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Sample records for demand-withdraw communication pattern

  1. Adult Attachment and Male Aggression in Couple Relationships: The Demand-Withdraw Communication Pattern and Relationship Satisfaction as Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Benoit; Brassard, Audrey; Shaver, Phillip R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines men's domestic aggression as a function of attachment insecurities, considering the mediating roles of the demand-withdraw communication pattern and relationship satisfaction. The sample included 55 Canadian men undergoing counseling for relationship difficulties including aggression. The men completed questionnaires assessing…

  2. Exploring the basis for gender differences in the demand-withdraw pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Sarah R; Sturm, Virginia E; Levenson, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    During marital conflict, wives tend to demand and husbands tend to withdraw. These behaviors were historically thought to stem from essential differences between men and women. An alternative explanation implicates one form of power differences-wives desire more change and, therefore, demand; husbands desire less change and withdraw to maintain status quo. Studying same-sex as well as cross-sex couples enables an evaluation of both explanations. We examined demand-withdraw behaviors in 63 heterosexual, gay, and lesbian couples. The demand-withdraw pattern was seen regardless of type of couple. Further, for all couples, differences in the amount of change desired in partners during a conflict interaction predicted differences in demand and withdraw behaviors. These results offer further evidence that an often-observed difference in heterosexual relationships may result from social conventions that afford men greater power and women less power.

  3. The Relationship between Gender Stereotypes, Sense of Power, and Demographic Variables with the Cycle of Demand-Withdrawal Marital Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    somayeh shahmoradi

    2014-04-01

    The regression results showed that gender stereotypes, sense of power and number of children were all significant predictors for demand/withdraw pattern. The correlation results showed that increasing in stereotypical thinking and the number of children can lead to an increase in the probability of demand/withdraw cycle. Also, more sense of power has a positive correlation with the “withdrawal pattern” and less sense of power has a positive correlation with the “demand pattern”. The results demonstrate that the variables which were considered in the analysis of the cycle in this research are important and can help relevant agents to provide opportunities for improving couple relationships.

  4. The interpersonal process model of demand/withdraw behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucom, Brian R; Dickenson, Janna A; Atkins, David C; Baucom, Donald H; Fischer, Melanie S; Weusthoff, Sarah; Hahlweg, Kurt; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    The demand/withdraw interaction pattern is a destructive cycle of relationship communication behavior that is associated with negative individual and relationship outcomes. Demand/withdraw behavior is thought to be strongly linked to partners' emotional reactions, but current theories are inconsistent with empirical findings. The current study proposes the interpersonal process model of demand/withdraw behavior, which includes linkages between each partners' emotional reactions and the interpersonal behavior of demanding and withdrawing. Data come from problem solving discussions of 55 German couples with observationally coded demand/withdraw behavior and fundamental frequency (f₀) to measure vocally encoded emotional arousal. Actor-partner interdependence models (Kenny, Kashy, & Cook, 2006) were used to examine associations among demand/withdraw behavior and f₀ in the overall discussion and 5-min segments. Significant cross-partner associations emerged for demanding and withdrawing behavior across the whole conversation as well as within 5-min segments, and these associations are partially accounted for by each individual's f₀. When behaviorally coded demanders expressed more vocal arousal, they demanded more and withdrew less while their partners withdrew more. In contrast, when behaviorally coded withdrawers expressed more vocal arousal, their partners demanded less and withdrew more. Findings demonstrate that demand/withdraw behavior varies between couples (i.e., some couples engage in a stronger demand/withdraw cycle than others) and between segments (i.e., when 1 partner increases demanding, the other increases withdrawing). Findings support key elements of the interpersonal process model, showing intra- and interpersonal pathways linking demand/withdraw behavior and emotion and demonstrate the importance of partners' behavioral roles in these linkages.

  5. Demand/withdraw communication in the context of intimate partner violence: Implications for psychological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickover, Alison M; Lipinski, Alexandra J; Dodson, Thomas S; Tran, Han N; Woodward, Matthew J; Beck, J Gayle

    2017-07-22

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is associated with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). To clarify the influence of a dyadic conflict pattern that has previously been shown to accompany violence in romantic relationships (partner demand/self withdraw) on these mental health outcomes, we examined the associations between three forms of IPV (physical, emotional-verbal, dominance-isolation), partner demand/self withdraw, and PTSD and GAD symptoms, in a sample of 284 IPV-exposed women. Using structural equation modeling, we found significant associations between dominance-isolation IPV, partner demand/self withdraw, and clinician-assessed GAD symptoms. Associations between emotional-verbal IPV and partner demand/self withdraw were also significant. Associations for physical IPV, partner demand/self withdraw, and clinician-assessed PTSD symptoms were not statistically significant. These results underscore the need for research on the mental health outcomes associated with specific forms of IPV and the long-term psychological consequences of the conflict patterns that uniquely characterize violent relationships. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A Cross-Cultural Analysis of the Demand-Withdraw Marital Interaction: Observing Couples from a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Uzma S.; Holtzworth-Munroe, Amy

    2006-01-01

    The authors used cross-cultural methodology to examine the demand-withdraw pattern of marital communication. In Western countries, women usually make more demands, whereas men are more likely to withdraw. But the recently advanced marital structure hypothesis suggests that this pattern can be altered by gender roles and beliefs, particularly in…

  7. Communication Processes that Mediate Family Communication Patterns and Mental Well-Being: A Mean and Covariance Structures Analysis of Young Adults from Divorced and Nondivorced Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrodt, Paul; Ledbetter, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, demand/withdraw patterns and feeling caught were tested as mediators of family communication patterns and young adults' mental well-being. Participants included 567 young adults from divorced and nondivorced families. For young adults in nondivorced families, family conversation orientations had both a positive, direct effect on…

  8. Patterns of interhemispheric correlation during human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg-Zylberbaum, J; Ramos, J

    1987-09-01

    Correlation patterns between the electroencephalographic activity of both hemispheres in adult subjects were obtained. The morphology of these patterns for one subject was compared with another subject's patterns during control situations without communication, and during sessions in which direct communication was stimulated. Neither verbalization nor visual or physical contact are necessary for direct communication to occur. The interhemispheric correlation patterns for each subject were observed to become similar during the communication sessions as compared to the control situations. These effects are not due to nonspecific factors such as habituation or fatigue. The results support the syntergic theory proposed by one of the authors (Grinberg-Zylberbaum).

  9. Adolescents' Contributions to Family Communication Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saphir, Melissa Nichols; Chaffee, Steven H.

    2002-01-01

    Notes that early explications of family communication patterns (FCP) suggested a family's communication pattern arises from interactions in which parents and adolescents influence each other. Revisits the assumption that adolescents influence FCP, using data from a longitudinal quasi-experimental evaluation of a school-based civics curriculum…

  10. Mapping the Communication Patterns of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Lloyd W.

    1974-01-01

    The current academic interest in interpersonal communication is noted and a rationale and technique for mapping the self-disclosure patterns of adolescents is presented. An attempt is made to link the study of interpersonal communication to the mainstream of the ecological systems approach to the behavioral sciences. (Author)

  11. Patterns of power communication: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kali Prasad

    1958-07-01

    Full Text Available "Communication in one form or others is the basis of all social interaction. This paper deals with a particular aspect of communication namely, the effect of power and authority on the communication patterns that are set up between individuals. In such situation usually a power differential exists between the individuals as in the case of an employer and an employee, and this is responsible for setting up different attitudes in the mind of the people. The aim of the experiment described here is to study the reactions in individuals to expression of praise and hostility. The main finding is that those who are in power e.g. the employers are not so susceptible to praise as those who are subordinate to them. Also, a superior power person is less disturbed by hostile act of a subordinate than vice versa.

  12. Flexible IDL Compilation for Complex Communication Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Eide

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed applications are complex by nature, so it is essential that there be effective software development tools to aid in the construction of these programs. Commonplace “middleware” tools, however, often impose a tradeoff between programmer productivity and application performance. For instance, many CORBA IDL compilers generate code that is too slow for high‐performance systems. More importantly, these compilers provide inadequate support for sophisticated patterns of communication. We believe that these problems can be overcome, thus making idl compilers and similar middleware tools useful for a broader range of systems. To this end we have implemented Flick, a flexible and optimizing IDL compiler, and are using it to produce specialized high‐performance code for complex distributed applications. Flick can produce specially “decomposed” stubs that encapsulate different aspects of communication in separate functions, thus providing application programmers with fine‐grain control over all messages. The design of our decomposed stubs was inspired by the requirements of a particular distributed application called Khazana, and in this paper we describe our experience to date in refitting Khazana with Flick‐generated stubs. We believe that the special idl compilation techniques developed for Khazana will be useful in other applications with similar communication requirements.

  13. Calling patterns in human communication dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Podobnik, Boris; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-29

    Modern technologies not only provide a variety of communication modes (e.g., texting, cell phone conversation, and online instant messaging), but also detailed electronic traces of these communications between individuals. These electronic traces indicate that the interactions occur in temporal bursts. Here, we study intercall duration of communications of the 100,000 most active cell phone users of a Chinese mobile phone operator. We confirm that the intercall durations follow a power-law distribution with an exponential cutoff at the population level but find differences when focusing on individual users. We apply statistical tests at the individual level and find that the intercall durations follow a power-law distribution for only 3,460 individuals (3.46%). The intercall durations for the majority (73.34%) follow a Weibull distribution. We quantify individual users using three measures: out-degree, percentage of outgoing calls, and communication diversity. We find that the cell phone users with a power-law duration distribution fall into three anomalous clusters: robot-based callers, telecom fraud, and telephone sales. This information is of interest to both academics and practitioners, mobile telecom operators in particular. In contrast, the individual users with a Weibull duration distribution form the fourth cluster of ordinary cell phone users. We also discover more information about the calling patterns of these four clusters (e.g., the probability that a user will call the c(r)-th most contact and the probability distribution of burst sizes). Our findings may enable a more detailed analysis of the huge body of data contained in the logs of massive users.

  14. Extracting Association Patterns in Network Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Javier; Villalba, Luis Javier García; Trujillo, Alejandra Guadalupe Silva; Orozco, Ana Lucila Sandoval; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2015-01-01

    In network communications, mixes provide protection against observers hiding the appearance of messages, patterns, length and links between senders and receivers. Statistical disclosure attacks aim to reveal the identity of senders and receivers in a communication network setting when it is protected by standard techniques based on mixes. This work aims to develop a global statistical disclosure attack to detect relationships between users. The only information used by the attacker is the number of messages sent and received by each user for each round, the batch of messages grouped by the anonymity system. A new modeling framework based on contingency tables is used. The assumptions are more flexible than those used in the literature, allowing to apply the method to multiple situations automatically, such as email data or social networks data. A classification scheme based on combinatoric solutions of the space of rounds retrieved is developed. Solutions about relationships between users are provided for all pairs of users simultaneously, since the dependence of the data retrieved needs to be addressed in a global sense. PMID:25679311

  15. Cross-Cultural Communication Patterns in Computer Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panina, Daria; Kroumova, Maya

    2015-01-01

    There are important cultural differences in attitudes towards and use of electronic text communication. Consistent with Hall's high-context/low-context conceptualization of culture, electronic inter-cultural communication, just as verbal inter-cultural communication, is affected by the culturally-specific assumptions and preferences of message…

  16. The Effect of Family Communication Patterns on Adopted Adolescent Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueter, Martha A.; Koerner, Ascan F.

    2008-01-01

    Adoption and family communication both affect adolescent adjustment. We proposed that adoption status and family communication interact such that adopted adolescents in families with certain communication patterns are at greater risk for adjustment problems. We tested this hypothesis using a community-based sample of 384 adoptive and 208…

  17. Substitute and Communication Pattern for an Internet Banking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meiappane

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The design patterns are the reusable component used in the development of the software, which delivers enhanced quality software to the end users. The design patterns are available for user interface, mobile applications, text classification and so on. There are no design patterns for internet banking applications. This motivated to mine the design patterns for internet banking application from the document of Business Process Management (BPM by using the qualitative research technique. The nonfunctional quality attribute of software architecture is enhanced by using the design patterns. In this paper the mined two patterns are presented namely substitute pattern and communication pattern for internet banking application.

  18. Optimal signal patterns for dynamical cellular communication

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Cells transmit information via signaling pathways, using temporal dynamical patterns. As optimality with respect to environments is the universal principle in biological systems, organisms have acquired an optimal way of transmitting information. Here we obtain optimal dynamical signal patterns which can transmit information efficiently (low power) and reliably (high accuracy) using the optimal control theory. Adopting an activation-inactivation decoding network, we reproduced several dynamical patterns found in actual signals, such as steep, gradual and overshooting dynamics. Notably, when minimizing the power of the input signal, optimal signals exhibit the overshooting pattern, which is a biphasic pattern with transient and steady phases; this pattern is prevalent in actual dynamical patterns as it can be generated by an incoherent feed-forward loop (FFL), a common motif in biochemical networks. We also identified conditions when the three patterns, steep, gradual and overshooting, confer advantages.

  19. Secure steganographic communication algorithm based on self-organizing patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunoriene, Loreta; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2011-11-01

    A secure steganographic communication algorithm based on patterns evolving in a Beddington-de Angelis-type predator-prey model with self- and cross-diffusion is proposed in this paper. Small perturbations of initial states of the system around the state of equilibrium result in the evolution of self-organizing patterns. Small differences between initial perturbations result in slight differences also in the evolving patterns. It is shown that the generation of interpretable target patterns cannot be considered as a secure mean of communication because contours of the secret image can be retrieved from the cover image using statistical techniques if only it represents small perturbations of the initial states of the system. An alternative approach when the cover image represents the self-organizing pattern that has evolved from initial states perturbed using the dot-skeleton representation of the secret image can be considered as a safe visual communication technique protecting both the secret image and communicating parties.

  20. Citation Patterns of Core Communication Journals: An Assessment of the Developmental Status of Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Clement Y. K.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluates the developmental status of communication by studying citation patterns both within the field and between communication and other fields. Examines citation linkages of 10 communication journals using the 1983-1985 data from "Social Sciences Citation Index's Journal Citation Reports." (MM)

  1. Adolescent-Parent Communication in a Digital World: Differences by Family Communication Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudi, Jessie H.; Walkner, Amy; Dworkin, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    We examined how family communication patterns (FCPs) are associated with frequency of adolescent-parent communication in person, over the phone, via text message, and via email. Adolescents (N = 195) aged 13 to 18 completed an online survey assessing FCPs and frequency of communication methods used with parents. The results revealed that both…

  2. [Interactive patterns detection in family communication with adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno Collado, Adelina; Anguera Argilaga, M Teresa; Berzosa Sanz, Amparo; Ramírez Ramírez, Luis

    2006-11-01

    Interactive patterns detection in family communication with adolescents. Nondistant communication is a relevant indicator for family functionality valuation. The goal of this study is to analyze this communication in order to identify specific kinds of leadership, interaction patterns and the relation between verbal and nonverbal elements in communication. The observational design exposed is an idiographic one, punctual and multidimensional, which uses field format as observation instrument. Participants were seven standardized families made up of both ancestors and an adolescent son or daughter. According to the family models analyzed, results show a predominantly democratic communication style in adults with recurrent support expressions. The sequential analysis incorporates only categories from the emitter point of view, and detects relevant sequences which show symmetric interaction between all three family members. Verbal and nonverbal channels provide complementary information. Depending on adolescents' gender different patterns in behaviour can be identified as well.

  3. Gender Differences in Communication Patterns of Females in Single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Females in Single-Sex and Mixed-Sex Schools in Nnewi. Education Zone ... According to Tannen (1993), males are socialized to see the social world as .... interaction between female students' communication patterns and school-type.

  4. Family Communication Patterns and the Development of Reticence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lynne; Keaten, James A.; Finch, Cynthia; Duarte, Ilze B.; Hoffman, Patrizia; Michels, Margaret M.

    2002-01-01

    Explores the relationship between family communication patterns and reticence. Reveals that reticent individuals reported a significantly lower level of conversation orientation within their families than members of a comparison group. (SG)

  5. Data Mining based Software Development Communication Pattern Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Zhang; Caixian Ye; Chunru Wang; Xiaomin He

    2010-01-01

    Smaller time loss and smoother communication pattern is the urgent pursuit in the software development enterprise. However, communication is difficult to control and manage and demands on technical support, due to the uncertainty and complex structure of data appeared in communication. Data mining is a well established framework aiming at intelligently discovering knowledge and principles hidden in massive amounts of original data. Data mining technology together with shared repositories resu...

  6. Associations between Family Communication Patterns, Sibling Closeness, and Adoptive Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Diana R.; Rueter, Martha A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the protective effect of family and sibling closeness on child adjustment, but fewer studies have investigated how closeness is promoted within families. Guided by Family Communication Patterns Theory, we tested the association between family communication and sibling emotional and behavioral closeness, and…

  7. Calling patterns in human communication dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Ming-Xia; Podobnik, Boris; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H Eugene; 10.1073/pnas.1220433110

    2013-01-01

    Modern technologies not only provide a variety of communication modes, e.g., texting, cellphone conversation, and online instant messaging, but they also provide detailed electronic traces of these communications between individuals. These electronic traces indicate that the interactions occur in temporal bursts. Here, we study the inter-call durations of the 100,000 most-active cellphone users of a Chinese mobile phone operator. We confirm that the inter-call durations follow a power-law distribution with an exponential cutoff at the population level but find differences when focusing on individual users. We apply statistical tests at the individual level and find that the inter-call durations follow a power-law distribution for only 3460 individuals (3.46%). The inter-call durations for the majority (73.34%) follow a Weibull distribution. We quantify individual users using three measures: out-degree, percentage of outgoing calls, and communication diversity. We find that the cellphone users with a power-law...

  8. Telehone consultations: At the emergency service, Copenhagen County: Analysis of doctor-patient communication patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan-Helge; Risør, Ole

    1997-01-01

    Communications patterns, emergency service, out-of-hours service, telehpone consultations, video-supervision......Communications patterns, emergency service, out-of-hours service, telehpone consultations, video-supervision...

  9. Channel-Specific Daily Patterns in Mobile Phone Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Aledavood, Talayeh; Roberts, Sam G B; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I M; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Humans follow circadian rhythms, visible in their activity levels as well as physiological and psychological factors. Such rhythms are also visible in electronic communication records, where the aggregated activity levels of e.g. mobile telephone calls or Wikipedia edits are known to follow their own daily patterns. Here, we study the daily communication patterns of 24 individuals over 18 months, and show that each individual has a different, persistent communication pattern. These patterns may differ for calls and text messages, which points towards calls and texts serving a different role in communication. For both calls and texts, evenings play a special role. There are also differences in the daily patterns of males and females both for calls and texts, both in how they communicate with individuals of the same gender vs. opposite gender, and also in how communication is allocated at social ties of different nature (kin ties vs. non-kin ties). Taken together, our results show that there is an unexpected ri...

