GPa are effective. A design is proposed which passes linear-elastic code rules up to an applied heat flux of 18 MW/m{sup 2}.

  13. An assessment for the erosion rate of DEMO first wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2018-01-01

    In a fusion reactor a significant fraction of plasma particles lost from the confined volume will reach the vessel wall. The recombination of these charged species, electrons and ions of hydrogen isotopes, is a source of neutral molecules and atoms, recycling back into the plasma. Here they participate, in particular, in charge-exchange (c-x) collisions with the plasma ions and, as a result, atoms of high energies with chaotically oriented velocities are generated. A significant fraction of these hot neutrals will hit the wall, leading, as well as the outflowing fuel and impurity ions, to its erosion, limiting the reactor operation time. The rate of the wall erosion in DEMO is assessed by applying a one-dimensional model which takes into account the transport of charged and neutral species across the flux surfaces in the main part of the scrape-off layer, beyond the X-point vicinity and divertor, and by considering the shift of the centers of flux surfaces, their elongation and triangularity. Atoms generated by c-x of recycling neutrals are modeled kinetically to define firmly their energy spectrum, being of particular importance for the erosion assessment. It is demonstrated the erosion rate of the DEMO wall armor of tungsten will have a pronounced ballooning character with a significant maximum of 0.3 mm per full power year at the low field side, decreasing with an increase in the anomalous perpendicular transport in the ‘far’ SOL or the plasma density at the separatrix.

  14. An FPGA computing demo core for space charge simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jinyuan; Huang, Yifei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    In accelerator physics, space charge simulation requires large amount of computing power. In a particle system, each calculation requires time/resource consuming operations such as multiplications, divisions, and square roots. Because of the flexibility of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), we implemented this task with efficient use of the available computing resources and completely eliminated non-calculating operations that are indispensable in regular micro-processors (e.g. instruction fetch, instruction decoding, etc.). We designed and tested a 16-bit demo core for computing Coulomb's force in an Altera Cyclone II FPGA device. To save resources, the inverse square-root cube operation in our design is computed using a memory look-up table addressed with nine to ten most significant non-zero bits. At 200 MHz internal clock, our demo core reaches a throughput of 200 M pairs/s/core, faster than a typical 2 GHz micro-processor by about a factor of 10. Temperature and power consumption of FPGAs were also lower than those of micro-processors. Fast and convenient, FPGAs can serve as alternatives to time-consuming micro-processors for space charge simulation.

  15. Physics issues for a very-low-aspect-ratio Quasi-Poloidal Stellarator (QPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Berry, L.A.; Hirshman, S.P.

    2003-01-01

    A quasi-poloidal stellarator with very low plasma aspect ratio (R/a ∼ 2.7, 1/2-1/4 that of existing stellarators) is a new confinement approach that could ultimately lead to a high-beta compact stellarator reactor. The Quasi-Poloidal Stellarator (QPS) experiment is being developed to test key features of this approach. The QPS will study neoclassical and anomalous transport, stability limits at beta up to 2.5%, the configuration dependence of the bootstrap current, and equilibrium robustness. The quasi-poloidal symmetry leads to neoclassical transport that is much smaller than the anomalous transport. The reduced effective field ripple may also produce reduced poloidal viscosity, enhancing the ambipolar E x B poloidal drift and allowing larger poloidal flows for reduction of anomalous transport. A region of second stability exists in the QPS experiment at higher beta. Very-high-beta configurations with a tokamak-like transform profile have also been obtained with a bootstrap current 1/3-1/5 that in an equivalent tokamak. These configurations are stable to low-n ideal MHD kink and vertical instabilities for beta up to 11%. Ballooning-stable configurations are found for beta in the range 2% to 23%. (author)

  16. The Effects of Radial and Poloidal ExB Drifts in the Tokamak SOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Jing; Zhu Sizheng

    2006-01-01

    The effects of radial and poloidal ExB drifts in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a limiter tokamak are studied with a one-dimensional fluid code. The transport equations are solved in the poloidal direction with the radial influxes as the source terms. The simulation results show that in the high recycling regime, the effect of the radial ExB drift on plasma density tends to be stronger than that of the poloidal ExB drift. In the sheath-limited regime, the effects of the radial ExB drift and poloidal ExB drift on plasma density are almost equally important. Considering the influence on the electron temperature, the poloidal ExB drift tends to be more important than the radial ExB drift in both the high recycling regime and sheath-limited regime. For the normal B φ , the poloidal ExB drift tends to raise the pressure at the low field side while the radial ExB drift favours the high field side. The simulation results also show that the ExB drift influences the asymmetries on the parameter distributions at the high field side and low field side, and the distributions are much more symmetric with the field reversal

  17. STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF THE DIII-D TOROIDAL FIELD COIL TO INCREASED LATERAL LOADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REIS, E.E; CHIN, E.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Recent calibration shots in which full toroidal field (TF) coil current interacted with the maximum poloidal field coils have produced increased lateral loads on the outer sections of the TF-coil. The increased lateral loads have resulted in deflections that have been sufficient to cause the TF-coil to contact adjacent equipment and produce a transient short to ground within the coil. The six outer turns of each TF-coil bundle are clamped together by insulated preloaded studs to provide increased bending stiffness. These sections of the outer bundles depend on friction to react the lateral loads as a bundle rather than six individual turns. A major concern is that the increased loads will produce slip between turns resulting in excessive lateral deflections and possible damage to the insulating sleeve on the preloaded studs. A finite element structural model of the TF-coil was developed for the calculation of deflections and the shear load distribution throughout the coil for the applied lateral loads from a full current calibration shot. The purpose of the updated structural model is to correlate the applied lateral loads to the total shear force between the unbonded sections of the outer turns. An allowable integrated lateral load applied to the outer turns is established based on the maximum shear force that can be reacted by friction. A program that calculates the magnetic fields and integrated lateral load along the outer turns can be incorporated into the plasma control system. The integrated load can then be compared to the calculated allowable value prior to execution of calibration shots. Calibration shots with a calculated total lateral load greater than the allowable value will be prevented

  18. Ring coil optimization with respect to stress, temperature, and system energy over a range of physics requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillsbury, R.D. Jr; Thome, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The poloidal field coil system for a tokamak can be divided into the central solenoid and the ring coils. A ring coil is defined as one that has a small cross-section compared to its diameter. The size of the central solenoid is usually fixed very early in the design process since its size is directly related to the tokamak size. The sizes of the other (ring) coils are not as critical to determining the basic machine size. It is necessary to know their locations and currents in order to verify the shaping and position control of the plasma. Attention is usually focused only on the baseline plasma of the design point. However, the PF set must also be able to shape and maintain other plasmas. This paper describes a program which evaluates PF coil current scenarios over a range of physics requirements and determines the sizes of the coils necessary to satisfy constraints on the temperature rise and stress levels for the worst case scenario. In addition, the system energy requirements can be assessed and trade-offs between system energy and coil sizes (cost) can be made. Examples are given based on studies performed of CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak)

  19. Neutronic analyses and tools development efforts in the European DEMO programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Bachmann, C. [European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA), Garching (Germany); Bienkowska, B. [Association IPPLM-Euratom, IPPLM Warsaw/INP Krakow (Poland); Catalan, J.P. [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid (Spain); Drozdowicz, K.; Dworak, D. [Association IPPLM-Euratom, IPPLM Warsaw/INP Krakow (Poland); Leichtle, D. [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Lengar, I. [MESCS-JSI, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jaboulay, J.-C. [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lu, L. [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Moro, F. [Associazione ENEA-Euratom, ENEA Fusion Division, Frascati (Italy); Mota, F. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Sanz, J. [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid (Spain); Szieberth, M. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), Budapest (Hungary); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pampin, R. [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Porton, M. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE), Culham (United Kingdom); Pereslavtsev, P. [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Ogando, F. [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid (Spain); Rovni, I. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), Budapest (Hungary); and others

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Evaluation of neutronic tools for application to DEMO nuclear analyses. •Generation of a DEMO model for nuclear analyses based on MC calculations. •Nuclear analyses of the DEMO reactor equipped with a HCLL-type blanket. -- Abstract: The European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) recently launched a programme on Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) with the aim to develop a conceptual design of a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO) addressing key technology and physics issues. A dedicated part of the PPPT programme is devoted to the neutronics which, among others, has to define and verify requirements and boundary conditions for the DEMO systems. The quality of the provided data depends on the capabilities and the reliability of the computational tools. Accordingly, the PPPT activities in the area of neutronics include both DEMO nuclear analyses and development efforts on neutronic tools including their verification and validation. This paper reports on first neutronics studies performed for DEMO, and on the evaluation and further development of neutronic tools.

  20. Impurity accumulation and performance of ITER and DEMO plasmas in the presence of transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatthong, B; Promping, J; Onjun, T

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the impurity accumulations and their performance in the presence of both ITB and ETB in ITER and DEMO plasmas are investigated using a BALDUR integrated predictive modelling code. In these simulations, a combination of a neoclassical transport model NCLASS and an anomalous transport model Mixed Bohm/gyro-Bohm is used. The boundary condition is described at the top of the pedestal, which is calculated theoretically based on a combination of magnetic and flow shear stabilization pedestal width scaling and an infinite-n ballooning pressure gradient model. The toroidal flow is calculated based on the NTV (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) toroidal velocity model. The time evolution of plasma temperature and density profiles of ITER and DEMO (Korean K-DEMO and Japanese DEMO models A, B and C) plasmas are simulated in H -mode scenario with and without ITB formation. It is found that Japanese DEMO model C yields highest plasma temperature; while Korean DEMO yields the best plasma performance among those designs considered. Impurity accumulation is found to be highest in Japanese DEMO model B. (paper)

  1. Neutronic analyses and tools development efforts in the European DEMO programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Bachmann, C.; Bienkowska, B.; Catalan, J.P.; Drozdowicz, K.; Dworak, D.; Leichtle, D.; Lengar, I.; Jaboulay, J.-C.; Lu, L.; Moro, F.; Mota, F.; Sanz, J.; Szieberth, M.; Palermo, I.; Pampin, R.; Porton, M.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Ogando, F.; Rovni, I.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Evaluation of neutronic tools for application to DEMO nuclear analyses. •Generation of a DEMO model for nuclear analyses based on MC calculations. •Nuclear analyses of the DEMO reactor equipped with a HCLL-type blanket. -- Abstract: The European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) recently launched a programme on Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) with the aim to develop a conceptual design of a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO) addressing key technology and physics issues. A dedicated part of the PPPT programme is devoted to the neutronics which, among others, has to define and verify requirements and boundary conditions for the DEMO systems. The quality of the provided data depends on the capabilities and the reliability of the computational tools. Accordingly, the PPPT activities in the area of neutronics include both DEMO nuclear analyses and development efforts on neutronic tools including their verification and validation. This paper reports on first neutronics studies performed for DEMO, and on the evaluation and further development of neutronic tools

  2. Coil Optimization for HTS Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    An optimization approach of HTS coils in HTS synchronous machines (SM) is presented. The optimization is aimed at high power SM suitable for direct driven wind turbines applications. The optimization process was applied to a general radial flux machine with a peak air gap flux density of ~3T...... is suitable for which coil segment is presented. Thus, the performed study gives valuable input for the coil design of HTS machines ensuring optimal usage of HTS tapes....

  3. Comparison of edge plasma perturbation during ELM control using one vs. two toroidal rows of RMP coils in ITER similar shaped plasmas on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenstermacher, M.E., E-mail: fenstermacher@fusion.gat.co [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Evans, T.E.; Osborne, T.H.; Schaffer, M.J.; DeGrassie, J.S.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Moyer, R.A. [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Large Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) were suppressed by n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) from a set of internal coils in plasmas with an ITER similar shape at the ITER pedestal collisionality, nu{sub e}*approx0.1 and low edge safety factor (q{sub 95} approx 3.6), with either a single toroidal row of the internal RMP coils or two poloidally separated rows of coils. ELM suppression with a single row of internal coils was achieved at approximately the same q{sub 95} surface-averaged perturbation field as with two rows of coils, but required higher current per coil. Maintaining complete suppression of ELMs using n = 3 RMPs from a single toroidal row of internal coils was less robust to variations in input neutral beam injection torque than previous ELM suppression cases using both rows of internal coils. With either configuration of RMP coils, maximum ELM size is correlated with the width of the edge region having good overlap of the magnetic islands from vacuum field calculations.

  4. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of K-DEMO Single Blanket Module for Preliminary Accident Analysis using MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Bo; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To develop the Korean fusion commercial reactor, preliminary design concept for K-DEMO (Korean fusion demonstration reactor) has been announced by NFRI (National Fusion Research Institute). This pre-conceptual study of K-DEMO has been introduced to identify technical details of a fusion power plant for the future commercialization of fusion reactor in Korea. Before this consideration, to build the K-DEMO, accident analysis is essential. Since the Fukushima accident, which is severe accident from unexpected disaster, safety analysis of nuclear power plant has become important. The safety analysis of both fission and fusion reactors is deemed crucial in demonstrating the low radiological effect of these reactors on the environment, during severe accidents. A risk analysis of K-DEMO should be performed, as a prerequisite for the construction of a fusion reactor. In this research, thermal-hydraulic analysis of single blanket module of K-DEMO is conducted for preliminary accident analysis for K-DEMO. Further study about effect of flow distributer is conducted. The normal K-DEMO operation condition is applied to the boundary condition and simulated to verify the material temperature limit using MELCOR. MELCOR is fully integrated, relatively fast-running code developed by Sandia National Laboratories. MELCOR had been used for Light Water Reactors and fusion reactor version of MELCOR was developed for ITER accident analysis. This study shows the result of thermal-hydraulic simulation of single blanket module with MELCOR which is severe accident code for nuclear fusion safety analysis. The difference of mass flow rate for each coolant channel with or without flow distributer is presented. With flow distributer, advantage of broadening temperature gradient in the K-DEMO blanket module and increase mass flow toward first wall is obtained. This can enhance the safety of K-DEMO blanket module. Most 13 .deg. C temperature difference in blanket module is obtained.

  5. Fuel cycle design for ITER and its extrapolation to DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)], E-mail: s-konishi@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Glugla, Manfred [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, D 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hayashi, Takumi [Apan Atomic Energy AgencyTokai, Ibaraki 319-0015 Japan (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    ITER is the first fusion device that continuously processes DT plasma exhaust and supplies recycled fuel in a closed loop. All the tritium and deuterium in the exhaust are recovered, purified and returned to the tokamak with minimal delay, so that extended burn can be sustained with limited inventory. To maintain the safety of the entire facility, plant scale detritiation systems will also continuously run to remove tritium from the effluents at the maximum efficiency. In this entire tritium plant system, extremely high decontamination factor, that is the ratio of the tritium loss to the processing flow rate, is required for fuel economy and minimized tritium emissions, and the system design based on the state-of-the-art technology is expected to satisfy all the requirements without significant technical challenges. Considerable part of the fusion tritium system will be verified with ITER and its decades of operation experiences. Toward the DEMO plant that will actually generate energy and operate its closed fuel cycle, breeding blanket and power train that caries high temperature and pressure media from the fusion device to the generation system will be the major addition. For the tritium confinement, safety and environmental emission, particularly blanket, its coolant, and generation systems such as heat exchanger, steam generator and turbine will be the critical systems, because the tritium permeation from the breeder and handling large amount of high temperature, high pressure coolant will be further more difficult than that required for ITER. Detritiation of solid waste such as used blanket and divertor will be another issue for both tritium economy and safety. Unlike in the case of ITER that is regarded as experimental facility, DEMO will be expected to demonstrate the safety, reliability and social acceptance issue, even if economical feature is excluded. Fuel and environmental issue to be tested in the DEMO will determine the viability of the fusion as a

  6. Fuel cycle design for ITER and its extrapolation to DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Glugla, Manfred; Hayashi, Takumi

    2008-01-01

    ITER is the first fusion device that continuously processes DT plasma exhaust and supplies recycled fuel in a closed loop. All the tritium and deuterium in the exhaust are recovered, purified and returned to the tokamak with minimal delay, so that extended burn can be sustained with limited inventory. To maintain the safety of the entire facility, plant scale detritiation systems will also continuously run to remove tritium from the effluents at the maximum efficiency. In this entire tritium plant system, extremely high decontamination factor, that is the ratio of the tritium loss to the processing flow rate, is required for fuel economy and minimized tritium emissions, and the system design based on the state-of-the-art technology is expected to satisfy all the requirements without significant technical challenges. Considerable part of the fusion tritium system will be verified with ITER and its decades of operation experiences. Toward the DEMO plant that will actually generate energy and operate its closed fuel cycle, breeding blanket and power train that caries high temperature and pressure media from the fusion device to the generation system will be the major addition. For the tritium confinement, safety and environmental emission, particularly blanket, its coolant, and generation systems such as heat exchanger, steam generator and turbine will be the critical systems, because the tritium permeation from the breeder and handling large amount of high temperature, high pressure coolant will be further more difficult than that required for ITER. Detritiation of solid waste such as used blanket and divertor will be another issue for both tritium economy and safety. Unlike in the case of ITER that is regarded as experimental facility, DEMO will be expected to demonstrate the safety, reliability and social acceptance issue, even if economical feature is excluded. Fuel and environmental issue to be tested in the DEMO will determine the viability of the fusion as a

  7. Automatic demand response referred to electricity spot price. Demo description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, Ove S.; Livik, Klaus; Hals, Arne

    2006-05-01

    This report presents background, technical solution and results from a test project (Demo I) developed in the DRR Norway) project. Software and technology from two different vendors, APAS and Powel ASA, are used to demonstrate a scheme for Automatic Demand Response (ADR) referred to spot price level and a system for documentation of demand response and cost savings. Periods with shortage of energy supply and hardly any investments in new production capacity have turned focus towards the need for increased price elasticity on the demand side in the Nordic power market. The new technology for Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) and Remote Load Control (RLC) provides an opportunity to improve the direct market participation from the demand side by introducing automatic schemes that reduce the need for customer attention to hourly market prices. The low prioritized appliances, and not the total load, are in this report defined as the Demand Response Objects, based on the assumption that there is a limit for what the customers are willing to pay for different uses of electricity. Only disconnection of residential water heaters is included in the demo, due to practical limitations. The test was performed for a group of single family houses over a period of 2 months. All the houses were equipped with a radio controlled 'Ebox' unit attached to the water heater socket. The settlement and invoicing were based on hourly metered values (kWh/h), which means that the customer benefit is equivalent to the accumulated changes in the electricity cost per hour. The actual load reduction is documented by comparison between the real meter values for the period and a reference curve. The curves show significant response to the activated control in the morning hours. In the afternoon it is more difficult to register the response, probably due to 'disturbing' activities like cooking etc. Demo I shows that load reduction referred to spot price level can be done in a smooth way. The experiences

  8. Large superconducting coil fabrication development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.; Allred, E.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Burn, P.B.; Deaderick, R.I.; Henderson, G.M.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    Toroidal fields for some fusion devices will be produced by an array of large superconducting coils. Their size, space limitation, and field requirements dictate that they be high performance coils. Once installed, accessibility for maintenance and repairs is severely restricted; therefore, good reliability is an obvious necessity. Sufficient coil fabrication will be undertaken to develop and test methods that are reliable, fast, and economical. Industrial participation will be encouraged from the outset to insure smooth transition from development phases to production phases. Initially, practice equipment for three meter bore circular coils will be developed. Oval shape coil forms will be included in the practice facility later. Equipment that is more automated will be developed with the expectation of winding faster and obtaining good coil quality. Alternate types of coil construction, methods of winding and insulating, will be investigated. Handling and assembly problems will be studied. All technology developed must be feasible for scaling up when much larger coils are needed. Experimental power reactors may need coils having six meter or larger bores

  9. Status of the cold test facility for the JT-60SA tokamak toroidal field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Maksoud, Walid, E-mail: walid.abdelmaksoud@cea.fr; Bargueden, Patrick; Bouty, André; Dispau, Gilles; Donati, André; Eppelle, Dominique; Genini, Laurent; Guiho, Patrice; Guihard, Quentin; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Kuster, Olivier; Médioni, Damien; Molinié, Frédéric; Sinanna, Armand; Solenne, Nicolas; Somson, Sébastien; Vieillard, Laurence

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The 5 K cryogenic loop includes a 500 W refrigerator and a She cold pump. • The coils are energized thanks to a 25.7 kA power supply and HTS current leads. • Temperature margin tests between 5 K and 7.5 K will be made on each coil. • A magnet safety system protects each double pancake of the coil in case of quench. • Instrumentation is monitored on a 1 Hz to 10 kHz fast acquisition system. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a fusion experiment which is jointly constructed by Japan and Europe and which shall contribute to the early realization of fusion energy, by providing support to the operation of ITER, and by addressing key physics issues for ITER and DEMO. In order to achieve these goals, the existing JT-60U experiment will be upgraded to JT-60SA by using superconducting coils. The 18 TF coils of the JT-60SA device will be provided by European industry and tested in a Cold Test Facility (CTF) at CEA Saclay. The coils will be tested at the nominal current of 25.7 kA and will be cooled with supercritical helium between 5 K and 7.5 K to check the temperature margin against a quench. The main objective of these tests is to check the TF coils performance and hence mitigate the fabrication risks. The most important components of the facility are: a 11.5 m × 6.5 m large cryostat in which the TF coils will be thermally insulated by vacuum; a 500 W helium refrigerator and a valve box to cool the coils down to 5 K and circulate 24 g/s of supercritical helium through the winding pack and through the casing; a power supply and HTS current leads to energize the coil; the control and instrumentation equipment (sensors, PLC's, supervision system, fast data acquisition system, etc.) and the Magnet Safety System (MSS) that protects the coils in case of quench. The paper will give an overview of the design of this large facility and the status of its realization.

