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Sample records for demembranated cardiac muscle

  1. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial function. Therefore, this study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in the smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cardiac......, skeletal, and smooth muscle was harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53±6 yrs) and mitochondrial respiration assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I+II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (54±1; 39±4; 15......±1 pmol•s(-1)•mg (-1), psmooth muscle (222±13; 115±2; 48±2 umol•g(-1)•min(-1), p

  2. Clofibrate, calcium and cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhurst, A S; Wickie, G; Peabody, T

    1982-03-01

    The anti-hyperlipidemic drug clofibrate produces negative inotropic effects and arrythmias in isolated perfused rabbit heart Langendorff preparations. In electrically stimulated rat left atria, clofibrate produces negative inotropic effects, the speed of onset and extent of which are decreased by raising the Ca concentration of the bathing medium. Sensitivity of isolated rat atria to clofibrate is not increased when the tissues are stimulated under slow Ca channel conditions, in which the tissues are activated by either isoproterenol or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, although sensitivity to clofibrate is decreased when atria are exposed to increasing concentrations of norepinephrine. Increasing the stimulation frequency of isolated guinea-pig atria to produce a positive treppe also decreases the inhibitory effect of clofibrate, while in rat atria the typical negative treppe is altered towards a positive treppe in presence of clofibrate. The effects of paired electrical stimulation are not diminished by the drug, suggesting that Ca release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum is not affected by clofibrate, although the drug inhibits the rate of Ca uptake by isolated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. These results suggest that clofibrate has multiple effects on Ca functions in cardiac muscle.

  3. Cross-bridge versus thin filament contributions to the level and rate of force development in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, M; Martin, H; Barsotti, R J; Rivera, A J; Martyn, D A; Clemmens, E

    2004-09-01

    In striated muscle thin filament activation is initiated by Ca(2+) binding to troponin C and augmented by strong myosin binding to actin (cross-bridge formation). Several lines of evidence have led us to hypothesize that thin filament properties may limit the level and rate of force development in cardiac muscle at all levels of Ca(2+) activation. As a test of this hypothesis we varied the cross-bridge contribution to thin filament activation by substituting 2 deoxy-ATP (dATP; a strong cross-bridge augmenter) for ATP as the contractile substrate and compared steady-state force and stiffness, and the rate of force redevelopment (k(tr)) in demembranated rat cardiac trabeculae as [Ca(2+)] was varied. We also tested whether thin filament dynamics limits force development kinetics during maximal Ca(2+) activation by comparing the rate of force development (k(Ca)) after a step increase in [Ca(2+)] with photorelease of Ca(2+) from NP-EGTA to maximal k(tr), where Ca(2+) binding to thin filaments should be in (near) equilibrium during force redevelopment. dATP enhanced steady-state force and stiffness at all levels of Ca(2+) activation. At similar submaximal levels of steady-state force there was no increase in k(tr) with dATP, but k(tr) was enhanced at higher Ca(2+) concentrations, resulting in an extension (not elevation) of the k(tr)-force relationship. Interestingly, we found that maximal k(tr) was faster than k(Ca), and that dATP increased both by a similar amount. Our data suggest the dynamics of Ca(2+)-mediated thin filament activation limits the rate that force develops in rat cardiac muscle, even at saturating levels of Ca(2+).

  4. Cardiac Muscle Studies with Rat Ventricular Strips

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    Whitten, Bert K.; Faleschini, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    Details undergraduate physiology laboratory experiments that demonstrate mechanical properties of cardiac muscle, using strips from the ventricle of a rat heart. Includes procedures for obtaining length-tension curves, demonstrating the role of calcium in excitation-contraction coupling, and showing effects of several cardiovascular drugs…

  5. Contractile Properties of Esophageal Striated Muscle: Comparison with Cardiac and Skeletal Muscles in Rats

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    Takahiko Shiina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The external muscle layer of the mammalian esophagus consists of striated muscles. We investigated the contractile properties of esophageal striated muscle by comparison with those of skeletal and cardiac muscles. Electrical field stimulation with single pulses evoked twitch-like contractile responses in esophageal muscle, similar to those in skeletal muscle in duration and similar to those in cardiac muscle in amplitude. The contractions of esophageal muscle were not affected by an inhibitor of gap junctions. Contractile responses induced by high potassium or caffeine in esophageal muscle were analogous to those in skeletal muscle. High-frequency stimulation induced a transient summation of contractions followed by sustained contractions with amplitudes similar to those of twitch-like contractions, although a large summation was observed in skeletal muscle. The results demonstrate that esophageal muscle has properties similar but not identical to those of skeletal muscle and that some specific properties may be beneficial for esophageal peristalsis.

  6. Muscle ring finger 1 mediates cardiac atrophy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Rojas, Mauricio; Li, Luge; Selzman, Craig H; Tang, Ru-Hang; Stansfield, William E; Rodriguez, Jessica E; Glass, David J; Patterson, Cam

    2009-04-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, induced by various etiologies such as high blood pressure and aortic stenosis, develops in response to increased afterload and represents a common intermediary in the development of heart failure. Understandably then, the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy is associated with a significant reduction in cardiovascular event risk and represents an important, yet underdeveloped, target of therapeutic research. Recently, we determined that muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1), a muscle-specific protein, inhibits the development of experimentally induced pathological; cardiac hypertrophy. We now demonstrate that therapeutic cardiac atrophy induced in patients after left ventricular assist device placement is associated with an increase in cardiac MuRF1 expression. This prompted us to investigate the role of MuRF1 in two independent mouse models of cardiac atrophy: 1) cardiac hypertrophy regression after reversal of transaortic constriction (TAC) reversal and 2) dexamethasone-induced atrophy. Using echocardiographic, histological, and gene expression analyses, we found that upon TAC release, cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional areas in MuRF1(-/-) mice decreased approximately 70% less than in wild type mice in the 4 wk after release. This was in striking contrast to wild-type mice, who returned to baseline cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte size within 4 days of TAC release. Despite these differences in atrophic remodeling, the transcriptional activation of cardiac hypertrophy measured by beta-myosin heavy chain, smooth muscle actin, and brain natriuretic peptide was attenuated similarly in both MuRF1(-/-) and wild-type hearts after TAC release. In the second model, MuRF1(-/-) mice also displayed resistance to dexamethasone-induced cardiac atrophy, as determined by echocardiographic analysis. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that MuRF1 is essential for cardiac atrophy in vivo, both in the setting of therapeutic

  7. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    André Luiz Lisboa Cordeiro; Thiago Araújo de Melo; Daniela Neves; Julianne Luna; Mateus Souza Esquivel; André Raimundo França Guimarães; Daniel Lago Borges; Jefferson Petto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective: To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods: This is a clinical randomized controlled tri...

  8. Detection of Trabeculae and Papillary Muscles in Cardiac MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Bangma, S.J.; Meerwaldt, R.J.H.W.; Vonken, E.J.; Breeuwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    With the improvement of the quality of MR imagery, more and more details become visible. Only 5-10 years ago cardiac images of the heart were still so unsharp that finer details of the heart like the papillary muscles and the trabeculae were hardly visible and it was simply impossible to determine their outlines with any measure of accuracy. With the improved image quality it becomes feasible to extract information about these small structures. Studying the operation of these tiny muscles can...

  9. Nicotiana ovule extracts in duce nuclear reconstitution of demembranated Xenopus sperm in cell-free system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    s Nicotiana tabaccum ovule extracts induced nuclear reconstitution of demembranated Xenopus leavis sperm in a ceil-free system. Demembranated Xenopus sperm began to swell after 15 rmin of incubation with Nicotiana ovulde extracts. Accompanying the process of incubation,Xenopus sperm decondensed and their shapes changed gradually from long and ellipse to round. The completely decondensed chromatin was surrounded with membrane structure, which was a mixture envelope of a double membrane and a single membrane. Nucleosome assembly was verified by means of micrococcal nuclease digestion to reconstituted nuclei and DNA electrophoresis. Nicotiana ovule extracts supplied one more experimental model and system.The new system could promote powerfully the research on mechanisms of cell division and cell cycle regulation.

  10. Nuclear reconstitution of demembranated Orychophragmus violaceus sperm in Xenopus laevis egg extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Ping(卢萍); REN; Min(任民); ZHAI; Zhonghe(翟中和)

    2002-01-01

    The cell-free extracts from animal Xenopus laevis egg could induce chromatin decon- densation and pronuclear formation from demembranated plant (Orychophragmus violaceus)sperm. The demembranated Orychophragmus violaceus sperm began to swell in 30 min incubation, and then were gradually decondensed. The reassembly of nuclear envelope in the reconstituted nuclei had been visualized by means of electron microscopy and fluorescent microscopy. Membrane vesicles fused to form the double envelope around the periphery of the decondensed chromatin. The morphology of the newly formed nucleus, with a double membrane, was similar to those nuclei after fertilization. Transmission electron microscope micrograph of the whole mount prepared nuclear matrix-lamina showed the reconstituted nucleus to be filled with a dense network.

  11. Detection of Trabeculae and Papillary Muscles in Cardiac MR Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Bangma, S.J.; Meerwaldt, R.J.H.W.; Vonken, E.J.; Breeuwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    With the improvement of the quality of MR imagery, more and more details become visible. Only 5-10 years ago cardiac images of the heart were still so unsharp that finer details of the heart like the papillary muscles and the trabeculae were hardly visible and it was simply impossible to determine

  12. Detection of Trabeculae and Papillary Muscles in Cardiac MR Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, L.J.; Bangma, S.J.; Meerwaldt, R.J.H.W.; Vonken, E.J.; Breeuwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    With the improvement of the quality of MR imagery, more and more details become visible. Only 5-10 years ago cardiac images of the heart were still so unsharp that finer details of the heart like the papillary muscles and the trabeculae were hardly visible and it was simply impossible to determine t

  13. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL−1 for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL−1. The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle.

  14. Strategies to Study Desmin in Cardiac Muscle and Culture Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diokmetzidou, Antigoni; Tsikitis, Mary; Nikouli, Sofia; Kloukina, Ismini; Tsoupri, Elsa; Papathanasiou, Stamatis; Psarras, Stelios; Mavroidis, Manolis; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) cytoskeleton comprises the fine-tuning cellular machinery regulating critical homeostatic mechanisms. In skeletal and cardiac muscle, deficiency or disturbance of the IF network leads to severe pathology, particularly in the latter. The three-dimensional scaffold of the muscle-specific IF protein desmin interconnects key features of the cardiac muscle cells, including the Z-disks, intercalated disks, plasma membrane, nucleus, mitochondria, lysosomes, and potentially sarcoplasmic reticulum. This is crucial for the highly organized striated muscle, in which effective energy production and transmission as well as mechanochemical signaling are tightly coordinated among the organelles and the contractile apparatus. The role of desmin and desmin-associated proteins in the biogenesis, trafficking, and organelle function, as well as the development, differentiation, and survival of the cardiac muscle begins to be enlightened, but the precise mechanisms remain elusive. We propose a set of experimental tools that can be used, in vivo and in vitro, to unravel crucial new pathways by which the IF cytoskeleton facilitates proper organelle function, homeostasis, and cytoprotection and further understand how its disturbance and deficiency lead to disease.

  15. Cardiac cachexia and muscle wasting: definition, physiopathology, and clinical consequences

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    Okoshi MP

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marina P Okoshi,1 Fernando G Romeiro,1 Paula F Martinez,1,2 Silvio A Oliveira Jr,1,2 Bertha F Polegato,1 Katashi Okoshi11Internal Medicine Department, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University, UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2School of Physiotherapy, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, BrazilAbstract: Cachexia and muscle wasting are frequently observed in heart failure patients. Cachexia is a predictor of reduced survival, independent of important parameters such as age, heart failure functional class, and functional capacity. Muscle and fat wasting can also predict adverse outcome during cardiac failure. Only more recently were these conditions defined in International Consensus. Considering that heart failure is an inflammatory disease, cardiac cachexia has been diagnosed by finding a body weight loss >5%, in the absence of other diseases and independent of other criteria. Muscle wasting has been defined as lean appendicular mass corrected for height squared of 2 standard deviations or more below the mean for healthy individuals between 20 years and 30 years old from the same ethnic group. The etiology of heart failure-associated cachexia and muscle wasting is multifactorial, and the underlying physiopathological mechanisms are not completely understood. The most important factors are reduced food intake, gastrointestinal alterations, immunological activation, neurohormonal abnormalities, and an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic processes. Cachexia and muscle wasting have clinical consequences in several organs and systems including the gastrointestinal and erythropoietic systems, and the heart, previously affected by the primary disease. We hope that a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in their physiopathology will allow the development of pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies to effectively prevent and treat heart failure-induced cachexia and muscle wasting before significant body

  16. Placental Growth Factor Promotes Cardiac Muscle Repair via Enhanced Neovascularization

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    Jianfeng Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs improves post-injury cardiac muscle repair using ill-defined mechanisms. Recently, we have shown that production and secretion of placental growth factor (PLGF by MSCs play a critical role in the MSCs-mediated post-injury cardiac muscle repair. In this study, we addressed the underlying molecular mechanisms, focusing specifically on the interactions between MSCs, macrophages and endothelial cells. Methods: We isolated macrophages (BM-MΦ from mouse bone-marrow derived cells based on F4/80 expression by flow cytometry. BM-MΦ were treated with different doses of PLGF. Cell number was analyzed by a MTT assay. Macrophage polarization was examined based on CD206 expression by flow cytometry. PLGF levels in macrophage subpopulations were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA. Effects of macrophages on vascularization were evaluated by a collagen gel assay using Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs co-cultured with PLGF-treated macrophages. Results: PLGF did not increase macrophage number, but dose-dependently polarized macrophages into a M2 subpopulation. M2 macrophages expressed high levels of PLGF. PLGF-polarized M2 macrophages significantly increased tubular structures in the collagen gel assay. Conclusion: Our data suggest that MSCs-derived PLGF may induce macrophage polarization into a M2 subpopulation, which in turn releases more PLGF to promote local neovascularization for augmenting post-injury cardiac muscle repair. This study thus sheds novel light on the role of PLGF in cardiac muscle regeneration.

  17. Effects of doxorubicin on cardiac muscle subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazis, Andreas N.; Morton, Aaron B.; Hall, Stephanie E.; Smuder, Ashley J.

    2017-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective chemotherapeutic used in the treatment of a broad spectrum of malignancies. However, clinical use of DOX is highly limited by cumulative and irreversible cardiomyopathy that occurs following DOX treatment. The pathogenesis of DOX-induced cardiac muscle dysfunction is complex. However, it has been proposed that the etiology of this myopathy is related to mitochondrial dysfunction, as a result of the dose-dependent increase in the mitochondrial accumulation of DOX. In this regard, cardiac muscle possesses two morphologically distinct populations of mitochondria. Subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria are localized just below the sarcolemma, whereas intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria are found between myofibrils. Mitochondria in both regions exhibit subtle differences in biochemical properties, giving rise to differences in respiration, lipid composition, enzyme activities and protein synthesis rates. Based on the heterogeneity of SS and IMF mitochondria, we hypothesized that acute DOX administration would have distinct effects on each cardiac mitochondrial subfraction. Therefore, we isolated SS and IMF mitochondria from the hearts of female Sprague-Dawley rats 48 h after administration of DOX. Our results demonstrate that while SS mitochondria appear to accumulate greater amounts of DOX, IMF mitochondria demonstrate a greater apoptotic and autophagic response to DOX exposure. Thus, the divergent protein composition and function of the SS and IMF cardiac mitochondria result in differential responses to DOX, with IMF mitochondria appearing more susceptible to damage after DOX treatment. PMID:27832997

  18. Developing cardiac and skeletal muscle share fast-skeletal myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin-I expression.

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    Kelly C Clause

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs transplanted into injured myocardium can differentiate into fast skeletal muscle specific myosin heavy chain (sk-fMHC and cardiac specific troponin-I (cTn-I positive cells sustaining recipient myocardial function. We have recently found that MDSCs differentiate into a cardiomyocyte phenotype within a three-dimensional gel bioreactor. It is generally accepted that terminally differentiated myocardium or skeletal muscle only express cTn-I or sk-fMHC, respectively. Studies have shown the presence of non-cardiac muscle proteins in the developing myocardium or cardiac proteins in pathological skeletal muscle. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that normal developing myocardium and skeletal muscle transiently share both sk-fMHC and cTn-I proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses were carried out in embryonic day 13 (ED13 and 20 (ED20, neonatal day 0 (ND0 and 4 (ND4, postnatal day 10 (PND10, and 8 week-old adult female Lewis rat ventricular myocardium and gastrocnemius muscle. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that sk-fMHC was expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern within ED13 ventricular myocardium, and the striated sk-fMHC expression was lost by ND4 and became negative in adult myocardium. cTn-I was not expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern throughout the myocardium until PND10. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that gene and protein expression patterns of cardiac and skeletal muscle transcription factors and sk-fMHC within ventricular myocardium and skeletal muscle were similar at ED20, and the expression patterns became cardiac or skeletal muscle specific during postnatal development. These findings provide new insight into cardiac muscle development and highlight previously unknown common developmental features of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

  19. Role of cAMP in the reactivation of demembranated ram spermatozoa.

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    San Agustin, J T; Witman, G B

    1994-01-01

    Ejaculated ram sperm were demembranated with Triton X-100, separated from the detergent-soluble matrix, and reactivated [San Agustin and Witman (1993): Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 24:264-273]. The percent motility of models prepared from freshly washed sperm was comparable to that of the washed sample before demembranation, regardless of whether cAMP was included in the reactivation medium. However, demembranated models derived from aging or metabolically inhibited sperm exhibited a lower percent reactivation and required cAMP to attain the level of motility of freshly washed sperm. Cyclic AMP was approximately 100 times more effective than cGMP. The requirement for cAMP could be bypassed by addition of porcine heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) catalytic subunit to the reactivation medium, demonstrating that cAMP was acting via PKA. The cAMP stimulation of reactivation was not affected by inclusion of the PKA inhibitor PKI(5-24) in the reactivation medium, but was decreased when the models were preincubated with PKI(5-24) prior to reactivation. The cytosol-free models retained > 90% of the sperm PKA activity; therefore, the PKA appears to be anchored to internal sperm structures. This PKA could not be extracted by cAMP or Triton X-100 alone, but only by cAMP and Triton X-100 in combination. We conclude that cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation is critical for sperm motility, but that the essential protein phosphate sites turn over slowly under our reactivation conditions, so that the cAMP requirement is apparent only in models prepared from sperm having a low internal ATP or cAMP content. Interestingly, reactivation was rapidly blocked by the peptide arg-lys-arg-ala-arg-lys-glu, which has been reported to be a selective inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

  20. In utero undernutrition programs skeletal and cardiac muscle metabolism

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    Brittany eBeauchamp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In utero undernutrition is associated with increased risk for insulin resistance, obesity, and cardiovascular disease during adult life. A common phenotype associated with low birth weight is reduced skeletal muscle mass. Given the central role of skeletal muscle in whole body metabolism, alterations in its mass as well as its metabolic characteristics may contribute to disease risk. This review highlights the metabolic alterations in cardiac and skeletal muscle associated with in utero undernutrition and low birth weight. These tissues have high metabolic demands and are known to be sites of major metabolic dysfunction in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research demonstrates that mitochondrial energetics are decreased in skeletal and cardiac muscles of adult offspring from undernourished mothers. These effects apparently lead to the development of a thrifty phenotype, which may represent overall a compensatory mechanism programmed in utero to handle times of limited nutrient availability. However, in an environment characterized by food abundance, the effects are maladaptive and increase adulthood risks of metabolic disease.

  1. From syncitium to regulated pump: a cardiac muscle cellular update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzick, Donna H

    2011-03-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information on Ca(2+) microdomains and local control theory, with particular emphasis on the role of Ca(2+) sparks as a key regulatory component of ventricular myocyte contraction dynamics. Recent information pertaining to local Ca(2+) cycling in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) as a mechanism underlying cardiac automaticity is also presented as part of the recently described coupled-clock pacemaker system. The details of this regulation are emerging; however, the notion that the sequestration and release of Ca(2+) from internal stores in SANCs (similar to that observed in ventricular myocytes) regulates the rhythmic excitation of the heart (i.e., membrane ion channels) is an important advancement in this area. The regulatory role of cardiac adrenergic receptors on cardiac rate and function is also included, and fundamental concepts related to intracellular signaling are discussed. An important point of emphasis is that whole organ cardiac dynamics can be traced back to cellular events regulating intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and, as such, provides an important conceptual framework from which students can begin to think about whole organ physiology in health and disease. Greater synchrony of Ca(2+)-regulatory mechanisms between ventricular and pacemaker cells should enhance student comprehension of complex regulatory phenomenon in cardiac muscle.

  2. Observation of nuclei reassembled from demembranated Xenopus sperm nuclei and analysis of their lamina components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUJIAN; CHUANMAOZHANG; 等

    1994-01-01

    A cell-free preparation obtained from extracts of activated Xenopus laevis eggs induced chromatin decondensation and nuclear formation from demembranated Xenopus sperm nuclei.Electron microscopy revealed that the reassembled nucleus had a double-layered nuclear memblane,nuclear pore complexes,and decondensed chromatin etc.Indirect immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated the presence of lamina in newly assembled nuclei.Western-blotting results showed that lamin LII was present in egg extracts and in lamina of the reassembled nuclei which were previously reported to contain only egg derived lamin LIII.

  3. Short-range mechanical properties of skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01

    Striated muscles are disproportionately stiff for small movements. This facet of their behavior can be demonstrated by measuring the force produced when the muscle is stretched more than about 1% of its initial length. When this is done, it can be seen that force rises rapidly during the initial phases of the movement and much less rapidly during the latter stages of the stretch. Experiments performed using chemically permeabilized skeletal and cardiac muscles show that the initial stiffness of the preparations increases in proportion with isometric force as the free Ca²(+) concentration in the bathing solution is raised from a minimal to a saturating value. This is strong evidence that the short-range mechanical properties of activated muscle result from stretching myosin cross-bridges that are attached between the thick and thin filaments. Relaxed intact muscles also exhibit short-range mechanical properties but the molecular mechanisms underlying this behavior are less clear. This chapter summarizes some of the interesting features of short-range mechanical properties in different types of muscle preparation, describes some of the likely underlying mechanisms and discusses the potential physiological significance of the behavior.

  4. Pharyngeal mesoderm regulatory network controls cardiac and head muscle morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Itamar; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Avraham, Roi; Rinon, Ariel; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Cross, Joe W; Leviatan, Noam; Hegesh, Julius; Roy, Achira; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Carvajal, Jaime; Tole, Shubha; Kioussi, Chrissa; Quaggin, Susan; Tzahor, Eldad

    2012-11-13

    The search for developmental mechanisms driving vertebrate organogenesis has paved the way toward a deeper understanding of birth defects. During embryogenesis, parts of the heart and craniofacial muscles arise from pharyngeal mesoderm (PM) progenitors. Here, we reveal a hierarchical regulatory network of a set of transcription factors expressed in the PM that initiates heart and craniofacial organogenesis. Genetic perturbation of this network in mice resulted in heart and craniofacial muscle defects, revealing robust cross-regulation between its members. We identified Lhx2 as a previously undescribed player during cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development. Lhx2 and Tcf21 genetically interact with Tbx1, the major determinant in the etiology of DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Furthermore, knockout of these genes in the mouse recapitulates specific cardiac features of this syndrome. We suggest that PM-derived cardiogenesis and myogenesis are network properties rather than properties specific to individual PM members. These findings shed new light on the developmental underpinnings of congenital defects.

  5. A viscoplastic model for the active component in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, M B

    2016-08-01

    The HMK model (Hunter et al. in Prog Biophys Mol Biol 69:289-331, 1998) proposes mechanobiological equations for the influence of intracellular calcium concentration [Formula: see text] on the evolution of bound calcium concentration [Formula: see text] and the tropomyosin kinetics parameter z, which model processes in the active component of the tension in cardiac muscle. The inelastic response due to actin-myosin crossbridge kinetics is modeled in the HMK model with a function Q that depends on the history of the rate of total stretch of the muscle fiber. Here, an alternative model is proposed which models the active component of the muscle fiber as a viscoplastic material. In particular, an evolution equation is proposed for the elastic stretch [Formula: see text] in the active component. Specific forms of the constitutive equations are proposed and used to match experimental data. The proposed viscoplastic formulation allows for separate modeling of three processes: the high rate deactivation of crossbridges causing rapid reduction in active tension; the high but lower rate reactivation of crossbridges causing recovery of active tension; and the low rate relaxation effects characterizing the Hill model of muscles.

  6. Functional Effects of Hyperthyroidism on Cardiac Papillary Muscle in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Fabricio Furtado; Olivoto, Robson Ruiz; da Silva, Priscyla Oliveira; Francisco, Julio Cesar; Fogaça, Rosalvo Tadeu Hochmuller

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism is currently recognized to affect the cardiovascular system, leading to a series of molecular and functional changes. However, little is known about the functional influence of hyperthyroidism in the regulation of cytoplasmic calcium and on the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) in the cardiac muscle. Objectives To evaluate the functional changes in papillary muscles isolated from animals with induced hyperthyroidism. Methods We divided 36 Wistar rats into a group of controls and another of animals with hyperthyroidism induced by intraperitoneal T3 injection. We measured in the animals' papillary muscles the maximum contraction force, speed of contraction (+df/dt) and relaxation (-df/dt), contraction and relaxation time, contraction force at different concentrations of extracellular sodium, post-rest potentiation (PRP), and contraction force induced by caffeine. Results In hyperthyroid animals, we observed decreased PRP at all rest times (p < 0.05), increased +df/dt and -df/dt (p < 0.001), low positive inotropic response to decreased concentration of extracellular sodium (p < 0.001), reduction of the maximum force in caffeine-induced contraction (p < 0.003), and decreased total contraction time (p < 0.001). The maximal contraction force did not differ significantly between groups (p = 0.973). Conclusion We hypothesize that the changes observed are likely due to a decrease in calcium content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, caused by calcium leakage, decreased expression of NCX, and increased expression of a-MHC and SERCA2.

  7. Functional Effects of Hyperthyroidism on Cardiac Papillary Muscle in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Furtado Vieira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hyperthyroidism is currently recognized to affect the cardiovascular system, leading to a series of molecular and functional changes. However, little is known about the functional influence of hyperthyroidism in the regulation of cytoplasmic calcium and on the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX in the cardiac muscle. Objectives: To evaluate the functional changes in papillary muscles isolated from animals with induced hyperthyroidism. Methods: We divided 36 Wistar rats into a group of controls and another of animals with hyperthyroidism induced by intraperitoneal T3 injection. We measured in the animals' papillary muscles the maximum contraction force, speed of contraction (+df/dt and relaxation (-df/dt, contraction and relaxation time, contraction force at different concentrations of extracellular sodium, post-rest potentiation (PRP, and contraction force induced by caffeine. Results: In hyperthyroid animals, we observed decreased PRP at all rest times (p < 0.05, increased +df/dt and -df/dt (p < 0.001, low positive inotropic response to decreased concentration of extracellular sodium (p < 0.001, reduction of the maximum force in caffeine-induced contraction (p < 0.003, and decreased total contraction time (p < 0.001. The maximal contraction force did not differ significantly between groups (p = 0.973. Conclusion: We hypothesize that the changes observed are likely due to a decrease in calcium content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, caused by calcium leakage, decreased expression of NCX, and increased expression of a-MHC and SERCA2.

  8. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Trinity, Joel D; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production.

  9. Regulation of the cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor by glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Hewawasam, Ruwani; Liu, Dan; Casarotto, Marco G; Board, Philip G

    2011-05-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are generally recognized for their role in phase II detoxification reactions. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that members of the GST family also have a diverse range of other functions that are, in general, unrelated to detoxification. One such action is a specific inhibition of the cardiac isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) intracellular Ca(2+) release channel. In this review, we compare functional and physical interactions between members of the GST family, including GSTO1-1, GSTA1-1, and GSTM2-2, with RyR2 and with the skeletal isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1). The active part of the muscle-specific GSTM2-2 is localized to its nonenzymatic C-terminal α-helical bundle, centered around α-helix 6. The GSTM2-2 binding site is in divergent region 3 (DR3 region) of RyR2. The sequence differences between the DR3 regions of RyR1 and RyR2 explain the specificity of the GSTs for one isoform of the protein. GSTM2-2 is one of the few known endogenous inhibitors of the cardiac RyR and is likely to be important in maintaining low RyR2 activity during diastole. We discuss interactions between a nonenzymatic member of the GST structural family, the CLIC-2 (type 2 chloride intracellular channel) protein, which inhibits both RyR1 and RyR2. The possibility that the GST and CLIC2 proteins bind to different sites on the RyR, and that different structures within the GST and CLIC proteins bind to RyR channels, is discussed. We conclude that the C-terminal part of GSTM2-2 may provide the basis of a therapeutic compound for use in cardiac disorders.

  10. Cardiac troponin testing in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis-spectrum disorders: biomarkers to distinguish between primary cardiac involvement and low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael; Lilleker, James B; Herrick, Ariane L; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-05-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, an under-recognised manifestation of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc)-spectrum disorders, is associated with significant mortality. Within these two conditions, traditional skeletal muscle enzyme testing may not effectively distinguish between skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement, especially in patients with subclinical cardiac disease. Accurate biomarkers are thus required to screen for cardiac disease, to better inform both therapeutic decision-making and treatment response. The widespread uptake of cardiac troponin testing has revolutionised the management of acute coronary syndromes. While cardiac troponin I (cTnI) appears specific to the myocardium, cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is also expressed by skeletal muscle, including regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There is increasing interest about the role of cardiac troponins as a putative biomarker of primary cardiac involvement in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders. Herewith we discuss subclinical cardiac disease in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders, the respective roles of cTnI and cTnT testing, and the re-expression of cTnT within regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There remains wide variation in access to cardiac troponin testing nationally and internationally. We propose two pragmatic clinical pathways using cardiac troponins, preferably measuring concomitant cTnT followed by confirmatory (cardiac) cTnI to screen patients for subclinical cardiac disease and/or low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity, and also an agenda for future research.

  11. Muscle ring finger 1 mediates cardiac atrophy in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monte S. Willis; Mauricio Rojas; Luge Li; Craig H. Selzman; Ru-Hang Tang; William E. Stansfield; Jessica E. Rodriguez; David J. Glass; Cam Patterson

    2009-01-01

    ...; cardiac hypertrophy. We now demonstrate that therapeutic cardiac atrophy induced in patients after left ventricular assist device placement is associated with an increase in cardiac MuRF1 expression...

  12. Myostatin from the heart: local and systemic actions in cardiac failure and muscle wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, Astrid; Auger-Messier, Mannix; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Heineke, Joerg

    2011-06-01

    A significant proportion of heart failure patients develop skeletal muscle wasting and cardiac cachexia, which is associated with a very poor prognosis. Recently, myostatin, a cytokine from the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family and a known strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, has been identified as a direct mediator of skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with heart failure. Myostatin is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, although basal expression is also detectable in heart and adipose tissue. During pathological loading of the heart, the myocardium produces and secretes myostatin into the circulation where it inhibits skeletal muscle growth. Thus, genetic elimination of myostatin from the heart reduces skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with heart failure, whereas transgenic overexpression of myostatin in the heart is capable of inducing muscle wasting. In addition to its endocrine action on skeletal muscle, cardiac myostatin production also modestly inhibits cardiomyocyte growth under certain circumstances, as well as induces cardiac fibrosis and alterations in ventricular function. Interestingly, heart failure patients show elevated myostatin levels in their serum. To therapeutically influence skeletal muscle wasting, direct inhibition of myostatin was shown to positively impact skeletal muscle mass in heart failure, suggesting a promising strategy for the treatment of cardiac cachexia in the future.

  13. Metalloproteinase expression is altered in cardiac and skeletal muscle in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Raymond D; Bicer, Sabahattin; Reiser, Peter J; Velten, Markus; Wold, Loren E

    2015-08-15

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle dysfunction is a recognized effect of cancer-induced cachexia, with alterations in heart function leading to heart failure and negatively impacting patient morbidity. Cachexia is a complex and multifaceted disease state with several potential contributors to cardiac and skeletal muscle dysfunction. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes capable of degrading components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Changes to the ECM cause disruption both in the connections between cells at the basement membrane and in cell-to-cell interactions. In the present study, we used a murine model of C26 adenocarcinoma-induced cancer cachexia to determine changes in MMP gene and protein expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle. We analyzed MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-14 as they have been shown to contribute to both cardiac and skeletal muscle ECM changes and, thereby, to pathology in models of heart failure and muscular dystrophy. In our model, cardiac and skeletal muscles showed a significant increase in RNA and protein levels of several MMPs and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Cardiac muscle showed significant protein increases in MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-14, whereas skeletal muscles showed increases in MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-14. Furthermore, collagen deposition was increased after C26 adenocarcinoma-induced cancer cachexia as indicated by an increased left ventricular picrosirius red-positive-stained area. Increases in serum hydroxyproline suggest increased collagen turnover, implicating skeletal muscle remodeling. Our findings demonstrate that cancer cachexia-associated matrix remodeling results in cardiac fibrosis and possible skeletal muscle remodeling. With these findings, MMPs represent a possible therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer-induced cachexia.

  14. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser(319) and Thr(24), as well as p-Foxo3a Thr(32) decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was

  15. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichi Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24 and serine-319 (Ser-319 residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser319 and Thr24, as well as p-Foxo3a Thr32 decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was

  16. Endothermic force generation in skinned cardiac muscle from rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, K W

    1999-08-01

    Isometric tension responses to rapid temperature jumps (T-jumps) of 2-6 degrees C were examined in skinned muscle fibre bundles isolated from papillary muscles of the rat heart. T-jumps were induced by an infra-red laser pulse (wave length 1.32 microm, pulse duration 0.2 ms) obtained from a Nd-YAG laser, which heated the fibres and bathing buffer solution in a 50 microl trough; the increased temperature by laser pulse was clamped at the high temperature by a Peltier system (see Ranatunga, 1996). In maximally Ca2+ -activated (pCa ca. 4.5) fibres, the relationship between tension and temperature was non-linear, the increase of active tension with temperature being more pronounced at lower temperatures (below ca. 20 degrees C). A T-jump at any temperature (range 3-35 degrees C) induced an initial step decrease of tension of variable amplitude (Phase 1), probably due to thermal expansion, and it was followed by a tension transient which resulted in a net rise of tension above the pre-T-jump level. The rate of net rise of tension (Phase 2b or endothermic force generation) was 7-10/s at ca. 12 degrees C and its Q10 was 6.3 (below 25 degrees C). In cases where the step decrease of tension in Phase 1 was prominent, an initial quick tension recovery phase (Phase 2a, 70-100/s at 12 degrees C) that did not contribute to a rise of tension above the pre-T-jump level, was also seen. This phase (Phase 2a) appeared to be similar to the quick tension recovery induced by a small length release and its rate increased with temperature with a Q10 of 1.8. In some cases where Phase 2a was present, a slower tension rise (Phase 3) was seen; its rate (ca. 5/s) was temperature-insensitive. The results show that the rate of endothermic force generation in cardiac fibres is clearly different from that of either fast-twitch or slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle fibres; implication of such fibre type-specific differences is discussed in relation to the difficulty in identifying the

  17. Developmental changes in the protein profiles of human cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, T D; Edwards, Y H; Hopkinson, D A

    1978-05-01

    1. The use of SDS electrophoresis as a tool for the analysis of development processes in man has been evaluated. 2. The protein profiles of cardiac and skeletal muscle from foetal (10--24 weeks gestation) infant and adult specimens have been analysed and striking developmental changes were found which involved all the major proteins. 3. Before 20 weeks gestation the soluble protein profile of skeletal muscle appears to consist largely of extracellular proteins. 4. Myoglobin was found in foetal cardiac muscle from 20 weeks gestation but was not demonstrable in foetal (greater than 24 weeks) skeletal muscle. Foetal and adult myoglobin were indistinguishable. 5. A limited survey of the protein patterns of brain, liver and kidney was carried out. In general these tissues show less developmental change than skeletal or cardiac muscle.

  18. Cardiac and skeletal muscles show molecularly distinct responses to cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Angie M Y; Fung, David C Y; Corley, Susan M; McGill, Max C; Bentley, Nicholas L; Tan, Timothy C; Wilkins, Marc R; Polly, Patsie

    2015-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is a systemic, paraneoplastic syndrome seen in patients with advanced cancer. There is growing interest in the altered muscle pathophysiology experienced by cachectic patients. This study reports the microarray analysis of gene expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle in the colon 26 (C26) carcinoma mouse model of cancer cachexia. A total of 268 genes were found to be differentially expressed in cardiac muscle tissue, compared with nontumor-bearing controls. This was fewer than the 1,533 genes that changed in cachectic skeletal muscle. In addition to different numbers of genes changing, different cellular functions were seen to change in each tissue. The cachectic heart showed signs of inflammation, similar to cachectic skeletal muscle, but did not show the upregulation of ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic processes or downregulation of genes involved in cellular energetics and muscle regeneration that characterizes skeletal muscle cachexia. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate a subset of inflammatory genes in the cardiac and skeletal muscle of independent cachectic samples; this revealed that B4galt1, C1s, Serpina3n, and Vsig4 were significantly upregulated in cardiac tissue, whereas C1s and Serpina3n were significantly upregulated in skeletal tissue. Our skeletal muscle microarray results were also compared with those from three published microarray studies and found to be consistent in terms of the genes differentially expressed and the functional processes affected. Our study highlights that skeletal and cardiac muscles are affected differently in the C26 mouse model of cachexia and that therapeutic strategies cannot assume that both muscle types will show a similar response.

  19. Enantioselective disposition of (R/S)-albuterol in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Glenn A; Yee, Kwang Choon; Premilovac, Dino; Rattigan, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Significant enhancement of skeletal muscle function has been observed with racemic albuterol (salbutamol). There is now general acceptance that the R-albuterol enantiomer elicits the pharmacological response, both in the lungs and extrapulmonary, while S-albuterol is pharmacologically inert. The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution of (R/S)-albuterol enantiomers into skeletal and cardiac muscle. Initially oral dosing was undertaken in neonatal mice administered a maximum tolerable dose of racemic albuterol. An in vivo infusion rat model was employed for the investigation of albuterol uptake into skeletal and cardiac muscle over 4 h. Tissue concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). From the oral dosing model, mean (±SD) levels of racemic albuterol after 5 days were 915 (±293) ng/mL in plasma, 2574 (±196) ng/g in muscle, and 53 (±6.6) ng/g in brain with enantioselective partitioning (muscle:plasma ratio of 5.7 and 1.7 for R- and S-albuterol, respectively). In the infusion model, enantioselective disposition was observed in skeletal muscle (muscle:plasma ratio of 1.2-1.7 and 0.6-0.7 for R- and S-albuterol, respectively) and in cardiac muscle (4.1 and 0.5, respectively). In conclusion, there is greater partitioning of active (R)-albuterol than inactive (S)-albuterol into both skeletal and cardiac muscle compared to plasma. These findings have relevance for albuterol sports doping, cardiac effects, and therapeutic use in muscle wasting diseases. Furthermore, the greater muscle partitioning of the active R-albuterol, and the availability of pure R-albuterol formulations highlight shortcomings in doping control measures using non-enantioselective assays.

  20. Scaling functional patterns of skeletal and cardiac muscles: New non-linear elasticity approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kokshenev, Valery B

    2009-01-01

    Responding mechanically to environmental requests, muscles show a surprisingly large variety of functions. The studies of in vivo cycling muscles qualified skeletal muscles into four principal locomotor patterns: motor, brake, strut, and spring. While much effort of has been done in searching for muscle design patterns, no fundamental concepts underlying empirically established patterns were revealed. In this interdisciplinary study, continuum mechanics is applied to the problem of muscle structure in relation to function. The ability of a powering muscle, treated as a homogenous solid organ, tuned to efficient locomotion via the natural frequency is illuminated through the non-linear elastic muscle moduli controlled by contraction velocity. The exploration of the elastic force patterns known in solid state physics incorporated in activated skeletal and cardiac muscles via the mechanical similarity principle yields analytical rationalization for locomotor muscle patterns. Besides the explanation of the origin...

  1. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Lisboa Cordeiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective: To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods: This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. Results: 50 patients, 27 (54% males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073 and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031. Conclusion: We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  2. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, André Luiz Lisboa; de Melo, Thiago Araújo; Neves, Daniela; Luna, Julianne; Esquivel, Mateus Souza; Guimarães, André Raimundo França; Borges, Daniel Lago; Petto, Jefferson

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. Results 50 patients, 27 (54%) males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073) and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031). Conclusion We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27556313

  3. Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jae-Sun; Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Park, Junbeom; Park, Jin-Kyu; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Joung, Boyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2015-10-15

    The present study was performed for elucidating the associations between the morphology of the papillary muscles (PMs) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). We retrospectively reviewed history, laboratory data, electrocardiography, echocardiography, coronary angiography, and cardiac CT/MRI for 190 patients with SCA. The prevalence of accessory PMs and PM hypertrophy in patients with SCA of unknown cause was compared with that in patients with SCA of known causes and 98 age- and sex-matched patients without SCA. An accessory PM was defined as a PM with origins separated from the anterolateral and posteromedial PMs, or a PM that branched into two or three bellies at the base of the anterolateral or posteromedial PM. PM hypertrophy was defined as at least one of the two PMs having a diameter of ≥1.1cm. In 49 patients (age 49.9±15.9years; 38 men) the cause of SCA was unknown, whereas 141 (age 54.2±16.6years; 121 men) had a known cause. The prevalence of accessory PMs was significantly higher in the unknown-cause group than in the known-cause group (24.5% and 7.8%, respectively; p=0.002) or the no-SCA group (7.1%, p=0.003). The same was true for PM hypertrophy (unknown-cause 12.2%, known-cause 2.1%, p=0.010; no SCA group 1.0%, p=0.006). By logistic regression, accessory PM and PM hypertrophy were independently associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. An accessory PM and PM hypertrophy are associated with SCA of unknown cause. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tissue-specific and substrate-specific mitochondrial bioenergetics in feline cardiac and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen;

    2015-01-01

    fibers. Biopsies of left ventricular cardiac muscle and soleus muscle, a type I-rich oxidative skeletal muscle, were obtained from 15 healthy domestic cats. Enzymatic activity of citrate synthase (CS), a biomarker of mitochondrial content, was measured. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity with various kinds...... of non-fatty-acid substrates and fatty-acid substrate in permeabilized muscle fiber was measured by using high-resolution respirometry. CS activity in the heart was 3 times higher than in the soleus muscle. Mitochondrial state 3 respiration, ADP-stimulated respiration, with complex I-linked and complex I...

  5. Gap-junction channels inhibit transverse propagation in cardiac muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy Lakshminarayanan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of adding many gap-junctions (g-j channels between contiguous cells in a linear chain on transverse propagation between parallel chains was examined in a 5 × 5 model (5 parallel chains of 5 cells each for cardiac muscle. The action potential upstrokes were simulated using the PSpice program for circuit analysis. Either a single cell was stimulated (cell A1 or the entire chain was stimulated simultaneously (A-chain. Transverse velocity was calculated from the total propagation time (TPT from when the first AP crossed a Vm of -20 mV and the last AP crossed -20 mV. The number of g-j channels per junction was varied from zero to 100, 1,000 and 10,000 (Rgj of ∞, 100 MΩ, 10 MΩ, 1.0 MΩ, respectively. The longitudinal resistance of the interstitial fluid (ISF space between the parallel chains (Rol2 was varied between 200 KΩ (standard value and 1.0, 5.0, and 10 MΩ. The higher the Rol2 value, the tighter the packing of the chains. It was found that adding many g-j channels inhibited transverse propagation by blocking activation of all 5 chains, unless Rol2 was greatly increased above the standard value of 200 KΩ. This was true for either method of stimulation. This was explained by, when there is strong longitudinal coupling between all 5 cells of a chain awaiting excitation, there must be more transfer energy (i.e., more current to simultaneously excite all 5 cells of a chain.

  6. Cardiac function in muscular dystrophy associates with abdominal muscle pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Kim, Gene; Watson, Sydeaka; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The muscular dystrophies target muscle groups differentially. In mouse models of muscular dystrophy, notably the mdx model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the diaphragm muscle shows marked fibrosis and at an earlier age than other muscle groups, more reflective of the histopathology seen in human muscular dystrophy. Methods Using a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, the Sgcg mouse, we compared muscle pathology across different muscle groups and heart. A cohort of nearly 200 Sgcg mice were studied using multiple measures of pathology including echocardiography, Evans blue dye uptake and hydroxyproline content in multiple muscle groups. Spearman rank correlations were determined among echocardiographic and pathological parameters. Findings The abdominal muscles were found to have more fibrosis than other muscle groups, including the diaphragm muscle. The abdominal muscles also had more Evans blue dye uptake than other muscle groups. The amount of diaphragm fibrosis was found to correlate positively with fibrosis in the left ventricle, and abdominal muscle fibrosis correlated with impaired left ventricular function. Fibrosis in the abdominal muscles negatively correlated with fibrosis in the diaphragm and right ventricles. Together these data reflect the recruitment of abdominal muscles as respiratory muscles in muscular dystrophy, a finding consistent with data from human patients. PMID:26029630

  7. Effect of Cerium on Cardiac Muscle of Rat and Guinea Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of Ce3+ on cardiac muscle of rat and guinea pig was studied. In vitro, 0.05 mmol.L-1 solution of Ce3+ inhibited the contraction of guinea pig atria. The change of action potential duration(APD) of guinea pig papillary muscle exposed to 0.4 mmol·L-1 Ce3+ was significant, and those exposed to 0.1 and 0.2 mmol·L-1 Ce3+ were not significant. In vivo, compared with the control group, the APD for rat cardiac muscle after long-term feed on Ce3+ was significantly delayed in high dose, and that was not significantly delayed in low dose. The results suggest that Ce3+ with long-term high dose intake might affect the influx of Ca2+, Na+ and outflow of K+ for rat cardiac muscle.

  8. Effect of muscle length on cross-bridge kinetics in intact cardiac trabeculae at body temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Xu, Ying; Davis, Jonathan P.; Campbell, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic force generation in cardiac muscle, which determines cardiac pumping activity, depends on both the number of sarcomeric cross-bridges and on their cycling kinetics. The Frank–Starling mechanism dictates that cardiac force development increases with increasing cardiac muscle length (corresponding to increased ventricular volume). It is, however, unclear to what extent this increase in cardiac muscle length affects the rate of cross-bridge cycling. Previous studies using permeabilized cardiac preparations, sub-physiological temperatures, or both have obtained conflicting results. Here, we developed a protocol that allowed us to reliably and reproducibly measure the rate of tension redevelopment (ktr; which depends on the rate of cross-bridge cycling) in intact trabeculae at body temperature. Using K+ contractures to induce a tonic level of force, we showed the ktr was slower in rabbit muscle (which contains predominantly β myosin) than in rat muscle (which contains predominantly α myosin). Analyses of ktr in rat muscle at optimal length (Lopt) and 90% of optimal length (L90) revealed that ktr was significantly slower at Lopt (27.7 ± 3.3 and 27.8 ± 3.0 s−1 in duplicate analyses) than at L90 (45.1 ± 7.6 and 47.5 ± 9.2 s−1). We therefore show that ktr can be measured in intact rat and rabbit cardiac trabeculae, and that the ktr decreases when muscles are stretched to their optimal length under near-physiological conditions, indicating that the Frank–Starling mechanism not only increases force but also affects cross-bridge cycling kinetics. PMID:23277479

  9. From Syncitium to Regulated Pump: A Cardiac Muscle Cellular Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzick, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information…

  10. Molecular Mechanisms for Exercise Training-Induced Changes in Vascular Structure and Function: Skeletal Muscle, Cardiac Muscle, and the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, T Dylan; Ferguson, Brian S; Laughlin, M Harold

    2015-01-01

    Compared with resting conditions, during incremental exercise, cardiac output in humans is elevated from ~5 to 25 L min(-1). In conjunction with this increase, the proportion of cardiac output directed toward skeletal muscle increases from ~20% to 85%, while blood flow to cardiac muscle increases 500% and blood flow to specific brain structures increases nearly 200%. Based on existing evidence, researchers believe that blood flow in these tissues is matched to the increases in metabolic rate during exercise. This phenomenon, the matching of blood flow to metabolic requirement, is often referred to as functional hyperemia. This chapter summarizes mechanical and metabolic factors that regulate functional hyperemia as well as other exercise-induced signals, which are also potent stimuli for chronic adaptations in vascular biology. Repeated exposure to exercise-induced increases in shear stress and the induction of angiogenic factors alter vascular cell gene expression and mediate changes in vascular volume and blood flow control. The magnitude and regulation of this coordinated response appear to be tissue specific and coupled to other factors such as hypertrophy and hyperplasia. The cumulative effects of these adaptations contribute to increased exercise capacity, reduced relative challenge of a given submaximal exercise bout and ameliorated vascular outcomes in patient populations with pathological conditions. In the subsequent discussion, this chapter explores exercise as a regulator of vascular biology and summarizes the molecular mechanisms responsible for exercise training-induced changes in vascular structure and function in skeletal and cardiac muscle as well as the brain.

  11. Attenuated muscle metaboreflex-induced increases in cardiac function in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Spranger, Marty D; Abu-Hamdah, Rania; Kaur, Jasdeep; Coutsos, Matthew; Stayer, Douglas; Augustyniak, Robert A; O'Leary, Donal S

    2013-11-15

    Sympathoactivation may be excessive during exercise in subjects with hypertension, leading to increased susceptibility to adverse cardiovascular events, including arrhythmias, infarction, stroke, and sudden cardiac death. The muscle metaboreflex is a powerful cardiovascular reflex capable of eliciting marked increases in sympathetic activity during exercise. We used conscious, chronically instrumented dogs trained to run on a motor-driven treadmill to investigate the effects of hypertension on the mechanisms of the muscle metaboreflex. Experiments were performed before and 30.9 ± 4.2 days after induction of hypertension, which was induced via partial, unilateral renal artery occlusion. After induction of hypertension, resting mean arterial pressure was significantly elevated from 98.2 ± 2.6 to 141.9 ± 7.4 mmHg. The hypertension was caused by elevated total peripheral resistance. Although cardiac output was not significantly different at rest or during exercise after induction of hypertension, the rise in cardiac output with muscle metaboreflex activation was significantly reduced in hypertension. Metaboreflex-induced increases in left ventricular function were also depressed. These attenuated cardiac responses caused a smaller metaboreflex-induced rise in mean arterial pressure. We conclude that the ability of the muscle metaboreflex to elicit increases in cardiac function is impaired in hypertension, which may contribute to exercise intolerance.

  12. Decreased hydrogen peroxide production and mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle but not cardiac muscle of the green-striped burrowing frog, a natural model of muscle disuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Beau D; Hickey, Anthony J R; Cramp, Rebecca L; Franklin, Craig E

    2014-04-01

    Suppression of disuse-induced muscle atrophy has been associated with altered mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mammals. However, despite extended hindlimb immobility, aestivating animals exhibit little skeletal muscle atrophy compared with artificially immobilised mammalian models. Therefore, we studied mitochondrial respiration and ROS (H2O2) production in permeabilised muscle fibres of the green-striped burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata. Mitochondrial respiration within saponin-permeabilised skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres was measured concurrently with ROS production using high-resolution respirometry coupled to custom-made fluorometers. After 4 months of aestivation, C. alboguttata had significantly depressed whole-body metabolism by ~70% relative to control (active) frogs, and mitochondrial respiration in saponin-permeabilised skeletal muscle fibres decreased by almost 50% both in the absence of ADP and during oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial ROS production showed up to an 88% depression in aestivating skeletal muscle when malate, succinate and pyruvate were present at concentrations likely to reflect those in vivo. The percentage ROS released per O2 molecule consumed was also ~94% less at these concentrations, indicating an intrinsic difference in ROS production capacities during aestivation. We also examined mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in permeabilised cardiac muscle fibres and found that aestivating frogs maintained respiratory flux and ROS production at control levels. These results show that aestivating C. alboguttata has the capacity to independently regulate mitochondrial function in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Furthermore, this work indicates that ROS production can be suppressed in the disused skeletal muscle of aestivating frogs, which may in turn protect against potential oxidative damage and preserve skeletal muscle structure during aestivation and following arousal.

  13. Noncontact quantitative biomechanical characterization of cardiac muscle using shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V; Martin, James F; Larin, Kirill V

    2014-07-01

    We report on a quantitative optical elastographic method based on shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (SWI-OCT) for biomechanical characterization of cardiac muscle through noncontact elasticity measurement. The SWI-OCT system employs a focused air-puff device for localized loading of the cardiac muscle and utilizes phase-sensitive OCT to monitor the induced tissue deformation. Phase information from the optical interferometry is used to reconstruct 2-D depth-resolved shear wave propagation inside the muscle tissue. Cross-correlation of the displacement profiles at various spatial locations in the propagation direction is applied to measure the group velocity of the shear waves, based on which the Young's modulus of tissue is quantified. The quantitative feature and measurement accuracy of this method is demonstrated from the experiments on tissue-mimicking phantoms with the verification using uniaxial compression test. The experiments are performed on ex vivo cardiac muscle tissue from mice with normal and genetically altered myocardium. Our results indicate this optical elastographic technique is useful as a noncontact tool to assist the cardiac muscle studies.

  14. The declined phosphorylation of Heat shock protein 27 in rat cardiac muscle after hindlimb unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Jiang, Shizhong; Li, Zhili; Yuan, Min; Ting, Li; Ying, Zhang; Wang, Desheng

    2009-07-01

    Hindlimb unloading can induce the cardiac atrophy and diminished cardiac function, however, the mechanisms responsible for which remain elusive. The chronic volume unloading of heart, which decreases the local mechanical stress, may lead to cardiac atrophy after hindlimb unloading. Many studies showed that integrin signaling, p38 MAPK, Heat shock protein 27 and cytoskeleton involved in the hypertrophic growth induced by mechanical stress. However, the mechanisms responsible for cardiac atrophy after hindlimb unloading are still unclear. In this study, we used the tail-suspended, hindlimb unloading rat model to simulate the effects of microgravity. Western blot analysis was used to detect the protein expression of Heat shock protein 27, focal adhesion kinase, p38 MAPK and their phosphorylation levels in rat cardiac muscle after 14d hindlimb unloading. The results showed that the phosphorylation levels of both Heat shock protein 27 and p38 MAPK were decreased significantly in rat cardiac muscle after hindlimb unloading. However, the phosphorylation level of focal adhesion kinase was not decreased significantly. The results suggested that Heat shock protein 27, the downstream of p38 MAPK, might play a critical role in the cardiac atrophy in response to simulated microgravity induced by hindlimb unloading.