  10. Pairwise interaction pattern in the weighted communication network

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiao-Ke; Wu, Ye; Small, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although recent studies show that both topological structures and human dynamics can strongly affect information spreading on social networks, the complicated interplay of the two significant factors has not yet been clearly described. In this work, we find a strong pairwise interaction based on analyzing the weighted network generated by the short message communication dataset within a Chinese tele-communication provider. The pairwise interaction bridges the network topological structure and human interaction dynamics, which can promote local information spreading between pairs of communication partners and in contrast can also suppress global information (e.g., rumor) cascade and spreading. In addition, the pairwise interaction is the basic pattern of group conversations and it can greatly reduce the waiting time of communication events between a pair of intimate friends. Our findings are also helpful for communication operators to design novel tariff strategies and optimize their communication services.

  11. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION PATTERNS AND LANGUAGE USE IN COMPUTER MEDIATED-COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Teodorescu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analyzing the degree to which intercultural communication patterns are embedded in computer-mediated communication. Drawing on Hall’s and Hofstede’s intercultural communication dimensions, this study evaluates empirically high-versus-low context cultural orientations as reflected in the electronic medium, namely the blog, in three different cultures. Cultural variation is also analyzed in linguistic features and communication style in a synchronous mode of communication, by investigating data from several popular blogs from Japan, Germany and Italy.

  12. Inferring human mobility using communication patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Palchykov, Vasyl; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Saramäki, Jari; Pan, Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the patterns of mobility of individuals is crucial for a number of reasons, from city planning to disaster management. There are two common ways of quantifying the amount of travel between locations: by direct observations that often involve privacy issues, e.g., tracking mobile phone locations, or by estimations from models. Typically, such models build on accurate knowledge of the population size at each location. However, when this information is not readily available, their applicability is rather limited. As mobile phones are ubiquitous, our aim is to investigate if mobility patterns can be inferred from aggregated mobile phone call data. Using data released by Orange for Ivory Coast, we show that human mobility is well predicted by a simple model based on the frequency of mobile phone calls between two locations and their geographical distance. We argue that the strength of the model comes from directly incorporating the social dimension of mobility. Furthermore, as only aggregated call da...

  13. DMA engine for repeating communication patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Vranas, Pavlos

    2010-09-21

    A parallel computer system is constructed as a network of interconnected compute nodes to operate a global message-passing application for performing communications across the network. Each of the compute nodes includes one or more individual processors with memories which run local instances of the global message-passing application operating at each compute node to carry out local processing operations independent of processing operations carried out at other compute nodes. Each compute node also includes a DMA engine constructed to interact with the application via Injection FIFO Metadata describing multiple Injection FIFOs where each Injection FIFO may containing an arbitrary number of message descriptors in order to process messages with a fixed processing overhead irrespective of the number of message descriptors included in the Injection FIFO.

  14. Patterns of communication in high-fidelity simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Judy K; Nelson, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    High-fidelity simulation is commonplace in nursing education. However, critical thinking, decision making, and psychomotor skills scenarios are emphasized. Scenarios involving communication occur in interprofessional or intraprofessional settings. The importance of effective nurse-patient communication is reflected in statements from the American Nurses Association and Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, and in the graduate outcomes of most nursing programs. This qualitative study examined the patterns of communication observed in video recordings of a medical-surgical scenario with 71 senior students in a baccalaureate program. Thematic analysis revealed patterns of (a) focusing on tasks, (b) communicating-in-action, and (c) being therapeutic. Additional categories under the patterns included missing opportunities, viewing the "small picture," relying on informing, speaking in "medical tongues," offering choices…okay?, feeling uncomfortable, and using therapeutic techniques. The findings suggest the importance of using high-fidelity simulation to develop expertise in communication. In addition, the findings reinforce the recommendation to prioritize communication aspects of scenarios and debriefing for all simulations.

  15. The Influence of Functional Communication Patterns on Interpersonal Attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Steve; And Others

    This study examined the effects of functional communication patterns on interpersonal attraction, using a ten-category system of interaction analysis. Eight undergraduates were randomly selected and assigned to four unacquainted male-female pairs. After completing a physical attraction measure of their partners in the pairs, members of two pairs…

  16. The Inventory of Communication Patterns for Adolescents (ICPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Lloyd W.; Altmann, Harold A.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a revised edition of the Self-Disclosure Inventory for Adolescents (SDIA), which has been renamed the Inventory of Communication Patterns for Adolescents (ICPA) and describes its psychometric properties. Presents several counseling applications of the ICPA and suggests a comprehensive research agenda. (Author/ABB)

  17. Agricultural activity shapes the communication and migration patterns in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gutierrez, S.; Borondo, J.; Morales, A. J.; Losada, J. C.; Tarquis, A. M.; Benito, R. M.

    2016-06-01

    The communication and migration patterns of a country are shaped by its socioeconomic processes. The economy of Senegal is predominantly rural, as agriculture employs over 70% of the labor force. In this paper, we use mobile phone records to explore the impact of agricultural activity on the communication and mobility patterns of the inhabitants of Senegal. We find two peaks of phone calls activity emerging during the growing season. Moreover, during the harvest period, we detect an increase in the migration flows throughout the country. However, religious holidays also shape the mobility patterns of the Senegalese people. Hence, in the light of our results, agricultural activity and religious holidays are the primary drivers of mobility inside the country.

  18. Circadian pattern and burstiness in human communication activity

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kertész, János; Kaski, Kimmo

    2011-01-01

    The temporal pattern of human communication is inhomogeneous and bursty, as reflected by the heavy tail distribution of the inter-event times. For the origin of this behavior two main mechanisms have been suggested: a) Externally driven inhomogeneities due to the circadian and weekly activity patterns and b) intrinsic correlation based inhomogeneity rooted deeply in the task handling strategies of humans. Here we address this question by providing systematic de-seasoning methods to remove the circadian and weekly patterns from the time series of communication events. We find that the heavy tails of the inter-event time distributions are robust with respect to this procedure indicating that burstiness is mostly caused by the latter mechanism b). Moreover, we find that our de-seasoning procedure improves the scaling behavior of the distribution.

  19. Influence and Dissemination Of Sentiments in Social Network Communication Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillmann, Robert; Trier, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    in online environments. We develop a theoretical framework that tries to bridge the gap between social influence theories that focus on offline interactions on one hand and online interaction in social networks on the other hand. We then test our hypothesis about the influence and dissemination......Previous research suggests the existence of sentiments in online social networks. In comparison to real life human interaction, in which sentiments have been shown to have an influence on human behaviour, it is not yet completely understood which mechanisms explain how sentiments influence users...... of sentiments in a quantitative analysis that is based on retrieved textual messages of communication patterns in over 12000 online social networks. Our empirical results suggest a general influence of sentiments on node communication patterns that is evidenced by increased occurrences of subsequent messages...

  20. Data Mining based Software Development Communication Pattern Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Smaller time loss and smoother communication pattern is the urgent pursuit in the software development enterprise. However, communication is difficult to control and manage and demands on technical support, due to the uncertainty and complex structure of data appeared in communication. Data mining is a well established framework aiming at intelligently discovering knowledge and principles hidden in massive amounts of original data. Data mining technology together with shared repositories results in an intelligent way to analyze data of communication in software development environment. We propose a data mining based algorithm to tackle the problem, adopting a co-training styled algorithm to discover pattern in software development environment. Decision tree is trained as based learners and a majority voting procedure is then launched to determine labels of unlabeled data. Based learners are then trained again with newly labeled data and such iteration stops when a consistent state is reached. Our method is naturally semi-supervised which can improve generalization ability by making use of unlabeled data. Experimental results on data set gathered from productive environment indicate that the proposed algorithm is effective and outperforms traditional supervised algorithms.

  1. Patterns of Programmers' Use of Computer-Mediated Communications Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatpong Tangmanee

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Communication behavior of programmers plays an essential role in success of software development. Computer-mediated communication (CMC system, such as e-mail, or the World Wide Web (WWW, have substantial implications for coordinating work of programmers. Yet, no studies have dealt systematically with CMC behaviors of programmers. Drawing upon theories in organizational studies, information science, computer-mediated communication and software engineering, this research examines what programmers accomplish through CMC systems. Data were gathered from survey questionnaires mailed to 730 programmers, who are members of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM and are involved in a variety of programming work. Based on factor analysis, the study found that programmers use CMC systems (1 to achieve progress in work-related tasks (i.e., task-related purposes, (2 to satisfy their social and emotional needs (i.e., socio-emotional purposes, and (3 to explore for information (i.e., exploring purposes. The findings of this research extend an insight into important patterns for which programmers use CMC systems. This insight has advanced theories of computer-mediated communication in the context of computer programmers. Also, practitioners, especially in software development, may use the results as guidelines in fostering a firm’s feasible network policy that fits with what their programming staff accomplish through computer-mediated communication.

  2. Veterinarian-client-patient communication patterns used during clinical appointments in companion animal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jane R; Bonnett, Brenda N; Adams, Cindy L; Roter, Debra L

    2006-03-01

    To identify communication patterns used by veterinarians during clinical appointments in companion animal practice. Cross-sectional descriptive study. A random sample of 50 companion animal practitioners in southern Ontario and a convenience sample of 300 clients and their pets. For each practitioner, 6 clinical appointments (3 wellness appointments and 3 appointments related to a health problem) were videotaped. The Roter interaction analysis system was used to analyze the resulting 300 videotapes, and cluster analysis was used to identify veterinarian communication patterns. 175 (58%) appointments were classified as having a biomedical communication pattern, and 125 (42%) were classified as having a biolifestyle-social communication pattern. None were classified as having a consumerist communication pattern. Twentythree (46%) veterinarians were classified as using a predominantly biomedical communication pattern, 19 (38%) were classified as using a mixed communication pattern, and 8 (16%) were classified as using a predominantly biolifestyle-social communication pattern. Pattern use was related to the type of appointment. Overall, 103 (69%) wellness appointments were classified as biolifestyle-social and 127 (85%) problem appointments were classified as biomedical. Appointments with a biomedical communication pattern (mean, 11.98 minutes) were significantly longer than appointments with a biolifestyle-social communication pattern (10.43 minutes). Median relationship-centered care score (ie, the ratio of client-centered talk to veterinarian-centered talk) was significantly higher during appointments with a biolifestyle-social communication pattern (1.10) than during appointments with a biomedical communication pattern (0.40). Results suggest that veterinarians in companion animal practice use 2 distinct patterns of communication. Communication pattern was associated with duration of visit, type of appointment, and relationship-centeredness. Recognition of these

  3. Media Consumption Patterns and Communicative Competence of University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel A. Grijalva Verdugo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of media competence arises in the last decade to describe audiovisual education levels of citizens, the interaction of individuals with complex media environments, and the effects of the screens and their influences on audiences. This paper analyzes media consumption patterns and perceptions of university students to certain stimuli emitted by the screens (Internet, social networks, and television, recreating an overview of the uses and acceptance that recipients give to the media content they broadcast. In that sense, the results of this work allow to establish a relationship between screen consumption patterns of university students and the media contents. This research was conducted in a Mexican university. First, an exploratory questionnaire was applied to a stratified probabilistic sample, which helped to interpret how audience uses the new communication artifacts. Then, a second structured questionnaire was applied, to demonstrate the dynamism of current communication processes in contemporary societies, where the role of media is fundamental for public life, society, culture, and even a major element in private life of the subjects.

  4. Hidden scaling patterns and universality in written communication

    CERN Document Server

    Formentin, M; Zanzotto, G; Maritan, A

    2013-01-01

    The temporal statistics exhibited by written correspondence appear to be media dependent, with features which have so far proven difficult to characterize. We explain the origin of these difficulties by disentangling the role of spontaneous activity from decision-based prioritizing processes in human dynamics, clocking all waiting times through each agent's `proper time' measured by activity. This unveils the same fundamental patterns in written communication across all media (letters, email, sms), with response times displaying truncated power-law behavior and average exponents near -3/2. When standard time is used, the response time probabilities are theoretically predicted to exhibit a bi-modal character, which is empirically borne out by our new years-long data on email. These novel perspectives on the temporal dynamics of human correspondence should aid in the analysis of interaction phenomena in general, including resource management, optimal pricing and routing, information sharing, emergency handling.

  5. Hidden scaling patterns and universality in written communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formentin, M; Lovison, A; Maritan, A; Zanzotto, G

    2014-07-01

    The temporal statistics exhibited by written correspondence appear to be media dependent, with features which have so far proven difficult to characterize. We explain the origin of these difficulties by disentangling the role of spontaneous activity from decision-based prioritizing processes in human dynamics, clocking all waiting times through each agent's "proper time" measured by activity. This unveils the same fundamental patterns in written communication across all media (letters, email, sms), with response times displaying truncated power-law behavior and average exponents near -3/2. When standard time is used, the response time probabilities are theoretically predicted to exhibit a bimodal character, which is empirically borne out by our newly collected years-long data on email. These perspectives on the temporal dynamics of human correspondence should aid in the analysis of interaction phenomena in general, including resource management, optimal pricing and routing, information sharing, and emergency handling.

  6. Mapping the online communication patterns of political conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borondo, J.; Morales, A. J.; Benito, R. M.; Losada, J. C.

    2014-11-01

    The structure of the social networks in which individuals are embedded influences their political choices and therefore their voting behavior. Nowadays, social media represent a new channel for individuals to communicate, what together with the availability of the data, makes it possible to analyze the online social network resulting from political conversations. Here, by taking advantage of the recently developed techniques to analyze complex systems, we map the communication patterns resulting from Spanish political conversations. We identify the different existing communities, building networks of communities, and finding that users cluster themselves in politically homogeneous networks. We found that while most of the collective attention was monopolized by politicians, traditional media accounts were still the preferred sources from which to propagate information. Finally, we propose methods to analyze the use of different languages, finding a clear trend from sympathizers of several political parties to overuse or infra-use each language. We conclude that, on the light of a social media analysis perspective, the political conversation is constrained by both ideology and language.

  7. Patterns of family health history communication among older African American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovick, Shelly R; Yamasaki, Jill S; Burton-Chase, Allison M; Peterson, Susan K

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examined patterns of communication regarding family health history among older African American adults. The authors conducted 5 focus groups and 6 semi-structured interviews with African Americans aged 60 years and older (N = 28). The authors identified 4 distinct patterns of family health history communication: noncommunication, open communication, selective communication (communication restricted to certain people or topics), and one-way communication (communication not reciprocated by younger family members). In general, participants favored open family health history communication, often resulting from desires to change patterns of noncommunication in previous generations regarding personal and family health history. Some participants indicated that they were selective about what and with whom they shared health information in order to protect their privacy and not worry others. Others described family health history communication as one-way or unreciprocated by younger family members who appeared uninterested or unwilling to share personal and family health information. The communication patterns that the authors identified are consistent with communication privacy management theory and with findings from studies focused on genetic testing results for hereditary conditions, suggesting that individuals are consistent in their communication of health and genetic risk information. Findings may guide the development of health message strategies for African Americans to increase family health history communication.

  8. Information communication technology use pattern by women tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most of the women enjoy traditional for·ms of communication particularly local music (67% ) ... shortcomings, limitations of manpower, Jack of motivation of start: limited ... implications of housewife employment status to ..... Communication: A tool.

  9. The Teacher-Student Communication Pattern: A Need to Follow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashamdar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is intended to investigate the teacher-student communication patterns in an upper-intermediate English class. There are major questions in this study; (a what the nature ofinteraction is in a foreign language classroom, (b what the characteristics of teacher-student turn taking are, (c what type of feedback is taken by the teacher, (d how the teacher's competence and performance are. The participants of the study are female adult students and a female teacher majoring English literature at MA level that has had five years of teaching experience. Five partial sessions of the class are recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. According to the findings, the type of discourse is teacher-initiated one and the question type is both WH-questions and questions with auxiliaries. The way of student's reply is brief and limited to one teacher-student turn-taking. The type of interaction is based on the questions posed by the teacher and long interaction such as discussing, debating, and challenging could rarely be seen in the classroom in question. The type of feedback depending on the skill and tasks dealt with, ranging from recast to direct correction. The teacher's competence and performance are satisfactory with correct pronunciation and near native accent.

  10. The Teacher-Student Communication Pattern: A Need to Follow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashamdar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is intended to investigate the teacher-student communication patterns in an upperintermediate English class. There are major questions in this study; (a what the nature of interaction is in a foreign language classroom, (b what the characteristics of teacher-student turn taking are, (c what type of feedback is taken by the teacher, (d how the teacher's competence and performance are. The participants of the study are female adult students and a female teacher majoring English literature at MA level that has had five years of teaching experience. Five partial
    sessions of the class are recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. According to the findings, the type of discourse is teacher-initiated one and the question type is both WH-questions and questions with auxiliaries. The way of student's reply is brief and limited to one teacher-student turn-taking. The type of interaction is based on the questions posed by the teacher and long interaction such as discussing, debating, and challenging could rarely be seen in the classroom in question. The type of
    feedback depending on the skill and tasks dealt with, ranging from recast to direct correction. The teacher's competence and performance are satisfactory with correct pronunciation and near native accent.

  11. The Child with Cancer: Patterns of Communication and Denial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinetta, John J.; Maloney, Lorrie J.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the role of communication and denial in coping efforts of children with cancer. Results indicate level of family communication about cancer expressed by mother's communication is correlated with hypothesized responses in child. Usefulness of three instruments as effective tools in measuring child's reactions is demonstrated. (Author/BEF)

  12. Rankings and Trends in Citation Patterns of Communication Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    Journal citations are increasingly used as indicators of the impact of scholarly work. Because many communication journals are not included in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI), SSCI impact factors are potentially misleading for communication journals. The current paper reports a citation analysis of 30 communication journals based on…

  13. Rankings and Trends in Citation Patterns of Communication Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    Journal citations are increasingly used as indicators of the impact of scholarly work. Because many communication journals are not included in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI), SSCI impact factors are potentially misleading for communication journals. The current paper reports a citation analysis of 30 communication journals based on…

  14. Regional Patterns of Communication in the United States: A Theoretical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Peter A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provides the rationale for a systematic study of regional patterns of communication in the United States. Conceptualizes regionalism, appraises regional influences on communication, and establishes their significance. Describes regional development of the U.S. and proposes a program of regional research on U.S. communication. Examines deficiencies…

  15. Use Patterns of Visual Cues in Computer-Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Doris U.

    2009-01-01

    Communication in the virtual environment can be challenging for participants because it lacks physical presence and nonverbal elements. Participants may have difficulties expressing their intentions and emotions in a primarily text-based course. Therefore, the use of visual communication elements such as pictographic and typographic marks can be…

  16. It's More than Just Talk: Patterns of CEO Impromptu Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Anett D.; Taylor, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates whether CEOs actually demonstrate the communication strengths and weaknesses they think they have. Videotaped interviews with CEOs in the initial stage of executive coaching were analyzed to identify categories of communication strength and weakness: delivery, content, audience, and character. Next, the interviews and…

  17. It's More than Just Talk: Patterns of CEO Impromptu Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Anett D.; Taylor, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates whether CEOs actually demonstrate the communication strengths and weaknesses they think they have. Videotaped interviews with CEOs in the initial stage of executive coaching were analyzed to identify categories of communication strength and weakness: delivery, content, audience, and character. Next, the interviews and…

  18. Underwater Acoustic Communication Based on Pattern Time Delay Shift Coding Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jing-wei; HUI Jun-ying; HUI Juan; YAO Zhi-xiang; WANG Yi-lin

    2006-01-01

    Underwater acoustic communication based on Pattern Time Delay Shift Coding (PDS) communication scheme is studied. The time delay shift values of the pattern are used to encode the digital information in the PDS scheme, which belongs to the Pulse Position Modulation (PPM). The duty cycle of the PDS scheme is small, so it can economize the power for communication. By use of different patterns for code division and different frequencies for channel division, the communication system is capable of mitigating the inter-symbol interference (ISI) caused by the multipath channel. The data rate of communication is 1000 bits/s at 8 kHz bandwidth. The receiver separates the channels by means of band-pass filters, and performs decoding by 4 copy-correlators to estimate the time delay shift value. Based on the theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, the PDS scheme is shown to be a robust and effective approach for underwater acoustic communication.