  10. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  11. The coiled coil motif in polymer drug delivery systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 1 (2013), s. 90-96 ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0543; GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : coiled coil * hydrophilic polymer * recombinant protein Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 8.905, year: 2013

  12. Feasibility studies on plasma vertical position control by ex-vessel coils in ITER-like tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Shimomura, Yasuo

    1993-01-01

    Feasibility of the plasma vertical position control by control coils installed outside the vacuum vessel (ex-vessel) in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined for an ITER-like device. When a pair of ex-vessel control coils is made of normal conductor material and located near the outmost superconducting (SC) poloidal field (PF) coils, the applied voltage of several hundred volts on the control coils is the maximum allowable value which is limited by the maximum allowable induced voltage and eddy current heating on the SC PF coils, under the conditions that the SC PF coils are connected in series and a partitioning connection is employed for each of these PF coils. A proportional and derivative (PD) controller with and without voltage limitation has been employed to examine the feasibility. Indices of settling time and overshoot are introduced to measure the controllability of the control system. Based on these control schemes and indices, higher elongation (κ=2) and moderate elongation (κ=1.6) plasmas are examined for normal and deteriorated (low beta value and peaked current profile) plasma conditions within the restriction of applied voltage and current of control coils. The effect of the time constant of the passive stabilizer is also examined. The major results are: (1) A plasma with an elongation of 2.0 inevitably requires a passive stabilizer close to the plasma surface, (2) in case of a higher elongation than κ=2, even the ex-vessel control coil system is marginally controllable under normal plasma conditions, while it is difficult to control the deteriorated plasma conditions, (3) the time constant of the passive stabilizer is not an essential parameter for the controllability, (4) when the elongation is reduced down to 1.6, the ex-vessel control coil system can control the plasma even under deteriorated plasma conditions. (orig.)

  13. Facebook pages as ’demo versions’ of issue publics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Andreas

    ’political muscle’ through numbers. Second, these protests also focused on demonstrating harmful indirect consequences of a future payment ring by sharing news stories and other analyses that served to undermine the soundness of the payment ring. Third, these two kinds of demonstrations functioned as ’demoes...... of representative democracy are founded with a distinction between direct and indirect consequences of action (Dewey 1927), Facebook can be understood as an experimental issue public-generating device. In the payment ring controversy, several Facebook pages became spaces of ’demonstration’ in three senses...... is at stake in Facebook practices like these, then, it becomes useful to rethink publics as processes of on-going experimental inquiry into issues (Marres 2007)....

  14. Neutral beam deployment on DEMO and its influence on design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surrey, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth.surrey@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); King, Damian; Lister, Jonathan; Porton, Michael; Timmis, William; Ward, David [EURATOM/CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The demands on the neutral beam heating and current drive system of a DEMO device exceed those of existing fusion experiments by several orders of magnitude. By predicting possible power waveforms it is possible to analyse the technological advances necessary to achieve a system relevant to deployment on a power plant. Achieving the necessary efficiency will require simultaneous improvements in beam current density, neutralization efficiency and beam transmission. Considering the deployment on the tokamak vessel shows no major disruption to the tritium breeder blanket and no requirement to reach a high packing density of injectors. The thermal management of components subjected to low heat flux for many hours is considered and it is shown that radiation cooling can be exploited to control the temperature of such items.

  15. Optimization and limitations of known DEMO divertor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Limitations of the materials. ► Improved H 2 O cooled divertor. ► Improved He cooled divertor. - Abstract: In this work we will introduce and discuss improvements for two types of DEMO divertors based on known designs: (i) gas cooled designs and (ii) liquid coolant concepts. In a first step, the advantages and disadvantages of gas cooling as well as the necessity of a jet impingement to increase the heat transfer coefficients will be discussed. Further discussion deals with the pros and cons of liquid coolant concepts, like for example, liquid metal or water cooling. Thereafter, we will present two rather contrary DEMO divertor concepts which are based on today's knowledge on refractory materials science, fabrication and joining technology. The first improved concept uses water flowing through steel pipes, typically made of Eurofer steel. It is well known that using Eurofer at low temperatures is critical due to its severe embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Here we make a proposal how it could be possible to use the Eurofer steel anyway: the solution could consist in a limited operation period followed by an annealing cycle at 550 °C for a few hours during any maintenance shut down phases. The second design is based on the known helium cooling concept using jet impingement. Drawbacks of the actual He-cooled divertor design are small scale parts as well as the necessary high helium inlet temperature of about 600–800 °C which leads to the question: How can we deal with such high helium temperatures? This paper shows a solution for large scale components as well as a new thermal management for the helium outlet gas that we call ‘cooling of the coolant’. Both concepts are discussed in terms of materials selection due to material limits and joining technology with a special focus on the material issue using already existing and available materials.

  16. European DEMO design strategy and consequences for materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, G.; Biel, W.; Gilbert, M. R.; Kemp, R.; Taylor, N.; Wenninger, R.

    2017-09-01

    Demonstrating the production of net electricity and operating with a closed fuel-cycle remain unarguably the crucial steps towards the exploitation of fusion power. These are the aims of a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) proposed to be built after ITER. This paper briefly describes the DEMO design options that are being considered in Europe for the current conceptual design studies as part of the Roadmap to Fusion Electricity Horizon 2020. These are not intended to represent fixed and exclusive design choices but rather ‘proxies’ of possible plant design options to be used to identify generic design/material issues that need to be resolved in future fusion reactor systems. The materials nuclear design requirements and the effects of radiation damage are briefly analysed with emphasis on a pulsed ‘low extrapolation’ system, which is being used for the initial design integration studies, based as far as possible on mature technologies and reliable regimes of operation (to be extrapolated from the ITER experience), and on the use of materials suitable for the expected level of neutron fluence. The main technical issues arising from the plasma and nuclear loads and the effects of radiation damage particularly on the structural and heat sink materials of the vessel and in-vessel components are critically discussed. The need to establish realistic target performance and a development schedule for near-term electricity production tends to favour more conservative technology choices. The readiness of the technical (physics and technology) assumptions that are being made is expected to be an important factor for the selection of the technical features of the device.

  17. Neutronics experiments for DEMO blanket at JAERI/FNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Ochiai, K.; Hori, J.; Verzilov, Y.; Klix, A.; Wada, M.; Terada, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Morimoto, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify the accuracy of the tritium production rate (TPR), neutron irradiation experiments have been performed with a mockup relevant to the fusion DEMO blanket consisting of F82H blocks, Li 2 TiO 3 blocks with a 6 Li enrichment of 40 and 95%, and beryllium blocks. Sample pellets of Li 2 TiO 3 were irradiated and the TPR was measured by a liquid scintillation counter. The TPR was also calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B with the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2 and ENDF-B/VI. The results agreed with experimental values within the statistical error (10%) of the experiment. Accordingly, it was clarified that the TPR could be evaluated within 10% uncertainty by the calculation code and the nuclear data. In order to estimate the induced activity caused by sequential reactions in cooling water pipes in the DEMO blanket, neutron irradiation experiments have been performed using test speciments simulating the pipes. Sample metals of Fe, W, Ti, Pb, Cu, V and reduced activation ferritic steels F82H were irradiated as typical fusion materials. The effective cross-sections for incident neutron flux to calculate the radioactive nuclei ( 56 Co, 184 Re, 48 V, 206 Bi, 65 Zn and 51 Cr) due to sequential reactions were measured. From the experimental results, it was found that the effective cross-sections remarkably increases with coming closer to polyethylene board that was a substitute of water. As a result of the present study, it has become clear that the sequential reaction rates are important factors to accurately evaluate the induced activity in fusion reactors design. (author)

  18. Neutronics experiments for DEMO blanket at JAERI/FNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Ochiai, K.; Hori, J.; Verzilov, Y.; Klix, A.; Wada, M.; Terada, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Morimoto, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify the accuracy of the tritium production rate (TPR), neutron irradiation experiments have been performed with a mockup relevant to the fusion DEMO blanket consisting of F82H blocks, Li 2 TiO 3 blocks with a 6 Li enrichment of 40 and 95%, and beryllium blocks. Sample pellets of Li 2 TiO 3 were irradiated and the TPR was measured by a liquid scintillation counter. The TPR was also calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B with the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2 and ENDF-B/VI. The results agreed with experimental values within the statistical error (10%) of the experiment. Accordingly, it was clarified that the TPR could be evaluated within 10% uncertainty by the calculation code and the nuclear data. In order to estimate the induced activity caused by sequential reactions in cooling water pipes in the DEMO blanket, neutron irradiation experiments have been performed using test specimens simulating the pipes. Sample metals of Fe, W, Ti, Pb, Cu, V and reduced activation ferritic steel F82H were irradiated as typical fusion materials. The effective cross- sections for incident neutron flux to calculate the radioactive nuclei ( 56 Co, 184 Re, 48 V, 206 Bi, 65 Zn and 51 Cr) due to sequential reactions were measured. From the experimental results, it was found that the effective cross-sections remarkably increases with coming closer to polyethylene board that was a substitute of water. As a result of the present study, it has become clear that the sequential reaction rates are important factors to accurately evaluate the induced activity in fusion reactors design. (author)

  19. Control of highly vertically unstable plasmas in TCV with internal coils and fast power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, A.; Moret, J.M.; Chavan, R.; Fasel, D.; Hofmann, F.; Lister, J.B.; Mayor, J.M.; Perez, A.; Elkjaer, A.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of TCV (Tokamak a Configuration Variable) is to investigate effects of plasma shape, in particular high elongation (up to 3), on tokamak physics. Such elongated configurations (I p ≅1 MA) are highly vertically unstable with growth rates up to γ=4000 s -1 . Control of the vertical position using the poloidal coils located outside the vessel is limited to γ≤1000 s -1 because of the shielding effect of the conductive vessel and because of the relative slow time response of their power supplies (0.8 ms thyristor 12 pulse switching at 120 Hz). This dictated the necessity to install a coil set inside the vacuum vessel fed with a Fast Power Supply (FPS). The choice and design of the system with a special attention to the mechanical and electrical constraints in TCV tokamak, as the results and real performances, will be presented. (author) 3 figs., 2 tabs., 2 refs

  20. Comparison of Poloidal Velocity Meassurements to Neoclassical Theory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.E.; Andre, R.; Kaye, S.M.; Kolesnikov, R.A.; LeBlance, B.P.; Rewolldt, G.; Wang, W.X.; Sabbagh, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of poloidal velocity is necessary for the determination of the radial electric field, Er, which along with its gradient is linked to turbulence suppression and transport barrier formation. Recent measurements of poloidal flow on conventional tokamaks have been reported to be an order of magnitude larger than expected from neoclassical theory. In contrast, recent poloidal velocity measurements on the NSTX spherical torus (S. M. Kaye et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)) are near or below neoclassical estimates. A novel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic is used, which features active and passive sets of up/down symmetric views to produce line-integrated poloidal velocity measurements that do not need atomic physics corrections. Local profiles are obtained with an inversion. Poloidal velocity measurements are compared with neoclassical values computed with the codes NCLASS (W. A. Houlberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 3230 (1997)) and GTC-Neo (W. X. Wang, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 082501 (2006)), which has been updated to handle impurities.

  1. Equilibrium poloidal-field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison between the approximate analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation for reversed-field-pinch (RFP) configurations is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal-field distribution at the conducting shell that surrounds the plasma is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the centre shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the gross equilibrium behaviour of an axisymmetric RFP discharge, as well as an effective tool for designing the poloidal-field systems of RFP experiments. (author)

  2. Intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch with partial coverage of the toroidal surface by a discrete active coil array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    An active feedback system is required for long pulse operation of the reversed field pinch (RFP) device to suppress resistive wall modes (RWMs). A general feature of a feedback system using a discrete active coil array is a coupling effect which arises when a set of side band modes determined by the number of active coils is produced. Recent results obtained on the EXTRAP T2R RFP demonstrated the suppression of independent m = 1 RWMs using an active feedback system with a two-dimensional array of discrete active coils in the poloidal and toroidal directions. One of the feedback algorithms used is the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Active feedback systems having different number of active coils in the poloidal (Mc) and toroidal (Nc) directions (Mc × Nc = 2 × 32 and Mc × Nc = 4 × 16) are studied. Different side band effects are seen for these configurations. A significant prolongation of the plasma discharge is achieved for the intelligent shell feedback scheme using the 2 × 32 active coil configuration. This is attributed to the side band sets including only one of the dominant unstable RWMs and avoiding coupling to resonant modes. Analog proportional-integral-derivative controllers are used in the feedback system. Regimes with different values of the proportional gain are studied. The requirement of the proportional-integral control for low proportional gain and proportional-derivative control for high proportional gain is seen in the experiments.

  3. Development of Tokamak Reactor System Code and Performance for Early Realization of DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, B. G.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To develop the concepts of DEMO and identify the design parameters, dependence on performance objectives, design features and physical and technical constraints have to be considered. System analyses are necessary to find device variables which optimize figures of merit such as major radius, ignition margin, divertor heat load, neutron wall load, etc. Demonstration fusion power plant, DEMO is regarded as the last step before the development of a commercial fusion reactor in Korea National Basic Plan for the Development of Fusion Energy. The DEMO should demonstrate a net electric power generation, a tritium self sufficiency, and the safety aspect of a power plant. Performance of DEMO for early realization has been investigated with a limited extension from the plasma physics and technology in the 2nd phase of the ITER operation (EPP phase)

  4. The IEA Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, D.S.; Klose, W.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1988-01-01

    A multinational program of cooperative research, development, demonstrations, and exchanges of information on superconducting magnets for fusion was initiated in 1977 under an IEA agreement. The first major step in the development of TF magnets was called the Large Coil Task. Participants in LCT were the U.S. DOE, EURATOM, JAERI, and the Departement Federal de l'Interieur of Switzerland. The goals of LCT were to obtain experimental data, to demonstrate reliable operation of large superconducting coils, and to prove design principles and fabrication techniques being considered for the toroidal magnets of thermonuclear reactors. These goals were to be accomplished through coordinated but largely independent design, development, and construction of six test coils, followed by collaborative testing in a compact toroidal test array at fields of 8 T and higher. Under the terms of the IEA Agreement, the United States built and operated the test facility at Oak Ridge and provided three test coils. The other participants provided one coil each. Information on design and manufacturing and all test data were shared by all. The LCT team of each participant included a government laboratory and industrial partners or contractors. The last coil was completed in 1985, and the test assembly was completed in October of that year. Over the next 23 months, the six-coil array was cooled down and extensive testing was performed. Results were gratifying, as tests achieved design-point performance and well beyond. (Each coil reached a peak field of 9 T.) Experiments elucidated coil behavior, delineated limits of operability, and demonstrated coil safety. (orig./KP)

  5. Superconducting cyclotron magnet coil short

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, M.L.; Blosser, H.G.; Clark, D.J.; Launer, H.; Lawton, D.; Miller, P.; Resmini, F.

    1982-01-01

    In February 1981, a short circuit appeared in the superconducting coil of the K500 cyclotron. The short is resistive in character and therefore has no effect on steady state operation of the magnet. The resistance of the short varies, sometimes being below threshold of detection as a heat load on the cooling system and sometimes being significant. The resistance under certain conditions shows approximately cyclic phenomena with time constants in the range of seconds and other approximately cyclic phenomena which correlate with gross operating parameters of the magnet (shifting current from one coil to another at high field and lowering and raising the liquid helium level). A number of diagnostic studies of the short have been made, using 1) an array of flux sensing loops to sense the magnetic effect of the short, 2) voltage comparisons between upper and lower sections of the coil, 3) comparisons of forces in the nine member coil support system and 4) the effect of the short on the thermal charactersitics of the coil. Insulation failure or a metal chip shorting out turns have been explored in some detail but a convincing determination of the exact cause of the short may never be available, (even the extreme step of unwinding the coil having a significant probability that an imperfection with the observed characteristics would pass unnoticed). Analysis of the characteristics of the short indicated that the most serious consequence would be failure of the coils mechanical support system in the event that the magnet was quickly discharged, as in a dump or quench. To deal with this hazard, the support system has been modified by installing solid supports which prevent the coil from moving by an amount sufficient to damage the support system. We have also reexamined the data and calculations used in the original coil design and have made some additional measurements of the properties of the materials (yield strength, friction coefficient, Young's modulus) used in the

  6. Neutronic design studies of a conceptual DCLL fusion reactor for a DEMO and a commercial power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, I.; Veredas, G.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Ibarra, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutronic analyses or, more widely, nuclear analyses have been performed for the development of a dual-coolant He/LiPb (DCLL) conceptual design reactor. A detailed three-dimensional (3D) model has been examined and optimized. The design is based on the plasma parameters and functional materials of the power plant conceptual studies (PPCS) model C. The initial radial-build for the detailed model has been determined according to the dimensions established in a previous work on an equivalent simplified homogenized reactor model. For optimization purposes, the initial specifications established over the simplified model have been refined on the detailed 3D design, modifying material and dimension of breeding blanket, shield and vacuum vessel in order to fulfil the priority requirements of a fusion reactor in terms of the fundamental neutronic responses. Tritium breeding ratio, energy multiplication factor, radiation limits in the TF coils, helium production and displacements per atom (dpa) have been calculated in order to demonstrate the functionality and viability of the reactor design in guaranteeing tritium self-sufficiency, power efficiency, plasma confinement, and re-weldability and structural integrity of the components. The paper describes the neutronic design improvements of the DCLL reactor, obtaining results for both DEMO and power plant operational scenarios.

  7. Neoclassical transport, poloidal rotation and radial electric field at the L-H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minardi, E.; Gervasini, G.; Lazzaro, E.

    1993-01-01

    The transition to a high confinement regime in tokamaks operating with a magnetic divertor configuration is accompanied by the strong steepening of the edge temperature profile and the onset of a large positive poloidal mass rotation associated with a negative radial electric field. The latter phenomena are signatures of a neoclassical transport mechanism. We address the question of establishing whether neoclassical transport is indeed sufficient to establish high edge gradients and drive poloidal rotation under strong auxiliary heating. The heat transport equation is solved numerically in a narrow edge layer interfaced to the plasma body through heat flux continuity, but allowing for heat conductivity discontinuity. The results compared with recent experimental measurements support the assumption that a highly sheared neoclassical poloidal velocity profile can suppress the anomalous part of the heat transport, and that the neoclassical residual transport, characterizes the plasma behaviour at the edge during H modes. (author) 3 refs., 4 figs

  8. Poloidal field effects on fundamental minority ion cyclotron resonance heating in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, S. C.; Imre, Kaya; Stevens, D. C.; Weitzner, Harold; Chang, C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Minority ion fundamental cyclotron resonance is studied in a large tokamak in which the geometrical optics approximation applies off resonance and the minority average speed is less than the wave phase speeds. Poloidal equilibrium magnetic field effects are included, which lead to nontrivially nonlocal integrodifferential equations for the wave fields. Exact reciprocity relation is given as well as explicit analytic solutions for the transmission coefficients for both the high and low field side incidences. Numerical solutions are needed only for the high field side incident reflection coefficient. Numerical schemes are described and numerical results are presented together with a reliable error bound. Typically, energy absorption increases with poloidal field. The energy absorption increases with minority density at low values of minority density. However, it decreases at high minority density. Poloidal field effects weaken the dependence of energy absorption on the toroidal wave number. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  9. Development of a measuring system for poloidal field profile in JIPP T-IIU plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Hideharu; Hiraki, Naoji; Moriyama, Shin-ichi; Toi, Kazuo; Sato, Kuninori.