  15. Changes in the cardiac muscle electric activity as a result of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajek, Magdalena; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kalawski, Ryszard; Kulczak, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Many bioelectric signals have a complex internal structure that can be a rich source of information on the tissue or cell processes. The structure of such signals can be analysed in detail by applying digital methods of signal processing. Therefore, of substantial use in diagnosis of the coronary arterial disease is the method of digital enhancement of increasing signal resolution ECG (NURSE-ECG), permitting detection of temporary changes in the electric potentials in the cardiac muscle in the process of depolarisation. Thanks to the application of NURSE-ECG it has become possible to detect relatively small changes in the electric activity of particular fragments of the cardiac muscle undetectable by the standard ECG method, caused by ischemia, the effect of a drug or infarct. The aim of this study was to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) operation. In this study the method of NURSE-ECG has been applied in order to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the CABG operation. In the study performed in cooperation of the Institute of Physics Adam Mickiewicz University and the Strus Hospital, Cardiac Surgery Ward, 37 patients with advanced coronary arterial disease were asked to participate. The patients were examined prior to the operation, on the day after the operation and two months after the operation and a year after the operation. The ECG recordings were subjected to a numerical procedure of resolution enhancement by a NURSE-ECG program to reveal the tentative changes in the electric potential of the cardiac muscle on its depolarisation. Results of the study have shown that the NURSE ECG method can be applied to monitor changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle occurring as a result of CABG operation. One the second day after the operation in the majority of patients (70%) a rapid decrease of the total

  16. Oral resveratrol therapy inhibits cancer-induced skeletal muscle and cardiac atrophy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadfar, Scott; Couch, Marion E; McKinney, Kibwei A; Weinstein, Lisa J; Yin, Xiaoying; Rodríguez, Jessica E; Guttridge, Denis C; Willis, Monte

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which cancer mediates muscle atrophy has been delineated in the past 3 decades and includes a prominent role of tumor-derived cytokines, such as IL-6, TNFα, and IL-1. These cytokines interact with their cognate receptors on muscle to activate the downstream transcription factor NF-κB and induce sarcomere proteolysis. Experimentally, inhibiting NF-κB signaling largely prevents cancer-induced muscle wasting, indicating its prominent role in muscle atrophy. Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin found in the skin of grapes, has recently been shown to inhibit NF-κB in cancer cells, which led us to hypothesize that it might have a protective role in cancer cachexia. Therefore, we investigated whether daily oral resveratrol could protect against skeletal muscle loss and cardiac atrophy in an established mouse model. We demonstrate resveratrol inhibits skeletal muscle and cardiac atrophy induced by C26 adenocarcinoma tumors through its inhibition of NF-κB (p65) activity in skeletal muscle and heart. These studies demonstrate for the first time the utility of oral resveratrol therapy to provide clinical benefit in cancer-induced atrophy through the inhibition of NF-κB in muscle. These findings may have application in the treatment of diseases with parallel pathophysiologies such as muscular dystrophy and heart failure.

  17. Cellular models and viral vectors for skeletal and cardiac muscle research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neshati, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal and cardiac muscle disorders are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Despite many improvements in the medical and surgical management of these disorders, development of effective treatments has proven to be challenging. This is because of the limited suitability of existing

  18. The morphological development of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of the migratory barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bishop, CM; Butler, PJ; ElHaj, AJ; Egginton, S; Loonen, MJJE

    1996-01-01

    The masses of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of wild barnacle goose goslings, from a migratory population, were examined systematically during development and their values compared to those of pre-migratory geese. Pre-flight development was typified by approximately linear increases of body, leg,

  19. Cellular models and viral vectors for skeletal and cardiac muscle research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neshati, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal and cardiac muscle disorders are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Despite many improvements in the medical and surgical management of these disorders, development of effective treatments has proven to be challenging. This is because of the limited suitability of existing

  20. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Penheiter, Alan R. [Molecular Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Burghardt, Thomas P., E-mail: burghardt@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Ajtai, Katalin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  1. Effects of protein-calorie restriction on mechanical function of hypertrophied cardiac muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Cicogna

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of food restriction (FR on hypertrophied cardiac muscle in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. METHODS: Isolated papillary muscle preparations of the left ventricle (LV of 60-day-old SHR and of normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rats were studied. The rats were fed either an unrestricted diet or FR diet (50% of the intake of the control diet for 30 days. The mechanical function of the muscles was evaluated through monitoring isometric and isotonic contractions. RESULTS: FR caused: 1 reduction in the body weight and LV weight of SHR and WKY rats; 2 increase in the time to peak shortening and the time to peak developed tension (DT in the hypertrophied myocardium of the SHR; 3 diverging changes in the mechanical function of the normal cardiac muscles of WKY rats with reduction in maximum velocity of isotonic shortening and of the time for DT to decrease 50% of its maximum value, and increase of the resting tension and of the rate of tension decline. CONCLUSION: Short-term FR causes prolongation of the contraction time of hypertrophied muscles and paradoxal changes in mechanical performance of normal cardiac fibers, with worsening of the shortening indices and of the resting tension, and improvement of the isometric relaxation.

  2. Cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormality in taurine transporter-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi; Oishi, Shohei; Takai, Mika; Kimura, Yasushi; Uozumi, Yoriko; Fujio, Yasushi; Schaffer, Stephen W; Azuma, Junichi

    2010-08-24

    Taurine, a sulfur-containing beta-amino acid, is highly contained in heart and skeletal muscle. Taurine has a variety of biological actions, such as ion movement, calcium handling and cytoprotection in the cardiac and skeletal muscles. Meanwhile, taurine deficiency leads various pathologies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, in cat and fox. However, the essential role of taurine depletion on pathogenesis has not been fully clarified. To address the physiological role of taurine in mammalian tissues, taurine transporter-(TauT-) knockout models were recently generated. TauTKO mice exhibited loss of body weight, abnormal cardiac function and the reduced exercise capacity with tissue taurine depletion. In this chapter, we summarize pathological profile and histological feature of heart and skeletal muscle in TauTKO mice.

  3. Evaluation of peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Maria Souza Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peripheral muscle strength has been little explored in the literature in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. Objective: To evaluate the peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods: This was a longitudinal observational study. The peripheral muscle strength was measured using isometric dynamometry lower limb (knee extensors and flexors at three different times: preoperatively (M1, the day of discharge (M2 and hospital discharge (M3. Participants received physiotherapy pre and postoperatively during the days of hospitalization during the morning and afternoon. Results: Twenty-two patients were evaluated. The values of peripheral muscle strength of knee extensors preoperative found were about 50% lower than those predicted for the healthy population. When comparing muscle strength prior (M1, with the remaining evaluation, found himself in a fall of 29% for the movement of knee extension and 25% for knee flexion in M2 and a decrease of 10% movement for knee extension and 13% for knee flexion in M3 when comparing with M1. Conclusion: The values of peripheral muscle strength prior of the study patients were lower than predicted for the healthy population of the same age. After the surgical event this reduction is even more remarkable, being reestablished until the time of discharge, to values close to baseline.

  4. Transient kinetics of Ca2+ transport of sarcoplasmic reticulum. A comparison of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, M; Wang, T; Mandel, F; Froehlich, J P; Schwartz, A

    1978-12-25

    Current evidence supports similar functions and mechanisms for cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (CSR) as for skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SSR). It is thought that the slower relaxation rate of cardiac muscle compared to fast skeletal muscle reflects the lower ATPase activity and calcium transport of CSR. Possible quantitative differences is phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and calcium transport of the isolated preparations are studied using a quench-flow apparatus. The results show that both CSR and SSR bind calcium tightly in the absence of ATP, and coupling of E approximately P formation and calcium transport occurs in the transient phase of ATP hydrolysis. The rate of phosphorylation (t-1/2 - 10 ms) of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) preloaded with calcium is the same for cardiac and skeletal preparations. However, the rates of dissociation of extra vesicular calcium (10 s-1 versus 15 s-1), phosphorylation of calcium-free SR, and dephosphorylation of E approximately P (8 s-1 versus 12 s-1) are lower for CSR than for SSR. By computer simulation, the apparent rate constants associated with the reduced rates of phosphorylation of calcium-free SR were: 12 s-1 for CSR and 63 s-1 for SSR in the presence of high Mg2+. The difference in the rates may be partly responsible for the lower levels of ATPase and calcium transport activity with characterize cardiac muscle preparations.

  5. The Hippo signal transduction network in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerhage, Henning; Del Re, Dominic P; Judson, Robert N; Sudol, Marius; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-08-05

    The discovery of the Hippo pathway can be traced back to two areas of research. Genetic screens in fruit flies led to the identification of the Hippo pathway kinases and scaffolding proteins that function together to suppress cell proliferation and tumor growth. Independent research, often in the context of muscle biology, described Tead (TEA domain) transcription factors, which bind CATTCC DNA motifs to regulate gene expression. These two research areas were joined by the finding that the Hippo pathway regulates the activity of Tead transcription factors mainly through phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivators Yap and Taz, which bind to and activate Teads. Additionally, many other signal transduction proteins crosstalk to members of the Hippo pathway forming a Hippo signal transduction network. We discuss evidence that the Hippo signal transduction network plays important roles in myogenesis, regeneration, muscular dystrophy, and rhabdomyosarcoma in skeletal muscle, as well as in myogenesis, organ size control, and regeneration of the heart. Understanding the role of Hippo kinases in skeletal and heart muscle physiology could have important implications for translational research. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Effect of HIV-1-related protein expression on cardiac and skeletal muscles from transgenic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidot David M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and the consequent acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS has protean manifestations, including muscle wasting and cardiomyopathy, which contribute to its high morbidity. The pathogenesis of these myopathies remains partially understood, and may include nutritional deficiencies, biochemical abnormalities, inflammation, and other mechanisms due to viral infection and replication. Growing evidence has suggested that HIV-1-related proteins expressed by the host in response to viral infection, including Tat and gp120, may also be involved in the pathophysiology of AIDS, particularly in cells or tissues that are not directly infected with HIV-1. To explore the potentially independent effects of HIV-1-related proteins on heart and skeletal muscles, we used a transgenic rat model that expresses several HIV-1-related proteins (e.g., Tat, gp120, and Nef. Outcome measures included basic heart and skeletal muscle morphology, glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress, and gene expressions of atrogin-1, muscle ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1 and Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGFβ1, three factors associated with muscle catabolism. Results Consistent with HIV-1 associated myopathies in humans, HIV-1 transgenic rats had increased relative heart masses, decreased relative masses of soleus, plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles, and decreased total and myosin heavy chain type-specific plantaris muscle fiber areas. In both tissues, the levels of cystine (Cyss, the oxidized form of the anti-oxidant cysteine (Cys, and Cyss:Cys ratios were significantly elevated, and cardiac tissue from HIV-1 transgenic rats had altered glutathione metabolism, all reflective of significant oxidative stress. In HIV-1 transgenic rat hearts, MuRF-1 gene expression was increased. Further, HIV-1-related protein expression also increased atrogin-1 (~14- and ~3-fold and TGFβ1 (~5-fold and ~3-fold in heart and

  7. Induction of cardiac muscle differentiation in isolated animal pole explants of Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, M; Mohun, T

    1993-07-01

    We have isolated a cDNA fragment encoding a portion of the myosin heavy chain alpha-isoform (XMHC alpha) in the amphibian, Xenopus laevis. The XMHC alpha transcript is highly enriched in adult heart RNA and is expressed exclusively in embryonic heart tissue. It therefore provides a tissue-specific marker for cardiac muscle differentiation during early embryogenesis. Using an RNAase protection assay, we can detect the onset of cardiac muscle differentiation in an anterior, ventral region of tailbud embryos, many hours before the appearance of a beating heart. Whole-mount in situ RNA hybridisation indicates that expression of the XMHC alpha gene is restricted to the developing heart primordium. XMHC alpha gene expression can also be induced in isolated animal pole explants of blastulae by treatment with the growth factor, activin A. Induction is dose-dependent, requiring high doses of the growth factor compared with that required for myotomal (skeletal) muscle differentiation. In contrast, no XMHC alpha transcripts are detected in explants incubated with basic FGF, despite the induction of myotomal muscle differentiation. Activin-induced explants show a similar temporal pattern of XMHC alpha gene expression to that found in normal embryogenesis. Furthermore, cells expressing this gene appear clustered in one or two foci within fused explant aggregates, which often show regular, spontaneous contractions after several days in culture. These results show that terminal differentiation of cardiac muscle can occur in growth factor-induced explants and may be distinguished from skeletal muscle differentiation by the dose and nature of the inducing factor.

  8. Effect of xinmailong on ischemic cardiac muscle during hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Xinmailong injection solution was invented at 1988 by prof. Li Shunan in Dali medical college. It was made from the material which has high biological activeness to the cardiac and vascular system. During the experimental shock caused by excessive loss of blood in monkey and dog, it was found by ECG that the T-wave of anterion lead on left chest elevated and became high and sharp after acute blood loss. Arterial blood pressure dropped to 8-5.3 kPa for dog and 8-5.3-2.7 kPa for monkey, changes of T-wave all recovered to near normal level after xinmailong solution was injected intravenously (0.05-0.2 mL/kg). These Results implied that xinmailong might improve the ischemia of myocardium induced by hemorrhagic shock.

  9. The Role of Vitamin D in Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Function

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    Patsie ePolly

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Myopathy is a feature of many inflammatory syndromes. Chronic inflammation has been linked to pathophysiological mechanisms which implicate 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH2D3-mediated signaling pathways with emerging evidence supporting a role for the vitamin D receptor (VDR in contractile and metabolic function of both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Altered VDR expression in skeletal and cardiac muscle has been reported to result in significant effects on metabolism, calcium signaling and fibrosis in these tissues. Elevated levels of serum inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, TNF- and IFN, have been shown to impact myogenic and nuclear receptor signaling pathways in cancer-induced cachexia. The dysregulation of nuclear receptors, such as VDR and RXR in muscle cells, has also been postulated to result in myopathy via their effects on muscle structural integrity and metabolism. Future research directions include generating transcriptome-wide information incorporating VDR and its gene targets and using systems biology approaches to identify altered molecular networks in human tissues such as muscle. These approaches will aid in the development of novel therapeutic targeting strategies for inflammation-induced myopathies.

  10. Tragedy in a heartbeat: malfunctioning desmin causes skeletal and cardiac muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Lev G; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2009-07-01

    Muscle fiber deterioration resulting in progressive skeletal muscle weakness, heart failure, and respiratory distress occurs in more than 20 inherited myopathies. As discussed in this Review, one of the newly identified myopathies is desminopathy, a disease caused by dysfunctional mutations in desmin, a type III intermediate filament protein, or alphaB-crystallin, a chaperone for desmin. The range of clinical manifestations in patients with desminopathy is wide and may overlap with those observed in individuals with other myopathies. Awareness of this disease needs to be heightened, diagnostic criteria reliably outlined, and molecular testing readily available; this would ensure prevention of sudden death from cardiac arrhythmias and other complications.

  11. Sarcomere Imaging by Quantum Dots for the Study of Cardiac Muscle Physiology

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    Fuyu Kobirumaki-Shimozawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We here review the use of quantum dots (QDs for the imaging of sarcomeric movements in cardiac muscle. QDs are fluorescence substances (CdSe that absorb photons and reemit photons at a different wavelength (depending on the size of the particle; they are efficient in generating long-lasting, narrow symmetric emission profiles, and hence useful in various types of imaging studies. Recently, we developed a novel system in which the length of a particular, single sarcomere in cardiomyocytes can be measured at ~30 nm precision. Moreover, our system enables accurate measurement of sarcomere length in the isolated heart. We propose that QDs are the ideal tool for the study of sarcomere dynamics during excitation-contraction coupling in healthy and diseased cardiac muscle.

  12. Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Defects in a Mouse Model of Human Barth Syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acehan, Devrim; Vaz, Frederic; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; James, Jeanne; Moore, Vicky; Tokunaga, Chonan; Kulik, Willem; Wansapura, Janaka; Toth, Matthew J.; Strauss, Arnold; Khuchua, Zaza

    2011-01-01

    Barth syndrome is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by mutations in the tafazzin (taz) gene and characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy, exercise intolerance, chronic fatigue, delayed growth, and neutropenia. Tafazzin is a mitochondrial transacylase required for cardiolipin remodeling. Although tafazzin function has been studied in non-mammalian model organisms, mammalian genetic loss of function approaches have not been used. We examined the consequences of tafazzin knockdown on sarcomeric mitochondria and cardiac function in mice. Tafazzin knockdown resulted in a dramatic decrease of tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin in cardiac and skeletal muscles and accumulation of monolysocardiolipins and cardiolipin molecular species with aberrant acyl groups. Electron microscopy revealed pathological changes in mitochondria, myofibrils, and mitochondrion-associated membranes in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe cardiac abnormalities, including left ventricular dilation, left ventricular mass reduction, and depression of fractional shortening and ejection fraction in tafazzin-deficient mice. Tafazzin knockdown mice provide the first mammalian model system for Barth syndrome in which the pathophysiological relationships between altered content of mitochondrial phospholipids, ultrastructural abnormalities, myocardial and mitochondrial dysfunction, and clinical outcome can be completely investigated. PMID:21068380

  13. Characterization of Post-Translational Modifications to Calsequestrins of Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle

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    Kevin M. Lewis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calsequestrin is glycosylated and phosphorylated during its transit to its final destination in the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum. To determine the significance and universal profile of these post-translational modifications to mammalian calsequestrin, we characterized, via mass spectrometry, the glycosylation and phosphorylation of skeletal muscle calsequestrin from cattle (B. taurus, lab mice (M. musculus and lab rats (R. norvegicus and cardiac muscle calsequestrin from cattle, lab rats and humans. On average, glycosylation of skeletal calsequestrin consisted of two N-acetylglucosamines and one mannose (GlcNAc2Man1, while cardiac calsequestrin had five additional mannoses (GlcNAc2Man6. Skeletal calsequestrin was not phosphorylated, while the C-terminal tails of cardiac calsequestrin contained between zero to two phosphoryls, indicating that phosphorylation of cardiac calsequestrin may be heterogeneous in vivo. Static light scattering experiments showed that the Ca2+-dependent polymerization capabilities of native bovine skeletal calsequestrin are enhanced, relative to the non-glycosylated, recombinant isoform, which our crystallographic studies suggest may be due to glycosylation providing a dynamic “guiderail”-like scaffold for calsequestrin polymerization. Glycosylation likely increases a polymerization/depolymerization response to changing Ca2+ concentrations, and proper glycosylation, in turn, guarantees both effective Ca2+ storage/buffering of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and localization of calsequestrin (Casq at its target site.

  14. Cardiac and skeletal muscle scintigraphy in dermato- and polymyositis: clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchpiguel, C.A. [Centro de Medicina Nuclear, Dept. de Radiologia, Faculdade de Medicina da USP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Roizemblatt, S. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Sao Paulo Univ. School of Medicine (Brazil); Pastor, E.H. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Sao Paulo Univ. School of Medicine (Brazil); Hironaka, F.H. [Centro de Medicina Nuclear, Dept. de Radiologia, Faculdade de Medicina da USP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cossermelli, W. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Sao Paulo Univ. School of Medicine (Brazil)

    1996-02-01

    To determine the role of scintigraphy in the detection of skeletal and cardiac involvement in dermato- and polymyosits (DM/PM), we studied 30 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of DM/PM (23 females, 7 males; mean age: 35 years). Technetium-99m pyrophosphate ({sup 99m}Tc-DYP) and gallium-67 scans showed similar sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the detection of skeletal muscle involvement when compared with serum enzymes (70%, 100% and 80%, respectively). Compared with the clinical parameters, {sup 99m}Tc-PYP showed 70% and {sup 67}Ga 65% accuracy. Abnormal PYP cardiac uptake was observed in 57% of patients, whereas abnormal {sup 67}Ga cardiac uptake was seen in only 15%. Electrocardiogrpahy was abnormal in 40%, rest gated blood pool study in 23%, and chest X-ray in 13%. In conclusion, both {sup 99m}Tc-PYP and {sup 67}Ga can be useful in the detection of the active phase of muscle disease. However, {sup 99m}Tc-PYP seems to be more effective than {sup 67}Ga in the early diagnosis of cardiac involvement. (orig.)

  15. Respiratory muscle strength in relation to sarcopenia in elderly cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Satoshi; Oka, Koichiro; Kasahara, Yusuke; Morio, Yuji; Hiraki, Koji; Hirano, Yasuyuki; Omori, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norio; Kida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J

    2016-12-01

    Little information exists on the relation between respiratory muscle strength such as maximum inspiratory muscle pressure (MIP) and sarcopenia in elderly cardiac patients. The present study aimed to determine the differences in MIP, and cutoff values for MIP according to sarcopenia in elderly cardiac patients. We enrolled 63 consecutive elderly male patients aged ≥65 years with cardiac disease in this cross-sectional study. Sarcopenia was defined based on the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People algorithm, and, accordingly, the patients were divided into two groups: the sarcopenia group (n = 24) and non-sarcopenia group (n = 39). The prevalence of sarcopenia in cardiac patients and MIP in the patients with and without sarcopenia were assessed to determine cutoff values of MIP. After adjustment for body mass index, the MIP in the sarcopenia group was significantly lower than that in the non-sarcopenia group (54.7 ± 36.8 cmH2O; 95 % CI 42.5-72.6 vs. 80.7 ± 34.7 cmH2O; 95 % CI 69.5-92.0; F = 4.89, p = 0.029). A receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis of patients with and without sarcopenia identified a cutoff value for MIP of 55.6 cmH2O, with a sensitivity of 0.76, 1-specificity of 0.37, and AUC of 0.70 (95 % CI 0.56-0.83; p = 0.01) in the study patients. Compared with elderly cardiac patients without sarcopenia, MIP in those with sarcopenia may be negatively affected. The MIP cutoff value reported here may be a useful minimum target value for identifying elderly male cardiac patients with sarcopenia.

  16. Cardiac Meets Skeletal: What’s New in Microfluidic Models for Muscle Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Visone

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years microfluidics and microfabrication technique principles have been extensively exploited for biomedical applications. In this framework, organs-on-a-chip represent promising tools to reproduce key features of functional tissue units within microscale culture chambers. These systems offer the possibility to investigate the effects of biochemical, mechanical, and electrical stimulations, which are usually applied to enhance the functionality of the engineered tissues. Since the functionality of muscle tissues relies on the 3D organization and on the perfect coupling between electrochemical stimulation and mechanical contraction, great efforts have been devoted to generate biomimetic skeletal and cardiac systems to allow high-throughput pathophysiological studies and drug screening. This review critically analyzes microfluidic platforms that were designed for skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue engineering. Our aim is to highlight which specific features of the engineered systems promoted a typical reorganization of the engineered construct and to discuss how promising design solutions exploited for skeletal muscle models could be applied to improve cardiac tissue models and vice versa.

  17. (-)-Stepholodine induced enhancement of cardiac muscle contractions mediated by D1 receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shu-yuan; LIU Zheng; HU Hui-sheng; SHI Zhen; CHEN Long

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of (-)-Stepholidine (SPD) on enhancing D1 receptor mediated contraction of cardiac muscle in isolated rat heart and to examine whether SPD has a direct effect on the heart dopamine D1 receptors. SPD an active ingredient of the Chinese herb Stephania intermedia, binds to dopamine D1 and D2 like receptors. Biochemical, electrophysiological and behavioural experiments have provided strong evidence that SPD is both a D(1/5) agonist and a D(2/4) antagonist, which could indicate unique antipsychotic properties. Methods Normal adult rat working hearts were isolated by Langendorff technique. Results SPD significantly increased the cardiac muscle contraction in a dose-dependent manner. The selective D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (1 μM) blocked the SPD induced heart contraction, however, neither the β-receptor antagonist propranolol (1 μM) nor the α1-receptor antagonist prazosin (1 μM) had any effect on blocking SPD induced heart contractions. Moreover, the L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor nimodipine (1 μM) completely blocked the effect of SPD on cardiac muscle contraction. Conclusions SPD show the effect on enhancing contraction of isolated rat heart through activating L-type Ca2+ channel mediated by heart D1 receptors.

  18. Controlling the contractile strength of engineered cardiac muscle by hierarchal tissue architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Adam W; Alford, Patrick W; Jin, Hongwei; Ripplinger, Crystal M; Werdich, Andreas A; Sheehy, Sean P; Grosberg, Anna; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2012-08-01

    The heart is a muscular organ with a wrapping, laminar structure embedded with neural and vascular networks, collagen fibrils, fibroblasts, and cardiac myocytes that facilitate contraction. We hypothesized that these non-muscle components may have functional benefit, serving as important structural alignment cues in inter- and intra-cellular organization of cardiac myocytes. Previous studies have demonstrated that alignment of engineered myocardium enhances calcium handling, but how this impacts actual force generation remains unclear. Quantitative assays are needed to determine the effect of alignment on contractile function and muscle physiology. To test this, micropatterned surfaces were used to build 2-dimensional myocardium from neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with distinct architectures: confluent isotropic (serving as the unaligned control), confluent anisotropic, and 20 μm spaced, parallel arrays of multicellular myocardial fibers. We combined image analysis of sarcomere orientation with muscular thin film contractile force assays in order to calculate the peak sarcomere-generated stress as a function of tissue architecture. Here we report that increasing peak systolic stress in engineered cardiac tissues corresponds with increasing sarcomere alignment. This change is larger than would be anticipated from enhanced calcium handling and increased uniaxial alignment alone. These results suggest that boundary conditions (heterogeneities) encoded in the extracellular space can regulate muscle tissue function, and that structural organization and cytoskeletal alignment are critically important for maximizing peak force generation.

  19. SCN4A variants and Brugada syndrome : phenotypic and genotypic overlap between cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bissay, Veronique; Van Malderen, Sophie C. H.; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lissens, Willy; Peeters, Uschi; Daneels, Dorien; Jansen, Anna C.; Pappaert, Gudrun; Brugada, Pedro; De Keyser, Jacques; Van Dooren, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A mutations involving the alpha-subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated muscle sodium channel (NaV1.5) result in different cardiac channelopathies with an autosomal-dominant inheritance such as Brugada syndrome. On the other hand, mutations in SCN4A encoding the alpha-subunit of the skeletal voltag

  20. SCN4A variants and Brugada syndrome: Phenotypic and genotypic overlap between cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bissay (Véronique); S. van Malderen (Sophie); K. Keymolen (Kathelijn); J. Lissens (Jurgen); U. Peeters (Uschi); D. Daneels (Dorien); A.C. Jansen (Anna C.); G. Pappaert (Gudrun); P. Rugada (Pedro); J. De Keyser (Jacques); S. van Dooren (Sonia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSCN5A mutations involving the α-subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated muscle sodium channel (NaV1.5) result in different cardiac channelopathies with an autosomal-dominant inheritance such as Brugada syndrome. On the other hand, mutations in SCN4A encoding the α-subunit of the skeletal vo

  1. Changes in isoform composition, structure, and functional properties of titin from Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) cardiac muscle after space flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikhlyantsev, I M; Okuneva, A D; Shpagina, M D; Shumilina, Yu V; Molochkov, N V; Salmov, N N; Podlubnaya, Z A

    2011-12-01

    Changes in isoform composition, secondary structure, and titin phosphorylation in Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) cardiac muscle were studied after 12-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft Foton-M3. The effect of titin on the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity at pCa 7.5 and 4.6 was also studied. Almost twofold increase in titin long N2BA isoform content relative to that of short N2B isoform was found on electrophoregrams of cardiac muscle left ventricle of the flight group gerbils. Differences in secondary structure of titin isolated from cardiac muscle of control and flight groups of gerbils were found. An increase in phosphorylation (1.30-1.35-fold) of titin of cardiac muscle of the flight group gerbils was found. A decrease in activating effect of titin of cardiac muscle of the flight group gerbils on actomyosin ATPase activity in vitro was also found. The observed changes are discussed in the context of M. unguiculatus cardiac muscle adaptation to conditions of weightlessness. © Pleiades Publishing, Ltd., 2011.

  2. Absence of acute skeletal and cardiac muscle injuries in amateur triathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos C. Jovita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Creatine kinase (CK and creatine kinase muscle-brain fraction (CK-MB might be associated with damage to muscle and cardiac tissue, respectively, as a consequence of intense prolonged exercise. The objective of the present study was to determine whether acute changes in CK and CK-MB reflect some risk of damage to skeletal and cardiac muscles in amateur athletes after Ironman 70.3. The sample consisted of 10 male athlete volunteers (age: 34.0 ± 9.2 years. A venous blood sample (2 mL was collected before and after the competition. The volunteers completed the race in 5h20min to 6 h. CK and CK-MB were analyzed by an enzymatic method using Wiener labreagent in an automatic spectrophotometer (Targa bt 3000. The nonparametric Wilcoxon test showed significant differences (p < .05 in the variables studied before and after the competition. Mean CK was 112.23 ± 34.9 and 458.0 ± 204.9 U/L (Δ% = 418.2, and mean CK-MB was 7.4 ± 2.6 and 10.8 ± 3.9 U/L (Δ% = 153.3 before and after the event, respectively. The relative variation in CK-MB compared to CK before (6.9% and after (2.5% the competition showed that the former is not a factor of concern during intense prolonged exercise such as Ironman 70.3. In conclusion, the acute increase in CK after the end of intense prolonged exercise indicates skeletal muscle damage which, however, is considered to be normal for athletes. With respect to CK-MB, cardiac muscle injury was inexistent.

  3. Zebrafish cardiac muscle thick filaments: isolation technique and three-dimensional structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Solá, Maryví; Al-Khayat, Hind A; Behra, Martine; Kensler, Robert W

    2014-04-15

    To understand how mutations in thick filament proteins such as cardiac myosin binding protein-C or titin, cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, it is important to determine the structure of the cardiac thick filament. Techniques for the genetic manipulation of the zebrafish are well established and it has become a major model for the study of the cardiovascular system. Our goal is to develop zebrafish as an alternative system to the mammalian heart model for the study of the structure of the cardiac thick filaments and the proteins that form it. We have successfully isolated thick filaments from zebrafish cardiac muscle, using a procedure similar to those for mammalian heart, and analyzed their structure by negative-staining and electron microscopy. The isolated filaments appear well ordered with the characteristic 42.9 nm quasi-helical repeat of the myosin heads expected from x-ray diffraction. We have performed single particle image analysis on the collected electron microscopy images for the C-zone region of these filaments and obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction at 3.5 nm resolution. This reconstruction reveals structure similar to the mammalian thick filament, and demonstrates that zebrafish may provide a useful model for the study of the changes in the cardiac thick filament associated with disease processes.

  4. Cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity are absent in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2013-02-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome) is an hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN type III), expressed at birth, that is associated with reduced pain and temperature sensibilities and absent baroreflexes, causing orthostatic hypotension as well as labile blood pressure that increases markedly during emotional excitement. Given the apparent absence of functional baroreceptor afferents, we tested the hypothesis that the normal cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) are absent in patients with familial dysautonomia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into muscle or cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in 12 patients with familial dysautonomia. Spontaneous bursts of MSNA were absent in all patients, but in five patients we found evidence of tonically firing sympathetic neurones, with no cardiac rhythmicity, that increased their spontaneous discharge during emotional arousal but not during a manoeuvre that unloads the baroreceptors. Conversely, skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), recorded in four patients, appeared normal. We conclude that the loss of phasic bursts of MSNA and the loss of baroreflex modulation of muscle vasoconstrictor drive contributes to the poor control of blood pressure in familial dysautonomia, and that the increase in tonic firing of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones contributes to the increase in blood pressure during emotional excitement.

  5. A Novel Human Tissue-Engineered 3-D Functional Vascularized Cardiac Muscle Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valarmathi, Mani T.; Fuseler, John W.; Davis, Jeffrey M.; Price, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Organ tissue engineering, including cardiovascular tissues, has been an area of intense investigation. The major challenge to these approaches has been the inability to vascularize and perfuse the in vitro engineered tissue constructs. Attempts to provide oxygen and nutrients to the cells contained in the biomaterial constructs have had varying degrees of success. The aim of this current study is to develop a three-dimensional (3-D) model of vascularized cardiac tissue to examine the concurrent temporal and spatial regulation of cardiomyogenesis in the context of postnatal de novo vasculogenesis during stem cell cardiac regeneration. In order to achieve the above aim, we have developed an in vitro 3-D functional vascularized cardiac muscle construct using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived embryonic cardiac myocytes (hiPSC-ECMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). First, to generate the prevascularized scaffold, human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (hCMVECs) and hMSCs were co-cultured onto a 3-D collagen cell carrier (CCC) for 7 days under vasculogenic culture conditions. In this milieu, hCMVECs/hMSCs underwent maturation, differentiation, and morphogenesis characteristic of microvessels, and formed extensive plexuses of vascular networks. Next, the hiPSC-ECMs and hMSCs were co-cultured onto this generated prevascularized CCCs for further 7 or 14 days in myogenic culture conditions. Finally, the vascular and cardiac phenotypic inductions were analyzed at the morphological, immunological, biochemical, molecular, and functional levels. Expression and functional analyses of the differentiated cells revealed neo-angiogenesis and neo-cardiomyogenesis. Thus, our unique 3-D co-culture system provided us the apt in vitro functional vascularized 3-D cardiac patch that can be utilized for cellular cardiomyoplasty. PMID:28194397

  6. Skeletal and cardiac muscle defects in a murine model of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, M J; Kondo, C; Thurston, J; Alakija, P; Burke, B J; Stewart, C; Syme, D; Giles, W R

    2005-01-01

    Previous histological findings, physiological data, and behavioral observations on the A-type lamin knockout mouse (Lmna(-/-)) suggest that important aspects of this model resemble the human Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) phenotype. The main goal of our experiments was to study skeletal and cardiac muscle function in this murine model to obtain the semiquantitative data needed for more detailed comparisons with human EDMD defects. Measurements of the mechanical properties of preparations from two different skeletal muscle groups, the soleus and the diaphragm, were made in vitro. In addition, records of the electrocardiogram, and measurements of heart rate variability were obtained; and phasic contractions (unloaded shortening) of enzymatically isolated ventricular myocytes were monitored. Soleus muscles from Lmna(-/-) mice produced less force and work than control preparations. In contrast, force and work production in strips of diaphragm were not changed significantly. Lead II electrocardiograms from conscious, restrained Lmna(-/-) mice revealed slightly decreased heart rates, with significant prolongations of PQ, QRS, and 'QT' intervals compared with those from control recordings. These ECG changes resemble some aspects of the ECG records from humans with EDMD; however, the cardiac phenotype in this Lmna(-/-) mouse model appears to be less well-defined/developed. Ventricular myocytes isolated from Lmna(-/-) mice exhibited impaired contractile responses, particularly when superfused with the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (1 microM). This deficit was more pronounced in myocytes isolated from the left ventricle(s) than in myocytes from the right ventricle(s). In summary, tissues from the Lmna(-/-) mouse exhibit a number of skeletal and cardiac muscle deficiencies, some of which are similar to those which have been reported in studies of human EDMD.

  7. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmento AO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana de Oliveira Sarmento,1–3 Amilton da Cruz Santos,1,4 Ivani Credidio Trombetta,2,5 Marciano Moacir Dantas,1 Ana Cristina Oliveira Marques,1,4 Leone Severino do Nascimento,1,4 Bruno Teixeira Barbosa,1,2 Marcelo Rodrigues Dos Santos,2 Maria do Amparo Andrade,3 Anna Myrna Jaguaribe-Lima,3,6 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos1,3,4 1Laboratory of Physical Training Studies Applied to Health, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, Brazil; 2Unit of Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology – Heart Institute (InCor/HC-FMUSP, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Graduate Program in Physiotherapy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; 4Associate Graduate Program in Physical Education UPE/UFPB, João Pessoa, Brazil; 5Graduate Program in Medicine, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Department of Morphology and Animal Physiology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver. Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac

  8. Modeling of cardiac muscle thin films: pre-stretch, passive and active behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jongmin; Grosberg, Anna; Nawroth, Janna C; Parker, Kevin Kit; Bertoldi, Katia

    2012-03-15

    Recent progress in tissue engineering has made it possible to build contractile bio-hybrid materials that undergo conformational changes by growing a layer of cardiac muscle on elastic polymeric membranes. Further development of such muscular thin films for building actuators and powering devices requires exploring several design parameters, which include the alignment of the cardiac myocytes and the thickness/Young's modulus of elastomeric film. To more efficiently explore these design parameters, we propose a 3-D phenomenological constitutive model, which accounts for both the passive deformation including pre-stretch and the active behavior of the cardiomyocytes. The proposed 3-D constitutive model is implemented within a finite element framework, and can be used to improve the current design of bio-hybrid thin films and help developing bio-hybrid constructs capable of complex conformational changes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transgenic overexpression of LARGE induces α-dystroglycan hyperglycosylation in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Brockington

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: LARGE is one of seven putative or demonstrated glycosyltransferase enzymes defective in a common group of muscular dystrophies with reduced glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. Overexpression of LARGE induces hyperglycosylation of α-dystroglycan in both wild type and in cells from dystroglycanopathy patients, irrespective of their primary gene defect, restoring functional glycosylation. Viral delivery of LARGE to skeletal muscle in animal models of dystroglycanopathy has identical effects in vivo, suggesting that the restoration of functional glycosylation could have therapeutic applications in these disorders. Pharmacological strategies to upregulate Large expression are also being explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to asses the safety and efficacy of long term LARGE over-expression in vivo, we have generated four mouse lines expressing a human LARGE transgene. On observation, LARGE transgenic mice were indistinguishable from the wild type littermates. Tissue analysis from young mice of all four lines showed a variable pattern of transgene expression: highest in skeletal and cardiac muscles, and lower in brain, kidney and liver. Transgene expression in striated muscles correlated with α-dystroglycan hyperglycosylation, as determined by immunoreactivity to antibody IIH6 and increased laminin binding on an overlay assay. Other components of the dystroglycan complex and extracellular matrix ligands were normally expressed, and general muscle histology was indistinguishable from wild type controls. Further detailed muscle physiological analysis demonstrated a loss of force in response to eccentric exercise in the older, but not in the younger mice, suggesting this deficit developed over time. However this remained a subclinical feature as no pathology was observed in older mice in any muscles including the diaphragm, which is sensitive to mechanical load-induced damage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work shows that

  10. Cardiac myostatin upregulation occurs immediately after myocardial ischemia and is involved in skeletal muscle activation of atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillero, Estibaliz; Akashi, Hirokazu; Wang, Catherine; Najjar, Marc; Ji, Ruiping; Kennel, Peter J; Sweeney, H Lee; Schulze, Paul C; George, Isaac

    2015-01-30

    Myostatin (MSTN), a negative regulator of muscle growth and size, is increased after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) but timing of upregulation after injury is not known. In this study, we investigated the timing of the MSTN/AKT/p38 pathway activation in heart and skeletal muscle after AMI, as well as the potential effect of cardiac injury-related MSTN endocrine signaling on skeletal muscle and other circulating growth factors. Coronary artery ligation was performed in C57BL/6 mice at age 8 weeks to induce AMI. Mice were sacrificed at different time points (10 m, 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 months and 2 months) after surgery (n=3 per time point, n=18 total). Cardiac and circulating MSTN upregulation occurred as early as 10 min after AMI. Two months after AMI, increased cardiac MSTN/SMAD2,3 and p38 together with decreased IGF-1/AKT signaling suggest an anti-hypertrophic profile. In skeletal muscle, an absence of local MSTN increase was accompanied by increased MSTN-dependent SMAD2,3 signaling, suggestive of paracrine effects due to cardiac-derived MSTN. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the skeletal muscle was also evident. Serum from 24h post-MI mice effectively induced a MSTN-dependent increase in atrogin1 and MuRF1. Our study shows that cardiac MTSN activation occurs rapidly after cardiac ischemia and may be involved in peripheral protein degradation in the skeletal muscle by activating atrogin1 and MuRF1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiac pathological changes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) affected with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousaf, Muhammad Naveed; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Skjødt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) is a disease of marine farmed Atlantic salmon where the pathological changes associated with the disease involve necrosis and an infiltration of inflammatory cells into different regions of the heart and skeletal muscle. The aim of this work...... was to characterize cardiac changes and inflammatory cell types associated with a clinical HSMI outbreak in Atlantic salmon using immunohistochemistry. Different immune cells and cardiac tissue responses associated with the disease were identified using different markers. The spectrum of inflammatory cells associated...

  12. Vanadium and cadmium in vivo effects in teleost cardiac muscle: metal accumulation and oxidative stress markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, S S; Martins, H; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2008-03-01

    Several biological studies associate vanadium and cadmium with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes alterations. The present study aims to analyse and compare the oxidative stress responses induced by an acute intravenous exposure (1 and 7 days) to a sub-lethal concentration (5 mM) of two vanadium solutions, containing different vanadate n-oligomers (n=1-5 or n=10), and a cadmium solution on the cardiac muscle of the marine teleost Halobatrachus didactylus (Lusitanian toadfish). It was observed that vanadium is mainly accumulated in mitochondria (1.33+/-0.26 microM), primarily when this element was administrated as decameric vanadate, than when administrated as metavanadate (432+/-294 nM), while the highest content of cadmium was found in cytosol (365+/-231 nM). Indeed, decavanadate solution promotes stronger increases in mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes activities (catalase: +120%; superoxide dismutase: +140%) than metavanadate solution. On contrary, cadmium increases cytosolic catalase (+111%) and glutathione peroxidases (+50%) activities. It is also observed that vanadate oligomers induce in vitro prooxidant effects in toadfish heart, with stronger effects induced by metavanadate solution. In summary, vanadate and cadmium are differently accumulated in blood and cardiac subcellular fractions and induced different responses in enzymatic antioxidant defence mechanisms. In the present study, it is described for the first time the effects of equal doses of two different metals intravenously injected in the same fish species and upon the same exposure period allowing to understand the mechanisms of vanadate and cadmium toxicity in fish cardiac muscle.

  13. Metabolic aspects of cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues in the condition of hypoxia, ischaemia and reperfusion induced by extracorporeal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G G; Menichetti, A; Cogliati, A; Ruvolo, C

    1995-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) during aortopulmonary bypass surgery allows the investigation of the metabolic and biochemical effects of hypoxia (skeletal muscle), ischaemia (cardiac muscle) and reperfusion (skeletal and cardiac muscle) in homogeneous groups of patients. In this study we examined the mitochondrial enzymic response to oxidative stress in 40 subjects, and analysis was carried out on heart and skeletal-muscle biopsies taken before, during and after aortic clamping and 115 min of ECC. The results obtained constitute a clinical and biochemical picture characterized by some peculiar adaptive changes of enzymic activities which thus antagonize the oxidative damage due to acute hypoxia, ischaemia and reperfusion. Consequently it seems that this cellular protective mechanism plays a crucial role in the reversibility of oxidative damage in hypoxic and ischaemic tissues.

  14. Endurance training prevents negative effects of the hypoxia mimetic dimethyloxalylglycine on cardiac and skeletal muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Francois B; Britto, Florian A; Ponçon, Benjamin; Begue, Gwenaelle; Chabi, Beatrice; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Gregory; Py, Guillaume

    2016-02-15

    Hypoxic preconditioning is a promising strategy to prevent hypoxia-induced damages to several tissues. This effect is related to prior stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α via inhibition of the prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), which are responsible for its degradation under normoxia. Although PHD inhibition has been shown to increase endurance performance in rodents, potential side effects of such a therapy have not been explored. Here, we investigated the effects of 1 wk of dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) treatment (150 mg/kg) on exercise capacity, as well as on cardiac and skeletal muscle function in sedentary and endurance-trained rats. DMOG improved maximal aerobic velocity and endurance in both sedentary and trained rats. This effect was associated with an increase in red blood cells without significant alteration of skeletal muscle contractile properties. In sedentary rats, DMOG treatment resulted in enhanced left ventricle (LV) weight together with impairment in diastolic function, LV relaxation, and pulse pressure. Moreover, DMOG decreased maximal oxygen uptake (state 3) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle. Importantly, endurance training reversed the negative effects of DMOG treatment on cardiac function and restored maximal mitochondrial oxygen uptake to the level of sedentary placebo-treated rats. In conclusion, we provide here evidence that the PHD inhibitor DMOG has detrimental influence on myocardial and mitochondrial function in healthy rats. However, one may suppose that the deleterious influence of PHD inhibition would be potentiated in patients with already poor physical condition. Therefore, the present results prompt us to take into consideration the potential side effects of PHD inhibitors when administrated to patients.

  15. Galectin-3 in cardiac muscle and circulation of dogs with degenerative mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakarin, S; Rungsipipat, A; Surachetpong, S D

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the association of cardiac fibrosis with the galectin-3 (Gal-3) expression, a fibrosis marker in the myocardium and to compare plasma Gal-3 levels in normal and degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD) dogs. Studies of muscle expression and plasma levels of Gal-3 were performed in separate groups of dogs. The tissue study was performed on cardiac tissues collected from 22 dogs. The plasma study was performed on 46 client-owned dogs. Papillary muscle and left ventricular (LV) wall obtained from 10 normal and 12 DMVD dogs were stained with Masson trichrome and Gal-3 immunohistochemistry to determine fibrosis areas and Gal-3 expression. Plasma samples were collected from 19 normal and 27 DMVD dogs for Gal-3 measurement by ELISA. Percentage of fibrosis was higher in papillary muscle and LV wall of DMVD dogs (66.13 ± 5.58%; 52.98 ± 8.45%) than in normal dogs (35.40 ± 8.46%; 27.41 ± 7.91%; p Fibrosis areas correlated strongly with the Gal-3 expression (r = 0.821, p fibrosis and was higher in DMVD dogs than in normal dogs. DMVD dogs had higher plasma Gal-3 concentrations than normal dogs. Tissue Gal-3 is a candidate of fibrosis biomarker in DMVD; however, further investigation of associations between plasma Gal-3 and myocardial fibrosis is necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Exposure to a Low Lead Concentration Impairs Contractile Machinery in Rat Cardiac Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marito A S C; de Oliveira, Thiago F; Almenara, Camila C P; Broseghini-Filho, Gilson B; Vassallo, Dalton V; Padilha, Alessandra S; Silveira, Edna A

    2015-10-01

    Lead exposure has been considered to be a risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of low plasma lead concentration on cardiac contractility in isolated papillary muscles. Wistar rats were divided in control group or group treated with 100 ppm of lead acetate in the drinking water for 15 days. Blood pressure (BP) was measured weekly. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were anesthetized and euthanized, and parameters related to isolated papillary muscle contractility were recorded. The lead concentrations in the blood reached 12.3 ± 2 μg/dL. The BP was increased in the group treated with 100 ppm of lead acetate. Lead treatment did not alter force and time derivatives of the force of left ventricular papillary muscles. In addition, the inotropic response induced by an increase in the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration was reduced in the Pb(2+) group. However, the uptake of Ca(2+) by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the protein expression of SERCA and phospholamban remained unchanged. Postrest contraction was similar in the both groups, and tetanic peak and plateau tension were reduced in lead group. These results demonstrated that the reduction in the inotropic response to calcium does not appear to be caused by changes in the trans-sarcolemmal calcium flux but suggest that an impairment of the contractile machinery might be taking place. Our results demonstrate that even at a concentration below the limit considered to be safe, lead exerts deleterious effects on the cardiac contractile machinery.

  17. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  18. Evaluation of skeletal and cardiac muscle function after chronic administration of thymosin beta-4 in the dystrophin deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Spurney

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tbeta4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tbeta4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ and mdx mice, 8-10 weeks old, were treated with 150 microg of Tbeta4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tbeta4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tbeta4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tbeta4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tbeta4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  19. Neonatal epicardial-derived progenitors aquire myogenic traits in skeletal muscle, but not cardiac muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Jensen, Charlotte H; Skovrind, Ida;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Epicardium-derived progenitor cells (EPDCs) differentiate into all heart cell types in the embryonic heart, yet their differentiation into cardiomyocytes in the adult heart is limited and poorly described. This may be due to EPDCs lacking myogenic potential or the inert adu...... that EPDCs may be more myogenic than previously anticipated. But, the heart may lack factors for induction of myogenesis of EPDCs, a scenario that should be taken into consideration when aiming for repair of damaged myocardium by stem cell transplantation.......BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Epicardium-derived progenitor cells (EPDCs) differentiate into all heart cell types in the embryonic heart, yet their differentiation into cardiomyocytes in the adult heart is limited and poorly described. This may be due to EPDCs lacking myogenic potential or the inert adult...... heart missing regenerative signals essential for directed differentiation of EPDCs. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the myogenic potential of neonatal EPDCs in adult and neonatal mouse myocardium, as well as in skeletal muscle. The two latter tissues have an intrinsic capability to develop and regenerate...

  20. Myosin heavy chain expression and atrophy in rat skeletal muscle during transition from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Campos, Gerson Eduardo Rocha; De Assis, Jeane Marlene Fogaça; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Pai-Silva, Maeli Dal

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether changes in myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression and atrophy in rat skeletal muscle are observed during transition from cardiac hypertrophy to chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by aortic stenosis (AS). AS and control animals were studied 12 and 18 weeks after surgery and when overt CHF had developed in AS animals, 28 weeks after the surgery. The following parameters were studied in the soleus muscle: muscle atrophy index (soleus weight/body weight), muscle fibre diameter and frequency and MHC expression. AS animals presented decreases in both MHC1 and type I fibres and increases in both MHC2a and type IIa fibres during late cardiac hypertrophy and CHF. Type IIa fibre atrophy occurred during CHF. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that skeletal muscle phenotype changes occur in both late cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure; this suggests that attention should be given to the fact that skeletal muscle phenotype changes occur prior to overt heart failure symptoms.

  1. NK4 antagonizes Tbx1/10 to promote cardiac versus pharyngeal muscle fate in the ascidian second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Razy-Krajka, Florian; Siu, Eric; Ketcham, Alexandra; Christiaen, Lionel

    2013-12-01

    The heart and head muscles share common developmental origins and genetic underpinnings in vertebrates, including humans. Parts of the heart and cranio-facial musculature derive from common mesodermal progenitors that express NKX2-5, ISL1, and TBX1. This ontogenetic kinship is dramatically reflected in the DiGeorge/Cardio-Velo-Facial syndrome (DGS/CVFS), where mutations of TBX1 cause malformations in the pharyngeal apparatus and cardiac outflow tract. Cardiac progenitors of the first heart field (FHF) do not require TBX1 and segregate precociously from common progenitors of the second heart field (SHF) and pharyngeal muscles. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern heart versus pharyngeal muscle specification within this lineage remain elusive. Here, we harness the simplicity of the ascidian larva to show that, following asymmetric cell division of common progenitors, NK4/NKX2-5 promotes GATAa/GATA4/5/6 expression and cardiac specification in the second heart precursors by antagonizing Tbx1/10-mediated inhibition of GATAa and activation of Collier/Olf/EBF (COE), the determinant of atrial siphon muscle (ASM) specification. Our results uncover essential regulatory connections between the conserved cardio-pharyngeal factor Tbx1/10 and muscle determinant COE, as well as a mutual antagonism between NK4 and Tbx1/10 activities upstream of GATAa and COE. The latter cross-antagonism underlies a fundamental heart versus pharyngeal muscle fate choice that occurs in a conserved lineage of cardio-pharyngeal progenitors. We propose that this basic ontogenetic motif underlies cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development and evolution in chordates.

  2. NK4 antagonizes Tbx1/10 to promote cardiac versus pharyngeal muscle fate in the ascidian second heart field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The heart and head muscles share common developmental origins and genetic underpinnings in vertebrates, including humans. Parts of the heart and cranio-facial musculature derive from common mesodermal progenitors that express NKX2-5, ISL1, and TBX1. This ontogenetic kinship is dramatically reflected in the DiGeorge/Cardio-Velo-Facial syndrome (DGS/CVFS, where mutations of TBX1 cause malformations in the pharyngeal apparatus and cardiac outflow tract. Cardiac progenitors of the first heart field (FHF do not require TBX1 and segregate precociously from common progenitors of the second heart field (SHF and pharyngeal muscles. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern heart versus pharyngeal muscle specification within this lineage remain elusive. Here, we harness the simplicity of the ascidian larva to show that, following asymmetric cell division of common progenitors, NK4/NKX2-5 promotes GATAa/GATA4/5/6 expression and cardiac specification in the second heart precursors by antagonizing Tbx1/10-mediated inhibition of GATAa and activation of Collier/Olf/EBF (COE, the determinant of atrial siphon muscle (ASM specification. Our results uncover essential regulatory connections between the conserved cardio-pharyngeal factor Tbx1/10 and muscle determinant COE, as well as a mutual antagonism between NK4 and Tbx1/10 activities upstream of GATAa and COE. The latter cross-antagonism underlies a fundamental heart versus pharyngeal muscle fate choice that occurs in a conserved lineage of cardio-pharyngeal progenitors. We propose that this basic ontogenetic motif underlies cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development and evolution in chordates.

  3. Impact of the papillary muscles on cardiac magnetic resonance image analysis of important left ventricular parameters in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommans, D.H.F.; Bakker, J.; Cramer, G.E.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Brouwer, M.A.; Kofflard, M.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) analysis has increased in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Quantification of left ventricular (LV) measures will be affected by the inclusion or exclusion of the papillary muscles as part of the LV mass, but the magnitude of effect

  4. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Gimzewski, James K [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, 607 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mishra, Bud [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, NYU, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States)], E-mail: jreed@chem.ucla.edu, E-mail: gim@chem.ucla.edu

    2008-09-24

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing.

  5. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta (IIT); (Iowa); (Miami-MED)

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  6. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy for the study of cardiac muscle ultrastructure at nanoscale resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinali, Christian; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2014-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques have made a significant contribution towards understanding muscle physiology since the 1950s. Subsequent advances in hardware and software have led to major breakthroughs in terms of image resolution as well as the ability to generate three-dimensional (3D) data essential for linking structure to function and dysfunction. In this methodological review we consider the application of a relatively new technique, serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), for the study of cardiac muscle morphology. Employing SBF-SEM we have generated 3D data for cardiac myocytes within the myocardium with a voxel size of ~15 nm in the X-Y plane and 50 nm in the Z-direction. We describe how SBF-SEM can be used in conjunction with selective staining techniques to reveal the 3D cellular organisation and the relationship between the t-tubule (t-t) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) networks. These methods describe how SBF-SEM can be used to provide qualitative data to investigate the organisation of the dyad, a specialised calcium microdomain formed between the t-ts and the junctional portion of the SR (jSR). We further describe how image analysis methods may be applied to interrogate the 3D volumes to provide quantitative data such as the volume of the cell occupied by the t-t and SR membranes and the volumes and surface area of jSR patches. We consider the strengths and weaknesses of the SBF-SEM technique, pitfalls in sample preparation together with tips and methods for image analysis. By providing a 'big picture' view at high resolutions, in comparison to conventional confocal microscopy, SBF-SEM represents a paradigm shift for imaging cellular networks in their native environment.

  7. Heart Rate Changes in Response to Mechanical Pressure Stimulation of Skeletal Muscles Are Mediated by Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Hotta, Harumi

    2017-01-01

    Stimulation of mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles such as contraction and stretch elicits reflexive autonomic nervous system changes which impact cardiovascular control. There are pressure-sensitive mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles. Mechanical pressure stimulation of skeletal muscles can induce reflex changes in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure, although the neural mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear. We examined the contribution of cardiac autonomic nerves to HR responses induced by mechanical pressure stimulation (30 s, ~10 N/cm2) of calf muscles in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Animals were artificially ventilated and kept warm using a heating pad and lamp, and respiration and core body temperature were maintained within physiological ranges. Mechanical stimulation was applied using a stimulation probe 6 mm in diameter with a flat surface. Cardiac sympathetic and vagus nerves were blocked to test the contribution of the autonomic nerves. For sympathetic nerve block, bilateral stellate ganglia, and cervical sympathetic nerves were surgically sectioned, and for vagus nerve block, the nerve was bilaterally severed. In addition, mass discharges of cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve were electrophysiologically recorded. Mechanical stimulation increased or decreased HR in autonomic nerve-intact rats (range: −56 to +10 bpm), and the responses were negatively correlated with pre-stimulus HR (r = −0.65, p = 0.001). Stimulation-induced HR responses were markedly attenuated by blocking the cardiac sympathetic nerve (range: −9 to +3 bpm, p mechanical stimulation increased, or decreased the frequency of sympathetic nerve activity in parallel with HR (r = 0.77, p = 0.0004). Furthermore, the changes in sympathetic nerve activity were negatively correlated with its tonic level (r = −0.62, p = 0.0066). These results suggest that cardiac sympathetic nerve activity regulates HR responses to muscle mechanical pressure stimulation and the direction of HR

  8. Intracellular pH and K+ of cardiac and skeletal muscle in acidosis and alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole-Wilson, P A; Cameron, I R

    1975-11-01

    The effects of a metabolic and respiratory acidosis and alkalosis on intracellular pH (pHi) and K+ have been compared in cardiac and skeletal muscle from the anesthetized rabbit. The extracellular space and pHi were calculated from the distribution volumes of [51Cr] EDTA and [14C]DMO, respectively. When pHe was varied by altering PCO2, the slope of the line relating pHi to the extracellular pH (pHe) was greater (P less than 0.05--0.001) than that obtained during metabolic changes of pHe in right and left ventricles, atria, diaphragm, and quadriceps. During metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, the slope of pHi/pHe line did not vary between tissues. During respiratory acidosis, there was no difference in slope between cardiac tissues, but it was less in left ventricle than quadriceps (P less than 0.001). In left ventricle intracellular K+ increased in a metabolic (P less than 0.05) or respiratory acidosis (P less than 0.02), whereas in diaphragm it decreased (P less than 0.02). Intracellular K+ correlated with pHe and pHE-PHi. Changes in pHi but not intracellular K+ could explain known differences in myocardial function in respiratory and metabolic acidosis.