  19. Patterns of Mother-Daughter Communication for Reproductive Health Knowledge Transfer in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koblowe Obono

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Many reproductive health studies have examined trends and outcomes of adolescent sexual behaviour but have overlooked the patterns of reproductive communication between mothers and daughters that have implications on girls’ reproductive wellbeing. Although there is a need to safeguard adolescent health, not enough work exists at the interface between female reproductive change and communication. The patterns of communication determine the effectiveness of reproductive knowledge transfer to safeguard girls’ reproductive health at a time of social change. Despite widespread opinion about the taboo nature of sexual and reproductive communication in traditional African settings, its prevalence among mothers and daughters in Ugep, Nigeria, was found to be quite high. The context, form, direction and level of communication reveal that the females engage in reproductive communication in a private environment and through peaceful and friendly strategies. Communication is achieved through sharing of meaning and mutual understanding, which has implications for adolescent female reproductive health.

  20. Communication Pattern Regarding Alarms and Patient Signals Between Nurses, Other Health Care Actors, Patients and Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvoll, Terje; Hanenburg, Adrienne; Giordanego, Alain; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    CallMeSmart is a context aware communication system for hospitals. The system is being used by nurses and the physicians at the Oncology department, University Hospital of North Norway. CallMeSmart has been designed to increase the efficiency of communication between the nurse-physician and physician-physician. In this study, we have looked at the communication pathways between nurse-nurse and patient-nurse: how nurses define a preference of calling somebody, how alarms and tasks are prioritized, and how this could be implemented into the CallMeSmart system to improve the system for the nurses. This paper discusses how the communication pathways of the patient alarm system can be improved for health care actors in hospitals by revealing the communication patterns according to an alarm between those actors. We address the communication pattern between nurses, other health care actors, patients and the devices used, and discuss possible improvements of this communication.

  1. Scaffolding the Communication of People With Congenital Deafblindness: An Analysis of Sequential Interaction Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen, Saskia; Janssen, Marleen J; Ruijssenaars, Wied A; Schuengel, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The High Quality Communication intervention aims to stimulate interpersonal communication between individuals with congenital deaf-blindness (CDB) and their social partners. Found effective in multiple-case experiments, the intervention is based on Trevarthen's theory of inter-subjective development (Bråten & Trevarthen, 2007), which describes children's innate and developing ability to share subjective states in interpersonal communication and social partners' mediating role in this development. One implication of this theory is that social partners can support the emergence of higher-complexity communication behaviors in individuals who are still developing these behaviors. To test this proposition, communication patterns between individuals with CDB and their parents, teachers, and professional caregivers were analyzed. Analysis of two-event sequences of communicative behaviors showed a highly significant correspondence between the behavior of the social partner and the subsequent behavior of the individual with CDB, confirming that social partners can scaffold higher-complexity communication within interpersonal communication.

  2. Exploring the Pattern of Internal Communication in Total Quality Management Implementation in Manufacturing Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsudin Sharina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication is an important aspect of organizational dynamic process and it is irrefutable one of the critical success factors of the Total Quality Management (TQM implementation. Although there are increasing awareness concerning the importance of internal organizational communication, knowledge appears to have rarely translated into practice or there is lack of guidance to effectively practicing it. Therefore, a study was proposed to investigate the pattern of internal communication practice in TQM implementation. This paper concerns on focusing into internal communication practices in TQM implementation factors and the communication patterns in terms of message forms and mediums of communication to convey TQM messages. Reliability and Factor analysis were carried out to confirm items that form each factor in internal communication in TQM implementation. Based on the analysis of survey questionnaires distributed to 104 large manufacturing companies implementing TQM in Malaysia, it was found that there are certain communication patterns practice by the management when conveying and disseminating TQM messages, but they have no specific guidelines. Therefore, the internal communication practices are not well planned. Finally, it is suggested that further research should be carried out to explain clearly the role and strategy of communication on this issue in order to boost the success of TQM implementation particularly in manufacturing company.

  3. Exploring the Pattern of Internal Communication in Total Quality Management Implementation in Manufacturing Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Samsudin Sharina; Jalil Nor Hayati Mohd; Ibrahim Marzura

    2017-01-01

    Communication is an important aspect of organizational dynamic process and it is irrefutable one of the critical success factors of the Total Quality Management (TQM) implementation. Although there are increasing awareness concerning the importance of internal organizational communication, knowledge appears to have rarely translated into practice or there is lack of guidance to effectively practicing it. Therefore, a study was proposed to investigate the pattern of internal communication prac...

  4. Power and Violence: The Relation between Communication Patterns, Power Discrepancies, and Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Julia C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined discrepancies in economic status, decision-making power, communication patterns, and communication skill in three groups of spouses (n=95): domestically violent, maritally distressed/nonviolent, and maritally happy/nonviolent. Domestically violent couples were more likely than nonviolent groups to engage in husband-demand/wife-withdraw…

  5. Family Communication Patterns and Relational Maintenance Behavior: Direct and Mediated Associations with Friendship Closeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, both face-to-face and online relational maintenance behaviors were tested as mediators of family communication patterns and closeness with a same-sex friend. Participants included 417 young adults recruited from communication courses at a large university in the Midwestern United States. The obtained structural model demonstrated…

  6. Technology, Talk, and Time: Patterns of Group Communication and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Laura Brown

    2015-01-01

    The effective use of technology is increasingly important in many fields where online and digital communication, collaboration, and production have become more prevalent. Although it is clear that many higher education students come into the classroom with skills involved with consuming technology, they often are much less capable of producing…

  7. Coaching Techniques and Play Therapy Responses: A New Communication Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Joel H.; Stulmaker, Hayley; Rose, Katherine Kensinger

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the developmental stages of children is crucial for coaches. Equally important is the way adults communicate with children. In his seminal work describing the influence of society and social interactions on the psychosocial development of children, Erikson (1950, 1963) described the developmental crises faced by children at each…

  8. The Structural-Communicative Pattern of Hadiqa's Tales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Mirzaei

    2011-04-01

    The analysis of the addresser, addressee and context elements and their functions in Hadiqa’s tales indicates that the referential function is the most significant and dominant function in this work and so communication orients towards context .Then the conative and emotive functions are dominant and reinforce the effect of narrator’s speech.

  9. The Concept of Data Model Pattern Based on Fully Communication Oriented Information Modeling (FCO-IM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazat Nur Azizah

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Just as in many areas of software engineering, patterns have been used in data modeling to create high quality data models. We provide a concept of data model pattern based on Fully Communication Oriented Information Modeling (FCO-IM, a fact oriented data modeling method. A data model pattern is defined as the relation between context, problem, and solution. This definition is adopted from the concept of pattern by Christopher Alexander. We define the concept of Information Grammar for Pattern (IGP in the solution part of a pattern, which works as a template to create a data model. The IGP also shows how a pattern can relate to other patterns. The data model pattern concept is then used to describe 15 data model patterns, organized into 4 categories. A case study on geographical location is provided to show the use of the concept in a real case.

  10. From book to screen: Changing genre patterns and communicative purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Ørevik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a genre-based study of EFL educational websites on two text levels: the surface (screenshot level and the hyperlinked level. Findings suggest that genre patterns on the surface level emulate those of printed course books, whereas the hyperlinked level reflects textual patterns and participant roles typical of the ‘digital media space’. These findings are discussed in the light of the Norwegian national EFL subject curriculum’s construal of ‘digital skills’.

  11. How networks communicate: propagation patterns in spontaneous brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Anish; Raichle, Marcus E

    2016-10-05

    Initially regarded as 'noise', spontaneous (intrinsic) activity accounts for a large portion of the brain's metabolic cost. Moreover, it is now widely known that infra-slow (less than 0.1 Hz) spontaneous activity, measured using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal, is correlated within functionally defined resting state networks (RSNs). However, despite these advances, the temporal organization of spontaneous BOLD fluctuations has remained elusive. By studying temporal lags in the resting state BOLD signal, we have recently shown that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations consist of remarkably reproducible patterns of whole brain propagation. Embedded in these propagation patterns are unidirectional 'motifs' which, in turn, give rise to RSNs. Additionally, propagation patterns are markedly altered as a function of state, whether physiological or pathological. Understanding such propagation patterns will likely yield deeper insights into the role of spontaneous activity in brain function in health and disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting blood oxygen level-dependent: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  12. Acoustics and sociolinguistics: Patterns of communication in hearing impairing classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellin, William; Shahin, Kimary; Jamieson, Janet; Hodgson, Murray; Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen

    2005-04-01

    In elementary school classes, noise during student led activities is often taken as evidence of successful interaction and learning. In this complex social environment of elementary school classrooms, acquisition of complex language and social skills-the focus of activities in early education-is expected to take place in hearing-hostile environments. Communication and language processing in these contexts requires interactive strategies, discourse forms, and syntactic structures different from the educationally desired forms used in acoustically advantageous environments. Recordings were made of the interaction of groups of students in grades 1-3, 5, and 7 during collaborative group work in their regular classrooms. Each student wore microphones at the ear level and head-mounted video cameras. Each group as a whole was also audio- and videotaped and noise level readings were recorded. Analysis of the acoustical and phonological properties of language heard by each student has demonstrated that the language variety used in these noisy and reverberant settings is similar to that of individuals with hearing impairments. This paper reports similarities between the syntactic structures and pragmatic strategies used by hearing impaired children and normally hearing children in noisy contexts. [Work supported by Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, University of British Columbia.

  13. Temporal motifs reveal homophily, gender-specific patterns and group talk in mobile communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kovanen, Lauri; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2013-01-01

    Electronic communication records provide detailed information about temporal aspects of human interaction. Previous studies have shown that individuals' communication patterns have complex temporal structure, and that this structure has system-wide effects. In this paper we use mobile phone records to show that interaction patterns involving multiple individuals have non-trivial temporal structure that cannot be deduced from a network presentation where only interaction frequencies are taken into account. We apply a recently introduced method, temporal motifs, to identify interaction patterns in a temporal network where nodes have additional attributes such as gender and age. We then develop a null model that allows identifying differences between various types of nodes so that these differences are independent of the network based on interaction frequencies. We find gender-related differences in communication patters, and show the existence of temporal homophily, the tendency of similar individuals to partic...

  14. A Pattern Construction Scheme for Neural Network-Based Cognitive Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Orcay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inefficient utilization of the frequency spectrum due to conventional regulatory limitations and physical performance limiting factors, mainly the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR, are prominent restrictions in digital wireless communication. Pattern Based Communication System (PBCS is an adaptive and perceptual communication method based on a Cognitive Radio (CR approach. It intends an SNR oriented cognition mechanism in the physical layer for improvement of Link Spectral Efficiency (LSE. The key to this system is construction of optimal communication signals, which consist of encoded data in different pattern forms (waveforms depending on spectral availabilities. The signals distorted in the communication medium are recovered according to the pre-trained pattern glossary by the perceptual receiver. In this study, we have shown that it is possible to improve the bandwidth efficiency when largely uncorrelated signal patterns are chosen in order to form a glossary that represents symbols for different length data groups and the information can be recovered by the Artificial Neural Network (ANN in the receiver site.

  15. Within-session communication patterns predict alcohol treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Jon M; Moyers, Theresa B

    2015-12-01

    Within-session client speech is theorized to be a key mechanism of behavior change in motivational interviewing (MI), a directional, client-centered approach to behavior change. Client change talk (CT: speech indicating movement toward changing a problematic health behavior) and sustain talk (ST: speech supporting continuing a problematic health behavior) have each shown relationships with outcomes. However, it may be the case that patterns of within-session client speech, rather than counts of client speech, are important for producing change. Recorded initial MI/MET psychotherapy sessions from Project MATCH had been previously rated using the Motivational Interviewing Sequential Code for Observing Process Exchange (MI-SCOPE), a mutually exclusive and exhaustive sequential coding system. From these existing data, session conditional probabilities for transitions of interest (the transition from CT to more CT, and the transition from reflections of CT to CT) were analyzed as empirical Bayes estimates of log-normalized odds ratios. CT frequencies and these log-normalized odds ratios were entered as independent variables into longitudinal generalized estimating equation (GEE) models predicting within-treatment and post-treatment drinking. While all variables were significant predictors of within-treatment drinking, only the CT-CT transition emerged as a significant predictor of decreased drinking after treatment. The momentum of a client's speech about change during an MI session may be a better predictor of outcome than is a simple frequency count of it. Attending not only to the mere occurrence of CT, but also recognizing the importance of consecutive client statements of CT, may improve treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Leaders' Communication Pattern: A Predictor of Lecturers' Job Performance in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwatoyin, Fashiku Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the influence leaders' communication pattern has on lecturers' job performance in Kwara State Colleges of Education, Nigeria. Using the descriptive survey method, the population of the study was made up of all lecturers and students of the existing three state government owned Colleges of Education in the state. Five hundred…

  17. The Intergenerational Transmission of Environmental Concern: The Influence of Parents and Communication Patterns within the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeusen, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the intergenerational transmission of environmental concern and the explanatory power of communication patterns within the family. Using representative data from the Parent-Child Socialization Study in Belgium (PCSS, 2012), this article focuses on the relative influence of the mother and the father, and gender-specific…

  18. The Effect of Teaching Communicative Patterns of Pluralistic Family on Couples Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Molavi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: One of the basic elements declared in positive psychology is the concept of happiness. Researches have shown that without concerning how achieved, happiness can enhance our health. People who are happy feel more secure, decide easier, and are more satisfied of the people who live with. The aim of the present study was to measure the efficiency of teaching communicative pattern of pluralistic family on the happiness of couples. Materials & Method:This experimental study was designed to have a pre-test and post test and also a control group. Subjects of this study were comprised of consultation centers clients in Shiraz and was based on random sampling. Forty couples were selected according to the revised version of family communication patterns of Koerner and Fitzpatrick. Two dimensions, namely laisseze fair and protective family patterns, were taken into account through the process of selection . Oxford Happiness Invintory was administered to 40 couples and they were randomly divided into a control and an experimental group. Ten training sessions, 90- minute each, were held for experimental group exposed to pluralistic communication patterns. Three Couples declined and finally 34 couples were analyzed.The test was run for both groups and data was analyzed with covariance analysis method using SPSSI5. Results:The results of the present study revealed that with regard to happiness, there is a meaningful difference in both groups (p<0.005. The difference also existed between the pretest and post test scores of happiness test in both groups (p<0.0001. However, communication patterns and interaction between both groups did not reach a meaningful level. Conclusion: Based on the finding, it can be concluded that listening to and speaking with each other play a key role in happiness, therefore pluralistic communication methods based on high levels of listing speaking interactions can be effective happiness of couples.

  19. Eye-movement patterns are associated with communicative competence in autistic spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Courtenay Frazier; Brock, Jon; Cragg, Lucy; Einav, Shiri; Griffiths, Helen; Nation, Kate

    2009-07-01

    Investigations using eye-tracking have reported reduced fixations to salient social cues such as eyes when participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) view social scenes. However, these studies have not distinguished different cognitive phenotypes. The eye-movements of 28 teenagers with ASD and 18 typically developing peers were recorded as they watched videos of peers interacting in familiar situations. Within ASD, we contrasted the viewing patterns of those with and without language impairments. The proportion of time spent viewing eyes, mouths and other scene details was calculated, as was latency of first fixation to eyes. Finally, the association between viewing patterns and social-communicative competence was measured. Individuals with ASD and age-appropriate language abilities spent significantly less time viewing eyes and were slower to fixate the eyes than typically developing peers. In contrast, there were no differences in viewing patterns between those with language impairments and typically developing peers. Eye-movement patterns were not associated with social outcomes for either language phenotype. However, increased fixations to the mouth were associated with greater communicative competence across the autistic spectrum. Attention to both eyes and mouths is important for language development and communicative competence. Differences in fixation time to eyes may not be sufficient to disrupt social competence in daily interactions. A multiple cognitive deficit model of ASD, incorporating different language phenotypes, is advocated.

  20. A study on family communication pattern and parenting styles with quality of life in adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanavi, Fariba Shahhraki; Baghbanian, Abdolvahab; Shovey, Mehdi Faraji; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between parenting styles and family communication patterns with adolescent's quality of life. The cross-sectional study was carried out on 439 randomly selected adolescents in the city of Zahedan, Iran, from January to July 2011.The subjects were asked to complete the KIDSCREEN-52 health-related quality of life questionnaire, while their parents were asked to complete the Diana Brinder's Test to show their parenting styles. SPSS 15 was used to analyse data. Most parents had 'authoritative' parenting style (n = 380; 86.6%). Pluralistic (n = 170; 38.7%) and consensual (n = 152; 34.6%) patterns were the most frequent styles of communication in families. Data suggested a significant relationship between parenting style and some dimensions of quality of life, including physical well-being, psychological well-being, social support and peers, and autonomy (p parent relation and home life (p parents while raising their children.

  1. Scientific communication in clinical psychology: examining patterns of citations and references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselica, Andrew M; Ruscio, John

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of scientific communication used citation mapping, establishing psychology as a 'hub science' from which many other fields draw information. Within psychology, the clinical and counselling discipline is a major 'knowledge broker'. This study analyzed scientific communication among three major subdisciplines of clinical psychology-the cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic and humanistic schools of thought-by examining patterns of references within and citations to 305 target articles published in leading journals of these subdisciplines. The results suggest that clinical researchers of each theoretical orientation engage in more insular scientific communication than an integrationist would find desirable and that cognitive-behavioural articles are more closely connected to mainstream psychology and related fields. Eclectic practitioners draw on several different theoretical orientations to inform their practice; as such, they should be interested in understanding the patterns of scientific communication within and across theoretical orientations. Practitioners work in a variety of different mental health settings, with a variety of other professionals in psychology-related fields, and should be interested in how much influence their particular theoretical orientation has on the work of colleagues. Many practitioners rely on new, evidence-based research to inform their work. The results of this study provide these individuals with an objective measure of the influence of empirical work in different areas of clinical psychology. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Similarity of relationship standards, couple communication patterns, and marital satisfaction among Chinese couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Peilian; Epstein, Norman B; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lam, Debbie O B; Li, Xiaoming

    2013-10-01

    Prior research has indicated that partners' standards for their couple relationships are associated with their levels of marital satisfaction, both in terms of similarity between standards and the degree to which partners are able to resolve differences in their standards constructively. However, little is known about processes through which couples effectively cope with conflicting relationship standards. Furthermore, most research on relationship standards has been conducted in Western countries, and there is a need for more information about the role of this form of cognition in Asian and other cultures. In the present study, relationship standards and communication patterns were examined in relation to marital satisfaction among 297 community couples in a northern city in mainland China. Results indicated that the similarity of relationship standards of members of real couples was significantly higher than randomly matched male-female pairs. A hypothesized conceptual model predicting marital satisfaction from partners' similarity of relationship standards and communication patterns was tested using structural equation modeling. Similarity of relationship standards can affect couple's marital satisfaction indirectly, through perceived communication patterns. The interdependence between husbands' and wives' aspects of relationship functioning also are examined and discussed.