    1995-01-01

    A Zeeman polarimeter has been developed to measure the poloidal magnetic field profile in the plasma edge of the JIPP T-IIU tokamak. The poloidal field strength is determined from the analysis of circular polarization of a HeII 4686A spectral lines emitted from a plasma. The polarization modulation rate, which is proportional to the magnetic field strength along a line of sight, is estimated as a ratio of the difference between the left-hand circular polarized line intensity and right-hand one to the sum of them. A newly developed fast scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer allows us to improve a time resolution up to 1.5 ms. The poloidal magnetic field profile in He-doped deuterium plasmas of JIPP T-IIU has been successfully obtained with this polarimeter system. (author)

  10. Numerical study for determining PF coil system parameters in MHD equilibrium of KT-2 tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, J.; Hong, S.H.; Lee, K.W.; Hong, B.G.; In, S.R.; Kim, S.K.

    1995-01-01

    The KT-2 is a large-aspect-ratio medium-sized divertor tokamak in the conceptual design phase and planned to be operational in 1998 at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Plasma equilibrium in tokamak can be acquired by controlling the current of poloidal field (PF) coils in appropriate geometries and positions. In this study, the authors have performed numerical calculations to achieve the various equilibrium conditions fitting given plasma shapes and satisfying PF current limitations. Usually an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equation is used to obtain the equilibrium solution of tokamak plasma, and it is practical to take advantage of a numerical method in solving the MHD equation because it has nonlinear source terms. Two equilibrium codes have been applied to find a double-null configuration of free-boundary tokamak plasma in KT-2: one is of the authors' own developing and the other is a free-boundary tokamak equilibrium code (FBT) that has been used mainly for the verification of developed code's results. PF coil system parameters including their positions and currents are determined for the optimization of input power required when the specifications of KT-2 tokamak are met. Then, several sets of equilibrium conditions during the tokamak operation are found to observe the changes of poloidal field currents with the passing of operation time step, and the basic stability problems related with the magnetic field structure is also considered

  11. Recent technical progress on BA Program: DEMO activities and IFMIF/EVEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanishi, T.; Asakura, N.; Tobita, K.; Ohira, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Federici, G. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Heidinger, R. [Fusion for Energy, Garching (Germany); Knaster, J. [BA IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Clement, S. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Nakajima, N. [BA IFERC Project Team, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    The Broader Approach (BA) activities consists of three major projects: the International Fusion Energy Research Center (IFERC) project, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility/Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (IFMIF/EVEDA) project, and the Satellite Tokamak Programme (STP, JT-60SA). These projects have been carried out to obtain basic data for the design of DEMO fusion reactor from 2007. For 8-year activities, the above projects could produce a set of fruitful results for the DEMO reactor. DEMO design activity has been conducted to build a set of DEMO design bases in accordance with a series of discussion between EU and JA. In the DEMO R&D activities, five basic R&D subjects for a DEMO blanket system have been selected, and been studies under close collaborations between EU and JA: structure materials (RAFM steels and SiC/SiC composites), functional materials (tritium breeders and neutron multipliers), and tritium technology. Some additional R&D subjects recommended by peer review comments have also been studied successfully in recent years. Regarding the IFMIF/EVEDA project, some main components of the accelerator facility been designed and tested. The validation test using EVEDA Lithium Test Loop (ELTL) was also completed successfully in October 2014.

  12. Spatial Variations of Poloidal and Toroidal Mode Field Line Resonances Observed by MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Kepko, L.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Torbert, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Field line resonances (FLRs) are magnetosphere's responses to solar wind forcing and internal instabilities generated by solar wind-magnetospheric interactions. They are standing waves along the Earth's magnetic field lines oscillating in either poloidal or toroidal modes. The two types of waves have their unique frequency characteristics. The eigenfrequency of FLRs is determined by the length of the field line and the plasma density, and thus gradually changes with L. For toroidal mode oscillations with magnetic field perturbations in the azimuthal direction, ideal MHD predicts that each field line oscillates independently with its own eigenfrequency. For poloidal mode waves with field lines oscillating radially, their frequency cannot change with L easily as L shells need to oscillate in sync to avoid efficient damping due to phase mixing. Observations, mainly during quiet times, indeed show that poloidal mode waves often exhibit nearly constant frequency across L shells. Our recent observations, on the other hand, reveal a clear L-dependent frequency trend for a long lasting storm-time poloidal wave event, indicating the wave can maintain its power with changing frequencies for an extended period [Le et al., 2017]. The spatial variation of the frequency shows discrete spatial structures. The frequency remains constant within each discrete structure that spans about 1 REalong L, and changes discretely. We present a follow-up study to investigate spatial variations of wave frequencies using the Wigner-Ville distribution. We examine both poloidal and toroidal waves under different geomagnetic conditions using multipoint observations from MMS, and compare their frequency and occurrence characteristics for insights into their generation mechanisms. Reference: Le, G., et al. (2017), Global observations of magnetospheric high-m poloidal waves during the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm, Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, 3456-3464, doi:10.1002/2017GL073048.

  13. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Lawson, J.E.; Persing, R.G.; Senko, T.R.; Woolley, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    A new coil protection system (CPS) is being developed to replace the existing TFTR magnetic coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPS, when installed in October of 1988, will permit operation up to the actual coil stress limits parameters in real-time. The computation will be done in a microprocessor based Coil Protection Calculator (CPC) currently under construction at PPL. THe new CPC will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates. The CPC will provide real-time estimates of critical coil and bus temperatures and stresses based on real-time redundant measurements of coil currents, coil cooling water inlet temperature, and plasma current. The critical parameter calculations are compared to prespecified limits. If these limits are reached or exceeded, protection action will be initiated to a hard wired control system (HCS), which will shut down the power supplies. The CPC consists of a redundant VME based microprocessor system which will sample all input data and compute all stress quantities every ten milliseconds. Thermal calculations will be approximated every 10ms with an exact solution occurring every second. The CPC features continuous cross-checking of redundant input signal, automatic detection of internal failure modes, monitoring and recording of calculated results, and a quick, functional verification of performance via an internal test system. (author)

  14. Far infrared polarimetry with tokamak plasmas for determination of the poloidal magnetic field distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, W

    1979-01-01

    This study examines the poloidal magnetic field distribution of tokamak plasma, and the elucidation of the radial distribution of the toroidal plasma flow. A numerical and experimental determination of the poloidal field based on the Faraday effect is presented. A method is discussed for measuring the rotation of the polarization plane linear polarized electromagnetic radiation, by passing through a plasma magnetized in the direction of the radiation. The polarization behavior of a linear polarized wave passing through a tokamak plasma is presented theoretically for various wavelengths, along with the experimental investigation of a ferrite modulation procedure through the use of different far infrared detectors.

  15. Tokamak ion temperature and poloidal field diagnostics using 3 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Strachan, J.D.

    1984-10-01

    The 3 MeV protons created by d(d,p)t fusion reactions in a moderately sized tokamak leave the plasma on trajectories determined by the position of their birth and by the poloidal magnetic field. Pitch-angle resolution of the escaping 3 MeV protons can separately resolve the spatial distribution of the d(d,p)t fusion reactions and the poloidal field distribution inside the tokamak. These diagnostic techniques have been demonstrated on PLT with an array of collimated surface barrier detectors

  16. Poloidal plasma rotation in the presence of RF waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyssow, B.; Liu, Caigen

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that one of the consequences of strong RF heating is the deformation of the equilibrium distribution function that induces a change in plasma transport and plasma rotation. The poloidal plasma rotation during RF wave heating in tokamaks is investigated using a moment approach. A set of closed, self-consistent transport and rotation equations is derived and reduced to a single equation for the poloidal particle flux. The formulas are sufficiently general to apply to heating schemes that can be represented by a quasilinear operator. (author)

  17. Temperature anisotropy in a cyclotron resonance heated tokamak plasma and the generation of poloidal electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Chang, C.S.

    1994-11-01

    The temperature anisotropy generated by cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas is calculated and the poloidal equilibrium electric field due to the anisotropy is studied. For the calculation of anisotropic temperatures, bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function of heated particles is solved, assuming a moderate wave power and a constant quasilinear cyclotron resonance diffusion coefficient. The poloidal electrostatic potential variation is found to be proportional to the particle density and the degree of temperature anisotropy of warm species created by cyclotron resonance heating

  18. Optimization and limitations of known DEMO divertor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Jens, E-mail: Jens.Reiser@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rieth, Michael [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Limitations of the materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved H{sub 2}O cooled divertor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved He cooled divertor. - Abstract: In this work we will introduce and discuss improvements for two types of DEMO divertors based on known designs: (i) gas cooled designs and (ii) liquid coolant concepts. In a first step, the advantages and disadvantages of gas cooling as well as the necessity of a jet impingement to increase the heat transfer coefficients will be discussed. Further discussion deals with the pros and cons of liquid coolant concepts, like for example, liquid metal or water cooling. Thereafter, we will present two rather contrary DEMO divertor concepts which are based on today's knowledge on refractory materials science, fabrication and joining technology. The first improved concept uses water flowing through steel pipes, typically made of Eurofer steel. It is well known that using Eurofer at low temperatures is critical due to its severe embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Here we make a proposal how it could be possible to use the Eurofer steel anyway: the solution could consist in a limited operation period followed by an annealing cycle at 550 Degree-Sign C for a few hours during any maintenance shut down phases. The second design is based on the known helium cooling concept using jet impingement. Drawbacks of the actual He-cooled divertor design are small scale parts as well as the necessary high helium inlet temperature of about 600-800 Degree-Sign C which leads to the question: How can we deal with such high helium temperatures? This paper shows a solution for large scale components as well as a new thermal management for the helium outlet gas that we call 'cooling of the coolant'. Both concepts are discussed in terms of materials selection due to material limits and joining technology with a special focus on the material issue using already existing and

  19. Supporting structures of the toroidal field coils of intor-net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Biggio, M.; Macco, A.; Perfumo, A.; Reale, M.

    1984-01-01

    The design of the toroidal field (TF) coil supporting structures for INTOR-NET Phase 2A (European Configuration) is described. In order to identify the proposed design several preliminary evaluations were performed. These evaluations indicated that suitable supporting structures are those shown in the annexed figures, where each coil is guided and centered by a separate reinforcing structure, on which the intercoil structures are attached. A simplified structural analysis was carried out considering only the cyclic out-of-plane loads due to the poloidal field, acting on the coils, since this constitutes the most critical loading condition due to its impact on the fatigue behavior of the material. This analysis was performed with finite element method for displacements and stresses calculations by using the SAP IV-code. The calcaulation model was made with the aid of the GIFTS system. The results show that the maximum equivalent stress does not exceed the stress limit assumed in the INTOR specifications for stainless steel (AISI 316 type) at cryogenic temperature and under cyclic loading, for the operating conditions of INTOR. Consequently the proposed concept for the support of the TF coils can be considered a workable scheme. Further detailed analysis must be done, so as to demonstrate the complete feasibility of the system. (orig.)

  20. Requirements for accuracy of superconducting coils in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K; Yanagi, N; Ji, H; Kaneko, H; Ohyabu, N; Satow, T; Morimoto, S; Yamamoto, J; Motojima, O [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Chikusa, Nagoya (Japan); LHD Design Group

    1993-01-01

    Irregular magnetic fields resonate with the rational surface of the magnetic confinement systems, form magnetic islands and ergodic layers, and destruct the plasma confinement. To avoid this confinement destruction the requirement of an accuracy of 10[sup -4] in the magnetic field is adopted as the magnetic-accuracy design criterion for the LHD machine. Following this criterion the width of the undesirable magnetic island is kept less than one tenth of the plasma radius. The irregular magnetic field from the superconducting (SC) helical and poloidal coils is produced by winding irregularity, installing irregularity, cooling-down deformations and electromagnetic deformations. The local irregularities such as feeders, layer connections, adjacent-conductor connections of the coils also produce an error field. The eddy currents on the supporting shell structure of SC coils, the cryostat, etc. are also evaluated. All irregular effects are analyzed using Fourier decomposition and field mapping methods for the LHD design, and it is confirmed that the present design of the superconducting coil system satisfies the design criterion for these field irregularities. (orig.).

  1. Coil for LEAR extraction septum

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    Which way does the current flow ? This intriguing object is the coil for the LEAR extraction septum. There were two septa, first a thin one, then this one, not so thin, somewhat on the borderline between septum and bending magnet.

  2. First coil for the SC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1955-01-01

    The coils for the SC magnet were stored in the large hangar of the Cointrin Airport (to make sure that they would be available before snow and ice would block the roads and canals from Belgium, where they were built).

  3. Conceptual design of the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, Kenji; Nishio, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Nishitani, Takeo; Isono, Takaaki; Sakurai, Shinji; Kurita, Genichi; Hayashi, Takao; Oyama, Naoyuki; Liu Changle; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Inoue, Takashi; Ozeki, Takahisa; Sato, Masayasu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kawashima, Hisato; Ezato, Koichiro; Tsuru, Daigo; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Sakamoto, Keiji; Ando, Masami; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Shibama, Yusuke; Suzuki, Takahiro; Takechi, Manabu; Takahashi, Koji; Hirose, Takanori; Sato, Satoru; Nozawa, Takashi; Tanigawa, Hisashi; Kakudate, Satoshi; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Ide, Shunsuke; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Honda, Mitsuru; Nakamichi, Masaru; Nishi, Hiroshi; Seki, Yoji; Nakamura, Yukiharu; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Yoshida, Tohru; Song Yuntao

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the results of the conceptual design study of the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor aiming at demonstrating fusion power production in a plant scale and allowing to assess the economic prospects of a fusion power plant. The design study has focused on a compact and low aspect ratio tokamak reactor concept with a reduced-sized central solenoid, which is novel compared with previous tokamak reactor concept such as SSTR (Steady State Tokamak Reactor). Owing to low aspect ratio, the reactor will be capable of having comparatively high beta limit and high elongation (which can elevate the Greenwald density limit), having potential for high power density. The reactor has the main parameters of a major radius of 5.5 m, aspect ratio of 2.6, elongation of 2.0, normalized beta of 4.3, fusion out put of 2.95 GW and average neutron wall load of 3 MW/m 2 . This report covers various aspects of design study including systematic design, physics design, torus configuration, blanket, superconducting magnet, maintenance and building, which were carried out increase the engineering feasibility of the concept. (author)

  4. Pre-conceptual design assessment of DEMO remote maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loving, A., E-mail: antony.loving@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/Culham Center Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Crofts, O.; Sykes, N.; Iglesias, D.; Coleman, M.; Thomas, J. [EURATOM/Culham Center Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Harman, J. [EFDA Close Support Unit Garching, Boltzmannstaße 2, D-85748 Garching Bei München (Germany); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sanz, J. [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear/UPM, Madrid (Spain); Siuko, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Mittwollen, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut für Fördertechnik und Logistiksysteme, Gotthard-Franz-Straße 8, Geb.50.38, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    EDFA, as part of the Power Plant Physics and Technology programme, has been working on the pre-conceptual design of a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO). As part of this programme, a review of the remote maintenance strategy considered maintenance solutions compatible with expected environmental conditions, whilst showing potential for meeting the plant availability targets. A key finding was that, for practical purposes, the expected radiation levels prohibit the use of complex remote handling operations to replace the first wall. In 2012/2013, these remote maintenance activities were further extended, providing an insight into the requirements, constraints and challenges. In particular, the assessment of blanket and divertor maintenance, in light of the expected radiation conditions and availability, has elaborated the need for a very different approach from that of ITER. This activity has produced some very informative virtual reality simulations of the blanket segments and pipe removal that are exceptionally valuable in communicating the complexity and scale of the required operations. Through these simulations, estimates of the maintenance task durations have been possible demonstrating that a full replacement of the blankets within 6 months could be achieved. The design of the first wall, including the need to use sacrificial limiters must still be investigated. In support of the maintenance operations, a first indication of the requirements of an Active Maintenance Facility (AMF) has been elaborated.

  5. Engineering options for the U.S. Fusion Demo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; El-Guebaly, L.; Wong, C.

    1995-01-01

    Through its successful operation, the US Fusion Demo must be sufficiently convincing that a utility or independent power producer will choose to purchase one as its next electric generating plant. A fusion power plant which is limited to the use of currently-proven technologies is unlikely to be sufficiently attractive to a utility unless fuel shortages and regulatory restrictions are far more crippling to competing energy sources than currently anticipated. In that case, the task of choosing an appropriate set of engineering technologies today involves trade-offs between attractiveness and technical risk. The design space for an attractive tokamak fusion power core is not unlimited; previous studies have shown that advanced low-activation ferritic steel, vanadium alloy, or SiC/SiC composites are the only candidates the authors have for the primary in-vessel structural material. An assessment of engineering design options has been performed using these three materials and the associated in-vessel component designs which are compatible with them

  6. Radiation resistant ducted superconductive coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleich, A.

    1976-01-01

    The radiation-resistant ducted superconductive coil consists of a helically wound electrical conductor constituted by an electrically conductive core of superconductive material provided with a longitudinally extending cooling duct. The core is covered with a layer of inorganic insulating material and the duct is covered by an electrically conductive metallic gas-tight sheath. The metallic sheaths on adjacent turns of the coil are secured together. 2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures

  7. The Swiss LCT-coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecsey, G.; Benz, H.; Horvath, I.

    1985-01-01

    With delivery of the coil to ORNL on February 4, 1984, the second phase of the Swiss Large Coil Program - design and construction - was terminated. Mainlines of the Swiss design concept are summarized and related to theoretical calculations, experimental results of the supporting program, fabricational experience and first successful test results. An attempt is made to draw preliminary conclusions with regard to the design of future toroidal systems such as NET

  8. Conceptual design of the beam source for the DEMO Neutral Beam Injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonato, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Fantz, U.; Franke, T.; Furno, I.; Simonin, A.; Tran, M. Q.

    2016-12-01

    DEMO (DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant) is a proposed nuclear fusion power plant that is intended to follow the ITER experimental reactor. The main goal of DEMO will be to demonstrate the possibility to produce electric energy from the fusion reaction. The injection of high energy neutral beams is one of the main tools to heat the plasma up to fusion conditions. A conceptual design of the Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) for the DEMO fusion reactor, is currently being developed by Consorzio RFX in collaboration with other European research institutes. High efficiency and low recirculating power, which are fundamental requirements for the success of DEMO, have been taken into special consideration for the DEMO NBI. Moreover, particular attention has been paid to the issues related to reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability. A conceptual design of the beam source for the DEMO NBI is here presented featuring 20 sub-sources (two adjacent columns of 10 sub-sources each), following a modular design concept, with each sub-source featuring its radio frequency driver, capable of increasing the reliability and availability of the DEMO NBI. Copper grids with increasing size of the apertures have been adopted in the accelerator, with three main layouts of the apertures (circular apertures, slotted apertures and frame-like apertures for each sub-source). This design, permitting to significantly decrease the stripping losses in the accelerator without spoiling the beam optics, has been investigated with a self-consistent model able to study at the same time the magnetic field, the electrostatic field and the trajectory of the negative ions. Moreover, the status on the R&D carried out in Europe on the ion sources is presented.