  9. Effects of muscle electrical stimulation on peak VO2 in cardiac transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, A F; Chicharro, J L; Gil, L; Ruiz, M P; Sánchez, V; Lucía, A; Urrea, S; Gómez, M A

    1998-07-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) has become a critical component in the evaluation of heart transplant recipients (HTR). In these patients, peak VO2 remains low after cardiac transplantation mainly because of persisting peripheral limitations in the working muscles. Muscular electrical stimulation, on the other hand, has been shown to enhance the oxidative capacity of healthy muscle. It was the purpose of our investigation to study the effects of ES on the peak VO2 of HTR. Fourteen (11 males and 3 females) HTR (age: 57+/-7yr, mean +/- SD; height: 163+/-7 cm, weight: 70.5+/-8.6 kg) were selected as subjects and each of them was randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a) group EXP (n = 7), receiving electrical stimulation on both quadriceps muscles during a period of 8 weeks, and (b) group CONT (n = 7), not receiving electrical stimulation. Before (PRE) and after (POST) the aforementioned 8-week period, respectively, all the subjects performed a cardiopulmonary exercise test (ramp protocol) on a cycle ergometer for peak VO2 determination. PRE values of peak VO2 were similar in both groups (17.1+/-2.0 vs 16.9+/-3.8ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) in EXP and CONT, respectively). However, peak values of VO2 significantly increased in EXP (p < 0.05) after the period of electrical stimulation (POST peak VO2: 18.7+/-2.0ml x kg(-1)), whereas no change was observed in CONT (POST peak VO2: 16.2+/-3.2 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)). In conclusion, electrical stimulation could therefore be used to improve the functional capacity of HTR, and might be included in the rehabilitation programs of this population group.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to desmin: evidence for stage-dependent intermediate filament immunoreactivity during cardiac and skeletal muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischman, D A; Danto, S I

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with desmin (D3 and D76) have been generated and their specificities validated by immunoblots, RIAs, and immunocytochemistry. No cross-reaction with other IFPs has been observed. The McAbs recognized different epitopes but both reside in the amino-terminal rod domain of desmin. Whereas McAb D3 produces a staining pattern characteristic of desmin throughout the development of cardiac and skeletal muscles, McAb D76 was selectively unreactive with certain regions of early (three days in ovo) embryonic cardiac anlage, with cultured cardiac myocytes derived from 7-day-old embryos, and with skeletal myotubes in early stages of myogenesis in vitro. Positive reactivity of D76 was seen at stages of myofibrillogenesis when the sarcomeres assume lateral alignment. Evidence was presented that differential reactivity of D76 did not result from the biosynthesis of a new desmin isoform or the post-translational modification of an existing protein. We suggest that the appearance of D76 immunoreactivity during striated muscle development represents an unmasking of the epitope by some IF-associated protein. Since this transition during skeletal muscle differentiation occurs during lateral alignment of the myofibrils, this antibody may serve as a useful probe for exploring this reorganization of the contractile apparatus during myogenesis and muscle regeneration.

  11. Effects of sildenafil on the gastrocnemius and cardiac muscles of rats in a model of prolonged moderate exercise training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Rinaldi

    Full Text Available Moderate exercise training improves energetic metabolism, tissue perfusion and induces cardiac and skeletal muscle remodeling. Sildenafil, a potent phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor used to treat erectile dysfunction, reduces infarct size and increases tissue oxygenation in experimental models of cardiovascular disease. We have evaluated the effects of prolonged moderate exercise training and a repeat administration of sildenafil on the rat gastrocnemius and cardiac muscles. Animals were divided into two groups: sedentary and trained. Each group was subdivided into animals treated with vehicle or with two doses of sildenafil (10 or 15 mg/kg/day during the last week of training. Physical exercise did not induce cardiac hypertrophy, whereas it increased mRNA levels of the PGC-1α, HIF-1α and VEGF genes, which are involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis, and reduced mRNA levels of FoxO3a, MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1. Sildenafil dose-dependently promoted both angiogenesis, as shown by increased capillary density, and muscle atrophy, as shown by muscle fibre size. These effects were more pronounced in trained animals. Our data confirm the beneficial effects of a moderate and prolonged training on cardiovascular and skeletal systems and document the positive and negative effects of sildenafil on these tissues at doses higher than those used in clinical practice. This report may impact on the use of sildenafil as a substance able to influence sports performance.

  12. Cardiac proteasome activity in muscle ring finger-1 null mice at rest and following synthetic glucocorticoid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwee, Darren T; Gomes, Aldrin V; Bodine, Sue C

    2011-11-01

    Muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been implicated in the regulation of cardiac mass through its control of the ubiquitin proteasome system. While it has been suggested that MuRF1 is required for cardiac atrophy, a resting cardiac phenotype has not been reported in mice with a null deletion [knockout (KO)] of MuRF1. Here, we report that MuRF1 KO mice have significantly larger hearts than age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates at ≥ 6 mo of age and that loss of cardiac mass can occur in the absence of MuRF1. The objective of this study was to determine whether changes in proteasome activity were responsible for the cardiac phenotypes observed in MuRF1 KO mice. Cardiac function, architecture, and proteasome activity were analyzed at rest and following 28 days of dexamethasone (Dex) treatment in 6-mo-old WT and MuRF1 KO mice. Echocardiography demonstrated normal cardiac function in the enlarged hearts in MURF1 KO mice. At rest, heart mass and cardiomyocyte diameter were significantly greater in MuRF1 KO than in WT mice. The increase in cardiac size in MuRF1 KO mice was related to a decrease in proteasome activity and an increase in Akt signaling relative to WT mice. Dex treatment induced a significant loss of cardiac mass in MuRF1 KO, but not WT, mice. Furthermore, Dex treatment resulted in an increase in proteasome activity in KO, but a decrease in WT, mice. In contrast, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling decreased in MuRF1 KO mice and increased in WT mice in response to Dex treatment. These findings demonstrate that MuRF1 plays an important role in regulating cardiac size through alterations in protein turnover and that MuRF1 is not required to induce cardiac atrophy.

  13. Strategic Positioning and Biased Activity of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Cardiac Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente, Sergio; Fernandez-Sanz, Celia; Vail, Caitlin; Agra, Elorm J; Holmstrom, Kira; Sun, Junhui; Mishra, Jyotsna; Williams, Dewight; Finkel, Toren; Murphy, Elizabeth; Joseph, Suresh K; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Csordás, György

    2016-10-28

    Control of myocardial energetics by Ca(2+) signal propagation to the mitochondrial matrix includes local Ca(2+) delivery from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) ryanodine receptors (RyR2) to the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) Ca(2+) uniporter (mtCU). mtCU activity in cardiac mitochondria is relatively low, whereas the IMM surface is large, due to extensive cristae folding. Hence, stochastically distributed mtCU may not suffice to support local Ca(2+) transfer. We hypothesized that mtCU concentrated at mitochondria-SR associations would promote the effective Ca(2+) transfer. mtCU distribution was determined by tracking MCU and EMRE, the proteins essential for channel formation. Both proteins were enriched in the IMM-outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) contact point submitochondrial fraction and, as super-resolution microscopy revealed, located more to the mitochondrial periphery (inner boundary membrane) than inside the cristae, indicating high accessibility to cytosol-derived Ca(2+) inputs. Furthermore, MCU immunofluorescence distribution was biased toward the mitochondria-SR interface (RyR2), and this bias was promoted by Ca(2+) signaling activity in intact cardiomyocytes. The SR fraction of heart homogenate contains mitochondria with extensive SR associations, and these mitochondria are highly enriched in EMRE. Size exclusion chromatography suggested for EMRE- and MCU-containing complexes a wide size range and also revealed MCU-containing complexes devoid of EMRE (thus disabled) in the mitochondrial but not the SR fraction. Functional measurements suggested more effective mtCU-mediated Ca(2+) uptake activity by the mitochondria of the SR than of the mitochondrial fraction. Thus, mtCU "hot spots" can be formed at the cardiac muscle mitochondria-SR associations via localization and assembly bias, serving local Ca(2+) signaling and the excitation-energetics coupling. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Use-dependence of ryanodine effects on postrest contraction in ferret cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecot, C O; Katzung, B G

    1987-04-01

    During an investigation of the effect of ryanodine on contractions in cardiac muscle, it was found that long rest periods removed all or most of the drug's effect. Therefore, we studied the kinetics of block development and recovery from block produced by low concentrations of ryanodine (1-100 pM) on the postrest contractions of ferret papillary muscle. At 100 pM, ryanodine depressed steady-state contraction amplitude slightly (4.2 +/- 1.1% mean +/- SEM, n = 10) but strongly inhibited (40-80%) the first contraction (postrest contraction) elicited on restimulation of the preparation after rest periods of 1 second to 5 minutes. Under control conditions, the nearly maximal potentiation of the twitch occurring after a standard test rest period (30 seconds of rest) was not affected by a preceding conditioning rest of up to 20 minutes. In the presence of 100 pM ryanodine, a conditioning rest increased the amplitude of the twitch elicited after a test rest, and the test rest contraction recovered toward control (drug-free) amplitude monoexponentially (time constant, 582 +/- 105 seconds). Block of postrest contraction could be reinduced by stimulation and occurred faster when higher rates were used (time constants, 758 seconds at 1 Hz and 107 +/- 26 seconds at 3 Hz). Since rest potentiation of twitch tension is believed to be mostly dependent on extra calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the results suggest that the ryanodine-induced blockade of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum is use-dependent and recovers during diastole.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Negative inotropic actions of nitric oxide require high doses in rat cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyeth, R P; Temma, K; Seifen, E; Kennedy, R H

    1996-08-01

    Initial experiments were designed to determine if vasoactive concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) alter contractility in rat heart. Contractile function was monitored in left atrial and papillary muscles (30 degrees C; paced at 0.5 Hz) during cumulative addition of 3-morpholino-sydnonimine-HCl(SIN-1), an agent that releases NO. At concentrations between 10(-7) and 10(-4) M (NO concentrations of approximately 10(-8)- 3 x 10(-7) M), SIN-1 did not affect contractility in either tissue. Similarly, 10(-4) M SIN-1 did not alter the positive inotropic responses to isoproterenol or increasing extracellular [Ca+2] ([Ca+2]o). To obtain higher concentrations of NO, additional studies were conducted using authentic NO. NO-saturated stock solutions and a corresponding control solvent were adjusted to pH 1.6 with HCl. Dose-dependent effects of NO were examined by adding aliquots of the stock solutions (or control solvent) to the bathing solution. At final concentrations of 1 x 10(-5)- 5 x 10(-4) M, NO produced transient, concentration-dependent decreases in contractility that were paralleled by reductions in buffer pH. Control solvent elicited similar reductions in pHo and transient decreases in contractility; however, the negative inotropic action elicited by the NO-containing solution was approximately 20% greater than that observed in control conditions. These data demonstrate that only high concentrations of NO depress contractility in isolated rat cardiac muscle, and suggest that this effect is mediated by both acidosis and a pHo-independent mechanism.

  16. Physical exercise regulates p53 activity targeting SCO2 and increases mitochondrial COX biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengtang Qi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to outline the timelines of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age, and to evaluate whether and how these age-related changes were attenuated by exercise. ICR/CD-1 mice were treated with pifithrin-μ (PFTμ, sacrificed and studied at different ages; ICR/CD-1 mice at younger or older ages were randomized to endurance treadmill running and sedentary conditions. The results showed that mRNA expression of p53 and its protein levels in mitochondria increased with age in cardiac muscle, accompanied by increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, reduced expression of COX subunits and assembly proteins, and decreased expression of most markers in mitochondrial biogenesis. Most of these age-related changes including p53 activity targeting cytochrome oxidase deficient homolog 2 (SCO2, p53 translocation to mitochondria and COX biogenesis were attenuated by exercise in older mice. PFTμ, an inhibitor blocking p53 translocation to mitochondria, increased COX biogenesis in older mice, but not in young mice. Our data suggest that physical exercise attenuates age-related changes in mitochondrial COX biogenesis and p53 activity targeting SCO2 and mitochondria, and thereby induces antisenescent and protective effects in cardiac muscle.

  17. Fetal cardiac muscle contractility decreases with gestational age: a color-coded tissue velocity imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmstedt Nina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Present data regarding how the fetal heart works and develops throughout gestation is limited. However, the possibility to analyze the myocardial velocity profile provides new possibilities to gain further knowledge in this area. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate human fetal myocardial characteristics and deformation properties using color-coded tissue velocity imaging (TVI. Methods TVI recordings from 55 healthy fetuses, at 18 to 42 weeks of gestation, were acquired at a frame rate of 201–273 frames/s for offline analysis using software enabling retrieval of the myocardial velocity curve and 2D anatomical information. The measurements were taken from an apical four-chamber view, and the acquired data was correlated using regression analysis. Results Left ventricular length and width increased uniformly with gestational age. Atrioventricular plane displacement and the E’/A’ ratio also increased with gestational age, while a longitudinal shortening was demonstrated. Conclusions Fetal cardiac muscle contractility decreases with gestational age. As numerous fetal- and pregnancy-associated conditions directly influence the pumping function of the fetal heart, we believe that this new insight into the physiology of the human fetal cardiovascular system could contribute to make diagnosis and risk assessment easier and more accurate.

  18. Mechanisms of cardiac muscle insensitivity to a novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitor C-547.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramochkin, Denis V; Petrov, Konstantin A; Zobov, Vladimir V; Yagodina, Lilia O; Nikolsky, Eugen E; Rosenshtraukh, Leonid V

    2009-02-01

    We compared the effects of the novel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor C-547 on action potential configuration and sinus rhythm in the isolated right atrium preparation of rat with those of armin and neostigmine. Both armin (10(-7), 10(-6), and 10(-5) M) and neostigmine (10(-7), 10(-6), and 5 x 10(-6) M) produced a marked decrease in action potential duration and slowing of sinus rate. These effects were abolished by atropine and are attributable to the accumulation of acetylcholine in the myocardium. The novel selective AChE inhibitor C-547 (10(-9) to 10(-7) M), an alkylammonium derivative of 6-methyluracil, had no such effects. The inhibition constant of C-547 on cardiac AChE is 40-fold higher than that on extensor digitorum longus muscle AChE. These results suggest that C-547 might be employed to treat diseases such as myasthenia gravis or Alzheimer disease, without having unwanted effects on the heart.

  19. Optimizing PANi doped electroactive substrates as patches for the regeneration of cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, A; Guarino, V; Schiavo, L; Alvarez-Perez, M A; Ambrosio, L

    2011-04-01

    In scaffold aided regeneration of muscular tissue, composite materials are currently utilized as a temporary substrate to stimulate tissue formation by controlled electrochemical signals as well as continuous mechanical stimulation until the regeneration processes are completed. Among them, composites from the blending of conductive (CPs) and biocompatible polymers are powerfully emerging as a successful strategy for the regeneration of myocardium due to their unique conductive and biological recognition properties able to assure a more efficient electroactive stimulation of cells. Here, different composite substrates made of synthesized polyaniline (sPANi) and polycaprolactone (PCL) were investigated as platforms for cardiac tissue regeneration. Preliminary, a comparative analysis of substrates conductivity performed on casted films endowed with synthesized polyaniline (sPANi) short fibres or blended with emeraldine base polyaniline (EBPANi) allows to study the attitude of charge transport, depending on the conducting filler amount, shape and spatial distribution. In particular, conducibility tests indicated that sPANi short fibres provide a more efficient transfer of electric signal due to the spatial organization of electroactive needle-like phases up to form a percolative network. On the basis of this characterization, sPANi/PCL electrospun membranes have been also optimized to mimic either the morphological and functional features of the cardiac muscle ECM. The presence of sPANi does not relevantly affect the fibre architecture as confirmed by SEM/image analysis investigation which shows a broader distribution of fibres with only a slight reduction of the average fibre diameter from 7.1 to 6.4 μm. Meanwhile, biological assays--evaluation of cell survival rate by MTT assay and immunostaining of sarcomeric α-actinin of cardiomyocites-like cells--clearly indicate that conductive signals offered by PANi needles, promote the cardiogenic differentiation of h

  20. Propagation velocity profile in a cross-section of a cardiac muscle bundle from PSpice simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperelakis Nicholas

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of depth on propagation velocity within a bundle of cardiac muscle fibers is likely to be an important factor in the genesis of some heart arrhythmias. Model and methods The velocity profile of simulated action potentials propagated down a bundle of parallel cardiac muscle fibers was examined in a cross-section of the bundle using a PSpice model. The model (20 × 10 consisted of 20 chains in parallel, each chain being 10 cells in length. All 20 chains were stimulated simultaneously at the left end of the bundle using rectangular current pulses (0.25 nA, 0.25 ms duration applied intracellularly. The simulated bundle was symmetrical at the top and bottom (including two grounds, and voltage markers were placed intracellularly only in cells 1, 5 and 10 of each chain to limit the total number of traces to 60. All electrical parameters were standard values; the variables were (1 the number of longitudinal gap-junction (G-j channels (0, 1, 10, 100, (2 the longitudinal resistance between the parallel chains (Rol2 (reflecting the closeness of the packing of the chains, and (3 the bundle termination resistance at the two ends of the bundle (RBT. The standard values for Rol2 and RBT were 200 KΩ. Results The velocity profile was bell-shaped when there was 0 or only 1 gj-channel. With standard Rol2 and RBT values, the velocity at the surface of the bundle (θ1 and θ20 was more than double (2.15 × that at the core of the bundle (θ10, θ11. This surface:core ratio of velocities was dependent on the values of Rol2 and RBT. When Rol2 was lowered 10-fold, θ1 increased slightly and θ2decreased slightly. When there were 100 gj-channels, the velocity profile was flat, i.e. the velocity at the core was about the same as that at the surface. Both velocities were more than 10-fold higher than in the absence of gj-channels. Varying Rol2 and RBT had almost no effect. When there were 10 gj-channels, the cross-sectional velocity profile

  1. Increased mitochondrial emission of reactive oxygen species and calpain activation are required for doxorubicin-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kisuk; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Sollanek, Kurt J; Christou, Demetra D; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Szeto, Hazel H; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2015-04-15

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-tumour agent used to treat a variety of cancers, DOX administration is associated with significant side effects, including myopathy of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The mechanisms responsible for DOX-mediated myopathy remain a topic of debate. We tested the hypothesis that both increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission and activation of the cysteine protease calpain are required for DOX-induced myopathy in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cause and effect was determined by administering a novel mitochondrial-targeted anti-oxidant to prevent DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission, whereas a highly-selective pharmacological inhibitor was exploited to inhibit calpain activity. Our findings reveal that mitochondria are a major site of DOX-mediated ROS production in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres and the prevention of DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission protects against fibre atrophy and contractile dysfunction in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. Furthermore, our results indicate that DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission are required to activate calpain in heart and skeletal muscles and, importantly, calpain activation is a major contributor to DOX-induced myopathy. Taken together, these findings show that increased mitochondrial ROS production and calpain activation are significant contributors to the development of DOX-induced myopathy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres.

  2. Increased mitochondrial emission of reactive oxygen species and calpain activation are required for doxorubicin-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kisuk; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Sollanek, Kurt J; Christou, Demetra D; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Szeto, Hazel H; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-tumour agent used to treat a variety of cancers, DOX administration is associated with significant side effects, including myopathy of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The mechanisms responsible for DOX-mediated myopathy remain a topic of debate. We tested the hypothesis that both increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission and activation of the cysteine protease calpain are required for DOX-induced myopathy in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cause and effect was determined by administering a novel mitochondrial-targeted anti-oxidant to prevent DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission, whereas a highly-selective pharmacological inhibitor was exploited to inhibit calpain activity. Our findings reveal that mitochondria are a major site of DOX-mediated ROS production in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres and the prevention of DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission protects against fibre atrophy and contractile dysfunction in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. Furthermore, our results indicate that DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission are required to activate calpain in heart and skeletal muscles and, importantly, calpain activation is a major contributor to DOX-induced myopathy. Taken together, these findings show that increased mitochondrial ROS production and calpain activation are significant contributors to the development of DOX-induced myopathy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres. PMID:25643692

  3. Central injection of GalR1 agonist M617 facilitates GLUT4 expression in cardiac muscle of type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Zhenwen; Bo, Ping

    2015-05-01

    Although galanin has been shown to increase GLUT4 expression in the cardiac muscle of rats, there is no literature available about the effect of GalR1 on GLUT4 expression in the cardiac muscle of type 2 diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to determine whether intracerebroventricular injection of GalR1 agonist M617 would elevate GLUT4 expression in the cardiac muscle of type 2 diabetic rats. The rats tested were divided into four groups: rats from healthy and type 2 diabetic drug groups were injected with 10nM/kg/d M617 in 5μl artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 21days, while control received 5μl vehicle injections. The blood samples were analyzed for glucose and insulin concentration. Cardiac muscle was collected and processed for determination of GLUT4 mRNA expression and GLUT4 protein levels. The present findings showed that fasting blood glucose levels in both M617 treatment groups were lower compared with each control. The insulin levels in both M617 treatment groups were decreased compared with each control. Moreover, the GLUT4 content in the cardiac muscle in both drug groups was higher compared with each control. M617 treatment increased GLUT4 mRNA expression and GLUT4 protein levels compared with each control group. These observations suggest that GalR1 agonist M617, acting through its central GalR1, can promote GLUT4 expression and enhance GLUT4 content in the cardiac muscle of type 2 diabetic rats. Central GalR1 may play a significant role in regulation of glucose metabolic homeostasis in the cardiac muscle of type 2 diabetic rats.

  4. Tissue-specific and substrate-specific mitochondrial bioenergetics in feline cardiac and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen;

    2015-01-01

    No studies have investigated the mitochondrial function in permeabilized muscle fiber from cats. The aim of this study was to investigate tissue-specific and substrate-specific characteristics of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity in feline permeabilized oxidative muscle...

  5. Precocious appearance of cardiac troponin T pre-mRNAs during early avian embryonic skeletal muscle development in ovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1990-07-01

    Cardiac troponin T (cTNT), a component of the muscle contractile apparatus, is transiently expressed in skeletal muscle during avian limb development. While cTNT was first detected immunohistochemically in limb buds undergoing overt myogenic differentiation (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 26, about 5 days in ovo), RNA blot analyses of early, predifferentiated wing buds have revealed the presence of cTNT transcripts in limb buds as early as stage 23 (4 days in ovo). Steady-state cTNT poly(A) RNAs of stage 22 through stage 37 fore- and hindlimbs were compared using both cTNT cDNA and cTNT intron-specific probes. In the predifferentiated state, two incompletely processed RNAs (3.8 and 2.4 kb) were expressed in the absence of the mature cTNT transcript, while a third pre-mRNA (3.5 kb) appeared concomitantly with the mature mRNA as differentiation and development proceeded. In addition, a population of unique cTNT transcripts were expressed in a proximal to distal manner in wing buds which had undergone initial overt myogenic differentiation (stage 26). Some of the cTNT pre-mRNAs observed in premyogenic limbs appeared to accumulate stably in a tissue-specific manner, based on their absence from the cardiac poly(A) RNA population. These results suggest that the appearance of cardiac troponin T mRNA, as well as the polypeptide, may be regulated at multiple levels including RNA processing, stability, and/or translation during early skeletal muscle myogenesis.

  6. Gene control of acupuncture and moxibustion preconditioning on apoptosis in ischemic cardiac muscle of rats with re-perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhong-ren; LI Xiao-ning; ZHAO Yu-hui; TIAN Yan-yan; XU Li

    2008-01-01

    In order to explore the effect of acupuncture preconditioning on rats' cell apoptosis with cardiac muscle re-perfusion damage and bcl-2mRNA genes, we used differentiating acupuncture and moxibustion preconditioning among groups, then compared acupuncture and moxibustion preconditioning with ischemic preconditioning. The experimental results show that acupuncture and moxibustion preconditioning makes more bcl-2mRNA genes expressed and produces less cell apeptosis, furthermore, groups of acupuncture and moxibustion preconditioning for twice a day are more effective than those of ischemic preconditioning.

  7. Topographic Mapping and Compression Elasticity Analysis of Skinned Cardiac Muscle Fibers in Vitro with Atomic Force Microscopy and Nanoindentation

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Surface topography and compression elasticity of bovine cardiac muscle fibers in rigor and relaxing state has been studied with atomic force microscopy. Characteristic sarcomere patterns running along the longitudinal axis of the fibers were clearly observed, and Z-lines, M-lines, I-bands, and A-bands can be distinguished through comparing with TEM images and force curves. AFM height images of fibers had shown a sarcomere length of 1.22±0.02μm (n=5) in rigor with a significant 9% increase in ...

  8. Gel stretch method: a new method to measure constitutive properties of cardiac muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, M. R.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, B. A.; Baicu, C. F.; Cooper G, I. V.; Gharpuray, V.

    1998-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is an important cause of congestive heart failure; however, the basic mechanisms causing diastolic congestive heart failure are not fully understood, especially the role of the cardiac muscle cell, or cardiocyte, in this process. Before the role of the cardiocyte in this pathophysiology can be defined, methods for measuring cardiocyte constitutive properties must be developed and validated. Thus this study was designed to evaluate a new method to characterize cardiocyte constitutive properties, the gel stretch method. Cardiocytes were isolated enzymatically from normal feline hearts and embedded in a 2% agarose gel containing HEPES-Krebs buffer and laminin. This gel was cast in a shape that allowed it to be placed in a stretching device. The ends of the gel were held between a movable roller and fixed plates that acted as mandibles. Distance between the right and left mandibles was increased using a stepper motor system. The force applied to the gel was measured by a force transducer. The resultant cardiocyte strain was determined by imaging the cells with a microscope, capturing the images with a CCD camera, and measuring cardiocyte and sarcomere length changes. Cardiocyte stress was characterized with a finite-element method. These measurements of cardiocyte stress and strain were used to determine cardiocyte stiffness. Two variables affecting cardiocyte stiffness were measured, the passive elastic spring and viscous damping. The passive spring was assessed by increasing the force on the gel at 1 g/min, modeling the resultant stress vs. strain relationship as an exponential [sigma = A/k(ekepsilon - 1)]. In normal cardiocytes, A = 23.0 kN/m2 and k = 16. Viscous damping was assessed by examining the loop area between the stress vs. strain relationship during 1 g/min increases and decreases in force. Normal cardiocytes had a finite loop area = 1.39 kN/m2, indicating the presence of viscous damping. Thus the gel stretch method provided accurate

  9. A Cycling Movement Based System for Real-Time Muscle Fatigue and Cardiac Stress Monitoring and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chang, Ya-Ju; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Chiu, Li-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we defined a new parameter, referred to as the cardiac stress index (CSI), using a nonlinear detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of heart rate (HR). Our study aimed to incorporate the CSI into a cycling based fatigue monitoring system developed in our previous work so the muscle fatigue and cardiac stress can be both continuously and quantitatively assessed for subjects undergoing the cycling exercise. By collecting electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, the DFA scaling exponent α was evaluated on the RR time series extracted from a windowed ECG segment. We then obtained the running estimate of α by shifting a one-minute window by a step of 20 seconds so the CSI, defined as the percentage of all the less-than-one α values, can be synchronously updated every 20 seconds. Since the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale is considered as a convenient index which is commonly used to monitor subjective perceived exercise intensity, we then related the Borg RPE scale value to the CSI in order to investigate and quantitatively characterize the relationship between exercise-induced fatigue and cardiac stress. Twenty-two young healthy participants were recruited in our study. Each participant was asked to maintain a fixed pedaling speed at a constant load during the cycling exercise. Experimental results showed that a decrease in DFA scaling exponent α or an increase in CSI was observed during the exercise. In addition, the Borg RPE scale and CSI were positively correlated, suggesting that the factors due to cardiac stress might also contribute to fatigue state during physical exercise. Since the CSI can effectively quantify the cardiac stress status during physical exercise, our system may be used in sports medicine, or used by cardiologists who carried out stress tests for monitoring heart condition in patients with heart diseases.

  10. A Cycling Movement Based System for Real-Time Muscle Fatigue and Cardiac Stress Monitoring and Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szi-Wen Chen

    Full Text Available In this study, we defined a new parameter, referred to as the cardiac stress index (CSI, using a nonlinear detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA of heart rate (HR. Our study aimed to incorporate the CSI into a cycling based fatigue monitoring system developed in our previous work so the muscle fatigue and cardiac stress can be both continuously and quantitatively assessed for subjects undergoing the cycling exercise. By collecting electrocardiogram (ECG signals, the DFA scaling exponent α was evaluated on the RR time series extracted from a windowed ECG segment. We then obtained the running estimate of α by shifting a one-minute window by a step of 20 seconds so the CSI, defined as the percentage of all the less-than-one α values, can be synchronously updated every 20 seconds. Since the rating of perceived exertion (RPE scale is considered as a convenient index which is commonly used to monitor subjective perceived exercise intensity, we then related the Borg RPE scale value to the CSI in order to investigate and quantitatively characterize the relationship between exercise-induced fatigue and cardiac stress. Twenty-two young healthy participants were recruited in our study. Each participant was asked to maintain a fixed pedaling speed at a constant load during the cycling exercise. Experimental results showed that a decrease in DFA scaling exponent α or an increase in CSI was observed during the exercise. In addition, the Borg RPE scale and CSI were positively correlated, suggesting that the factors due to cardiac stress might also contribute to fatigue state during physical exercise. Since the CSI can effectively quantify the cardiac stress status during physical exercise, our system may be used in sports medicine, or used by cardiologists who carried out stress tests for monitoring heart condition in patients with heart diseases.

  11. Chronic hindlimb suspension unloading markedly decreases turnover rates of skeletal and cardiac muscle proteins and adipose tissue triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bederman, Ilya R; Lai, Nicola; Shuster, Jeffrey; Henderson, Leigh; Ewart, Steven; Cabrera, Marco E

    2015-07-01

    We previously showed that a single bolus of "doubly-labeled" water ((2)H2 (18)O) can be used to simultaneously determine energy expenditure and turnover rates (synthesis and degradation) of tissue-specific lipids and proteins by modeling labeling patterns of protein-bound alanine and triglyceride-bound glycerol (Bederman IR, Dufner DA, Alexander JC, Previs SF. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 290: E1048-E1056, 2006). Using this novel method, we quantified changes in the whole body and tissue-specific energy balance in a rat model of simulated "microgravity" induced by hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU). After chronic HSU (3 wk), rats exhibited marked atrophy of skeletal and cardiac muscles and significant decrease in adipose tissue mass. For example, soleus muscle mass progressively decreased 11, 43, and 52%. We found similar energy expenditure between control (90 ± 3 kcal · kg(-1)· day(-1)) and hindlimb suspended (81 ± 6 kcal/kg day) animals. By comparing food intake (∼ 112 kcal · kg(-1) · day(-1)) and expenditure, we found that animals maintained positive calorie balance proportional to their body weight. From multicompartmental fitting of (2)H-labeling patterns, we found significantly (P triglycerides. Specifically, we found that synthesis rates of skeletal and cardiac muscle proteins were affected to a much greater degree compared with the decrease in degradation rates, resulting in large negative balance and significant tissue loss. In contrast, we found a small decrease in adipose tissue triglyceride synthesis paired with a large decrease in degradation, resulting in smaller negative energy balance and loss of fat mass. We conclude that HSU in rats differentially affects turnover of muscle proteins vs. adipose tissue triglycerides.

  12. Physiological Function and Transplantation of Scaffold-Free and Vascularized Human Cardiac Muscle Tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    K. R. Stevens; K. L. Kreutziger; S. K. Dupras; F. S. Korte; M. Regnier; V. Muskheli; M. B. Nourse; K. Bendixen; H. Reinecke; C. E. Murry; William A. Catterall

    2009-01-01

    Success of human myocardial tissue engineering for cardiac repair has been limited by adverse effects of scaffold materials, necrosis at the tissue core, and poor survival after transplantation due to ischemie injury...

  13. Skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  14. Abundance, distribution, mobility and oligomeric state of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in live cardiac muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Nenasheva, Tatiana A.; Neary, Marianne; Gregory I. Mashanov; Birdsall, Nigel J.M.; Breckenridge, Ross A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cardiac rhythm via regulation of the inward potassium current. To increase our understanding of M2 receptor physiology we used Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy to visualize individual receptors at the plasma membrane of transformed CHOM2 cells, a cardiac cell line (HL-1), primary cardiomyocytes and tissue slices from pre- and post-natal mice. Receptor expression levels between individual cells in dissociated cardiomyocytes and he...

  15. Dose-dependent effect of Bisphenol-A on insulin signaling molecules in cardiac muscle of adult male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashanmugam, Preethi; Mullainadhan, Vigneswari; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2017-03-25

    Environmental contaminant, Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a xenoestrogen, an essential component used for the production of two classes of polymers such as polycarbonate and epoxy resin which disrupts the normal endocrine function. BPA has intense effects on mice endocrine pancreas, an essential tissue involved in glucose metabolism. It disrupts pancreatic β-cell insulin content, induces hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in male rats. Cardiac muscle is an insulin responsive organ and insulin has direct effects on glucose transport. The present study was designed to assess the effect of BPA on insulin signaling molecules in the cardiac muscle of adult male Wistar rat. Adult male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were selected and divided into following groups: Group 1: Control (vehicle treated), Group 2: Rats treated with 10 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally, Group 3: Rats treated with 100 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally, Group 4: Rats treated with 400 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally. IR (insulin receptor) and pIR(Tyr1162) proteins were significantly decreased in the high dose group (400 mg). There was no change in IRS1 (insulin receptor substrate-1) and Akt proteins. Whereas, a decrease in pIRS1(Tyr632) (100 mg and 400 mg), pAkt (Ser473) (400 mg) and GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4) (cytosolic and plasma membrane) proteins was observed which may affect the cardiovascular function. It is concluded that BPA exposure has adverse effect on cardiac insulin signal transduction which may affect its function.

  16. [The expression of the sperm-specific lactate dehydrogenase gene Ldh-c in plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) cardiac muscle and its effect on the anaerobic glycolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Wei, Lian; Wang, Yang; Xu, Li-Na; Wei, Lin-Na; Wei, Deng-Bang

    2015-06-25

    The plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) has a strong adaptability to hypoxic plateau environment. We found that the sperm-specific lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C4) gene Ldh-c expressed in plateau pika cardiac muscle. In order to shed light on the effect of LDH-C4 on the anaerobic glycolysis in plateau pika cardiac muscle, 20 pikas were randomly divided into the inhibitor group and the control group, and the sample size of each group was 10. The pikas of inhibitor group were injected with 1 mL 1 mol/L N-isopropyl oxamate, a specific LDH-C4 inhibitor, in biceps femoris muscle of hind legs, each leg with 500 μL. The pikas of control group were injected with the same volume of normal saline (0.9% NaCl). The mRNA and protein expression levels of Ldh-c gene in plateau pika cardiac muscle were determined by real-time PCR and Western blot. The activities of LDH, and the contents of lactate (LD) and ATP in cardiac muscle were compared between the inhibitor group and the control group. The results showed that 1) the expression levels of Ldh-c mRNA and protein were 0.47 ± 0.06 and 0.68 ± 0.08, respectively; 2) 30 min after injection of 1 mL 1 mol/L N-isopropyl oxamate in biceps femoris muscle, the concentration of N-isopropyl oxamate in blood was 0.08 mmol/L; 3) in cardiac muscle of the inhibitor group and the control group, the LDH activities were (6.18 ± 0.48) U/mg and (9.08 ± 0.58) U/mg, the contents of LD were (0.21 ± 0.03) mmol/g and (0.26 ± 0.04) mmol/g, and the contents of ATP were (4.40 ± 0.69) nmol/mg and (6.18 ± 0.73) nmol/mg (P < 0.01); 5) the inhibition rates of N-isopropyl oxamate to LDH, LD and ATP were 31.98%, 20.90% and 28.70%, respectively. The results suggest that Ldh-c expresses in cardiac muscle of plateau pika, and the pika cardiac muscle may get at least 28% ATP for its activities by LDH-C4 catalyzed anaerobic glycolysis, which reduces the dependence on oxygen and enhances the adaptation to the hypoxic environments.

  17. Fast activation of Ca2+-ATPases in plasma membranes from cardiac muscle and from ascites carcinoma cells: a possible function of endogenous calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzker, R; Klinger, R; Haase, H; Vetter, R; Böhmer, F D

    1987-01-01

    Content of endogenous calmodulin, binding of calmodulin to, and Ca2+-ATPase activity in plasma membranes of cardiac muscle. Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells and erythrocytes were examined. The content of endogenous calmodulin in cardiac and EAC cells was shown to be considerably higher than in erythrocyte membranes. Ca2+-independent binding of calmodulin to cardiac and EAC cell membranes was found to be realized by some low molecular weight proteins. Ca2+-ATPases in cardiac and EAC cell membranes differ from those in erythrocytes with respect to their activation by Ca2+ and calmodulin. The erythrocyte enzyme is strongly stimulated by exogenous calmodulin and reaches its maximum activity about 2 min after Ca2+-addition. In contrast, the Ca2+-ATPases in cardiac and EAC cell plasma membranes cannot be considerably stimulated by exogenous calmodulin and are instantaneously activated by Ca2+.

  18. Effects of Mg2+ on Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbara, A A; Stephenson, D G

    1994-10-01

    The influence of myoplasmic Mg2+ (0.05-10 mM) on Ca2+ accumulation (net Ca2+ flux) and Ca2+ uptake (pump-driven Ca2+ influx) by the intact sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in skinned fibres from the toad iliofibularis muscle (twitch portion), rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle (fast twitch), rat soleus muscle (slow twitch) and rat cardiac trabeculae. Ca2+ accumulation was optimal between 1 and 3 mM Mg2+ in toad fibres and reached a plateau between 1 and 10 mM Mg2+ in the rat EDL fibres and between 3 and 10 mM Mg2+ in the rat cardiac fibres. In soleus fibres, optimal Ca2+ accumulation occurred at 10 mM Mg2+. The same trend was obtained with all preparations at 0.3 and 1 microM Ca2+. Experiments with 2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone, a specific inhibitor of the Ca2+ pump, revealed a marked Ca2+ efflux from the SR of toad iliofibularis fibres in the presence of 0.2 microM Ca2+ and 1 mM Mg2+. Further experiments indicated that the SR Ca2+ leak could be blocked by 10 microM ruthenium red without affecting the SR Ca2+ pump and this allowed separation between SR Ca2+ uptake and SR Ca2+ accumulation. At 0.3 microM Ca2+, Ca2+ uptake was optimal with 1 mM Mg2+ in the toad iliofibularis and rat EDL fibres and between 1 and 10 mM Mg2+ in the rat soleus and trabeculae preparations. At higher [Ca2+] (1 microM), Ca2+ uptake was optimal with 1 mM Mg2+ in the iliofibularis fibres and between 1 and 3 mM Mg2+ in the EDL fibres.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. CGP 41251, a new potential anticancer drug, improves contractility of rat isolated cardiac muscle subjected to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, I; Dworakowska, D; Dworakowski, R; Petrusewicz, J

    2001-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to examine the effects of 4'-N-benzoyl staurosporine (CGP 41251), a protein kinase C inhibitor with broad antiproliferative activity in many cell lines, on the rat isolated heart contractility under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Additionally, we examined the effects of CGP 41251, WB-4101 (alpha1a -adrenoceptor antagonist), chloroethylclonidine (CEC) (alpha1b-adrenoceptor antagonist) and selective damage of endocardial endothelium by Triton X-100 on the protection against hypoxia induced by preconditioning of rat heart tissue. Experiments were performed on rat isolated left ventricular papillary muscle. The following parameters were measured: force of contraction (Fc), velocity of contraction (+dF/dt) and velocity of relaxation (-dF/dt). The temperature of the bath solution was 37 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C, and rate of electrical stimulation was 0.5 Hz. At concentrations less than 1 microM CGP 41251 did not cause any changes in contractility of rat heart. At 1 and 3 microM, significant positive inotropic action was observed. Treatment of rat papillary muscle by CGP 41251 at 3 microM reduced decreasing of contractility by simulated hypoxia and reperfusion. Moreover, protective effects of preconditioning was not affected by addition of CGP 41251 neither at 1 nor at 3 microM. Pretreatment with CEC at 3 microM, and selective damage of endocardial endothelium induced by fast (1-s) immersion of papillary muscle in 0.5% Triton X-100, but not pretreatment with WB-4101, abolished the protective effects of preconditioning. The results imply that CGP 41251 improves contractility of heart muscle under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and does not alter hypoxic preconditioning in rat isolated cardiac tissue. Moreover, it was shown that alpha1b-adrenoceptors and endocardial endothelium are involved in triggering of preconditioning in rat isolated heart muscle.

  20. Glucose transporters and in vivo glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscle: fasting, insulin stimulation and immunoisolation studies of GLUT1 and GLUT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraegen, E W; Sowden, J A; Halstead, M B; Clark, P W; Rodnick, K J; Chisholm, D J; James, D E

    1993-01-01

    Our aim was to study glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4 in relation to in vivo glucose uptake in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. The levels of both transporters were of a similar order of magnitude in whole muscle tissue (GLUT1/GLUT4 ratio varied from 0.1 to 0.6), suggesting that both may have an important physiological role in regulating muscle glucose metabolism. GLUT4 correlated very strongly (r2 = 0.97) with maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (Rg' max., estimated using the glucose clamp plus 2-deoxy[3H]glucose bolus technique) in six skeletal muscles and heart. A distinct difference in regulation of the two transporters was evident in heart: in 5 h-fasted rats, basal glucose uptake and GLUT1 levels in heart were very high and both were reduced, by 90 and 60% respectively, by 48 h fasting. However, in heart (and in red skeletal muscle), neither GLUT4 levels nor Rg' max. were reduced by 48 h fasting. GLUT1 was shown to be specifically expressed in cardiac myocytes, because intracellular vesicles enriched in GLUT4 contained significant levels of GLUT1. In conclusion, the high association of muscle GLUT4 content with insulin responsiveness in different muscles, and the preservation of both with fasting, supports a predominant role of GLUT4 in insulin-mediated glucose uptake. GLUT1 may play an important role in mediating cardiac muscle glucose uptake in the basal metabolic state. Marked changes in GLUT1 expression with alterations in the metabolic state, such as prolonged fasting, may play an important role in cardiac glucose metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8216230

  1. Contribution of IL-6 to the Hsp72, Hsp25, and alphaB-crystallin [corrected] responses to inflammation and exercise training in mouse skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Kimberly A; Meador, Benjamin M

    2008-12-01

    The heat shock proteins (Hsps) Hsp72, Hsp25, and alphaB-crystallin (alphaB C) [corrected]may protect tissues during exercise and/or inflammatory insults; however, no studies have investigated whether exercise training increases both basal and inflammation-induced expression of these Hsps in skeletal or cardiac muscle. IL-6 is produced by muscle during both exercise and inflammation and has been shown to modulate Hsp expression. These studies tested the hypothesis that voluntary wheel running (RW) increases basal and inflammation-induced Hsp72, Hsp25, and alphaB C [corrected] protein through an IL-6-dependent mechanism. We compared Hsp72, Hsp25, alphaB C, [corrected] and IL-6 protein levels 4 h after systemic inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in skeletal and cardiac muscles of wild-type (IL-6(+/+)) and IL-6 deficient (IL-6(-/-)) mice after 2 wk of RW or normal cage activity (Sed). LPS significantly increased skeletal Hsp72 and Hsp25 relative to saline in Sed IL-6(+/+), but not IL-6(-/-) mice. LPS increased Hsp72 relative to saline in Sed IL-6(+/+) cardiac muscle. RW increased basal Hsp72, Hsp25, and alphaB C [corrected] in skeletal muscle in IL-6(+/+) and IL-6(-/-) mice. However, LPS was not associated with increases in any Hsp in RW IL-6(+/+) or IL-6(-/-) mice. LPS increased IL-6 protein in skeletal muscle and plasma in Sed and RW groups, with a significantly greater response in RW. The major results provide the first in vivo evidence that the absence of IL-6 is associated with reduced skeletal muscle Hsp72 and Hsp25 responses to LPS, but that IL-6 is not required for exercise-induced Hsp upregulation in skeletal or cardiac muscle.

  2. Sustained elevation of circulating growth and differentiation factor-15 and a dynamic imbalance in mediators of muscle homeostasis are associated with the development of acute muscle wasting following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Susannah A A; Lee, Jen Y; Wort, S John; Polkey, Michael I; Kemp, Paul R; Griffiths, Mark J D

    2013-04-01

    Acute muscle wasting in the critically ill is common and causes significant morbidity. In a novel human model of acute muscle wasting following cardiac surgery, known or potential circulating modulators of muscle mass--insulin-like growth factor-1, myostatin, and growth and differentiation factor-15--were measured over a week. It was hypothesized that patients who developed acute muscle wasting would show distinct patterns of change in these mediators. A prospective longitudinal observational study of high-risk elective cardiac surgical patients identifying, by ultrasound, those developing muscle wasting. Tertiary cardiothoracic referral center: Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK. Forty-two patients undergoing elective high-risk cardiothoracic surgery. Circulating insulin-like growth factor-1, myostatin, and growth and differentiation factor-15 were assayed preoperatively and over the first week postoperatively. The ability of growth and differentiation factor-15 to cause muscle wasting in vitro was determined in C2C12 myotubes. Of the 42 patients, 23 (55%) developed quadriceps atrophy. There was an acute decrease in insulin-like growth factor-1 and unexpectedly myostatin, known mediators of muscle hypertrophy and atrophy, respectively. By contrast, plasma growth and differentiation factor-15 concentrations increased in all patients. This increase in growth and differentiation factor-15 was sustained at day 7 in those who developed muscle wasting (day 7 compared with baseline, p0.05). Insulin-like growth factor-1 did not recover in those who developed muscle wasting (day 7 compared with baseline, p0.05). Finally, we demonstrated that growth and differentiation factor-15 caused atrophy of myotubes in vitro. These data support the hypothesis that acute muscle loss occurs as a result of an imbalance between drivers of muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. Growth and differentiation factor-15 is a potential novel factor associated with muscle atrophy, which may become a

  3. Motor imagery muscle contraction strength influences spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in spinal motor neuron excitability and autonomic nervous system activity during motor imagery of isometric thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). [Methods] The F-waves and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio were recorded at rest, during motor imagery, and post-trial. For motor imagery trials, subjects were instructed to imagine thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% MVC while holding the...

  4. Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT): key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy and skeletal muscle adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourajjaj, M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant progress in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, heart failure is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrial countries. Sustained cardiac hypertrophy, which is defined as an increase in heart size resulting from an increase in cardiomyocyte

  5. Sexual Dimorphism in the Alterations of Cardiac Muscle Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Associated to the Ageing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Bartomeu; Oliver, Jordi; Garcia-Palmer, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of cardiac disease is age and sex dependent, but the mechanisms governing these associations remain poorly understood. Mitochondria are the organelles in charge of producing energy for the cells, and their malfunction has been linked to cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Interestingly, heart mitochondrial content and functionality are also age and sex dependent. Here we investigated the combinatory effects of age and sex in mitochondrial bioenergetics that could help to understand their role on cardiac disease. Cardiac mitochondria from 6- and 24-month-old male and female Wistar rats were isolated, and the enzymatic activities of the oxidative-phosphorylative complexes I, III, and IV and ATPase, as well as the protein levels of complex IV, β-ATPase, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were measured. Furthermore, heart DNA content, citrate synthase activity, mitochondrial protein content, oxygen consumption, and H2O2 generation were also determined. Results showed a reduction in heart mitochondrial mass and functionality with age that correlated with increased H2O2 generation. Moreover, sex-dependent differences were found in several of these parameters. In particular, old females exhibited a significant loss of mitochondrial function and increased relative H2O2 production compared with their male counterparts. The results demonstrate a sex dimorphism in the age-associated defects on cardiac mitochondrial function.

  6. Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT): key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy and skeletal muscle adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourajjaj, M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant progress in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, heart failure is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrial countries. Sustained cardiac hypertrophy, which is defined as an increase in heart size resulting from an increase in cardiomyocyte

  7. Chronic impairment of leg muscle blood flow following cardiac catheterization in childhood. [/sup 133/Xe clearance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skovranek, J.; Samanek, M.

    1979-01-01

    In 99 patients with congenital heart defects or chronic respiratory disease without clinical symptoms of disturbances in peripheral circulation, resting and maximal blood flow in the anterior tibial muscle of both extremities were investigated 2.7 yrs (average) after cardiac catheterization. The method used involved /sup 133/Xe clearance. Resting blood flow was normal and no difference could be demonstrated between the extremity originally used for catheterization and the contralateral control extremity. No disturbance in maximal blood flow could be proved in the extremity used for catheterization by the venous route only. Maximal blood flow was significantly lower in that extremity where the femoral artery had been catheterized or cannulated for pressure measurement and blood sampling. The disturbance in maximal flow was shown regardless of whether the arterial catheterization involved the Seldinger percutaneous technique, arteriotomy, or mere cannulation of the femoral artery. The values in the involved extremity did not differ significantly from the values in a healthy population.

  8. Chiral recognition of pinacidil and its 3-pyridyl isomer by canine cardiac and smooth muscle: Antagonism by sulfonylureas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, M.I.; Wiest, S.A.; Zimmerman, K.M.; Ertel, P.J.; Bemis, K.G.; Robertson, D.W. (Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Pinacidil, a potassium channel opener (PCO), relaxes vascular smooth muscle by increasing potassium ion membrane conductance, thereby causing membrane hyperpolarization. PCOs also act on cardiac muscle to decrease action potential duration (APD) selectively. To examine the enantiomeric selectivity of pinacidil, the stereoisomers of pinacidil (a 4-pyridylcyanoguanidine) and its 3-pyridyl isomer (LY222675) were synthesized and studied in canine Purkinje fibers and cephalic veins. The (-)-enantiomers of both pinacidil and LY222675 were more potent in relaxing phenylephrine-contracted cephalic veins and decreasing APD than were their corresponding (+)-enantiomers. The EC50 values for (-)-pinacidil and (-)-LY222675 in relaxing cephalic veins were 0.44 and 0.09 microM, respectively. In decreasing APD, the EC50 values were 3.2 microM for (-)-pinacidil and 0.43 microM for (-)-LY222675. The eudismic ratio was greater for the 3-pyridyl isomer than for pinacidil in both cardiac (71 vs. 22) and vascular (53 vs. 17) tissues. (-)-LY222675 and (-)-pinacidil (0.1-30 microM) also increased 86Rb efflux from cephalic veins to a greater extent than did their respective optical antipodes. The antidiabetic sulfonylurea, glyburide (1-30 microM), shifted the vascular concentration-response curve of (-)-pinacidil to the right by a similar extent at each inhibitor concentration. Glipizide also antagonized the response to (-)-pinacidil, but was about 1/10 as potent with a maximal shift occurring at 10 and 30 microM. Glyburide antagonized the vascular relaxant effects of 0.3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 2.3 microM) and reversed the decrease in APD caused by 3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 1.9 microM). Nitroprusside did not alter 86Rb efflux, and vascular relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by sulfonylureas.

  9. The Effect of Fructose-1,6-diphosphate and HTK Solution on Protecting Primary Cardiac Muscle Cells of Rat with Cold Preservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiaofeng; CHENG Jun; XIA Suisheng

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In this study we tried to investigate the effect of fructose-1,6-diphosphate and HTK solution on protecting primary cardiac muscle cells of rat with cold preservation. The primary cardiac muscle cells of rat were cultured in vitro with four preservation solutions respectively: 0.9 % sodium chloride solution (group A), FDP (group B), HTK solution (group C) and a mixture of FDP and HTK solution (group D). The cells were preserved for 6, 8 and 10 h at 0-4 ℃. The values of AST and LDH-L and the Na+-K+ ATPase activity in cardiac muscle cells were detected, and the survival rate of cardiac muscle cells was detected with trypan blue staining. The values of AST and LDH-L in group C and group D were remarkable lower those in group A and group B (P<0.001), while the Na+-K+ ATPase activity and the survival rate of cells in group C and group D were much higher than those in group A and group B (P<0.001). The values of AST and LDH-L after 6 hours in group D decreased much more than those in group C (P<0.01), while the Na+-K+ ATPase activity and the survival rate of cells in group D improved more than those in group C (P<0.01). Both of the HTK solution and the mixture of HTK and FDP solution have an evident effect on protecting the primary cardiac muscle cells of rat in vitro with cold preservation, Compared with the HTK solution, the mixture solution has a better short-term protective effect.

  10. The unusual adrenergic-like excitatory action of acetylcholine on the ventricular cardiac muscle of the horned shark, Heterodontus portusjacksoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A P; O'Shea, J E

    1997-01-01

    The atypical excitatory effect of acetylcholine on cardiac ventricular muscle was investigated in the horned shark, Heterodontus portusjacksoni. Electrically paced ventricular strips produced a massive 391.45% (+/-26.39%) increase in basal force of contraction in response to exogenously applied acetylcholine. The response was similar in nature to that produced by applied adrenaline, which caused a 382.52% (+/-72.47%) increase. The response to acetylcholine was blocked by the muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist atropine and the competitive beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol and was reduced by bretylium, an agent known to inhibit the release of catecholamines from adrenergic nerves. These findings strongly suggest that acetylcholine mediates a localised release of a catecholamine via muscarinic cholinoceptors in shark heart. A cholinergically controlled catecholamine store has been proposed (cholinergic-adreno complex), implying that elasmobranchs may be capable of finer control of cardiac output than has previously been suspected. This complex may represent a transitional adrenergic state between humoral and neuronal regulation. The spontaneously beating atrium showed no evidence of such an excitatory response to applied acetylcholine but produced an atropine-sensitive slowing, a response typical of other vertebrates.

  11. Host-derived smooth muscle cells accumulate in cardiac allografts: role of inflammation and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Religa

    Full Text Available Transplant arteriosclerosis is characterized by inflammation and intimal thickening caused by accumulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs both from donor and recipient. We assessed the relationship between clinical factors and the presence of host-derived SMCs in 124 myocardial biopsies from 26 consecutive patients who received hearts from opposite-sex donors. Clinical and demographic information was obtained from the patients' medical records. Host-derived SMCs accounted for 3.35+/-2.3% of cells in arterioles (range, 0.08-12.51%. As shown by linear regression analysis, an increased number of SMCs was associated with rejection grade (mean, 1.41+/-1.03, p = 0.034 and the number of leukocytes (19.1+/-12.7 per 20 high-power fields, p = 0.01. The accumulation of host-derived SMCs was associated with an increased number of leukocytes in the allografts. In vitro, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 released from leukocytes was crucial for SMC migration. After heart allotransplantation, mice treated with MCP-1-specific antibodies had significantly fewer host-derived SMCs in the grafts than mice treated with isotypic antibody controls. We conclude that the number of host-derived SMCs in human cardiac allografts is associated with the rejection grade and that MCP-1 may play pivotal role in recruiting host-derived SMCs into cardiac allografts.