  3. Communication Patterns in the Perioperative Environment During Epic Electronic Health Record System Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Tynan H; Jennings, Samantha J; Levine, Wilton C

    2017-02-01

    In April 2016, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) went live with the Epic electronic health records (EHR) system, replacing a variety of EHRs that previously existed in different departments throughout the hospital. At the time of implementation, the Vocera® Badge Communication System, a wireless hands-free communication device distributed to perioperative team members, had increased perioperative communication flow and efficiency. As a quality improvement effort to better understand communication patterns during an EHR go-live, we monitored our Vocera call volume and user volume before, during and after our go-live. We noticed that call volume and user volume significantly increased during our immediate go-live period and quickly returned to baseline levels. We also noticed that call volume increased during periods of unplanned EHR downtime long after our immediate go-live period. When planning the implementation of a new EHR, leadership must plan for and support this critical communication need at the time of the go-live and must also be aware of these needs during unplanned downtime.

  4. Human infants and baboons show the same pattern of handedness for a communicative gesture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Meunier

    Full Text Available To test the role of gestures in the origin of language, we studied hand preferences for grasping or pointing to objects at several spatial positions in human infants and adult baboons. If the roots of language are indeed in gestural communication, we expect that human infants and baboons will present a comparable difference in their pattern of laterality according to task: both should be more right-hand/left-hemisphere specialized when communicating by pointing than when simply grasping objects. Our study is the first to test both human infants and baboons on the same communicative task. Our results show remarkable convergence in the distribution of the two species' hand biases on the two kinds of tasks: In both human infants and baboons, right-hand preference was significantly stronger for the communicative task than for grasping objects. Our findings support the hypothesis that left-lateralized language may be derived from a gestural communication system that was present in the common ancestor of baboons and humans.

  5. Patterns of interaction between caregiver and child (two to seven-years-old with complex communication needs and cerebral palsy, using Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Chaves Cruz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the communicative interaction patterns of 40 children (from two to seven years of age with complex communication needs with cerebral palsy using Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems (AACS with their primary caregivers. The dyads were videotaped in a free-play situation for 15 minutes considering five categories of variables: mother-child communication patterns; conversational management; implicit educational strategies; turn-taking, and communication functions. The findings indicated a pattern of mother-directed initiation of interaction, 85% of them doing so many times and only 15% doing so only occasionally. Similar results were obtained with different formulations of questions: the results revealed that 85% of the mothers directed their children with questions that favoured Yes/No replies. In the turn-taking analysis, 70% of caregivers that received training in AACS managed the communication interaction with their children in a compensated way as compared with 40.6% of those who did not receive such a training. Regarding duration of training in AACS, 72% of mothers with less than 12 months of training failed to respond to children’s communication attempts through sounds as compared with 45.0% of those with more than 12 month’s training in AACS. Communicative functions were seen to be independent of the type of AACS employed. Future research is discussed in the light of the present finding.

  6. Communication patterns and satisfaction levels in three-dimensional versus real-life intimate relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Richard L; Murphy, Nora A; Ávalos, M Clementina

    2011-10-01

    The present study compared communication patterns and satisfaction levels between three-dimensional (3D) and real-life intimate relationships using a sample of 71 participants who were concurrently involved in an intimate relationship within Second Life and a separate real-life romantic relationship. Participants indicated that the quality of their communication was significantly better in their Second-Life relationship and that they experienced higher levels of satisfaction with their virtual partners. The more positive or idealized view of the 3D relationships may have been due to higher levels of focused interaction and reduced stressors in the virtual world and the greater length, and associated problems, in participant's real-life relationships. In addition, the presence of a concurrent relationship within Second Life could have negatively affected participant's judgments of their real-life relationships. These data offer the first detailed assessment of communication patterns and satisfaction levels in intimate relationships across the real and 3D virtual realms as the number of users and romantic partners in immersive virtual environments continue to grow.

  7. Associations between clinical and sociodemographic data and patterns of communication in pediatric oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kohlsdorf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pediatric communication directly contributes to treatment adherence, fewer symptoms, better clinical responses, healthier treatment adaptation and management of psychosocial issues. This study aimed to evaluate associations between the clinical and sociodemographic data of caregivers and children and the communicative patterns of pediatricians. Three oncohematology physicians and 44 child-caregiver dyads took part, with audio recording of 146 medical consultations. The physicians interacted more often with older children, offering more guidance, clarifying doubts, and asking for information. The number of questions from children and caregivers was positively correlated with the physician’s communicative behaviors. However, there was no association between the age of the children and the number of doubts of the patients. The diagnosis, treatment time, family income, marital status and caregiver’s level of education were associated with the amount of interaction provided by physicians to the children and caregivers. This study offers subsides relevant to psychosocial interventions that may improve communication in pediatric oncohematology settings.

  8. Methods for measuring the impact of health information technologies on clinicians' patterns of work and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Johanna I; Ampt, Amanda; Williamson, Margaret; Nguyen, Ken; Kearney, Leanne

    2007-01-01

    Evidence regarding how health information technologies influence clinical work patterns and support efficient practices is limited. Traditional paper-based data collection methods are unable to capture clinical work complexity and communication patterns. Our objective was to design and test an electronic data collection tool for work measurement studies which would allow efficient, accurate and reliable data collection, and capture work complexity. We developed software on a personal digital assistant (PDA) which captures details of nurses' work; what task, with whom, and with what; multi-tasking; interruptions and event duration. During field-testing over seven months across four hospital wards, fifty-two nurses were observed for 250 hours. Inter-rater reliability scores were maintained at over 85%. Only 1% of tasks did not match the classification developed. Over 40% of nurses' time was spent in direct care or professional communication, with 11.8% in multi-tasking. Nurses were interrupted approximately every 49 minutes. One quarter of interruptions occurred while nurses were preparing or administering medications. This approach produces data which provides greater insights into patterns of clinician's work than has previously been possible.

  9. Quantitative Content Analysis of Communication Patterns on Facebook: A Case Study of the Croatian Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mato Brautović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the process of involving citizens more deeply in the democratic process, Facebook is becoming an increasingly important tool for governments in policy making. Facebook has the potential to increase political participation, but many governments fail to use it in the right way, because they just share information online and do not engage with their followers/citizens. This paper shows how the Croatian government is using Facebook and the communication patterns resulting from their work. The quantitative analysis of 20,546 posts and 52,311 comments show that communication is one way, rather than interactive. Government users do not follow the 90-9-1- rule of thumb for social networks.

  10. Family communication patterns moderate the relationship between psychological reactance and willingness to talk about organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Allison M; Quick, Brian L

    2012-01-01

    Considerable research has investigated how psychological reactance affects individuals' responses to health promotion messages, but little is known about how family processes might moderate the reactance process. In this study, 301 participants were exposed to a persuasive message about organ donation. The moderating role of family communication patterns in the reactance process was tested using hierarchical regression. We found that family conversation orientation had a direct effect on willingness to talk with family members about being an organ donor and that family conformity orientation and family conversation orientation each interacted with reactance to predict willingness to communicate with family about donation. Theoretically, these results extend psychological reactance theory by considering how interpersonal factors affect the reactance process. Practically, the findings suggest that for optimal impact, family processes should be considered in the design of messages promoting organ donation.

  11. Electrochemical communication with the inside of cells using micro-patterned vertical carbon nanofibre electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, F. J.; Cole, M. T.; Hicks, J. M.; Aylott, J. W.; Milne, W. I.; Collins, C. M.; Jackson, S. K.; Silman, N. J.; Mendes, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    With the rapidly increasing demands for ultrasensitive biodetection, the design and applications of new nano-scale materials for development of sensors based on optical and electrochemical transducers have attracted substantial interest. In particular, given the comparable sizes of nanomaterials and biomolecules, there exist plenty of opportunities to develop functional nanoprobes with biomolecules for highly sensitive and selective biosensing, shedding new light on cellular behaviour. Towards this aim, herein we interface cells with patterned nano-arrays of carbon nanofibers forming a nanosensor-cell construct. We show that such a construct is capable of electrochemically communicating with the intracellular environment.

  12. Gender Differences in Communication Behaviors, Spatial Proximity Patterns, and Mobility Habits

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Dong; Dong, Yuxiao; Striegel, Aaron D; Hachen, David; Chawla, Nitesh V

    2016-01-01

    The existence of gender differences in the structure and composition of social networks is a well established finding in the social and behavioral sciences, but researchers continue to debate whether structural, dispositional, or life course factors are the primary driver of these differences. In this paper we extend work on gender differences in social networks to patterns of interaction, propinquity, and connectivity captured via a social sensing platform comprised of an ensemble of individuals' phone calls, text messaging, face-to-face interactions, and traces of their mobility activities. We attempt to isolate dispositional from other factors by focusing on a relatively homogeneous population on a relatively closed setting at the same stage in the life course. Analysis across three different networks along with mobility data reveals systematic gender differences in terms of communicative, distributional, mobility, and spatial proximity tendencies. Most importantly, some patterns observed in the communicat...

  13. Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lang, R.; Singh, N.N.; Didden, H.C.M.; Green, V.A.; Marschik, P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Communication disorders are common among people with intellectual disabilities. Consequently, enhancing the communication skills of such individuals is a major intervention priority. This chapter reviews the nature and prevalence of the speech, language, and communication problems associated with

  14. Popular discourse on expert systems: communication patterns in the acculturation of an A. I. innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opt, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    This study offers an organicist, trialectical communication perspective for analyzing the assumed relationship between technology and society. Other persons who have examined this relationship primarily have construed it as one in which (1) technology drives social change or (2) society drives technological change. Unanswered, though, is: what drives the relationship. This becomes the focus of this study. The study argues that understanding communication patterns about a technology (1) shows the processes by which human beings constitute sense-making scenarios about a technology, (2) makes salient the scenarios' implications for human needs, relationships, and worldview, and (3) provides an alternative approach to thinking about intervention into and side effects arising from the symbolic constitution of the future. The technology considered as case study is expert systems, and, by extension, artificial intelligence. The study focuses on the communication system of AI researchers, business persons, critics, and writers and their roles in inventing pasts, presents, and futures for the technology. The study finds that participants in discourse constitute names for expert systems in relation to the overarching ideology - the American dream.

  15. Multi-Connection Pattern Analysis: Decoding the representational content of neural communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanning; Richardson, Robert Mark; Ghuman, Avniel Singh

    2017-08-13

    The lack of multivariate methods for decoding the representational content of interregional neural communication has left it difficult to know what information is represented in distributed brain circuit interactions. Here we present Multi-Connection Pattern Analysis (MCPA), which works by learning mappings between the activity patterns of the populations as a factor of the information being processed. These maps are used to predict the activity from one neural population based on the activity from the other population. Successful MCPA-based decoding indicates the involvement of distributed computational processing and provides a framework for probing the representational structure of the interaction. Simulations demonstrate the efficacy of MCPA in realistic circumstances. In addition, we demonstrate that MCPA can be applied to different signal modalities to evaluate a variety of hypothesis associated with information coding in neural communications. We apply MCPA to fMRI and human intracranial electrophysiological data to provide a proof-of-concept of the utility of this method for decoding individual natural images and faces in functional connectivity data. We further use a MCPA-based representational similarity analysis to illustrate how MCPA may be used to test computational models of information transfer among regions of the visual processing stream. Thus, MCPA can be used to assess the information represented in the coupled activity of interacting neural circuits and probe the underlying principles of information transformation between regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Does teaching method affect students' perceptions regarding communication patterns in pediatric dentistry? A comparison of lecture and video methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwitzki, Matthias; Meller, Christina; Beyer, Christine

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dental students' perceptions regarding six communication patterns for use in pediatric dentistry differed depending on whether they were taught by lecturing or by video-based teaching. Prior to the introduction of interpersonal skills in a clinical course in pediatric dentistry, four consecutive cohorts of students (n=107) in a German dental school were divided equally into two groups. Group one (n=57) was taught by video sequences and group two (n=50) by conventional lecture. Six communication patterns were presented: involvement of the child's toy(s), speaking in positive phrases, mentioning a personal aspect, recalling positive behavior of the patient, addressing fear verbally, and complimenting the patient. Immediately after the presentation, students were asked by means of a questionnaire about their assessment of and intentions regarding the clinical application of the communication patterns presented. After completion of the course, they were asked about the communication patterns that had been used. There were significant differences for three communication patterns in favor of video-based teaching (p<0.05); there were no significant differences regarding the intention for clinical application and the actual clinical application. In this study, students perceived differences between video-based teaching and lecturing regarding ease of use, but they did not seem to benefit from one method over the other regarding clinical application.

  17. Hemodynamic Patterns of Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms: A Possible Association with Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, MA; Putman, CM; Sheridan, M; Cebral, JR

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study is to characterize the different flow types present at anterior communicating artery aneurysms and investigate possible associations with rupture. Methods Patient-specific computational models of 26 anterior communicating artery aneurysms were constructed from 3D rotational angiography images. Bilateral images were acquired in 15 patients who had both A1 segments of the anterior cerebral arteries and models of the whole anterior circulation were created by fusing the reconstructed left and right arterial trees. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed under pulsatile flow conditions measured on a healthy subject. Visualizations of flow velocity, instantaneous streamlines, and wall shear stress were performed. These were analyzed for flow patterns, size of the impaction zone, and peak wall shear stress (WSS) and then correlations made with prior history of rupture. Results Aneurysms with small impaction zones were more likely to have ruptured than those with large impaction zones (83% vs. 63%). Maximum intra-aneurysmal WSS (MWSS) for the unruptured aneurysms ranged from 10 to 230 dyn/cm2 (mean 114 dyn/cm2) compared with ruptured aneurysms from 35–1500 dyn/cm2 (mean 271 dyn/cm2). This difference in MWSS was statistically significant at 90% confidence levels (p=0.10). Conclusions Aneurysms with small impaction zones, higher flow rates entering the aneurysm, and elevated maximum wall shear stress are associated with a clinical history of previous rupture. PMID:19131411

  18. Effects of nursing unit spatial layout on nursing team communication patterns, quality of care, and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ying; Becker, Franklin; Wurmser, Teri; Bliss-Holtz, Jane; Hedges, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Studies investigating factors contributing to improved quality of care have found that effective team member communication is among the most critical and influential aspects in the delivery of quality care. Relatively little research has examined the role of the physical design of nursing units on communication patterns among care providers. Although the concept of decentralized unit design is intended to increase patient safety, reduce nurse fatigue, and control the noisy, chaotic, and crowded space associated with centralized nursing stations, until recently little attention has been paid to how such nursing unit designs affected communication patterns or other medical and organizational outcomes. Using a pre/post research design comparing more centralized or decentralized unit designs with a new multi-hub design, the aim of this study was to describe the relationship between the clinical spatial environment and its effect on communication patterns, nurse satisfaction, distance walked, organizational outcomes, patient safety, and patient satisfaction. Hospital institutional data indicated that patient satisfaction increased substantially. Few significant changes were found in communication patterns; no significant changes were found in nurse job satisfaction, patient falls, pressure ulcers, or organizational outcomes such as average length of stay or patient census.

  19. Emergence of long-range correlations and bursty activity patterns in online communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarasa, Pietro; Bonaventura, Moreno

    2015-12-01

    Research has suggested that the activity occurring in a variety of social, economic, and technological systems exhibits long-range fluctuations in time. Pronounced levels of rapidly occurring events are typically observed over short periods of time, followed by long periods of inactivity. Relatively few studies, however, have shed light on the degree to which inhomogeneous temporal processes can be detected at, and emerge from, different levels of analysis. Here we investigate patterns of human activity within an online forum in which communication can be assessed at three intertwined levels: the micro level of the individual users; the meso level of discussion groups and continuous sessions; and the macro level of the whole system. To uncover the relation between different levels, we conduct a number of numerical simulations of a zero-crossing model in which users' behavior is constrained by progressively richer and more realistic rules of social interaction. Results indicate that, when users are solipsistic, their bursty behavior is not sufficient for generating heavy-tailed interevent time distributions at a higher level. However, when users are socially interdependent, the power spectra and interevent time distributions of the simulated and real forums are remarkably similar at all levels of analysis. Social interaction is responsible for the aggregation of multiple bursty activities at the micro level into an emergent bursty activity pattern at a higher level. We discuss the implications of the findings for an emergentist account of burstiness in complex systems.

  20. Investigating the Effects of Information and Communication Technology (ICT on Citizens’ Travel Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Soltani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study makes an effort to investigate the effects of Information and Communication Technology (ICT on daily urban travel patterns. The main research question is based on the capability of ICT in reducing trip production (generation and attraction. The results obtained from the analysis of the data extracted from a questionnaire given to a sample population of 300 people from Golestan Town, Shiraz-South of Iran - in 2011 revealed that there is a tendency towards decreasing the amount of urban travels through encouraging virtual travels and telecommuting. Most of the people who answered the questionnaire tend to have an economical approach towards the daily travel patterns through the use of at least one ICT method for special trips. On the other hand, the majority of the people questioned believed that ICT has not been full successful in replacing physical trips to supply various needs and can only be of use as a powerful supplement for the purpose of decreasing the amount of physical trips if the existing services are improved and enjoy a higher level of public satisfaction.

  1. Emergence of long-range correlations and bursty activity patterns in online communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarasa, Pietro; Bonaventura, Moreno

    2015-12-01

    Research has suggested that the activity occurring in a variety of social, economic, and technological systems exhibits long-range fluctuations in time. Pronounced levels of rapidly occurring events are typically observed over short periods of time, followed by long periods of inactivity. Relatively few studies, however, have shed light on the degree to which inhomogeneous temporal processes can be detected at, and emerge from, different levels of analysis. Here we investigate patterns of human activity within an online forum in which communication can be assessed at three intertwined levels: the micro level of the individual users; the meso level of discussion groups and continuous sessions; and the macro level of the whole system. To uncover the relation between different levels, we conduct a number of numerical simulations of a zero-crossing model in which users' behavior is constrained by progressively richer and more realistic rules of social interaction. Results indicate that, when users are solipsistic, their bursty behavior is not sufficient for generating heavy-tailed interevent time distributions at a higher level. However, when users are socially interdependent, the power spectra and interevent time distributions of the simulated and real forums are remarkably similar at all levels of analysis. Social interaction is responsible for the aggregation of multiple bursty activities at the micro level into an emergent bursty activity pattern at a higher level. We discuss the implications of the findings for an emergentist account of burstiness in complex systems.