  9. Cost assessment of demo fusion reactor with considering maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Kitagoh, Kazutoshi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform cost assessment of nuclear fusion reactors in order to draw up commercial plants. A fusion reactor may have a complex configuration to achieve high beta value, which leads to low and instable availability when maintenance is taken into account. Therefore, reactor's availability must be evaluated with considering the influence of the configuration complexity. Furthermore the availability has the strong impact on COE (Cost of Electricity), that is, a fusion reactor with low availability will not be accepted as a commercial plant. Therefore, we developed a new method to calculate availabilities with random numbers, in which the complexity of reactor's configuration could become considered. In addition, we considered the reduction of superconducting coil's maintenance time by introducing remountable magnet system because the coil maintenance requires quite long time in the present technology. The results show that the availability becomes relatively large if the short maintenance time of coils could be achieved, for example, by remountable magnetic systems. (author)

  10. Role of advanced refuelling and heating on edge Reynolds stress-induced poloidal flow in HL-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Wenyu; Wang Enyao; Li Qiang; Cao Jianyong; Yan Longwen

    2002-01-01

    The radial profile of electrostatic Reynolds stress, plasma poloidal rotations, radial and poloidal electric fields have been measured in the plasma boundary region of the HL-1M tokamak using a multi-array of Mach/Langmuir probes. In the experiments of ohmic discharge, lower hybrid current drive, supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) and multi-shot pellet injection, the correlation between the Reynolds stress and poloidal flow in the edge plasma is presented. The radial profile changes of the Reynolds stress and poloidal flow velocity V pol with lower hybrid wave injection power and SMBI injection are obtained. The results indicate that the sheared poloidal flow can be generated in tokamak plasma due to the radially varying Reynolds stress

  11. The SMES model coil. Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Takahashi, Nobuji

    1998-01-01

    A SMES model coil was fabricated as R and D item in the development of component technologies for a 480 MJ/20 MW SMES pilot plant. The coil consists of four double-pancake windings. The coil is the same diameter but half the number of pancakes that will be needed for a SMES pilot plant. The NbTi cable-in-conduit conductor and superconducting joints between the double pancakes are cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. Prior to fabrication, various characteristics of the cable-in-conduit were measured by full-sized short samples from actual conductors and by scaled short samples from scaled conductors. The critical current of the scaled short samples was in agreement with that calculated from one strand of the conductor. The impedance between arbitrary dual-oxide coated strands in the full-size conductor was measured to be smaller than that obtained from two Cr-plated strands, which showed a good degree of stability in another coil. It was estimated that oxide-coated conductors would have high stability. Through fabrication of a model coil, it was demonstrated that a large forced-flow coil for a small-scale 100 kWh SMES device could be manufactured. (author)

  12. The SMES model coil. Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanai, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Takahashi, Nobuji [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)] [and others

    1998-07-01

    A SMES model coil was fabricated as R and D item in the development of component technologies for a 480 MJ/20 MW SMES pilot plant. The coil consists of four double-pancake windings. The coil is the same diameter but half the number of pancakes that will be needed for a SMES pilot plant. The NbTi cable-in-conduit conductor and superconducting joints between the double pancakes are cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. Prior to fabrication, various characteristics of the cable-in-conduit were measured by full-sized short samples from actual conductors and by scaled short samples from scaled conductors. The critical current of the scaled short samples was in agreement with that calculated from one strand of the conductor. The impedance between arbitrary dual-oxide coated strands in the full-size conductor was measured to be smaller than that obtained from two Cr-plated strands, which showed a good degree of stability in another coil. It was estimated that oxide-coated conductors would have high stability. Through fabrication of a model coil, it was demonstrated that a large forced-flow coil for a small-scale 100 kWh SMES device could be manufactured. (author)

  13. Theoretical considerations and preparatory experiments for poloidal field measurements in tokamaks by far-infrared polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, W; Dodel, G [Stuttgart Univ. (TH) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaforschung

    1978-12-01

    Numerical calculations give an optimum wavelength and show the precision requirements for determining poloidal field profiles in tokamaks on the basis of the Faraday effect. The required precision of the polarimetric measurements can be achieved in the far-infrared as is verified in a model experiment using a ferrite modulated HCN laser beam.

  14. Poloidal rotation and the evolution of H-mode and VH-mode profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, F.L.; Staebler, G.M.; Kim, Y.B.

    1993-12-01

    The physics which determines poloidal rotation, and its role in the development of profiles during H- and VH-modes, is discussed. A simple phenomenological transport model, which incorporates the rvec E x rvec B flow shear suppression of turbulence, is shown to predict profile evolution similar to that observed experimentally during H-mode and VH-mode

  15. Poloidal asymmetries in the limiter shadow plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBombard, B.

    1986-05-01

    This thesis investigates conditions which exist in the limiter shadow plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. The understanding of this edge plasma region is approached from both experimental and theoretical points of view. First, a general overview of edge plasma physical processes is presented. Simple edge plasma models and conditions which can theoretically result in a poloidally asymmetric edge plasma are discussed. A review of data obtained from previous diagnostics in the Alcator C edge plasma is then used to motivate the development of a new edge plasma diagnostic system (DENSEPACK) to experimentally investigate poloidal asymmetries in this region. The bulk of this thesis focuses on the marked poloidal asymmetries detected by this poloidal probe array and possible mechanisms which might support such asymmetries on a magnetic flux surface. In processing the probe data, some important considerations on fitting Langmuir probe characteristics are identified. The remainder of this thesis catalogues edge versus central plasma parameter dependences. Regression analysis techniques are applied to characterize edge density for various central plasma parameters. Edge plasma conditions during lower hybrid radio frequency heating and pellet injection are also discussed

  16. Calibration of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic for core poloidal rotation velocity measurements on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crombe, K.; Andrew, Y.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.C.; Murari, A.; Valisa, M.; Oost, G. van; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes recent improvements in the measurement of C 6+ impurity ion poloidal rotation velocities in the core plasma of JET using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. Two independent techniques are used to provide an accurate line calibration. The first method uses a Perkin-Elmer type 303-306 samarium hollow cathode discharge lamp, with a Sm I line at 528.291 nm close to the C VI line at 529.1 nm. The second method uses the Be II at 527.06 nm and C III at 530.47 nm in the plasma spectrum as two marker lines on either side of the C VI line. Since the viewing chords have both a toroidal and poloidal component, it is important to determine the contribution of the toroidal rotation velocity component separately. The toroidal rotation velocity in the plasma core is measured with an independent charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic, looking tangentially at the plasma core. The contribution of this velocity along the lines of sight of the poloidal rotation diagnostic has been determined experimentally in L-mode plasmas keeping the poloidal component constant (K. Crombe et al., Proc. 30th EPS Conference, St. Petersburg, Russia, 7-11 July 2003, p. 1.55). The results from these experiments are compared with calculations of the toroidal contribution that take into account the original design parameters of the diagnostic and magnetic geometry of individual shots

  17. Testing neoclassical and turbulent effects on poloidal rotation in the core of DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrystal, C. [University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.; Lao, L. L.; Grassie, J. S. de [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Wang, W. X. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L. [University of California Los Angeles, P.O. Box 957099, Los Angeles, California 90095-7099 (United States); Mordijck, S. [College of William and Mary, P.O. Box 8795, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187-8795 (United States); Meneghini, O. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, 1299 Bethel Valley Rd, Bldg SC-200, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Experimental tests of ion poloidal rotation theories have been performed on DIII-D using a novel impurity poloidal rotation diagnostic. These tests show significant disagreements with theoretical predictions in various conditions, including L-mode plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITB), H-mode plasmas, and QH-mode plasmas. The theories tested include standard neoclassical theory, turbulence driven Reynolds stress, and fast-ion friction on the thermal ions. Poloidal rotation is observed to spin up at the formation of an ITB and makes a significant contribution to the measurement of the E{sup →}×B{sup →} shear that forms the ITB. In ITB cases, neoclassical theory agrees quantitatively with the experimental measurements only in the steep gradient region. Significant quantitative disagreement with neoclassical predictions is seen in the cores of ITB, QH-, and H-mode plasmas, demonstrating that neoclassical theory is an incomplete description of poloidal rotation. The addition of turbulence driven Reynolds stress does not remedy this disagreement; linear stability calculations and Doppler backscattering measurements show that disagreement increases as turbulence levels decline. Furthermore, the effect of fast-ion friction, by itself, does not lead to improved agreement; in QH-mode plasmas, neoclassical predictions are closest to experimental results in plasmas with the largest fast ion friction. Predictions from a new model that combines all three effects show somewhat better agreement in the H-mode case, but discrepancies well outside the experimental error bars remain.

  18. Testing neoclassical and turbulent effects on poloidal rotation in the core of DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.; Lao, L. L.; Grassie, J. S. de; Grierson, B. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Wang, W. X.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Mordijck, S.; Meneghini, O.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental tests of ion poloidal rotation theories have been performed on DIII-D using a novel impurity poloidal rotation diagnostic. These tests show significant disagreements with theoretical predictions in various conditions, including L-mode plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITB), H-mode plasmas, and QH-mode plasmas. The theories tested include standard neoclassical theory, turbulence driven Reynolds stress, and fast-ion friction on the thermal ions. Poloidal rotation is observed to spin up at the formation of an ITB and makes a significant contribution to the measurement of the E → ×B → shear that forms the ITB. In ITB cases, neoclassical theory agrees quantitatively with the experimental measurements only in the steep gradient region. Significant quantitative disagreement with neoclassical predictions is seen in the cores of ITB, QH-, and H-mode plasmas, demonstrating that neoclassical theory is an incomplete description of poloidal rotation. The addition of turbulence driven Reynolds stress does not remedy this disagreement; linear stability calculations and Doppler backscattering measurements show that disagreement increases as turbulence levels decline. Furthermore, the effect of fast-ion friction, by itself, does not lead to improved agreement; in QH-mode plasmas, neoclassical predictions are closest to experimental results in plasmas with the largest fast ion friction. Predictions from a new model that combines all three effects show somewhat better agreement in the H-mode case, but discrepancies well outside the experimental error bars remain

  19. Observations of toroidal and poloidal rotation in the high beta tokamak Torus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostek, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The macroscopic rotation of plasma in a toroidal containment device is an important feature of the equilibrium. Toroidal and poloidal rotation in the high beta tokamak Torus II is measured experimentally by examining the Doppler shift of the 4685.75 A He II line emitted from the plasma. The toroidal flow at an average velocity of 1.6 x 10 6 cm/sec, a small fraction of the ion thermal speed, moves in the same direction as the toroidal plasma current. The poloidal flow follows the ion diamagnetic current direction, also at an average speed of 1.6 x 10 6 cm/sec. In view of certain ordering parameters, the toroidal flow is compared with predictions from neoclassical theory in the collosional, Pfirsch-Schluter regime. The poloidal motion, however results from an E x B drift in a positive radial electric field, approaching a stable ambipolar state. This radial electric field is determined from theory by using the measured poloidal velocity. Mechanisms for the time evolution of rotation are also examined. It appears that the circulation damping is governed by a global decay of the temperature and density gradients which, in turn, may be functions of radiative cooling, loss of equilibrium due to external field decay, or the emergence of a growing instability, occasionally observed in CO 2 interferometry measurements

  20. Three-dimensional plasma equilibrium model based on the poloidal representation of the magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, R.; Degtyarev, L.M.; Kuper, A.; Martynov, A.A.; Medvedev, S.Yu.; Shafranov, V.D.

    1996-01-01

    Equations for the three-dimensional equilibrium of a plasma are formulated in the poloidal representation. The magnetic field is expressed in terms of the poloidal magnetic flux Ψ and the poloidal electric current F. As a result, three-dimensional equilibrium configurations are analyzed with the help of a set of equations including the elliptical equation for the poloidal flux, the magnetic differential equation for the parallel current, and the equations for the basis vector field b. To overcome the difficulties associated with peculiarities that can arise in solving the magnetic differential equation at rational toroidal magnetic surfaces, small regulating corrections are introduced into the proposed set of equations. In this case, second-order differential terms with a small parameter appear in the magnetic differential equations. As a result, these equations take the form of elliptical equations. Three versions of regulating corrections are proposed. The equations obtained can be used to develop numerical codes for calculating three-dimensional equilibrium plasma configurations with an island structure

  1. Equilibrium poloidal field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1982-04-01

    A comparison between the analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal reversed field pinch (RFP) systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal field distribution is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one-third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the center shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one-tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The behavior of the magnetic axis shift as a function of plasma parameters is included. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the equilibrium behavior of an RFP discharge. Examples illustrating the application of the analytic formulae to the Los Alamos ZT-40M RFP experiment are given

  2. Structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow in high temperature toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow is discussed for the high temperature plasma in toroidal systems, tokamak and Heliotron type magnetic configurations. The spontaneous toroidal and poloidal flows are observed in the plasma with improved confinement. The radial electric field is mainly determined by the poloidal flow, because the contribution of toroidal flow to the radial electric field is small. The jump of radial electric field and poloidal flow are commonly observed near the plasma edge in the so-called high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in tokamaks and electron root plasma in stellarators including Heliotrons. In general the toroidal flow is driven by the momentum input from neutral beam injected toroidally. There is toroidal flow not driven by neutral beam in the plasma and it will be more significant in the plasma with large electric field. The direction of these spontaneous toroidal flows depends on the symmetry of magnetic field. The spontaneous toroidal flow driven by the ion temperature gradient is in the direction to increase the negative radial electric field in tokamak. The direction of spontaneous toroidal flow in Heliotron plasmas is opposite to that in tokamak plasma because of the helicity of symmetry of the magnetic field configuration. (author)

  3. Neoclassical impurity transport in the presence of toroidal and poloidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feneberg, W.

    1988-06-01

    This paper presents an extended theory of neoclassical impurity transport, starting from the parameters of bulk plasma toroidal and poloidal rotation. Analytic expressions resulting from the influence of a compressible flow on the perpendicular momentum balance and on the neoclassical Braginskii parallel viscosity are derived. The predicted impurity transport is extensively compared with that in earlier papers. (orig.)

  4. Endovascular rescue method for undesirably stretched coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Hoon

    2014-10-01

    Undesirable detachment or stretching of coils within the parent artery during aneurysm embolization can be related with thrombus formation, which can be caused occlusion of parent artery or embolic event(s). To escape from this situation, several rescue methods have been reported. A case with undesirably stretched coil in which another rescue method was used, is presented. When the stretched coil is still located in the coil delivery microcatheter, the stretched coil can be removed safely using a snare and a handmade monorail microcatheter. After a snare is lodged in the handmade monorail microcatheter, the snare is introduced over the coil delivery micorcatheter and located in the distal part of the stretched coil. After then, the handmade monorail microcatheter captures the stretched coil and the snare as one unit. This technique using a handmade monorail microcatheter and a snare can be a good rescue modality for the undesirably stretched coil, still remained within the coil delivery microcatheter.

  5. Development of a new lower hybrid antenna module using a poloidal power divider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maebara, Sunao; Seki, Masami; Suganuma, Kazuaki

    1996-07-01

    The antenna using poloidal power divider is an effective method for simplification of Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) antenna system. This method should allow to reduce the power density in the antenna while maintaining a good flexibility of N parallel spectrum of waves. For this purpose, three types of poloidal power divider which split the power in three, and the 3 x 6 multi-junction module were developed. r.f. properties and outgassing of these components were evaluated using the CEA Cadarache RF Test Facility. A good power dividing ratio of 33 ± 4% was obtained for each of these poloidal dividers, and the reflection coefficient was lower value than 1.5%. For the 3 x 6 multi-junction, reflection coefficient was less than 1.3% and r.f. losses lower than 1.0% were measured. On the other hand, it was found in the scattering matrix analysis that reflection coefficient at plasma has to be less than a few % in order to operate these components under available conditions. In combination with two poloidal power dividers connected to the 3 x 6 multi-junction module, quasi stationary operation for r.f. injection time of 1000 sec at 300 kW was demonstrated under water cooling. In this case, it was found that the outgassing rate is in the lower range of 10 -7 Pam 3 s -1 m -2 within the maximum module temperature of ∼100degC. This report describes the experimental and analytical results of a new lower hybrid (LH) antenna module using the poloidal power divider. (author)

  6. The poloidal distribution of turbulent fluctuations in the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antar, G.Y.; Counsell, G.; Ahn, J.-W.; Yang, Y.; Price, M.; Tabasso, A.; Kirk, A.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that intermittency observed in magnetic fusion devices is caused by large-scales events with high radial velocity reaching about 1/10th of the sound speed (called avaloids or blobs) [G. Antar et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 065001 (2001)]. In the present paper, the poloidal distribution of turbulence is investigated on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak [A. Sykes et al., Phys. Plasmas 8 2101 (2001)]. To achieve our goal, target probes that span the divertor strike points are used and one reciprocating probe at the midplane. Moreover, a fast imaging camera that can reach 10 μs exposure time looks tangentially at the plasma allowing us to view a poloidal cut of the plasma. The two diagnostics allow us to have a rather accurate description of the particle transport in the poloidal plane for L-mode discharges. Turbulence properties at the low-field midplane scrape-off layer are discussed and compared to other poloidal positions. On the low-field target divertor plates, avaloids bursty signature is not detected but still intermittency is observed far from the strike point. This is a consequence of the field line expansion which transforms a structure localized in the poloidal plane into a structure which expands over several tens of centimeters at the divertor target plates. Around the X point and in the high-field side, however, different phenomena enter into play suppressing the onset of convective transport generation. No signs of intermittency are observed in these regions. Accordingly, like 'normal' turbulence, the onset of convective transport is affected by the local magnetic curvature and shear

  7. Calculation of the form of an equilibrium poloidal magnetic field contained in a polytropic star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brundrit, G.B.; Miketinac, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    This program is designed to integrate the exact equations which determine the distribution of the density of a self-gravitating, axisymmetric polytrope of infinite conductivity containing a poloidal magnetic field. In addition, other properties of an equilibrium configuration such as mass, volume and radius are calculated. The program can also provide at very small extra cost the rates of change of the density with respect to changes of the polytropic index n and the parameter lambda which characterizes the poloidal magnetic field. Mathematically, the problem can be formulated as a boundary value problem for three coupled equations, two of which are second order, non-linear, two-dimensional partial differential equations. The solution is obtained numerically by an adaptation of the Stoeckl's finite difference-finite expansion method. In fact, the present program is a major modification of the program TOROID. The numerical scheme developed in the program is valid for all polytropes whose polytropic index n is greater than or equal to one. The other parameter of the theory, lambda, is unrestricted, i.e. the program permits the study of stars whose matnetic energy is a 'sizeable' percentage of their gravitational energy. Also, the program, with minor modifications, could be used for calculating equilibrium configurations of (a) (uniformly or non-uniformly) rotating polytropes pervaded by poloidal magnetic fields or (b) (rotation) polytropes containing poloidal magnetic fields. However, the greatest use of the present program is expected to arise in attempts to construct equilibrium configurations of polytropes containing mixed poloidal toroidal magnetic fields. (Auth.)

  8. Coil supporting device in nuclear fusion apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Ryo; Imura, Yasuya.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To secure intermediate fittings with a coil fixed thereon by an insulating tape to a fixed body by means of fittings, thereby supporting the coil in a narrow space. Structure: A coil is secured to intermediate fittings by means of an insulating tape, after which the intermediate fittings is mounted on a fixed body through fittings to support the coil in a narrow clearance portion between a plasma sealed vessel and a main coil. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Safety studies on Korean fusion DEMO plant using integrated safety assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myoung-suk; Heo, Gyunyoung; Kim, Hyoung-chan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant. •The concepts of integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM) that can be applied in addressing regulatory requirements and recognizing safety issues for K-DEMO were emphasized. •Phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) was proposed. It can recognize vulnerabilities of systems and identify the gaps in technical areas requiring additional researches. •This work is expected to contribute on the conceptual design of safety features for K-DEMO to design engineers and the guidance for regulatory requirements to licensers. -- Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant (K-DEMO) as a part of R and D program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea. Even though nuclear regulation and licensing framework is well setup due to the operating and design experience of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) since 1970s, the regulatory authority of South Korea has concerns on the challenge of facing new nuclear facilities including K-DEMO due to the differences in systems, materials, and inherent safety feature from conventional PWRs. Even though the follow-up of the ITER license process facilitates to deal with significant safety issues of fusion facilities, a licensee as well as a licenser should identify the gaps between ITER and DEMO in terms of safety issues. First we reviewed the methods of conducting safety analysis for unprecedented nuclear facilities such as Generation IV reactors, particularly very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is called as integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM). Second, the analysis for the conceptual design of K-DEMO on the basis of ISAM was conducted. The ISAM consists of five analytical tools to develop the safety requirements from licensee

  10. Safety studies on Korean fusion DEMO plant using integrated safety assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myoung-suk [Kyung Hee University, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung, E-mail: gheo@khu.ac.kr [Kyung Hee University, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon-si 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant. •The concepts of integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM) that can be applied in addressing regulatory requirements and recognizing safety issues for K-DEMO were emphasized. •Phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) was proposed. It can recognize vulnerabilities of systems and identify the gaps in technical areas requiring additional researches. •This work is expected to contribute on the conceptual design of safety features for K-DEMO to design engineers and the guidance for regulatory requirements to licensers. -- Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant (K-DEMO) as a part of R and D program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea. Even though nuclear regulation and licensing framework is well setup due to the operating and design experience of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) since 1970s, the regulatory authority of South Korea has concerns on the challenge of facing new nuclear facilities including K-DEMO due to the differences in systems, materials, and inherent safety feature from conventional PWRs. Even though the follow-up of the ITER license process facilitates to deal with significant safety issues of fusion facilities, a licensee as well as a licenser should identify the gaps between ITER and DEMO in terms of safety issues. First we reviewed the methods of conducting safety analysis for unprecedented nuclear facilities such as Generation IV reactors, particularly very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is called as integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM). Second, the analysis for the conceptual design of K-DEMO on the basis of ISAM was conducted. The ISAM consists of five analytical tools to develop the safety requirements from licensee

  11. Design concept of K-DEMO for near-term implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Im, K.; Kim, H. C.; Oh, S.; Park, J. S.; Kwon, S.; Lee, Y. S.; Yeom, J. H.; Lee, C.; Lee, G.-S.; Neilson, G.; Kessel, C.; Brown, T.; Titus, P.; Mikkelsen, D.; Zhai, Y.