  12. Host-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells Accumulate in Cardiac Allografts: Role of Inflammation and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Soin, Joanna; Nozynski, Jerzy; Zakliczynski, Michal; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is characterized by inflammation and intimal thickening caused by accumulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) both from donor and recipient. We assessed the relationship between clinical factors and the presence of host-derived SMCs in 124 myocardial biopsies from 26 consecutive patients who received hearts from opposite-sex donors. Clinical and demographic information was obtained from the patients' medical records. Host-derived SMCs accounted for 3.35±2.3% of cells in arterioles (range, 0.08–12.51%). As shown by linear regression analysis, an increased number of SMCs was associated with rejection grade (mean, 1.41±1.03, p = 0.034) and the number of leukocytes (19.1±12.7 per 20 high-power fields, p = 0.01). The accumulation of host-derived SMCs was associated with an increased number of leukocytes in the allografts. In vitro, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) released from leukocytes was crucial for SMC migration. After heart allotransplantion, mice treated with MCP-1-specific antibodies had significantly fewer host-derived SMCs in the grafts than mice treated with isotypic antibody controls. We conclude that the number of host-derived SMCs in human cardiac allografts is associated with the rejection grade and that MCP-1 may play pivotal role in recruiting host-derived SMCs into cardiac allografts. PMID:19142231

  13. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4–8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K+ contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 °C to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R2 ~ 0.76). SR Ca2+-ATPase, relative to Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments. PMID:25056841

  14. SCN4A variants and Brugada syndrome: phenotypic and genotypic overlap between cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissay, Véronique; Van Malderen, Sophie C H; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lissens, Willy; Peeters, Uschi; Daneels, Dorien; Jansen, Anna C; Pappaert, Gudrun; Brugada, Pedro; De Keyser, Jacques; Van Dooren, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    SCN5A mutations involving the α-subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated muscle sodium channel (NaV1.5) result in different cardiac channelopathies with an autosomal-dominant inheritance such as Brugada syndrome. On the other hand, mutations in SCN4A encoding the α-subunit of the skeletal voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.4) cause non-dystrophic myotonia and/or periodic paralysis. In this study, we investigated whether cardiac arrhythmias or channelopathies such as Brugada syndrome can be part of the clinical phenotype associated with SCN4A variants and whether patients with Brugada syndrome present with non-dystrophic myotonia or periodic paralysis and related gene mutations. We therefore screened seven families with different SCN4A variants and non-dystrophic myotonia phenotypes for Brugada syndrome and performed a neurological, neurophysiological and genetic work-up in 107 Brugada families. In the families with an SCN4A-associated non-dystrophic myotonia, three patients had a clinical diagnosis of Brugada syndrome, whereas we found a remarkably high prevalence of myotonic features involving different genes in the families with Brugada syndrome. One Brugada family carried an SCN4A variant that is predicted to probably affect function, one family suffered from a not genetically confirmed non-dystrophic myotonia, one family was diagnosed with myotonic dystrophy (DMPK gene) and one family had a Thomsen disease myotonia congenita (CLCN1 variant that affects function). Our findings and data suggest a possible involvement of SCN4A variants in the pathophysiological mechanism underlying the development of a spontaneous or drug-induced type 1 electrocardiographic pattern and the occurrence of malignant arrhythmias in some patients with Brugada syndrome.

  15. Eliminating cardiac contamination from myoelectric control signals developed by targeted muscle reinnervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Kuiken, Todd A

    2006-12-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) artifact is a major noise contaminating the myoelectric control signals when using shoulder disarticulation prosthesis. This is an even more significant problem with targeted muscle reinnervation to develop additional myoelectric sites for improved prosthesis control in a bilateral amputee at shoulder disarticulation level. This study aims at removal of ECG artifacts from the myoelectric prosthesis control signals produced from targeted muscle reinnervation. Three ECG artifact removal methods based on template subtracting, wavelet thresholding and adaptive filtering were investigated, respectively. Surface EMG signals were recorded from the reinnervated pectoralis muscles of the amputee. As a key parameter for clinical myoelectric prosthesis control, the amplitude measurement of the signal was used as a performance indicator to evaluate the proposed methods. The feasibility of the different methods for clinical application was also investigated with consideration of the clinical speed requirements and memory limitations of commercial prosthesis controllers.

  16. Simulation of steady state and transient cardiac muscle response experiments with a Huxley-based contraction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Jorge A; Lascano, Elena C

    2008-08-01

    A cardiac muscle model is presented with the purpose of representing a wide range of mechanical experiments at constant and transient Ca(2+) concentration. Modifications of a previous model were: weak and power attached crossbridge states, a troponin system involving three consecutive regulatory troponin-tropomyosin units acting together in Ca(2+) kinetics and detachment constants depending on crossbridge length. This model improved cooperativity (Hill coefficient close to 4) and the force-velocity relationship, and incorporated the representation of the four phases of muscle response to length and force steps, isotonic shortening and isosarcometric contractions, preserving previous satisfactory results. Moreover, experimentally reported effects, such as length dependence on Ca(2+) affinity, the decreased cooperativity at higher Ca(2+) concentrations, temperature effects on the stiffness-frequency relationship and the isometric internal shortening due to series elasticity, were obtained. In conclusion, the model is more comprehensive than a previous version because it is able to represent a wider variety of steady state experiments, the mechanical variables in twitches can be adequately related to intracellular Ca(2+), and all the simulations were performed with the same set of parameters.

  17. Effect of sildenafil on skeletal and cardiac muscle in Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Kruuse, Christina; Nyhuus, Bo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy lack neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). nNOS mediates physiological sympatholysis, thus ensuring adequate blood supply to working muscle. In mice lacking dystrophin, restoration of nNOS effects by a phosp...

  18. Influence of menstrual cycle phase on muscle metaboreflex control of cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate and blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwich, Doreen; Aldred, Sarah; Fisher, James P

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine whether menstrual cycle phase influences muscle metaboreflex control of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Twenty-three young women not taking oral contraceptives were studied during the early (EF; low oestrogen, low progesterone) and late follicular menstrual phases (LF; high oestrogen, low progesterone). Protocol 1 consisted of leg cycling at low (21 ± 2 W) and moderate workloads (71 ± 3 W) in free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh-cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to activate the muscle metaboreflex. Protocol 2 consisted of rhythmic hand-grip exercise with incremental upper arm-cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia. Leg cycling decreased cBRS (EF, 20 ± 5, 6 ± 1 and 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 19 ± 3, 6 ± 0.4, 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) during rest, low- and moderate-intensity leg cycling, respectively) and increased HR in an intensity-dependent manner, while BP remained unchanged. Partial flow restriction during leg cycling decreased cBRS, and increased HR and BP. During post-exercise ischaemia, HR and BP remained elevated, while cBRS remained suppressed (EF, 4.2 ± 0.6 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 4.7 ± 0.5 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 versus rest). Cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was unchanged during hand-grip with and without partial flow restriction and post-exercise ischaemia. No differences in cBRS, HR or BP responses were observed between EF and LF at any time during either protocol. These data indicate that endogenous fluctuations in oestrogen between the EF and LF phases of the menstrual cycle do not influence muscle metaboreflex control of cBRS, BP or HR in young women.

  19. Myosin types and fiber types in cardiac muscle. II. Atrial myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies were produced against myosins isolated from the left atrial myocardium (anti-bAm) and the left ventricular myocardium (anti-bVm) of the bovine heart. Cross-reactive antibodies were removed by cross- absorption. Absorbed anti-bAm and anti-bVm were specific for the myosin heavy chains when tested by enzyme immunoassay combined with SDS gel electrophoresis. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to determine the reactivity of atrial muscle fibers to the two antibodies. Three populations...

  20. Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy with muscle, vitreous, leptomeningeal, and cardiac involvement: Phenotypic, pathological, and MRI description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashantha D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAN type 1 is a rare systemic disease that causes severe and disabling peripheral neuropathy. We describe the phenotypic, radiological, and pathological characteristics of a patient with familial amyloid polyneuropathy type 1 who had evidence of motor-sensory-autonomic neuropathy, ocular vitreous deposits, diffuse leptomeningeal involvement, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Muscle involvement, an infrequently reported feature, was also observed. Early recognition of the disease has significant therapeutic implications.

  1. Comparative cardiac pathological changes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) affected with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousaf, Muhammad Naveed; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Skjødt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The heart is considered the powerhouse of the cardiovascular system. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD) are cardiac diseases of marine farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which commonly affect the heart in addition to the skeletal......) and TUNEL, and moderate levels of caspase 3 immuno-reactivity suggested a high cell turnover where DNA damage/repair might be occurring in the diseased hearts. Interestingly, the apparently similar cardiac diseases exhibited differences in the immunopathological responses in Atlantic salmon....

  2. High expression of nuclear factor 90 (NF90 leads to mitochondrial degradation in skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuma Higuchi

    Full Text Available While NF90 has been known to participate in transcription, translation and microRNA biogenesis, physiological functions of this protein still remain unclear. To uncover this, we generated transgenic (Tg mice using NF90 cDNA under the control of β-actin promoter. The NF90 Tg mice exhibited a reduction in body weight compared with wild-type mice, and a robust expression of NF90 was detected in skeletal muscle, heart and eye of the Tg mice. To evaluate the NF90 overexpression-induced physiological changes in the tissues, we performed a number of analyses including CT-analysis and hemodynamic test, revealing that the NF90 Tg mice developed skeletal muscular atrophy and heart failure. To explore causes of the abnormalities in the NF90 Tg mice, we performed histological and biochemical analyses for the skeletal and cardiac muscles of the Tg mice. Surprisingly, these analyses demonstrated that mitochondria in those muscular tissues of the Tg mice were degenerated by autophagy. To gain further insight into the cause for the mitochondrial degeneration, we identified NF90-associated factors by peptide mass fingerprinting. Of note, approximately half of the NF90-associated complexes were ribosome-related proteins. Interestingly, protein synthesis rate was significantly suppressed by high-expression of NF90. These observations suggest that NF90 would negatively regulate the function of ribosome via its interaction with the factors involved in the ribosome function. Furthermore, we found that the translations or protein stabilities of PGC-1 and NRF-1, which are critical transcription factors for expression of mitochondrial genes, were significantly depressed in the skeletal muscles of the NF90 Tg mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that the mitochondrial degeneration engaged in the skeletal muscle atrophy and the heart failure in the NF90 Tg mice may be caused by NF90-induced posttranscriptional repression of transcription factors such as PGC-1 and

  3. Effects of Acupuncture Pretreatment on Ischemic Cardiac Muscle Cell Apoptosis and Gene Expression in Ischemia-reperfusion Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宇辉; 孙忠人; 崔学军

    2009-01-01

    目的:针灸预处理对缺血心肌具有保护作用.通过观察针刺预处理对心肌缺血再灌注损伤大鼠心肌细胞凋亡及HSP70mPNA表达的影响,探讨针刺预处理的心肌保护机制.方法:64只Wistar大鼠随机分为8组,即正常对照组,假手术组,缺血再灌注组,缺血预处理组,手捻针预处理日1次组,电针预处理日1次组,手捻针预处理日2次组,电针预处理日2次组.建立大鼠心肌缺血再灌注模型,采用原位杂交法测定心肌HSP70mRNA的表达,TUNEL法检测细胞凋亡.结果:与正常对照组、假手术组比较,缺血再灌注组细胞凋亡增加,HSP70 mRNA表达增加;与缺血再灌注组比较,针刺预处理使心肌细胞凋亡减少、HSP70mRNA表达增加,且针刺预处理日2次组作用强于针刺预处理日1次组和缺血预处理组.结论:针刺预处理能够抑制心肌缺血再灌注损伤大鼠心肌细胞凋亡,上调心肌HSP70mRNA的表达.针刺预处理每日2次的作用强于针剌预处理每日1次.%Objective:To investigate the protective effects of acupuncture pretreatment on ischemic myocardium,the protective mechanism of acupuncture pretreatment on ischemic myocardium was explored by observing the cardiac muscle cell apoptosis and the expression of HSP70 mRNA of ischemia-reperfusion injury rats treated with acupuncture pretreatment.Methods:Sixty-four Wistar rats were randomly divided into eight groups:control group,sham surgery group,ischemia-repertusion group,ischemia pretreatment group,manual acupuncture pretreatment group(once a day),electroacupuncture pretreatment group(once a day),manual acupuncture pretreatment group(twice a day),and electroacupuncture pretreatment group(twice a day).The reperfusion model of rat myocardial ischemia was made.Expression of HSP70 mRNA was assayed by in situ hyrbridization,and cell apoptosis by TUNEL.Results:Compared with those in the control group and the sham surgery group,the apoptosis and the expression of HSP70 m

  4. Physiologic Basis and Pathophysiologic Implications of the Diastolic Properties of the Cardiac Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ferreira-Martins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although systole was for long considered the core of cardiac function, hemodynamic performance is evenly dependent on appropriate systolic and diastolic functions. The recognition that isolated diastolic dysfunction is the major culprit for approximately fifty percent of all heart failure cases imposes a deeper understanding of its underlying mechanisms so that better diagnostic and therapeutic strategies can be designed. Risk factors leading to diastolic dysfunction affect myocardial relaxation and/or its material properties by disrupting the homeostasis of cardiomyocytes as well as their relation with surrounding matrix and vascular structures. As a consequence, slower ventricular relaxation and higher myocardial stiffness may result in higher ventricular filling pressures and in the risk of hemodynamic decompensation. Thus, determining the mechanisms of diastolic function and their implications in the pathophysiology of heart failure with normal ejection fraction has become a prominent field in basic and clinical research.

  5. Metabolomic Profiling of Pompe Disease-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Reveals That Oxidative Stress Is Associated With Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yohei; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Yohta; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya

    2016-08-18

    : Pompe disease (PD) is a lysosomal storage disease that is caused by a deficiency of the acid α-glucosidase, which results in glycogen accumulation in the lysosome. The major clinical symptoms of PD include skeletal muscle weakness, respiratory failure, and cardiac hypertrophy. Based on its severity and symptom onset, PD is classified into infantile and late-onset forms. Lysosomal accumulation of glycogen can promote many types of cellular dysfunction, such as autophagic dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and abnormal calcium signaling within skeletal muscle. However, the disease mechanism underlying PD cardiomyopathy is not fully understood. Several researchers have shown that PD induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes successfully replicate the disease phenotype and are useful disease models. We have analyzed the metabolomic profile of late-onset PD iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and found that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are likely associated with cardiac complications. Furthermore, we have validated that these disease-specific changes were also observed in the cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle of a genetically engineered murine PD model. Oxidative stress may contribute to skeletal muscle and cardiomyocyte dysfunction in PD mice; however, NF-E2-related factor 2 was downregulated in cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle, despite evidence of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that oxidative stress and an impaired antioxidative stress response mechanism may underlie the molecular pathology of late-onset PD.

  6. Myosin types and fiber types in cardiac muscle. II. Atrial myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorza, L; Sartore, S; Schiaffino, S

    1982-12-01

    Antibodies were produced against myosins isolated from the left atrial myocardium (anti-bAm) and the left ventricular myocardium (anti-bVm) of the bovine heart. Cross-reactive antibodies were removed by cross-absorption. Absorbed anti-bAm and anti-bVm were specific for the myosin heavy chains when tested by enzyme immunoassay combined with SDS gel electrophoresis. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to determine the reactivity of atrial muscle fibers to the two antibodies. Three populations of atrial muscle fibers were distinguished in the bovine heart: (a) fibers reactive with anti-bAm and unreactive with anti-bVm, like most fibers in the left atrium; (b) fibers reactive with both antibodies, especially numerous in the right atrium; (c) fibers reactive with anti-bVm and unreactive with anti-bAm, present only in the interatrial septum and in specific regions of the right atrium, such as the crista terminalis. These findings can be accounted for by postulating the existence of two distinct types of atrial myosin heavy chains, one of which is antigenically related to ventricular myosin. The tendency for fibers labeled by anti-bVm to occur frequently in bundles and their preferential distribution in the crista terminalis, namely along one of the main conduction pathways between the sinus node and the atrioventricular node, and in the interatrial septum, where different internodal tracts are known to converge, suggests that these fibers may be specialized for faster conduction.

  7. Dynamics of cross-bridge cycling, ATP hydrolysis, force generation, and deformation in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Shivendra G; Bugenhagen, Scott M; Palmer, Bradley M; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Despite extensive study over the past six decades the coupling of chemical reaction and mechanical processes in muscle dynamics is not well understood. We lack a theoretical description of how chemical processes (metabolite binding, ATP hydrolysis) influence and are influenced by mechanical processes (deformation and force generation). To address this need, a mathematical model of the muscle cross-bridge (XB) cycle based on Huxley's sliding filament theory is developed that explicitly accounts for the chemical transformation events and the influence of strain on state transitions. The model is identified based on elastic and viscous moduli data from mouse and rat myocardial strips over a range of perturbation frequencies, and MgATP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations. Simulations of the identified model reproduce the observed effects of MgATP and MgADP on the rate of force development. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the rate of force re-development measured in slack-restretch experiments is not directly proportional to the rate of XB cycling. For these experiments, the model predicts that the observed increase in the rate of force generation with increased Pi concentration is due to inhibition of cycle turnover by Pi. Finally, the model captures the observed phenomena of force yielding suggesting that it is a result of rapid detachment of stretched attached myosin heads.

  8. Predicting Effects of Tropomyosin Mutations on Cardiac Muscle Contraction through Myofilament Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Rakesh Sewanan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations to the human gene TPM1 have been implicated in the development of both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Such observations have led to studies investigating the link between single residue changes and the biophysical behavior of the tropomyosin molecule. However, the degree to which these molecular perturbations explain the performance of intact sarcomeres containing mutant tropomyosin remains uncertain. Here, we present a modeling approach that integrates various aspects of tropomyosin’s molecular properties into a cohesive paradigm representing their impact on muscle function. In particular, we considered the effects of tropomyosin mutations on (1 persistence length, (2 equilibrium between thin filament blocked and closed regulatory states, and (3 the crossbridge duty cycle. After demonstrating the ability of the new model to capture Ca-dependent myofilament responses during both dynamic and steady-state activation, we used it to capture the effects of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM related E180G and D175N mutations on skinned myofiber mechanics. Our analysis indicates that the fiber-level effects of the two mutations can be accurately described by a combination of changes to the three tropomyosin properties represented in the model. Subsequently, we used the model to predict mutation effects on muscle twitch. Both mutations led to increased twitch contractility as a consequence of diminished cooperative inhibition between thin filament regulatory units. Overall, simulations suggest that a common twitch phenotype for HCM-linked tropomyosin mutations includes both increased contractility and elevated diastolic tension.

  9. Short-term inspiratory muscle training potentiates the benefits of aerobic and resistance training in patients undergoing CABG in phase II cardiac rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Maria Hermes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To investigate the efficiency of short-term inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined aerobic and resistance exercise on respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in the phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Methods: A prospective, quasi-experimental study with 24 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and were randomly assigned to two groups in the Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program: inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined training (aerobic and resistance group (GCR + IMT, n=12 and combined training with respiratory exercises group (GCR, n=12, over a period of 12 weeks, with two sessions per week. Before and after intervention, the following measurements were obtained: maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax, peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2 and quality of life scores. Data were compared between pre- and post-intervention at baseline and the variation between the pre- and post-phase II cardiac rehabilitation program using the Student's t-test, except the categorical variables, which were compared using the Chi-square test. Values of P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Compared to GCR, the GCR + IMT group showed larger increments in PImax (P<0.001, PEmax (P<0.001, peak VO2 (P<0.001 and quality of life scores (P<0.001. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the addition of inspiratory muscle training, even when applied for a short period, may potentiate the effects of combined aerobic and resistance training, becoming a simple and inexpensive strategy for patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in phase II cardiac rehabilitation.

  10. The Conditions for Initiating "All-or-Nothing" Repolarization in Cardiac Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, D.; Hall, A. E.

    1963-01-01

    Solutions have been computed for the point polarization of an infinite cable-like membrane obeying the equations used to reproduce the Purkinje fiber action potential (Noble, 1960, 1962a) in order to determine the conditions for initiating all-or-nothing repolarization during the action potential plateau. It was found that all-or-nothing repolarization would not be obtainable during the first half of the action potential in spite of the fact that the membrane current-voltage relations contain regions of negative conductance. At the point at which the all-or-nothing response is first obtained, the computed threshold is large and repolarization almost back to the resting potential would be required in order to initiate the response. The results are discussed in relation to the experimental evidence at present available on repolarization in heart muscle. PMID:19431326

  11. Myosin light chain phosphorylation enhances contraction of heart muscle via structural changes in both thick and thin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2016-05-24

    Contraction of heart muscle is triggered by calcium binding to the actin-containing thin filaments but modulated by structural changes in the myosin-containing thick filaments. We used phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (cRLC) by the cardiac isoform of its specific kinase to elucidate mechanisms of thick filament-mediated contractile regulation in demembranated trabeculae from the rat right ventricle. cRLC phosphorylation enhanced active force and its calcium sensitivity and altered thick filament structure as reported by bifunctional rhodamine probes on the cRLC: the myosin head domains became more perpendicular to the filament axis. The effects of cRLC phosphorylation on thick filament structure and its calcium sensitivity were mimicked by increasing sarcomere length or by deleting the N terminus of the cRLC. Changes in thick filament structure were highly cooperative with respect to either calcium concentration or extent of cRLC phosphorylation. Probes on unphosphorylated myosin heads reported similar structural changes when neighboring heads were phosphorylated, directly demonstrating signaling between myosin heads. Moreover probes on troponin showed that calcium sensitization by cRLC phosphorylation is mediated by the thin filament, revealing a signaling pathway between thick and thin filaments that is still present when active force is blocked by Blebbistatin. These results show that coordinated and cooperative structural changes in the thick and thin filaments are fundamental to the physiological regulation of contractility in the heart. This integrated dual-filament concept of contractile regulation may aid understanding of functional effects of mutations in the protein components of both filaments associated with heart disease.

  12. The Effect of Xin Mai Tong Capsules in Protecting Survival Cardiac Muscles of the Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Ruixiang; Feng Jun; Meng Jun

    2005-01-01

    To study the effect of Composite Xin Mai Tong capsules (复方心脉通胶囊 CXMT) in protecting survival cardiac muscles in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) operation. The treatment with Composite XMT capsules started 3 days prior to the operation and continued for a period of 4 weeks; and its effect on the number of segments of nuclide resting ventricular myocardial imaging, the nuclide defect extension score (ES) and nuclide defect severity score (SS),and the level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of circulatory blood were determined and compared with that of the control group. More segments originally scored 1 turning to be scored 2 in nuclide imaging were seen in the treatment group than in the control group; and smaller ES and less SS seen in the former than in the latter group (P<0.05). Composite XMT capsules play an active role in myocardial salvage by promoting its metabolism and expression of circulatory VEGF. Its angiogenesis-like action helps establish collateral flow and has a positive role in myocardial salvage.

  13. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Seema R; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Watkin, Levi B; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S; Coe, Bradley P; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H B; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M; Hanchard, Neil A; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Yang, Yaping

    2016-02-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3-9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3-9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4-6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3-9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations.

  14. Oxidative stress in toadfish (Halobactrachus didactylus) cardiac muscle. Acute exposure to vanadate oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M; Joaquim, N; Sousa, A; Martins, H; Coucelo, J M

    2002-06-07

    Vanadate solutions as "metavanadate" (containing ortho and metavanadate species) and "decavanadate" (containing mainly decameric species) (5 mM; 1 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneously in Halobatrachus didactylus (toadfish), in order to evaluate the contribution of decameric vanadate species to vanadium (V) intoxication on the cardiac tissue. Following short-term exposure (1 and 7 days), different changes on antioxidant enzyme activities-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), selenium-glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), lipid peroxidation and subcellular vanadium distribution were observed in mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions of heart ventricle toadfish. After 1 day of vanadium intoxication, SOD, CAT and Se-GPx activities were decreased up to 25%, by both vanadate solutions, except mitochondrial CAT activity that increased (+23%) upon decavanadate administration. After 7 days of exposure, decavanadate versus metavanadate solutions promoted different effects mainly on cytosolic CAT activity (-56% versus -5%), mitochondrial CAT activity (-10% versus +10%) and total GPx activity (+1% versus -35%), whereas lipid peroxidation products were significantly increased (+82%) upon 500 microM decavanadate intoxication. Accumulation of vanadium in total (0.137+/-0.011 microg/g) and mitochondrial (0.022+/-0.001 microg/g) fractions was observed upon 7 days of metavanadate exposure, whereas for decavanadate, the concentration of vanadium increased in cytosolic (0.020+/-0.005 microg/g) and mitochondrial (0.021+/-0.009 microg/g) fractions. It is concluded that decameric vanadate species are responsible for a strong increase on lipid peroxidation and a decrease in cytosolic catalase activity thus contributing to oxidative stress responses upon vanadate intoxication, in the toadfish heart.

  15. The role of dye affinity in optical measurements of Cai(2+) transients in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wei; Fast, Vladimir G

    2014-07-01

    Previous experiments in cultures of neonatal rat myocytes demonstrated that the shape of Cai(2+) transients measured using high-affinity Ca(2+)-sensitive dyes may be misrepresented. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of dye affinity in Cai(2+) measurements in intact adult cardiac tissue by comparing optical recordings obtained with high- and low-affinity dyes. Experiments were carried out in porcine left ventricular (LV) wedge preparations stained locally by intramural injection via microcapillaries (diameter = 150 μm) with a low-affinity Ca(2+)-sensitive dye Fluo-4FF or Fluo-2LA (nominal Kd, ~7-10 μmol/l), high-affinity dye Rhod-2 (Kd = 0.57 μmol/l), and Fluo-4 or Fluo-2MA (Kd, ~0.4 μmol/l); in addition, tissue was stained with transmembrane potential (Vm)-sensitive dye RH-237. Optical recordings of Vm and Cai(2+) were made using optical fibers (diameter = 325 μm) glued with the microcapillaries. The durations of Cai(2+) transients measured at 50% level of recovery (CaD50) using high-affinity Fluo-4/Fluo-2MA dyes were up to ~81% longer than those measured with low-affinity Fluo-4FF/Fluo-2LA at long pacing cycle lengths (CL). In Fluo-4/Fluo-2MA measurements at long CLs, Cai(2+) transients often (~50% of cases) exhibited slow upstroke rise and extended plateau. In Rhod-2 measurements, CaD50 was moderately longer (up to ~35%) than in Fluo-4FF recordings, but Cai(2+) transient shapes were similar. In all series of measurements, mean action potential duration values were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The delays between Vm and Cai(2+) upstrokes were comparable for low- and high-affinity dyes (P > 0.05). In conclusion, measurements of Cai(2+) transient in ventricular myocardium are strongly affected by the affinity of Ca(2+) dyes. The high-affinity dyes may overestimate the duration and alter the shape of Cai(2+) transients. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. The role of dye affinity in optical measurements of Cai2+ transients in cardiac muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments in cultures of neonatal rat myocytes demonstrated that the shape of Cai2+ transients measured using high-affinity Ca2+-sensitive dyes may be misrepresented. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of dye affinity in Cai2+ measurements in intact adult cardiac tissue by comparing optical recordings obtained with high- and low-affinity dyes. Experiments were carried out in porcine left ventricular (LV) wedge preparations stained locally by intramural injection via microcapillaries (diameter = 150 μm) with a low-affinity Ca2+-sensitive dye Fluo-4FF or Fluo-2LA (nominal Kd, ∼7–10 μmol/l), high-affinity dye Rhod-2 (Kd = 0.57 μmol/l), and Fluo-4 or Fluo-2MA (Kd, ∼0.4 μmol/l); in addition, tissue was stained with transmembrane potential (Vm)-sensitive dye RH-237. Optical recordings of Vm and Cai2+ were made using optical fibers (diameter = 325 μm) glued with the microcapillaries. The durations of Cai2+ transients measured at 50% level of recovery (CaD50) using high-affinity Fluo-4/Fluo-2MA dyes were up to ∼81% longer than those measured with low-affinity Fluo-4FF/Fluo-2LA at long pacing cycle lengths (CL). In Fluo-4/Fluo-2MA measurements at long CLs, Cai2+ transients often (∼50% of cases) exhibited slow upstroke rise and extended plateau. In Rhod-2 measurements, CaD50 was moderately longer (up to ∼35%) than in Fluo-4FF recordings, but Cai2+ transient shapes were similar. In all series of measurements, mean action potential duration values were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The delays between Vm and Cai2+ upstrokes were comparable for low- and high-affinity dyes (P > 0.05). In conclusion, measurements of Cai2+ transient in ventricular myocardium are strongly affected by the affinity of Ca2+ dyes. The high-affinity dyes may overestimate the duration and alter the shape of Cai2+ transients. PMID:24791783

  17. Topographic mapping and compression elasticity analysis of skinned cardiac muscle fibers in vitro with atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Sabharwal, Tanya; Kalyanasundaram, Aruna; Guo, Lianhong; Wang, Guodong

    2009-09-18

    Surface topography and compression elasticity of bovine cardiac muscle fibers in rigor and relaxing state have been studied with atomic force microscopy. Characteristic sarcomere patterns running along the longitudinal axis of the fibers were clearly observed, and Z-lines, M-lines, I-bands, and A-bands can be distinguished through comparing with TEM images and force curves. AFM height images of fibers had shown a sarcomere length of 1.22+/-0.02 microm (n=5) in rigor with a significant 9% increase in sarcomere length in relaxing state (1.33+/-0.03 microm, n=5), indicating that overlap moves with the changing physiological conditions. Compression elasticity curves along with sarcomere locations have been taken by AFM compression processing. Coefficient of Z-line, I-band, Overlap, and M-line are 25+/-2, 8+/-1, 10+/-1, and 17+/-1.5 pN/nm respectively in rigor state, and 18+/-2.5, 4+/-0.5, 6+/-1, and 11+/-0.5 pN/nm respectively in relaxing state. Young's Modulus in Z-line, I-band, Overlap, and M-line are 115+/-12, 48+/-9, 52+/-8, and 90+/-12 kPa respectively in rigor, and 98+/-10, 23+/-4, 42+/-4, and 65+/-7 kPa respectively in relaxing state. The elasticity curves have shown a similar appearance to the section analysis profile of AFM height images of sarcomere and the distance between adjacent largest coefficient and Young's Modulus is equal to the sarcomere length measured from the AFM height images using section analysis, indicating that mechanic properties of fibers have a similar periodicity to the topography of fibers.

  18. Effects of pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy on passive stiffness in isolated adult cardiac muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Koide, M.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the changes in myocardial stiffness induced by chronic hemodynamic overloading are dependent on changes in the passive stiffness of the cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte). However, no previous studies have examined the passive constitutive properties of cardiocytes isolated from animals with myocardial hypertrophy. Accordingly, changes in relative passive stiffness of cardiocytes isolated from animals with chronic pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy were determined by examining the effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiocyte size. Anisosmotic stress was produced by altering superfusate osmolarity. Hypertrophied cardiocytes were enzymatically isolated from 16 adult cats with right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) and from 6 adult cats with RV volume-overload hypertrophy induced by creating an atrial septal defect (ASD). Left ventricular (LV) cardiocytes from each cat served as nonhypertrophied, normally loaded, same-animal controls. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 305 +/- 3 to 135 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 645 +/- 4 mosM. During anisosmotic stress, there were no significant differences between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes in pressure overload PAB cats with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area (47 +/- 2% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), diameter (46 +/- 3% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), or length (2.4 +/- 0.2% in RV vs. 2.0 +/- 0.3% in LV), or sarcomere length (1.5 +/- 0.1% in RV vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3% in LV). Likewise, there were no significant differences in cardiocyte strain between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes from ASD cats. In conclusion, chronic pressure-overload hypertrophy and chronic volume-overload hypertrophy did not alter the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress. Thus chronic overload hypertrophy did not alter relative passive cardiocyte stiffness.

  19. Effects of pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy on passive stiffness in isolated adult cardiac muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Koide, M.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the changes in myocardial stiffness induced by chronic hemodynamic overloading are dependent on changes in the passive stiffness of the cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte). However, no previous studies have examined the passive constitutive properties of cardiocytes isolated from animals with myocardial hypertrophy. Accordingly, changes in relative passive stiffness of cardiocytes isolated from animals with chronic pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy were determined by examining the effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiocyte size. Anisosmotic stress was produced by altering superfusate osmolarity. Hypertrophied cardiocytes were enzymatically isolated from 16 adult cats with right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) and from 6 adult cats with RV volume-overload hypertrophy induced by creating an atrial septal defect (ASD). Left ventricular (LV) cardiocytes from each cat served as nonhypertrophied, normally loaded, same-animal controls. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 305 +/- 3 to 135 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 645 +/- 4 mosM. During anisosmotic stress, there were no significant differences between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes in pressure overload PAB cats with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area (47 +/- 2% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), diameter (46 +/- 3% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), or length (2.4 +/- 0.2% in RV vs. 2.0 +/- 0.3% in LV), or sarcomere length (1.5 +/- 0.1% in RV vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3% in LV). Likewise, there were no significant differences in cardiocyte strain between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes from ASD cats. In conclusion, chronic pressure-overload hypertrophy and chronic volume-overload hypertrophy did not alter the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress. Thus chronic overload hypertrophy did not alter relative passive cardiocyte stiffness.

  20. Endogenous muscle atrophy F-box mediates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy through regulation of nuclear factor-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Soichiro; Maejima, Yasuhiro; Pain, Jayashree; Hong, Chull; Cho, Jaeyeaon; Park, Ji Yeon; Zablocki, Daniela; Tian, Bin; Glass, David J; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2011-07-08

    Overexpression of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx/atrogin-1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, induces proteasomal degradation in cardiomyocytes. The role of endogenous MAFbx in regulating cardiac hypertrophy and failure remains unclear. We investigated the role of MAFbx in regulating cardiac hypertrophy and function in response to pressure overload. Transverse aortic constriction (TAC) was applied to MAFbx knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Expression of MAFbx in WT mice was significantly increased by TAC. TAC-induced increases in cardiac hypertrophy were significantly smaller in MAFbx KO than in WT mice. There was significantly less lung congestion and interstitial fibrosis in MAFbx KO than in WT mice. MAFbx KO also inhibited β-adrenergic cardiac hypertrophy. DNA microarray analysis revealed that activation of genes associated with the transcription factor binding site for the nuclear factor-κB family were inhibited in MAFbx KO mice compared with WT mice after TAC. Although the levels of IκB-α were significantly decreased after TAC in WT mice, they were increased in MAFbx KO mice. MAFbx regulates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of IκB-α in cardiomyocytes. In primary cultured rat cardiomyocytes, phenylephrine-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB and hypertrophy were significantly suppressed by MAFbx knockdown but were partially rescued by overexpression of nuclear factor-κB p65. MAFbx plays an essential role in mediating cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. Downregulation of MAFbx inhibits cardiac hypertrophy in part through stabilization of IκB-α and inactivation of nuclear factor-κB. Taken together, inhibition of MAFbx attenuates pathological hypertrophy, thereby protecting the heart from progression into heart failure.

  1. Nandrolone decanoate negatively reverses the beneficial effects of exercise on cardiac muscle via sarcolemmal, but not mitochondrial K(ATP) channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Gholamreza; Javan, Mohammad; Safari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Azadeh; Shokri, Saeed; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Salimi, Mehdi; Hajizadeh, Sohrab

    2016-03-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels are supposed to have a substantial role in improvement of cardiac performance. This study was performed to evaluate whether nandrolone decanoate (ND) and (or) exercise training could affect the expression of cardiac K(ATP) channel subunits. Thirty-five male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, including sedentary control (SC), sedentary vehicle (SV), sedentary ND (SND), exercise control (EC), and exercise and ND (E+ND). Exercise training was performed on a treadmill 5 times per week. ND was injected (10 mg/kg/week, i.m.) to the rats in the SND and E+ND groups. Following cardiac isolation, the expression of both sarcolemmal and mitochondrial subunits of K(ATP) channel was measured using Western blot method. The expression of sarcolemmal, but not mitochondrial, subunits of K(ATP) channel (Kir6.2 and SUR2) of EC group was significantly higher compared with SC group while ND administration (SND group) did not show any change in their expression. In the E+ND group, ND administration led to decrease of the over-expression of sarcolemmal Kir6.2 and SUR2 which was previously induced by exercise. There was no significant association between the mitochondrial expression of either Kir6.2 or SUR2 proteins and administration of ND or exercise. Supra-physiological dosage of ND negatively reverses the effects of exercise on the cardiac muscle expression of sarcolemmal, but not mitochondrial, K(ATP) channel subunits.

  2. Role of heart rate and stroke volume during muscle metaboreflex-induced cardiac output increase: differences between activation during and after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Piras, Francesco; Filippi, Michele; Piredda, Carlo; Chiappori, Paolo; Melis, Franco; Milia, Raffaele; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    We hypothesized that the role of stroke volume (SV) in the metaboreflex-induced cardiac output (CO) increase was blunted when the metaboreflex was stimulated by exercise muscle ischemia (EMI) compared with post-exercise muscle ischemia (PEMI), because during EMI heart rate (HR) increases and limits diastolic filling. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited and their hemodynamic responses to the metaboreflex evoked by EMI, PEMI, and by a control dynamic exercise were assessed. The main finding was that the blood pressure increment was very similar in the EMI and PEMI settings. In both conditions the main mechanism used to raise blood pressure was a CO elevation. However, during the EMI test CO was increased as a result of HR elevation whereas during the PEMI test CO was increased as a result of an increase in SV. These results were explainable on the basis of the different HR behavior between the two settings, which in turn led to different diastolic time and myocardial performance.

  3. Evaluation of copper concentration in subclinical cases of white muscle disease and its relationship with cardiac troponin I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Ataollahi

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the serum level of copper (Cu in lambs suffering from subclinical forms of white muscle disease (WMD and its relationship with cardiac troponin I (cTn-I as a novel biomarker of cardiovascular disorders. Ten milliliters of jugular blood were taken from 200 lambs less than one year old to measure serum concentrations of Cu, selenium (Se, and cTn-I. The subjects were divided into 2 groups, namely, the deficient group which included 36 lambs, and the control group which included 164 lambs according to the reference serum Se concentration (50 ng/mL. Serum Se levels in the deficient group were lower than 50 ng/mL. By contrast, the control group showed Se levels higher than 50 ng/mL. Differences among the serum Cu and cTn-I levels were determined in both groups. The mean ±SD and median of serum Cu and cTn-I levels in the deficient group were lower and higher than those in the control group, respectively. A significant positive correlation was observed between serum Cu and Se levels, and also serum Cu and Se levels showed a negative correlation with serum cTn-I concentrations. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed that serum Cu levels were correlated positively with serum Se levels (p<0.05. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis indicated that the area under curve (AUC of Cu was significantly higher than that of cTn-I based on the reference diagonal line. It is important to keep in mind that the value of AUC for the ROC curve is between 0.5 and 1.00, in which the lowest accuracy is related to the reference diagonal line with AUC of 0.5. A cut-off was determined to indicate which Cu level can discriminate between affected and healthy lambs. The cut-off level, sensitivity, and specificity of Cu in this study were 144.5 ng/mL, 74%, and 61%, respectively.

  4. The Scaffold Protein Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein β Orchestrates Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophic Signaling Required for the Development of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Passariello, Catherine L.; Gayanilo, Marjorie; Thakur, Hrishikesh; Dayan, Joseph; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. In vitro evidence suggests that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein β (mAKAPβ) serves as a nodal organizer of hypertrophic signaling. However, the relevance of mAKAPβ signalosomes to pathological remodeling and heart failure in vivo remains unknown. Methods and Results Using conditional, cardiac myocyte–specific gene deletion, we now demonstrate that mAKAPβ expression in mice is important for the cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and catecholamine toxicity. mAKAPβ targeting prevented the development of heart failure associated with long-term transverse aortic constriction, conferring a survival benefit. In contrast to 29% of control mice (n=24), only 6% of mAKAPβ knockout mice (n=31) died in the 16 weeks of pressure overload (P=0.02). Accordingly, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited myocardial apoptosis and the development of interstitial fibrosis, left atrial hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. This improvement in cardiac status correlated with the attenuated activation of signaling pathways coordinated by the mAKAPβ scaffold, including the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase D1 and histone deacetylase 4 that we reveal to participate in a new mAKAP signaling module. Furthermore, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited pathological gene expression directed by myocyte-enhancer factor-2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell transcription factors that associate with the scaffold. Conclusions mAKAPβ orchestrates signaling that regulates pathological cardiac remodeling in mice. Targeting of the underlying physical architecture of signaling networks, including mAKAPβ signalosome formation, may constitute an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of pathological remodeling and heart failure. PMID:24812305

  5. Evidence towards Improved Estimation of Respiratory Muscle Effort from Diaphragm Mechanomyographic Signals with Cardiac Vibration Interference Using Sample Entropy with Fixed Tolerance Values

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    Sarlabous, Leonardo; Torres, Abel; Fiz, José A.; Jané, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of amplitude parameters of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi) signal is a non-invasive technique to assess respiratory muscle effort and to detect and quantify the severity of respiratory muscle weakness. The amplitude of the MMGdi signal is usually evaluated using the average rectified value or the root mean square of the signal. However, these estimations are greatly affected by the presence of cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG) noise. In this study, we present a method for improving the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals that is robust to the presence of MCG. This method is based on the calculation of the sample entropy using fixed tolerance values (fSampEn), that is, with tolerance values that are not normalized by the local standard deviation of the window analyzed. The behavior of the fSampEn parameter was tested in synthesized mechanomyographic signals, with different ratios between the amplitude of the MCG and clean mechanomyographic components. As an example of application of this technique, the use of fSampEn was explored also in recorded MMGdi signals, with different inspiratory loads. The results with both synthetic and recorded signals indicate that the entropy parameter is less affected by the MCG noise, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, we believe that the proposed fSampEn parameter could improve estimates of respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals with the presence of MCG interference. PMID:24586436

  6. Evidence towards improved estimation of respiratory muscle effort from diaphragm mechanomyographic signals with cardiac vibration interference using sample entropy with fixed tolerance values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Sarlabous

    Full Text Available The analysis of amplitude parameters of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi signal is a non-invasive technique to assess respiratory muscle effort and to detect and quantify the severity of respiratory muscle weakness. The amplitude of the MMGdi signal is usually evaluated using the average rectified value or the root mean square of the signal. However, these estimations are greatly affected by the presence of cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG noise. In this study, we present a method for improving the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals that is robust to the presence of MCG. This method is based on the calculation of the sample entropy using fixed tolerance values (fSampEn, that is, with tolerance values that are not normalized by the local standard deviation of the window analyzed. The behavior of the fSampEn parameter was tested in synthesized mechanomyographic signals, with different ratios between the amplitude of the MCG and clean mechanomyographic components. As an example of application of this technique, the use of fSampEn was explored also in recorded MMGdi signals, with different inspiratory loads. The results with both synthetic and recorded signals indicate that the entropy parameter is less affected by the MCG noise, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, we believe that the proposed fSampEn parameter could improve estimates of respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals with the presence of MCG interference.

  7. Cardiac BIN1 (cBIN1) is a regulator of cardiac contractile function and an emerging biomarker of heart muscle health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kang; Hong, Tingting

    2017-03-01

    In recent decades, a cardiomyocyte membrane scaffolding protein bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) has emerged as a critical multifunctional regulator of transverse-tubule (t-tubule) function and calcium signaling in cardiomyocytes. Encoded by a single gene with 20 exons that are alternatively spliced, more than ten BIN1 protein isoforms are expressed with tissue and disease specificity. The recently discovered cardiac alternatively spliced isoform BIN1 (cBIN1 or BIN1+13+17)plays a crucial role in organizing membrane microfolds within cardiac t-tubules. These cBIN1-induced microfolds form functional dyad microdomains by trafficking L-type calcium channels (LTCC) to t-tubule membrane and recruiting ryanodine receptors (RyR) to junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. When cBIN1 is transcriptionally reduced as occurs in heart failure, cBIN1-microfolds are disrupted and fail to form LTCC and RyR couplons. As a result, impaired dyad formation limits excitation-contraction coupling thus cardiac contractility, and accumulation of orphaned leaky RyRs outside of dyads increases ventricular arrhythmias. Reduced myocardial BIN1 in heart failure is also detectable at the blood level, and plasma BIN1 level predicts heart failure progression and future arrhythmias in cardiomyopathy patients. Here we will review the recent progress in BIN1-related cardiomyocyte biology studies and discuss the diagnostic and predictive values of cBIN1 in future clinical use.

  8. Exercise-induced changes of MCT1 in cardiac and skeletal muscles of diabetic rats induced by high-fat diet and STZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikooie, Rohollah; Rajabi, Hamid; Gharakhanlu, Reza; Atabi, Fereshteh; Omidfar, Kobra; Aveseh, Malihe; Larijani, Bagher

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that a part of therapeutic effects of endurance training on insulin resistance is mediated by increase in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial lactate transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1). Therefore, we examined the effect of 7 weeks endurance training on the mRNA and protein expression of MCT1 and MCT4 and their chaperon, CD147, on both sarcolemmal and mitochondrial membrane, separately, in healthy and type 2 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by injection of low dose of streptozotocin and feeding with high-fat diet. Insulin resistance was confirmed by homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance index and accuracy of two membranes separation was confirmed by negative control markers (glucose transporter 1 and cytochrome c oxidase. Real-time PCR and western blotting were used for mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Diabetes dramatically reduced MCT1 and MCT4 mRNA and their expression on sarcolemmal membrane whereas the reduction in MCT1 expression was less in mitochondrial membrane. Training increased the MCT1 mRNA and protein expression in both membranes and decreased insulin resistance as an adaptive consequence. In both tissues increase in CD147 mRNA was only parallel to MCT1 expression. The response of MCT1 on sarcolemmal and mitochondrial membranes was different between cardiac and skeletal muscles which indicate that intracellular lactate kinetic is tissue specific that allows a tissue to coordinate whole organism metabolism.

  9. A separate pool of cardiac phospholemman that does not regulate or associate with the sodium pump: multimers of phospholemman in ventricular muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wypijewski, Krzysztof J; Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Tulloch, Lindsay B; Aughton, Karen L; McLatchie, Linda M; Shattock, Michael J; Calaghan, Sarah C; Fuller, William

    2013-05-10

    Phospholemman regulates the plasmalemmal sodium pump in excitable tissues. In cardiac muscle, a subpopulation of phospholemman with a unique phosphorylation signature associates with other phospholemman molecules but not with the pump. Phospholemman oligomers exist in cardiac muscle. Much like phospholamban regulation of SERCA, phospholemman exists as both a sodium pump inhibiting monomer and an unassociated oligomer. Phospholemman (PLM), the principal quantitative sarcolemmal substrate for protein kinases A and C in the heart, regulates the cardiac sodium pump. Much like phospholamban, which regulates the related ATPase SERCA, PLM is reported to oligomerize. We investigated subpopulations of PLM in adult rat ventricular myocytes based on phosphorylation status. Co-immunoprecipitation identified two pools of PLM: one not associated with the sodium pump phosphorylated at Ser(63) and one associated with the pump, both phosphorylated at Ser(68) and unphosphorylated. Phosphorylation of PLM at Ser(63) following activation of PKC did not abrogate association of PLM with the pump, so its failure to associate with the pump was not due to phosphorylation at this site. All pools of PLM co-localized to cell surface caveolin-enriched microdomains with sodium pump α subunits, despite the lack of caveolin-binding motif in PLM. Mass spectrometry analysis of phosphospecific immunoprecipitation reactions revealed no unique protein interactions for Ser(63)-phosphorylated PLM, and cross-linking reagents also failed to identify any partner proteins for this pool. In lysates from hearts of heterozygous transgenic animals expressing wild type and unphosphorylatable PLM, Ser(63)-phosphorylated PLM co-immunoprecipitated unphosphorylatable PLM, confirming the existence of PLM multimers. Dephosphorylation of the PLM multimer does not change sodium pump activity. Hence like phospholamban, PLM exists as a pump-inhibiting monomer and an unassociated oligomer. The distribution of different PLM

  10. Low-level laser therapy associated with high intensity resistance training on cardiac autonomic control of heart rate and skeletal muscle remodeling in wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolillo, Fernanda Rossi; Arena, Ross; Dutra, Daniela Bassi; de Cassia Marqueti Durigan, Rita; de Araujo, Heloisa Selistre; de Souza, Hugo Celso Dutra; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Cipriano, Gerson; Chiappa, Gaspar; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2014-12-01

    Phototherapy plus dynamic exercise can enhance physical performance and improve health. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) associated with high intensity resistance training (HIT) on cardiac autonomic and muscle metabolic responses in rats. Forty Wistar rats were randomized into 4 groups: sedentary control (CG), HIT, LLLT and HIT + LLLT. HIT was performed 3 times/week for 8 weeks with loads attached to the tail of the animal. The load was gradually increased by 10% of body mass until reaching a maximal overload. For LLLT, irradiation parameters applied to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle were as follows: infrared laser (780 nm), power of 15 mW for 10 seconds, leading to an irradiance of 37.5 mW/cm(2), energy of 0.15 J per point and fluency of 3.8 J/cm(2). Blood lactate (BL), matrix metalloproteinase gelatinase A (MMP(-2)) gene expression and heart rate variability (HRV) indices were performed. BL significantly increased after 8-weeks for HIT, LLLT and HIT + LLLT groups. However, peak lactate when normalized by maximal load was significantly reduced for both HIT and HIT + LLLT groups (Phigh frequency [HF (un)] and HF (ms(2))] for the HIT, LLLT and HIT + LLLT groups compared with the CG (P < 0.05). However, the LF/HF ratio was further reduced in the LLLT and HIT + LLLT groups compared to the CG and HIT group (P < 0.05). These results provide evidence for the positive benefits of LLLT and HIT with respect to enhanced muscle metabolic and cardiac autonomic function in Wistar rats. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cellular trafficking determines the exon skipping activity of Pip6a-PMO in mdx skeletal and cardiac muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Taavi; Castillo Alvarez, Alejandra; Gauck, Sarah; Gait, Michael J; Coursindel, Thibault; Wood, Matthew J A; Lebleu, Bernard; Boisguerin, Prisca

    2014-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) has shown great promise for exon-skipping therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Pip6a-PMO, a recently developed conjugate, is particularly efficient in a murine DMD model, although mechanisms responsible for its increased biological activity have not been studied. Here, we evaluate the cellular trafficking and the biological activity of Pip6a-PMO in skeletal muscle cells and primary cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate that Pip6a-PMO is taken up in the skeletal muscle cells by an energy- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, its cellular distribution is different in undifferentiated and differentiated skeletal muscle cells (vesicular versus nuclear). Likewise, Pip6a-PMO mainly accumulates in cytoplasmic vesicles in primary cardiomyocytes, in which clathrin-mediated endocytosis seems to be the pre-dominant uptake pathway. These differences in cellular trafficking correspond well with the exon-skipping data, with higher activity in myotubes than in myoblasts or cardiomyocytes. These differences in cellular trafficking thus provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the variations in exon-skipping activity and restoration of dystrophin protein in heart muscle compared with skeletal muscle tissues in DMD models. Overall, Pip6a-PMO appears as the most efficient conjugate to date (low nanomolar EC50), even if limitations remain from endosomal escape.

  12. Cardiac and skeletal muscle expression of mutant β-myosin heavy chains, degree of functional impairment and phenotypic heterogeneity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Marina; Casadonte, Rita; Ricci, Pietroantonio; Santini, Mario; Frati, Giacomo; Rizzo, Antonietta; Carratelli, Caterina Romano; Lamberti, Monica; Parrotta, Elvira; Quaresima, Barbara; Faniello, Concetta M; Costanzo, Francesco; Cuda, Giovanni

    2012-10-01

    Several mutations in distinct genes, all coding for sarcomeric proteins, have been reported in unrelated kindreds with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). We have identified nine individuals from three families harboring two distinct mutations in one copy of the β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) gene. In this study, the expression of the mutant β-myosin protein isoform, isolated from slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle, was demonstrated by Northern and Western blot analysis; this myosin showed a decreased in vitro motility activity and produced a lower actin-activated ATPase activity. Isometric tension, measured in single slow-twitch fibers isolated from the affected individuals, also showed a significant decrease. The degree of impairment of β-myosin function, as well as the loss in isometric tension development, were strictly dependent on the amount of the isoform transcribed from the mutated allele. Interestingly, a strong correlation was also demonstrated between mutant β-myosin content and clinical features of FHC. On the other hand, we were unable to detect any correlation between mutant β-myosin expression and degree of cardiac hypertrophy, thereby strengthening the hypothesis that hypertrophy, one of the hallmarks of FHC, might not necessarily be related to the clinical evolution of this disease. These findings lend support to the notion that additional factors rather than the mutated gene may play a pathogenetic role in cardiac wall thickening, whereas the prognosis appears to be strongly related to the amount of mutant protein.

  13. Interrelation between the changes of phase functions of cardiac muscle contraction and biochemical processes as an algorithm for identifying local pathologies in cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury V. Fedosov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims The interrelation between hemodynamic changes, functions of the cardiovascular system and biochemical reactions in the cells of the heart muscle is investigated in the present paper. Materials and methods Several methods were used to influence the metabolism processes in the myocardium. The changes in the phase functions of contraction of different cardiac muscles were recorded. In order to have comprehensive influence on the metabolism processes, normalization of the acid-base balance was performed. L-carnitine and octolipen were used to affect the lipid metabolism. Results Phase blood volumes that are characteristic of hemodynamics changed in the course of treatment to reach their nornal values. The ECG shape during the heart cycle phases also changed to reach the norm. The initial ECG shape describing Brugada syndrome almost reached its normal value. Extrasystole disappeared therewith. Conclusion The method of the heart cycle phase analysis enables monitoring any changes in hemodynamics and functions of the cardiovascular system. The method can be used for identifying the original cause of pathologies and efficient monitoring of the treatment progress.

  14. Chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation and papillary muscle infarction detected by late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Willemsen, Hendrik M; Lexis, Chris P H; Prakken, Niek H; Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Mariani, Massimo A; van der Harst, Pim; van der Horst, Iwan C C

    2016-12-01

    Both papillary muscle infarction (PMI) and chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR) are associated with reduced survival after myocardial infarction. The influence of PMI on CIMR and factors influencing both entities are incompletely understood. We sought to determine the influence of PMI on CIMR after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and to define independent predictors of PMI and CIMR. Between January 2011 and May 2013, 263 patients (mean age 57.8 ± 11.5 years) underwent late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and transthoracic echocardiography 4 months after PCI for STEMI. Infarct size, PMI, and mitral valve and left ventricular geometric and functional parameters were assessed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of PMI and CIMR (≥grade 2+). PMI was present in 61 patients (23 %) and CIMR was present in 86 patients (33 %). In patients with PMI, 52 % had CIMR, and in patients without PMI, 27 % had CIMR (P PMI. Age [OR 1.08 (1.04-1.11), P PMI is mainly associated with inferior infarction and infarction in the circumflex coronary artery. Although the prevalence of CIMR is almost doubled in the presence of PMI, PMI is not an independent predictor of CIMR. Tethering height and interpapillary muscle distance are the strongest independent predictors of CIMR.

  15. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4 due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rajab

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4 of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT. PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  16. Host-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells Accumulate in Cardiac Allografts: Role of Inflammation and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Religa; Grudzinska, Monika K; Krzysztof Bojakowski; Joanna Soin; Jerzy Nozynski; Michal Zakliczynski; Zbigniew Gaciong; Marian Zembala; Cecilia Söderberg-Nauclér

    2009-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is characterized by inflammation and intimal thickening caused by accumulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) both from donor and recipient. We assessed the relationship between clinical factors and the presence of host-derived SMCs in 124 myocardial biopsies from 26 consecutive patients who received hearts from opposite-sex donors. Clinical and demographic information was obtained from the patients' medical records. Host-derived SMCs accounted for 3.35+/-2.3% of ce...

  17. [Dynamics of cardiac and skeletal muscle lactate dehydrogenase activity following a single exposure to an alternating magnetic field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udintsev, N A; Kanskaia, N V; Shchepetil'nikova, A I; Ordina, O M; Pichurina, R A

    1976-06-01

    A rise in LDH activity and a change of the enzyme distribution in the cytostructures of the heart and skeletal muscles of albino rats was revealed during the first 48 hours after a single twenty-four-hour action of an A. C. magnetic field (200 e, 50 cps). A displacement of the enzyma ratio in the direction of M-type was noted. Complete normalization occurred in the 3rd or 4th week only.