  2. Holy Koran's Pattern in the Cultural Communication of Islam and Christianity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Ehtemam

    2015-12-01

    an announcement of  divine mercy and forgiveness, explained by Holy Koran. 4-        In this phase, if the Christians refuse to accept the truthfulness of Islam because of prejudice, jealousy or ignorance, the Holy Koran warns them to follow the realities of their religion and to be united with Islam based on the monotheism. 5-        If the warning is not followed and accepted, the Holy Koran invites the Christian, based on the logic  to consider their belief system and wants them to rethink with common sense about what they ignore or believe superstitiously and to follow the divine path. 6-        In this stage of communication, if the Christians continue to insist on their beliefs and ignorance, the Holy Koran warns them explicitly about the damnation, suffering and loss. 7-        At the end, if the Christians do not abandon their beliefs and try to influence the Muslims by creating division and confusion, the Holy Koran orders to wage war against them. It then curses them and warns them about suffering in this very world. Looking to these seven steps of communicating, it can be concluded based on the Holy Koran teachings that the pattern of the inter-cultural communication between Muslims and Christians is the monotheism and staying away from polytheism. The more this pattern is reinforced and highlighted, the more this closeness and communication will be constructive and efficient. The Holy Koran presents seven practices and solutions. If the Holy Koran accepts and respects some of the foundations of Christianity (such as the Holy Bible, Jesus Christ, the Apostles and the chastity of Saint Mary in these practices which are based on the monotheism and refusal of polytheism, it is because they are all centered around the monotheistic principles. Whenever there is a deviation from these principles, the Holy Koran warns and invites the people to consider their beliefs. It even orders explicitly to wage war to make the Christians return

  3. Holy Koran\\\\\\'s Pattern in the Cultural Communication of Islam and Christianity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Arzani

    2016-01-01

    an announcement of  divine mercy and forgiveness, explained by Holy Koran. 4-        In this phase, if the Christians refuse to accept the truthfulness of Islam because of prejudice, jealousy or ignorance, the Holy Koran warns them to follow the realities of their religion and to be united with Islam based on the monotheism. 5-        If the warning is not followed and accepted, the Holy Koran invites the Christian, based on the logic  to consider their belief system and wants them to rethink with common sense about what they ignore or believe superstitiously and to follow the divine path. 6-        In this stage of communication, if the Christians continue to insist on their beliefs and ignorance, the Holy Koran warns them explicitly about the damnation, suffering and loss. 7-        At the end, if the Christians do not abandon their beliefs and try to influence the Muslims by creating division and confusion, the Holy Koran orders to wage war against them. It then curses them and warns them about suffering in this very world. Looking to these seven steps of communicating, it can be concluded based on the Holy Koran teachings that the pattern of the inter-cultural communication between Muslims and Christians is the monotheism and staying away from polytheism. The more this pattern is reinforced and highlighted, the more this closeness and communication will be constructive and efficient. The Holy Koran presents seven practices and solutions. If the Holy Koran accepts and respects some of the foundations of Christianity (such as the Holy Bible, Jesus Christ, the Apostles and the chastity of Saint Mary in these practices which are based on the monotheism and refusal of polytheism, it is because they are all centered around the monotheistic principles. Whenever there is a deviation from these principles, the Holy Koran warns and invites the people to consider their beliefs. It even orders explicitly to wage war to make the Christians return

  4. Dietary patterns and non-communicable disease risk in Indian adults: secondary analysis of Indian Migration Study data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Edward Jm; Green, Rosemary; Agrawal, Sutapa; Aleksandrowicz, Lukasz; Bowen, Liza; Kinra, Sanjay; Macdiarmid, Jennie I; Haines, Andy; Dangour, Alan D

    2017-08-01

    Undernutrition and non-communicable disease (NCD) are important public health issues in India, yet their relationship with dietary patterns is poorly understood. The current study identified distinct dietary patterns and their association with micronutrient undernutrition (Ca, Fe, Zn) and NCD risk factors (underweight, obesity, waist:hip ratio, hypertension, total:HDL cholesterol, diabetes). Data were from the cross-sectional Indian Migration Study, including semi-quantitative FFQ. Distinct dietary patterns were identified using finite mixture modelling; associations with NCD risk factors were assessed using mixed-effects logistic regression models. India. Migrant factory workers, their rural-dwelling siblings and urban non-migrants. Participants (7067 adults) resided mainly in Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh. Five distinct, regionally distributed, dietary patterns were identified, with rice-based patterns in the south and wheat-based patterns in the north-west. A rice-based pattern characterised by low energy consumption and dietary diversity ('Rice & low diversity') was consumed predominantly by adults with little formal education in rural settings, while a rice-based pattern with high fruit consumption ('Rice & fruit') was consumed by more educated adults in urban settings. Dietary patterns met WHO macronutrient recommendations, but some had low micronutrient contents. Dietary pattern membership was associated with several NCD risk factors. Five distinct dietary patterns were identified, supporting sub-national assessments of the implications of dietary patterns for various health, food system or environment outcomes.

  5. micromapST: Exploring and Communicating Geospatial Patterns in US State Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Williams Pickle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The linked micromap graphical design uses color to link each geographic units name with its statistical graphic elements and map location across columns in a single row. Perceptual grouping of these rows into smaller chunks of data facilitates local focus and visual queries. Sorting the geographic units (the rows in different ways can reveal patterns in the statistics, in the maps, and in the association between them. This design supports both exploration and communication in a multivariate geospatial context. This paper describes micromapST, an R package that implements the linked micromap graphical design specifically formatted for US state data, a common geographic unit used to display geographic patterns of health and other factors within the US. This package creates a graphic for the 51 geographic units (50 states plus DC that fits on a single page, with states comprising the rows and state names, graphs and maps the columns. The graphical element for each state/column combination may represent a single statistical value, e.g., by a dot or horizontal bar, with or without an uncertainty measure. The distribution of values within each state, e.g., for counties, may be displayed by a boxplot. Two values per state may be represented by an arrow indicating the change in values, e.g., between two time points, or a scatter plot of the paired data. Categorical counts may be displayed as horizontal stacked bars, with optional standardization to percents or centering of the bars. Layout options include specification of the sort order for the rows, the graph/map linking colors, a vertical reference line and others. Output may be directed to the screen but is best displayed on a printer (or as a print image saved to any file format supported by R. The availability of a pre-defined linked micromap layout specifically for the 51 US states with graphical displays of single values, data distributions, change between two values, scatter plots of paired

  6. Linking Contextual Factors with Rhetorical Pattern Shift: Direct and Indirect Strategies Recommended in English Business Communication Textbooks in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhua; Zhu, Pinfan

    2011-01-01

    Scholars have consistently claimed that rhetorical patterns are culturally bound, and indirectness is a defining characteristic of Chinese writing. Through examining how the rhetorical mechanism of directness and indirectness is presented in 29 English business communication textbooks published in China, we explore how English business…

  7. Linking Contextual Factors with Rhetorical Pattern Shift: Direct and Indirect Strategies Recommended in English Business Communication Textbooks in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhua; Zhu, Pinfan

    2011-01-01

    Scholars have consistently claimed that rhetorical patterns are culturally bound, and indirectness is a defining characteristic of Chinese writing. Through examining how the rhetorical mechanism of directness and indirectness is presented in 29 English business communication textbooks published in China, we explore how English business…

  8. Pattern of Nutritional Intake among Obese Undergraduate in Faculty of Communication Studies Universitas Padjadjaran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilavenmalar Perianan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity has become the 5th leading cause of death worldwide in 2010. It is a combination of genetic susceptibility, increased availability of high energy food intake and decreased requirements for physical activity in modern society. The increase in calorie intake among obese people often leads to many chronic diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to observe calorie intake pattern among obese undergraduates. Methods: This study was conducted at Faculty of Communication Studies Universitas Padjadjaran, from September to November 2013. This cross-sectional study used anthropometric measurement based on Asian Body Mass cut-off points, which the screening was conducted on 512 undergraduate students, consisting of 103 undergraduates, overweight (50 and obese (53. From 53 undergraduates, 30 respondents were randomly selected. The respondents were then interviewed using 3x24 hours Food Recall questionnaire, conducted on two weekdays and one weekend to observe their pattern of nutritional intake. Total number of calories was categorized into few groups according to the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA 2012. Results: From the thirty obese undergraduates, both male (11 and female (9 consumed more excess protein in daily life. Consumption of carbohydrate and energy was significantly normal. Common consumption of food as daily basis contained more carbohydrate then protein, fats or energy. Conclusions: Prevalence of obesity is still high. Frequent meal and high intake of carbohydrates has become factors to nutritional imbalance of obese undergraduates. Types of food most widely consumed are white rice, fried chicken, tofu, tempe (asian food made from fermenting soybeans and sweetened tea.

  9. Communication channels in general internal medicine: a description of baseline patterns for improved interprofessional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Lingard, Lorelei; Reeves, Scott; Miller, Karen-Lee; Russell, Ann; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2009-07-01

    General internal medicine (GIM) is a communicatively complex specialty because of its diverse patient population and the number and diversity of health care providers working on a medicine ward. Effective interprofessional communication in such information-intensive environments is critical to achieving optimal patient care. Few empirical studies have explored the ways in which health professionals exchange patient information and the implications of their chosen communication forms. In this article, we report on an ethnographic study of health professionals' communication in two GIM wards through the lens of communication genre theory. We categorize and explore communication in GIM into two genre sets-synchronous and asynchronous-and analyze the relationship between them. Our findings reveal an essential relationship between synchronous and asynchronous modes of communication that has implications for the effectiveness of interprofessional collaboration in this and similar health care settings, and is intended to inform efforts to overcome existing interprofessional communication barriers.

  10. Parents' perceptions of communication patterns and effectiveness of use of augmentative and alternative communication systems by their children with Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calculator, Stephen N

    2014-11-01

    The author describes communication patterns and outcomes of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention for individuals with Angelman syndrome. Parents self-administered a web-based survey using Qualtrics software. A series of rating scales and closed questions were used to gather information about individuals' current methods of communication, including AAC devices they were using. Individuals' uses of their single most advanced AAC devices were further explored in terms of associated importance, usefulness, success, acceptance, and functional outcomes. Nonsymbolic methods of communication proved to be very important to individuals, as did electronic AAC devices, although to a lesser extent. Individuals tended to have access to more than one electronic device concurrently. Although numerous devices were cited, mobile technologies, particularly iPads, were especially prevalent. This represented a significant change from a previous investigation. Overall, device use was perceived to be frequently important, accepted, successful, and useful in relation to 8 different factors, although ratings across a series of 19 functional outcomes varied. Differences were noted on several measures when individuals' ages and educational placements were considered. Results suggest a changing landscape in terms of types of devices used, particularly with respect to mobile technologies, and show clear evidence that device use is often, although not uniformly, associated with positive outcomes.

  11. Social media and mobile communications adoption patterns of South African civil society organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiru Pillay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The resurgence of civil society has largely been attributed to the sector’s ability to exploit new interactive technologies and its ability to adapt its communication and mobilisation strategies.Objectives: This study focuses on how South African civil society organisations (CSOs deploy Web 2.0 services and technologies for social advocacy and the context of this technology use.Whilst the literature points to many studies relating to the use of the Internet for advocacy, it also suggests that the role and impact of emerging technologies have not been studied in any detail in CSOs. Such studies have the potential to provide new perspectives to current theoretical frameworks and also to add to the discourse around the use of emerging technologies for advocacy.Method: A survey of South African CSOs explored the level of knowledge of social media services and revealed which services in particular were being adopted.Results: The key findings that emerged were that the sector has a low level of knowledge of social media services and an accompanying low level of adoption. These are partly explained by factors such as macro-economic policies and low levels of Internet penetration and ICT readiness.Conclusion: Further research to determine why certain social media services have been embraced more willingly than others and an analysis of the patterns of adoption to determine any underlying significance or relationships is necessary. An analysis of how CSOs build their advocacy capabilities by appropriating social media and how they thus provide alternate discourses and agendas would be instructive.

  12. Social media and mobile communications adoption patterns of South African civil society organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiru Pillay

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The resurgence of civil society has largely been attributed to the sector’s ability to exploit new interactive technologies and its ability to adapt its communication and mobilisation strategies. Objectives: This study focuses on how South African civil society organisations (CSOs deploy Web 2.0 services and technologies for social advocacy and the context of this technology use. Whilst the literature points to many studies relating to the use of the Internet for advocacy, it also suggests that the role and impact of emerging technologies have not been studied in any detail in CSOs. Such studies have the potential to provide new perspectives to current theoretical frameworks and also to add to the discourse around the use of emerging technologies for advocacy. Method: A survey of South African CSOs explored the level of knowledge of social media services and revealed which services in particular were being adopted. Results: The key findings that emerged were that the sector has a low level of knowledge of social media services and an accompanying low level of adoption. These are partly explained by factors such as macro-economic policies and low levels of Internet penetration and ICT readiness. Conclusion: Further research to determine why certain social media services have been embraced more willingly than others and an analysis of the patterns of adoption to determine any underlying significance or relationships is necessary. An analysis of how CSOs build their advocacy capabilities by appropriating social media and how they thus provide alternate discourses and agendas would be instructive.

  13. Emergent team roles in organizational meetings: Identifying communication patterns via cluster analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Beck, S.J.; Kauffeld, S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous team role taxonomies have largely relied on self-report data, focused on functional roles, and described individual predispositions or personality traits. Instead, this study takes a communicative approach and proposes that team roles are produced, shaped, and sustained in communicative behaviors. To identify team roles communicatively, 59 regular organizational meetings were videotaped and analyzed. Cluster analysis revealed five emergent roles: the solution seeker, the problem anal...

  14. Atypical Verbal Communication Pattern According to Others' Attention in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Kosuke; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka; Okada, Masako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    Children with Williams syndrome (WS) have been reported to often face problems in daily communication and to have deficits in their pragmatic language abilities. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether children with WS could modify their verbal communication according to others' attention in order to share what they did. The children with WS…

  15. Patterns of Change in Willingness to Communicate in Public Speaking Contexts: A Latent Growth Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, Georgeta M.; Bardhan, Nilanjana R.; Hodis, Flaviu A.

    2010-01-01

    This study offers a comprehensive analysis of change in willingness to communicate (WTC) in public speaking contexts (i.e., PS-WTC). The proposed conceptualization of change was tested using longitudinal data collected from a sample of 706 undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory communication course in a US university. Results of latent…

  16. Emergent team roles in organizational meetings: Identifying communication patterns via cluster analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Beck, S.J.; Kauffeld, S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous team role taxonomies have largely relied on self-report data, focused on functional roles, and described individual predispositions or personality traits. Instead, this study takes a communicative approach and proposes that team roles are produced, shaped, and sustained in communicative beh

  17. Patterns of Sexuality Communication between Preadolescents and Their Mothers and Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Sarah C.; Miller, Kim S.; Forehand, Rex; Bau, J. J.; Fasula, Amy; Long, Nicholas; Armistead, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine communication about sexual topics between preadolescents and their mothers and fathers. Participants were 135 African-American mothers, fathers, and their 9- to 12-year-old offspring. Each member of the triad completed a 10-item measure of communication about risk factors for sexual activity, sexual…

  18. A Firm-Growing Model and the Study of Communication Patterns' Effect on the Structure of Firm's Social Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Li, Haigang; Chen, Zhong; Li, Li; He, Da-Ren

    In this article, we propose a firm-growing model, and then collect empirical data to test model validity. The simulation results agree well with the empirical data. We next explore the effect of communication patterns on the growth and structure of firm’s social network and find that the extents to which employees reluctantly interact within or across departments significantly influence the structure of firm’s social network.

  19. Bases for a model of the communication patterns of scientists at the National University of Mexico (UNAM)

    OpenAIRE

    Jane M Russell; Liberman, Sofía

    2002-01-01

    The object of the present study was to develop a model to describe the communication patterns for the scientific publications of researchers in different disciplines affiliated to the National University of Mexico (UNAM). Using information on the scientific production of the different research institutes and centres published in the annual reports of the UNAM from 1997-2000 and analysing its presence in regional and international databases from 1997-1999, it was possible to establish the basi...

  20. UNDERSTANDING THE INFLUENCE OF INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS, INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION PATTERNS AND CONTEXTUAL FACTORS ON TACIT KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER EFFICIENCY IN BUSINESS NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Bowe, Leanne; Lupiáñez,José Luis; Rico, Luis; Holden, Mary T.; Lynch, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    2 ABSTRACT Over the last decade, there has been an upsurge in interest among scholars on the importance of tacit knowledge transfer in firms, due to the belief that tacit knowledge represents a major source of sustainable competitive advantage (Darr and Kurtzberg, 2000). Despite this interest, factors affecting knowledge transfer at the micro level of analysis, namely a firm‟s interpersonal relationships and communication patterns, have been largely ignored, leaving a significant gap in...