    2015-05-01

    A Korean fusion energy development promotion law (FEDPL) was enacted in 2007. As a following step, a conceptual design study for a steady-state Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) was initiated in 2012. After the thorough 0D system analysis, the parameters of the main machine characterized by the major and minor radii of 6.8 and 2.1 m, respectively, were chosen for further study. The analyses of heating and current drives were performed for the development of the plasma operation scenarios. Preliminary results on lower hybrid and neutral beam current drive are included herein. A high performance Nb3Sn-based superconducting conductor is adopted, providing a peak magnetic field approaching 16 T with the magnetic field at the plasma centre above 7 T. Pressurized water is the prominent choice for the main coolant of K-DEMO when the balance of plant development details is considered. The blanket system adopts a ceramic pebble type breeder. Considering plasma performance, a double-null divertor is the reference configuration choice of K-DEMO. For a high availability operation, K-DEMO incorporates a design with vertical maintenance. A design concept for K-DEMO is presented together with the preliminary design parameters.

  12. Activity inventories and decay heat calculations for a DEMO with HCPB and HCLL blanket modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankunas, Gediminas; Tidikas, Andrius; Pereslavstev, Pavel; Catalán, Juan; García, Raquel; Ogando, Francisco; Fischer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The afterheat and activity inventories were calculated for Eurofer steel which is the reference structural material for DEMO. • The decay heat for the HCPB DEMO was found to be larger than for the HCLL both for short and longer cooling times. • The comparison calculations were performed for a single outboard blanket module of the HCLL DEMO assuming High-Temperature Ferritic–Martensitic (HT-FM) steel and SS-316 (LN) as structural material. - Abstract: Activation inventories, decay heat and radiation doses are important nuclear quantities which need to be assessed on a reliable basis for the safe operation of a fusion nuclear power reactor. The afterheat and activity inventories were shown to be dominated by the Eurofer steel which is the reference structural material for DEMO. The decay heat for the HCPB DEMO was found to be larger than for the HCLL both for short (a few days) and longer (more than a year) cooling times. As for the alternative steels, the induced radioactivity was turned out to be lowest for the SS-316 until about 200 years after shut-down. Afterwards, the activity level of SS-316 steel was found to be the highest. For these times, the activity of both Eurofer and the HT-FM steel is about one order of magnitude lower.

  13. Activity inventories and decay heat calculations for a DEMO with HCPB and HCLL blanket modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankunas, Gediminas, E-mail: gediminas.stankunas@lei.lt [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Breslaujos Str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Tidikas, Andrius [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Breslaujos Str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Pereslavstev, Pavel [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Catalán, Juan; García, Raquel; Ogando, Francisco [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fischer, Ulrich [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The afterheat and activity inventories were calculated for Eurofer steel which is the reference structural material for DEMO. • The decay heat for the HCPB DEMO was found to be larger than for the HCLL both for short and longer cooling times. • The comparison calculations were performed for a single outboard blanket module of the HCLL DEMO assuming High-Temperature Ferritic–Martensitic (HT-FM) steel and SS-316 (LN) as structural material. - Abstract: Activation inventories, decay heat and radiation doses are important nuclear quantities which need to be assessed on a reliable basis for the safe operation of a fusion nuclear power reactor. The afterheat and activity inventories were shown to be dominated by the Eurofer steel which is the reference structural material for DEMO. The decay heat for the HCPB DEMO was found to be larger than for the HCLL both for short (a few days) and longer (more than a year) cooling times. As for the alternative steels, the induced radioactivity was turned out to be lowest for the SS-316 until about 200 years after shut-down. Afterwards, the activity level of SS-316 steel was found to be the highest. For these times, the activity of both Eurofer and the HT-FM steel is about one order of magnitude lower.

  14. Remote handling assessment of attachment concepts for DEMO blanket segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.iglesias@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bastow, Roger; Cooper, Dave; Crowe, Robert; Middleton-Gear, Dave [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sibois, Romain [VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, Industrial Systems, ROViR, Tampere (Finland); Carloni, Dario [Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Vizvary, Zsolt; Crofts, Oliver [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Harman, Jon [EFDA Close Support Unit Garching, Boltzmannstaße 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Loving, Antony [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Challenges are identified for the remote handling of blanket segments’ attachments. • Two attachment design approaches are assessed for remote handling (RH) feasibility. • An alternative is proposed, which potentially simplifies and speeds-up RH operations. • Up to three different assemblies are proposed for the remote handling of the attachments. • Proposed integrated design of upper port is compatible with the attachment systems. - Abstract: The replacement strategy of the massive Multi-Module Blanket Segments (MMS) is a key driver in the design of several DEMO systems. These include the blankets themselves, the vacuum vessel (VV) and its ports and the Remote Maintenance System (RMS). Common challenges to any blanket attachment system have been identified, such as the need for applying a preload to the MMS manifold, the effects of the decay heat and several uncertainties related to permanent deformations when removing the blanket segments after service. The WP12 kinematics of the MMS in-vessel transportation was adapted to the requirements of each of the supports during 2013 and 2014 design activities. The RM equipment envisaged for handling attachments and earth connections may be composed of up to three different assemblies. An In-Vessel Mover at the divertor level handles the lower support and earth bonding, and could stabilize the MMS during transportation. A Shield Plug crane with a 6 DoF manipulator operates the upper attachment and earth straps. And a Vertical Maintenance Crane is responsible for the in-vessel MMS transportation and can handle the removable upper support pins. A final proposal is presented which can potentially reduce the number of required systems, at the same time that speeds-up the RMS global operations.

  15. Tritium Cycle Design for He-cooled Blankets for Demo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedano, L. A.

    2007-01-01

    Final goal of COMPU task is to develop a reliable tritium Process Flow Diagram (PFD) modelling tool for DEMO tritium cycle. With this aim, the COMPU task is devoted to: (1) Review of existing available documentation related on configuration layouts, and systems and tritium control process key technologies. (2) To select those validated and considered relevant as basis for code development. (3) Implement results from (1), and (2) in the PFD TRICICLO. This fi rst deliverable focuses on item (1) and is conceived as a managerial tool to: (1) establish and discuss the correct inputs, (2) to identify existing lack of basic information and (3) to establish the general demands and characteristics for the development of an advanced PFD model. Thus, in order to discuss and determine the basic information required for future new developments of the task, this report presents a review of the documentation of: (1) The outline of total cycle and system configuration with the main tritium system design specifications. (2) The ultimate processing technologies with the associated design of their implementing units. (3) Key parameters needed to describe processes and modes of operation of the system units. (4) An overview of the existing models for cycle and units with a general analysis of their performances and limitations. Thus, this report is a direct review of the base information generated previously in the context of tasks of the EU FT Programmers (reported in EFDA Green Books) and available results in open fields literature provided by parallel Programmes abroad (JP, US, RF). (Author) 102 refs

  16. Tritium Cycle Design for He-cooled Blankets for Demo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedano, L. A.

    2007-09-27

    Final goal of COMPU task is to develop a reliable tritium Process Flow Diagram (PFD) modelling tool for DEMO tritium cycle. With this aim, the COMPU task is devoted to: (1) Review of existing available documentation related on configuration layouts, and systems and tritium control process key technologies. (2) To select those validated and considered relevant as basis for code development. (3) Implement results from (1), and (2) in the PFD TRICICLO. This fi rst deliverable focuses on item (1) and is conceived as a managerial tool to: (1) establish and discuss the correct inputs, (2) to identify existing lack of basic information and (3) to establish the general demands and characteristics for the development of an advanced PFD model. Thus, in order to discuss and determine the basic information required for future new developments of the task, this report presents a review of the documentation of: (1) The outline of total cycle and system configuration with the main tritium system design specifications. (2) The ultimate processing technologies with the associated design of their implementing units. (3) Key parameters needed to describe processes and modes of operation of the system units. (4) An overview of the existing models for cycle and units with a general analysis of their performances and limitations. Thus, this report is a direct review of the base information generated previously in the context of tasks of the EU FT Programmers (reported in EFDA Green Books) and available results in open fields literature provided by parallel Programmes abroad (JP, US, RF). (Author) 102 refs.

  17. Modelling of DEMO core plasma consistent with SOL/divertor simulations for long-pulse scenarios with impurity seeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacher, G.W.; Pacher, H.D.; Janeschitz, G.; Kukushkin, A.S.; Kotov, V.; Reiter, D.

    2007-01-01

    The integrated core-pedestal-SOL model is applied to the simulation of a typical DEMO operation. Impurity seeding is used to reduce the power load on the divertor to acceptable levels. The influence on long-pulse operation of impurity seeding with various impurities is investigated. DEMO operation at acceptable peak power loads and long-pulse lengths is demonstrated

  18. Research at ITER towards DEMO: Specific reactor diagnostic studies to be carried out on ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kaschuck, Y. A.; Vershkov, V. A.; Petrov, A. A.; Petrov, V. G.; Tugarinov, S. N.

    2014-08-01

    In ITER diagnostics will operate in the very hard radiation environment of fusion reactor. Extensive technology studies are carried out during development of the ITER diagnostics and procedures of their calibration and remote handling. Results of these studies and practical application of the developed diagnostics on ITER will provide the direct input to DEMO diagnostic development. The list of DEMO measurement requirements and diagnostics will be determined during ITER experiments on the bases of ITER plasma physics results and success of particular diagnostic application in reactor-like ITER plasma. Majority of ITER diagnostic already passed the conceptual design phase and represent the state of the art in fusion plasma diagnostic development. The number of related to DEMO results of ITER diagnostic studies such as design and prototype manufacture of: neutron and γ-ray diagnostics, neutral particle analyzers, optical spectroscopy including first mirror protection and cleaning technics, reflectometry, refractometry, tritium retention measurements etc. are discussed.

  19. Research at ITER towards DEMO: Specific reactor diagnostic studies to be carried out on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kaschuck, Y. A.; Vershkov, V. A.; Petrov, A. A.; Petrov, V. G.; Tugarinov, S. N.

    2014-01-01

    In ITER diagnostics will operate in the very hard radiation environment of fusion reactor. Extensive technology studies are carried out during development of the ITER diagnostics and procedures of their calibration and remote handling. Results of these studies and practical application of the developed diagnostics on ITER will provide the direct input to DEMO diagnostic development. The list of DEMO measurement requirements and diagnostics will be determined during ITER experiments on the bases of ITER plasma physics results and success of particular diagnostic application in reactor-like ITER plasma. Majority of ITER diagnostic already passed the conceptual design phase and represent the state of the art in fusion plasma diagnostic development. The number of related to DEMO results of ITER diagnostic studies such as design and prototype manufacture of: neutron and γ–ray diagnostics, neutral particle analyzers, optical spectroscopy including first mirror protection and cleaning technics, reflectometry, refractometry, tritium retention measurements etc. are discussed

  20. Research at ITER towards DEMO: Specific reactor diagnostic studies to be carried out on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kaschuck, Y. A.; Vershkov, V. A.; Petrov, A. A.; Petrov, V. G.; Tugarinov, S. N. [Institution Project center ITER, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-21

    In ITER diagnostics will operate in the very hard radiation environment of fusion reactor. Extensive technology studies are carried out during development of the ITER diagnostics and procedures of their calibration and remote handling. Results of these studies and practical application of the developed diagnostics on ITER will provide the direct input to DEMO diagnostic development. The list of DEMO measurement requirements and diagnostics will be determined during ITER experiments on the bases of ITER plasma physics results and success of particular diagnostic application in reactor-like ITER plasma. Majority of ITER diagnostic already passed the conceptual design phase and represent the state of the art in fusion plasma diagnostic development. The number of related to DEMO results of ITER diagnostic studies such as design and prototype manufacture of: neutron and γ–ray diagnostics, neutral particle analyzers, optical spectroscopy including first mirror protection and cleaning technics, reflectometry, refractometry, tritium retention measurements etc. are discussed.

  1. Conceptual design of the DEMO neutral beam injectors: main developments and R&D achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonato, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Cismondi, F.; Fantz, U.; Fassina, A.; Franke, T.; Furno, I.; Hopf, C.; Jenkins, I.; Sartori, E.; Tran, M. Q.; Varje, J.; Vincenzi, P.; Zanotto, L.

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of the nuclear fusion power plant DEMO, to be built after the ITER experimental reactor, are usually understood to lie somewhere between those of ITER and a ‘first of a kind’ commercial plant. Hence, in DEMO the issues related to efficiency and RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) are among the most important drivers for the design, as the cost of the electricity produced by this power plant will strongly depend on these aspects. In the framework of the EUROfusion Work Package Heating and Current Drive within the Power Plant Physics and Development activities, a conceptual design of the neutral beam injector (NBI) for the DEMO fusion reactor has been developed by Consorzio RFX in collaboration with other European research institutes. In order to improve efficiency and RAMI aspects, several innovative solutions have been introduced in comparison to the ITER NBI, mainly regarding the beam source, neutralizer and vacuum pumping systems.

  2. Conceptual study of ECH/ECCD system for fusion DEMO plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kasugai, A.; Minami, R.; Kobayashi, N.; Nishio, S.; Sato, M.; Tobita, K.

    2006-01-01

    The conceptual study of the electron cyclotron heating and current drive (ECH/ECCD) system for a DEMO reactor was carried out. The ECH/ECCD system was considered on the basis of a design of the DEMO reactor by JAERI. The reactor is a low aspect ratio tokamak, and its size and magnetic field are similar to those of ITER. Therefore, many ECH/ECCD technologies developed at 170 GHz for ITER can be applied. Truly continuous operation is needed for DEMO, and the neutron fluence from the plasma is two orders of magnitude higher than that of ITER. An RF launcher that has reliability under the condition of high neutron fluence is, critically, important. For power deposition control in the plasma, a gyrotron frequency tuning system is considered as the primary candidate to realize a simple and robust launching system, but two RF beam steering systems are discussed as alternatives

  3. Report on the diagnostics for control of the fusion DEMO reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    The range of diagnostics that can be used in DEMO will be severely restricted compared to that used in the current experiments or to be used in ITER. Therefore, a study is planned on the technical feasibility of sensors and diagnostics on the basis of specific tokamak and helical DEMO designs, with the involvement of a wide range of specialists covering reactor design, diagnostics, neutronics, reactor structure, remote maintenance, plasma physics, plasma and machine control, and computer simulation. Topics included typical characteristic times of target plasma behavior, diagnostics tools with their resolution and lifetime, response time of actuators, and plasmas. Through these studies, possible candidates for DEMO diagnostics were identified. The outcome of two years of activities is summarized in this report with a recommendation to the government of Japan. (J.P.N.)

  4. CCHMM_PROF: a HMM-based coiled-coil predictor with evolutionary information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartoli, Lisa; Fariselli, Piero; Krogh, Anders

    2009-01-01

    tools are available for predicting coiled-coil domains in protein sequences, including those based on position-specific score matrices and machine learning methods. RESULTS: In this article, we introduce a hidden Markov model (CCHMM_PROF) that exploits the information contained in multiple sequence...... alignments (profiles) to predict coiled-coil regions. The new method discriminates coiled-coil sequences with an accuracy of 97% and achieves a true positive rate of 79% with only 1% of false positives. Furthermore, when predicting the location of coiled-coil segments in protein sequences, the method reaches...

  5. Assessment of hypervapotron heat sink performance using CFD under DEMO relevant first wall conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domalapally, Phani, E-mail: p_kumar.domalapally@cvrez.cz

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Performance of Hypervapotron heat sink was tested for First wall limiter application. • Two different materials were tested Eurofer 97 and CuCrZr at PWR conditions. • Simulations were performed to see the effect of the different inlet conditions and materials on the maximum temperature. • It was found that CuCrZr heat sink performance is far better than Eurofer heat sink at the same operating conditions. - Abstract: Among the proposed First Wall (FW) cooling concepts for European Demonstration Fusion Power Plant (DEMO), water cooled FW is one of the options. The heat flux load distribution on the FW of the DEMO reactor is not yet precisely defined. But if the heat loads on the FW are extrapolated from ITER conditions, the numbers are quite high and have to be handled none the less. The design of the FW itself is challenging as the thermal conductivity ratio of heat sink materials in ITER (CuCrZr) and in DEMO (Eurofer 97) is ∼10–12 and the operating conditions are of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) in DEMO instead of 70 °C and 4 MPa as in ITER. This paper analyzes the performance of Hypervapotron (HV) heat sink for FW limiter application under DEMO conditions. Where different materials, temperatures, heat fluxes and velocities are considered to predict the performance of the HV, to establish its limits in handling the heat loads before reaching the upper limits from temperature point of view. In order to assess the performance, numerical simulations are performed using commercial CFD code, which was previously validated in predicting the thermal hydraulic performance of HV geometry. Based on the results the potential usage of HV heat sink for DEMO will be assessed.

  6. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated

  7. Large coil program support structure conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to perform tests on both pool boiling and force cooled superconducting toroidal field coils. The tests will attempt to approximate conditions anticipated in an ignition tokamak. The test requirements resulted in a coil support design which accommodates up to six (6) test coils and is mounted to a structure capable of resisting coil interactions. The steps leading to the present LCP coil support structure design, details on selected structural components, and the basic assembly sequence are discussed

  8. Progress in the RAMI analysis of a conceptual LHCD system for DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirizzi, F.

    2014-02-01

    Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability (RAMI) concepts and techniques, that acquired great importance during the first manned space missions, have been progressively extended to industrial, scientific and consumer equipments to assure them satisfactory performances and lifetimes. In the design of experimental facilities, like tokamaks, mainly aimed at demonstrating validity and feasibility of scientific theories, RAMI analysis has been often left aside. DEMO, the future prototype fusion reactors, will be instead designed for steadily delivering electrical energy to commercial grids, so that the RAMI aspects will assume an absolute relevance since their initial design phases. A preliminary RAMI analysis of the LHCD system for the conceptual EU DEMO reactor is given in the paper.

  9. Progress in the RAMI analysis of a conceptual LHCD system for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirizzi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability (RAMI) concepts and techniques, that acquired great importance during the first manned space missions, have been progressively extended to industrial, scientific and consumer equipments to assure them satisfactory performances and lifetimes. In the design of experimental facilities, like tokamaks, mainly aimed at demonstrating validity and feasibility of scientific theories, RAMI analysis has been often left aside. DEMO, the future prototype fusion reactors, will be instead designed for steadily delivering electrical energy to commercial grids, so that the RAMI aspects will assume an absolute relevance since their initial design phases. A preliminary RAMI analysis of the LHCD system for the conceptual EU DEMO reactor is given in the paper

  10. Breeding blanket design for ITER and prototype (DEMO) fusion reactors and breeding materials issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsu, H; Enoeda, M [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Current status of the designs of the ITER breeding blanket and DEMO blankets is introduced placing emphasis on the breeding materials selection and related issues. The former design is based on the up-to-date design activities, as of October 1997, being performed jointly by Joint Central Team (JCT) and Home Teams (HT`s), while the latter is based on the DEMO blanket test module designs being proposed by each Party at the TBWG (Test Blanket Working Group) meetings. (J.P.N.)

  11. Cooling device of superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthil, R.; Lottin, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    This device is rotating around an horizontal axis. The superconducting coils are contained in a cryogenic enclosure feeded in liquid helium forced circulation. They are related to an electric generator by electric mains each of them comprising a gas exchanger, and an exchanger-evaporator set between the cryogenic device and those exchangers. The exchanger-evaporator is aimed at dissipating the heat arriving by conductors connected to the superconducting coils. According to the invention, the invention includes an annular canalization with horizontal axis in which the connection conductors bathe in liquid helium [fr

  12. Calculation of poloidal rotation in the edge plasma of limiter tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhauser, H.; Claassen, H.A.

    1987-05-01

    The existing 2-d two-fluid code for computing the plasma profiles in the scrape-off layer of limiter tokamaks has been further developed to include the effect of poloidal rotation in the basic equations. This rotation is produced by radial electric fields which arise in the limiter shadow due to radial gradients in the Langmuir sheath potential in front of the limiter. As a consequence slight deviations from ambipolar motion must occur. A strong increase of rotation near the separatrix is connected with an electric current circuit closed via the limiter edge. The 2-d profiles of all relevant quantities are calculated and discussed for TEXTOR-typical parameters including also the effect of limiter recycled neutrals. The results agree well with the known experimental evidence on poloidal rotation and should be transferable to all limiter tokamaks. (orig.)