  18. Transcriptional assessment by microarray analysis and large-scale meta-analysis of the metabolic capacity of cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues to cope with reduced nutrient availability in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calduch-Giner, Josep A; Echasseriau, Yann; Crespo, Diego; Baron, Daniel; Planas, Josep V; Prunet, Patrick; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume

    2014-08-01

    The effects of nutrient availability on the transcriptome of cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues were assessed in juvenile gilthead sea bream fed with a standard diet at two feeding levels: (1) full ration size and (2) 70 % satiation followed by a finishing phase at the maintenance ration. Microarray analysis evidenced a characteristic transcriptomic profile for each muscle tissue following changes in oxidative capacity (heart > red skeletal muscle > white skeletal muscle). The transcriptome of heart and secondly that of red skeletal muscle were highly responsive to nutritional changes, whereas that of glycolytic white skeletal muscle showed less ability to respond. The highly expressed and nutritionally regulated genes of heart were mainly related to signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. In contrast, those of white muscle were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms related to proteolysis and protein ubiquitination. Microarray meta-analysis using the bioinformatic tool Fish and Chips ( http://fishandchips.genouest.org/index.php ) showed the close association of a representative cluster of white skeletal muscle with some of cardiac and red skeletal muscle, and many GO terms related to mitochondrial function appeared to be common links between them. A second round of cluster comparisons revealed that mitochondria-related GOs also linked differentially expressed genes of heart with those of liver from cortisol-treated gilthead sea bream. These results show that mitochondria are among the first responders to environmental and nutritional stress stimuli in gilthead sea bream, and functional phenotyping of this cellular organelle is highly promising to obtain reliable markers of growth performance and well-being in this fish species.

  19. [Parameters of cardiac muscle repolarization on the electrocardiogram when changing anatomical and electric position of the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaĭkovskiĭ, I A; Baum, O V; Popov, L A; Voloshin, V I; Budnik, N N; Frolov, Iu A; Kovalenko, A S

    2014-01-01

    While discussing the diagnostic value of the single channel electrocardiogram a set of theoretical considerations emerges inevitably, one of the most important among them is the question about dependence of the electrocardiogram parameters from the direction of electrical axis of heart. In other words, changes in what of electrocardiogram parameters are in fact liable to reflect pathological processes in myocardium, and what ones are determined by extracardiac factors, primarily by anatomic characteristics of patients. It is arguable that while analyzing electrocardiogram it is necessary to orient to such physiologically based informative indexes as ST segment displacement. Also, symmetry of the T wave shape is an important parameter which is independent of patients anatomic features. The results obtained are of interest for theoretical and applied aspects of the biophysics of the cardiac electric field.

  20. Dynamic muscle O2 saturation response is impaired during major non-cardiac surgery despite goal-directed haemodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldheiser, A; Hunsicker, O; Kaufner, L; Köhler, J; Sieglitz, H; Casans Francés, R; Wernecke, K-D; Sehouli, J; Spies, C

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a vascular occlusion test (VOT) could indicate an impairment of microvascular reactivity (MVR) in septic patients by detecting changes in dynamic variables of muscle O2 saturation (StO2). However, in the perioperative context the consequences of surgical trauma on dynamic variables of muscle StO2 as indicators of MVR are still unknown. This study is a sub-analysis of a randomised controlled trial in patients with metastatic primary ovarian cancer undergoing debulking surgery, during which a goal-directed haemodynamic algorithm was applied using oesophageal Doppler. During a 3 min VOT, near-infrared spectroscopy was used to assess dynamic variables arising from changes in muscle StO2. At the beginning of surgery, values of desaturation and recovery slope were comparable to values obtained in healthy volunteers. During the course of surgery, both desaturation and recovery slope showed a gradual decrease. Concomitantly, the study population underwent a transition to a surgically induced systemic inflammatory response state shown by a gradual increase in norepinephrine administration, heart rate, and Interleukin-6, with a peak immediately after the end of surgery. Higher rates of norepinephrine and a higher heart rate were related to a faster decline in StO2 during vascular occlusion. Using near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a VOT during surgery showed a gradual deterioration of MVR in patients treated with optimal haemodynamic care. The deterioration of MVR was accompanied by the transition to a surgically induced systemic inflammatory response state. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormal skeletal and cardiac development, cardiomyopathy, muscle atrophy and cataracts in mice with a targeted disruption of the Nov (Ccn3) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Emma; Tahri, Dalal; Andermarcher, Elisabetta; Schofield, Paul; Fleming, Stewart; Boulter, Catherine A

    2008-02-20

    Signals from the extracellular environment control many aspects of cell behaviour including proliferation, survival, differentiation, adhesion and migration. It is increasingly evident that these signals can be modulated by a group of matricellular proteins called the CCN family. CCN proteins have multiple domains through which they regulate the activities of a variety of signalling molecules including TGFbeta, BMPs and integrins, thereby influencing a wide range of processes in development and disease. Whilst the developmental roles of CCN1 and CCN2 have been elucidated, very little is known about the function of CCN3 (NOV). To investigate this, we have generated mice carrying a targeted mutation in the Nov gene (Novdel3) which reveal for the first time its diverse functions in embryos and adults. By replacing Nov exon 3 with a TKneomycin cassette, we have generated Novdel3-/- mice which produce no full length NOV protein and express at a barely detectable level a mutant NOV protein that lacks the VWC domain. In Novdel3-/- embryos, and to a lesser extent in Novdel3+/- embryos, development of the appendicular and axial skeleton was affected with enlarged vertebrae, elongated long bones and digits, delayed ossification, increased bone mineralization and severe joint malformations. Primary embryo fibroblasts from Novdel3-/- mutant embryos showed enhanced chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Cardiac development was also influenced leading to enlargement and abnormal modelling of the endocardial cushions, associated with septal defects and delayed fusion. In adults, cardiomyopathy was apparent, with hypertrophy and calcification of the septum and left ventricle dilation. Muscle atrophy was seen by 5 months of age, associated with transdifferentiation to fat. Premature tissue degeneration was also seen in the lens, with cataracts present from 6 months. We have generated the first mice with a mutation in the Nov gene (Novdel3). Our data demonstrate that NOV is a regulator of

  2. Abnormal skeletal and cardiac development, cardiomyopathy, muscle atrophy and cataracts in mice with a targeted disruption of the Nov (Ccn3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schofield Paul

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signals from the extracellular environment control many aspects of cell behaviour including proliferation, survival, differentiation, adhesion and migration. It is increasingly evident that these signals can be modulated by a group of matricellular proteins called the CCN family. CCN proteins have multiple domains through which they regulate the activities of a variety of signalling molecules including TGFβ, BMPs and integrins, thereby influencing a wide range of processes in development and disease. Whilst the developmental roles of CCN1 and CCN2 have been elucidated, very little is known about the function of CCN3 (NOV. To investigate this, we have generated mice carrying a targeted mutation in the Nov gene (Novdel3 which reveal for the first time its diverse functions in embryos and adults. Results By replacing Nov exon 3 with a TKneomycin cassette, we have generated Novdel3-/- mice which produce no full length NOV protein and express at a barely detectable level a mutant NOV protein that lacks the VWC domain. In Novdel3-/- embryos, and to a lesser extent in Novdel3+/- embryos, development of the appendicular and axial skeleton was affected with enlarged vertebrae, elongated long bones and digits, delayed ossification, increased bone mineralization and severe joint malformations. Primary embryo fibroblasts from Novdel3-/- mutant embryos showed enhanced chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Cardiac development was also influenced leading to enlargement and abnormal modelling of the endocardial cushions, associated with septal defects and delayed fusion. In adults, cardiomyopathy was apparent, with hypertrophy and calcification of the septum and left ventricle dilation. Muscle atrophy was seen by 5 months of age, associated with transdifferentiation to fat. Premature tissue degeneration was also seen in the lens, with cataracts present from 6 months. Conclusion We have generated the first mice with a mutation in the Nov gene

  3. Noninvasive, near infrared spectroscopic-measured muscle pH and PO2 indicate tissue perfusion for cardiac surgical patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Babs R.; Idwasi, Patrick O.; Balaguer, Jorge; Levin, Steven; Simsir, Sinan A.; Vander Salm, Thomas J.; Collette, Helen; Heard, Stephen O.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether near infrared spectroscopic measurement of tissue pH and Po2 has sufficient accuracy to assess variation in tissue perfusion resulting from changes in blood pressure and metabolic demand during cardiopulmonary bypass. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: Eighteen elective cardiac surgical patients. INTERVENTION: Cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A near infrared spectroscopic fiber optic probe was placed over the hypothenar eminence. Reference Po2 and pH sensors were inserted in the abductor digiti minimi (V). Data were collected every 30 secs during surgery and for 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass. Calibration equations developed from one third of the data were used with the remaining data to investigate sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopic measurement to physiologic changes resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass. Near infrared spectroscopic and reference pH and Po2 measurements were compared for each subject using standard error of prediction. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 at baseline were compared with values during cardiopulmonary bypass just before rewarming commenced (hypotensive, hypothermic), after rewarming (hypotensive, normothermic) just before discontinuation of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass (normotensive, normothermic) using mixed-model analysis of variance. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 were well correlated with the invasive measurement of pH (R2 =.84) and Po2 (R 2 =.66) with an average standard error of prediction of 0.022 +/- 0.008 pH units and 6 +/- 3 mm Hg, respectively. The average difference between the invasive and near infrared spectroscopic measurement was near zero for both the pH and Po2 measurements. Near infrared spectroscopic Po2 significantly decreased 50% on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass and remained depressed throughout the bypass and

  4. Noninvasive, near infrared spectroscopic-measured muscle pH and PO2 indicate tissue perfusion for cardiac surgical patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Babs R.; Idwasi, Patrick O.; Balaguer, Jorge; Levin, Steven; Simsir, Sinan A.; Vander Salm, Thomas J.; Collette, Helen; Heard, Stephen O.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether near infrared spectroscopic measurement of tissue pH and Po2 has sufficient accuracy to assess variation in tissue perfusion resulting from changes in blood pressure and metabolic demand during cardiopulmonary bypass. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: Eighteen elective cardiac surgical patients. INTERVENTION: Cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A near infrared spectroscopic fiber optic probe was placed over the hypothenar eminence. Reference Po2 and pH sensors were inserted in the abductor digiti minimi (V). Data were collected every 30 secs during surgery and for 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass. Calibration equations developed from one third of the data were used with the remaining data to investigate sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopic measurement to physiologic changes resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass. Near infrared spectroscopic and reference pH and Po2 measurements were compared for each subject using standard error of prediction. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 at baseline were compared with values during cardiopulmonary bypass just before rewarming commenced (hypotensive, hypothermic), after rewarming (hypotensive, normothermic) just before discontinuation of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass (normotensive, normothermic) using mixed-model analysis of variance. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 were well correlated with the invasive measurement of pH (R2 =.84) and Po2 (R 2 =.66) with an average standard error of prediction of 0.022 +/- 0.008 pH units and 6 +/- 3 mm Hg, respectively. The average difference between the invasive and near infrared spectroscopic measurement was near zero for both the pH and Po2 measurements. Near infrared spectroscopic Po2 significantly decreased 50% on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass and remained depressed throughout the bypass and

  5. Neonatal multiorgan failure due to ACAD9 mutation and complex I deficiency with mitochondrial hyperplasia in liver, cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle, and renal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Nancy; Wang, Xinjian; Peng, Yanyan; Valencia, C Alexander; Khuchua, Zaza; Hata, Jessica; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Bove, Kevin E

    2016-03-01

    Complex I deficiency causes Leigh syndrome, fatal infant lactic acidosis, and neonatal cardiomyopathy. Mutations in more than 100 nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA genes miscode for complex I subunits or assembly factors. ACAD9 is an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase with a novel function in assembly of complex I; biallelic mutations cause progressive encephalomyopathy, recurrent Reye syndrome, and fatal cardiomyopathy. We describe the first autopsy in fatal neonatal lethal lactic acidosis due to mutations in ACAD9 that reduced complex I activity. We identified mitochondrial hyperplasia in cardiac myocytes, diaphragm muscle, and liver and renal tubules in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using immunohistochemistry for mitochondrial antigens. Whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in the ACAD9 gene: c.187G>T (p.E63*) and c.941T>C (p.L314P). The nonsense mutation causes late infantile lethality; the missense variant is novel. Autopsy-derived fibroblasts had reduced complex I activity (53% of control) with normal activity in complexes II to IV, similar to reported cases of ACAD9 deficiency.

  6. Shortening and intracellular Ca2+ in ventricular myocytes and expression of genes encoding cardiac muscle proteins in early onset type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, K A; Adrian, T E; Qureshi, M A; Parekh, K; Oz, M; Howarth, F C

    2012-12-01

    There has been a spectacular rise in the global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular complications are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Contractile dysfunction, associated with disturbances in excitation-contraction coupling, has been widely demonstrated in the diabetic heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of cardiac muscle genes that are involved in the process of excitation-contraction coupling in the hearts of early onset (8-10 weeks of age) type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. Gene expression was assessed in ventricular muscle with real-time RT-PCR; shortening and intracellular Ca(2+) were measured in ventricular myocytes with video edge detection and fluorescence photometry, respectively. The general characteristics of the GK rats included elevated fasting and non-fasting blood glucose and blood glucose at 120 min following a glucose challenge. Expression of genes encoding cardiac muscle proteins (Myh6/7, Mybpc3, Myl1/3, Actc1, Tnni3, Tnn2, Tpm1/2/4 and Dbi) and intercellular proteins (Gja1/4/5/7, Dsp and Cav1/3) were unaltered in GK ventricle compared with control ventricle. The expression of genes encoding some membrane pumps and exchange proteins was unaltered (Atp1a1/2, Atp1b1 and Slc8a1), whilst others were either upregulated (Atp1a3, relative expression 2.61 ± 0.69 versus 0.84 ± 0.23) or downregulated (Slc9a1, 0.62 ± 0.07 versus 1.08 ± 0.08) in GK ventricle compared with control ventricle. The expression of genes encoding some calcium (Cacna1c/1g, Cacna2d1/2d2 and Cacnb1/b2), sodium (Scn5a) and potassium channels (Kcna3/5, Kcnj3/5/8/11/12, Kchip2, Kcnab1, Kcnb1, Kcnd1/2/3, Kcne1/4, Kcnq1, Kcng2, Kcnh2, Kcnk3 and Kcnn2) were unaltered, whilst others were either upregulated (Cacna1h, 0.95 ± 0.16 versus 0.47 ± 0.09; Scn1b, 1.84 ± 0.16 versus 1.11 ± 0.11; and Hcn2, 1.55 ± 0.15 versus 1.03 ± 0.08) or downregulated (Hcn4, 0.16 ± 0.03 versus 0.37 ± 0.08; Kcna2, 0.35 ± 0

  7. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  8. The cardiac sodium current Na(v)1.5 is functionally expressed in rabbit bronchial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, E; Webb, T I; Hollywood, M A; Sergeant, G P; McHale, N G; Thornbury, K D

    2013-08-15

    A collagenase-proteinase mixture was used to isolate airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) from rabbit bronchi, and membrane currents were recorded using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. Stepping from -100 mV to a test potential of -40 mV evoked a fast voltage-dependent Na(+) current, sometimes with an amplitude of several nanoamperes. The current disappeared within 15 min of exposure to papain + DTT (n = 6). Comparison of the current in ASMC with current mediated by NaV1.5 α-subunits expressed in human embryonic kidney cells revealed similar voltage dependences of activation (V1/2 = -42 mV for NaV1.5) and sensitivities to TTX (IC50 = 1.1 and 1.2 μM for ASMC and NaV1.5, respectively). The current in ASMC was also blocked by lidocaine (IC50 = 160 μM). Although veratridine, an agonist of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, reduced the peak current by 33%, it slowed inactivation, resulting in a fourfold increase in sustained current (measured at 25 ms after onset). In current-clamp mode, veratridine prolonged evoked action potentials from 37 ± 9 to 1,053 ± 410 ms (n = 8). Primers for NaV1.2-1.9 were used to amplify mRNA from groups of ∼20 isolated ASMC and from whole bronchial tissue by RT-PCR. Transcripts for NaV1.2, NaV1.3, and NaV1.5-1.9 were detected in whole tissue, but only NaV1.2 and NaV1.5 were detected in single cells. We conclude that freshly dispersed rabbit ASMC express a fast voltage-gated Na(+) current that is mediated mainly by the NaV1.5 subtype.

  9. The Use of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of the Lower Limbs Skeletal Muscles in Cardiac Rehabilitation of Patients With Chronic Heart Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ewa Kucio; A. Polak; C. Kucio

    2014-01-01

    ...) may be an alternative to physical training in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Through stimulating the work of the muscles, NMES raises the exercise tolerance, muscle mass and endurance in patients with CHF...

  10. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, c

  11. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, c

  12. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness,

  13. Healthy Muscles Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower than normal number of red blood cells. Atrophy (A-truh-fee). Wasting away of the body or of an organ or part, as from deficient nutrition, nerve damage, or lack of use. Cardiac (KAR-dee-ak) muscle . The heart muscle. An ...

  14. Studies of muscle proteins in embryonic myocardial cells of cardiac lethal mutant mexican axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) by use of heavy meromyosin binding and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    In the Mexican axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum recessive mutant gene c, by way of abnormal inductive processes from surrounding tissues, results in an absence of embryonic heart function. The lack of contractions in mutant heart cells apparently results from their inability to form normally organized myofibrils, even though a few actin-like (60-A) and myosin-like (150-A) filaments are present. Amorphous "proteinaceous" collections are often visible. In the present study, heavy meromyosin (HMM) treatment of mutant heart tissue greatly increases the number of thin filaments and decorates them in the usual fashion, confirming that they are actin. The amorphous collections disappear with the addition of HMM. In addition, an analysis of the constituent proteins of normal and mutant embryonic hearts and other tissues is made by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. These experiments are in full agreement with the morphological and HMM binding studies. The gels show distinct 42,000-dalton bands for both normal and mutant hearts, supporting the presence of normal actin. During early developmental stages (Harrison's stage 34) the cardiac tissues in normal and mutant siblings have indistinguishable banding patterns, but with increasing development several differences appear. Myosin heavy chain (200,000 daltons) increases substantially in normal hearts during development but very little in mutants. Even so the quantity of 200,000-dalton protein in mutant hearts is significantly more than in any of the nonmuscle tissues studied (i.e. gut, liver, brain). Unlike normal hearts, the mutant hearts lack a prominent 34,000-dalton band, indicating that if mutants contain muscle tropomyosin at all, it is present in drastically reduced amounts. Also, mutant hearts retain large amounts of yolk proteins at stages when the platelets have virtually disappeared from normal hearts. The morphologies and electrophoresis patterns of skeletal muscle from normal and mutant siblings are

  15. Cardiac Electrophysiology: Normal and Ischemic Ionic Currents and the ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Basic cardiac electrophysiology is foundational to understanding normal cardiac function in terms of rate and rhythm and initiation of cardiac muscle contraction. The primary clinical tool for assessing cardiac electrical events is the electrocardiogram (ECG), which provides global and regional information on rate, rhythm, and electrical…

  16. Diaphragm muscle fiber function and structure in humans with hemidiaphragm paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welvaart, W N; Paul, M A; van Hees, H W H; Stienen, G J M; Niessen, J W M; de Man, F S; Sieck, G C; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A; Ottenheijm, C A C

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies proposed that mechanical inactivity of the human diaphragm during mechanical ventilation rapidly causes diaphragm atrophy and weakness. However, conclusive evidence for the notion that diaphragm weakness is a direct consequence of mechanical inactivity is lacking. To study the effect of hemidiaphragm paralysis on diaphragm muscle fiber function and structure in humans, biopsies were obtained from the paralyzed hemidiaphragm in eight patients with hemidiaphragm paralysis. All patients had unilateral paralysis of known duration, caused by en bloc resection of the phrenic nerve with a tumor. Furthermore, diaphragm biopsies were obtained from three control subjects. The contractile performance of demembranated muscle fibers was determined, as well as fiber ultrastructure and morphology. Finally, expression of E3 ligases and proteasome activity was determined to evaluate activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The force-generating capacity, as well as myofibrillar ultrastructure, of diaphragm muscle fibers was preserved up to 8 wk of paralysis. The cross-sectional area of slow fibers was reduced after 2 wk of paralysis; that of fast fibers was preserved up to 8 wk. The expression of the E3 ligases MAFbx and MuRF-1 and proteasome activity was not significantly upregulated in diaphragm fibers following paralysis, not even after 72 and 88 wk of paralysis, at which time marked atrophy of slow and fast diaphragm fibers had occurred. Diaphragm muscle fiber atrophy and weakness following hemidiaphragm paralysis develops slowly and takes months to occur.

  17. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  18. Non-targeted metabolomics analysis of cardiac Muscle Ring Finger-1 (MuRF1), MuRF2, and MuRF3 in vivo reveals novel and redundant metabolic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ranjan; He, Jun; Spaniel, Carolyn; Quintana, Megan T.; Wang, Zhongjing; Bain, James; Newgard, Christopher B.; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2017-01-01

    The muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases MuRF1, MuRF2, MuRF3 have been reported to have overlapping substrate specificities, interacting with each other as well as proteins involved in metabolism and cardiac function. In the heart, all three MuRF family proteins have proven critical to cardiac responses to ischemia and heart failure. The non-targeted metabolomics analysis of MuRF1-/-, MuRF2-/-, and MuRF3-/- hearts was initiated to investigate the hypothesis that MuRF1, MuRF2, and MuRF3 have a similarly altered metabolome, representing alterations in overlapping metabolic processes. Ventricular tissue was flash frozen and quantitatively analyzed by GC/MS using a library built upon the Fiehn GC/MS Metabolomics RTL Library. Non-targeted metabolomic analysis identified significant differences (via VIP statistical analysis) in taurine, myoinositol, and stearic acid for the three MuRF-/- phenotypes relative to their matched controls. Moreover, pathway enrichment analysis demonstrated that MuRF1-/- had significant changes in metabolite(s) involved in taurine metabolism and primary acid biosynthesis while MuRF2-/- had changes associated with ascorbic acid/aldarate metabolism (via VIP and t-test analysis vs. sibling-matched wildtype controls). By identifying the functional metabolic consequences of MuRF1, MuRF2, and MuRF3 in the intact heart, non-targeted metabolomics analysis discovered common pathways functionally affected by cardiac MuRF family proteins in vivo. These novel metabolomics findings will aid in guiding the molecular studies delineating the mechanisms that MuRF family proteins regulate metabolic pathways. Understanding these mechanism is an important key to understanding MuRF family proteins' protective effects on the heart during cardiac disease.

  19. Technetium-99m labeled 1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-4-(2-mercapto-2-methyl-4-azapentyl)-4- (2-mercapto-2-methylp ropylamino)-piperidine and iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine for studying cardiac adrenergic function: a comparison of the uptake characteristics in vascular smooth muscle cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes, and an investigation in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samnick, Samuel E-mail: rassam@uniklinik-saarland.de; Scheuer, Claudia; Muenks, Sven; El-Gibaly, Amr M.; Menger, Michael D.; Kirsch, Carl-Martin

    2004-05-01

    In developing technetium-99m-based radioligands for in vivo studies of cardiac adrenergic neurons, we compared the uptake characteristics of the {sup 99m}Tc-labeled 1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-4-(2-mercapto-2-methyl-4-azapentyl)-4- (2-mercapto-2-methylpropylamino)-piperidine ({sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT) with those of the clinically established meta-[{sup 123}I]iodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, the cardiac and extracardiac uptake of both radiopharmaceuticals was assessed in intact rats and in rats pretreated with various {alpha}- and {beta}-adrenoceptor drugs, and adrenergic reuptake blocking agents. The uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT and {sup 123}I-MIBG into vascular smooth muscle cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes was rapid; more than 85% of the radioactivity accumulation into the cells occurring within the first 3 minutes. Radioactivity uptake after a 60-minute incubation at 37 degree sign C (pH 7.4) varied from 15% to 65% of the total loaded activity per million cells. In all cases, {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT showed the higher uptake, relative to {sup 123}I-MIBG, at any given cell concentration. The cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT was lower at 4 degree sign C and 20 degree sign C than at 37 degree sign C. In contrast, the {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake was only slightly temperature dependent. Inhibition experiments confirmed that the cellular uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG is mediated by the uptake-I carrier, whereas {alpha}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 1}-adrenoceptors were predominantly involved in the uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT into the cardiovascular tissues. Biodistribution studies in rats showed that {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT accumulated in myocardium after intravenous injection. Radioactivity in rat heart amounted to 2.32% and 1.91% of the injected dose per gram at 15 and 60 minutes postinjection, compared with 3.10% and 2.21% injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) in the experiment with {sup 123}I

  20. Mitochondrial physiology in the skeletal and cardiac muscles is altered in torrent ducks, Merganetta armata, from high altitudes in the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Neal J; Ivy, Catherine M; Alza, Luis; Cheek, Rebecca; York, Julia M; Chua, Beverly; Milsom, William K; McCracken, Kevin G; Scott, Graham R

    2016-12-01

    Torrent ducks inhabit fast-flowing rivers in the Andes from sea level to altitudes up to 4500 m. We examined the mitochondrial physiology that facilitates performance over this altitudinal cline by comparing the respiratory capacities of permeabilized fibers, the activities of 16 key metabolic enzymes and the myoglobin content in muscles between high- and low-altitude populations of this species. Mitochondrial respiratory capacities (assessed using substrates of mitochondrial complexes I, II and/or IV) were higher in highland ducks in the gastrocnemius muscle - the primary muscle used to support swimming and diving - but were similar between populations in the pectoralis muscle and the left ventricle. The heightened respiratory capacity in the gastrocnemius of highland ducks was associated with elevated activities of cytochrome oxidase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase and malate dehydrogenase (MDH). Although respiratory capacities were similar between populations in the other muscles, highland ducks had elevated activities of ATP synthase, lactate dehydrogenase, MDH, hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in the left ventricle, and elevated MDH activity and myoglobin content in the pectoralis. Thus, although there was a significant increase in the oxidative capacity of the gastrocnemius in highland ducks, which correlates with improved performance at high altitudes, the variation in metabolic enzyme activities in other muscles not correlated to respiratory capacity, such as the consistent upregulation of MDH activity, may serve other functions that contribute to success at high altitudes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Green tea polyphenols improve cardiac muscle mRNA, and protein levels of signal pathways related to insulin and lipid metabolism and inflammation in insulin-resistant rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that the consumption of green tea polyphenols (GTP) may reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. To explore the underlying mechanisms of action at the molecular level, we examined the effects of GTP on cardiac mRNA and protein levels of genes involved in insulin an...

  2. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  3. Effect of tighter glycemic control on cardiac function, exercise capacity, and muscle strength in heart failure patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent Roni Ranghøj; Wiggers, Henrik; Thomsen, Henrik Holm;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and heart failure (HF), the optimal glycemic target is uncertain, and evidence-based data are lacking. Therefore, we performed a randomized study on the effect of optimized glycemic control on left ventricular function, exercise capacity, muscle...

  4. Chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation and papillary muscle infarction detected by late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Willemsen, Hendrik M.; Lexis, Chris P. H.; Prakken, Niek H.; Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Mariani, Massimo A.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Both papillary muscle infarction (PMI) and chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR) are associated with reduced survival after myocardial infarction. The influence of PMI on CIMR and factors influencing both entities are incompletely understood. We sought to determine the influence of PMI on

  5. Enteral leucine supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscles and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTORC1-dependent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucine activates mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to upregulate protein synthesis (PS). To examine enteral Leu effects on PS and signaling activation, 5-d-old piglets were fed for 24 h diets containing: (i) LP, (ii) LP+L, or (iii) HP. PS in skeletal muscles, heart, liver, pancreas, and jejunum...

  6. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  7. Acute cardiac failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sparrow, Patrick

    2012-02-03

    We present a case of rapid onset acute cardiac failure developing as part of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 35-year-old woman following treatment with thioridazine and lithium. Post mortem histology of cardiac and skeletal muscle showed similar changes of focal cellular necrosis and vacuolation suggesting a common disease process.

  8. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccio, M.; Goumans, M. J.; Sluijter, J. P. G.; Doevendans, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyo

  9. Low oxygen tension induces positive inotropy and decreases a(i)Na in isolated guinea-pig cardiac ventricular papillary muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, M J; Yang, J M

    1998-06-30

    Effects of low oxygen on contractile force, intracellular Na+ activity (aiNa), and action potential were simultaneously measured in isolated guinea-pig ventricular papillary muscles. Reduction of oxygen from control 488 to 150 mmHg biphasically increased and decreased the twitch tension, and decreased aiNa in muscles driven at 60 beats/min. The action potential duration (APD) was decreased but the maximum rate of upstroke (Vmax) was increased. In control, 1 microM epinephrine significantly increased the the action potential amplitude and twitch tension with decreases in the time to twitch peak (TTP), time for 50% relaxation (RT50), and aiNa. After exposure to low oxygen for 10 min, with twitch tension elevated and TTP and RT90 increased, 1 microM epinephrine significantly increased the twitch tension and Vmax, and decreased the APD and aiNa. Pretreatment with reserpine inhibited the twitch tension, both at control and in the presence of epinephrine. But changes of action potential and aiNa in response to low oxygen and epinephrine were similar to those in control. Our results indicate that the isolated guinea-pig ventricular muscle needs a high oxygen tension to maintain a normal contractile function. Reduction of oxygen deteriorates the electrical and mechanical activities, most likely, by a coaxial graded hypoxia. The decreased aiNa, not associated with endogenous catecholamines, suggests that the activity of the Na(+)-K+ pump can be maintained in the superficial muscle cells despite of core-central hypoxia.

  10. Envolvimento das musculaturas esquelética e cardíaca na esclerose sistêmica Skeletal and cardiac muscles involvement in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Schade

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes com Esclerose Sistêmica (ES podem apresentar envolvimento muscular na forma de miosite ou miopatianão inflamatória. É verificada também associação entre acometimento muscular e disfunção ventricular esquerda (DVE em pacientes com ES, o que lhes confere pior prognóstico. Avaliamos 87 pacientes do Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná, com diagnóstico de ES, quanto à presença de manifestações da musculatura esquelética e a relação destas com DVE. Verificamos uma prevalência de 42,5% de acometimento muscular nos pacientes avaliados, observando uma correlação positiva com a forma difusa da doença. Afastadas outras causas de DVE, três dos quatro pacientes com fração de ejeção abaixo do valor de normalidade apresentaram alteração de força muscular, atrofia e/ou elevação de enzima creatinofosfoquinase sérica (CPKPatients with systemic sclerosis (SSc can have muscle involvement in the form of myositis or non-infl ammatory myopathy. The muscle involvement can be associated with left ventricular dysfunction (LVD in patients with SSc, resulting in worse prognosis. Eighty-seven patients of the Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal do Paraná, diagnosed with SSc, were assessed regarding the presence of skeletal muscle manifestations and their relation with LVD. A 42.5% prevalence of muscle involvement was observed in the patients studied, as well as a positive correlation with the diffuse form of the disease. Excluding other causes of LVD, three of the four patients with ejection fraction below the normal reference value had alteration of the muscle strength, atrophy and/or serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK elevation

  11. Mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Garnier, Anne; Ventura-Clapier, Renée

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac performance depends on a fine balance between the work the heart has to perform to satisfy the needs of the body and the energy that it is able to produce. Thus, energy production by oxidative metabolism, the main energy source of the cardiac muscle, has to be strictly regulated to adapt to cardiac work. Mitochondrial biogenesis is the mechanism responsible for mitochondrial component synthesis and assembly. This process controls mitochondrial content and thus correlates with energy production that, in turn, sustains cardiac contractility. Mitochondrial biogenesis should be finely controlled to match cardiac growth and cardiac work. When the heart is subjected to an increase in work in response to physiological and pathological challenges, it adapts by increasing its mass and expressing a new genetic program. In response to physiological stimuli such as endurance training, mitochondrial biogenesis seems to follow a program involving increased cardiac mass. But in the context of pathological hypertrophy, the modifications of this mechanism remain unclear. What appears clear is that mitochondrial biogenesis is altered in heart failure, and the imbalance between cardiac work demand and energy production represents a major factor in the development of heart failure.

  12. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  13. Oxidative capacities of cardiac and skeletal muscles of heart transplant recipients: mitochondrial effects of cyclosporin-A and its vehicle Cremophor-EL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N' Guessan, Benoit Banga; Sanchez, Hervé; Zoll, Joffrey; Ribera, Florence; Dufour, Stéphane; Lampert, Eliane; Kindo, Michel; Geny, Bernard; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Mettauer, Bertrand

    2014-04-01

    Chronic immunosuppressive treatment was suspected to alter maximal muscle oxidative capacity (Vmax ) of heart transplant recipients, leading to a limitation of their exercise tolerance. It remains undefined whether the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) of right ventricle (RV) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles were altered by immunosuppressants and/or their vehicles. Vmax was measured polarographically in saponin-skinned fibres of RV and VL biopsies of patients and compared with Vmax of healthy VL and myocardium. Effects of increasing concentrations (1-10-100 μM) of Sandimmune(®) , its vehicle, Cyclosporine (CsA) in ethanol (EtOH), or EtOH alone were tested. The vehicle's effects on MRC complexes were investigated using specific substrates and inhibitors. Ten months after grafting, Vmax of RV and VL of immunosuppressed patients were similar to their Vmax at time of transplantation and to that of control tissues. In Vitro, Sandimmune(®) significantly decreased Vmax while CsA in EtOH or EtOH exerted small and similar effects. Effects of the vehicle were higher than (RV) or identical to (VL) those of Sandimmune(®) . The sites of action of the vehicle on MRC were located on complexes I and IV. While unchanged under chronic immunosuppressive therapy, Vmax of RV and VL muscles was depressed by acute exposure to intravenous Sandimmune(®) in vitro, an effect attributed to its vehicle by inhibition of complexes I and IV of the MRC. This work provides an in vitro proof of a toxic effect on the mitochondria respiratory chain of the vehicle used in the intravenous formulation of Sandimmune(®) but with no clinical consequences in chronically immunosuppressed patients. © 2012 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  14. Discovery and progress of direct cardiac reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hidenori; Ieda, Masaki

    2017-02-14

    Cardiac disease remains a major cause of death worldwide. Direct cardiac reprogramming has emerged as a promising approach for cardiac regenerative therapy. After the discovery of MyoD, a master regulator for skeletal muscle, other single cardiac reprogramming factors (master regulators) have been sought. Discovery of cardiac reprogramming factors was inspired by the finding that multiple, but not single, transcription factors were needed to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts. We first reported a combination of cardiac-specific transcription factors, Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT), that could convert mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells, which were designated as induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs). Following our first report of cardiac reprogramming, many researchers, including ourselves, demonstrated an improvement in cardiac reprogramming efficiency, in vivo direct cardiac reprogramming for heart regeneration, and cardiac reprogramming in human cells. However, cardiac reprogramming in human cells and adult fibroblasts remains inefficient, and further efforts are needed. We believe that future research elucidating epigenetic barriers and molecular mechanisms of direct cardiac reprogramming will improve the reprogramming efficiency, and that this new technology has great potential for clinical applications.

  15. Protective effects of oxymatrine on the cardiac muscle mitochondrion in rat model of septic shock%氧化苦参碱对感染性休克大鼠心肌线粒体结构和功能的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鸣号; 王秀玉; 曹军

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨氧化苦参碱(oxymatrine,OMT)对感染性休克大鼠心肌线粒体结构和功能的保护作用.方法 采用大鼠盲肠结扎穿孔法(cecal ligation and puncture,CLP)复制大鼠感染性休克模型,随机将56只SD大鼠分为假手术组、OMT对照组、模型(CLP)组、CLP+OMT(52、26、13 mg/kg)组、阳性药物对照(CLP+地塞米松10 mg/kg)组.观察OMT对感染性休克大鼠心肌线粒体超微结构改变的影响.采用比色法测定各组大鼠心肌组织琥珀酸脱氢酶(succinic dehydrogenase,SDH)活性以及心肌钙含量的改变.结果 不同剂量的OMT 能明显升高感染性休克大鼠心肌组织中SDH活性(P<0.01)及降低心肌钙含量(P<0.01),改善感染性休克所致的心肌线粒体超微结构损伤,并且该作用在OMT 52、26 mg/kg剂量组与阳性药物对照组的结果相一致.结论 OMT(52、26、13 mg/kg)能对抗大鼠感染性休克引起的心肌线粒体结构和功能损伤,其机制与OMT改善感染性休克过程中心肌细胞能量代谢状况、减少心肌细胞内钙超载有关.%Objective To evaluate the protective effects of oxymatrine ( OMT ) on cardiac muscle mitochondrion in the rat model of septic shock. Methods Fifty - six male SD rats were randomly divided into 7 groups : sham operation group, OMT control group, model ( cecal ligation and puncture, CLP ) group, positive control group, and CLP + OMT high , moderate and low - dose groups. Ultrastructural observation of cardiac muscle mitochondrion was carried out with electron microscope. Plasma succinate dehydrogenase ( SDH ) activity and calcium content in the cardiac muscle tissue were determined by colorimetric method. Results OMT significantly increased the SDH activity and reduced calcium content in the cardiac muscle tissue ( P < 0. 01 ). OMT also alleviated the ultrastructure injury in cardiac muscle mitochondrion.CLP plus OMT with 52 and 26 mg/kg produced equal efficacy in cardiac muscle mitochondrion as OMT + DEX

  16. Up-regulation of alpha-smooth muscle actin in cardiomyocytes from non-hypertrophic and non-failing transgenic mouse hearts expressing N-terminal truncated cardiac troponin I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that a restrictive N-terminal truncation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI-ND is up-regulated in the heart in adaptation to hemodynamic stresses. Over-expression of cTnI-ND in the hearts of transgenic mice revealed functional benefits such as increased relaxation and myocardial compliance. In the present study, we investigated the subsequent effect on myocardial remodeling. The alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA isoform is normally expressed in differentiating cardiomyocytes and is a marker for myocardial hypertrophy in adult hearts. Our results show that in cTnI-ND transgenic mice of between 2 and 3 months of age (young adults, a significant level of α-SMA is expressed in the heart as compared with wild-type animals. Although blood vessel density was increased in the cTnI-ND heart, the mass of smooth muscle tissue did not correlate with the increased level of α-SMA. Instead, immunocytochemical staining and Western blotting of protein extracts from isolated cardiomyocytes identified cardiomyocytes as the source of increased α-SMA in cTnI-ND hearts. We further found that while a portion of the up-regulated α-SMA protein was incorporated into the sarcomeric thin filaments, the majority of SMA protein was found outside of myofibrils. This distribution pattern suggests dual functions for the up-regulated α-SMA as both a contractile component to affect contractility and as possible effector of early remodeling in non-hypertrophic, non-failing cTnI-ND hearts.

  17. Cardiac Malpositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Shi Joon; Im, Chung Gie; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Hasn, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    Cardiac Malposition refers to any position of the heart other than a left-sided heart in a situs solitus individual. Associated cardiac malformations are so complex that even angiocardiographic and autopsy studies may not afford an accurate information. Although the terms and classifications used to describe the internal cardiac anatomy and their arterial connections in cardiac malpositions differ and tend to be confusing, common agreement exists on the need for a segmental approach to diagnosis. Authors present 18 cases of cardiac malpositions in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between 1971 and 1979. Authors analyzed the clinical, radiographic, operative and autopsy findings with the emphasis on the angiocardiographic findings. The results are as follows: 1. Among 18 cases with cardiac malpositions, 6 cases had dextrocardia with situs inversus, 9 cases had dextrocardia with situs solitus and 3 cases had levocardia with situs inversus. 2. There was no genuine exception to visceroatrial concordance rule. 3. Associated cardiac malpositions were variable and complex with a tendency of high association of transposition and double outlet varieties with dextrocardia in situs solitus and levocardia in situs inversus. Only one in 6 cases of dextrocardia with situs inversus had pure transposition. 4. In two cases associated pulmonary atresia was found at surgery which was not predicted by angiocardiography. 5. Because many of the associated complex lesions can be corrected surgically provided the diagnosis is accurate, the selective biplane angiocardiography with or without cineradiography is essential.

  18. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury.

  19. 斑点追踪成像技术对心功能不全患者心肌应变及收缩不同步性的评价%Evaluation of cardiac muscle strain and systolic dyssynchrony in patients with cardiac insufficiency by speckle tracking imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解欣欣; 郑慧; 张婧姝; 靳鹏; 张昊; 姚文; 帅秀芳

    2013-01-01

    This research used standard dynamic images of basal, papillary muscle and apical - LV short-axis from thirty patients with cardiac insufficiency and thirty healthy volunteers, meanwhile, apical long axis chamber, 4 chamber and 2 chamber views of three consecutive cardiac cycles were acuquired. Parameters included peak systolic strain, the maximum difference and standard deviation of time to peak systolic strain ( Txs-diff, Txs-SD ) among 18 segments were measured and calculated. Simultaneously, left ventricular ejection fraction( LVEF ) was calculated through real time tri-plane LV volume rule. Compared with healthy volunteers, the longitudinal, radial and circumferential peak strian were reduced in patients with cardiac insufficiency( P < 0. 05 ), the time to peak strian was inconsistent; Left ventricular systolic dyssynchrony indices ( SDI ) were prolonged significantly( P <0. 01 ). There were a higher correlation between radial indices and LVEF.%收集30例心功能不全患者和30例健康志愿者的左室短轴二尖瓣、乳头肌及心尖水平和心尖四腔、心尖两腔及心尖左室长轴的二维灰阶图像,测量各节段心肌应变峰值及应变达峰时间,计算达峰时间最大差值及标准差,同时应用实时三平面左室容积法测量左室射血分数(LVEF).结果显示心功能不全组心肌纵向、径向及圆周应变较对照组降低(P<0.05),达峰时间不一致;左室收缩不同步指数均较对照组显著延长(P<0.01).径向不同步指数与LVEF相关性较高.

  20. Exercise training reduces insulin resistance and upregulates the mTOR/p70S6k pathway in cardiac muscle of diet-induced obesity rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Cleber; Frederico, Marisa J; da Luz, Gabrielle; Pauli, José R; Silva, Adelino S R; Pinho, Ricardo A; Velloso, Lício A; Ropelle, Eduardo R; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2011-03-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are rapidly expanding public health problems. These disturbances are related to many diseases, including heart pathology. Acting through the Akt/mTOR pathway, insulin has numerous and important physiological functions, such as the induction of growth and survival of many cell types and cardiac hypertrophy. However, obesity and insulin resistance can alter mTOR/p70S6k. Exercise training is known to induce this pathway, but never in the heart of diet-induced obesity subjects. To evaluate the effect of exercise training on mTOR/p70S6k in the heart of obese Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of 12 weeks of swimming on obese rats, induced by a high-fat diet. Exercise training reduced epididymal fat, fasting serum insulin and plasma glucose disappearance. Western blot analyses showed that exercise training increased the ability of insulin to phosphorylate intracellular molecules such as Akt (2.3-fold) and Foxo1 (1.7-fold). Moreover, reduced activities and expressions of proteins, induced by the high-fat diet in rats, such as phospho-JNK (1.9-fold), NF-kB (1.6-fold) and PTP-1B (1.5-fold), were observed. Finally, exercise training increased the activities of the transduction pathways of insulin-dependent protein synthesis, as shown by increases in Raptor phosphorylation (1.7-fold), p70S6k phosphorylation (1.9-fold), and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation (1.4-fold) and a reduction in atrogin-1 expression (2.1-fold). Results demonstrate a pivotal regulatory role of exercise training on the Akt/mTOR pathway, in turn, promoting protein synthesis and antagonizing protein degradation.

  1. Mechanism of the Frank-Starling law--a simulation study with a novel cardiac muscle contraction model that includes titin and troponin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Natalie S; Shimayoshi, Takao; Amano, Akira; Matsuda, Tetsuya

    2006-09-01

    A stretch-induced increase of active tension is one of the most important properties of the heart, known as the Frank-Starling law. Although a variation of myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity with sarcomere length (SL) change was found to be involved, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully clarified. Some recent experimental studies indicate that a reduction of the lattice spacing between thin and thick filaments, through the increase of passive tension caused by the sarcomeric protein titin with an increase in SL within the physiological range, promotes formation of force-generating crossbridges (Xbs). However, the mechanism by which the Xb concentration determines the degree of cooperativity for a given SL has so far evaded experimental elucidation. In this simulation study, a novel, rather simple molecular-based cardiac contraction model, appropriate for integration into a ventricular cell model, was designed, being the first model to introduce experimental data on titin-based radial tension to account for the SL-dependent modulation of the interfilament lattice spacing and to include a conformational change of troponin I (TnI). Simulation results for the isometric twitch contraction time course, the length-tension and the force-[Ca(2+)] relationships are comparable to experimental data. A complete potential Frank-Starling mechanism was analyzed by this simulation study. The SL-dependent modulation of the myosin binding rate through titin's passive tension determines the Xb concentration which then alters the degree of positive cooperativity affecting the rate of the TnI conformation change and causing the Hill coefficient to be SL-dependent.

  2. The Ca(2+)-ATPase of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal and cardiac muscle. An overview from the very beginning to more recent prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, W

    1998-09-16

    The discovery of the ATP-driven calcium pump in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes reaches back to the postwar (World War II) years and would not be possible without the generous support by the American scientific community. It was this community that in pre- and postwar years gave shelter to many European scientists, which in return stimulated scientific development in the United States. These pre- and postwar relations helped to establish the calcium pump as a physiologically relevant mechanism in all kinds of cells. The pump and its counterpart, the calcium release channel, proved to be controlled by various intrinsic mechanisms. Rising hydrogen concentrations as occurring in ischemic muscles switch off pump activity and counteract allosterically caffeine-induced calcium release (CICR). Rising phosphate or the presence of other calcium-precipitating anions, on the other hand, prevents pump inhibition by intraluminal calcium precipitation, which, simultaneously, can increase the quantity of releasable calcium. The inactivation of CICR by removing medium chloride must be considered as a hint of additional mechanisms by which calcium-dependent activity regulation can be modified.

  3. Cardiac cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  4. Recombinant proteins secreted from tissue-engineered bioartificial muscle improve cardiac dysfunction and suppress cardiomyocyte apoptosis in rats with heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Shu-ling; WANG Yong-jin; WANG Xiao-lin; LU Yong-xin; WU Yin; LIU Qi-yun; MI Shao-hua; XU Yu-lan

    2010-01-01

    Background Tissue-engineered bioartificial muscle-based gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of heart diseases. Experimental and clinical studies suggest that systemic administration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) protein or overexpression of IGF-1 in the heart exerts a favorable effect on cardiovascular function. This study aimed to investigate a chronic stage after myocardial infarction (MI) and the potential therapeutic effects of delivering a human IGF-1 gene by tissue-engineered bioartificial muscles (BAMs) following coronary artery ligation in Sprague-Dawley rats.Methods Ligation of the left coronary artery or sham operation was performed. Primary skeletal myoblasts were retrovirally transduced to synthesize and secrete recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1), and green fluorescent protein (GFP), and tissue-engineered into implantable BAMs. The rats that underwent ligation were randomly assigned to 2 groups: MI-IGF group (n=6) and MI-GFP group (n=6). The MI-IGF group received rhIGF-secreting BAM (IGF-BAMs) transplantation, and the MI-GFP group received GFP-secreting BAM (GFP-BAMs) transplantation. Another group of rats served as the sham operation group, which was also randomly assigned to 2 subgroups: S-IGF group (n=6)and S-GFP group (n=6). The S-IGF group underwent IGF-1-BAM transplantation, and S-GFP group underwent GFP-BAM transplantation. IGF-1-BAMs and GFP-BAMs were implanted subcutaneously into syngeneic rats after two weeks of operation was performed. Four weeks after the treatment, hemodynamics was performed. IGF-1 was measured by radioimmunoassay, and then the rats were sacrificed and ventricular samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to examine the mRNA expression of bax and Bcl-2. TNF-α and caspase 3 expression in myocardium was examined by Western blotting.Results Primary rat myoblasts were retrovirally transduced to

  5. Muscle diseases: the muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Pytel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic muscle disease can occur at any age. Early- or childhood-onset muscular dystrophies may be associated with profound loss of muscle function, affecting ambulation, posture, and cardiac and respiratory function. Late-onset muscular dystrophies or myopathies may be mild and associated with slight weakness and an inability to increase muscle mass. The phenotype of muscular dystrophy is an endpoint that arises from a diverse set of genetic pathways. Genes associated with muscular dystrophies encode proteins of the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix, and the sarcomere and Z band, as well as nuclear membrane components. Because muscle has such distinctive structural and regenerative properties, many of the genes implicated in these disorders target pathways unique to muscle or more highly expressed in muscle. This chapter reviews the basic structural properties of muscle and genetic mechanisms that lead to myopathy and muscular dystrophies that affect all age groups.

  6. Muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Chang-Yong

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy, is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by out-of-frame mutations of the dystrophin gene. Thus, it is classified asa dystrophinopathy. The disease onset is before age 5 years. Patients with DMD present with progressive symmetrical limb-girdle muscle weakness and become wheelchair dependent after age 12 years. (2)(3). On the basis of some research evidence,cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure are usually seen in the late teens in patients with DMD. Progressive scoliosis and respiratory in sufficiency often develop once wheelchair dependency occurs. Respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy are common causes of death, and few survive beyond the third decade of life. (2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7). On the basis of some research evidence, prednisone at 0.75 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 40 mg/d) or deflazacort at 0.9 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 39 mg/d), a derivative of prednisolone (not available in the United States), as a single morning dose is recommended for DMD patients older than 5 years, which may prolong independent walking from a few months to 2 years. (2)(3)(16)(17). Based on some research evidence, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, b-blockers, and diuretics has been reported to be beneficial in DMD patients with cardiac abnormalities. (2)(3)(5)(18). Based on expert opinion, children with muscle weakness and increased serum creatine kinase levels may be associated with either genetic or acquired muscle disorders (Tables 1 and 3). (14)(15)

  7. Thick-to-Thin Filament Surface Distance Modulates Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Drosophila Flight Muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Miller, Mark S. (IIT); (Vermont); (BU)

    2012-09-19

    The demembranated (skinned) muscle fiber preparation is widely used to investigate muscle contraction because the intracellular ionic conditions can be precisely controlled. However, plasma membrane removal results in a loss of osmotic regulation, causing abnormal hydration of the myofilament lattice and its proteins. We investigated the structural and functional consequences of varied myofilament lattice spacing and protein hydration on cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle, using x-ray diffraction to compare the lattice spacing of dissected, osmotically compressed skinned fibers to native muscle fibers in living flies. Osmolytes of different sizes and exclusion properties (Dextran T-500 and T-10) were used to differentially alter lattice spacing and protein hydration. At in vivo lattice spacing, cross-bridge attachment time (t{sub on}) increased with higher osmotic pressures, consistent with a reduced cross-bridge detachment rate as myofilament protein hydration decreased. In contrast, in the swollen lattice, t{sub on} decreased with higher osmotic pressures. These divergent responses were reconciled using a structural model that predicts t{sub on} varies inversely with thick-to-thin filament surface distance, suggesting that cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment are modulated more by myofilament lattice geometry than protein hydration. Generalizing these findings, our results suggest that cross-bridge cycling rates slow as thick-to-thin filament surface distance decreases with sarcomere lengthening, and likewise, cross-bridge cycling rates increase during sarcomere shortening. Together, these structural changes may provide a mechanism for altering cross-bridge performance throughout a contraction-relaxation cycle.

  8. 左旋千金藤啶碱增加离体大鼠心肌收缩力的作用%Effect of(-)-stepholidine on enhancing cardiac muscle contraction mediated by dopamine D1 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周淑媛; 施铮; 刘峥; 胡慧升; 李晓冬; 金国章; 陈龙

    2009-01-01

    目的:观察左旋千金藤啶碱((-)-Stepholidine SPD)对离体心脏心肌收缩力的影响,分析其增加心肌收缩力是否直接作用于心脏多巴胺D1受体.方法:采用Langendorff离体灌流装置及膜片钳技术,观察左旋千金藤啶碱(1μM、10 μM、100μM)对大鼠离体心脏左心室收缩力各参数及对左心室心肌细胞L型钙电流的影响;再分析给予选择性多巴胺受体阻断剂SCH23390、H_1受体阻断剂非索非那定、β受体阻断剂普萘洛尔以及α1受体阻断剂哌唑嗪对SPD增加心肌收缩力的影响.结果:SPD以剂量依赖的方式显著增加心肌收缩力及左心室心肌细胞L型钙电流.SCH23390可明显阻断SPD心肌收缩效应,普萘洛尔、哌唑嗪和非索非那定则无此作用.结论:左旋千金藤啶碱(SPD)可显著地增加大鼠离体工作心脏心肌收缩力,其作用机制是通过心脏多巴胺D_1受体增加L型钙电流而发挥作用.%Objective:The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of (-)-Stepholidine (SPD) on enhancing L-type Ca~(2+) current and contraction of cardiac muscle in isolated rat heart mediated by dopamine D_1 receptor and to examine whether SPD has a direct effect on the heart dopamine D_1 receptors.Methods:Normal adult rat working hearts by Langendorff and patch clamp techniques were applied to investigate the effects of SPD on left ventricular pressure and L-type Ca~(2+) current.Results:SPD significantly increased the cardiac muscle contraction and L-type Ca~(2+) current in a dose-dependent manner.The selective dopamine D_1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (1 μM) blocked the SPD induced heart contraction effect.However,β-receptor antagonist propranolol (1 μM),αl-receptor antagonist prazosin (1 μM) and Hl-receptor antagonist Fexofenadine (1 μM) had no effects in blocking SPD induced heart contractions.Conclusions:SPD exerted its effect on enhancing contraction of isolated rat heart through activating heart dopamine D_1

  9. Muscle Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  10. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur ... minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  11. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Amezcua

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possibly resulting in the development of arrhythmia, ventricular remodeling, and eventual heart failure. Scarred cardiac muscle results in heart failure for millions of heart attack survivors worldwide. Modern cardiac tissue engineering research has developed nanomaterial applications to combat heart failure, preserve normal heart tissue, and grow healthy myocardium around the infarcted area. This review will discuss the recent progress of nanomaterials for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications through three main nanomaterial approaches: scaffold designs, patches, and injectable materials.

  12. Normal cardiac function in mice with supraphysiological cardiac creatine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz, Lucia; Hernandez, Alejandro; Nienaber, Jeffrey; Mishra, Rajashree; Pinilla, Miguel; Burchette, James; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Jacobs, Danny O

    2014-02-01

    Creatine and phosphocreatine levels are decreased in heart failure, and reductions in myocellular phosphocreatine levels predict the severity of the disease and portend adverse outcomes. Previous studies of transgenic mouse models with increased creatine content higher than two times baseline showed the development of heart failure and shortened lifespan. Given phosphocreatine's role in buffering ATP content, we tested the hypothesis whether elevated cardiac creatine content would alter cardiac function under normal physiological conditions. Here, we report the creation of transgenic mice that overexpress the human creatine transporter (CrT) in cardiac muscle under the control of the α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Cardiac transgene expression was quantified by qRT-PCR, and human CrT protein expression was documented on Western blots and immunohistochemistry using a specific anti-CrT antibody. High-energy phosphate metabolites and cardiac function were measured in transgenic animals and compared with age-matched, wild-type controls. Adult transgenic animals showed increases of 5.7- and 4.7-fold in the content of creatine and free ADP, respectively. Phosphocreatine and ATP levels were two times as high in young transgenic animals but declined to control levels by the time the animals reached 8 wk of age. Transgenic mice appeared to be healthy and had normal life spans. Cardiac morphometry, conscious echocardiography, and pressure-volume loop studies demonstrated mild hypertrophy but normal function. Based on our characterization of the human CrT protein expression, creatine and phosphocreatine content, and cardiac morphometry and function, these transgenic mice provide an in vivo model for examining the therapeutic value of elevated creatine content for cardiac pathologies.