  1. The Comparison of Relationship between Family Communication Patterns and Self Concept with Coping Styles in Male and Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Taheri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Since people have different coping styles, the purpose of the present research was to compare the relationship between family communication patterns and self-concept with coping styles among male and female students of Eram Higher Education Institution in Shiraz. Methods: In the present correlation study conducted in 2011 at Eram Higher Education Institution in Shiraz, 229 participants (91 males &119 females were selected by simple random sampling method. Data was collected by using the revised version of family communication patterns questionnaire (RFCP, Koerner & Fitz patrik (2002, Beck's Self-concept Test (CST (1990 and Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS Endler & Parker (1990. Data was analyzed using correlation matrix & independent t-test analysis. Results: According to the result, there was significant correlation between family communication patterns and self-concept with coping styles among male and female students. In the female group, task oriented coping and avoidance oriented coping with conversation orientation and emotion oriented coping with conforming orientation showed positive significant correlation. In male group avoidance orientation coping with conversation orientation and emotion oriented coping with conforming orientation showed positive significant correlation. Also, related to self concept variable, results showed female students task oriented coping and avoidance oriented coping had significant correlation with the self concept variable, but the male students avoidance oriented coping had significant correlation with the self concept variable(P<0/05. Also, the result showed significant difference between two male and female students, in emotion oriented coping, so the female group, emotion oriented coping with (51/48 was more than the orientation within the male group with (48/18, (p<0.05. Conclusion: Family communication patterns and the concept are effective on coping styles. Therefore

  2. An investigation of communication patterns and strategies between international teaching assistants and undergraduate students in university-level science labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Barbara Elas

    This research project investigates communication between international teaching assistants and their undergraduate students in university-level chemistry labs. During the fall semester, introductory-level chemistry lab sections of three experienced non-native speaking teaching assistants and their undergraduate students were observed. Digital audio and video recordings documented fifteen hours of lab communication, focusing on the activities and interactions in the first hour of the chemistry laboratory sessions. In follow-up one-on-one semi-structured interviews, the participants (undergraduates, teaching assistants, and faculty member) reviewed interactions and responded to a 10-item, 7-point Likert-scaled interview. Interactions were classified into success categories based on participants' opinions. Quantitative and qualitative data from the observations and interviews guided the analysis of the laboratory interactions, which examined patterns of conversational listening. Analysis of laboratory communication reveals that undergraduates initiated nearly two-thirds of laboratory communication, with three-fourths of interactions less than 30 seconds in duration. Issues of gender and topics of interaction activity were also explored. Interview data identified that successful undergraduate-teaching assistant communication in interactive science labs depends on teaching assistant listening comprehension skills to interpret and respond successfully to undergraduate questions. Successful communication in the chemistry lab depended on the coordination of visual and verbal sources of information. Teaching assistant responses that included explanations and elaborations were also seen as positive features in the communicative exchanges. Interaction analysis focusing on the listening comprehension demands placed on international teaching assistants revealed that undergraduate-initiated questions often employ deixis (exophoric reference), requiring teaching assistants to

  3. Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  4. An exploration of the communication patterns and language used between clinical geneticists and parents of children with dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emma J; Hodgson, Jan; Stirling, Lesley; White, Susan M

    2014-11-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the interactions between clinical geneticists and parents of children with dysmorphic features during syndrome assessment. Seven families attending a dysmorphology clinic for syndrome assessment consented to have their consultation recorded and transcribed verbatim. Content and discourse analyses were used to study the language and communication patterns of problematic and challenging sections of the consultations, primarily sections concerning the child's appearance and diagnosis which were marked by dysfluency and hesitation, indicators of problematic communication. Findings revealed that the clinical geneticists used a range of communicative strategies when discussing a child's appearance, such as comparing the child's features with those of parents or other individuals and minimizing differences. In doing so they displayed an orientation to the "face-threatening" nature of this communicative task. While geneticists discussed the child's appearance in an extremely sensitive manner, parents tended to describe their child's appearance using direct and objective language. These findings provide novel insight into the complexity of syndrome assessment consultations in a dysmorphology clinic. We suggest that parents may be seeking a more open discussion of their child's appearance, and clinician engagement with this may prove a more effective communication strategy than those currently employed, while remaining sensitive to parents' responses to such a discussion. At the start of the consultation it is important to give parents the opportunity to voice their concerns and expectations, and to explain to parents that a diagnosis may not be reached. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Publication Patterns of Male and Female Faculty Members in the Communication Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Lawrence B.; Nadler, Marjorie Keeshan

    2001-01-01

    Examines sex-based patterns regarding research productivity. Examines the literature regarding sex-based publication patterns; delineates research questions concerning these key variables; reports results of a study regarding publication patterns; and addresses implications of the study's findings for faculty and administrators. Finds that male…

  6. The effect of self-disclosure skill training on communication patterns of referred couples to counseling clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Eghbal; Sanaeimanesh, Mehri

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of self-disclosure skill training on communication patterns of referred couples to counseling clinics in Bandar Abbas. The applied research design was an experimental study using pre-test and post-test, which was performed on a population of all referred couples to counseling clinics in Bandar Abbas who were interested to participate in a self-disclosure training workshop in response to the announcement. This study was performed on 26 couples who were selected by simple, convenient sampling method; however, they were randomly assigned to the control and experiment groups. A pre-test was administrated before self-disclosure training. The applied instrument includes Christensen and Salavy's scale of communication patterns. Participants in the experiment group had six sessions of training workshop, each lasted for 90 min. After the intervention, both groups answered the questionnaire again. The collected data were analyzed with paired t-test and covariance statistics. The results showed that the intervention led to significant (p self-disclosure can help couples to improve their communication and consequently improve their marital satisfaction.

  7. Pattern and quality of scientific communications on drug safety produced by a regional pharmacovigilance center in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palaian S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the pattern and quality of scientific communications on pharmacovigilance can help the regional centers in Nepal and other developing countries to develop approaches for communicating effectively medicine safety issues. This kind of research is lacking in developing countries. Objectives: To analyze the pattern and quality of scientific communications on drug safety produced by the regional pharmacovigilance center at western Nepal. Methodology: Various conference abstracts and journal publications produced by the center during its initial four years of establishment (14th September 2004 till 13th September 2008 were identified. These communications were categorized in to case reports, review articles, conference presentations, short communications, newsletter and bulletin articles, original research and case series. In addition, the quality of the case reports were evaluated as per International Society of Pharmacovigilance/International Society of Pharmacoepidemiology (ISoP/ISPE guidelines on the requirements for submitting case reports on adverse event reports in biomedical journals. Results: During the study period, 53 scientific communications were produced by the staff of the regional pharmacovigilance center in relation with drug safety. Among these, 18 (34% were related to case reports and letters. The median (interquartile range age of the patients described in the case reports was 46.5 (21.7-51.2 years. Among the total 18 ADRs, four were fixed drug eruptions, followed by contact dermatitis (n=2. Majority of the published case reports were related to skin (n=13; 72.2%. Antimicrobials were responsible for 27.8% (n=5 of the case reports. Among the 18 case reports published by the pharmacovigilance center, a majority followed the ISoP/ISPE guidelines. Few parameters like physical examination of the patient experiencing ADR, patient disposition, dosage and administration of the suspected drugs, and drug-reaction interface were

  8. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Document Server

    A. Petrilli

    2013-01-01

    The organisation of the Open Days at the end of September was the single biggest effort of the CMS Communications Group this year. We would like to thank all volunteers for their hard work to show our Point 5 facilities and explain science and technology to the general public. During two days more than 5,000 people visited the CMS detector underground and profited from the surface activities, which included an exhibition on CMS, a workshop on superconductivity, and an activity for our younger visitors involving wooden Kapla blocks. The Communications Group took advantage of the preparations to produce new CMS posters that can be reused at other venues. Event display images have been produced not just for this occasion but also for other exhibits, education purposes, publications etc. During the Open Days, Gilles Jobin, 2012 winner of CERN Collide@CERN prize, performed his Quantum show in Point 5, with the light installation of German artist Julius von Bismarck. Image 3: CERN Open Days at CMS wel...

  9. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor and D. Barney

    2010-01-01

    CMS Centres, Outreach and the 7 TeV Media Event The new CMS Communications group is now established and is addressing three areas that are critical to CMS as it enters the physics operations phase: - Communications Infrastructure, including almost 50 CMS Centres Worldwide, videoconferencing systems, and CERN meeting rooms - Information systems, including the internal and external Web sites as well as the document preparation and management systems - Outreach and Education activities, including working with print, radio and TV media, visits to CMS, and exhibitions. The group has been active in many areas, with the highest priority being accorded to needs of CMS operations and preparations for the major media event planned for 7 TeV collisions. Unfortunately the CMS Centre@CERN suffered a major setback when, on 21st December, a cooling water pipe froze and burst on the floor above the CMS Centre main room. Water poured through the ceiling, flooding the floor and soaking some of the consoles, before e...

  10. Attending to Communication and Patterns of Interaction: Culturally Sensitive Mental Health Care for Groups of Urban, Ethnically Diverse, Impoverished, and Underserved Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molewyk Doornbos, Mary; Zandee, Gail Landheer; DeGroot, Joleen

    2014-07-01

    The United States is ethnically diverse. This diversity presents challenges to nurses, who, without empirical evidence to design culturally congruent interventions, may contribute to mental health care disparities. Using Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality, this study documented communication and interaction patterns of ethnically diverse, urban, impoverished, and underserved women. Using a community-based participatory research framework, 61 Black, Hispanic, and White women participated in focus groups around their experiences with anxiety/depression. Researchers recorded verbal communication, nonverbal behavior, and patterns of interaction. The women's communication and interaction patterns gave evidence of three themes that were evident across all focus groups and five subthemes that emerged along ethnic lines. The results suggest cultural universalities and cultural uniquenesses relative to the communication and interaction patterns of urban, ethnically diverse, impoverished, and underserved women that may assist in the design of culturally sensitive mental health care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Patronen van kommunikatie en hun organisatorisch verband bij de landbouwvoorlichting in Suriname 1967-1969 [Patterns of communication in agricultural information in Surinam 1967-1969

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalshoven, G.

    1969-01-01

    The organization of communication patterns in agricultural information service / assistants were asked about the farmers in their districts / contacts with the farmers / the extent to which advice is accepted and implemented / progressive versus traditional farmers / the influence of politics ( patr

  12. How do conflict and communication patterns between fathers and daughters contribute to or offset eating disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Renée A; Dumlao, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    As many as 22% of young women regularly engage in eating disordered behaviors. Research indicates eating disorders are a result of a complex set of factors, including family environment. This survey research with 210 undergraduate women at 2 universities tests the possibility that father-daughter communication and conflict resolution are related to eating disordered behaviors. Results indicate skilled conflict resolution and open communication between father and daughter may offset eating disorders. A lack of those skills or attempting to resolve conflict in ways that do not offer long-term resolution for both father and daughter can lead to increased eating disordered behaviors. Implications are discussed.

  13. Evaluating the Impact of a Pattern Structure on Communicating Interaction Design Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sunil George

    2011-01-01

    This study reports findings from a controlled experiment evaluating the benefits of structuring design advice as patterns. Over the years, the pattern concept from architecture has become a native within the HCI community and its related discussions on sharing design knowledge. It is argued that the context-rich, and tangible, nature of patterns…

  14. A comparison of facial color pattern and gazing behavior in canid species suggests gaze communication in gray wolves (Canis lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayoko Ueda

    Full Text Available As facial color pattern around the eyes has been suggested to serve various adaptive functions related to the gaze signal, we compared the patterns among 25 canid species, focusing on the gaze signal, to estimate the function of facial color pattern in these species. The facial color patterns of the studied species could be categorized into the following three types based on contrast indices relating to the gaze signal: A-type (both pupil position in the eye outline and eye position in the face are clear, B-type (only the eye position is clear, and C-type (both the pupil and eye position are unclear. A-type faces with light-colored irises were observed in most studied species of the wolf-like clade and some of the red fox-like clade. A-type faces tended to be observed in species living in family groups all year-round, whereas B-type faces tended to be seen in solo/pair-living species. The duration of gazing behavior during which the facial gaze-signal is displayed to the other individual was longest in gray wolves with typical A-type faces, of intermediate length in fennec foxes with typical B-type faces, and shortest in bush dogs with typical C-type faces. These results suggest that the facial color pattern of canid species is related to their gaze communication and that canids with A-type faces, especially gray wolves, use the gaze signal in conspecific communication.

  15. A comparison of facial color pattern and gazing behavior in canid species suggests gaze communication in gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Sayoko; Kumagai, Gaku; Otaki, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Kohshima, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    As facial color pattern around the eyes has been suggested to serve various adaptive functions related to the gaze signal, we compared the patterns among 25 canid species, focusing on the gaze signal, to estimate the function of facial color pattern in these species. The facial color patterns of the studied species could be categorized into the following three types based on contrast indices relating to the gaze signal: A-type (both pupil position in the eye outline and eye position in the face are clear), B-type (only the eye position is clear), and C-type (both the pupil and eye position are unclear). A-type faces with light-colored irises were observed in most studied species of the wolf-like clade and some of the red fox-like clade. A-type faces tended to be observed in species living in family groups all year-round, whereas B-type faces tended to be seen in solo/pair-living species. The duration of gazing behavior during which the facial gaze-signal is displayed to the other individual was longest in gray wolves with typical A-type faces, of intermediate length in fennec foxes with typical B-type faces, and shortest in bush dogs with typical C-type faces. These results suggest that the facial color pattern of canid species is related to their gaze communication and that canids with A-type faces, especially gray wolves, use the gaze signal in conspecific communication.

  16. Sexual attitudes, pattern of communication, and sexual behavior among unmarried out-of-school youth in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naar-King Sylvie

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, more adolescents are engaging in premarital sex in China. However, only a limited number of studies have explored out-of-school youth's sexual attitudes and behaviors, critical for prevention intervention development. Methods Using data from the baseline survey of a comprehensive sex education program that was conducted in a suburb of Shanghai in 2000–2002, this study describes sexual attitudes, patterns of communication on sexual matters, and premarital sexual behavior among 1,304 out-of-school youth. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the factors associated with youth's premarital sexual intercourse. Results The majority (60% of out-of-school youth held favorable attitudes towards premarital sex. Males were more likely to have favorable attitudes compared with females. Male youth generally did not communicate with either parent about sex, while one-third of female youth talked to their mothers about sexual matters. Both males and females chose their friends as the person with whom they were most likely to talk about sexual matters. About 18% of the youth reported having engaged in sexual intercourse. One-fifth of sexually active youth had always used a contraceptive method, and one-quarter had been pregnant (or had impregnated a partner. There were no gender differences in rate of premarital sex or frequency of contraceptive use. Multivariate analysis revealed that age, education, family structure, parent's discipline, attitudes towards premarital sex, pattern of communication and dating were significantly associated with youth premarital sex. Conclusion A substantial proportion of out-of-school youth engage in risky sexual behaviors. Prevention programs that empower communication and sexual negotiation skills, and promote condom use should be implemented for this vulnerable group.

  17. Fixed channel assignment in cellular communication systems considering the whole set of packed patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Pedro Manuel F. C.; Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of fixed channel assignment in cellular communication systems with nonuniform traffic distribution. The objective of the channel assignment is to minimise the average blocking probability. Methods for finding a good allocation can be based on first building a numb...

  18. The power of communication. Modifying behaviour: Effectively influencing nutrition patterns of patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, F.R.T.; Verheijden, M.W.; Baartmans, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Every year 7000 people die from obesity and another 13 000 people die by wrong diets in The Netherlands. Part of this problem can be solved when the communication between general practitioners (GPs) and patients about nutrition and diets improves. There are four activities that can contribute greatl

  19. Enhanced Cyberspace Defense through Covert Publish-Subscribe Broker Pattern Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    time constraint imposed. For example, a hard real-time system such as an automotive airbag system must operate within fractions of a second. The...communications between the users? Recall from Chapter II however that data points to the sustained presence of adversaries inside the borders of

  20. Communication Practice vs. Pattern Practice "or a Live Teacher Is Absolutely Necessary"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    A language course has two components: (1) the course content; and (2) the presentation of that content. This article deals with the presentation component. Its main thesis is this: Since the ultimate goal of language learning is communication, classroom presentation should, from the outset, be directed toward the development of communication…

  1. The power of communication. Modifying behaviour: Effectively influencing nutrition patterns of patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, F.R.T.; Verheijden, M.W.; Baartmans, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Every year 7000 people die from obesity and another 13 000 people die by wrong diets in The Netherlands. Part of this problem can be solved when the communication between general practitioners (GPs) and patients about nutrition and diets improves. There are four activities that can contribute greatl

  2. Changing Patterns of Parent-Teacher Communication and Parent Involvement from Preschool to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Harrison, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    PreschoolThis study investigated the nature of parent involvement and parent-educator communication in prior-to-school early childhood settings and school, to explore relations to social capital variables and consistencies and changes in practices over time. Parent interview and teacher questionnaire data from two waves of the Longitudinal Study…

  3. Acoustic patterns and communicative functions of phrase-final F0 rises in German

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombrowski, Ernst; Niebuhr, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic features and communicative functions of phrase-final F(0) rises starting before an accented-vowel onset are analysed in a corpus of German unscripted speech. Two conversational conditions are examined: turn-yielding and turn-holding. The most important feature distinguishing rises...

  4. Communication Patterns in Adult-Infant Interactions in Western and Non-Western Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Heidi; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes the early communication structure in adult-child interactions with two- to six-month old babies in Western (West Germany, Greece) and non-Western (Yanomami, Trobriand) societies. Discusses universal international verbal and non-verbal structures reflecting intuitive parenting programs. (FMW)

  5. Usage Patterns of Communication Interfaces for Social Support among At-Risk Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passig, David

    2014-01-01

    Social and interpersonal support has mostly been carried out face-to-face. However, the internet was able, in the last couple of decades, to facilitate social interactions through a range of computer-mediated communication (CMC) interfaces--from email applications, chat-rooms, forums, instant messages (IM), short text messages (SMS), social…

  6. Communicating Epistemic Stance: How Speech and Gesture Patterns Reflect Epistemicity and Evidentiality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseano, Paolo; González, Montserrat; Borràs-Comes, Joan; Prieto, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how epistemic stance is encoded and perceived in face-to-face communication when language is regarded as comprised by speech and gesture. Two studies were conducted with this goal in mind. The first study consisted of a production task in which participants performed opinion reports. Results showed that speakers communicate…

  7. A Comparison of Empathic Communication Pattern for Teenagers and Older People in Online Support Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriaraya, Panote; Tang, Caleb; Ang, Chee Siang; Pfeil, Ulrike; Zaphiris, Panayiotis

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a study that investigated the occurrences of empathy in online support communities for teenagers. Qualitative content analysis with 400 messages from a discussion board about depression was used to identify how empathy was expressed in the specific online communication. Emphasis was also placed on the comparison of this age…

  8. Fixed channel assignment in cellular communication systems considering the whole set of packed patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Pedro Manuel F. C.; Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of fixed channel assignment in cellular communication systems with nonuniform traffic distribution. The objective of the channel assignment is to minimise the average blocking probability. Methods for finding a good allocation can be based on first building a numb...

  9. Future urbanization patterns: in the Netherlands under the influence of information and communication technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhammad, S.

    2007-01-01

    Computer-based Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are revolutionary in that they change the meaning of distance and accessibility in society. People can now access opportunities (jobs, shopping, education, recreation etc.) in virtual space in a matter of seconds, which in physical spa

  10. The Contribution of Family Communication Patterns to Children's Interpretations of Television Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krcmar, Marina

    1998-01-01

    A study of 191 K-6 children who viewed three violent TV clips showing identical acts of aggression but with different motivations and punishments found that children rated higher in communications were more likely to see motivated violence as more justified, while children higher in control were likely to see punished violence as less justified.…

  11. Future urbanization patterns: in the Netherlands under the influence of information and communication technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhammad, S.

    2007-01-01

    Computer-based Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are revolutionary in that they change the meaning of distance and accessibility in society. People can now access opportunities (jobs, shopping, education, recreation etc.) in virtual space in a matter of seconds, which in physical

  12. Design science research methods and patterns innovating information and communication technology

    CERN Document Server

    Vaishnavi, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    Presenting innovative research methods, this second edition of a bestseller describes a simple and practical methodology for conducting cutting-edge design science research (DSR). It provides comprehensive guidance on how to conduct such research and supplies in-depth treatment of design science theory and the different types of theory that can be generated in design science research.Making novel use of the concept of patterns, it presents 84 research patterns for conducting effective DSR. It emphasizes design science theory throughout and is filled with practical examples of using patterns to

  13. Quality of Language and Purpose of Task: Patterns of Learners' Language on Two Oral Communication Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygate, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Examines the performance of Hungarian secondary school students on two types of unscripted tasks--an argument task and a narrative task. Focuses on grammatical patterns of learner language, and reports significant differences in the learners' performance. (Author/VWL)

  14. Technical Perspective on Using Information Demand Pattern in a Collaborative Recommendation System for Improving E-Mail Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Stamer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Today e-mail communication information is widely used in organizations to distribute information. The increasing volume of received e-mails hinders an efficient work. It becomes more and more difficult to identify relevant e-mails inside this enormous volume of information. This work presents a solution in a multi-user environment by improving an established e-mail client extension based on information demand pattern with a recommendation system. The contributions of this work are (1 the concept and implementation of the solution for a single-user environment using information demand pattern, (2 the concept and architecture to use the solution in a multi-user environment (3 a detailed technical description about the proposed solutions.