  13. Generation of sheared poloidal flows via Reynolds stress and transport barrier physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Sanchez, E.; Balbin, R.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Milligen, B. van; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Riccardi, C.; Carrozza, R.; Fontanesi, M.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.

    2000-01-01

    A view of the latest experimental results and progress in the understanding of the role of poloidal flows driven by fluctuations via Reynolds stress is given. Reynolds stress shows a radial gradient close to the velocity shear layer location in tokamaks and stellarators, indicating that this mechanism may drive significant poloidal flows in the plasma boundary. Observation of the generation of ExB sheared flows via Reynolds stress at the ion Bernstein resonance layer has been noticed in toroidal magnetized plasmas. The experimental evidence of sheared ExB flows linked to the location of rational surfaces in stellarator plasmas might be interpreted in terms of Reynolds stress sheared driven flows. These results show that ExB sheared flows driven by fluctuations can play an important role in the generation of transport barriers. (author)

  14. Confinement improvement with rf poloidal current drive in the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.; Sarff, J.; Sovinec, C.; Uchimoto, E.

    1994-01-01

    External control of the current profile in a reversed-field pinch (RFP), by means such as rf poloidal current drive, may have beneficial effects well beyond the direct reduction of Ohmic input power due to auxiliary heating. Reduction of magnetic turbulence associated with the dynamo, which drives poloidal current in a conventional RFP, may allow operation at lower density and higher electron temperature, for which rf current drive becomes efficient and the RFP operates in a more favorable regime on the nτ vs T diagram. Projected parameters for RFX at 2 MA axe studied as a concrete example. If rf current drive allows RFX to operate with β = 10% (plasma energy/magnetic energy) at low density (3 x 10 19 m -3 ) with classical resistivity (i.e. without dynamo-enhanced power input), 40 ms energy confinement times and 3 keV temperatures will result, matching the performance of tokamaks of similar size

  15. Effect of limiter recycling on measured poloidal impurity emission profiles in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.; DeMichelis, C.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Becoulet, M.; Bush, C.; Ghendrih, P.; Guirlet, R.; Hess, W.; Mattioli, M.; Vallet, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Poloidal impurity emission profiles measured with the Tore Supra grazing incidence duochromator exhibit a complex spatial structure during ergodic divertor operation with an outboard poloidal guard limiter. As previous measurements with inboard-wall limited plasmas have shown that these profiles give important information about the ergodic field structure, so the contribution of local neon recycling from the limiter-induced plume has been modeled. This permits a discrimination of edge and core transport effects. The BBQ 3D scrape-off layer code calculates the asymmetric contribution to the emission and MIST 1D simulation gives the symmetric part. A systematic increase is observed in the decay rate of neon emission after injection as the ergodic divertor strength is increased. The calculations permit identification of the limiter plume contribution to the profile structure, and, with this identification, the effect of the divertor to enhance impurity efflux can be seen from the decay data

  16. Ion transport analysis of a high beta-poloidal JT-60U discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Tajima, T.; Dong, J.-Q.; Kim, J.-Y.; Kishimoto, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The high beta-poloidal discharge number 17110 in JT-60U (JT-60 Team, IAEA, Vienna, 1993) that developes an internal transport barrier is analysed for the transport of ion energy and momentum. First, the classical ion temperature gradient stability properties are calculated in the absence of sheared plasma flows to establish the L-mode transport level prior to the emergence of the transport barrier. Then the evolving toroidal and poloidal velocity profiles reported by Koide et al (1994 Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 3662) are used to show how the sheared mass flows control the stability and transport. Coupled energy-momentum transport equations predict the creation of a transport barrier. The balance of the steep ion temperature gradient against the magnetic shear and sheared mass flow is calculated for the profiles in the 17110 discharge. (Author)

  17. Large Coil Program magnetic system design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, S.D.; Johnson, N.E.

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting coils to provide a basis for the design principles, materials, and fabrication techniques proposed for the toroidal magnets for the THE NEXT STEP (TNS) and other future tokamak devices. This paper documents a design study of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in which the structural response of the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils and the supporting structure was evaluated under simulated reactor conditions. The LCP test facility structural system consists of six TF Coils, twelve coil-to-coil torsional restraining beams (torque rings), a central bucking post with base, and a Pulse Coil system. The NASTRAN Finite Element Structural Analysis computer Code was utilized to determine the distribution of deflections, forces, and stresses for each of the TF Coils, torque rings, and the central bucking post. Eleven load conditions were selected to represent probable test operations. Pulse Coils suspended in the bore of the test coil were energized to simulate the pulsed field environment characteristic of the TNS reactor system. The TORMAC Computer Code was utilized to develop the magnetic forces in the TF Coils for each of the eleven loading conditions examined, with or without the Pulse Coils energized. The TORMAC computer program output forces were used directly as input load conditions for the NASTRAN analyses. Results are presented which demonstrate the reliability of the LCTF under simulated reactor operating conditions

  18. Measurement of poloidal field distributions in Tokamaks by far-infrared polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, W [Stuttgart Univ. (TH) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physikalische Elektronik; Dodel, G

    1978-02-01

    A sufficiently precise measurement of small Faraday rotation angles in a Tokamak experiment should be possible. Besides the precision with which the Faraday rotation angles can be measured, the precision with which the poloidal field can finally be deduced from such measurements, depends on other factors such as the measuring precision of the electron density profile, the diameter of the probing beam and the deviation of the plasma from circular symmetry.

  19. Poloidally asymmetric potential increases in tokamak scrape-off layer plasmas by radiofrequency power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebold, D.A.; Majeski, R.; Tanaka, T.

    1992-01-01

    Langmuir probe data are presented which show poloidally asymmetric increases in floating potential, electron temperature and, hence, plasma potential on magnetic field lines which map to the Faraday shield of an ICRF antenna in a medium size tokamak, Phaedrus-T, during radiofrequency power injection. These data are consistent with and suggestive of the existence of radiofrequency generated sheath voltages on those field lines. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 20 refs, 3 figs

  20. Resonance localization and poloidal electric field due to cyclo- tron wave heating in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, J.Y.; Chan, V.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Prater, R.; Wong, S.K.

    1984-01-01

    The perpendicular heating in cyclotron waves tends to pile up the resonant particles toward the low magnetic field side with their banana tips localized to the resonant surface. A poloidal electric field with an E x B drift comparable to the ion vertical drift in a toroidal magnetic field may result. With the assumption of anomalous electron and neoclassical ion transport, density variations due to wave heating are discussed

  1. Overview of progress on the European DEMO remote maintenance strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crofts, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.crofts@ccfe.ac.uk [RACE/UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, Oxon (United Kingdom); Loving, Antony; Iglesias, Daniel [RACE/UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, Oxon (United Kingdom); Coleman, Matti [EUROfusion Consortium, PPP& T Department, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Siuko, Mikko [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Mittwollen, Martin [KIT Institut für Fördertechnik und Logistiksysteme, Gotthard-Franz-Straße 8, Geb.50.38, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Queral, Vicente [CIEMAT Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Edif. 66, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vale, Alberto [IST, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Villedieu, Eric [CEA, IRFM, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The remote maintenance strategy is applicable to the range of tokamak and component options currently under consideration in Europe • The remote maintenance development work is concentrating on the application and limits of the immature technologies that pose the greatest risk to the feasibility of the maintenance strategy • Position control during the handling of the in-vessel components is one of the areas of high risk and a system is being developed and will be tested prior to concept design to demonstrate the feasibility and capability of a system capable of real time incorporation of changing kinematic data provided by a structural simulator running in parallel • In-vessel recovery and rescue and the pipe joining technology form two more of the high risk areas where developments are being concentrated - Abstract: The EU-DEMO remote maintenance strategy must be relevant for a range of in-vessel component design options. The remote maintenance project must provide an understanding of the limits of the strategy and technologies so as to inform the developing plant design of the maintenance constraints. A comprehensive set of maintenance requirements has been produced, in conjunction with the plant designers, against which design options can be assessed. The proposed maintenance solutions are based around a strategy that deploys casks above each of the vertical ports to exchange the blanket segments and at each of the divertor ports to exchange the divertor cassettes. The casks deploy remote handling equipment to open and close the vacuum vessel, remove and re-install pipework, and replace the in-vessel components. A technical design risk assessment has shown that the largest risks are common to all of the proposed solutions and that they are associated with two key issues, first; the ability to handle the large blanket and divertor components to the required positional accuracy with limited viewing and position feedback, and second; to

  2. Overview of progress on the European DEMO remote maintenance strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crofts, Oliver; Loving, Antony; Iglesias, Daniel; Coleman, Matti; Siuko, Mikko; Mittwollen, Martin; Queral, Vicente; Vale, Alberto; Villedieu, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The remote maintenance strategy is applicable to the range of tokamak and component options currently under consideration in Europe • The remote maintenance development work is concentrating on the application and limits of the immature technologies that pose the greatest risk to the feasibility of the maintenance strategy • Position control during the handling of the in-vessel components is one of the areas of high risk and a system is being developed and will be tested prior to concept design to demonstrate the feasibility and capability of a system capable of real time incorporation of changing kinematic data provided by a structural simulator running in parallel • In-vessel recovery and rescue and the pipe joining technology form two more of the high risk areas where developments are being concentrated - Abstract: The EU-DEMO remote maintenance strategy must be relevant for a range of in-vessel component design options. The remote maintenance project must provide an understanding of the limits of the strategy and technologies so as to inform the developing plant design of the maintenance constraints. A comprehensive set of maintenance requirements has been produced, in conjunction with the plant designers, against which design options can be assessed. The proposed maintenance solutions are based around a strategy that deploys casks above each of the vertical ports to exchange the blanket segments and at each of the divertor ports to exchange the divertor cassettes. The casks deploy remote handling equipment to open and close the vacuum vessel, remove and re-install pipework, and replace the in-vessel components. A technical design risk assessment has shown that the largest risks are common to all of the proposed solutions and that they are associated with two key issues, first; the ability to handle the large blanket and divertor components to the required positional accuracy with limited viewing and position feedback, and second; to

  3. Tritium transport in HCLL and WCLL DEMO blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candido, Luigi [DENERG, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Utili, Marco [ENEA UTIS- C.R. Brasimone, Bacino del Brasimone, Camugnano, BO (Italy); Nicolotti, Iuri [DENERG, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Zucchetti, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.zucchetti@polito.it [DENERG, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Tritium inventories and tritium losses are the main output of the presented model for HCLL and WCLL. • A parametric study has been performed, to show the behavior of the two systems when certain parameters are changed, in order to minimize inventories and/or losses. • An improved design is needed, in order to reduce the radiological hazard related to tritium activity. According to test number 7, HCLL-BB could be able to have a tritium inventory of 33.05 g and losses of 19.55 Ci/d. • WCLL-BB shows a very low radiological risk, much lower than that suggested (inventory: 17.48 g, losses: 3.2 Ci/d). An ptimization study has been performed aiming to minimize the water flow rate for an upgraded design. • Both for HCLL and WCLL, the most critical parameters able to produce relevant variations in inventories and losses are the helium/water fraction, the CPS/WDS and the permeation reduction factors. - Abstract: The Helium-Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) and Water-Cooled Lithium Lead (WCLL) Breeding Blankets are two of the four blanket designs proposed for DEMO reactor. The study of tritium transport inside the blankets is fundamental to assess their preliminary design and safety features. A mathematical model has been derived, in a new form making makes easier to determine the most critical components as far as tritium losses and tritium inventories are concerned, and to model the tritium performance of the whole system. Two cases have been studied, the former with tritium generation rate constant in time and the latter considering a typical pulsed operation for a time span of 100 h. Tritium inventories and tritium losses are the main output of the model. Tritium concentrations, inventories and losses are initially calculated and compared for the two blankets, in a reference case without permeation barriers or cold traps. A parametric study to show the behavior of the two systems when certain parameters are changed, in order to minimize inventories and

  4. Design of MgB2 Superconducting coils for the Ignitor Experiment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, G.; Penco, R.; Berta, S.; Coppi, B.; Giunchi, G.

    2009-11-01

    A feasibility study for the adoption of MgB2 superconducting cables for the largest (about 5 m in diameter) of the poloidal field coils of the Ignitor machine is being carried out. This initiative was prompted by the progress made in the fabrication of MgB2 long cables, and related superconducting magnets of relatively large dimensions. These magnets will be cryocooled at the operating temperature of 10-15 K that is compatible with the He-gas cryogenic cooling system of Ignitor as well as with the projected superconducting current density of the MgB2 material, at the magnetic field values (˜4-5 T) in which these coils are designed to operate. The optimal cable configuration has been identified that can provide an efficient cooling of the MgB2 conductors over times compatible with the machine duty cycles. MgB2 superconductors hold the promise of becoming suitable for high field magnets by appropriate doping of the material and of replacing gradually the normal conducting coils adopted, by necessity, in high field experiments. Therefore, an appropriate R&D program on the development of improved MgB2 material and related superconducting cabling options has been undertaken, involving different institutions.

  5. Effect of GFRP spacer on local deformation of large superconductor in coil pack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Arata; Tamura, Hitoshi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Junya

    1994-01-01

    Design and construction of the Large Helical Device (LHD) are in progress at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan. The LHD has superconducting poloidal and helical coils, and many efforts have been undertaken to develop these large superconductors. When designing a large superconducting magnet, the mechanical behavior of the wound structure becomes a very important factor since the apparent rigidity affects the design of a coil support structure and the superconducting coil needs to endure the large electro-magnetic force it creates. Also, non-linear mechanical behavior should yield the instability of the magnet. In this paper, local deformation in a large conductor caused by GFRP spacers and epoxy adhesives was investigated after compressive rigidity testing. The epoxy adhesive used for attaching the GFRP spacers to the superconductor changed shape from an almost square sheet into a lens-like sheet during deformation, and a dent appeared on the surface of the superconductor. Three-dimensional FEM analysis showed that a compressive stress in the vertical direction of the loading axis existed in the adhesive plane. This stress component makes the adhesive lens-like and it results in the dent created during the compressive testing. This local deformation should yield a part of the permanent deformation observed after the compressive load cycle at 4.2 K

  6. The Role of Viscosity in Causing the Plasma Poloidal Motion in Magnetic Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ake; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Jiajia; Zhou, Zhenjun; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Rui; Zhuang, Bin; Zhang, Quanhao, E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2017-08-20

    An interesting phenomenon, plasma poloidal motion, has been found in many magnetic clouds (MCs), and viscosity has been proposed as a possible mechanism. However, it is not clear how significant the role of viscosity is in generating such motion. In this paper, we conduct a statistical study of the MCs detected by the Wind spacecraft during 1995–2012. It is found that, for 19% of all the studied MCs (186), the poloidal velocities of the MC plasma near the MC boundaries are well correlated with those of the corresponding ambient solar wind plasma. A non-monotonic increase from inner to outer MCs suggests that the viscosity does play a role, albeit weak, on the poloidal motion in the MC statistically. The possible dependence on the solar wind parameters is then studied in detail for the nine selected crossings, which represent the viscosity characteristic. There is an evident negative correlation between the viscosity and the density, a weak negative correlation between the viscosity and the turbulence strength, and no clear correlation between the viscosity and the temperature.

  7. Spatial and temporal characteristics of poloidal waves in the terrestrial plasmasphere: a CLUSTER case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schäfer

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Oscillating magnetic field lines are frequently observed by spacecraft in the terrestrial and other planetary magnetospheres. The CLUSTER mission is a very suitable tool to further study these Alfvén waves as the four CLUSTER spacecraft provide for an opportunity to separate spatial and temporal structures in the terrestrial magnetosphere. Using a large scaled configuration formed by the four spacecraft we are able to detect a poloidal Ultra-Low-Frequency (ULF pulsation of the magnetic and electric field in order to analyze its temporal and spatial structures. For this purpose the measurements are transformed into a specific field line related coordinate system to investigate their specific amplitude pattern depending on the path of the CLUSTER spacecraft across oscillating field lines. These measurements are then compared with modeled spacecraft observations across a localized poloidal wave resonator in the dayside plasmasphere. A detailed investigation of theoretically expected poloidal eigenfrequencies allows us to specify the observed 16 mHz pulsation as a third harmonic oscillation. Based on this we perform a case study providing a clear identification of wave properties such as an spatial scale structure of about 0.67 RE, the azimuthal wave number m≈30, temporal evolution, and energy transport in the detected ULF pulsations.

  8. Poloidal structure of the plasma response to n = 1 Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, L.; Bettini, P.; Piovesan, P.; Terranova, D.; Giannone, L.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Suttrop, W.; Teschke, M.; Liu, Y. Q.; Ryan, D.; Eurofusion Mst1 Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-10-01

    The hybrid scenario, a candidate for high-beta steady-state tokamak operations, becomes highly sensitive to 3D magnetic field near the no-wall limit. A predictive understanding of the plasma response to 3D fields near ideal MHD limits in terms of validated MHD stability codes is therefore important in order to safely operate future devices. Slowly rotating (5 - 10 Hz) n = 1 external magnetic fields have been applied in hybrid discharges in ASDEX Upgrade for an experimental characterization: the global n = 1 kink response has been measured by means of SXR and complete poloidal arrays of bθ probes located at different toroidal angles and compared to predictions of MHD codes such as MARS-F and V3FIT-VMEC. A Least-Squares Spectral Analysis approach has been developed together with a Monte Carlo technique to extract the small plasma response and its confidence interval from the noisy magnetic signals. MARS-F correctly reproduces the poloidal structure of the n = 1 measurements: for example, the dependence of the dominant poloidal mode number at the plasma edge from q95 is the same as in the experiment. Similar comparisons with V3FIT-VMEC and will be presented. See author list of ``H. Meyer et al. 2017 Nucl. Fusion 57 102014''.

  9. Demonstration of real-time control for poloidal beta in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Hyunsun; Hahn, S.H.; Bak, J.G.; Hyatt, A.; Johnson, R.; Woo, M.H.; Kim, J.S.; Bae, Y.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Real time control system for poloidal beta has been designed in KSTAR. • Poloidal beta has been calculated based on the diamagnetic loop signals. • The neutral beam Injector plays a role as the actuator. • The control system has been validated in the KSTAR experiments. - Abstract: Sustaining the plasma in a stable and a high performance condition is one of the important control issues for future steady state tokamaks. In the 2014 KSTAR campaign, we have developed a real-time poloidal beta (β p ) control technique and carried out preliminary experiments to identify its feasibility. In the control system, the β p is calculated in real time using the measured diamagnetic loop signal, and compared with the target value leading to the change of the neutral beam (NB) heating power using a feedback PID control algorithm. To match the requested power of NB which is operated with constant voltage, the on-time periods of the intervals were adjusted as the ratio of the required power to the maximum achievable one. This paper will present the overall procedures of the β p control, the β p estimation process and NB operation scheme implemented in the plasma control system (PCS), and the analysis on the preliminary experimental results

  10. Demonstration of real-time control for poloidal beta in KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hyunsun, E-mail: hyunsun@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Hahn, S.H.; Bak, J.G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Hyatt, A.; Johnson, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Woo, M.H.; Kim, J.S.; Bae, Y.S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Real time control system for poloidal beta has been designed in KSTAR. • Poloidal beta has been calculated based on the diamagnetic loop signals. • The neutral beam Injector plays a role as the actuator. • The control system has been validated in the KSTAR experiments. - Abstract: Sustaining the plasma in a stable and a high performance condition is one of the important control issues for future steady state tokamaks. In the 2014 KSTAR campaign, we have developed a real-time poloidal beta (β{sub p}) control technique and carried out preliminary experiments to identify its feasibility. In the control system, the β{sub p} is calculated in real time using the measured diamagnetic loop signal, and compared with the target value leading to the change of the neutral beam (NB) heating power using a feedback PID control algorithm. To match the requested power of NB which is operated with constant voltage, the on-time periods of the intervals were adjusted as the ratio of the required power to the maximum achievable one. This paper will present the overall procedures of the β{sub p} control, the β{sub p} estimation process and NB operation scheme implemented in the plasma control system (PCS), and the analysis on the preliminary experimental results.