  13. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  14. Effect of Xuebijing injection on cardiac muscle in the rats undergoing abdominal aorta clamping with sepsis%血必净对腹主动脉阻断合并脓毒症大鼠心肌的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏文芳; 周青山; 徐洁

    2014-01-01

    Objective It is to observe the protecting effect of Xuebijing injection (XBJ) on cardiac muscle in the rats un-dergoing abdominal aorta clamping complicating with sepsis .Methods 32 Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group (S group), abdominal aorta clamping complicating with sepsis group (I/R+LPS group), Xuebijing injection group (XBJ group ) .The rats in XBJ group were pretreated with XBJ 30 min before abdominal aorta separated , 8 mL/kg by caudal vein in-jection, in 2 h after abdominal aorta ischemia reperfusion injury , they were given LPS20 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection . All the animals were killed in 8 h after abdominal aorta blocking , and their cardiac tissue was gotten to do HE staining to ob-serve pathological damage , the expression of TNF -αandβ2 adrenoreceptor ( AR) in the tissue was detected by immunohisto-chemistry technique .Results①Cardiac tissue pathology results showed that: no obvious pathological change was found in S group;In I/R+LPS group myocardial cells were swelling with wider intermuscular space , little blood vessel was obviously hy-peremia with agglutination of many red blood cells which were also leaked much in the space , myocardial fibers were degenera-tion and necrosis , many inflammatory cells gathered in the space , even the structure was indistinct in cardiac tissue;In XBJ group , myocardial tissue was disorder in which the cells were slight swelling , and less leak of red blood cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the space was found .②Immunohistochemistry detection results showed that the expression of TNF -ɑin cardiac cells:S groupXBJ group>I/R+LPS group, the difference between S group and I/R+LPS group was significant but not in XBJ group compared with the other two groups .Conclusion XBJ pretreatment has some protecting effect on early myocardial injury in the rats undergoing abdominal aorta clamping complicating with sepsis , it can decrease the expression of TNF-αwith no obvious effect

  15. Ischemic Stroke Due to Cardiac Involvement: Emery Dreifuss Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kasım Ulusoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is a hereditary disease. It is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, fatigue related to skapulo-humero-peroneal muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy which develops in adulthood and cardiac conduction system block. Cardiac involvement has a prognostic significance in patients with EDMD and even sudden cardiac death may be the first clinical presentation. In this article, an EDMD patient with ischemic stroke clinic who didn’t have regular cardiac follow-up was reported and the importance of the treatment of cardiac diseases which could play a role in ischemic stroke etiology and the implantation of pace-maker was mentioned.

  16. Automated cardiac sarcomere analysis from second harmonic generation images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Crispi, Fatima; Torre, Iratxe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Bijnens, Bart H.; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    Automatic quantification of cardiac muscle properties in tissue sections might provide important information related to different types of diseases. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging provides a stain-free microscopy approach to image cardiac fibers that, combined with our methodology of the automated measurement of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers, computes a reliable set of quantitative image features (sarcomere length, A-band length, thick-thin interaction length, and fiber orientation). We evaluated the performance of our methodology in computer-generated muscle fibers modeling some artifacts that are present during the image acquisition. Then, we also evaluated it by comparing it to manual measurements in SHG images from cardiac tissue of fetal and adult rabbits. The results showed a good performance of our methodology at high signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. We conclude that our automated measurements enable reliable characterization of cardiac fiber tissues to systematically study cardiac tissue in a wide range of conditions.

  17. ERR gamma Regulates Cardiac, Gastric, and Renal Potassium Homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alaynick, William A.; Way, James M.; Wilson, Stephanie A.; Benson, William G.; Pei, Liming; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth; Jonker, Johan W.; Holt, Jason A.; Rajpal, Deepak K.; Li, Hao; Stuart, Joan; McPherson, Ruth; Remlinger, Katja S.; Chang, Ching-Yi; McDonnell, Donald P.; Evans, Ronald M.; Billin, Andrew N.

    2010-01-01

    Energy production by oxidative metabolism in kidney, stomach, and heart, is primarily expended in establishing ion gradients to drive renal electrolyte homeostasis, gastric acid secretion, and cardiac muscle contraction, respectively. In addition to orchestrating transcriptional control of oxidative

  18. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-01-01

    .... In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia...

  19. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your risk of future heart problems, and to improve your health and quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs increase ... exercise routine at home or at a local gym. You may also continue to ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and weight loss ...

  20. Review of Cardiac Disease in Nemaline Myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the type, frequency, severity, treatment, and outcome of cardiac disease in nemaline myopathy. This review summarizes and discusses findings concerning the type, prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of cardiac involvement in nemaline myopathy. Review of publications about nemaline myopathy and cardiac disease. Altogether, 35 patients with nemaline myopathy with cardiac disease were identified. Age at presentation ranged from 0 to 62 years. In 30 individuals whose gender was described, 22 were male and eight were female. Onset was congenital in 16 patients, infantile in five, and adult in four. Nine patients presented with dilated cardiomyopathy, six with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and one with nonspecific cardiomyopathy. Among those with cardiomyopathy, four developed heart failure. One patient experienced sudden cardiac death. A ventricular septal defect was described in two patients. Cardiac treatment included drugs for heart failure (eight patients), implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation (one patient), and heart transplant (three patients). Four patients received noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation and two continuous positive-pressure ventilation. The outcome was fatal in 11 patients. Cardiac disease in nemaline myopathy manifests as cardiomyopathy leading to heart failure. If respiratory muscles are affected, the right side of the heart may be secondarily involved. Early detection of cardiac involvement is essential since effective treatment for cardiac disease in nemaline myopathy may be available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Design, construction and operation of a measurement device to evaluate the disturbance effect caused by the magnetic field in the cardiac muscle of rats; Diseno, construccion y operacion de un dispositivo de medicion para evaluar el efecto perturbador del campo magnetico en el funcionamiento del musculo cardiaco de ratas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soibelzon, Hector Leopoldo; Arcione, Juan Carlos [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Ingenieria. Grupo Energia y Ambiente]. E-mail: hsoibel@fi.uba.br

    2001-07-01

    This article focuses the requirements and procedures for design, construction of inductors and measurement explorer coils in relation to an addressed device to analyse the effects of magnetic fields in the cardiac muscle of rats. It also offers information about tests and measurements involving heart systems made by Buenos Aires Medicine College. It also presents a description of a suitable mechanism that could explain the international current concern in relation to risks for the health starting from the submission to electric and magnetic fields.

  2. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  3. Troponin Ⅰ,cardiac diastolic dysfunction and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-pei HUANG; Jian-feng DU

    2004-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of heart muscle that are associated with cardiac dysfunction. Molecular genetic studies performed to date have demonstrated that the damage or mutations in several sarcomeric contractile protein genes are associated with the development of the diseases. In this review, cardiac troponin Ⅰ, one of the sarcomeric thin filament protein, will be discussed regarding its role in cardiac function, its deficiency-related diastolic dysfunction, and the mutation of this protein-mediated restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  4. Development of new anatomy reconstruction software to localize cardiac isochrones to the cardiac surface from the 12 lead ECG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, P.M. van; Gordon, J.P.; Laks, M.M.; Boyle, N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) of the cardiac muscle can help the pre-procedure planning of the ablation of ventricular arrhythmias by reducing the time to localize the origin. Our non-invasive ECGI system, the cardiac isochrone positioning system (CIPS), requires non-intersecting

  5. Potential of cardiac stem/progenitor cells and induced pluripotent stem cells for cardiac repair in ischaemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei Eric; Chen, Xiongwen; Houser, Steven R.; Zeng, Chunyu

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising strategy for cardiac and vascular repair. The ultimate goal is to rebuild functional myocardium by transplanting exogenous stem cells or by activating native stem cells to induce endogenous repair. CS/PCs (cardiac stem/progenitor cells) are one type of adult stem cell with the potential to differentiate into cardiac lineages (cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells). iPSCs (induced pluripotent stem cells) also ha...

  6. Complete cardiac rupture associated with closed chest cardiac massage: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattoli, Lucia; Maselli, Eloisa; Romanelli, Maria Carolina; Di Vella, Giancarlo; Solarino, Biagio

    2014-03-01

    Chest skeletal injuries are the most frequent complications of external chest massage (ECM) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but heart and great vessels lacerations that are indeed very rare. We report the case of a 35-year-old workman who collapsed and underwent ECM by his co-workers for almost 30 min. At autopsy, no external injuries, fractures or bruises of the ribs or sternum, were observed. A hemopericardium with a rupture of the heart was found, with no signs of pre-existent cardiac disease. Bruises of thoracic aortic wall, lung petechiae, a contusion of the liver, and bruises of lumbar muscles were found. The cause of death was due to sudden cardiac death with an extensive cardiac rupture. This is an unusual report of massive heart damage without any skeletal or muscle chest injuries, secondary to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This kind of cardiac lesions may be considered when thoracic–abdominal trauma, or medical history, is unclear.

  7. Signaling in muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ivana Y; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2015-02-02

    Signaling pathways regulate contraction of striated (skeletal and cardiac) and smooth muscle. Although these are similar, there are striking differences in the pathways that can be attributed to the distinct functional roles of the different muscle types. Muscles contract in response to depolarization, activation of G-protein-coupled receptors and other stimuli. The actomyosin fibers responsible for contraction require an increase in the cytosolic levels of calcium, which signaling pathways induce by promoting influx from extracellular sources or release from intracellular stores. Rises in cytosolic calcium stimulate numerous downstream calcium-dependent signaling pathways, which can also regulate contraction. Alterations to the signaling pathways that initiate and sustain contraction and relaxation occur as a consequence of exercise and pathophysiological conditions.

  8. Cardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.

  9. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  10. Does Resistance Training Stimulate Cardiac Muscle Hypertrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the left ventricular structural adaptations induced by resistance/strength exercise, focusing on human work, particularly well-trained strength athletes engaged in regular, moderate- to high-intensity resistance training (RT). The article discusses both genders and examines the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in…

  11. Does Resistance Training Stimulate Cardiac Muscle Hypertrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the left ventricular structural adaptations induced by resistance/strength exercise, focusing on human work, particularly well-trained strength athletes engaged in regular, moderate- to high-intensity resistance training (RT). The article discusses both genders and examines the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in…

  12. Muscle disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  13. Transplantation of 5-azacytidine treated cardiac fibroblasts improves cardiac function of infarct hearts in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Cheng-chun; MA Gan-shan; CHEN Ji-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Background Cellular cardiomyoplasty by transplantation of various cell types has been investigated as potential treatments for the improvement of cardiac function after myocardial injury. A major barrier for the clinical application of cell transplantation is obtaining sufficiently large quantities of suitable cells. AIIogeneic cellular cardiomyoplasty may provide an alternative source of abundant, transplantable, myogenic cells by in vitro manipulation of cardiac fibroblasts using chemicals including 5-azacytidine. This study evaluated cardiomyogenic differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts, their survival in myocardial scar tissue, and the effect of the implanted cells on heart function.Methods Primary cardiac fibroblasts from neonatal rats were treated with 5-azacytidine (10 μmol/L) or control.Treatment of 5-azacytidine caused myogenic differentiation of cultured cardiac fibroblasts, as defined by elongation and fusion into multinucleated myotubes with sarcomeric structures as identified by electron microscopy, and positive immunostaining for cardiac specific proteins, troponin I and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) and the gap junction protein connexin 43. The myogenic cells (1.0x106) were transplanted into the infarcted myocardium 2 weeks after coronary artery occlusion.Results By 1 month after transplantation, the converted fibroblasts gave rise to a cluster of cardiac-like muscle cells that in the hearts occupied a large part of the scar with positive immunostaining for the myogenic proteins troponin I and β-MHC. Engrafted cells also expressed the gap junction protein connexin 43 in a disorganized manner. There was no positive staining in the control hearts treated with injections of culture medium. Heart function was evaluated at 6 weeks after myocardial injury with echocardiographic and hemodynamic measurements. Improvement in cardiac function was seen in the hearts transplanted with the 5-azacytidine-treated cardiac fibroblasts which was absent in the

  14. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside.

  15. Neuromuscular blockade in cardiac surgery: An update for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmerling Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been great advancements in cardiac surgery over the last two decades; the widespread use of off-pump aortocoronary bypass surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and robotic surgery have also changed the face of cardiac anaesthesia. The concept of "Fast-track anaesthesia" demands the use of nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs with short duration of action, combining the ability to provide (if necessary sufficiently profound neuromuscular blockade during surgery and immediate re-establishment of normal neuromuscular transmission at the end of surgery. Postoperative residual muscle paralysis is one of the major hurdles for immediate or early extubation after cardiac surgery. Nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs for cardiac surgery should therefore be easy to titrate, of rapid onset and short duration of action with a pathway of elimination independent from hepatic or renal dysfunction, and should equally not affect haemodynamic stability. The difference between repetitive bolus application and continuous infusion is outlined in this review, with the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics of vecuronium, pancuronium, rocuronium, and cisatracurium. Kinemyography and acceleromyography are the most important currently used neuromuscular monitoring methods. Whereas monitoring at the adductor pollicis muscle is appropriate at the end of surgery, monitoring of the corrugator supercilii muscle better reflects neuromuscular blockade at more central, profound muscles, such as the diaphragm, larynx, or thoraco-abdominal muscles. In conclusion, cisatracurium or rocuronium is recommended for neuromuscular blockade in modern cardiac surgery.

  16. Sudden cardiac arrest in a child with nemaline myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Marseglia, Lucia; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Manti, Sara; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Arrigo, Teresa; Cavallari, Vittorio; Gitto, Eloisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Nemaline myopathy is a rare, non progressive congenital skeletal muscle disorder defined by the presence of inclusions known as nemaline rods in muscle fibers. Several clinical subtypes have been described, according to degree of muscle weakness, severity and age at onset. The course of nemaline myopathy is very slowly progressive, and death is usually due to respiratory failure. Cardiac involvement is rare and generally considered to be the result of ACTA1 mutations. Patient We re...

  17. Cardiac tissue engineering: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Marc N; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2014-01-17

    The engineering of 3-dimensional (3D) heart muscles has undergone exciting progress for the past decade. Profound advances in human stem cell biology and technology, tissue engineering and material sciences, as well as prevascularization and in vitro assay technologies make the first clinical application of engineered cardiac tissues a realistic option and predict that cardiac tissue engineering techniques will find widespread use in the preclinical research and drug development in the near future. Tasks that need to be solved for this purpose include standardization of human myocyte production protocols, establishment of simple methods for the in vitro vascularization of 3D constructs and better maturation of myocytes, and, finally, thorough definition of the predictive value of these methods for preclinical safety pharmacology. The present article gives an overview of the present state of the art, bottlenecks, and perspectives of cardiac tissue engineering for cardiac repair and in vitro testing.

  18. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  19. Synergistic activation of cardiac genes by myocardin and Tbx5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunbo Wang

    Full Text Available Myocardial differentiation is associated with the activation and expression of an array of cardiac specific genes. However, the transcriptional networks that control cardiac gene expression are not completely understood. Myocardin is a cardiac and smooth muscle-specific expressed transcriptional coactivator of Serum Response Factor (SRF and is able to potently activate cardiac and smooth muscle gene expression during development. We hypothesize that myocardin discriminates between cardiac and smooth muscle specific genes by associating with distinct co-factors. Here, we show that myocardin directly interacts with Tbx5, a member of the T-box family of transcription factors involved in the Holt-Oram syndrome. Tbx5 synergizes with myocardin to activate expression of the cardiac specific genes atrial natriuretic factor (ANF and alpha myosin heavy chain (α-MHC, but not that of smooth muscle specific genes SM22 or smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC. We found that this synergistic activation of shared target genes is dependent on the binding sites for Tbx5, T-box factor-Binding Elements (TBEs. Myocardin and Tbx5 physically interact and their interaction domains were mapped to the basic domain and the coil domain of myocardin and Tbx5, respectively. Our analysis demonstrates that the Tbx5G80R mutation, which leads to the Holt-Oram syndrome in humans, failed to synergize with myocardin to activate cardiac gene expression. These data uncover a key role for Tbx5 and myocardin in establishing the transcriptional foundation for cardiac gene activation and suggest that the interaction of myocardin and Tbx5 maybe involved in cardiac development and diseases.

  20. Biochemical regulators in cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölbel, F; Schreiber, V

    1983-01-01

    In recent years research has shown that muscle is capable of reacting to mechanical stimuli by altering biochemical processes. Myocardium is probably the source of a biochemical factor, or factors which activate myocardial protein synthesis. In experimentally induced cardiac hypertrophy adaptive alterations have been shown to occur not only in the adrenal medulla but also in the adrenal cortex. Finally, detection of cross reactivity between digitalis glycosides and a number of steroid hormones has succeeded. We assume that such cross reactivity indicates the existence of an endogenic factor of steroid character, which is produced in the adrenal gland and functions as an endogenic cardiotonic agent. During experimental cardiac hypertrophy its synthesis is possibly increased. We propose the term "endocardin" or "endocardiotonin" for this agent.

  1. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Khalighi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Myotonic dystrophy (DM is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective: To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods: Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP studies. Results: Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion: Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies.

  2. 改良胸大肌肌瓣转移治疗心脏外科术后慢性胸骨骨髓炎疗效%Curative effect of repairing transfer of pectoralis major muscle flap on chronic sternum osteomyelitis after ;cardiac surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊; 姚建民; 高永顺; 崔振田; 陆龙

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the surgical method and curative effect of treating chronic sternum osteomyelitis after cardiac surgery with repairing transfer of pectoralis major muscle flap. Methods The patients with chronic sternum osteomyelitis after cardiac surgery (n=56) were chosen from Jan. 2008 to Aug. 2014, and among them 36 with simple sternum osteomyelitis, 11 with sternum osteomyelitis accompanied by costal chondritis and 9 with sternum osteomyelitis accompanied by suppurative infection in mediastinum. During the cardiac surgery, complete debridement and removing source of infection were carried out, and enough pectoralis major muscle flap was transferred to fill sternum defect. Negative pressure drainage was applied continuously and sensitive antibiotics were administered for preventing infection after cardiac surgery. The clinical efficacy was observed and followed up. Results All patients were followed up for 4 m to 12 m (averagely 8 m). There were 51 patients (91.1%) with phase I healing of incision, 3 (5.3%) with a few secretion at drainage outlet and healed after dressing changes for 1 w, and 2 (3.6%) with poor incision healing and cured after cardiac surgery again. There were no patients with incision re-infection, formation of chronic sinus tract and recrudescence of sternum osteomyelitis. All patients had normal functions of upper limbs. Conclusion The curative effect of repairing transfer of pectoralis major muscle flap is reliable in treatment of sternum osteomyelitis after cardiac surgery without more incisions, which is suitable for clinical application.%目的:探讨利用改良胸大肌肌瓣转移治疗心脏外科术后慢性胸骨骨髓炎的手术方法及临床效果。方法入选2008年1月~2014年8月在北京军区总医院收治心脏外科术后出现慢性胸骨骨髓炎患者56例。其中单纯胸骨骨髓炎36例,胸骨骨髓炎伴肋软骨炎11例,胸骨骨髓炎伴纵隔内感染9例。术中彻底扩创清除感染源

  3. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eMeireles Nogueira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route towards the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies.It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells.To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm.

  4. Measurement of Contractile Stress Generated by Cultured Rat Muscle on Silicon Cantilevers for Toxin Detection and Muscle Performance Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    neuromuscular junction [11]. Other diseases affect the muscle directly such as muscular dystrophy and muscular atrophy [12], which cause deterioration of...generation of skeletal muscle will also increase until tetanus is induced, resulting in tonic contraction. Cardiac muscle, on the other hand, will cease...by muscle. Nature Materials 4: 180–184. 8. Feinberg AW, Feigel A, Shevkoplyas SS, Sheehy S, Whitesides GM, et al. (2007) Muscular Thin Films for

  5. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  6. Swimming training increases cardiac vagal activity and induces cardiac hypertrophy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Medeiros

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of swimming training (ST on vagal and sympathetic cardiac effects was investigated in sedentary (S, N = 12 and trained (T, N = 12 male Wistar rats (200-220 g. ST consisted of 60-min swimming sessions 5 days/week for 8 weeks, with a 5% body weight load attached to the tail. The effect of the autonomic nervous system in generating training-induced resting bradycardia (RB was examined indirectly after cardiac muscarinic and adrenergic receptor blockade. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by cardiac weight and myocyte morphometry. Plasma catecholamine concentrations and citrate synthase activity in soleus muscle were also determined in both groups. Resting heart rate was significantly reduced in T rats (355 ± 16 vs 330 ± 20 bpm. RB was associated with a significantly increased cardiac vagal effect in T rats (103 ± 25 vs 158 ± 40 bpm, since the sympathetic cardiac effect and intrinsic heart rate were similar for the two groups. Likewise, no significant difference was observed for plasma catecholamine concentrations between S and T rats. In T rats, left ventricle weight (13% and myocyte dimension (21% were significantly increased, suggesting cardiac hypertrophy. Skeletal muscle citrate synthase activity was significantly increased by 52% in T rats, indicating endurance conditioning. These data suggest that RB induced by ST is mainly mediated parasympathetically and differs from other training modes, like running, that seems to mainly decrease intrinsic heart rate in rats. The increased cardiac vagal activity associated with ST is of clinical relevance, since both are related to increased life expectancy and prevention of cardiac events.

  7. Muscle biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inflammatory diseases of muscle (such as polymyositis or dermatomyositis ) Diseases of the connective tissue and blood vessels ( ... disease that involves inflammation and a skin rash ( dermatomyositis ) Inherited muscle disorder ( Duchenne muscular dystrophy ) Inflammation of ...

  8. Muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atrophy. Exercises may include ones done in a swimming pool to reduce the muscle workload, and other types ... a physical examination and ask about your medical history and symptoms, including: When did the muscle atrophy ...

  9. Changes and Significance of Matrix Metalloproteinase and Its Tissue Inhibitor in Plasma and Cardiac Muscle of Rats with Chronic Cardiac Failure Induced by Volume Overload%基质金属蛋白酶及其抑制物在容量过负荷致慢性心力衰竭大鼠血浆及心肌组织中的变化及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张超英; 李晓惠; 伏瑾; 崔小岱

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察容量过负荷致慢性心力衰竭大鼠血浆及心肌组织基质金属蛋白酶-8(MMP-8)及其抑制物-1(TIMP-1)的表达变化,探讨其在慢性心力衰竭发病中的病理生理作用.方法 雄性SD大鼠17只,随机分为分流组(n=9)和对照组(n=8).分流组通过腹主动脉下腔静脉穿刺术建立容量过负荷致慢性充血性心力衰竭动物模型,对照组大鼠除不做穿刺外,余操作过程同分流组.分别测定2组大鼠心功能及血流动力学指标,检测血浆MMP-8及TIMP-1水平,实时荧光定量PCR测定大鼠左心室、右心室MMP-8 mRNA、TIMP-1 mRNA的表达.结果 术后8周,分流组大鼠左心室收缩压、左心室舒张压、左心室内压差、左心室内压最大上升速率及最大下降速率较对照组明显降低(Pa<0.05,0.01);左心室舒张末压较对照组明显升高(P<0.05).分流组大鼠血浆MMP-8、TIMP-1水平均较对照组明显升高(Pa<0.05).与对照组相比,分流组大鼠左心室心肌组织MMP-8 mRNA及左、右心室心肌组织TIMP-1 mRNA水平均有升高趋势,右心室MMP-8 mRNA水平有下降趋势,但2组比较差异均无统计学意义(Pa>0.05);左心室和右心室心肌组织中MMP-8/TIMP-1明显降低,右心室较左心室下降更明显.结论 MMP-8与TIMP-1通过影响胶原代谢,参与容量过负荷致慢性充血性心力衰竭的病理生理过程.%Objective To observe the changes of matrix metalloproteinase - 8 ( MMP - 8 ) and its tissue inhibitors of metallopreteinase -1 ( TIMP - 1 ) in plasma and cardiac muscle of rats with chronic cardiac failure induced by volume overload, and to explore those roles in physiology of chronic cardiac failure. Methods Seventeen male SD rats were randomly divided into 2 groups as follows:9 shunt rat models were established by abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava shunt operation and 8 rats after sham operation served as controls. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic measurements were obtained 8 weeks

  10. Your Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develops. There they help to push the baby out of the mother's body when it's time to be born. You'll find smooth muscles at work behind the scenes in your eyes, too. These muscles keep the eyes ... thick muscles of the heart contract to pump blood out and then relax to let blood back in ...

  11. Modeling Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  12. Electrophysiological characteristics of cardiocyte from excised pulmonary vein cardiac muscle of rabbit%离体兔肺静脉肌袖心肌细胞电生理特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊辉; 李源; 刘泰槰; 黄卫斌

    2011-01-01

    目的 应用常规玻璃微电极细胞内记录技术,研究家兔肺静脉肌袖(PVC)电生理特性,观察PVC与左心房心肌细胞(LAC)之间的电传导现象,探讨肺静脉起源的阵发性房颤的发生机制.方法 50只健康成年家兔,获取肺静脉及相连左房心肌组织,应用常规微电极细胞内技术:记录PVC与LAC动作电位(AP),并进行各项参数比较(APD20,APD50,APD90);分别于PVC端和LAC端予不同频率脉冲刺激,观察另一端AP的产生情况;改用加有钾离子通道阻滞剂2mmol/L氯化铯(CsCl)的台式液,观察二者早后除极(EAD)发生的可能性.结果 PVC的APD20,APD50,APD90均较LAC长(APD20 (23.09±5.44)ms vs (19.50±1.66)ms,APD50 (52.40±7.93)ms vs (28.90±4.36)ms,APD90 (123.35±8.26)ms vs (69.65±9.44)ms),均有显著性差异(P均<0.05);在一定的刺激频率范围内,肺静脉的刺激均能传导至左心房,而后者较少能逆传至肺静脉(100% vs 10%,P<0.05);加用药物灌流后,PVC更易发生EAD(90% vs 15%,P<0.05).结论 PVC和LAC之间的电兴奋传导是不均一的,这可能是形成折返的基础.CsCl作为一种K+通道阻滞剂能延长复极过程,为后除极的发生创造条件,PVC的长AP时程特性,具备发生EAD的倾向性,并且兴奋易于传入左心房,这可能是促进房性心律失常的发生基础.%Objective It is to study the electrophysiological characteristics of cardiocyte from pulmonary vein cardiac muscle ( PVC ) of rabbit applying intracellular recording technique of routine glass microelectrode, to observe the electrical conduction between PVC and left atrium cardiocyte ( LAC ) and to approach the mechanism of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation originated from pulmonary vein. Methods Multiple cardiocytes preparations from pulmonary vein and left atrium of 50 healthy adult rabbits were obtained. The routine intracellular microelectrode technique was applied to record action potential ( AP ) of PVC and LAC , and a comparison of action potential duration

  13. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  14. Maximum shortening velocity of lymphatic muscle approaches that of striated muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongzhen; Taucer, Anne I; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Zawieja, David C; Davis, Michael J

    2013-11-15

    Lymphatic muscle (LM) is widely considered to be a type of vascular smooth muscle, even though LM cells uniquely express contractile proteins from both smooth muscle and cardiac muscle. We tested the hypothesis that LM exhibits an unloaded maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) intermediate between that of smooth muscle and cardiac muscle. Single lymphatic vessels were dissected from the rat mesentery, mounted in a servo-controlled wire myograph, and subjected to isotonic quick release protocols during spontaneous or agonist-evoked contractions. After maximal activation, isotonic quick releases were performed at both the peak and plateau phases of contraction. Vmax was 0.48 ± 0.04 lengths (L)/s at the peak: 2.3 times higher than that of mesenteric arteries and 11.4 times higher than mesenteric veins. In cannulated, pressurized lymphatic vessels, shortening velocity was determined from the maximal rate of constriction [rate of change in internal diameter (-dD/dt)] during spontaneous contractions at optimal preload and minimal afterload; peak -dD/dt exceeded that obtained during any of the isotonic quick release protocols (2.14 ± 0.30 L/s). Peak -dD/dt declined with pressure elevation or activation using substance P. Thus, isotonic methods yielded Vmax values for LM in the mid to high end (0.48 L/s) of those the recorded for phasic smooth muscle (0.05-0.5 L/s), whereas isobaric measurements yielded values (>2.0 L/s) that overlapped the midrange of values for cardiac muscle (0.6-3.3 L/s). Our results challenge the dogma that LM is classical vascular smooth muscle, and its unusually high Vmax is consistent with the expression of cardiac muscle contractile proteins in the lymphatic vessel wall.

  15. Proteomic analysis reveals new cardiac-specific dystrophin-associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K Johnson

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the expression of dystrophin result in progressive loss of skeletal muscle function and cardiomyopathy leading to early mortality. Interestingly, clinical studies revealed no correlation in disease severity or age of onset between cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting that dystrophin may play overlapping yet different roles in these two striated muscles. Since dystrophin serves as a structural and signaling scaffold, functional differences likely arise from tissue-specific protein interactions. To test this, we optimized a proteomics-based approach to purify, identify and compare the interactome of dystrophin between cardiac and skeletal muscles from as little as 50 mg of starting material. We found selective tissue-specific differences in the protein associations of cardiac and skeletal muscle full length dystrophin to syntrophins and dystrobrevins that couple dystrophin to signaling pathways. Importantly, we identified novel cardiac-specific interactions of dystrophin with proteins known to regulate cardiac contraction and to be involved in cardiac disease. Our approach overcomes a major challenge in the muscular dystrophy field of rapidly and consistently identifying bona fide dystrophin-interacting proteins in tissues. In addition, our findings support the existence of cardiac-specific functions of dystrophin and may guide studies into early triggers of cardiac disease in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies.

  16. Cardiac expression of ms1/STARS, a novel gene involved in cardiac development and disease, is regulated by GATA4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounzain, Samir; Kobayashi, Satoru; Peterson, Richard E; He, Aibin; Motterle, Anna; Samani, Nilesh J; Menick, Donald R; Pu, William T; Liang, Qiangrong; Chong, Nelson W

    2012-05-01

    Ms1/STARS is a novel muscle-specific actin-binding protein that specifically modulates the myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-serum response factor (SRF) regulatory axis within striated muscle. This ms1/STARS-dependent regulatory axis is of central importance within the cardiac gene regulatory network and has been implicated in cardiac development and postnatal cardiac function/homeostasis. The dysregulation of ms1/STARS is associated with and causative of pathological cardiac phenotypes, including cardiac hypertrophy and cardiomyopathy. In order to gain an understanding of the mechanisms governing ms1/STARS expression in the heart, we have coupled a comparative genomic in silico analysis with reporter, gain-of-function, and loss-of-function approaches. Through this integrated analysis, we have identified three evolutionarily conserved regions (ECRs), α, SINA, and DINA, that act as cis-regulatory modules and confer differential cardiac cell-specific activity. Two of these ECRs, α and DINA, displayed distinct regulatory sensitivity to the core cardiac transcription factor GATA4. Overall, our results demonstrate that within embryonic, neonatal, and adult hearts, GATA4 represses ms1/STARS expression with the pathologically associated depletion of GATA4 (type 1/type 2 diabetic models), resulting in ms1/STARS upregulation. This GATA4-dependent repression of ms1/STARS expression has major implications for MRTF-SRF signaling in the context of cardiac development and disease.

  17. Cardiac specific expression of Xenopus Popeye-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz, Marc P; Pandur, Petra; Brand, Thomas; Kühl, Michael

    2002-07-01

    Popeye genes code for putative transmembrane proteins that are predominantly expressed in heart and skeletal muscle. Here we report on the isolation and expression of a previously unknown Xenopus member of this family, Xenopus Popeye-1 (Xpop-1). Xpop-1 is 60-65% identical to other vertebrate Pop-1 genes at the protein level. Whole-mount in situ hybridization studies revealed a highly specific expression of Xpop-1 whose transcripts are restricted to the embryonic heart and become enriched in the forming ventricle. Interestingly, unlike other known vertebrate Popeye genes, Xpop-1 is exclusively expressed in cardiac tissue and absent from skeletal muscle.

  18. Scalable BDDC Algorithms for Cardiac Electromechanical Coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Pavarino, L. F.

    2017-03-17

    The spread of electrical excitation in the cardiac muscle and the subsequent contraction-relaxation process is quantitatively described by the cardiac electromechanical coupling model. The electrical model consists of the Bidomain system, which is a degenerate parabolic system of two nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) of reaction-diffusion type, describing the evolution in space and time of the intra- and extracellular electric potentials. The PDEs are coupled through the reaction term with a stiff system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the membrane model, which describes the flow of the ionic currents through the cellular membrane and the dynamics of the associated gating variables. The mechanical model consists of the quasi-static finite elasticity system, modeling the cardiac tissue as a nearly-incompressible transversely isotropic hyperelastic material, and coupled with a system of ODEs accounting for the development of biochemically generated active force.

  19. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ogle, Brenda M.; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F.; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M.; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or “big questions” were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state-of-the-art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repa...

  20. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  1. Cardiac tamponade (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac tamponade is a condition involving compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the space ... they cannot adequately fill or pump blood. Cardiac tamponade is an emergency condition that requires hospitalization.

  2. Cardiac Procedures and Surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedure Learn more about cardiac medications , including dual antiplatelet therapy, that you may need to take after your ... Procedure Learn more about cardiac medications , including dual antiplatelet therapy, that you may need to take after your ...

  3. Gap junction channels and cardiac impulse propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplantez, Thomas; Dupont, Emmanuel; Severs, Nicholas J; Weingart, Robert

    2007-08-01

    The role of gap junction channels on cardiac impulse propagation is complex. This review focuses on the differential expression of connexins in the heart and the biophysical properties of gap junction channels under normal and disease conditions. Structural determinants of impulse propagation have been gained from biochemical and immunocytochemical studies performed on tissue extracts and intact cardiac tissue. These have defined the distinctive connexin coexpression patterns and relative levels in different cardiac tissues. Functional determinants of impulse propagation have emerged from electrophysiological experiments carried out on cell pairs. The static properties (channel number and conductance) limit the current flow between adjacent cardiomyocytes and thus set the basic conduction velocity. The dynamic properties (voltage-sensitive gating and kinetics of channels) are responsible for a modulation of the conduction velocity during propagated action potentials. The effect is moderate and depends on the type of Cx and channel. For homomeric-homotypic channels, the influence is small to medium; for homomeric-heterotypic channels, it is medium to strong. Since no data are currently available on heteromeric channels, their influence on impulse propagation is speculative. The modulation by gap junction channels is most prominent in tissues at the boundaries between cardiac tissues such as sinoatrial node-atrial muscle, atrioventricular node-His bundle, His bundle-bundle branch and Purkinje fibers-ventricular muscle. The data predict facilitation of orthodromic propagation.

  4. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, A.S.; Asghari-Roodsari, A.; Tan, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  5. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, A.S.; Asghari-Roodsari, A.; Tan, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  6. Cardiac remodeling and contractile function in acid alpha-glucosidase knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J. Kamphoven (Joep); R. Stubenitsky (René); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPompe's disease is an autosomal recessive and often fatal condition, caused by mutations in the acid alpha-glucosidase gene, leading to lysosomal glycogen storage in heart and skeletal muscle. We investigated the cardiac phenotype of an acid

  7. Development of Bipotent Cardiac/Skeletal Myogenic Progenitors from MESP1+ Mesoderm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Sun-Kin Chan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The branchiomeric skeletal muscles co-evolved with new chambers of the heart to enable predatory feeding in chordates. These co-evolved tissues develop from a common population in anterior splanchnic mesoderm, referred to as cardiopharyngeal mesoderm (CPM. The regulation and development of CPM are poorly understood. We describe an embryonic stem cell-based system in which MESP1 drives a PDGFRA+ population with dual cardiac and skeletal muscle differentiation potential, and gene expression resembling CPM. Using this system, we investigate the regulation of these bipotent progenitors, and find that cardiac specification is governed by an antagonistic TGFβ-BMP axis, while skeletal muscle specification is enhanced by Rho kinase inhibition. We define transcriptional signatures of the first committed CPM-derived cardiac and skeletal myogenic progenitors, and discover surface markers to distinguish cardiac (PODXL+ from the skeletal muscle (CDH4+ CPM derivatives. These tools open an accessible window on this developmentally and evolutionarily important population.

  8. Evaluation of cardiac blood blow, metabolism and sympathetic nerve function in patients with cardiac failure using PET and SPECT. Prognostic diagnosis based on the analysis of aggravating factors of the disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Shimozu, Junko; Yasumura, Yoshio; Nagatani, Kenzo; Miyatake, Kunio [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    Focusing on the failure of energy metabolism, which is assumed to be attributed to the cardiac muscle disorder of a patient with cardiac failure, the characteristics and diagnostic significance of the metabolic disorders of cadiac muscles were investigated in those patients. The diagnostic efficacy of {beta}-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) which is a imaging agent for lipid metabolism in the cardiac muscle was assessed in the clinical states of cardiac failure due to pulmonary hypertension. Even if there was a considerable increase in the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the initial accumulation of BMIPP linearly increased, similarly to the increase in the accumulation of MIBI, a blood flow agent. The initial accumulation of BMIPP was thought to reflect a thicken cardiac muscle and/or increased blood flow. Also, its washing-out rate was suggested to be usable as an clinical indicator to estimate the loading of ventricular pressure. (M.N.)

  9. Computational approaches to understand cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Byron N.; Yang, Pei-Chi; Behrens, Steven B.; Moreno, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. These impulses spread throughout the cardiac muscle to manifest as electrical waves in the whole heart. Regularity of electrical waves is critically important since they signal the heart muscle to contract, driving the primary function of the heart to act as a pump and deliver blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. For more than 50 years, mathematically based models of cardiac electrical activity have been used to improve understanding of basic mechanisms of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical function. Computer-based modeling approaches to understand cardiac activity are uniquely helpful because they allow for distillation of complex emergent behaviors into the key contributing components underlying them. Here we review the latest advances and novel concepts in the field as they relate to understanding the complex interplay between electrical, mechanical, structural, and genetic mechanisms during arrhythmia development at the level of ion channels, cells, and tissues. We also discuss the latest computational approaches to guiding arrhythmia therapy. PMID:22886409

  10. Mechanisms of cardiac pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Robert D; Garrett, Kennon M; Blair, Robert W

    2015-04-01

    Angina pectoris is cardiac pain that typically is manifested as referred pain to the chest and upper left arm. Atypical pain to describe localization of the perception, generally experienced more by women, is referred to the back, neck, and/or jaw. This article summarizes the neurophysiological and pharmacological mechanisms for referred cardiac pain. Spinal cardiac afferent fibers mediate typical anginal pain via pathways from the spinal cord to the thalamus and ultimately cerebral cortex. Spinal neurotransmission involves substance P, glutamate, and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors; release of neurokinins such as nuclear factor kappa b (NF-kb) in the spinal cord can modulate neurotransmission. Vagal cardiac afferent fibers likely mediate atypical anginal pain and contribute to cardiac ischemia without accompanying pain via relays through the nucleus of the solitary tract and the C1-C2 spinal segments. The psychological state of an individual can modulate cardiac nociception via pathways involving the amygdala. Descending pathways originating from nucleus raphe magnus and the pons also can modulate cardiac nociception. Sensory input from other visceral organs can mimic cardiac pain due to convergence of this input with cardiac input onto spinothalamic tract neurons. Reduction of converging nociceptive input from the gallbladder and gastrointestinal tract can diminish cardiac pain. Much work remains to be performed to discern the interactions among complex neural pathways that ultimately produce or do not produce the sensations associated with cardiac pain.

  11. Biomarkers for cardiac cachexia: reality or utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Telma; Vitorino, Rui; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-09-25

    Cardiac cachexia is a serious complication of chronic heart failure, characterized by significant weight loss and body wasting. Chronic heart failure-related muscle wasting results from a chronic imbalance in the activation of anabolic or catabolic pathways, caused by a series of immunological, metabolic, and neurohormonal processes. In spite of the high morbidity and mortality associated to this condition, there is no universally accepted definition or specific biomarkers for cardiac cachexia, which makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. Several hormonal, inflammatory and oxidative stress molecules have been proposed as serological markers of prognosis in cardiac cachexia but with doubtful success. As individual biomarkers may have limited sensitivity and specificity, multimarker strategies involving mediators of the biological processes modulated by cardiac cachexia will strongly contribute for the diagnosis and management of the disease, as well as for the establishment of new therapeutic targets. An integrated analysis of the biomarkers proposed so far for cardiac cachexia is made in the present review, highlighting the biological processes to which they are related.

  12. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    Smooth muscle relaxation in vertebrates is regulated by a variety of neuronal signalling molecules, including neuropeptides and nitric oxide (NO). The physiology of muscle relaxation in echinoderms is of particular interest because these animals are evolutionarily more closely related to the vertebrates than to the majority of invertebrate phyla. However, whilst in vertebrates there is a clear structural and functional distinction between visceral smooth muscle and skeletal striated muscle, this does not apply to echinoderms, in which the majority of muscles, whether associated with the body wall skeleton and its appendages or with visceral organs, are made up of non-striated fibres. The mechanisms by which the nervous system controls muscle relaxation in echinoderms were, until recently, unknown. Using the cardiac stomach of the starfish Asterias rubens as a model, it has been established that the NO-cGMP signalling pathway mediates relaxation. NO also causes relaxation of sea urchin tube feet, and NO may therefore function as a 'universal' muscle relaxant in echinoderms. The first neuropeptides to be identified in echinoderms were two related peptides isolated from Asterias rubens known as SALMFamide-1 (S1) and SALMFamide-2 (S2). Both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of the starfish cardiac stomach, but with S2 being approximately ten times more potent than S1. SALMFamide neuropeptides have also been isolated from sea cucumbers, in which they cause relaxation of both gut and body wall muscle. Therefore, like NO, SALMFamides may also function as 'universal' muscle relaxants in echinoderms. The mechanisms by which SALMFamides cause relaxation of echinoderm muscle are not known, but several candidate signal transduction pathways are discussed here. The SALMFamides do not, however, appear to act by promoting release of NO, and muscle relaxation in echinoderms is therefore probably regulated by at least two neuronal signalling systems acting in parallel. Recently, other

  13. Biomimetic material strategies for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.sg [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Venugopal, J. [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kai, Dan [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2011-04-08

    Cardiovascular disease precedes many serious complications including myocardial infarction (MI) and it remains a major problem for the global community. Adult mammalian heart has limited ability to regenerate and compensate for the loss of cardiomyocytes. Restoration of cardiac function by replacement of diseased myocardium with functional cardiomyocytes is an intriguing strategy because it offers a potential cure for MI. Biomaterials are fabricated in nanometer scale dimensions by combining the chemical, biological, mechanical and electrical aspects of material for potential tissue engineering (TE) applications. Synthetic polymers offer advantageous in their ability to tailor the mechanical properties, and natural polymers offer cell recognition sites necessary for cell, adhesion and proliferation. Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) aim for the development of a bioengineered construct that can provide physical support to the damaged cardiac tissue by replacing certain functions of the damaged extracellular matrix and prevent adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after MI. Electrospun nanofibers are applied as heart muscle patches, while hydrogels serve as a platform for controlled delivery of growth factors, prevent mechanical complications and assist in cell recruitment. This article reviews the applications of different natural and synthetic polymeric materials utilized as cardiac patches, injectables or 3D constructs for cardiac TE. Smart organization of nanoscale assemblies with synergistic approaches of utilizing nanofibers and hydrogels could further advance the field of cardiac tissue engineering. Rapid innovations in biomedical engineering and cell biology will bring about new insights in the development of optimal scaffolds and methods to create tissue constructs with relevant contractile properties and electrical integration to replace or substitute the diseased myocardium.

  14. The Novel Desmin Mutant p.A120D Impairs Filament Formation, Prevents Intercalated Disk Localization, and Causes Sudden Cardiac Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodehl, Andreas; Dieding, Mareike; Klauke, Bärbel;

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate filament protein desmin is encoded by the gene DES and contributes to the mechanical stabilization of the striated muscle sarcomere and cell contacts within the cardiac intercalated disk. DES mutations cause severe skeletal and cardiac muscle diseases with heterogeneous phenotypes...

  15. Improvement on first-aid and nursing flow model in emergency department for patients with acute infarct of cardiac muscle%急诊科急性心肌梗死抢救护理流程模式的改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石丹琴; 马晓华; 林真珠; 赵俐玫; 张立民; 钟立光

    2009-01-01

    目的 为了提高急诊科急性心肌梗死抢救护理成功率.方法 对50例急性心肌梗死患者,采取在现有条件下,改进配合医生最便捷、有效抢救护理流程模式,缩短收住院时间.结果 50例患者经急诊科初步急救,病情稳定护送综合ICU或心内科住院部,成功率94%,与改进前50例比较,成功率提高10%(P<0.05),收住院时间由传统平均每人次15.5 min,下降到平均每人次6 min(P<0.01).结论 探索急诊科急性心肌梗死抢救护理流程模式,改进能有效配合医生提高抢救成功率;明显缩短收住院时间,为时间就是生命的抢救中争取了更宝贵的时间,提高满意度.%Objective To increase the success rate of first-aid and nursing of patients with acute infarct of cardiac muscle in emergency departments.Methods A total of 50 patients with acute infarct of cardiac muscle were taken,for seeking for the most convenient,effective flow model for first-aid and nursing under current conditions,which has a smooth cooperation with doctors,and shortens the time of patients staying in hosptal.Results The 50 patients were primarily first-aided in emergency department,and shew a stable status of disease,and were sent to the complex ICU or the cardiacology department in the in-patient section with care.The success rate was 94%.Compared with 50 patients in the past,the success rate was increased by 10% (P<0.05).The time for staying in hospital was reduced to 6 rain for a patient at a time in average,from the tradiational average time for a patient at a time of 15.5 rain.Conclusions This exploration in nursing model for first-aid and nursing of patients with acute infarct of cardiac muscle in emergency departments provides an improvement which can closely match with doctors,and increase the success rate of first aid.It clearly shortens the in-hospital time for patients.The model gives valuable time for the first-aid process which shows time is life,and increases the

  16. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  17. Reducing RBM20 activity improves diastolic dysfunction and cardiac atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, Florian; Dieterich, Christoph; Radke, Michael H; Granzier, Henk; Gotthardt, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Impaired diastolic filling is a main contributor to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a syndrome with increasing prevalence and no treatment. Both collagen and the giant sarcomeric protein titin determine diastolic function. Since titin's elastic properties can be adjusted physiologically, we evaluated titin-based stiffness as a therapeutic target. We adjusted RBM20-dependent cardiac isoform expression in the titin N2B knockout mouse with increased ventricular stiffness. A ~50 % reduction of RBM20 activity does not only maintain cardiac filling in diastole but also ameliorates cardiac atrophy and thus improves cardiac function in the N2B-deficient heart. Reduced RBM20 activity partially normalized gene expression related to muscle development and fatty acid metabolism. The adaptation of cardiac growth was related to hypertrophy signaling via four-and-a-half lim-domain proteins (FHLs) that translate mechanical input into hypertrophy signals. We provide a novel link between cardiac isoform expression and trophic signaling via FHLs and suggest cardiac splicing as a therapeutic target in diastolic dysfunction. Increasing the length of titin isoforms improves ventricular filling in heart disease. FHL proteins are regulated via RBM20 and adapt cardiac growth. RBM20 is a therapeutic target in diastolic dysfunction.

  18. Sudden cardiac arrest in a child with nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, Lucia; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Manti, Sara; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Arrigo, Teresa; Cavallari, Vittorio; Gitto, Eloisa

    2015-03-21

    Nemaline myopathy is a rare, non progressive congenital skeletal muscle disorder defined by the presence of inclusions known as nemaline rods in muscle fibers. Several clinical subtypes have been described, according to degree of muscle weakness, severity and age at onset. The course of nemaline myopathy is very slowly progressive, and death is usually due to respiratory failure. Cardiac involvement is rare and generally considered to be the result of ACTA1 mutations. We report the case of a 6 year old boy with typical congenital nemaline myopathy. Nemaline myopathy was confirmed at 3 years of age by muscle biopsy. No mutation of ACTA1, TPM2 and TNNT1 genes was detected. The child died suddenly of cardiac arrest and associated hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, in absence of acute respiratory failure or swallowing difficulties. Nemaline cardiomyopathy was suspected, but post mortem cardiac biopsy did not show findings consistent with nemaline myopathy. Congenital typical nemaline myopathy is not necessarily a static or very slowly progressive disorder and acute cardiac deterioration can lead to early death.

  19. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes of muscle pain include stress, physical activity, infections, hyper or .... Acupuncture. It is a traditional Chinese-based therapeutic method which ..... and Spinal Mechanisms of Pain and Dry Needling Mediated Analgesia: A Clinical.

  20. Cardiac sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ahmad S; Asghari-Roodsari, Alaleh; Tan, Hanno L

    2010-07-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (INa) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of INa for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of arrhythmias in cardiac sodium channelopathies, i.e., arrhythmogenic diseases in patients with mutations in SCN5A, the gene responsible for the pore-forming ion-conducting alpha-subunit, or in genes that encode the ancillary beta-subunits or regulatory proteins of the cardiac sodium channel. While clinical and genetic studies have laid the foundation for our understanding of cardiac sodium channelopathies by establishing links between arrhythmogenic diseases and mutations in genes that encode various subunits of the cardiac sodium channel, biophysical studies (particularly in heterologous expression systems and transgenic mouse models) have provided insights into the mechanisms by which INa dysfunction causes disease in such channelopathies. It is now recognized that mutations that increase INa delay cardiac repolarization, prolong action potential duration, and cause long QT syndrome, while mutations that reduce INa decrease cardiac excitability, reduce electrical conduction velocity, and induce Brugada syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, or combinations thereof. Recently, mutation-induced INa dysfunction was also linked to dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, and sudden infant death syndrome. This review describes the structure and function of the cardiac sodium channel and its various subunits, summarizes major cardiac sodium channelopathies and the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and underlying molecular mechanisms, and discusses recent advances in the discovery of mutation-specific therapies in the management of these channelopathies.

  1. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  2. Cardiac event monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ECG) - ambulatory; Continuous electrocardiograms (EKGs); Holter monitors; Transtelephonic event monitors ... attached. You can carry or wear a cardiac event monitor up to 30 days. You carry the ...

  3. Cardiac stem cell niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarosa Leri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The critical role that stem cell niches have in cardiac homeostasis and myocardial repair following injury is the focus of this review. Cardiac niches represent specialized microdomains where the quiescent and activated state of resident stem cells is regulated. Alterations in niche function with aging and cardiac diseases result in abnormal sites of cardiomyogenesis and inadequate myocyte formation. The relevance of Notch1 signaling, gap-junction formation, HIF-1α and metabolic state in the regulation of stem cell growth and differentiation within the cardiac niches are discussed.

  4. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with significant functional impairment. In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia is described as cardiac cachexia. The cardiac alterations may be due to underlying heart disease, the cancer itself, or problems initiated by the cancer treatment and, unfortunately, remains largely underappreciated by clinicians and basic scientists. Despite recent major advances in the treatment of cancer, little progress has been made in the treatment of cardiac cachexia in cancer, and much of this is due to lack of information regarding the mechanisms. This review focuses on the cardiac atrophy associated with cancer cachexia, describing some of the known mechanisms and discussing the current and future therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. Above all else, improved awareness of the condition and an increased focus on identification of mechanisms and therapeutic targets will facilitate the eventual development of an effective treatment for cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Expression changes of HSP90α in cardiac muscles in rats with severs hemorrhagic shock by the treatment of different resuscitating fluid%复苏液体对重度失血性休克大鼠心肌热休克蛋白90α表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓鲲; 徐明元; 徐贵森

    2013-01-01

    目的:用不同种类液体对重度失血性休克大鼠进行复苏后,对比大鼠心肌组织中热休克蛋白(HSP)90α的表达、变化规律及大鼠生存率,为临床治疗失血性休克选择复苏液体提供参考。方法建立失血性休克大鼠模型,分别运用乳酸林格液、聚明胶肽注射液、高渗氯化钠右旋糖酐进行液体复苏,测定大鼠心肌组织中HSP90α蛋白的表达及大鼠死亡率。结果重度失血性休克后运用不同种类液体进行复苏,大鼠心肌组织HSP90α表达、大鼠死亡率差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论重度失血性休克可以诱导大鼠心肌组织中HSP90α的表达,当用不同液体进行复苏后各组HSP90α的表达不同且具有一定的规律性,提示HSP90α作为一个重要的调控分子参与失血性休克后心肌组织的保护机制。%Objective To explore the expression changes of HSP90αin cardiac muscles and survival rates in rats by using the different fluids to resuscitate the severs hemorrhagic shocked rats ,and provide reference for the clinical treatment of hemorrhagic shock with different resuscitation fluids .Methods Uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock rats model was established ,using lactic acid salinger liquid ,poly peptide injection gelatin ,hypertonic sodium chloride dextran for fluid resuscitation respectively ,and then checked the HSP90αexpression changes and survival rates in rats .Results the expressions of HSP90αin myocardial tissue and the mortality in rats were different after using different resuscitation fluids in severe hemorrhagic shock rats ,difference was statistically significant(P<0 .05) .Conclusion the expression of HSP90α in cardiac muscles of rats could be induced by severe hemorrhagic shock ,the HSP90αexpressed differently and regularly after using different resuscitating fluids ,it implied that the HSP90α played an important role in the hemorrhagic rats cardiac as a regulating fator .

  6. Coupling of cardiac and locomotor rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, R L; Nugent, S T; Marlow, R W; MacLeod, D A; Marble, A E

    1989-01-01

    The pressure within exercising skeletal muscle rises and falls rhythmically during normal human locomotion, the peak pressure reaching levels that intermittently impede blood flow to the exercising muscle. Speculating that a reciprocal relationship between the timing of peak intramuscular and pulsatile arterial pressures should optimize blood flow through muscle and minimize cardiac load, we tested the hypothesis that heart rate becomes entrained with walking and running cadence at some locomotion speeds, by means of electrocardiography and an accelerometer to provide signals reflecting heart rate and cadence, respectively. In 18 of 25 subjects, 1:1 coupling of heart and step rates was present at one or more speeds on a motorized treadmill, generally at moderate to high exercise intensities. To determine how exercise specific this phenomenon is, and to refute the competing hypothesis that coupling is due to vertical accelerations of the heart during locomotion, we had 12 other subjects cycle on an electronically braked bicycle ergometer. Coupling was found between heart rate and pedaling frequency in 10 of them. Cardiac-locomotor coupling appears to be a normal physiological phenomenon, and its identification provides a fresh perspective from which to study endurance.

  7. Cancer causes cardiac atrophy and autophagy in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosper, Pippa F; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2011-03-01

    Approximately one-third of cancer deaths are caused by cachexia, a severe form of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue wasting that affects men more than women. The heart also undergoes atrophy in cancer patients, but the mechanisms and the basis for apparent sex differences are unclear. In a mouse colon-adenocarcinoma model, cancer causes a loss of cardiac mass due to a decrease in cardiac myocyte size that is associated with reduced levels of all sarcomeric proteins. Unlike skeletal muscle cachexia, atrophic hearts do not upregulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system or its activity but increase autophagy. Thus, cancer causes cardiac atrophy by a mechanism distinct from that in skeletal muscle. Male tumor-bearing mice have a more severe phenotype than females, including greater cardiac mass loss and mortality, a more robust pro-inflammatory response to the tumor, and greater cardiac autophagy. In females, estrogen protects against cancer-induced cardiac atrophy and body weight loss by signaling through its receptor. Sex differences in cardiac atrophy need to be considered during the treatment of patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy to prevent exacerbation of cardiac dysfunction. ©2010 AACR.

  8. [Advances in cardiac pacing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carranza, María-José Sancho-Tello; Fidalgo-Andrés, María Luisa; Ferrer, José Martínez; Mateas, Francisco Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of the current status of remote monitoring and follow-up involving cardiac pacing devices and of the latest developments in cardiac resynchronization therapy. In addition, the most important articles published in the last year are discussed.

  9. Phospholemman: a novel cardiac stress protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Joseph Y; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Song, Jianliang; Gao, Erhe; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Chan, Tung O; Wang, Jufang

    2010-08-01

    Phospholemman (PLM), a member of the FXYD family of regulators of ion transport, is a major sarcolemmal substrate for protein kinases A and C in cardiac and skeletal muscle. In the heart, PLM co-localizes and co-immunoprecipitates with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, and L-type Ca(2+) channel. Functionally, when phosphorylated at serine(68), PLM stimulates Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase but inhibits Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in cardiac myocytes. In heterologous expression systems, PLM modulates the gating of cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channel. Therefore, PLM occupies a key modulatory role in intracellular Na(+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis and is intimately involved in regulation of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. Genetic ablation of PLM results in a slight increase in baseline cardiac contractility and prolongation of action potential duration. When hearts are subjected to catecholamine stress, PLM minimizes the risks of arrhythmogenesis by reducing Na(+) overload and simultaneously preserves inotropy by inhibiting Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. In heart failure, both expression and phosphorylation state of PLM are altered and may partly account for abnormalities in EC coupling. The unique role of PLM in regulation of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, and potentially L-type Ca(2+) channel in the heart, together with the changes in its expression and phosphorylation in heart failure, make PLM a rational and novel target for development of drugs in our armamentarium against heart failure. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 189-196.