  15. A Cadaveric Study of the Communication Patterns Between the Buccal Trunks of the Facial Nerve and the Infraorbital Nerve in the Midface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansatit, Tanvaa; Phanchart, Piyaporn; Chinnawong, Dawinee; Apinuntrum, Prawit; Phetudom, Thavorn; Sahraoui, Yasmina M E

    2016-01-01

    Most nerve communications reported in the literature were found between the terminal branches. This study aimed to clarify and classify patterns of proximal communications between the buccal branches (BN) of the facial nerve and the infraorbital nerve (ION).The superficial musculoaponeurotic system protects any communication sites from conventional dissections. Based on this limitation, the soft tissues of each face were peeled off the facial skull and the facial turn-down flap specimens were dissected from the periosteal view. Dissection was performed in 40 hemifaces to classify the communications in the sublevator space. Communication site was measured from the ala of nose.A double communication was the most common type found in 62.5% of hemifaces. Triple and single communications existed in 25% and 10% of 40 hemiface specimens, respectively. One hemiface had no communication. The most common type of communication occurred between the lower trunk of the BN of the facial nerve and the lateral labial (fourth) branch of the ION (70% in 40 hemifaces). Communication site was deep to the levator labii superioris muscle at 16.2 mm from the nasal ala. Communications between the motor and the sensory nerves in the midface may be important to increase nerve endurance and to compensate functional loss from injury.Proximal communications between the main trunks of the facial nerve and the ION in the midface exist in every face. This implies some specific functions in normal individuals. Awareness of these nerves is essential in surgical procedure in the midface.

  16. Pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pollution in communication air of Hangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nine PAHs were surveyed in communication air of Hangzhou. The results indicated that the PAHs pollution is very serious and the total sum of 9 PAHs, on the average are 3.39- 13.82 μg/m3. The PAHs signatures for all streets are similar to each other. Multivariate statistical techniques were used to investigate source apportionment for PAHs. A factor analysis/multiple regression model was successfully applied to the study. The most important three PAHs sources in communication air are diesel emission, gasoline engine emission, coal-burning accounting for 61. 1 ± 6.4%, 19.9± 8.3%, 10.8 ± 10.8% of total PAHs, respectively. The relationship for three source tracers and total PAHsis: [PAHs] =1.471(±0.155)[Phen] + 2.538 (±2.522)[1-Mepy] +2.254 (±0.943)[Chry] + 1.022 (± 1.767).

  17. Future urbanization patterns: in the Netherlands under the influence of information and communication technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, S.

    2007-01-01

    Computer-based Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are revolutionary in that they change the meaning of distance and accessibility in society. People can now access opportunities (jobs, shopping, education, recreation etc.) in virtual space in a matter of seconds, which in physical space would have needed hours of travelling. But still due to the nature of opportunities and human need to have face to face contact, majority of the opportunities are being accessed in physical spac...

  18. Bursty communication patterns facilitate spreading in a threshold-based epidemic dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Takaguchi, Taro; Holme, Petter

    2015-01-01

    Records of social interactions provide us with new sources of data for understanding how interaction patterns affect collective dynamics. Such human activity patterns are often bursty, i.e., they consist of short periods of intense activity followed by long periods of silence. This burstiness has been shown to affect spreading phenomena; it accelerates epidemic spreading in some cases and slows it down in other cases. We investigate a model of history-dependent contagion. In our model, repeated interactions between susceptible and infected individuals in a short period of time is needed for a susceptible individual to contract infection. We carry out numerical simulations on real temporal network data to find that bursty activity patterns facilitate epidemic spreading in our model.

  19. Bursty communication patterns facilitate spreading in a threshold-based epidemic dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Takaguchi

    Full Text Available Records of social interactions provide us with new sources of data for understanding how interaction patterns affect collective dynamics. Such human activity patterns are often bursty, i.e., they consist of short periods of intense activity followed by long periods of silence. This burstiness has been shown to affect spreading phenomena; it accelerates epidemic spreading in some cases and slows it down in other cases. We investigate a model of history-dependent contagion. In our model, repeated interactions between susceptible and infected individuals in a short period of time is needed for a susceptible individual to contract infection. We carry out numerical simulations on real temporal network data to find that bursty activity patterns facilitate epidemic spreading in our model.

  20. Family perspectives in lynch syndrome becoming a family at risk, patterns of communication and influence on relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartuma Katarina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of individuals are diagnosed with hereditary cancer. Though increased levels of anxiety and depression have been demonstrated around the time of genetic counselling, most individuals handle life at increased risk well. Data have, however, been collected on individual basis, which led us to focus on family perspectives of hereditary cancer. Methods Lynch syndrome represents a major type of hereditary colorectal and gynaecological cancer. We preformed open-ended interviews with 27 informants from 9 Lynch syndrome families. Inductive content analysis revealed three major themes: transition to a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations and individual roles. Results Family members described how learning about Lynch syndrome shifted focus from daily issues to concerns about cancer. Changes in communication related to difficulties in talking to children about heredity and informing new family members and distant relatives about an increased risk of cancer. Influence on relations was exemplified by family members taking on different roles, e.g. females often being responsible for coordinating information about heredity and providing support. Families in which members had experienced cancer at young age typically informed children soon after learning about heredity and at young age, whereas families with experience of cancer at higher age postponed information and thereby also genetic counselling. Conclusions Three major family perspectives are described in Lynch syndrome families; becoming a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations. Since these issues are central, our findings suggests that such family perspectives should be considered during genetic counselling in order to contribute to information spread, help family members cope with the increased risk, and motivate family members at risk to undergo surveillance.

  1. A Planar Reconfigurable Radiation Pattern Dipole Antenna with Reflectors and Directors for Wireless Communication Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Ben Trad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A planar printed dipole antenna with reflectors and directors, able to steer its radiation pattern in different directions, is proposed for telecommunication applications. Starting from a dual-beam printed dipole antenna achieved by combining two elementary dipoles back to back, and by loading four PIN diodes, three modes of reconfigurable radiation patterns are achieved at the frequency 2.56 GHz thanks to switches states. A prototype of the structure was realized and characterized; an efficiency of 75% is obtained. Simulation and measured results of the results are presented and discussed.

  2. Care-seeking patterns for fatal non-communicable diseases among women of reproductive age in rural northwest Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikder Shegufta S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though non-communicable diseases contribute to an increasing share of the disease burden in South Asia, health systems in most rural communities are ill-equipped to deal with chronic illness. This analysis seeks to describe care-seeking behavior among women of reproductive age who died from fatal non-communicable diseases as recorded in northwest rural Bangladesh between 2001 and 2007. Methods This analysis utilized data from a large population-based cohort trial in northwest rural Bangladesh. To conduct verbal autopsies of women who died while under study surveillance, physicians interviewed family members to elicit the biomedical symptoms that the women experienced as well as a narrative of the events leading to deaths. We performed qualitative textual analysis of verbal autopsy narratives for 250 women of reproductive age who died from non-communicable diseases between 2001 and 2007. Results The majority of women (94% sought at least one provider for their illnesses. Approximately 71% of women first visited non-certified providers such as village doctors and traditional healers, while 23% first sought care from medically certified providers. After the first point of care, women appeared to switch to medically certified practitioners when treatment from non-certified providers failed to resolve their illness. Conclusions This study suggests that treatment seeking patterns for non-communicable diseases are affected by many of the sociocultural factors that influence care seeking for pregnancy-related illnesses. Families in northwest rural Bangladesh typically delayed seeking treatment from medically certified providers for NCDs due to the cost of services, distance to facilities, established relationships with non-certified providers, and lack of recognition of the severity of illnesses. Most women did not realize initially that they were suffering from a chronic illness. Since women typically reached medically certified

  3. Verbal communication about sex in marriage: patterns of language use and its connection with relational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jon A; Coffelt, Tina A

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the vocabulary husbands and wives use for talking to each other about sex, and connections between language use and relational qualities. Married people (n = 293) responded to a questionnaire about their use of common sex-related terms and about several characteristics of their marriage: sexual communication satisfaction, relational satisfaction, and relational closeness. Cluster analysis based on reported use revealed that sexual terms fell into clusters characterized as clinical terms, slang, or standard English. Results showed an association between use of sexual terms, particularly slang terms, and both satisfaction and closeness. This connection was stronger for women than for men. The findings offer insight into sexual talk and marital relationships.

  4. Assessing reliable human mobility patterns from higher-order memory in mobile communications

    CERN Document Server

    De Domenico, Manlio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how people move within a geographic area, e.g. a city, a country or the whole world, is fundamental in several applications, from predicting the spatio-temporal evolution of an epidemics to inferring migration patterns. Mobile phone records provide an excellent proxy of human mobility, showing that movements exhibit a high level of memory. However, the precise role of memory in widely adopted proxies of mobility, as mobile phone records, is unknown. Here we use 560 millions of call detail records from Senegal to show that standard Markovian approaches, including higher-order ones, fail in capturing real mobility patterns and introduce spurious movements never observed in reality. We introduce an adaptive memory-driven approach to overcome such issues. At variance with Markovian models, it is able to realistically model conditional waiting times, i.e. the probability to stay in a specific area depending on individual's historical movements. Our results demonstrate that in standard mobility models...

  5. Short Communication: Variation in isozymic pattern of germplasm from three ginger (Zingiber officinale varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMAD DWI SETYAWAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Setyawan AD, Wiryanto, Suranto, Bermawie N. 2014. Variation in isozymic pattern of germplasm from three of ginger (Zingiber officinale varieties. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 86-93. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc. has long been as spices, flavoring agent and raw material for herbal medicines. In Indonesia, there were three varieties based on color and size of the rhizome, i.e. gajah (big-white ginger, merah (red ginger, and emprit (small-white ginger. This research was conducted to find out: (i isozymic pattern of three ginger varieties, and (ii phylogenetic relationship of those three varieties. The plant materials were gathered from Wonogiri, Surakarta and Kulonprogo, Yogyakarta. Two enzyme systems, namely esterase (EST and peroxidase (PER, PRX were used in this study. The relationship among ginger varieties was determined by UPGMA. The result indicated that EST showed two bands (i.e. Rf 0.04 and 0.10, and PRX showed six bands (i.e. Rf 0.04, 0.05, 0.09, 0.10, 0.11, and 0.15. Peroxidase produce more numerous and more diverse isozymic bands than esterase, resulting in a more complex relationship. The data used to compile dendrogram affect the grouping; the more data used, the more obvious clustering of accessions in a population. Dendrogam generated from esterase and peroxidase banding patterns produced distinct clusters based on varieties and location.

  6. Disclosure and silencing: A systematic review of the literature on patterns of trauma communication in refugee families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, Nina Thorup; Montgomery, Edith

    2015-10-01

    This systematic review aimed to explore the effects of different degrees of parental disclosure of traumatic material from the past on the psychological well-being of children in refugee families. A majority of studies emphasize the importance of the timing of disclosure and the manner in which it takes place, rather than the effects of open communication or silencing strategies per se. A pattern emerged in which the level of parental disclosure that promotes psychological adjustment in refugee children depends on whether the children themselves have been directly exposed to traumatic experiences, and whether the children are prepubescent or older. The process of trauma disclosure is highly culturally embedded. Future research needs to address the culturally shaped variations in modulated disclosure and further explore how modulated disclosure can be facilitated in family therapy with traumatized refugee families.

  7. Pattern of online communication in teaching a blended oral surgery course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marei, H F; Al-Khalifa, K S

    2016-11-01

    To explore the factors that might affect the patterns of interaction amongst dental students that can be found in asynchronous online discussion fora. It is a qualitative study that involved the participation of 71 dental students (42 male and 29 female) who belong to one academic year. Students were participated in asynchronous online discussion fora as a part of a blended oral surgery course that involved both face-to-face lecture and an online learning environment using the Blackboard learning management system. Qualitative analysis of students' pattern of discussion was performed using Transcript Analysis Tool. The total number of postings was 410. Sixty-seven of 71 students participated in the discussion by writing posts, whereas all of the students had accessed all of the postings. A positive correlation between imposing vertical questions and the number of non-referential and referential statements was observed. Regarding horizontal questions, a positive correlation was observed with the number of referential statements, whilst there was a negative correlation with the number of non-referential statements. Asynchronous online discussion fora that are integrated as a part of a whole pedagogical practice may provide an opportunity for promoting learning, especially when consideration is given to the structure of problems, timely feedback by tutors and supportive strategies within the discussion threads. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Assessing reliable human mobility patterns from higher order memory in mobile communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamalas, Joan T; De Domenico, Manlio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how people move within a geographical area, e.g. a city, a country or the whole world, is fundamental in several applications, from predicting the spatio-temporal evolution of an epidemic to inferring migration patterns. Mobile phone records provide an excellent proxy of human mobility, showing that movements exhibit a high level of memory. However, the precise role of memory in widely adopted proxies of mobility, as mobile phone records, is unknown. Here we use 560 million call detail records from Senegal to show that standard Markovian approaches, including higher order ones, fail in capturing real mobility patterns and introduce spurious movements never observed in reality. We introduce an adaptive memory-driven approach to overcome such issues. At variance with Markovian models, it is able to realistically model conditional waiting times, i.e. the probability to stay in a specific area depending on individuals' historical movements. Our results demonstrate that in standard mobility models the individuals tend to diffuse faster than observed in reality, whereas the predictions of the adaptive memory approach significantly agree with observations. We show that, as a consequence, the incidence and the geographical spread of a disease could be inadequately estimated when standard approaches are used, with crucial implications on resources deployment and policy-making during an epidemic outbreak.

  9. Communication Deficits and the Motor System: Exploring Patterns of Associations in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, M; Shui, A M; Nowinski, L A; Golas, S B; Ferrone, C; O'Rourke, J A; McDougle, C J

    2017-01-01

    Many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have notable difficulties in motor, speech and language domains. The connection between motor skills (oral-motor, manual-motor) and speech and language deficits reported in other developmental disorders raises important questions about a potential relationship between motor skills and speech-language deficits in ASD. To this end, we examined data from children with ASD (n = 1781), 2-17 years of age, enrolled in the Autism Speaks-Autism Treatment Network (AS-ATN) registry who completed a multidisciplinary evaluation that included diagnostic, physical, cognitive and behavioral assessments as part of a routine standard of care protocol. After adjusting for age, non-verbal IQ, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) medication use, and muscle tone, separate multiple linear regression analyses revealed significant positive associations of fine motor skills (FM) with both expressive language (EL) and receptive language (RL) skills in an impaired FM subgroup; in contrast, the impaired gross motor (GM) subgroup showed no association with EL but a significant negative association with RL. Similar analyses between motor skills and interpersonal relationships across the sample found both GM skills and FM skills to be associated with social interactions. These results suggest potential differences in the contributions of fine versus gross motor skills to autistic profiles and may provide another lens with which to view communication differences across the autism spectrum for use in treatment interventions.

  10. Short communication: Assessment of activity patterns of growing rabbits in a flux-controlled chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Olivas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Flux-controlled and metabolic chambers are often used for nutritional and environmental studies. However, the potential alterations of animal behaviour and welfare are so far not fully understood. In consequence, this study had 2 main objectives: to assess potential alterations of animal activity pattern and time budget inside a flux chamber, and to assess the importance of the “rearing up” behaviour. To this end, 10 growing rabbits of different ages (from 1 to 5 wk of the growing period were housed inside a flux chamber. Their activity was continuously recorded and assessed, determining the frequency and duration of 8 different behaviours: lying, sleeping, sitting, eating, drinking, walking, rearing up and others. Nocturnal rabbit behaviour and time budget were not altered inside the chamber if compared to previously described rabbit activity under conventional cages. In addition, rabbits in this experiment presented a tendency to perform “rearing up” when housed inside the flux chamber.

  11. Do gender-dyads have different communication patterns? A comparative study in Western-European general practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Dulmen, S. van; Messerli-Rohrbach, V.; Bensing, J.

    2002-01-01

    From the viewpoint of quality of care, doctor–patient communication has become more and more important. Gender is an important factor in communication. Besides, cultural norms and values are likely to influence doctor–patient communication as well. This study examined (1)whether or not communication

  12. Short communication: Patterns of dairy consumption in free-living children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Benjamin P; Turner, Louise; Stevenson, Emma; Rumbold, Penny L S

    2015-06-01

    According to national survey data, dairy food consumption has fallen in recent years and declines further with age, especially from childhood to adolescence. Dietary surveys typically rely on retrospective dietary assessment methods and use broad age groupings (4-10 yr; 11-18 yr), making it challenging to differentiate between middle-childhood and adolescence. Consequently, there is a need to assess dairy food consumption during middle-childhood and adolescence using more robust dietary assessment tools. Therefore, the present study aimed to describe and compare patterns of dairy consumption throughout middle-childhood and adolescence. Dairy food consumption was assessed during school term-time over 4 consecutive days, including 2 weekdays and 2 weekend days, in a sample of free-living children (9-11 yr, n=40) and adolescents (15-18 yr, n=35). For children, free-living dairy intake was evaluated through parental-weighed food records, and for adolescents, a combined weighed self-reported food record and 24-h dietary recall technique was utilized. Food records were explored to determine types, amounts, and frequency of dairy food consumption, and were analyzed for differences between middle-childhood and adolescence using a between group 2×2 (age×sex) ANOVA. Descriptive data suggested that milk was the most popular dairy product consumed by both children and adolescents. Statistical analysis revealed a main effect for sex on total milk consumption (mL) and number of daily milk portions consumed. No interaction or main effect was present for any other variable. The present study indicates that independent of age, boys consumed greater amounts of milk compared with girls. Contrary to existing literature, findings suggest no difference in milk-based dairy consumption between middle-childhood and adolescence.

  13. An Analysis of the Relationship between Identity Patterns of Turkish Deaf Adolescents and the Communication Modes Used in Special Residential Schools for the Hearing Impaired and Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Hakan

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between identity patterns and the communication modes of deaf adolescents aged between 14 and 18 years in Turkey. They were currently being educated in state residential secondary schools for the deaf. Deaf adolescents were administered the "Deaf Identity Scale" presented in Turkish using total communication…

  14. Do gender-dyads have different communication patterns?: a comparative study in Western-European general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Dulmen, S. van; Messerli-Rohrbach, V.; Bensing, J.