  11. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  12. BPX toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzenvoeder, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the toroidal field (TF) coil system of the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) which consists of (18) beryllium copper magnets arrayed in a wedged configuration with a major radius of 2.6 meters and a field strength capability on axis of 9.0 Tesla. The toroidal array is constructed from six (3)-coil modules to facilitate remote recovery in the event of a magnet failure after nuclear activation precludes hands-on servicing. The magnets are of a modified Bitter plate design with partial cases of type 316-LN stainless steel welded with Inconel 182 weld wire. The coil turn plates are fabricated from CDA C17510 beryllium copper with optimized mechanical, thermal, and electrical characteristics. joints within the turns and between turns are made by welding with C17200 filler wire. Cryogenic cooling is employed to reduce power dissipation and to enhance performance. The magnets are cooled between experimental pulses by pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through channels in the edges of the coil turns. This arrangement makes possible one full-power pulse per hour. Electrical insulation consists of polyimide-glass sheets bonded in place with vacuum-pressure impregnated epoxy/glass

  13. Open-Coil Retraction Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavankumar Janardan Vibhute

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sliding mechanic has become a popular method for space closure with developments in preadjusted edgewise appliance. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and evaluated extensively for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low-load deflection rate (LDR/force decay. With the advent of NiTi springs in orthodontics, LDRs have been markedly reduced. For use of NiTi, clinician has to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. “Open Coil Retraction Spring (OCRS” is developed utilizing NiTi open-coil spring for orthodontic space closure. This paper describes fabrication and clinical application of OCRS which have number of advantages. It sustains low LDR with optimum force magnitude. Its design is adjustable for desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (i.e., it cannot be over activated, and decompression limit of open coil is also controlled by the operator, resp.. A possibility to offset the OCRS away from mucosa helps to reduce its soft-tissue impingement.

  14. Gyrokinetic full f analysis of electric field dynamics and poloidal velocity in the FT2-tokamak configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leerink, S.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Nora, M.; Ogando, F.

    2008-01-01

    The ELMFIRE gyrokinetic simulation code has been used to perform full f simulations of the FT-2 tokamak. The dynamics of the radial electric field and the creation of poloidal velocity in the presence of turbulence are presented.

  15. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case

  16. Design and modelling of a SMES coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Weijia; Campbell, A M; Coombs, T A, E-mail: wy215@cam.ac.u [EPEC Superconductivity group, Engineering Department, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    The design of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil wound by coated conductors has been presented. Based on an existing model for coated conductor pancake coils, this paper analysed the magnetic field and current density distribution of the coil at two different operation temperatures, 77K and 22K. A comparison table of the critical currents and AC losses at these two temperatures has been presented. Several steps to improve the transport current of the coil have been suggested as well.

  17. Demonstration of the role of turbulence-driven poloidal flow generation in the L-H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.X.; Xu, Y.H.; Luo, J.R.; Mao, J.S.; Liu, B.H.; Li, J.G.; Wan, B.N.; Wan, Y.X.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence for the role of turbulence-driven poloidal flow generation in the L-H transition induced by a turbulent heating pulse on the HT-6M tokamak. It is found that the poloidal flow υ θ plays a key role in developing the electric field E r and triggering the transition. The acceleration of υ θ across the transition is clearly correlated with the enhancement of the Reynolds stress gradient. (author)

  18. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Céspedes, Nora; Habel, Catherine; Lopez-Perez, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous to Pla...

  19. Sensitive quench detection of the HTS coil using a co-winding coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Tomohiro; Ariyama, Takahiro; Takao, Tomoaki; Tsukamoto, Osami

    2017-01-01

    The authors have studied the co-winding coil method (CW method) using the co-wound coil electrically insulated from the HTS coil. In this method, the quench is detected by the voltage difference between the coil of the HTS tape (HTS coil) and the coil of the normal conductor (CW coil). The voltage induced in the CW coil caused by the change of the magnetic field is almost the same as that in the HTS coil because the coils are magnetically coupled close to each other. Therefore, it is expected that the induced voltage will be canceled with high accuracy and that the resistive voltage in the HTS coil will be detected with greater sensitivity compared to the bridge balance method, which is used commonly. In this study, quench detection applying the CW method is demonstrated using an experimental double-pancake coil. A tape with the copper layer deposited on the polymer substrate was used as the insulated conductor wire to form the CW coil. An additional pancake coil was used to expose the experimental double-pancake coil to the external magnetic field asymmetrically. It was shown that the CW method can detect the resistive voltage with greater sensitivity even when the HTS coil was exposed to the changing asymmetric external magnetic field. (author)

  20. Status of the Swiss LCT-coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zichy, J; Benz, H.; Horvath, I.; Jakob, B.; Marinucci, C.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Swiss coil is a forced flow coil cooled by supercritical helium. A brief review of the design considerations, some of its specific features, and the progress in fabrication are described. A discussion of both the instrumentation and the cryogenic characteristics of the coil is presented

  1. Linear motor coil assembly and linear motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    An ironless linear motor (5) comprising a magnet track (53) and a coil assembly (50) operating in cooperation with said magnet track (53) and having a plurality of concentrated multi-turn coils (31 a-f, 41 a-d, 51 a-k), wherein the end windings (31E) of the coils (31 a-f, 41 a-e) are substantially

  2. Split Coil Forms for Rotary Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Split cores for rotor and stator windings of rotary transformer mounted around their respective coils (which are in bobbins) and cemented together. This arrangement simplifies winding of stator coil to go in a slot in inner diameter of stator coil. One practical application of rotary transformers fabricated according to this technique is for centrifuges, in which conventional sliprings are of uncertain reliability.

  3. Startup of large coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils. (author)

  4. Novel method of aligning ATF-1 coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, J.A.; Harris, J.H.; Neilson, G.H.; Jernigan, T.C.

    1983-08-01

    The coils for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF-1) torsatron may be easily aligned before the machine is placed under vacuum. This is done by creating nulls in the magnetic field by energizing the coils in various configurations. All of the nulls in vertical bar B vector vertical bar occur on the z-axis. When the nulls coincide, the coils are properly aligned

  5. Overview of Progress on the EU DEMO Reactor Magnet System Design

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zani, L.; Bayer, C.M.; Biancolini, M.E.; Bonifetto, R.; Bruzzone, P.; Brutti, C.; Ciazynski, D.; Coleman, M.; Ďuran, Ivan; Eisterer, M.; Fietz, W.H.; Gade, P.V.; Gaio, E.; Giorgetti, F.; Goldacker, W.; Gömöry, F.; Granados, X.; Heller, R.; Hertout, P.; Hoa, C.; Kario, A.; Lacroix, B.; Lewandowska, M.; Maistrello, A.; Muzzi, L.; Nijhuis, A.; Nunio, F.; Panin, A.; Petrisor, T.; Poncet, J.-M.; Prokopec, R.; Sanmarti Cardona, M.; Savoldi, L.; Schlachter, S.I.; Sedlak, K.; Stepanov, B.; Tiseanu, I.; Torre, A.; Turtu, S.; Vallcorba, R.; Vojenciak, M.; Weiss, K.-P.; Wesche, R.; Yagotintsev, K.; Zanino, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2016), č. článku 4204505. ISSN 1051-8223 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : DEMO * fusion * HTS * LTS * Nb3Sn * superconducting magnets Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.092, year: 2015

  6. Comparison over the nuclear analysis of the HCLL blanket for the European DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaboulay, Jean-Charles, E-mail: jean-charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aiello, Giacomo; Aubert, Julien [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Villari, Rosaria [ENEA, UTFUS-TECN, Via E. Fermi 4, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Fischer, Ulrich [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A complete nuclear analysis of the DEMO HCLL has been carried out at CEA with the TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} Monte Carlo code. • The DEMO tokamak model was generated by the CAD import tool McCad. • The HCLL blankets were implemented using a previous MCNP model developed at ENEA. • A good agreement is observed between the results obtained at CEA with TRIPOLI-4 and JEFF-3.1.1 and whose obtained at ENEA with MCNP and FENDL-2.1. - Abstract: This paper presents the comparison over the nuclear analysis of the European DEMO with HCLL blanket carried out with the TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} Monte Carlo code and the JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library and with the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the FENDL-2.1 nuclear data library. The MCNP5 analysis was conducted firstly by ENEA with a detailed 3D model describing all the HCLL blanket internal structures. This MCNP5 model was converted into TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} representation for performing the nuclear analysis at CEA with the objective to demonstrate consistency between both analyses. A very good agreement was obtained for all of the relevant nuclear responses (neutron wall loading, tritium breeding ratio, nuclear heating, neutron flux distribution, etc.), validating CEA’s nuclear analysis approach, based on TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} Monte Carlo code and JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library, for the European DEMO.

  7. Comparison over the nuclear analysis of the HCLL blanket for the European DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaboulay, Jean-Charles; Aiello, Giacomo; Aubert, Julien; Villari, Rosaria; Fischer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A complete nuclear analysis of the DEMO HCLL has been carried out at CEA with the TRIPOLI-4"® Monte Carlo code. • The DEMO tokamak model was generated by the CAD import tool McCad. • The HCLL blankets were implemented using a previous MCNP model developed at ENEA. • A good agreement is observed between the results obtained at CEA with TRIPOLI-4 and JEFF-3.1.1 and whose obtained at ENEA with MCNP and FENDL-2.1. - Abstract: This paper presents the comparison over the nuclear analysis of the European DEMO with HCLL blanket carried out with the TRIPOLI-4"® Monte Carlo code and the JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library and with the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the FENDL-2.1 nuclear data library. The MCNP5 analysis was conducted firstly by ENEA with a detailed 3D model describing all the HCLL blanket internal structures. This MCNP5 model was converted into TRIPOLI-4"® representation for performing the nuclear analysis at CEA with the objective to demonstrate consistency between both analyses. A very good agreement was obtained for all of the relevant nuclear responses (neutron wall loading, tritium breeding ratio, nuclear heating, neutron flux distribution, etc.), validating CEA’s nuclear analysis approach, based on TRIPOLI-4"® Monte Carlo code and JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library, for the European DEMO.

  8. Divertor remote handling for DEMO: Concept design and preliminary FMECA studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carfora, D., E-mail: dario.carfora@gmail.com [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); ENEA/CREATE/Università degli studi Napoli Federico II, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Di Gironimo, G. [ENEA/CREATE/Università degli studi Napoli Federico II, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Järvenpää, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Huhtala, K. [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Määttä, T.; Siuko, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Concept design of the RH system for the DEMO fusion power plant. • Divertor mover: hydraulic telescopic boom concept design. • An alternative solution to ITER rack and pinion divertor mover (CMM). • Divertor cassettes end effector studies. • FMECA studies started on the DEMO divertor mover. - Abstract: The paper describes a concept design of a remote handling (RH) system for replacing divertor cassettes and cooling pipes in future DEMO fusion power plant. In DEMO reactor design important considerations are the reactor availability and reliable maintenance operations. The proposed divertor mover is a hydraulic telescopic boom driven from the transportation cask through the maintenance tunnel of the reactor. The boom is divided in three sections and it is driving an end-effector in order to perform the scheduled operations of maintenance inside the vacuum vessel. Two alternative designs of the end effector to grip and manipulate the divertor cassette are presented in this work. Both concepts are hydraulically actuated, based on ITER previous studies. The divertor cassette end-effector consists of a lifting arm linked to the divertor mover, a tilting plate, a cantilever arm and a hook-plate. Taking advantage of the ITER RH background and experience, the proposed hydraulic RH system is compared with the rack and pinion system currently designed for ITER and is an object of simulations at Divertor Test Platform (DTP2) in VTT's Labs of Tampere, Finland. Pros and cons will be put in evidence.

  9. Dynamic modelling of balance of plant systems for a pulsed DEMO power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, C., E-mail: Chris.Harrington@ccfe.ac.uk

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A fully dynamic model of the balance of plant systems for pulsed DEMO is presented. • An operating strategy for handling pulse/dwell transitions has been devised. • Operation of a water-cooled system without energy storage appears feasible. • Steam turbine cycling can be minimised if rotation speed is maintained. - Abstract: The current baseline concept for a European DEMO defines a pulsed reactor producing power for periods of 2–4 h at a time, interrupted by dwell periods of approximately half an hour, potentially leading to cyclic fatigue of the heat transfer system and power generation equipment. Thermal energy storage systems could mitigate pulsing issues; however, the requirements for such a system cannot be defined without first understanding the challenges for pulsed operation, while any system will simultaneously increase the cost and complexity of the balance of plant. This work therefore presents a dynamic model of the primary heat transfer system and associated steam plant for a water-cooled DEMO, without energy storage, capable of simulating pulsed plant operation. An operating regime is defined such that the primary coolant flows continuously throughout the dwell period while the secondary steam flow is reduced. Simulation results show minimised thermal and pressure transients in the primary circuit, and small thermally induced stresses on the steam turbine rotor. If the turbine can be kept spinning to also minimise mechanical cycling, pulsed operation of a water-cooled DEMO without thermal energy storage may be feasible.

  10. Non-destructive examination of the bonding interface in DEMO divertor fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richou, Marianne; Missirlian, Marc; Vignal, Nicolas; Cantone, Vincent; Hernandez, Caroline; Norajitra, Prachai; Spatafora, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • SATIR tests on DEMO divertor fingers (integrating or not He cooling system). • Millimeter size artificial defects were manufactured. • Detectability of millimeter size artificial defects was evaluated. • SATIR can detect defect in DEMO divertor fingers. • Simulations are well correlated to SATIR tests. -- Abstract: Plasma facing components (PFCs) with tungsten (W) armor materials for DEMO divertor require a high heat flux removal capability (at least 10 MW/m 2 in steady-state conditions). The reference divertor PFC concept is a finger with a tungsten tile as a protection and sacrificial layer brazed to a thimble made of tungsten alloy W – 1% La 2 O 3 (WL10). Defects may be located at the W thimble to W tile interface. As the number of fingers is considerable (>250,000), it is then a major issue to develop a reliable control procedure in order to control with a non-destructive examination the fabrication processes. The feasibility for detecting defect with infrared thermography SATIR test bed is presented. SATIR is based on the heat transient method and is used as an inspection tool in order to assess component heat transfer capability. SATIR tests were performed on fingers integrating or not the complex He cooling system (steel cartridge with jet holes). Millimeter size artificial defects were manufactured and their detectability was evaluated. Results of this study demonstrate that the SATIR method can be considered as a relevant non-destructive technique examination for the defect detection of DEMO divertor fingers

  11. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I.G.; Akers, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis...

  12. The Monte Carlo approach to the economics of a DEMO-like power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustreo, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.bustreo@igi.cnr.it; Bolzonella, Tommaso; Zollino, Giuseppe

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A steady state DEMO-like power plant is modelled with the FRESCO code. • The Monte Carlo method is used to assess the probability distribution of the COE. • Uncertainties on technical and economical aspects make the COE vary in a large range. • The COE can be nearly 2/3 to nearly 4 times the cost derived deterministically. - Abstract: An early assessment of the economics of a fusion power plant is a key step to ensure the technology viability in a future global energy system. The FRESCO code is here used to generate the technical, physical and economic model of a steady state DEMO-like power plant whose features are taken from the current European research activities on the DEMO design definition. The Monte Carlo method is used to perform stochastic analyses in order to assess the weight on the cost of electricity of uncertainties on technical and economical aspects. This study demonstrates that a stochastic approach offers a much better perspective over the spectrum of values that could be expected for the cost of electricity from fusion. Specifically, this analysis proves that the cost of electricity of the DEMO-like power plant studied could vary in quite large range, from nearly 2/3 to nearly 4 times the cost derived through a deterministic approach, by choosing reference values for all the stochastic parameters, taken from the literature.

  13. Overview of Progress on the EU DEMO Reactor Magnet System Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zani, L.; Bayer, C.; biancolini, M.E.; Bonifetto, R.; Nijhuis, Arend; Yagotintsev, K.

    2016-01-01

    The DEMO reactor is expected to be the first application of fusion for electricity generation in the near future. To this aim, conceptual design activities are progressing in Europe (EU) under the lead of the EUROfusion Consortium in order to drive on the development of the major tokamak systems. In

  14. Preliminary concept design of the divertor remote handling system for DEMO power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carfora, D., E-mail: dario.carfora@gmail.com [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); ENEA/CREATE/University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Di Gironimo, G. [ENEA/CREATE/University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Järvenpää, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Huhtala, K. [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Määttä, T.; Siuko, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Concept design of the RH system for the DEMO fusion power plant. • Divertor Mover: Hydraulic telescopic boom concept design. An alternative solution to ITER rack and pinion divertor mover (CMM). • Divertor cassettes end effector studies. • Transportation cask conceptual studies and logistic. - Abstract: This paper is based on the remote maintenance system project (WPRM) for the demonstration fusion power reactor (DEMO). Following ITER, DEMO aims to confirm the capability of generating several hundred of MW of net electricity by 2050. The main objective of these activities is to develop an efficient and reliable remote handling (RH) system for replacing the divertor cassettes. This paper presents the preliminary results of the concept design of the divertor RH system. The proposed divertor mover is a hydraulic telescopic boom driven from the transportation cask through the maintenance tunnel of the reactor. The boom is divided in three sections of 4 m each, and it is driving an end-effector in order to perform the scheduled operations of maintenance inside the vacuum vessel. Two alternative design of the end effector to grip and manipulate the divertor cassette are also presented in this work. Both the concepts are hydraulically actuated, basing on the ITER previous studies. The divertor cassette end-effector consists of a lifting arm linked to the divertor mover, a tilting plate, a cantilever arm and a hook-plate. The main objective of this paper is to illustrate the feasibility of DEMO divertor remote maintenance operations.

  15. Self-Assembly of Rod-Coil Block Copolymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jenekhe, S

    1999-01-01

    ... the self-assembly of new rod-coil diblock, rod- coil-rod triblock, and coil-rod-coil triblock copolymers from solution and the resulting discrete and periodic mesostmctares with sizes in the 100...

  16. Poloidal electric field and variation of radial transport during ICRF heating in the JET scrape-off layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, S.; Tagle, J.A.; Bures, M.; Vince, J.; Kock, L. de; Stangeby, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    The highly anomalous perpendicular transport in the plasma edge of a tokamak is generally attributed to plasma turbulence, primarily to density and electrostatic potential fluctuations. The edge transport could be modified by changing the geometry of objects in contact with the plasma (limiters, radio frequency antennae ...) and during additional heating experiments. Poloidal asymmetries in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks using poloidal limiters (eg. ALCATOR-C) have been recently reported, indicating a poloidal asymmetry in cross-field transport. A poloidal ring limiter obstructs communications between different flux tubes in the SOL, thus permitting poloidal asymmetries in n e and T e to develop if D perpendicular is θ-dependent. When JET was operated with discrete limiters, equivalent to a single toroidal limiter at the outside mid-plane, little poloidal variation in the SOL plasma properties was observed. Currently JET is operated with two complete toroidal belt limiters located approximately one meter above and below the outside mid-plane. This configuration breaks the SOL into two regions: the low field side SOL (LFS), between the limiters, and the rest of the SOL on the high field side (HFS). Differences on the scrape-off lengths in the two SOLs are reported here, indicating that cross-field transport is faster on the LFS-SOL, in agreement with observations made on ASDEX and T-10. (author) 8 refs., 6 figs

  17. DEMO relevance of the test blanket modules in ITER-Application to the European test blanket modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnani, E.; Gabriel, F.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Li-Puma, A.

    2010-01-01

    Test blanket module (TBM) testing programme in ITER as a support to DEMO design is a very important step on the road map to commercial fusion reactors although it is an ambitious task. Finding as much as possible DEMO relevant tests in view of the future DEMO blanket design is therefore a major goal since ITER and DEMO environment and loading conditions are different. To clarify and quantify the meaning of the DEMO relevance, criteria using a structural, functional and behavioural representation of the breeding blanket acting as a system are investigated. Then, a three-step strategy is proposed to carry out TBM DEMO relevant tests associated with a TBM design modification strategy. Key parameters should intensively be used as target for TBM characterization and numerical code validation. When assessing the relevance, on the other hand, not only the actual difference between DEMO and ITER values should be considered, but also whether the analyzed phenomena have a threshold and a range of applicability, as numerical simulations are usually permitted within these limits. The proposed methodology is at the end applied to the design of the HCLL TBM breeding unit configuration.

  18. Preliminary analysis of K-DEMO thermal hydraulic system using MELCOR; Parametric study of hydrogen explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Bo; Lim, Soo Min; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    K-DEMO (Korean fusion demonstration reactor) is future reactor for the commercializing the fusion power generation. The Design of K-DEMO is similar to that of ITER but the fusion energy generation is much bigger because ITER is experimental reactor. For this reason, K-DEMO uses more fusion reaction with bigger amount of tritium. Higher fusion power means more neutron generation that can irradiate the structure around fusion plasma. Fusion reactor can produce many kinds of radioactive material in the accident. Because of this hazard, preliminary safety analysis is mandatory before its construction. Concern for safety problem of accident of fusion/fission reactor has been growing after Fukushima accident which is severe accident from unexpected disaster. To model the primary heat transfer system, in this study, MARS-KS thermal hydraulic analysis is referred. Lee et al. and Kim et al. conducted thermal hydraulic analysis using MARS-KS and multiple module simulation to deal with the phenomena of first wall corrosion for each plasma pulse. This study shows the relationship between vacuum vessel rupture area and source term leakage after hydrogen explosion. For the conservative study, first wall heating is not terminated because the heating inside the vacuum vessel increase the pressure inside VV. Pressurizer, steam generator and turbine is not damaged. 6.69 kg of tritiated water (HTO) and 1 ton of dust is modeled which is ITER guideline. The entire system of K-DEMO is smaller than that of ITER. For this reason, lots of aerosol is release into environment although the safety system like DS is maintained. This result shows that the safety system of K-DEMO should use much more safety system.