  10. Mechanotransduction in cardiac hypertrophy and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert C; Zanella, Fabian; Omens, Jeffrey H; Sheikh, Farah

    2015-04-10

    Cardiac muscle cells have an intrinsic ability to sense and respond to mechanical load through a process known as mechanotransduction. In the heart, this process involves the conversion of mechanical stimuli into biochemical events that induce changes in myocardial structure and function. Mechanotransduction and its downstream effects function initially as adaptive responses that serve as compensatory mechanisms during adaptation to the initial load. However, under prolonged and abnormal loading conditions, the remodeling processes can become maladaptive, leading to altered physiological function and the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction are far from being fully elucidated, human and mouse genetic studies have highlighted various cytoskeletal and sarcolemmal structures in cardiac myocytes as the likely candidates for load transducers, based on their link to signaling molecules and architectural components important in disease pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize recent developments that have uncovered specific protein complexes linked to mechanotransduction and mechanotransmission within the sarcomere, the intercalated disc, and at the sarcolemma. The protein structures acting as mechanotransducers are the first step in the process that drives physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling, as well as the transition to heart failure, and may provide better insights into mechanisms driving mechanotransduction-based diseases. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. RSK3 – A Regulator of Pathological Cardiac Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Eliana C.; Passariello, Catherine L.; Li, Jinliang; Matheson, Christopher J.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Reigan, Philip; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The family of p90 ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK) are pleiotropic effectors for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Recently, RSK3 was shown to be important for pathological remodeling of the heart. While cardiac myocyte hypertrophy can be compensatory for increased wall stress, in chronic heart diseases this non-mitotic cell growth is usually associated with interstitial fibrosis, increased cell death, and decreased cardiac function. Although RSK3 is less abundant in the cardiac myocyte than other RSK family members, RSK3 appears to serve a unique role in cardiac myocyte stress responses. A potential mechanism conferring RSK3’s unique function in the heart is anchoring by the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase Anchoring Protein β (mAKAPβ). Recent findings suggest that RSK3 should be considered as a therapeutic target for the prevention of heart failure, a clinical syndrome of major public health significance. PMID:25988524

  12. Extra cardiac activity detected on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy after intra-arterial injection of 99mTc-MIBI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Henriksen, Jens H

    2008-01-01

    , prolongation of the study and interference of the extra cardiac activity with the cardiac image reconstructions. Whole-body scintigraphy disclosed an arterial flow distribution of activity to skeletal muscles in left shoulder and upper limb. CONCLUSION: Accidentally injected radiotracer retrogradely...... (dipyridamol) imaging and followed by rest imaging day 2 was performed. RESULTS: On day 2, when rest perfusion scintigraphy was carried out, extra cardiac activity was present in the left part of thorax and in the left upper extremity resulting in reduced accumulation of 99mTc-MIBI in cardiac tissue...... into the arterial system resulted in an unusual extra cardiac activity interfering with later image processing....

  13. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs' exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-02-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period.

  14. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  15. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  16. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Parakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the most common cause of mortality worldwide. Despite significant advances in the medical science, there is little improvement in the sudden cardiac death related mortality. Coronary artery disease is the most common etiology behind sudden cardiac death, in the above 40 years population. Even in the apparently healthy population, there is a small percentage of patients dying from sudden cardiac death. Given the large denominator, this small percentage contributes to the largest burden of sudden cardiac death. Identification of this at risk group among the apparently healthy individual is a great challenge for the medical fraternity. This article looks into the causes and methods of preventing SCD and at some of the Indian data. Details of Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Genetics of SCD are discussed. Recent guidelines on many of these causes are summarised.

  17. Anion channelrhodopsins for inhibitory cardiac optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govorunova, Elena G.; Cunha, Shane R.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Spudich, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Optical control of the heart muscle is a promising strategy for cardiology because it is more specific than traditional electrical stimulation, and allows a higher temporal resolution than pharmacological interventions. Anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) from cryptophyte algae expressed in cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes produced inhibitory currents at less than one-thousandth of the light intensity required by previously available optogenetic tools, such as the proton pump archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch). Because of their greater photocurrents, ACRs permitted complete inhibition of cardiomyocyte electrical activity under conditions in which Arch was inefficient. Most importantly, ACR expression allowed precisely controlled shortening of the action potential duration by switching on the light during its repolarization phase, which was not possible with previously used optogenetic tools. Optical shortening of cardiac action potentials may benefit pathophysiology research and the development of optogenetic treatments for cardiac disorders such as the long QT syndrome. PMID:27628215

  18. Muscle myosin filaments: cores, crowns and couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, John M

    2009-09-01

    Myosin filaments in muscle, carrying the ATPase myosin heads that interact with actin filaments to produce force and movement, come in multiple varieties depending on species and functional need, but most are based on a common structural theme. The now successful journeys to solve the ultrastructures of many of these myosin filaments, at least at modest resolution, have not been without their false starts and erroneous sidetracks, but the picture now emerging is of both diversity in the rotational symmetries of different filaments and a degree of commonality in the way the myosin heads are organised in resting muscle. Some of the remaining differences may be associated with how the muscle is regulated. Several proteins in cardiac muscle myosin filaments can carry mutations associated with heart disease, so the elucidation of myosin filament structure to understand the effects of these mutations has a clear and topical clinical relevance.

  19. Gene Regulation, Alternative Splicing, and Posttranslational Modification of Troponin Subunits in Cardiac Development and Adaptation: A Focused Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Juan eSheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Troponin plays a central role in regulating the contraction and relaxation of vertebrate striated muscles. This review focuses on the isoform gene regulation, alternative RNA splicing, and posttranslational modifications of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations such as phosphorylation and proteolysis modifications, and structure-function relationships of troponin subunit proteins are summarized. The physiological and pathophysiological significances are discussed for impacts on cardiac muscle contractility, heart function, and adaptations in health and diseases.

  20. Gene regulation, alternative splicing, and posttranslational modification of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Juan-Juan; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Troponin plays a central role in regulating the contraction and relaxation of vertebrate striated muscles. This review focuses on the isoform gene regulation, alternative RNA splicing, and posttranslational modifications of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations such as phosphorylation and proteolysis modifications, and structure-function relationships of troponin subunit proteins are summarized. The physiological and pathophysiological significances are discussed for impacts on cardiac muscle contractility, heart function, and adaptations in health and diseases.

  1. Effect of cardiac rehabilitation program on exercise capacity in women undergoing coronary artery bypass graft in Hamadan-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Shabani

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions: Women referred for rehabilitation have similar lev-els of compliance and improvement in exercise capacity and sup-ply of oxygen to cardiac muscles (measured by peak myocardial oxygen consumption. After CRP, women demonstrated signifi-cant improvements in exercise duration time, 6MWT, RPP and supply of oxygen to cardiac muscles. CRP can play an important role in improving functional independence in women.

  2. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankad, Rekha; Herrmann, Joerg

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001-0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  3. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Mankad MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series. They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1 thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2 cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3 primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  4. Muscle strain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  5. Cardiac Tamponade Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyarajah, Vignendra; Spodick, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a life-threatening clinical syndrome that requires timely diagnosis. Herein, we present an instructive case of a patient who had cardiac tamponade. The condition went undiagnosed and resulted in the patient's death because almost all of the pathognomonic clinical findings of tamponade were unrecognized or not manifest. To better prepare health care professionals for similar challenges, we discuss the symptoms and clinical signs typical of cardiac tamponade, review the medical literature, and highlight current investigative methods that enable quick, efficient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:17948086

  6. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  7. Virgin birth: engineered heart muscle from parthenogenetic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Sara J; Schneider, Michael D

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac muscle restitution, or true regeneration, is an unmet need in the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), prompting a decade of study with stem cells of many kinds. Among key obstacles to effective cardiac cell grafting are the cost of autologous stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, the ethical implications of using embryonic stem cell (ESC) products, immunological barriers to allogeneic cells, functional maturation beyond just the correct lineage decision, and the lack of durable engraftment. In this issue of the JCI, Didié and colleagues show that cardiomyocytes made from parthenogenetic stem cells (PSCs) and deployed as engineered heart muscle (EHM) may overcome all of these formidable barriers.

  8. Vagal cardiac efferent innervation in F344 rats: Effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2017-03-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), which is a physiological consequence of obstructive sleep apnea, reduces baroreflex control of heart rate (HR). Previously, we showed that the heart rate (HR) response to electrical stimulation of the vagal efferent nerve was significantly increased following CIH in F344 rats. Since vagal cardiac efferent from the nucleus ambiguus (NA) project to cardiac ganglia and regulate HR, we hypothesized that vagal cardiac efferent innervation of cardiac ganglia is reorganized. Young adult F344 rats were exposed either to room air (RA) or to intermittent hypoxia for 35-50days. Fluorescent tracer DiI was injected into the NA to label vagal efferent innervation of cardiac ganglia which had been counterstained by Fluoro-Gold (FG) injections (i.p). Confocal microscopy was used to examine vagal cardiac efferent axons and terminals in cardiac ganglia. NA axons entered cardiac ganglia and innervated principal neurons (PNs) with robust basket endings in both RA control and CIH animals. In addition, the percentage of PNs which were innervated by DiI-labeled fibers in ganglia was similar. In CIH rats, abnormally large swollen cardiac axon segments and disorganized terminals as well as leaky endings were observed. In general, vagal efferent terminal varicosities around PNs appeared larger and the number of varicosities was significantly increased. Interestingly, some cardiac axons had sprouting-like terminal structures in the cardiac ganglia as well as in cardiac muscle, which had not been found in RA control. Finally, CIH increased the size of PNs and reduced the ratio of nucleus to PN somata. Thus, CIH significantly remodeled the structure of vagal cardiac axons and terminals in cardiac ganglia as well as cardiac PNs.

  9. Cardiac elastography: detecting pathological changes in myocardium tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Harrigan, Timothy; Solomon, Scott

    2003-05-01

    Estimation of the mechanical properties of the cardiac muscle has been shown to play a crucial role in the detection of cardiovascular disease. Elastography was recently shown feasible on RF cardiac data in vivo. In this paper, the role of elastography in the detection of ischemia/infarct is explored with simulations and in vivo experiments. In finite-element simulations of a portion of the cardiac muscle containing an infarcted region, the cardiac cycle was simulated with successive compressive and tensile strains ranging between -30% and 20%. The incremental elastic modulus was also mapped uisng adaptive methods. We then demonstrated this technique utilizing envelope-detected sonographic data (Hewlett-Packard Sonos 5500) in a patient with a known myocardial infarction. In cine-loop and M-Mode elastograms from both normal and infarcted regions in simulations and experiments, the infarcted region was identifed by the up to one order of magnitude lower incremental axial displacements and strains, and higher modulus. Information on motion, deformation and mechanical property should constitute a unique tool for noninvasive cardiac diagnosis.

  10. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Singhal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis.

  11. Muscle-directed gene therapy for phenylketonuria (PKU): Development of transgenic mice with muscle-specific phenylalanine hydroxylase expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, C.O.; Messing, A.; Wolff, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an attractive target for gene therapy because of shortcomings in current therapy including lifelong commitment to a difficult and expensive diet, persistent mild cognitive deficits in some children despite adequate dietary therapy, and maternal PKU syndrome. Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is normally expressed only in liver, but we propose to treat PKU by introducing the gene for PAH into muscle. In order to evaluate both the safety and efficacy of this approach, we have a developed a trangenic mouse which expresses PAH in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. The transgene includes promoter and enhancer sequences from the mouse muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene fused to the mouse liver PAH cDNA. Mice which have inherited the transgene are healthy, active, and do not exhibit any signs of muscle weakness or wasting. Ectopic PAH expression in muscle is not detrimental to the health, neurologic function, or reproduction of the mice. Pah{sup enu2} hyperphenylalaninemic mice, a model of human PAH deficiency, bred to carry the transgene have substantial PAH expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle but none in liver. Muscle PAH expression alone does not complement the hyperphenylalaninemic phenotype of Pah{sup enu2} mice. However, administration of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin to transgenic Pah{sup enu2} mice is associated with a 25% mean decrease in serum phenylalanine levels. We predict that ectopic expression of PAH in muscle along with adequate muscle supplies of reduced biopterin cofactor will decrease hyperphenylalaninemia in PKU.

  12. Taurine depletion caused by knocking out the taurine transporter gene leads to cardiomyopathy with cardiac atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi; Kimura, Yasushi; Uozumi, Yoriko; Takai, Mika; Muraoka, Satoko; Matsuda, Takahisa; Ueki, Kei; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Schaffer, Stephen W; Fujio, Yasushi; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-01

    The sulfur-containing beta-amino acid, taurine, is the most abundant free amino acid in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Although its physiological function has not been established, it is thought to play an important role in ion movement, calcium handling, osmoregulation and cytoprotection. To begin examining the physiological function of taurine, we generated taurine transporter- (TauT-) knockout mice (TauTKO), which exhibited a deficiency in myocardial and skeletal muscle taurine content compared with their wild-type littermates. The TauTKO heart underwent ventricular remodeling, characterized by reductions in ventricular wall thickness and cardiac atrophy accompanied with the smaller cardiomyocytes. Associated with the structural changes in the heart was a reduction in cardiac output and increased expression of heart cardiac failure (fetal) marker genes, such as ANP, BNP and beta-MHC. Moreover, ultrastructural damage to the myofilaments and mitochondria was observed. Further, the skeletal muscle of the TauTKO mice also exhibited decreased cell volume, structural defects and a reduction of exercise endurance capacity. Importantly, the expression of Hsp70, ATA2 and S100A4, which are upregulated by osmotic stress, was elevated in both heart and skeletal muscle of the TauTKO mice. Taurine depletion causes cardiomyocyte atrophy, mitochondrial and myofiber damage and cardiac dysfunction, effects likely related to the actions of taurine. Our data suggest that multiple actions of taurine, including osmoregulation, regulation of mitochondrial protein expression and inhibition of apoptosis, collectively ensure proper maintenance of cardiac and skeletal muscular structure and function.

  13. Cardiac Tumors; Tumeurs cardiaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laissy, J.P.; Fernandez, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bichat Claude Bernard, Service d' Imagerie, 76 - Rouen (France); Mousseaux, E. [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Service de Radiologie Cardio Vasculaire et Interventionnelle, 75 - Paris (France); Dacher, J.N. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Charles Nicolle, 75 - Rouen (France); Crochet, D. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Laennec, Centre Hemodynamique, Radiologie Thoracique et Vasculaire, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2004-04-01

    Metastases are the most frequent tumors of the heart even though they seldom are recognized. Most primary cardiac tumors are benign. The main role of imaging is to differentiate a cardiac tumor from thrombus and rare pseudo-tumors: tuberculoma, hydatid cyst. Echocardiography is the fist line imaging technique to detect cardiac tumors, but CT and MRl arc useful for further characterization and differential diagnosis. Myxoma of the left atrium is the most frequent benign cardiac tumor. It usually is pedunculated and sometimes calcified. Sarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant tumor and usually presents as a sessile infiltrative tumor. Lymphoma and metastases are usually recognized by the presence of known tumor elsewhere of by characteristic direct contiguous involvement. Diagnosing primary and secondary pericardial tumors often is difficult. Imaging is valuable for diagnosis, characterization, pre-surgical evaluation and follow-up. (author)

  14. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt;

    2012-01-01

    to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......%. Patients were equally distributed to the SRP and the ERP. No inequality was found in attendance and adherence among referred patients. Conclusions: It seems possible to overcome unequal referral, attendance, and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation by organisation of systematic screening and social......Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality...

  15. Transvenous Temporary Cardiac Pacing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emmanouil Poulidakis; Antonis S Manolis

    2014-01-01

      Transvenous temporary cardiac pacing is a rather old but still contemporary life-saving technique, with a unique value in the treatment of critically ill patients suffering from rhythm disturbances...

  16. Short-term effects of β2-AR blocker ICI 118,551 on sarcoplasmic reticulum SERCA2a and cardiac function of rats with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haibin; Li, Yanfei; Wang, Lei; Lv, Qian; Wang, Xiuli

    2016-09-01

    The study was conducted to examine the effects of ICI 118,551 on the systolic function of cardiac muscle cells of rats in heart failure and determine the molecular mechanism of selective β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) antagonist on these cells. The chronic heart failure model for rats was prepared through abdominal aortic constriction and separate cardiac muscle cells using the collagenase digestion method. The rats were then divided into Sham, HF and HF+ICI 50 nM goups and cultivated for 48 h. β2-AR, Gi/Gs and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) protein expression levels in the cardiac muscle cells were evaluated by western blotting and changes in the systolic function of cardiac muscle cells based on the boundary detection system of contraction dynamics for individual cells was measured. The results showed that compared with the Sham group, the survival rate, percentage of basic contraction and maximum contraction amplitude percentage of cardiac muscle cells with heart failure decreased, Gi protein expression increased while Gs and SERCA2a protein expression decreased. Compared with the HF group, the maximum contraction amplitude percentage of cardiac muscle cells in group HF+ICI 50 nM decreased, the Gi protein expression level increased while the SERCA2a protein expression level decreased. Following the stimulation of Ca(2+) and ISO, the maximum contraction amplitude percentage of cardiac muscle cells in the HF+ICI 50 nM group was lower than that in group HF. This indicated that ICI 118,551 has negative inotropic effects on cardiac muscle cells with heart failure, which may be related to Gi protein. Systolic function of cardiac muscle cells with heart failure can therefore be reduced by increasing Gi protein expression and lowering SERCA2a protein expression.

  17. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  18. Cardiac imaging in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  19. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targe...

  20. Port Access Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganó, Mario; Minzioni, Gaetano; Spreafico, Patrizio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Pasquino, Stefano; Ceriana, Piero; Locatelli, Alessandro

    2000-10-01

    The port-access technique for cardiac surgery was recently developed at Stanford University in California as a less invasive method to perform some cardiac operations. The port-access system has been described in detail elsewhere. It is based on femoral arterial and venous access for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and on the adoption of a specially designed triple-lumen catheter described originally by Peters, and subsequently modified and developed in the definitive configuration called the endoaortic clamp.

  1. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  2. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery, i...... on the coronary vessels, with cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial exudate. In the lighter cases, PCIS may be treated with NSAID and, in the more severe cases, with systemic glucocorticoid which has a prompt effect....

  3. Infected cardiac hydatid cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Ceviz, M; Becit, N; Kocak, H.

    2001-01-01

    A 24 year old woman presented with chest pain and palpitation. The presence of a semisolid mass—an echinococcal cyst or tumour—in the left ventricular apex was diagnosed by echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The infected cyst was seen at surgery. The cyst was removed successfully by using cardiopulmonary bypass with cross clamp.


Keywords: cardiac hydatid cyst; infected cardiac hydatid cyst

  4. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics.

  5. Exercises in anatomy: cardiac isomerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert H; Sarwark, Anne E; Spicer, Diane E; Backer, Carl L

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that the patients with the most complex cardiac malformations are those with so-called visceral heterotaxy. At present, it remains a fact that most investigators segregate these patients on the basis of their splenic anatomy, describing syndromes of so-called asplenia and polysplenia. It has also been known for quite some time, nonetheless, that the morphology of the tracheobronchial tree is usually isomeric in the setting of heterotaxy. And it has been shown that the isomerism found in terms of bronchial arrangement correlates in a better fashion with the cardiac anatomy than does the presence of multiple spleens, or the absence of any splenic tissue. In this exercise in anatomy, we use hearts from the Idriss archive of Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago to demonstrate the isomeric features found in the hearts obtained from patients known to have had heterotaxy. We first demonstrate the normal arrangements, showing how it is the extent of the pectinate muscles in the atrial appendages relative to the atrioventricular junctions that distinguishes between morphologically right and left atrial chambers. We also show the asymmetry of the normal bronchial tree, and the relationships of the first bronchial branches to the pulmonary arteries supplying the lower lobes of the lungs. We then demonstrate that diagnosis of multiple spleens requires the finding of splenic tissue on either side of the dorsal mesogastrium. Turning to hearts obtained from patients with heterotaxy, we illustrate isomeric right and left atrial appendages. We emphasize that it is only the appendages that are universally isomeric, but point out that other features support the notion of cardiac isomerism. We then show that description also requires a full account of veno-atrial connections, since these can seemingly be mirror-imaged when the arrangement within the heart is one of isomerism of the atrial appendages. We show how failure to recognize the presence of such isomeric

  6. Evaluation of myocardial viability with cardiac PET before and after CABG and the study of hibernating myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Shigeru [Kanazawa Medical Univ., Uchinada, Ishikawa (Japan); Seki, Hiroyasu

    1997-09-01

    This study included 28 patients in whom graft patency after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) was confirmed by coronary angiography. Diagnosis included angina pectoris following myocardial infarction and severe angina pectoris accompanied by stenosis at the left main trunk region or lesion involving multiple branches. As a rule, cardiac PET ({sup 13}NH{sub 3}, {sup 18}FDG) was performed in fasted patients before and 1 to 2 months after surgery. Myocardial blood flow and glucose metabolism in the bypass site were mainly investigated. Furthermore, {sup 201}Tl-SPECT was concurrently performed. The effect of CABG was examined by the two procedures, and redistribution was compared between PET and {sup 201}Tl-SPECT. Preoperative PET with {sup 13}NH{sub 3} revealed reduced blood flow in the ischemic site in all patients. However, preoperative {sup 201}Tl-SPECT showed redistribution in 16 (57.1%) of 28 patients, while there was no redistribution in 12 patients (42.9%). In 10 (83.3%) of 12 patients evaluated as having no myocardial viability on {sup 201}Tl-SPECT, PET showed accumulation of {sup 18}FDG. However, in 21 (75%) of 28 patients, accumulation of {sup 18}FDG was reduced postoperatively, suggesting improvement of aerobic metabolism in cardiac muscle. These patients also showed improvement in regional wall motion. The energy source of cardiac muscle consists mainly of free fatty acid and glucose. Fasting healthy cardiac muscle depends on fatty acid for approximately 60% of its energy source. However, ischemic cardiac muscle depends on the glycolytic system, utilizing glucose. Progression of ischemia causes myocardial necrosis without metabolism. Therefore, ischemic cardiac muscle can be differentiated from infarcted cardiac muscle by cardiac PET. We evaluated myocardial viability before and after CABG for ischemic heart disease, and confirmed that cardiac PET is more useful than standard myocardial scan with {sup 201}Tl for evaluating myocardial viability. (K.H.)

  7. [Psychosomatic aspects of cardiac arrhythmias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, Martin; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2010-07-01

    Emotional stress facilitates the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. The prevalence of anxiety and depression is increased in cardiac patients as compared to the normal population. The risk of cardiovascular mortality is enhanced in patients suffering from depression. Comorbid anxiety disorders worsen the course of cardiac arrhythmias. Disturbance of neurocardiac regulation with predominance of the sympathetic tone is hypothesized to be causative for this. The emotional reaction to cardiac arrhythmias is differing to a large extent between individuals. Emotional stress may result from coping with treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias may influence each other in the sense of a vicious circle. Somatoform cardiac arrhythmias are predominantly of psychogenic origin. Instrumental measures and frequent contacts between physicians and patients may facilitate disease chronification. The present review is dealing with the multifaceted relationships between cardiac arrhythmias and emotional stress. The underlying mechanisms and corresponding treatment modalities are discussed.

  8. A novel association of biventricular cardiac noncompaction and diabetic embryopathy: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jennifer S; Perez-Rosendahl, Mari; Haydel, Dana; Perens, Gregory; Fishbein, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic embryopathy refers to a constellation of congenital malformations arising in the setting of poorly controlled maternal diabetes mellitus. Cardiac abnormalities are the most frequently observed findings, with a 5-fold risk over normal pregnancies. Although a diverse spectrum of cardiac defects has been documented, cardiac noncompaction morphology has not been associated with this syndrome. In this report, we describe a novel case of biventricular cardiac noncompaction in a neonate of a diabetic mother. The patient was a late preterm female with right anotia, caudal dysgenesis, multiple cardiac septal and aortic arch defects, and biventricular cardiac noncompaction. Examination of both ventricles demonstrated spongy myocardium with increased myocardial trabeculation greater than 50% left ventricular thickness and greater than 75% right ventricular thickness, with hypoplasia of the bilateral papillary muscles, consistent with noncompaction morphology. Review of the literature highlights the importance of gene expression and epigenomic regulation in cardiac embryogenesis.

  9. Cardiac neural crest contributes to cardiomyogenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mariko; Yost, H Joseph

    2003-05-01

    In birds and mammals, cardiac neural crest is essential for heart development and contributes to conotruncal cushion formation and outflow tract septation. The zebrafish prototypical heart lacks outflow tract septation, raising the question of whether cardiac neural crest exists in zebrafish. Here, results from three distinct lineage-labeling approaches identify zebrafish cardiac neural crest cells and indicate that these cells have the ability to generate MF20-positive muscle cells in the myocardium of the major chambers during development. Fate-mapping demonstrates that cardiac neural crest cells originate both from neural tube regions analogous to those found in birds, as well as from a novel region rostral to the otic vesicle. In contrast to other vertebrates, cardiac neural crest invades the myocardium in all segments of the heart, including outflow tract, atrium, atrioventricular junction, and ventricle in zebrafish. Three distinct groups of premigratory neural crest along the rostrocaudal axis have different propensities to contribute to different segments in the heart and are correspondingly marked by unique combinations of gene expression patterns. Zebrafish will serve as a model for understanding interactions between cardiac neural crest and cardiovascular development.

  10. T3 and cardiac myocyte cell: a theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasios, Tsatsaris; Antonios, Baldoukas; Antonios, Loumousiotis; Eustathios, Koukounaris; Maria, Giota; Despina, Perrea

    2013-08-01

    In the last decades, the outstanding role of Thyroid gland in regulating both physiological and pathological operation of cardiovascular system has been acknowledged worldwide. Three main domains of Thyroid function, that is to say, euthyroidism -hyperthyroidism-hypothyroidism, have a direct impact on cardiac response through a variety of mechanisms. Cellular pathways mediate in cardiac contractility, cardiac output, cardiac rhythm, arterial blood pressure and peripheral vessel resistance. Particular biochemical algorithms exist not only between Thyroid hormones' serum concentration and thyroid gland but also between the hormones' serum level and heart muscle genes. These biochemical pathways primarily regulate the appropriate secretion of levothyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine(T3) via Thyroid- Stimulating-Hormone(TSH) pituitary system, and secondly adjust the cardiac function. In this study, a mathematic model has been developed describing significant aspects of positive or negative feedback mechanisms of THYRO-CARDIAC (THY-CAR) system along with potential applications of novel up-to-date patents in this area of research.

  11. Sarcopenia, cachexia, and muscle performance in heart failure: Review update 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Masakazu; Ishida, Junichi; Doehner, Wolfram; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Markus S; Coats, Andrew J S; Anker, Stefan D; Springer, Jochen

    2017-07-01

    Cachexia in the context of heart failure (HF) has been termed cardiac cachexia, and represents a progressive involuntary weight loss. Cachexia is mainly the result of an imbalance in the homeostasis of muscle protein synthesis and degradation due to a lower activity of protein synthesis pathways and an over-activation of protein degradation. In addition, muscle wasting leads to of impaired functional capacity, even after adjusting for clinical relevant variables in patients with HF. However, there is no sufficient therapeutic strategy in muscle wasting in HF patients and very few studies in animal models. Exercise training represents a promising intervention that can prevent or even reverse the process of muscle wasting, and worsening the muscle function and performance in HF with muscle wasting and cachexia. The pathological mechanisms and effective therapeutic approach of cardiac cachexia remain uncertain, because of the difficulty to establish animal cardiac cachexia models, thus novel animal models are warranted. Furthermore, the use of improved animal models will lead to a better understanding of the pathways that modulate muscle wasting and therapeutics of muscle wasting of cardiac cachexia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Intrapericardial capsaicin and bradykinin induce different cardiac-somatic and cardiovascular reflexes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Qi; Han, Man; Du, Jianqing

    2016-07-01

    Patients with myocardial infarction experience various types of chest pain and autonomic disturbance symptoms. Studies in rats have shown that pericardial infusions of certain chemicals induce cardiac-related muscle pain and cardiovascular reflexes. In the present study, bradykinin or capsaicin was injected into the pericardial sac and the resulting cardiac-somatic reflexes and blood pressure (BP) alterations were record. We found that the cardiac-somatic reflex induced by bradykinin had a longer latency, shorter duration, and lower firing rate than that induced by capsaicin (preflex induced by bradykinin (p>0.05) but reduced the reflex induced by capsaicin (p0.05). These results suggest that bradykinin and capsaicin activate different pathways to induce cardiac-somatic and cardiovascular reflexes and that the vagus nerve is involved in TRPV1-related muscle pain modulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Missense mutations in desmin associated with familial cardiac and skeletal myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, L G; Park, K Y; Cervenáková, L; Gorokhova, S; Lee, H S; Vasconcelos, O; Nagle, J W; Semino-Mora, C; Sivakumar, K; Dalakas, M C

    1998-08-01

    Desmin-related myopathy (OMIM 601419) is a familial disorder characterized by skeletal muscle weakness associated with cardiac conduction blocks, arrhythmias and restrictive heart failure, and by intracytoplasmic accumulation of desmin-reactive deposits in cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. The underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. Involvement of the desmin gene (DES) has been excluded in three families diagnosed with desmin-related myopathy. We report two new families with desmin-related cardioskeletal myopathy associated with mutations in the highly conserved carboxy-terminal end of the desmin rod domain. A heterozygous A337P mutation was identified in a family with an adult-onset skeletal myopathy and mild cardiac involvement. Compound heterozygosity for two other mutations, A360P and N393I, was detected in a second family characterized by childhood-onset aggressive course of cardiac and skeletal myopathy.

  14. Coiled fiber scaffolds embedded with gold nanoparticles improve the performance of engineered cardiac tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shevach, Michal; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2014-07-01

    Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold.Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00300d

  15. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  16. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    NASA seeks to transfer the NASA developed microwave ablation technology, designed for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (irregular heart beat), to industry. After a heart attack, many cells surrounding the resulting scar continue to live but are abnormal electrically; they may conduct impulses unusually slowly or fire when they would typically be silent. These diseased areas might disturb smooth signaling by forming a reentrant circuit in the muscle. The objective of microwave ablation is to heat and kill these diseased cells to restore appropriate electrical activity in the heart. This technology is a method and apparatus that provides for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In comparison with other methods that involve direct-current pulses or radio frequencies below 1 GHz, this method may prove more effective in treating ventricular tachycardia. This is because the present method provides for greater control of the location, cross-sectional area, and depth of a lesion via selection of the location and design of the antenna and the choice of microwave power and frequency.

  17. Potential of cardiac stem/progenitor cells and induced pluripotent stem cells for cardiac repair in ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei Eric; Chen, Xiongwen; Houser, Steven R; Zeng, Chunyu

    2013-10-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising strategy for cardiac and vascular repair. The ultimate goal is to rebuild functional myocardium by transplanting exogenous stem cells or by activating native stem cells to induce endogenous repair. CS/PCs (cardiac stem/progenitor cells) are one type of adult stem cell with the potential to differentiate into cardiac lineages (cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells). iPSCs (induced pluripotent stem cells) also have the capacity to differentiate into necessary cells to rebuild injured cardiac tissue. Both types of stem cells have brought promise for cardiac repair. The present review summarizes recent advances in cardiac cell therapy based on these two cell sources and discusses the advantages and limitations of each candidate. We conclude that, although both types of stem cells can be considered for autologous transplantation with promising outcomes in animal models, CS/PCs have advanced more in their clinical application because iPSCs and their derivatives possess inherent obstacles for clinical use. Further studies are needed to move cell therapy forward for the treatment of heart disease.

  18. Muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey; Phillips, Lauren; Trivedi, Jaya R

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare heterogeneous diseases with marked genotypic and phenotypic variability. Despite advances in understanding of the molecular pathology of these disorders, the diverse phenotypic manifestations remain a challenge in diagnosis and therapeutics. These disorders can cause lifetime disability and affect quality of life. There is no treatment of these disorders approved by the US Food and Drug Administration at this time. Recognition and treatment of symptoms might reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. This article summarizes the clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies, pathophysiology, and treatment options in nondystrophic myotonia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, and periodic paralyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... for the situation at hand. Due to challenging circumstances, the cost assessment turned out to be ex-post and top-down. RESULTS: Cost per treatment sequence is estimated to be approximately euro 976, whereas the incremental cost (compared with usual care) is approximately euro 682. The cost estimate is uncertain...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  20. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  1. Toothache of cardiac origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, M; Okeson, J P

    1999-01-01

    Pain referred to the orofacial structures can sometimes be a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. In some instances, a patient may complain of tooth pain that is completely unrelated to any dental source. This poses a diagnostic and therapeutic problem for the dentist. Cardiac pain most commonly radiates to the left arm, shoulder, neck, and face. In rare instances, angina pectoris may present as dental pain. When this occurs, an improper diagnosis frequently leads to unnecessary dental treatment or, more significantly, a delay of proper treatment. This delay may result in the patient experiencing an acute myocardial infarction. It is the dentist's responsibility to establish a proper diagnosis so that the treatment will be directed toward the source of pain and not to the site of pain. This article reviews the literature concerning referred pain of cardiac origin and presents a case report of toothache of cardiac origin.

  2. Expiratory muscle loading increases intercostal muscle blood flow during leg exercise in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Andrianopoulos, Vasilis; Roussos, Charis; Zakynthinos, Spyros

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether expiratory muscle loading induced by the application of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) during exercise in healthy subjects causes a reduction in quadriceps muscle blood flow in favor of the blood flow to the intercostal muscles. We hypothesized that, during exercise with EFL quadriceps muscle blood flow would be reduced, whereas intercostal muscle blood flow would be increased compared with exercise without EFL. We initially performed an incremental exercise test on eight healthy male subjects with a Starling resistor in the expiratory line limiting expiratory flow to ∼ 1 l/s to determine peak EFL exercise workload. On a different day, two constant-load exercise trials were performed in a balanced ordering sequence, during which subjects exercised with or without EFL at peak EFL exercise workload for 6 min. Intercostal (probe over the 7th intercostal space) and vastus lateralis muscle blood flow index (BFI) was calculated by near-infrared spectroscopy using indocyanine green, whereas cardiac output (CO) was measured by an impedance cardiography technique. At exercise termination, CO and stroke volume were not significantly different during exercise, with or without EFL (CO: 16.5 vs. 15.2 l/min, stroke volume: 104 vs. 107 ml/beat). Quadriceps muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (5.4 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.043) lower compared with exercise without EFL (7.6 nM/s), whereas intercostal muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (3.5 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.021) greater compared with that recorded during control exercise (0.4 nM/s). In conclusion, increased respiratory muscle loading during exercise in healthy humans causes an increase in blood flow to the intercostal muscles and a concomitant decrease in quadriceps muscle blood flow. PMID:20507965

  3. 超声斑点追踪技术评价慢性心力衰竭患者左室心肌应变的价值%Assessment the values of cardiac muscle strain in long axis of left ventricular in patients with chronic heart failure by speckle tracking imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许继梅; 郑慧; 张婧姝; 解欣欣; 靳鹏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To obverse two-dimensional strain changes of regional and global cardiac muscle in long axis of left ventricle( LV )in patients with chronic heart failure( CHF )using speckle tracking imaging( STI ),in order to asses the characteristics of LV systolic dyssynchrony and LV systolic function in patients with CHF. Methods The images of echocardiographic examinations were performed in 30 chronic heart failure patients verified by clinical diagnosis and 30 normal control subjects from apical long axis chamber,4 chamber and 2 chamber views of three consecutive cardiac cycles were acquired. Analyzed these images using a software of GE Echo PAC PC SW-Only , these parameters included peak systolic strain , its time to peak from each segment, global longitudinal peak systolic strain (GSL )and average global strain( GSL-Avg )from each view were measured in control and CHF group. As well as time-strain curves from each view and segment and 18 segments strain Bull-Eyes pie were obtained. Meanwhile . LV ejection fraction( EF )was calculated through real time tri-plane LV volume rule. Results The parameters S of each segment and GSL of each view in CHF patients were significantly lower than those of controls( P < 0. 05 ). There were a high correlation between EF and GSL-Avg( r =0. 89 ). Time to peak longitudinal strain in most LV segments 14/18 )in CHF were significantly advanced than that of controls( P < 0. 05 ). The maximum difference of time to peak systolic longitudinal strain among 18 segments was enlarged in CHF group( P<0. 05 ). Patients with CHF had impaired LV systolic function and resulted in LV dyssynchrony. Conclusion STI may measure quantitatively strain of regional and global cardiac muscle in long axis of LV. LV systolic dyssynchrony and correlation between EF and GSL-Avg in CHF were evaluated exactly using STI echocardiography.%目的 应用超声斑点追踪成像技术观察慢性心力衰竭(CHF)患者左心室长轴各节段心肌及整体心

  4. The cardiac anxiety questionnaire: cross-validation among cardiac inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, M.H. van; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Deelen, F.M. van; Balkom, A.J. van; Pop, G.A.; Speckens, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: General anxiety symptoms are common in patients with cardiac disease and considered to have an adverse effect on cardiac prognosis. The role of specific cardiac anxiety, however, is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the D

  5. THE CARDIAC ANXIETY QUESTIONNAIRE : CROSS-VALIDATION AMONG CARDIAC INPATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M. H. C. T.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude; van Deelen, F. M.; van Balkom, A. J. L. M.; Pop, G.; Speckens, A. E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: General anxiety symptoms are common in patients with cardiac disease and considered to have an adverse effect on cardiac prognosis. The role of specific cardiac anxiety, however, is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the D

  6. Tai Chi as an adjunct to cardiac rehabilitation exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E

    2003-01-01

    Heart disease is a chronic condition needing lifetime secondary prevention measures to decrease morbidity and mortality, and to improve quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation exercise training, one aspect of cardiac recovery, traditionally includes some form of aerobic fitness and, more recently, muscle strength training to improve exercise tolerance. Tai chi, widely practiced in China for centuries, is a popular form of exercise among older Chinese persons associated with enhanced well-being and health among traditional Chinese practitioners. Recent research has reported improvement in cardiorespiratory function, balance and postural stability, fall prevention, and stress reduction. A review of the literature suggests potential benefits from tai chi exercise performed as an adjunct to cardiac rehabilitation exercise training. Tai chi is cost-effective and facilitates a lifestyle of health-related behavior practices.

  7. Hearts of dystonia musculorum mice display normal morphological and histological features but show signs of cardiac stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin G Boyer

    Full Text Available Dystonin is a giant cytoskeletal protein belonging to the plakin protein family and is believed to crosslink the major filament systems in contractile cells. Previous work has demonstrated skeletal muscle defects in dystonin-deficient dystonia musculorum (dt mice. In this study, we show that the dystonin muscle isoform is localized at the Z-disc, the H zone, the sarcolemma and intercalated discs in cardiac tissue. Based on this localization pattern, we tested whether dystonin-deficiency leads to structural defects in cardiac muscle. Desmin intermediate filament, microfilament, and microtubule subcellular organization appeared normal in dt hearts. Nevertheless, increased transcript levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF, 66% beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC, 95% and decreased levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump isoform 2A (SERCA2a, 26%, all signs of cardiac muscle stress, were noted in dt hearts. Hearts from two-week old dt mice were assessed for the presence of morphological and histological alterations. Heart to body weight ratios as well as left ventricular wall thickness and left chamber volume measurements were similar between dt and wild-type control mice. Hearts from dt mice also displayed no signs of fibrosis or calcification. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the intricate structure of the sarcomere by situating dystonin in cardiac muscle fibers and suggest that dystonin does not significantly influence the structural organization of cardiac muscle fibers during early postnatal development.

  8. Effect of beta blockade on exercise response after cardiac transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bexton, R S; Milne, J R; Cory-Pearce, R; English, T A; Camm, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six cardiac transplant recipients underwent maximal exercise testing before and after the administration of intravenous propranolol to assess the effect of beta blockade on their exercise heart rate response and exercise capacity. Before propranolol the patients were capable of a mean of 6.8 minutes of exercise and heart rate increased from a resting value of 102 +/- 25 a minute to 138 +/- 34 at peak exercise--a mean increase of 35%. All tests were terminated because of tiredness or muscle we...

  9. HHF35, a muscle-actin-specific monoclonal antibody. I. Immunocytochemical and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, T; Tippens, D; Gordon, D; Ross, R; Gown, A M

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to muscle cell actin isotypes was produced and characterized. Immunocytochemical analysis of methanol-Carnoy's-fixed, paraffin-embedded human tissue revealed that this antibody, termed HHF35, reacts with skeletal muscle cells, cardiac muscle cells, smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and myoepithelial cells, but is nonreactive with endothelial, epithelial, neural, or connective tissue cells. When assayed by indirect immunofluorescence, HHF35 reacts with microfilament bundles from various cultured mammalian smooth muscle cells, but does not react with cultured human dermal fibroblasts or various epithelial tumor cell lines. In one-dimensional gel electrophoresis immunoblot experiments this antibody detects a 42-kd polypeptide from tissue extracts of uterus, ileum, aorta, diaphragm, and heart and extract from smooth muscle cells. The antibody also reacts with a comigrating 42-kd band of highly purified rabbit skeletal muscle actin. HHF35 is nonreactive on immunoblots of extracts from all tested nonmuscle cell extracts. Immunoelectrophoresis followed by immunoblotting performed in the presence of urea and reducing agents reveals recognition of the alpha isoelectrophoretic variant of actin from skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle sources and of the gamma variant from smooth muscle sources. Because HHF35 reacts with virtually all muscle cells, it will be useful as a marker for muscle and muscle-derived cells.

  10. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  11. Cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Möller Petrun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developments in the measuring of cardiac output and other haemodynamic variables are focused on the so-called minimally invasive methods. The aim of these methods is to simplify the management of high-risk and haemodynamically unstable patients. Due to the need of invasive approach and the possibility of serious complications the use of pulmonary artery catheter has decreased. This article describes the methods for measuring cardiac output, which are based on volume measurement (Fick method, indicator dilution method, pulse wave analysis, Doppler effect, and electrical bioimpedance.

  12. Rocuronium as muscle relaxant for electroconvulsive therapy in a patient with adult-onset muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Ethan O; Aloysi, Amy S; Katz, Maya; Popeo, Dennis; Kellner, Charles H

    2011-12-01

    Adult-onset muscular dystrophy is an inherited myopathy characterized by a variable degree of progressive muscle weakness and degeneration. Although not usually fatal, significant muscle weakness results in an up-regulation of acetylcholine receptors on the less responsive postjunctional muscles. The resulting profound potassium release when these receptors are stimulated by the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine can result in potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias. We report a case of electroconvulsive therapy safely administered in a 61-year-old man with adult-onset muscular dystrophy requiring muscle relaxation with rocuronium.

  13. [Myotonia and cardiac conduction defects in myotonic dystrophy and defect in ion channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tomoya; Nakamori, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masanori P

    2014-03-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), the most common hereditary muscle disease in adults, is caused by the unstable genomic expansion of simple sequence repeats. This disease is characterized by myotonia and various multisystemic complications, most commonly those of the cardiac, endocrine, and central nervous systems. The cardiac abnormalities, especially cardiac conduction defects, significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality in DM patients. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of cardiac conduction defects in DM is important. The pathomechanism of DM has been thoroughly investigated. The mutant RNA transcripts containing the expanded repeat give rise to a toxic gain-of-function by perturbing splicing factors in the nucleus, leading to the misregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. In particular, several studies, including ours, have shown that myotonia is caused by alternative splicing of the CLCN1 gene coding the voltage-gated chloride channel in skeletal muscle through an "RNA-dominant mechanism". Since the aberrantly spliced isoform does not seem to form a functional channel, the feature of skeletal muscle in DM can be interpreted as a "channelopathy" caused by reduced chloride channel protein. Similarly, we recently identified a misregulation of alternative splicing in an ion channel gene which is known to be responsible for arrhythmic disease showing Mendelian inheritance. Here, we review the cardiac manifestation and RNA-dominant mechanism of DM, and discuss the possible pathophysiology of cardiac conduction defects by referring to hereditary arrhythmic diseases, such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome.

  14. Slow-Adhering Stem Cells Derived from Injured Skeletal Muscle Have Improved Regenerative Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM); Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA] supplemented with 10% horse serum, 20% fetal bo- vine serum, 0.5% chicken embryo...also transplanted into dystrophic muscle of MDX/SCID mice to observe the progress of muscle regeneration. At 3 weeks after trans- plantation , SASCs from...fac- tor, angiogenesis, and cardiac repair after muscle stem cell trans- plantation into ischemic hearts. J Am Coll Cardiol 2007, 50:1677– 1684 13

  15. Perioperative management of cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresti, N A; Malik, A A; Ihsan, K M; Aftab, S M E; Khan, W S

    2014-01-01

    Pre-existing cardiac disease contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality amongst patients undergoing non cardiac surgery. Patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or with risk factors for it, have as much as a 3.9% risk of suffering a major perioperative cardiac event (Lee et al 1999, Devereaux 2005). Furthermore, the incidence of perioperative myocardial infarction (MI) is increased 10 to 50 fold in patients with previous coronary events (Jassal 2008).

  16. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  17. Muscle strain treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  18. Signaling pathways in failing human heart muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, H; Hasenfuss, G; Holubarsch, C

    1997-07-01

    Experimental studies have delineated important signaling pathways in cardiomyocytes and their alterations in heart failure; however, there is now evidence that these observations are not necessarily applicable to human cardiac muscle cells. For example, angiotensin II (A II) does not exert positive inotropic effects in human ventricular muscle cells, in contrast to observation in rats. Thus, it is important to elucidate cardiac signaling pathways in humans in order to appreciate the functional role of neurohumoral or mechanical stimulation in human myocardium in health and disease. In the present article, we review signal pathways in the failing human heart based on studies in human cardiac tissues and in vivo physiological studies related to A II, nitric oxide, and β-adrenergic stimulation. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997; 7:151-160). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  19. Behavior of cardiac variables in animals exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Alberto Rupp de Paiva

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the behavior of cardiac variables in animals exposed to cigarette smoke. METHODS: Two groups of Wistar rats were studied as follows: control group (C, comprising 28 animals; and smoking group (S, comprising 23 animals exposed to cigarette smoke for 30 days. Left ventricular cardiac function was assessed in vivo with transthoracic echocardiography, and myocardial performance was analyzed in vitro in preparations of isolated left ventricular papillary muscle. The cardiac muscle was assessed in isometric contractions with an extracellular calcium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L. RESULTS: No statistical difference was observed in the values of the body variables of the rats and in the mechanical data obtained from the papillary muscle between the control and smoking groups. The values of left ventricular systolic diameter were significantly greater in the smoking animals than in the control animals (C= 3.39 ± 0.4 mm and S= 3.71 ± 0.51 mm, P=0.02. A significant reduction was observed in systolic shortening fraction (C= 56.7 ± 4.2% and S= 53.5 ± 5.3%, P=0.02 and in ejection fraction (C= 0.92 ± 0.02 and S= 0.89 ± 0.04, P=0.01. CONCLUSION: The rats exposed to cigarette smoke had a reduction in left ventricular systolic function, although their myocardial function was preserved.

  20. Deletion of Galgt2 (B4Galnt2) Reduces Muscle Growth in Response to Acute Injury and Increases Muscle Inflammation and Pathology in Dystrophin-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Singhal, Neha; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Joshi, Mandar; Bauer, John A.; Janssen, Paulus M.L.; Martin, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic overexpression of Galgt2 (official name B4Galnt2) in skeletal muscle stimulates the glycosylation of α dystroglycan (αDG) and the up-regulation of laminin α2 and dystrophin surrogates known to inhibit muscle pathology in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophy 1A and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Skeletal muscle Galgt2 gene expression is also normally increased in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy compared with the wild-type mice. To assess whether this increased endogenous Galgt2 expression could affect disease, we quantified muscular dystrophy measures in mdx mice deleted for Galgt2 (Galgt2−/−mdx). Galgt2−/− mdx mice had increased heart and skeletal muscle pathology and inflammation, and also worsened cardiac function, relative to age-matched mdx mice. Deletion of Galgt2 in wild-type mice also slowed skeletal muscle growth in response to acute muscle injury. In each instance where Galgt2 expression was elevated (developing muscle, regenerating muscle, and dystrophic muscle), Galgt2-dependent glycosylation of αDG was also increased. Overexpression of Galgt2 failed to inhibit skeletal muscle pathology in dystroglycan-deficient muscles, in contrast to previous studies in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles. This study demonstrates that Galgt2 gene expression and glycosylation of αDG are dynamically regulated in muscle and that endogenous Galgt2 gene expression can ameliorate the extent of muscle pathology, inflammation, and dysfunction in mdx mice. PMID:26435413

  1. Data analysis in cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Pedrón-Torecilla, Jorge; Hernández, Ismael; Liberos, Alejandro; Climent, Andreu M; Guillem, María S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an increasingly present in developed countries and represent a major health and economic burden. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is closely linked to the electrical function of the heart. Consequently, the analysis of the electrical signal generated by the heart tissue, either recorded invasively or noninvasively, provides valuable information for the study of cardiac arrhythmias. In this chapter, novel cardiac signal analysis techniques that allow the study and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias are described, with emphasis on cardiac mapping which allows for spatiotemporal analysis of cardiac signals.Cardiac mapping can serve as a diagnostic tool by recording cardiac signals either in close contact to the heart tissue or noninvasively from the body surface, and allows the identification of cardiac sites responsible of the development or maintenance of arrhythmias. Cardiac mapping can also be used for research in cardiac arrhythmias in order to understand their mechanisms. For this purpose, both synthetic signals generated by computer simulations and animal experimental models allow for more controlled physiological conditions and complete access to the organ.

  2. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...

  3. Cardiac troponins and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Michael J; Jarolim, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Measurement of circulating cardiac troponins I and T has become integral to the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. This article discusses the structure and function of the troponin complex and the release of cardiac troponin molecules from the injured cardiomyocyte into the circulation. An overview of current cardiac troponin assays and their classification according to sensitivity is presented. The diagnostic criteria, role, and usefulness of cardiac troponin for myocardial infarction are discussed. In addition, several examples are given of the usefulness of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays for short-term and long-term prediction of adverse events.

  4. Voltage-Independent Calcium Release in Heart Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggli, Ernst; Lederer, W. Jonathan

    1990-10-01

    The Ca2+ that activates contraction in heart muscle is regulated as in skeletal muscle by processes that depend on voltage and intracellular Ca2+ and involve a positive feedback system. How the initial electrical signal is amplified in heart muscle has remained controversial, however. Analogous protein structures from skeletal muscle and heart muscle have been identified physiologically and sequenced; these include the Ca2+ channel of the sarcolemma and the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although the parallels found in cardiac and skeletal muscles have provoked valuable experiments in both tissues, separation of the effects of voltage and intracellular Ca2+ on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in heart muscle has been imperfect. With the use of caged Ca2+ and flash photolysis in voltage-clamped heart myocytes, effects of membrane potential in heart muscle cells on Ca2+ release from intracellular stores have been studied. Unlike the response in skeletal muscle, voltage across the sarcolemma of heart muscle does not affect the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that other regulatory processes are needed to control Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release.

  5. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses of cardiac troponin T during cardiac development in the Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Pietras, K M; Sferrazza, G F; Jia, P; Athauda, G; Rueda-de-Leon, E; Rveda-de-Leon, E; Maier, J A; Dube, D K; Lemanski, S L; Lemanski, L F

    2007-01-01

    The Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, is an excellent animal model for studying heart development because it carries a naturally occurring recessive genetic mutation, designated gene c, for cardiac nonfunction. The double recessive mutants (c/c) fail to form organized myofibrils in the cardiac myoblasts resulting in hearts that fail to beat. Tropomyosin expression patterns have been studied in detail and show dramatically decreased expression in the hearts of homozygous mutant embryos. Because of the direct interaction between tropomyosin and troponin T (TnT), and the crucial functions of TnT in the regulation of striated muscle contraction, we have expanded our studies on this animal model to characterize the expression of the TnT gene in cardiac muscle throughout normal axolotl development as well as in mutant axolotls. In addition, we have succeeded in cloning the full-length cardiac troponin T (cTnT) cDNA from axolotl hearts. Confocal microscopy has shown a substantial, but reduced, expression of TnT protein in the mutant hearts when compared to normal during embryonic development.

  6. Digoxin activates sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-release channels: a possible role in cardiac inotropy.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of digoxin on rapid 45Ca2+ efflux from cardiac and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles was investigated. Additionally the interaction of digoxin with single cardiac and skeletal muscle SR Ca(2+)-release channels incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers and held under voltage clamp was determined. 2. Digoxin (1 nM) increased the initial rate and amount of Ca(2+)-induced release of 45Ca2+ from cardiac SR vesicles, passively loaded with 45CaCl2, at an extravesicular...

  7. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasser; Mahrous; Fouad; Reem; Yehia

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases

  8. The cardiac malpositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2011-11-01

    Dextrocardia was known in the 17th century and was 1 of the first congenital malformations of the heart to be recognized. Fifty years elapsed before Matthew Baillie published his account of complete transposition in a human of the thoracic and abdominal viscera to the opposite side from what is natural. In 1858, Thomas Peacock stated that "the heart may be congenitally misplaced in various ways, occupying either an unusual position within the thorax, or being situated external to that cavity." In 1915, Maude Abbott described ectopia cordis, and Richard Paltauf's remarkable illustrations distinguished the various types of dextrocardia. In 1928, the first useful classification of the cardiac malpositions was proposed, and in 1966, Elliott et al's radiologic classification set the stage for clinical recognition. The first section of this review deals with the 3 basic cardiac malpositions in the presence of bilateral asymmetry. The second section deals with cardiac malpositions in the presence of bilateral left-sidedness or right-sidedness. Previous publications on cardiac malpositions are replete with an arcane vocabulary that confounds rather than clarifies. Even if the terms themselves are understood, inherent complexity weighs against clarity. This review was designed as a guided tour of an unfamiliar subject.

  9. Sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Valenzuela, Antonio Jesus Sanchez; Lachica, E

    1992-01-01

    The study deals with the comparison of morphological, histochemical and biochemical methods applied to the detection of myocardial infarction in 150 medico-legal autopsies performed at the Institute of Forensic Pathology in Copenhagen. The study also included an NBT (formazan) test of cardiac cro...

  10. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risk Assessment Related tests: Lipid Profile , VLDL Cholesterol , hs-CRP , Lp(a) Overview | Common Questions | Related Pages What ... cardiac risk include: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) : Studies have shown that measuring CRP with a ...

  11. Cardiac Catheterization (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... once a day. Avoid baths, hot tubs, and swimming for 1 week after the catheterization. Don't use any creams, lotions, or ointments on the site. The doctor will tell you when it's safe to go back to your normal activities after a cardiac catheterization. ...

  12. High prevalence of cardiac involvement in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Helle; Witting, Nanna; Ersbøll, Mads Kristian;

    2014-01-01

    .02). CONCLUSION: The cardiac phenotype of DM1 includes a high prevalence of conduction disorders, arrhythmias and risk factors of SCD. Systematic cardiac screening with ECG, Holter-monitoring and echocardiography is needed in order to make a proper characterization of cardiac involvement in DM1....... of controls. Thus, the optimal strategy for assessing cardiac involvement in DM1 is unclear. METHOD: In this large single-centre study, we evaluated 129 unselected DM1 patients (49.6% men), mean (SD) age 44 (14.7) years with family history, physical examination, electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiography......, Holter-monitoring and muscle strength testing. RESULTS: Cardiac involvement was found in 71 patients (55%) and included: 1) Conduction abnormalities: atrio-ventricular block grade I (AVB grade I) (23.6%), AVB grade II (5.6%), right/left bundle branch block (5.5/3.2%) and prolonged QTc (7.2%); 2...

  13. Evidence for cardiac atrophic remodeling in cancer-induced cachexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Min; Asp, Michelle L; Nishijima, Yoshinori; Belury, Martha A

    2011-11-01

    Cachexia is a common complication in cancer patients, which dramatically reduces quality of life and survival. In contrast to the well-studied feature of skeletal muscle loss, alterations in cardiac muscle are unclear. Recently, we reported that heart contractile function was significantly impaired in mice with colon-26 (C26) tumors, a widely used rodent model of cancer cachexia. In the present study, we investigated the potential underlying mechanisms for decreased heart function, specifically related to cardiac remodeling and atrophy. In cachectic mice bearing C26 tumors compared to mice without tumors, there was a gene expression pattern for cardiac remodeling, including increased BNP and c-fos, decreased PPARα and its responsive gene CPT1β, and a switch from 'adult' isoforms (MHCα, GLUT4) to 'fetal' isoforms (MHCβ and GLUT1). Echocardiography identified a decreased cardiac wall thickness. RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed a decreased amount of cardiac myofibrillar proteins MHC and troponin I, induced expression of E-3 ligases (MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1) and increased protein ubiquitination, providing evidence for cardiac atrophy in mice with cancer cachexia. Regulatory signaling pathways mediating these changes may include p44/42 MAPK. Together, these data provide evidence that pathways leading to cardiac remodeling and atrophy occur in mice with C26 cachexia.

  14. Cardiac Niche Influences the Direct Reprogramming of Canine Fibroblasts into Cardiomyocyte-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Palazzolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by mutation of dystrophin gene and primarily affect skeletal and cardiac muscles. Cardiac involvement in dystrophic GRMD dogs has been demonstrated by electrocardiographic studies with the onset of a progressive cardiomyopathy similar to the cardiac disease in DMD patients. In this respect, GRMD is a useful model to explore cardiac and skeletal muscle pathogenesis and for developing new therapeutic protocols. Here we describe a protocol to convert GRMD canine fibroblasts isolated from heart and skin into induced cardiac-like myocytes (ciCLMs. We used a mix of transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, TBX5, and MEF2C, known to be able to differentiate mouse and human somatic cells into ciCLMs. Exogenous gene expression was obtained using four lentiviral vectors carrying transcription factor genes and different resistance genes. Our data demonstrate a direct switch from fibroblast into ciCLMs with no activation of early cardiac genes. ciCLMs were unable to contract spontaneously, suggesting, differently from mouse and human cells, an incomplete differentiation process. However, when transplanted in neonatal hearts of SCID/Beige mice, ciCLMs participate in cardiac myogenesis.

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation in the Navy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzek-Kohler, C M; Love, V; Hendrickson, R; Branford, M; Gates, A; Telvick, C

    1994-10-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation has been effective in the management and recovery of the post-myocardial infarction population for almost 40 years. During that time, the fundamental components of rehabilitation have changed to reflect a growing complexity and number of cardiac patients. Great Lakes Naval Hospital has instituted a structured outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program. It is based on the needs of a large cardiac population with modifiable risk factors identified through quality improvement studies. Future implications and research in the area of cardiac rehabilitation include measurements of self-efficacy, long-term risk factor modification, cost effectiveness, gender-related differences, or morbidity and mortality.

  16. Skeletal muscle apolipoprotein B expression reduces muscular triglyceride accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Ploug, Thorkil; Størling, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, we investigated whether expression of a human apoB transgene affects triglyceride accumulation and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle in fat fed obese mice. Results. Expression of apoB and MTP mRNA and the human apoB transgene was seen in skeletal muscle of the transgene mice. Human apo...... insulin levels after 9 and 12 months, respectively, improved intra peritoneal glucose tolerance after 6 months, and a trend towards increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in isolated skeletal muscle. Conclusions. The data suggests that overexpression of apoB decreases skeletal muscle lipid......Abstract Background. Lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. In cardiac myocytes, lipoprotein secretion controlled by apolipoproteinB (apoB) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) affects lipid homeostasis. Design...

  17. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  18. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  19. Enteral leucine and protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are three members of the Branch Chain Amino Acids: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. As essential amino acids, these amino acids have important functions which include a primary role in protein structure and metabolism. It is intriguing that the requirement for BCAA in humans comprise about 40–...

  20. Early remodeling of rat cardiac muscle induced by swimming training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzola R.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of acute swimming training with an anaerobic component on matrix metallopeptidase (MMP activity and myosin heavy chain gene expression in the rat myocardium. Animals (male Wistar rats, weighing approximately 180 g were trained for 6 h/day in 3 sessions of 2 h each for 1 to 5 consecutive days (N = 5 rats per group. Rats swam in basins 47 cm in diameter and 60 cm deep filled with water at 33 to 35ºC. After the training period a significant increase (P < 0.05 was observed in the heart weight normalized to body weight by about 22 and 35% in the groups that trained for 96 and 120 h, respectively. Blood lactate levels were significantly increased (P < 0.05 in all groups after all training sessions, confirming an anaerobic component. However, lactate levels decreased (P < 0.05 with days of training, suggesting that the animals became adapted to this protocol. Myosin heavy chain-ß gene expression, analyzed by real time PCR and normalized with GAPDH gene expression, showed a significant two-fold increase (P < 0.01 after 5 days of training. Zymography analysis of myocardium extracts indicated a single ~60-kDa activity band that was significantly increased (P < 0.05 after 72, 96, and 120 h, indicating an increased expression of MMP-2 and suggesting precocious remodeling. Furthermore, the presence of MMP-2 was confirmed by Western blot analysis, but not the presence of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Taken together, our results indicate that in these training conditions, the rat heart undergoes early biochemical and functional changes required for the adaptation to the new physiological condition by tissue remodeling.

  1. Observational Study of Human Electrical Muscle Incapacitation and Cardiac Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display...activity have been proposed as the cause of death in a small fraction of these individuals. A study of 212 patient exposures to < 1000 volts found 28...combative individuals. A small fraction of these individuals subsequently die while in confinement. Critics of HEMI use claim these deaths are a direct

  2. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm

    2014-01-01

    disorders, arrhythmias, and device implantation). In the DM cohort, SIR for any cardiac disease was 3.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01-3.86]; for a cardiac disease belonging to the selected subgroups 6.91 (95% CI: 5.93-8.01) and for other cardiac disease 2.59 (95% CI: 2.03-3.25). For a cardiac disease......AIMS: To quantify the association between myotonic dystrophy (DM) and cardiac disease in a nationwide cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified a nationwide cohort of 1146 DM patients (period 1977-2011) using the National Patient Registry (NPR) and a subcohort of 485 patients who had undergone...... genetic testing for DM1. Information on incident cardiac diseases was obtained from the NPR. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cardiac disease compared with the background population, overall and according to selected diagnostic subgroups (cardiomyopathy, heart failure, conduction...

  3. Electrical stimulation as a biomimicry tool for regulating muscle cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadian, Samad; Ostrovidov, Serge; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ramalingam, Murugan; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need to understand muscle cell behaviors and to engineer muscle tissues to replace defective tissues in the body. Despite a long history of the clinical use of electric fields for muscle tissues in vivo, electrical stimulation (ES) has recently gained significant attention as a powerful tool for regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro. ES aims to mimic the electrical environment of electroactive muscle cells (e.g., cardiac or skeletal muscle cells) by helping to regulate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. As a result, it can be used to enhance the alignment and differentiation of skeletal or cardiac muscle cells and to aid in engineering of functional muscle tissues. Additionally, ES can be used to control and monitor force generation and electrophysiological activity of muscle tissues for bio-actuation and drug-screening applications in a simple, high-throughput, and reproducible manner. In this review paper, we briefly describe the importance of ES in regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro, as well as the major challenges and prospective potential associated with ES in the context of muscle tissue engineering.

  4. A novel physiological role for cardiac myoglobin in lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Esfeld, Sonja; Coman, Cristina; Ahrends, Robert; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Flögel, Ulrich; Rassaf, Tienush; Totzeck, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Continuous contractile activity of the heart is essential and the required energy is mostly provided by fatty acid (FA) oxidation. Myocardial lipid accumulation can lead to pathological responses, however the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The role of myoglobin in dioxygen binding in cardiomyocytes and oxidative skeletal muscle has widely been appreciated. Our recent work established myoglobin as a protector of cardiac function in hypoxia and disease states. We here unravel a novel role of cardiac myoglobin in governing FA metabolism to ensure the physiological energy production through β-oxidation, preventing myocardial lipid accumulation and preserving cardiac functions. In vivo1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy unveils a 3-fold higher deposition of lipids in mouse hearts lacking myoglobin, which was associated with depressed cardiac function compared to wild-type hearts as assessed by echocardiography. Mass spectrometry reveals a marked increase in tissue triglycerides with preferential incorporation of palmitic and oleic acids. Phospholipid levels as well as the metabolome, transcriptome and proteome related to FA metabolism tend to be unaffected by myoglobin ablation. Our results reveal a physiological role of myoglobin in FA metabolism with the lipid accumulation-suppressing effects of myoglobin preventing cardiac lipotoxicity. PMID:28230173

  5. The Frank-Starling mechanism in vertebrate cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiels, Holly A; White, Ed

    2008-07-01

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart applies to all classes of vertebrates. It describes how stretch of cardiac muscle, up to an optimum length, increases contractility thereby linking cardiac ejection to cardiac filling. The cellular mechanisms underlying the Frank-Starling response include an increase in myofilament sensitivity for Ca2+, decreased myofilament lattice spacing and increased thin filament cooperativity. Stretching of mammalian, amphibian and fish cardiac myocytes reveal that the functional peak of the sarcomere length (SL)-tension relationship occurs at longer SL in the non-mammalian classes. These findings correlate with in vivo cardiac function as non-mammalian vertebrates, such as fish, vary stroke volume to a relatively larger extent than mammals. Thus, it seems the length-dependent properties of individual myocytes are modified to accommodate differences in organ function, and the high extensibility of certain hearts is matched by the extensibility of their myocytes. Reasons for the differences between classes are still to be elucidated, however, the structure of mammalian ventricular myocytes, with larger widths and higher levels of passive stiffness than those from other vertebrate classes may be implicated.

  6. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  7. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  8. Regulation of cardiac microRNAs by serum response factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jeanne Y

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Serum response factor (SRF regulates certain microRNAs that play a role in cardiac and skeletal muscle development. However, the role of SRF in the regulation of microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis in cardiac hypertrophy has not been well established. In this report, we employed two distinct transgenic mouse models to study the impact of SRF on cardiac microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis. Cardiac-specific overexpression of SRF (SRF-Tg led to altered expression of a number of microRNAs. Interestingly, downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a and upregulation of miR-21 occurred by 7 days of age in these mice, long before the onset of cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that SRF overexpression impacted the expression of microRNAs which contribute to cardiac hypertrophy. Reducing cardiac SRF level using the antisense-SRF transgenic approach (Anti-SRF-Tg resulted in the expression of miR-1, miR-133a and miR-21 in the opposite direction. Furthermore, we observed that SRF regulates microRNA biogenesis, specifically the transcription of pri-microRNA, thereby affecting the mature microRNA level. The mir-21 promoter sequence is conserved among mouse, rat and human; one SRF binding site was found to be in the mir-21 proximal promoter region of all three species. The mir-21 gene is regulated by SRF and its cofactors, including myocardin and p49/Strap. Our study demonstrates that the downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a, and upregulation of miR-21 can be reversed by one single upstream regulator, SRF. These results may help to develop novel therapeutic interventions targeting microRNA biogenesis.

  9. Cardiac morphology after conditions of microgravity during Cosmos 2044

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Margaret A.; Edwards, Robert J.; Schroeter, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Light- and electron-microscopic studies were performed on cardiac muscle from rats flown on Cosmos 2044 and from four control groups. Average cross-sectional area of myofibers was measured by video analysis of the light-microscopic images of papillary and ventricular muscle samples from all animals. This cross-sectional area was significantly decreased in flight rats (P = 0.03) compared with synchronous controls. Additional findings at the electron microscopic level consistent with this atrophy were obtained by stereological analysis and optical diffraction analysis of papillary muscle samples. Slightly higher mitochondrial volume density values and mitochondria-to-myofibril ratios as well as normal A-band spacings (d1,0) and Z-band spacings of myofibrils were observed in the tail-suspension and flight groups. General morphological features similar to those in ventricular samples from the previous Cosmos 1887 flight were observed.

  10. Muscle Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ryabykh, Sergey; Ochirova, Polina; Kenis, Vladimir; Hofstätter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years) were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl) were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome). And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A) as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations. PMID:28210640

  11. Association between muscular strength and inflammatory markers among elderly persons with cardiac disease: results from the KORA-Age study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volaklis, K A; Halle, M; Koenig, W; Oberhoffer, R; Grill, E; Peters, A; Strasser, B; Heier, M; Emeny, R; Schulz, H; Ladwig, K H; Meisinger, C; Thorand, B

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the association between muscle strength and inflammation in diseased individuals and particularly in cardiac patients. Thus, our purpose was to examine the association of muscular strength with the inflammatory status in older adults with and without cardiac disease. The cross-sectional analysis was based on 1079 adults aged 65-94 years, who participated in the KORA-Age study. Participants underwent an interview and extensive physical examinations including anthropometric measurements, registration of diseases and drug intake, determination of health-related behaviors, collection of blood samples for measurements of interleukin-6 and hs-CRP and muscle strength measurement using hand-grip dynamometry. Cardiac patients (n = 323) had higher levels of IL-6 and poorer muscle strength compared with older adults without cardiac disease. Among persons with cardiac diseases, muscle strength in the lower tertile compared to the upper tertile was significantly associated with increased odds of having elevated IL-6 levels (OR 3.53, 95 % CI 1.18-10.50, p = 0.024) after controlling for age, gender, body fat, alcohol intake, smoking status, diseases, medications and physical activity, whereas the association between muscle strength and hs-CRP remained borderline significant (OR 2.80, 95 % CI 0.85-9.24, p = 0.092). The same trends, with slightly lower odds ratios, were also observed in older adults without cardiac disease. Lower levels of muscular strength are associated with higher concentrations of IL-6 and hs-CRP in elderly individuals with and without cardiac disease suggesting a significant contribution of the muscular system in reducing low-grade inflammation that accompanies cardiac disease and aging.

  12. Expression profiles of muscle disease-associated genes and their isoforms during differentiation of cultured human skeletal muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Hussein Saba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The formation of contractile myofibrils requires the stepwise onset of expression of muscle specific proteins. It is likely that elucidation of the expression patterns of muscle-specific sarcomeric proteins is important to understand muscle disorders originating from defects in contractile sarcomeric proteins. Methods We investigated the expression profile of a panel of sarcomeric components with a focus on proteins associated with a group of congenital disorders. The analyses were performed in cultured human skeletal muscle cells during myoblast proliferation and myotube development. Results Our culture technique resulted in the development of striated myotubes and the expression of adult isoforms of the sarcomeric proteins, such as fast TnI, fast TnT, adult fast and slow MyHC isoforms and predominantly skeletal muscle rather than cardiac actin. Many proteins involved in muscle diseases, such as beta tropomyosin, slow TnI, slow MyBPC and cardiac TnI were readily detected in the initial stages of muscle cell differentiation, suggesting the possibility of an early role for these proteins as constituent of the developing contractile apparatus during myofibrillogenesis. This suggests that in disease conditions the mechanisms of pathogenesis for each of the mutated sarcomeric proteins might be reflected by altered expression patterns, and disturbed assembly of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar structures and muscle development. Conclusions In conclusion, we here confirm that cell cultures of human skeletal muscle are an appropriate tool to study developmental stages of myofibrillogenesis. The expression of several disease-associated proteins indicates that they might be a useful model system for studying the pathogenesis of muscle diseases caused by defects in specific sarcomeric constituents.

  13. Molecular Cloning, Structural Analysis and Tissue Expression of Protein Phosphatase 3 Catalytic Subunit Alpha Isoform (PPP3CA Gene in Tianfu Goat Muscle

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    Lu Wan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, plays a critical role in controlling skeletal muscle fiber type. However, little information is available concerning the expression of calcineurin in goat. Therefore, protein phosphatase 3 catalytic subunit alpha isoform (PPP3CA gene, also called calcineurin Aα, was cloned and its expression characterized in Tianfu goat muscle. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR analyses revealed that Tianfu goat PPP3CA was detected in cardiac muscle, biceps femoris muscle, abdominal muscle, longissimus dors muscle, and soleus muscle. High expression levels were found in biceps femoris muscle, longissimus muscle and abdominal muscle (p < 0.01, and low expression levels were seen in cardiac muscle and soleus muscle (p > 0.05. In addition, the spatial-temporal mRNA expression levels showed different variation trends in different muscles with the age of the goats. Western blotting further revealed that PPP3CA protein was expressed in the above-mentioned tissues, with the highest level in biceps femoris muscle, and the lowest level in soleus muscle. In this study, we isolated the full-length coding sequence of Tianfu goat PPP3CA gene, analyzed its structure, and investigated its expression in different muscle tissues from different age stages. These results provide a foundation for understanding the function of the PPP3CA gene in goats.

  14. Reconditioning aging muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, H

    1978-06-01

    Weakness or stiffness of key posture muscles can cause much of the disability seen in elderly patients. Too much tension and too little exercise greatly increase the natural loss of muscular fitness with age. A systematic program of exercise, stressing relaxation and stretching of tight muscles and strenghthening of weak muscles, can improve physical fitness. The program must be tailored to the patient, starting with relaxation and gentle limbering exercises and proceeding ultimately to vigorous muscle-stretching exercises. Muscle aches and pain from tension and muscle imbalance are to be expected. Relaxation relieves tension pain, and strengthening weak muscles and stretching tight muscles will correct muscle imbalance. To prevent acute muscle spasm, the patient should avoid excessive exertion and increase exercise intensity gradually.

  15. Sudden Cardiac Death

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    Yipsy María Gutiérrez Báez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the second half of the twentieth century, dying suddenly due to heart-related problems has become the main health issue in all countries where infectious diseases are not prevalent. Sudden death from cardiac causes is an important global health problem. Major databases were searched for the leading causes of sudden cardiac death. It has been demonstrated that there is a group of hereditary diseases with structural alterations or without apparent organic cause that explains many cases of sudden death in young people, whether related or not to physical exertion. Certain population groups are at higher risk for this disease. They are relatively easy to identify and can be the target of primary prevention measures.

  16. Cardiac nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerson, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book begins with a review of the radionuclide methods available for evaluating cardiac perfusion and function. The authors discuss planar and tomographic thallium myocardial imaging, first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide angiography, and imaging with infarct-avid tracers. Several common but more specialized procedures are then reviewed: nonogemetric measurement of left ventricular volume, phase (Fourier) analysis, stroke volume ratio, right ventricular function, and diastolic function. A separate chapter is devoted to drug interventions and in particular the use of radionuclide ventriculography to monitor doxorubicin toxicity and therapy of congestive heart failure. The subsequent chapters provide a comprehensive guide to test selection, accuracy, and results in acute myocardial infarction, in postmyocardial infarction, in chronic coronary artery disease, before and after medical or surgical revascularization, in valvular heart disease, in cardiomyopathies, and in cardiac trauma.

  17. Cardiac arrest in children

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    Tress Erika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners.

  18. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias.

  19. MITOCHONDRIA QUALITY CONTROL AND MUSCLE MASS MAINTENANCE

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    Vanina eRomanello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of muscle mass and force occurs in many diseases such as disuse/inactivity, diabetes, cancer, renal and cardiac failure and in aging-sarcopenia. In these catabolic conditions the mitochondrial content, morphology and function are greatly affected. The changes of mitochondrial network influence the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS that play an important role in muscle function. Moreover, dysfunctional mitochondria trigger catabolic signaling pathways which feed-forward to the nucleus to promote the activation of muscle atrophy. Exercise, on the other hand, improves mitochondrial function by activating mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy, possibly playing an important part in the beneficial effects of physical activity in several diseases. Optimised mitochondrial function is strictly maintained by the coordinated activation of different mitochondrial quality control pathways. In this review we outline the current knowledge linking mitochondria-dependent signaling pathways to muscle homeostasis in aging and disease and the resulting implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to prevent muscle loss.

  20. Molecular mechanism by which AMP-activated protein kinase activation promotes glycogen accumulation in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Roger W; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE During energy stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) promotes glucose transport and glycolysis for ATP production, while it is thought to inhibit anabolic glycogen synthesis by suppressing the activity of glycogen synthase (GS) to maintain the energy balance in muscle. Paradoxically......, chronic activation of AMPK causes an increase in glycogen accumulation in skeletal and cardiac muscles, which in some cases is associated with cardiac dysfunction. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which AMPK activation promotes muscle glycogen accumulation. RESEARCH DESIGN...... AND METHODS We recently generated knock-in mice in which wild-type muscle GS was replaced by a mutant (Arg582Ala) that could not be activated by glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), but possessed full catalytic activity and could still be activated normally by dephosphorylation. Muscles from GS knock-in or transgenic...

  1. Cardiac hybrid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaemperli, Oliver [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Nuclear Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Hybrid cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging allows combined assessment of anatomical and functional aspects of cardiac disease. In coronary artery disease (CAD), hybrid SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of coronary artery stenosis and myocardial perfusion abnormalities. The clinical value of hybrid imaging has been documented in several subsets of patients. In selected groups of patients, hybrid imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy to detect CAD compared to the single imaging techniques. Additionally, this approach facilitates functional interrogation of coronary stenoses and guidance with regard to revascularization procedures. Moreover, the anatomical information obtained from CT coronary angiography or coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) adds prognostic information over perfusion data from SPECT. The use of cardiac hybrid imaging has been favoured by the dissemination of dedicated hybrid systems and the release of dedicated image fusion software, which allow simple patient throughput for hybrid SPECT/CT studies. Further technological improvements such as more efficient detector technology to allow for low-radiation protocols, ultra-fast image acquisition and improved low-noise image reconstruction algorithms will be instrumental to further promote hybrid SPECT/CT in research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  2. Cardiac tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICA RADISIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick,compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3 can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of perfluorocarbons, or with electrical stimulation (continuous application of biphasic pulses, 2 ms, 5 V, 1 Hz. Tissue constructs cultured without perfusion or electrical stimulation served as controls. Medium perfusion and addition of perfluorocarbons resulted in compact, thick constructs containing physiologic density of viable, electromechanically coupled cells, in contrast to control constructs which had only a ~100 mm thick peripheral region with functionally connected cells. Electrical stimulation of cultured constructs resulted in markedly improved contractile properties, increased amounts of cardiac proteins, and remarkably well developed ultrastructure (similar to that of native heart as compared to non-stimulated controls. We discuss here the state of the art of cardiac tissue engineering, in light of the biomimetic approach that reproduces in vitro some of the conditions present during normal tissue development.

  3. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect.

  4. Cardiac surgery 2015 reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doenst, Torsten; Strüning, Constanze; Moschovas, Alexandros; Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Essa, Yasin; Kirov, Hristo; Diab, Mahmoud; Faerber, Gloria

    2016-10-01

    For the year 2015, almost 19,000 published references can be found in PubMed when entering the search term "cardiac surgery". The last year has been again characterized by lively discussions in the fields where classic cardiac surgery and modern interventional techniques overlap. Lacking evidence in the field of coronary revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery has been added. As in the years before, CABG remains the gold standard for the revascularization of complex stable triple-vessel disease. Plenty of new information has been presented comparing the conventional to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) demonstrating similar short- and mid-term outcomes at high and low risk, but even a survival advantage with transfemoral TAVI at intermediate risk. In addition, there were many relevant and interesting other contributions from the purely operative arena. This review article will summarize the most pertinent publications in the fields of coronary revascularization, surgical treatment of valve disease, heart failure (i.e., transplantation and ventricular assist devices), and aortic surgery. While the article does not have the expectation of being complete and cannot be free of individual interpretation, it provides a condensed summary that is intended to give the reader "solid ground" for up-to-date decision-making in cardiac surgery.

  5. Cardiac assessment prior to non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, J F; Hillis, G S; Lee, V W; Halliwell, R; Vicaretti, M; Moncrieff, C; Chow, C K

    2016-08-01

    Increasingly, patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery are older and have more comorbidities yet preoperative cardiac assessment appears haphazard and unsystematic. We hypothesised that patients at high cardiac risk were not receiving adequate cardiac assessment, and patients with low-cardiac risk were being over-investigated. To compare in a representative sample of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery the use of cardiac investigations in patients at high and low preoperative cardiac risk. We examined cardiac assessment patterns prior to elective non-cardiac surgery in a representative sample of patients. Cardiac risk was calculated using the Revised Cardiac Risk Index. Of 671 patients, 589 (88%) were low risk and 82 (12%) were high risk. We found that nearly 14% of low-risk and 45% of high-risk patients had investigations for coronary ischaemia prior to surgery. Vascular surgery had the highest rate of investigation (38%) and thoracic patients the lowest rate (14%). Whilst 78% of high-risk patients had coronary disease, only 46% were on beta-blockers, 49% on aspirin and 77% on statins. For current smokers (17.3% of cohort, n = 98), 60% were advised to quit pre-op. Practice patterns varied across surgical sub-types with low-risk patients tending to be over-investigated and high-risk patients under-investigated. A more systemised approach to this large group of patients could improve clinical outcomes, and more judicious use of investigations could lower healthcare costs and increase efficiency in managing this cohort. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  6. Skeletal Muscle-specific G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Ablation Alters Isolated Skeletal Muscle Mechanics and Enhances Clenbuterol-stimulated Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Benjamin P; Woodall, Meryl C; Luongo, Timothy S; Grisanti, Laurel A; Tilley, Douglas G; Elrod, John W; Koch, Walter J

    2016-10-14

    GRK2, a G protein-coupled receptor kinase, plays a critical role in cardiac physiology. Adrenergic receptors are the primary target for GRK2 activity in the heart; phosphorylation by GRK2 leads to desensitization of these receptors. As such, levels of GRK2 activity in the heart directly correlate with cardiac contractile function. Furthermore, increased expression of GRK2 after cardiac insult exacerbates injury and speeds progression to heart failure. Despite the importance of this kinase in both the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart, relatively little is known about the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle function and disease. In this study we generated a novel skeletal muscle-specific GRK2 knock-out (KO) mouse (MLC-Cre:GRK2(fl/fl)) to gain a better understanding of the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology. In isolated muscle mechanics testing, GRK2 ablation caused a significant decrease in the specific force of contraction of the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle yet had no effect on the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Despite these effects in isolated muscle, exercise capacity was not altered in MLC-Cre:GRK2(fl/fl) mice compared with wild-type controls. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy stimulated by clenbuterol, a β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonist, was significantly enhanced in MLC-Cre:GRK2(fl/fl) mice; mechanistically, this seems to be due to increased clenbuterol-stimulated pro-hypertrophic Akt signaling in the GRK2 KO skeletal muscle. In summary, our study provides the first insights into the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology and points to a role for GRK2 as a modulator of contractile properties in skeletal muscle as well as β2AR-induced hypertrophy. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Material-based engineering strategies for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Mieke H van; Bax, Noortje A M; Spreeuwel, Ariane C C van; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue is composed of muscle and non-muscle cells, surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) and spatially organized into a complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture to allow for coordinated contraction and electrical pulse propagation. Despite emerging evidence for cardiomyocyte turnover in mammalian hearts, the regenerative capacity of human cardiac tissue is insufficient to recover from damage, e.g. resulting from myocardial infarction (MI). Instead, the heart 'repairs' lost or injured tissue by ongoing synthesis and remodeling of scar tissue. Conventional therapies and timely (stem) cell delivery to the injured tissue markedly improve short-term function and remodeling, but do not attenuate later stage adverse remodeling, leading to functional deterioration and eventually failure of the heart. Material-based therapies have been successfully used to mechanically support and constrain the post-MI failing heart, preventing it from further remodeling and dilation. When designed to deliver the right microenvironment for endogenous or exogenous cells, as well as the mechanical and topological cues to guide neo-tissue formation, material-based therapies may even reverse remodeling and boost cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the up-to-date status of material-based cardiac regeneration with special emphasis on 1) the use of bare biomaterials to deliver passive constraints that unload the heart, 2) the use of materials and cells to create engineered cardiac constructs for replacement, support, or regeneration of damaged myocardium, and 3) the development of bio-inspired and bioactive materials that aim to enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart. As the therapies should function in the infarcted heart, the damaged host environment and engineered in vitro test systems that mimic this environment, are reviewed as well.

  8. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. Material and Methods: There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position “1” and “2”. We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position “1” lasted 0.5 hours, and position “2” lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. Results: The analysis was done in three positions: “Operating position 1”, “Operating position 2 ‘, and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this

  9. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-07-16

    Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position "1" and "2". We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position "1" lasted 0.5 hours, and position "2" lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. The analysis was done in three positions: "Operating position 1", "Operating position 2 ', and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this model using CATIA R5v19. The proposed model is based on CATIA software

  10. Pre- and early-postnatal nutrition modify gene and protein expressions of muscle energy metabolism markers and phospholipid fatty acid composition in a muscle type specific manner in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Lei; Kongsted, Alice; Ghoreishi, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    determinants of insulin signalling in two types of skeletal muscles (longissimus dorsi (LD) and biceps femoris (BF)) and in the cardiac muscle (ventriculus sinister cordis (VSC)) of sheep from the same experiment. Twin-bearing ewes were fed either 100% (NORM) or 50% (LOW) of their energy and protein...

  11. Genetic deletion of myostatin from the heart prevents skeletal muscle atrophy in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Joerg; Auger-Messier, Mannix; Xu, Jian; Sargent, Michelle; York, Allen; Welle, Stephen; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2010-01-26

    Cardiac cachexia is characterized by an exaggerated loss of skeletal muscle, weakness, and exercise intolerance, although the cause of these effects remains unknown. Here, we hypothesized that the heart functions as an endocrine organ in promoting systemic cachexia by secreting peptide factors such as myostatin. Myostatin is a cytokine of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily that is known to control muscle wasting. We used a Cre/loxP system to ablate myostatin (Mstn gene) expression in a cell type-specific manner. As expected, elimination of Mstn selectively in skeletal muscle with a myosin light chain 1f (MLC1f)-cre allele induced robust hypertrophy in all skeletal muscle. However, heart-specific deletion of Mstn with an Nkx2.5-cre allele did not alter baseline heart size or secondarily affect skeletal muscle size, but the characteristic wasting and atrophy of skeletal muscle that typify heart failure were not observed in these heart-specific null mice, indicating that myocardial myostatin expression controls muscle atrophy in heart failure. Indeed, myostatin levels in the plasma were significantly increased in wild-type mice subjected to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy but not in Mstn heart-specific deleted mice. Moreover, cardiac-specific overexpression of myostatin, which increased circulating levels of myostatin by 3- to 4-fold, caused a reduction in weight of the quadriceps, gastrocnemius, soleus, and even the heart itself. Finally, to investigate myostatin as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of muscle wasting in heart failure, we infused a myostatin blocking antibody (JA-16), which promoted greater maintenance of muscle mass in heart failure. Myostatin released from cardiomyocytes induces skeletal muscle wasting in heart failure. Targeted inhibition of myostatin in cardiac cachexia might be a therapeutic option in the future.

  12. Indeterminacy of Spatiotemporal Cardiac Alternans

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in action potential duration (at the cellular level) or in ECG morphology (at the whole heart level), is a marker of ventricular fibrillation, a fatal heart rhythm that kills hundreds of thousands of people in the US each year. Investigating cardiac alternans may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and eventually better algorithms for the prediction and prevention of such dreadful diseases. In paced cardiac tissue, alternans develops under increasingly shorter pacing period. Existing experimental and theoretical studies adopt the assumption that alternans in homogeneous cardiac tissue is exclusively determined by the pacing period. In contrast, we find that, when calcium-driven alternans develops in cardiac fibers, it may take different spatiotemporal patterns depending on the pacing history. Because there coexist multiple alternans solutions for a given pacing period, the alternans pattern on a fiber becomes unpredictable. Usin...

  13. Fibrosis and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Sanne; van Veen, Toon A. B.; van Rijen, Harold V. M.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.

    2011-01-01

    In this review article about fibrosis and arrhythmias, we show that the amount of collagen, a normal element of the heart muscle, increases with age and in heart disease. The relation between fibrosis and electrophysiological parameters such as conduction, fractionation of electrograms, abnormal imp

  14. A modular approach to cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Brendan M; Sefton, Michael V

    2010-10-01

    Functional cardiac tissue was prepared using a modular tissue engineering approach with the goal of creating vascularized tissue. Rat aortic endothelial cells (RAEC) were seeded onto submillimeter-sized modules made of type I bovine collagen supplemented with Matrigel™ (25% v/v) embedded with cardiomyocyte (CM)-enriched neonatal rat heart cells and assembled into a contractile, macroporous, sheet-like construct. Modules (without RAEC) cultured in 10% bovine serum (BS) were more contractile and responsive to external stimulus (lower excitation threshold, higher maximum capture rate, and greater en face fractional area changes) than modules cultured in 10% fetal BS. Incorporating 25% Matrigel in the matrix reduced the excitation threshold and increased the fractional area change relative to collagen only modules (without RAEC). A coculture medium, containing 10% BS, low Mg2+ (0.814mM), and normal glucose (5.5mM), was used to maintain RAEC junction morphology (VE-cadherin) and CM contractility, although the responsiveness of CM was attenuated with RAEC on the modules. Macroporous, sheet-like module constructs were assembled by partially immobilizing a layer of modules in alginate gel until day 8, with or without RAEC. RAEC/CM module sheets were electrically responsive; however, like modules with RAEC this responsiveness was attenuated relative to CM-only sheets. Muscle bundles coexpressing cardiac troponin I and connexin-43 were evident near the perimeter of modules and at intermodule junctions. These results suggest the potential of the modular approach as a platform for building vascularized cardiac tissue.

  15. Cardiac mouse lymphatics: developmental and anatomical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaht-Zabost, Aleksandra; Gula, Grzegorz; Ciszek, Bogdan; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Madej, Maria; Niderla-Bielińska, Justyna; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota; Ratajska, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The adult mouse heart possesses an extensive lymphatic plexus draining predominantly the subepicardium and the outer layer of the myocardial wall. However, the development of this plexus has not been entirely explored, partially because of the lack of suitable methods for its visualization as well as prolonged lymphatic vessel formation that starts prenatally and proceeds during postnatal stages. Also, neither the course nor location of collecting vessels draining lymph from the mouse heart have been precisely characterized. In this article, we report that murine cardiac lymphatic plexus development that is limited prenatally only to the subepicardial area, postnatally proceeds from the subepicardium toward the myocardial wall with the base-to-apex gradient; this plexus eventually reaches the outer half of the myocardium with a predominant location around branches of coronary arteries and veins. Based on multiple marker immunostaining, the molecular marker-phenotype of cardiac lymphatic endothelial cells can be characterized as: Prox-1(+), Lyve-1(+), VEGFR3(+), Podoplanin(+), VEGFR2(+), CD144(+), Tie2(+), CD31(+), vWF(-), CD34(-), CD133(-). There are two major collecting vessels: one draining the right and left ventricles along the left conal vein and running upwards to the left side of the pulmonary trunk and further to the nearest lymph nodes (under the aortic arch and near the trachea), and the other one with its major branch running along the left cardiac vein and further on the surface of the coronary sinus and the left atrium to paratracheal lymph nodes. The extracardiac collectors gain the smooth muscle cell layer during late postnatal stages.

  16. Computational estimation of tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes using noisy NMR data from cardiac biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Hettling (Hannes); D.J. C. Alders (David); M.P. Heringa (Martijn); T.W. Binsl (Thomas); A.B.J. Groeneveld (Johan); J.H.G.M. van Beek (Johannes)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The aerobic energy metabolism of cardiac muscle cells is of major importance for the contractile function of the heart. Because energy metabolism is very heterogeneously distributed in heart tissue, especially during coronary disease, a method to quantify metabolic fluxes in

  17. Impact of statin use on exercise-induced cardiac troponin elevations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Januzzi, J.L., Jr.; Taylor, B.A.; Isaacs, S.K.; D'Hemecourt, P.; Zaleski, A.; Dyer, S.; Troyanos, C.; Weiner, R.B.; Thompson, P.D.; Baggish, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Marathon running commonly causes a transient elevation of creatine kinase and cardiac troponin I (cTnI). The use of statins before marathon running exacerbates the release of creatine kinase from skeletal muscle, but the effect of statin use on exercise-induced cTnI release is unknown. We therefore

  18. Advising a cardiac disease gene positive yet phenotype negative or borderline abnormal athlete: is sporting disqualification really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Pascale; Denjoy, Isabelle; Fressart, Véronique; Wilson, Mathew G; Carré, François; Charron, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    The sudden cardiac death (SCD) of an athlete is a rare and tragic event, often caused by a number of inherited heart muscle disorders, namely the cardiomyopathies and primary arrhythmia syndromes (also known as cardiac ion channelopathies). Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics of these heritable cardiovascular diseases present new challenges for clinicians who manage athletes with these types of heart muscle conditions. Unfortunately, the clinical heterogeneity of many of these SCD diseases are also matched by the genotypic heterogeneity associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. A particularly challenging situation arises when the sports physician and attending cardiologist are presented with an athlete who demonstrates a familial context of inherited cardiac disease or presents mild cardiac abnormalities suggestive of inherited cardiac disease. Alongside the complete cardiac evaluation, genetic testing may be proposed as an additional diagnostic tool in this clinical conundrum. However, debate still remains on how extensive the screening should be, in particular the use and interpretation of genetic testing in that setting. The aim of this review is to examine the role of genetic testing within the diagnostic algorithm of preparticipation screening of athletes. This will be achieved by providing the sports medicine physician with simple current cardiac genetic knowledge for the main inherited cardiac conditions known to cause SCD. Furthermore, it will examine current knowledge for the role of genetic testing upon the prediction of SCD, concluding with its impact on the sport eligibility and disqualification conundrum using case examples from our genetic testing laboratory.

  19. Skeletal muscle molecular alterations precede whole-muscle dysfunction in NYHA Class II heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godard MP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael P Godard,1 Samantha A Whitman,2 Yao-Hua Song,3 Patrice Delafontaine41Department of Nutrition and Kinesiology, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO, USA; 2Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 3Cyrus Tang Hematology Center, Jiangsu Institute of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University, Suzhou, China; 4Tulane University School of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, New Orleans, LA, USABackground: Heart failure (HF, a debilitating disease in a growing number of adults, exerts structural and neurohormonal changes in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. However, these alterations and their affected molecular pathways remain uncharacterized. Disease progression is known to transform skeletal muscle fiber composition by unknown mechanisms. In addition, perturbation of specific hormonal pathways, including those involving skeletal muscle insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFB-5 appears to occur, likely affecting muscle metabolism and regeneration. We hypothesized that changes in IGF-1 and IGFB-5 mRNA levels correlate with the transformation of single–skeletal muscle fiber myosin heavy chain isoforms early in disease progression, making these molecules valuable markers of skeletal muscle changes in heart failure.Materials and methods: To investigate these molecules during “early” events in HF patients, we obtained skeletal muscle biopsies from New York Heart Association (NYHA Class II HF patients and controls for molecular analyses of single fibers, and we also quantified isometric strength and muscle size.Results: There were more (P < 0.05 single muscle fibers coexpressing two or more myosin heavy chains in the HF patients (30% ± 7% compared to the control subjects (13% ± 2%. IGF-1 and IGFBP-5 expression was fivefold and 15-fold lower in patients with in HF compared to control subjects (P < 0.05, respectively. Strikingly

  20. Case Report: Penetrating Cardiac Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Grbolar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Penetrating cardiac injurys caused by gunshots and penetrating tools have high mortality rates. The way of injury, how the cardiac area is effected and the presence of cardiac tamponadecauses mortality in different rates. However the better treatment quality of hospitals, increasingoperative techniques, and internel care unit quality has not been change during the years. Searching the literature, we want to present a 42 years old male patient whowas injured by knife and had a 1 cm skin wound on chest with cardiac tamponade. After sternotomy a 7 cm laseration was observed in heart. Cardioraphy was performed.

  1. Cardiac surgery for Kartagener syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkebuchava, T; von Segesser, L K; Niederhäuser, U; Bauersfeld, U; Turina, M

    1997-01-01

    Two patients (one girl, one boy) with Kartagener syndrome (situs inversus, bronchiectasis, sinusitis), despite pulmonary problems and associated congenital cardiac anomalies, were operated on at the ages of 4 years and 7 years, respectively. They had had previous palliative treatment at the age of 3 months and 1.3 years, respectively. Both postoperative periods after total correction were without significant complications. Long-term follow-up was available for 9 and 19 years, respectively, with no manifestations of heart insufficiency. Both patients are physically active, and neither requires cardiac medication. Patients with Kartagener syndrome and associated congenital cardiac anomalies can successfully undergo multiple cardiac operations with good long-term outcome.

  2. Metformin inhibits angiotensin II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jian; Zhang, Na; Hua, Ying; Wang, Bingjian; Ling, Lin; Ferro, Albert; Xu, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts is a critical event in the progression of cardiac fibrosis that leads to pathological cardiac remodeling. Metformin, an antidiabetic agent, exhibits a number of cardioprotective properties. However, much less is known regarding the effect of metformin on cardiac fibroblast differentiation. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effect of metformin on angiotensin (Ang) II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and its underlying mechanism. Adult rat cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated with Ang II (100 nM) in the presence or absence of metformin (10-200 µM). Ang II stimulation induced the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, as indicated by increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen types I and III, and this effect of Ang II was inhibited by pretreatment of cardiac fibroblasts with metformin. Metformin also decreased Ang II-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in cardiac fibroblasts via inhibiting the activation of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway. Further experiments using PKC inhibitor calphostin C and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin confirmed that inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway markedly attenuated Ang II-induced ROS generation and myofibroblast differentiation. These data indicate that metformin inhibits Ang II-induced myofibroblast differentiation by suppressing ROS generation via the inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway in adult rat cardiac fibroblasts. Our results provide new mechanistic insights regarding the cardioprotective effects of metformin and provide an efficient therapeutic strategy to attenuate cardiac fibrosis.

  3. Metformin inhibits angiotensin II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Bai

    Full Text Available Differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts is a critical event in the progression of cardiac fibrosis that leads to pathological cardiac remodeling. Metformin, an antidiabetic agent, exhibits a number of cardioprotective properties. However, much less is known regarding the effect of metformin on cardiac fibroblast differentiation. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effect of metformin on angiotensin (Ang II-induced differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and its underlying mechanism. Adult rat cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated with Ang II (100 nM in the presence or absence of metformin (10-200 µM. Ang II stimulation induced the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, as indicated by increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and collagen types I and III, and this effect of Ang II was inhibited by pretreatment of cardiac fibroblasts with metformin. Metformin also decreased Ang II-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in cardiac fibroblasts via inhibiting the activation of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway. Further experiments using PKC inhibitor calphostin C and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin confirmed that inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway markedly attenuated Ang II-induced ROS generation and myofibroblast differentiation. These data indicate that metformin inhibits Ang II-induced myofibroblast differentiation by suppressing ROS generation via the inhibition of the PKC-NADPH oxidase pathway in adult rat cardiac fibroblasts. Our results provide new mechanistic insights regarding the cardioprotective effects of metformin and provide an efficient therapeutic strategy to attenuate cardiac fibrosis.

  4. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Emerson Randolph; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in t...

  5. CSI cardiac prevent 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CSI Cardiac Prevent 2015 was held at Hotel Taj Palace, New Delhi, on September 25-27, 2015. The major challenge was to create interest among cardiologists and physicians on preventive cardiology, a neglected area. The theme of the conference was "Innovations in Heart Disease Prevention.′′ This conference included "CSI at WHF Roadmap Workshop, Inauguration Ceremony, scientific program, plenary sessions, Nursing/Dietician track, Industry Exhibition, Social Events," Great India blood pressure Survey, and CSI Smart Heart App. A total of 848 delegates/faculties attended this conference against a total of 1140 people registered for the meeting.

  6. Expression of muscle-specific myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain 1 in the electric tissue of Electrophorus electricus (L.) in comparison with other vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres Sá, L; Menezes, M A; dos Santos Mermelstein, C

    2001-08-01

    Myosin light and heavy chains from skeletal and cardiac muscles and from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus (L.) were characterised using biochemical and immunological methods, and compared with myosin extracted from avian, reptilian, and mammalian skeletal and cardiac muscles. The results indicate that the electric tissue has a myosin light chain 1 (LC1) and a muscle-specific myosin heavy chain. We also show that monoclonal antibody F109-12A8 (against LC1 and LC2) recognizes LC1 of myosin from human skeletal and cardiac muscles as well as those of rabbit, lizard, chick, and electric eel. However, only cardiac muscles from humans and rabbits have LC2, which is recognized by antibody F109-16F4. The data presented confirm the muscle origin of the electric tissue of E. electricus. This electric tissue has a profile of LC1 protein expression that resembles the myosin from cardiac muscle of the eel more than that from eel skeletal muscle. This work raises an interesting question about the ontogenesis and differentiation of the electric tissue of E. electricus. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. PARP-1 inhibition alleviates diabetic cardiac complications in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Esraa M; El-Bassossy, Hany M; El-Maraghy, Nabila N; Ahmed, Ahmed F; Ali, Abdelmoneim A

    2016-11-15

    Cardiovascular complications are the major causes of mortality among diabetic population. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 enzyme (PARP-1) is activated by oxidative stress leading to cellular damage. We investigated the implication of PARP-1 in diabetic cardiac complications. Type 2 diabetes was induced in rats by high fructose-high fat diet and low streptozotocin dose. PARP inhibitor 4-aminobenzamide (4-AB) was administered daily for ten weeks after diabetes induction. At the end of study, surface ECG, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were studied. PARP-1 activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitrite contents were assessed in heart muscle. Fasting glucose, fructosamine, insulin, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were measured in serum. Finally, histological examination and collagen deposition detection in rat ventricular and aortic sections were carried out. Hearts isolated from diabetic animals showed increased PARP-1 enzyme activity compared to control animals while significantly reduced by 4-AB administration. PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AB alleviated cardiac ischemia in diabetic animals as indicated by ECG changes. PARP-1 inhibition also reduced cardiac inflammation in diabetic animals as evidenced by histopathological changes. In addition, 4-AB administration improved the elevated blood pressure and the associated exaggerated vascular contractility, endothelial destruction and vascular inflammation seen in diabetic animals. Moreover, PARP-1 inhibition decreased serum levels of TNF-α and cardiac nitrite but increased cardiac GSH contents in diabetic animals. However, PARP-1 inhibition did not significantly affect the developed hyperglycemia. Our findings prove that PARP-1 enzyme plays an important role in diabetic cardiac complications through combining inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis mechanisms.

  8. Muscle strain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  9. Exercise-induced muscle damage and the potential protective role of estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Becky; Eston, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage is a well documented phenomenon that often follows unaccustomed and sustained metabolically demanding activities. This is a well researched, but poorly understood area, including the actual mechanisms involved in the muscle damage and repair cycle. An integrated model of muscle damage has been proposed by Armstrong and is generally accepted. A more recent aspect of exercise-induced muscle damage to be investigated is the potential of estrogen to have a protective effect against skeletal muscle damage. Estrogen has been demonstrated to have a potent antioxidant capacity that plays a protective role in cardiac muscle, but whether this antioxidant capacity has the ability to protect skeletal muscle is not fully understood. In both human and rat studies, females have been shown to have lower creatine kinase (CK) activity following both eccentric and sustained exercise compared with males. As CK is often used as an indirect marker of muscle damage, it has been suggested that female muscle may sustain less damage. However, these findings may be more indicative of the membrane stabilising effect of estrogen as some studies have shown no histological differences in male and female muscle following a damaging protocol. More recently, investigations into the potential effect of estrogen on muscle damage have explored the possible role that estrogen may play in the inflammatory response following muscle damage. In light of these studies, it may be suggested that if estrogen inhibits the vital inflammatory response process associated with the muscle damage and repair cycle, it has a negative role in restoring normal muscle function after muscle damage has occurred. This review is presented in two sections: firstly, the processes involved in the muscle damage and repair cycle are reviewed; and secondly, the possible effects that estrogen has upon these processes and muscle damage in general is discussed. The muscle damage and repair cycle is

  10. S100A1: A Regulator of Striated Muscle Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Handling, Sarcomeric, and Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Völkers

    2010-01-01

    S100A1 has further been detected at different sites within the cardiac sarcomere indicating potential roles in myofilament function. More recently, a study reported a mitochondrial location of S100A1 in cardiomyocytes. Additionally, normalizing the level of S100A1 protein by means of viral cardiac gene transfer in animal heart failure models resulted in a disrupted progression towards cardiac failure and enhanced survival. This brief review is confined to the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of S100A1 in cardiac and skeletal muscle Ca2+ handling with a particular focus on its potential as a molecular target for future therapeutic interventions.

  11. Prox1 maintains muscle structure and growth in the developing heart

    OpenAIRE

    Risebro, C. A.; Searles, R. G.; Melville, A. A. D.; Ehler, E.; Jina, N; Shah, S; Pallas, J.; Hubank, M.; Dillard, M; Harvey, N L; Schwartz, R. J.; Chien, K R; Oliver, G; Riley, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    Impaired cardiac muscle growth and aberrant myocyte arrangement underlie congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathy. We show that cardiac-specific inactivation of the murine homeobox transcription factor Prox1 results in the disruption of expression and localisation of sarcomeric proteins, gross myofibril disarray and growth-retarded hearts. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Prox1 is required for direct transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the structural proteins alpha-actinin, N-...

  12. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  13. Extraocular muscle function testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003397.htm Extraocular muscle function testing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Extraocular muscle function testing examines the function of the eye ...

  14. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... patients who received their first pacemaker (PM) or cardiac resynchronization device from 1997 to 2008. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and pneumothorax treated with a chest tube. The median...... age was 77 years (25th and 75th percentile: 69-84) and 55% were male (n = 15 785). A total of 190 patients (0.66%) were treated for pneumothorax, which was more often in women [aOR 1.9 (1.4-2.6)], and in patients with age >80 years [aOR 1.4 (1.0-1.9)], a prior history of chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  15. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance.

  16. [Cardiac myxoma with cerebral metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, A; Peruzzi, P; Baudrillard, J C; Pluot, M; Rousseaux, P

    1987-01-01

    A 56 year old woman developed multiple metastases in the cerebrum and cerebellum, four years after cardiac intervention on a left atrial myxoma. The absence of stroke is noteworthy. Multiple high density lesions with contrast enhancement were seen by CT scan, suggesting metastatic neoplasms. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of metastases of cardiac myxoma. Only four cases were recorded in the literature.

  17. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  18. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  19. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  20. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). STUDY POPULATION: Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutane...

  1. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    . An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  2. [Chronic surplus of Japanese cardiac surgeon--ideal nurse practitioner for cardiac surgery, cardiac surgeon's attitude toward the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Hirohisa

    2014-03-01

    It is chronically surplus of doctors in the world of cardiac surgery. There are too many cardiac surgeons because cardiac surgery requires a large amount of manpower resources to provide adequate medical services. Many Japanese cardiac surgeons do not have enough opportunity to perform cardiac surgery operations, and many Japanese cardiac surgery residents do not have enough opportunity to learn cardiac surgery operations. There are physician assistants and nurse practitioners in the US. Because they provide a part of medical care to cardiac surgery patients, American cardiac surgeons can focus more energy on operative procedures. Introduction of cardiac surgery specialized nurse practitioner is essential to deliver a high quality medical service as well as to solve chronic problems that Japanese cardiac surgery has had for a long time.

  3. Finite Element Model of Cardiac Electrical Conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, John Zhihao

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop mathematical models to study electrical conduction of the heart. One important pattern of wave propagation of electrical excitation in the heart is reentry which is believed to be the underlying mechanism of some dangerous cardiac arhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. We present in this thesis a new ionic channel model of the ventricular cardiac cell membrane to study the microscopic electrical properties of myocardium. We base our model on recent single channel experiment data and a simple physical diffusion model of the calcium channel. Our ionic channel model of myocardium has simpler differential equations and fewer parameters than previous models. Further more, our ionic channel model achieves better results in simulating the strength-interval curve when we connect the membrane patch model to form a one dimensional cardiac muscle strand. We go on to study a finite element model which uses multiple states and non-nearest neighbor interactions to include curvature and dispersion effects. We create a generalized lattice randomization to overcome the artifacts generated by the interaction between the local dynamics and the regularities of the square lattice. We show that the homogeneous model does not display spontaneous wavefront breakup in a reentrant wave propagation once the lattice artifacts have been smoothed out by lattice randomization with a randomization scale larger than the characteristic length of the interaction. We further develop a finite 3-D 3-state heart model which employs a probability interaction rule. This model is applied to the simulation of Body Surface Laplacian Mapping (BSLM) using a cylindrical volume conductor as the torso model. We show that BSLM has a higher spatial resolution than conventional mapping methods in revealing the underlying electrical activities of the heart. The results of these studies demonstrate that mathematical modeling and computer simulation are very

  4. [Cardiac fibroma: A rare cause of sudden child death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Sarah; Gibier, Jean-Baptiste; Recher, Morgan; Leteurtre, Stéphane; Leroy, Xavier; Devisme, Louise

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 3-year-old child who died from the consequences of a cardio-respiratory arrest despite reanimation procedures. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass of the free wall of the left ventricle. Autopsy confirmed the existence of a solitary myocardial tumor, well-circumscribed, firm, with a whitish and trabeculated cut surface. Histologically, the tumor consisted of bundles of spindle-shaped and regular cells mingling with collagen and elastic fibers, insinuating themselves between myocytes in periphery. Calcifications were present. After immunohistochemistry, the cells were highlighted by anti-actin smooth muscle antibody; but they were not highlighted by anti-desmin, anti-β catenin and anti-Ki67 antibodies. The diagnosis of cardiac fibroma was made. The primary cardiac tumors of child are rare and usually benign. They are essentially represented by rhabdomyoma and fibroma. Cardiac fibroma mostly occurs during the first year of life. It can be revealed by cardiac insufficiency, arrhythmia, chest pain or sudden death.

  5. Cardiac arrhythmias in hypokalemic periodic paralysis: Hypokalemia as only cause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stunnenberg, Bas C; Deinum, Jaap; Links, Thera P; Wilde, Arthur A; Franssen, Hessel; Drost, Gea

    2014-09-01

    It is unknown how often cardiac arrhythmias occur in hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) and if they are caused by hypokalemia alone or other factors. This systematic review shows that cardiac arrhythmias were reported in 27 HypoPP patients. Cases were confirmed genetically (13 with an R528H mutation in CACNA1S, 1 an R669H mutation in SCN4A) or had a convincing clinical diagnosis of HypoPP (13 genetically undetermined) if reported prior to the availability of genetic testing. Arrhythmias occurred during severe hypokalemia (11 patients), between attacks at normokalemia (4 patients), were treatment-dependent (2 patients), or unspecified (10 patients). Nine patients died from arrhythmia. Convincing evidence for a pro-arrhythmogenic factor other than hypokalemia is still lacking. The role of cardiac expression of defective skeletal muscle channels in the heart of HypoPP patients remains unclear. Clinicians should be aware of and prevent treatment-induced cardiac arrhythmia in HypoPP. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cardiac involvement in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 and Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Thune, Jens Jakob; Køber, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    of dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a high prevalence of cardiac involvement in patients with LGMD2I, LGMD2E, and BMD. Patients with LGMD2A, LGMD2D, and unclassified LGMD2 have a much lower and milder prevalence of cardiac involvement.......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cardiac involvement in patients with 1 of the 12 groups of recessively inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2A-L) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). DESIGN: Prospective screening. SETTING: Neuromuscular Clinic and Department of Cardiology...... at Rigshospitalet. Patients One hundred one patients with LGMD2A-I and BMD and 29 patients with LGMD2 and no molecular diagnosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical investigation, echocardiography, and electrocardiographic findings. RESULTS: Cardiac involvement was present in 24 of 100 patients (24%) with LGMD2A...

  7. Obturator internus muscle strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh, BAO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of obturator internus muscle strains. The injuries occurred in young male athletes involv