  19. Updated conceptual design of helium cooling ceramic blanket for HCCB-DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Suhao [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Cao, Qixiang; Wu, Xinghua; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Guoshu [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Feng, Kaiming, E-mail: fengkm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An updated design of Helium Cooled Ceramic breeder Blanket (HCCB) for HCCB-DEMO is proposed in this paper. • The Breeder Unit is transformed to TBM-like sub-modules, with double “banana” shape tritium breeder. Each sub-module is inserted in space formed by Stiffen Grids (SGs). • The performance analysis is performed based on the R&D development of material, fabrication technology and safety assessment in CN ITER TBM program. • Hot spots will be located at the FW bend side. - Abstract: The basic definition of the HCCB-DEMO plant and preliminary blanket designed by Southwestern Institution of Physics was proposed in 2009. The DEMO fusion power is 2550 MW and electric power is 800 MW. Based on development of R&D in breeding blanket, a conceptual design of helium cooled blanket with ceramic breeder in HCCB-DEMO was presented. The main design features of the HCCB-DEMO blanket were: (1) CLF-1 structure materials, Be multiplier and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} breeder; (2) neutronic wall load is 2.3 MW/m{sup 2} and surface heat flux is 0.43 MW/m{sup 2} (2) TBR ≈ 1.15; (3) geometry of breeding units is ITER TBM-like segmentation; (4)Pressure of helium is 8 MPa and inlet/outlet temperature is 300/500 °C. On the basis of these design, some important analytical results are presented in aspects of (i) neutronic behavior of the blanket; (ii) design of 3D structure and thermal-hydraulic lay-out for breeding blanket module; (iii) structural-mechanical behavior of the blanket under pressurization. All of these assessments proved current stucture fulfill the design requirements.

  20. European DEMO divertor target: Operational requirements and material-design interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. You

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an integrated program of conceptual design activities for the European DEMO reactor was launched in the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium, where reliable power handling capability was identified as one of the most critical scientific as well as technological challenges for a DEMO reactor. The divertor is the key in-vessel plasma-facing component being in charge of power exhaust and removal of impurity particles. The DEMO divertor target will have to withstand extreme thermal loads where the local peak heat flux is expected to reach up to 20 MW/m2 during slow transient events in DEMO. To assure sufficient heat removal capability of the divertor target against normal and transient operational scenarios under expected cumulative neutron dose of up to 13 dpa is one of the fundamental engineering challenges imposed on target design. To develop the design of the DEMO divertor and related technologies, an R&D work package ‘Divertor’ has been set up in this consortium. The subproject ‘Target Development’ is devoted to the development of the conceptual design and the core technologies of the plasma-facing target. Devising and implementing novel structural heat sink materials (e.g. W/Cu composites to advanced target design concepts is one of the major objectives of this subproject. In this paper, the underlying design requirements imposed by the envisaged power exhaust goal and the prominent material-design interface issues are discussed. In addition, the candidate design concepts being currently considered are presented together with the related material issues. Finally, the first results achieved so far are presented.

  1. Coil Migration through a Neuroform 3 Stent during Endovascular Coiling. A Case Report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, A

    2009-07-29

    Summary: A 43-year-old woman attended for stent assisted coiling. A Neuroform 30 x 4.5 mm stent had been successfully placed over the left periophthalmic aneurysm. During the coiling the first coil migrated through the crowns in the stent, lodging at the MCA bifurcation. We believe that the coil herniated through the overlying stent due to the carotid siphon curvature and the open cell design. Furthermore the distal markers of the stent impeded coil extraction with a MERCI device.

  2. An inflatable surface coil for rectal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.F.; Hajek, P.C.; Baker, L.L.; Gylys-Morin, V.; Mattrey, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Surface coils have become ubiquitous in MR imaging of the body because of substantial gains in signal-to-noise ratio. Unfortunately, there are some anatomic regions, such as the prostate, for which surface coils have insufficient depth sensitivity. The authors have developed an inflatable, distributed capacitance, passively decoupled surface coil which is collapsed for insertion and reinflated for imaging. Images of the prostate are dramatically improved due to proximity of the coil. Lesions in cadaver specimens were observed which were not seen with body coil imaging. Clinical trials are expected to begin in September

  3. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1978-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started in aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pulsed coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  4. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1977-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started an aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pusled coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  5. Performance evaluation of matrix gradient coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Schultz, Gerrit; Testud, Frederik; Welz, Anna Masako; Weber, Hans; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new performance measure of a matrix coil (also known as multi-coil) from the perspective of efficient, local, non-linear encoding without explicitly considering target encoding fields. An optimization problem based on a joint optimization for the non-linear encoding fields is formulated. Based on the derived objective function, a figure of merit of a matrix coil is defined, which is a generalization of a previously known resistive figure of merit for traditional gradient coils. A cylindrical matrix coil design with a high number of elements is used to illustrate the proposed performance measure. The results are analyzed to reveal novel features of matrix coil designs, which allowed us to optimize coil parameters, such as number of coil elements. A comparison to a scaled, existing multi-coil is also provided to demonstrate the use of the proposed performance parameter. The assessment of a matrix gradient coil profits from using a single performance parameter that takes the local encoding performance of the coil into account in relation to the dissipated power.

  6. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  7. Evaluation of inductive heating energy of a PF insert coil conductor by the calorimetric method (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Kunihiro; Nabara, Yoshihiro; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Okuno, Kiyoshi

    2009-02-01

    The PF Insert Coil is a single layer solenoid coil using a superconducting conductor designed for ITER, housed in a Poloidal field coil and installed in the bore of the CS Model Coil. A stability test of the conductor will be performed in a magnetic field generated by the CS Model Coil. In this test, the inductive heat of an inductive heater attached to the conductor will be applied to initiate a normal zone in the conductor. Since the conductor for the PF Insert Coil is a cable-in-conduit conductor, it is quite difficult to estimate inductive heating energy theoretically. Thus, the inductive heating energy is measured experimentally by the calorimetric method. The heating energy is in proportion to a constant multiplied by the integrated square of an applied sinusoidal current wave over the heating period. Experimental results show that the proportional constants of the conductor, cable, conduit and dummy conductor are 0.138 [J/A 2 s], 0.028 [J/A 2 s], 0.118 [J/A 2 s] and 0.009 [J/A 2 s], respectively. The first three denote not only the inductive heating but also the joule heating of the inductive heater. The final value denotes joule heating only. Therefore, subtracting the first three constants by the last one, the proportional constants of inductive heating generated in the conductor, cable and conduit are estimated to be 0.129 [J/A 2 s], 0.019 [J/A 2 s] and 0.109 [J/A 2 s], respectively. (author)

  8. Heat loads on poloidal and toroidal edges of castellated plasma-facing components in COMPASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejarnac, R.; Corre, Y.; Vondracek, P.; Gaspar, J.; Gauthier, E.; Gunn, J. P.; Komm, M.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Horacek, J.; Hron, M.; Matejicek, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Panek, R.

    2018-06-01

    Dedicated experiments have been performed in the COMPASS tokamak to thoroughly study the power deposition processes occurring on poloidal and toroidal edges of castellated plasma-facing components in tokamaks during steady-state L-mode conditions. Surface temperatures measured by a high resolution infra-red camera are compared with reconstructed synthetic data from a 2D thermal model using heat flux profiles derived from both the optical approximation and 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In the case of poloidal leading edges, when the contribution from local radiation is taken into account, the parallel heat flux deduced from unperturbed, upstream measurements is fully consistent with the observed temperature increase at the leading edges of various heights, respecting power balance assuming simple projection of the parallel flux density. Smoothing of the heat flux deposition profile due to finite ion Larmor radius predicted by the PIC simulations is found to be weak and the power deposition on misaligned poloidal edges is better described by the optical approximation. This is consistent with an electron-dominated regime associated with a non-ambipolar parallel current flow. In the case of toroidal gap edges, the different contributions of the total incoming flux along the gap have been observed experimentally for the first time. They confirm the results of recent numerical studies performed for ITER showing that in specific cases the heat deposition does not necessarily follow the optical approximation. Indeed, ions can spiral onto the magnetically shadowed toroidal edge. Particle-in-cell simulations emphasize again the role played by local non-ambipolarity in the deposition pattern.

  9. Second harmonic poloidal waves observed by Van Allen Probes in the dusk-midnight sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Kyungguk; Takahashi, Kazue; Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr Y.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents observations of ultralow-frequency (ULF) waves from Van Allen Probes. The event that generated the ULF waves occurred 2 days after a minor geomagnetic storm during a geomagnetically quiet time. Narrowband pulsations with a frequency of about 7 mHz with moderate amplitudes were registered in the premidnight sector when Probe A was passing through an enhanced density region near geosynchronous orbit. Probe B, which passed through the region earlier, did not detect the narrowband pulsations but only broadband noise. Despite the single-spacecraft measurements, we were able to determine various wave properties. We find that the observed waves are a second harmonic poloidal mode propagating westward with an azimuthal wave number estimated to be ~100; the magnetic field fluctuations have a finite compressional component due to small but finite plasma beta (~0.1); the energetic proton fluxes in the energy ranging from above 10 keV to about 100 keV exhibit pulsations with the same frequency as the poloidal mode and energy-dependent phase delays relative to the azimuthal component of the electric field, providing evidence for drift-bounce resonance; and the second harmonic poloidal mode may have been excited via the drift-bounce resonance mechanism with free energy fed by the inward radial gradient of ~80 keV protons. Here, we show that the wave active region is where the plume overlaps the outer edge of ring current and suggest that this region can have a wide longitudinal extent near geosynchronous orbit.

  10. Conformational switching in the coiled-coil domains of a proteasomal ATPase regulates substrate processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoberger, Aaron; Brettrager, Evan J; Smith, David M

    2018-06-18

    Protein degradation in all domains of life requires ATPases that unfold and inject proteins into compartmentalized proteolytic chambers. Proteasomal ATPases in eukaryotes and archaea contain poorly understood N-terminally conserved coiled-coil domains. In this study, we engineer disulfide crosslinks in the coiled-coils of the archaeal proteasomal ATPase (PAN) and report that its three identical coiled-coil domains can adopt three different conformations: (1) in-register and zipped, (2) in-register and partially unzipped, and (3) out-of-register. This conformational heterogeneity conflicts with PAN's symmetrical OB-coiled-coil crystal structure but resembles the conformational heterogeneity of the 26S proteasomal ATPases' coiled-coils. Furthermore, we find that one coiled-coil can be conformationally constrained even while unfolding substrates, and conformational changes in two of the coiled-coils regulate PAN switching between resting and active states. This switching functionally mimics similar states proposed for the 26S proteasome from cryo-EM. These findings thus build a mechanistic framework to understand regulation of proteasome activity.

  11. Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.; Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Initial feasibility studies of a number of configurations for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) resulted in the selection of a resistive copper continuous-coil torsatron as the optimum device considering the physics program, cost, and schedule. Further conceptual design work was directed toward optimization of this configuration and, if possible, a shorter schedule. It soon became obvious that in order to shorten the schedule, a number of design and fabrication activities should proceed in parallel. This was most critical for the vacuum vessel and the helical field (HF) coils. If the HF coils were wound in place on a completed vacuum vessel, the overall schedule would be significantly (greater than or equal to12 months) longer. The approach of parallel scheduel paths requires that the HF coils be segmented into parts of less than or equal to180 0 of poloidal angle and that joints be made on a turn-by-turn basis when the segments are installed. It was obvious from the outset that the compact and complex geometry of the joint design presented a special challenge in the areas of reliability, assembly, maintenance, disassembly, and cost. Also, electrical, thermal, and force excursions are significant for these joints. A number of soldered, welded, brazed, electroplated, and bolted joints were evaluated. The evaluations examined fabrication feasibility and complexity, thermal-electrical performance at approximately two-thirds of the steady-state design conditions, and installation and assembly processes. Results of the thermal-electrical tests were analyzed and extrapolated to predict performance at peak design parameters. The final selection was a lap-type joint clamped with insulated bolts that pass through the winding packing. 3 refs., 4 figs

  12. Development of two color laser diagnostics for the ITER poloidal polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahata, K; Akiyama, T; Tanaka, K; Nakayama, K; Okajima, S

    2010-10-01

    Two color laser diagnostics using terahertz laser sources are under development for a high performance operation of the Large Helical Device and for future fusion devices such as ITER. So far, we have achieved high power laser oscillation lines simultaneously oscillating at 57.2 and 47.7 μm by using a twin optically pumped CH(3)OD laser, and confirmed the original function, compensation of mechanical vibration, of the two color laser interferometer. In this article, application of the two color laser diagnostics to the ITER poloidal polarimeter and recent hardware developments will be described.

  13. Development of two color laser diagnostics for the ITER poloidal polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahata, K.; Akiyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nakayama, K.; Okajima, S.

    2010-01-01

    Two color laser diagnostics using terahertz laser sources are under development for a high performance operation of the Large Helical Device and for future fusion devices such as ITER. So far, we have achieved high power laser oscillation lines simultaneously oscillating at 57.2 and 47.7 μm by using a twin optically pumped CH 3 OD laser, and confirmed the original function, compensation of mechanical vibration, of the two color laser interferometer. In this article, application of the two color laser diagnostics to the ITER poloidal polarimeter and recent hardware developments will be described.

  14. Development of a Closed Loop Simulator for Poloidal Field Control in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.A. Leuer; M.L. Walker; D.A. Humphreys; J.R. Ferron; A. Nerem; B.G. Penaflor

    1999-01-01

    The design of a model-based simulator of the DIII-D poloidal field system is presented. The simulator is automatically configured to match a particular DIII-D discharge circuit. The simulator can be run in a data input mode, in which prior acquired DIII-D shot data is input to the simulator, or in a stand-alone predictive mode, in which the model operates in closed loop with the plasma control system. The simulator is used to design and validate a multi-input-multi-output controller which has been implemented on DIII-D to control plasma shape. Preliminary experimental controller results are presented

  15. Self-similar solutions for poloidal magnetic field in turbulent jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarov, S.S.; Ovchinnikov, I.L.

    1990-01-01

    Evolution of a large-scale magnetic field in a turbulent extragalactic source radio jets is considered. Self-similar solutions for a weak poloidal magnetic field transported by turbulent jet of incompressible fluid are found. It is shown that the radial profiles of the solutions are the eigenfunctions of a linear differential operator. In all the solutions, the strength of a large-scale field decreases more rapidly than that of a small-scale turbulent field. This can be understood as a decay of a large-scale field in the turbulent jet

  16. Fast particles confinement in stellarators with both poloidal-pseudo-symmetry and quasi-isodynamicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, M.I.; Yamazaki, K.

    2004-04-01

    By analytical and computational consideration it is shown that the condition of quasi-isodynamicity for the configurations with poloidal direction of the contours of the magnetic field strength on the magnetic surfaces can be fulfilled with high enough accuracy for compact configuration. It is shown that for the configurations with toroidal direction of these contours the condition of quasi-isodynamicity is equivalent to the condition of quasi-symmetry, so that there is no the gap between these two conditions. The further optimization is required to stabilize the ballooning modes in the considered configuration. (author)

  17. Fast time resolution charge-exchange measurements during the fishbone instability in the poloidal divertor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Kaita, R.; Goldston, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of fast ion losses due to the fishbone instability during high β/sub T/q neutral beam heated discharges in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment have been made using two new vertical-viewing charge-exchange analyzers. The measurements show that the instability has an n=1 toroidal mode number, and that it ejects beam ions in a toroidally rotating beacon directed outward along a major radius. Observations of ejected ions with energies up to twice the beam injection energy at R approx. = R 0 + a indicate the presence of a non-μ-conserving acceleration mechanism

  18. Mirnov coil data analysis for tokamak ADITYA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    i.e. a superposition of cosinusoids of mode number СР rotating having frequency Р and amplitude Р, with an additional white noise of amplitude was considered. The sig- nal was detected at Е equidistant poloidal positions with a sampling time Ш×. Algorithm. 728. Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. 55, Nos 5 & 6, Nov. & Dec. 2000 ...

  19. First disruption studies and simulations in view of the development of the DEMO Physics Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramogida, G., E-mail: giuseppe.ramogida@enea.it [ENEA for EUROfusion, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [ENEA for EUROfusion, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Villone, F. [University of Cassino Consorzio CREATE, Cassino (Italy); Albanese, R. [University Federico II Consorzio CREATE, Naples (Italy); Barbato, L. [University of Cassino Consorzio CREATE, Cassino (Italy); Crisanti, F. [ENEA for EUROfusion, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Mastrostefano, S. [University of Cassino Consorzio CREATE, Cassino (Italy); Mazzuca, R. [ENEA for EUROfusion, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Palmaccio, R. [University of Cassino Consorzio CREATE, Cassino (Italy); Rubinacci, G.; Ventre, S. [University Federico II Consorzio CREATE, Naples (Italy); Wenninger, R. [IPP, Garching (Germany); EFDA, Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The prediction of disruption features and loads is essential in the design of DEMO. • Different disruptions need to be simulated to evaluate the EM and thermal loads. • Extrapolation of the thermal quench duration to DEMO gives values from 0.8 to 1.1 ms. • Extrapolation of the current quench duration to DEMO gives values from 47 to 107 ms. • First CarMa0NL simulations points out the effect of large 3D conductive structures. - Abstract: In the development of the DEMO Physics Basis an important role is played by the prediction of the plasma disruption features and by the evaluation of the electro-magnetic (EM) and thermal loads associated with these events. Indeed, the kind and number of foreseen plasma disruptions drive the development of the DEMO operation scenarios and the design of vessel and in-vessel components. To characterize a plausible macroscopic plasma dynamics during these events, we will carry out an extrapolation from present-day machines of the main parameters characterizing the disruptions: thermal and current quench time, evolution of plasma current, β and l{sub i}, safety factor limits, halo current fraction and width, radiated heat fraction. In particular, we will focus on extrapolations for the thermal and current quench characteristic times, due to their importance for the subsequent simulations aimed at the evaluation of the EM and thermal loads. The different options for DEMO design will be taken into account and the possible range of variation of the parameters will be estimated. The 2D axysimmetric MAXFEA and the 3D CarMa0NL codes will be used to evaluate the effects of the induced currents and the EM loads during a disruptive event and to analyze the various design options obtained by the PROCESS code. The results of these simulations, modeled as worst expected events, will be used as input for the system level analysis and design of the vessel and relevant in-vessel components. First simulations with CarMa0NL code

  20. DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF A SCORE™ DEMO2.1 THERMO-ACOUSTIC ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAIMAN CHEN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The early low-cost, wood burning Thermo-Acoustic Engine (TAE known as Demo2.0-build-1 was developed by SCORE™ at the UK Centre and was capable of achieving 22.7 Watts of electricity. This prototype was limited to an operating temperature of about 300oC and due to excessive leaks could not operate continuously above ambient pressure. To absorb a thermal heat input of 4.4 kW from the burning wood so as to fulfil the required acoustic power, the Hot Heat Exchanger (HHX requires heating to the highest possible temperature. Therefore, a corrugated stainless steel plate HHX design that maximises heating surface area was adopted to the current Demo2 TAE design. In addition, the system is often pressurised to achieve higher acoustic intensity. Rigorous sealing of the system at high temperature is also required. A Demo2.1 TAE design based on the Demo2 TAE design and its prototype which is developed recently by the SCORE™ Centre in Malaysia was successfully constructed and well integrated with the stove. During the early construction and assembly process, fabrication difficulties and serious leak problems around the HHX’s edges were found when the apparatus operated at high temperatures. This is because the uneven geometrical HHX (convolution profile makes it difficult and relatively costly to be sealed. The Demo2.1 TAE is focused on the sealing efficiency and effective manufacturing cost by meantime to allow further modification variation. The design was made to adopt the local manufacturing technologies and materials available or easy to access in Malaysia. It also aims to minimise the parasitic heat losses to lower the system onset temperature. By removing the Linear Alternator and Tuning Volume from the system, preliminary measurements shown that the apparatus was oscillating at the frequency of 70 Hz. A much lower onset temperature was observed at around 144oC for the new configuration when the apparatus was oscillating at approximately 200 Pa