    2002-01-01

    From the viewpoint of quality of care, doctor-patient communication has become more and more important. Gender is an important factor in communication. Besides, cultural norms and values are likely to influence doctor-patient communication as well. This study examined (1) whether or not communicatio

  15. Bases for a model of the communication patterns of scientists at the National University of Mexico (UNAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell, Jane M.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The object of the present study was to develop a model to describe the communication patterns for the scientific publications of researchers in different disciplines affiliated to the National University of Mexico (UNAM. Using information on the scientific production of the different research institutes and centres published in the annual reports of the UNAM from 1997-2000 and analysing its presence in regional and international databases from 1997-1999, it was possible to establish the basis for the development of models in five main areas of knowledge: Exact Sciences; Natural Sciences; Applied Sciences; Social Sciences and the Humanities. Researchers from the first three areas published mainly in articles from international, peer-reviewed journals and, consequently, their production was highly visible in mainstream databases. On the other hand, researchers from the social sciences and humanities give equal weight to publication in books and in book chapters as they do to publication in journals. Unlike researchers in the hard sciences, social scientists and those working in the humanities prefer regional journals as shown by a strong presence in regional databases and low representation in the international databases. Therefore we conclude that communication patterns are different between the main areas of knowledge as previously defined.

    Se buscó elaborar las bases de un modelo de comunicación científica que permitiera demostrar las diferencias entre los patrones de comunicación de la producción científica en diferentes disciplinas en la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM. Partiendo de la producción presentada por las diferentes dependencias de investigación de la UNAM en los informes anuales institucionales 1997-2000, así como a través de un análisis de su presencia en bases de datos regionales e internacionales 1997- 1999. Fue posible asentar las bases para el desarrollo de modelos de la comunicación de la

  16. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic patterns of chronic non-communicable disease among the older adult population in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Minicuci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Ghana, the older adult population is projected to increase from 5.3% of the total population in 2015 to 8.9% by 2050. National and local governments will need information about non-communicable diseases (NCDs in this population in order to allocate health system resources and respond to the health needs of older adults. Design: The 2007/08 Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE Wave 1 in Ghana used face-to-face interviews in a nationally representative sample of persons aged 50-plus years. Individual respondents were asked about their overall health, diagnosis of 10 chronic non-communicable conditions, and common health risk factors. A number of anthropometric and health measurements were also taken in all respondents, including height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and blood pressure (BP. Results: This paper includes 4,724 adults aged 50-plus years. The highest prevalence of self-reported chronic conditions was for hypertension [14.2% (95% CI 12.8–15.6] and osteoarthritis [13.8%, (95% CI 11.7–15.9]. The figure for hypertension reached 51.1% (95% CI 48.9–53.4 when based on BP measurement. The prevalence of current smokers was 8.1% (95% CI 7.0–9.2, while 2.0 (95% CI 1.5–2.5 were infrequent/frequent heavy drinkers, 67.9% (95% CI 65.2–70.5 consume insufficient fruits and vegetables, and 25.7% (95% CI 23.1–28.3 had a low level of physical activity. Almost 10% (95% CI 8.3–11.1 of adults were obese and 77.6% (95% CI 76.0–79.2 had a high-risk waist-to-hip ratio (WHR. Risks from tobacco and alcohol consumption continued into older age, while insufficient fruit and vegetable intake, low physical activity and obesity increased with increasing age. The patterns of risk factors varied by income quintile, with higher prevalence of obesity and low physical activity in wealthier respondents, and higher prevalence of insufficient fruit and vegetable intake and smoking in lower-income respondents. The multivariate

  17. Variations in contact patterns and dispatch guideline adherence between Norwegian emergency medical communication centres--a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellensen, Eirin N; Hunskaar, Steinar; Wisborg, Torben; Zakariassen, Erik

    2014-01-08

    The 19 Norwegian Emergency medical communication centres (EMCCs) use Norwegian Index for medical emergency assistance (Index) as dispatch guidelines. Little is known about the use of Index, nor its validity. We aimed to document the epidemiology of contacts made to the public emergency medical phone number and the operators' self-reported use of Index as a first step towards a validation study. We registered all medical emergency calls to the EMCCs during a 72 h period in a national cross sectional study. We subsequently sent a questionnaire to all EMCC operators in Norway, asking how they use Index. A combined outcome variable "use of Index" was computed through a Likert scale, range 1-5. Regression models were used to examine factors influencing use. 2 298 contacts were included. National contact rate was 56/1,000 inhabitants per year, range between EMCCs 34 - 119. Acute contact (life-threatening situations) rate was 21/1,000 per year, range between EMCCs 5 - 31. Index criteria 6 - 'Unresolved problem' accounts for 20% of the 113 contacts, range between EMCCs 10 - 42%. The mean use of Index was 3.95 (SD 0.39), corresponding to "more than 75% of emergency calls". There were differences in use of Index on EMCC level, range 3.7 - 4.4, and a multi regression model explained 23.4% of the variation in use. Operators working rotation with ground ambulance services reported reduced use of Index compared to operators not working in rotation, while distinct EMCC focus on Index increased use of Index compared to EMCCs with no focus on Index. Use of electronic records and operators experience were the main reasons given for not using Index. There is a large variation between the EMCCs with regard to both contact patterns and use of Index. There is a relatively high overall self-reported use of Index by the operators, with variations on both individual and EMCC level.

  18. Parent-child communication patterns during the first year after a parent's cancer diagnosis - the effect on parents' functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donofrio, Stacey; Hoekstra, Harald; van der Graaf, Winette; van de Wiel, Harry; Visser, Annemieke; Huizinga, Gea; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good parent-child communication is thought to help families adjust more easily during stressful events such as parental cancer. Families dealing with cancer who communicate openly have reported less psychological distress. The first year after diagnosis may be particularly stressful. The

  19. The Pattern and Trend of Non-communicable Diseases in Children in Jos, North Central Nigeria: A Four-year Review

    OpenAIRE

    Esther S Yiltok; Helen O. Akhiwu; Ibrahim I. Abok; Olukemi O. Ige; Ejeliogu, Emeka U.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are becoming significant causes of morbidity and mortality. However very little information is available in our setting on the trend of NCDs in children. The aim is to determine the pattern and trend of NCDs in children in Jos, Nigeria. Study Design: This is a retrospective study of patients that were admitted and managed for NCDs. The relevant clinical information was extracted from the hospital records. Place and Duration of Study: The Emergenc...

  20. Communication patterns in a psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury: A quantitative case study based on symbolic dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilpin Adele MK

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of traumatic brain injury is receiving increased attention. The evaluation of psychotherapy with these patients has been conducted largely in the absence of quantitative data concerning the therapy itself. Quantitative methods for characterizing the sequence-sensitive structure of patient-therapist communication are now being developed with the objective of improving the effectiveness of psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury. Methods The content of three therapy session transcripts (sessions were separated by four months obtained from a patient with a history of several motor vehicle accidents who was receiving dialectical behavior therapy was scored and analyzed using methods derived from the mathematical theory of symbolic dynamics. Results The analysis of symbol frequencies was largely uninformative. When repeated triples were examined a marked pattern of change in content was observed over the three sessions. The context free grammar complexity and the Lempel-Ziv complexity were calculated for each therapy session. For both measures, the rate of complexity generation, expressed as bits per minute, increased longitudinally during the course of therapy. The between-session increases in complexity generation rates are consistent with calculations of mutual information. Taken together these results indicate that there was a quantifiable increase in the variability of patient-therapist verbal behavior during the course of therapy. Comparison of complexity values against values obtained from equiprobable random surrogates established the presence of a nonrandom structure in patient-therapist dialog (P = .002. Conclusions While recognizing that only limited conclusions can be based on a case history, it can be noted that these quantitative observations are consistent with qualitative clinical observations of increases in the flexibility of discourse during therapy. These

  1. Variations in contact patterns and dispatch guideline adherence between Norwegian emergency medical communication centres - a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The 19 Norwegian Emergency medical communication centres (EMCCs) use Norwegian Index for medical emergency assistance (Index) as dispatch guidelines. Little is known about the use of Index, nor its validity. We aimed to document the epidemiology of contacts made to the public emergency medical phone number and the operators’ self-reported use of Index as a first step towards a validation study. Methods We registered all medical emergency calls to the EMCCs during a 72 h period in a national cross sectional study. We subsequently sent a questionnaire to all EMCC operators in Norway, asking how they use Index. A combined outcome variable “use of Index” was computed through a Likert scale, range 1–5. Regression models were used to examine factors influencing use. Results 2 298 contacts were included. National contact rate was 56/1 000 inhabitants per year, range between EMCCs 34 – 119. Acute contact (life-threatening situations) rate was 21/1 000 per year, range between EMCCs 5 – 31. Index criteria 6 – ’Unresolved problem’ accounts for 20% of the 113 contacts, range between EMCCs 10 – 42%. The mean use of Index was 3.95 (SD 0.39), corresponding to “more than 75% of emergency calls”. There were differences in use of Index on EMCC level, range 3.7 – 4.4, and a multi regression model explained 23.4% of the variation in use. Operators working rotation with ground ambulance services reported reduced use of Index compared to operators not working in rotation, while distinct EMCC focus on Index increased use of Index compared to EMCCs with no focus on Index. Use of electronic records and operators experience were the main reasons given for not using Index. Conclusions There is a large variation between the EMCCs with regard to both contact patterns and use of Index. There is a relatively high overall self-reported use of Index by the operators, with variations on both individual and EMCC level. PMID:24398290

  2. 课堂交际模式对二语习得的影响%The Impact of Classroom Communicative Patterns on the SLA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁慧

    2012-01-01

    Classroom communicative pattern is proposed on the basis of interaction teaching mode, it mainly aims to conduct teaching through the information change, activity communication, place conversion and extended sociality of the teacher, students, class and environment. Teaching process is not unidirectional and determined, but multi-directional and undetermined. Teacher, students, class and environment connect, interact and accelerate with each other. This paper analyzes and discusses the teacher factors, student factors and affective factors influencing classroom communicative pattern.%课堂交际模式是在交互式教学模式的基础上提出的,主要是指通过教师、学生、课堂、环境等的信息交流、活动交往、位置交换、更大范围的交际来进行教学。教学过程不是单向确定的,而是多向不确定的。教师、学生、课堂、环境等彼此都相互作用、相互联系、相互促进。本文就影响课堂交际模式的教师因素、学生因素及情感因素进行讨论分析。

  3. Changes in Practice Patterns of Clopidogrel in Combination with Proton Pump Inhibitors after an FDA Safety Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Annie; Mody, Reema; Carter, Valerie; Ayas, Charles; Patel, Haridarshan; Lasch, Karen; Wu, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In 2009, the FDA issued a warning that omeprazole–a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)–reduces the antithrombotic effect of clopidogrel by almost half when taken concomitantly. This study aims to analyze the impact of the FDA Safety Communications on prescribing clopidogrel together with PPIs. Methods This retrospective study identified clopidogrel users from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Databases (01/2006–12/2012). Rates of clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy were estimated in 6-month intervals for patients with ≥1 clopidogrel prescription fill, then were analyzed pre- and post-safety communication (11/17/2009). Analyses were also conducted by grouping PPIs into CYP2C19 inhibitors (omeprazole and esomeprazole) and CYP2C19 non-inhibitors (pantoprazole, lansoprazole, dexlansoprazole, and rabeprazole). Results Overall, 483,074 patients met the selection criteria; of these, 157,248 used a clopidogrel-PPI combination. On average, 30.5% of patients in the pre- and 19.9% in the post-communication period used a clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy. Among clopidogrel users, the probability of using clopidogrel-PPI combinations fell by over 40% in the post-communication period (OR = 0.57; pomeprazole fell from 10.1% to 6.3%. Among combination therapy users, the probability of patients using a combination with a CYP2C19 inhibitor decreased by 53% (OR = 0.47; p<0.001); however, 31.5% of patients were still prescribed a clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy. Trends were similar for all and newly treated patients, regardless of clopidogrel indication and physician specialty. Conclusions The FDA Safety Communication resulted in a reduction in the number of patients undergoing combination therapy; however approximately one-third of patients still used combination therapy post-communication. PMID:26727382

  4. Patterns of Racial Socialization and Psychological Adjustment: Can Parental Communications about Race Reduce the Impact of Racial Discrimination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neblett, Enrique W., Jr.; White, Rhonda L.; Ford, Kahlil R.; Philip, Cheri L.; Nguye-N, Hoa X.; Sellers, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses two waves of data to examine the relations among racial discrimination experiences, patterns of racial socialization practices, and psychological adjustment in a sample of 361 African American adolescents. Using latent class analyses, we identified four patterns of child-reported racial socialization experiences: Moderate Positive,…

  5. Investigating the Relationship between Effective Communication of Spouse and Father-Child Relationship (Test Pattern Causes to Education Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataeifar, Robabeh; Amiri, Sholeh; Ali Nadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This research is targeted with the plan of father-child model or effective relationship mediating of spouses or investigating attachment style, personality traits, communication skills, and spouses' sexual satisfaction. Based on this, 260 people (father and child) were selected through random sampling method based on share. Participants were…

  6. Integrating Emerging Topics through Online Team Design in a Hybrid Communication Networks Course: Interaction Patterns and Impact of Prior Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisslein, Jana; Seeling, Patrick; Reisslein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge in the introductory communication networks course in electrical and computer engineering curricula is to integrate emerging topics, such as wireless Internet access and network security, into the already content-intensive course. At the same time it is essential to provide students with experiences in online collaboration,…

  7. Establishing a Comprehensive English Teaching Pattern Combining the Communicative Teaching Method and the Grammar-Translation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Na

    2011-01-01

    Based on the current contradiction between the grammar-translation method and the communicative teaching method in English teaching, this paper, starting with clarifying the task of comprehensive English as well as the definition of the two teaching methods, objectively analyzes their advantages and disadvantages and proposes establishing a new…

  8. Investigating skin-to-skin care patterns with extremely preterm infants in the NICU and their effect on early cognitive and communication performance: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonya, Jenn; Ray, William C; Rumpf, R Wolfgang; Brock, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective of the study was to investigate how patterns of skin-to-skin care might impact infant early cognitive and communication performance. Design This was a retrospective cohort study. Setting This study took place in a level-IV all-referral neonatal intensive care unit in the Midwest USA specialising in the care of extremely preterm infants. Participants Data were collected from the electronic medical records of all extremely preterm infants (gestational age 0.05). Mothers provided the majority of skin-to-skin care with a sharp decline at 30 weeks corrected age, regardless of when extremely preterm infants were admitted. Additional exploratory network analysis suggests that medical and skin-to-skin factors play a parallel, non-synergistic role in contributing to early cognitive and communication performance as assessed through the Bayley-III. Conclusions This study suggests an association between early and frequent skin-to-skin care with extremely preterm infants and early cognitive and communication performance. PMID:28320787

  9. The Changing Pattern of Hospital Admission to Medical Wards; Burden of non-communicable diseases at a hospital in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufian K. Noor

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the pattern of hospital admissions and patient outcomes in medical wards at Atbara Teaching Hospital in River Nile State, Sudan. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2013 to July 2014 and included all patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital during the study period. Morbidity and mortality data was obtained from medical records. Diseases were categorised using the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD coding system. Results: A total of 2,614 patient records were analysed. The age group with the highest admissions was the 56‒65-year-old age group (19.4% and the majority of patients were admitted for one week or less (86.4%. Non-communicable diseases constituted 71.8% of all cases. According to ICD classifications, patients were admitted most frequently due to infectious or parasitic diseases (19.7%, followed by diseases of the circulatory (16.4%, digestive (16.4% and genito-urinary (13.8% systems. The most common diseases were cardiovascular disease (16.4%, malaria (11.3%, gastritis/peptic ulcer disease (9.8%, urinary tract infections (7.2% and diabetes mellitus (6.9%. The mortality rate was 4.7%. Conclusion: The burden of non-communicable diseases was found to exceed that of communicable diseases among patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital.

  10. Online social communication patterns among emerging adult women with histories of childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Amori Yee; Szwedo, David E; Ahmad, Shaikh I; Samuels, Andrea Stier; Hinshaw, Stephen P

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about adult women with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); however, available evidence suggests that they experience social impairment. Online social networking websites such as Facebook have become endemic outlets through which emerging adults communicate with peers. No study has examined the peer interactions of emerging adults with childhood histories of ADHD in this developmentally relevant online domain. Participants in the current study were an ethnically diverse sample of 228 women, 140 of whom met diagnostic criteria for ADHD in childhood and 88 who composed a matched comparison sample. These women were assessed at 3 time points spanning 10 years (mean age = 9.6 at Wave 1, 14.1 at Wave 2, 19.6 at Wave 3). After statistical control of demographic covariates and comorbidities, childhood ADHD diagnosis predicted, by emerging adulthood, a greater stated preference for online social communication and a greater tendency to have used online methods to interact with strangers. A childhood diagnosis of ADHD also predicted observations of fewer Facebook friends and less closeness and support from Facebook friends in emerging adulthood. These associations were mediated by a composite of face-to-face peer relationship impairment during childhood and adolescence. Intriguingly, women with persistent diagnoses of ADHD from childhood to emerging adulthood differed from women with consistent comparison status in their online social communication; women with intermittent diagnoses of ADHD had scores intermediate between the other 2 groups. Results are discussed within the context of understanding the social relationships of women with childhood histories of ADHD. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Online Social Communication Patterns among Young Adult Women with Histories of Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Amori Yee; Szwedo, David E.; Ahmad, Shaikh I.; Samuels, Andrea Stier; Hinshaw, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about adult women with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), however available evidence suggests that they experience social impairment. Online social networking websites such as Facebook have become endemic outlets through which emerging adults communicate with peers. No study has examined the peer interactions of emerging adults with childhood histories of ADHD in this developmentally relevant online domain. Participants in the current study were an ethnically diverse sample of 228 women, 140 of whom met diagnostic criteria for ADHD in childhood and 88 who composed a matched comparison sample. These women were assessed at three time points spanning 10 years (mean age = 9.6 at Wave 1, 14.1 at Wave 2, 19.6 at Wave 3). After statistical control of demographic covariates and comorbidites, childhood ADHD diagnosis predicted, by emerging adulthood, a greater stated preference for online social communication and a greater tendency to have used online methods to interact with strangers. A childhood diagnosis of ADHD also predicted observations of fewer Facebook friends and less closeness and support from Facebook friends in emerging adulthood. These associations were mediated by a composite of face-to-face peer relationship impairment during childhood and adolescence. Intriguingly, women with persistent diagnoses of ADHD from childhood to emerging adulthood differed from women with consistent comparison status in their online social communication; women with intermittent diagnoses of ADHD had scores intermediate between the other two groups. Results are discussed within the context of understanding the social relationships of women with childhood histories of ADHD. PMID:25894439

  12. Brief communication: Comparative patterns of enamel thickness topography and oblique molar wear in two Early Neolithic and medieval population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Luyer, Mona; Rottier, Stéphane; Bayle, Priscilla

    2014-09-01

    Enamel thickness has been linked to functional aspects of masticatory biomechanics and has been demonstrated to be an evolutionary plastic trait, selectively responsive to dietary changes, wear and tooth fracture. European Late Paleolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherers mainly show a flat wear pattern, while oblique molar wear has been reported as characteristic of Neolithic agriculturalists. We investigate the relationships between enamel thickness distribution and molar wear pattern in two Neolithic and medieval populations. Under the assumption that dietary and/or non-dietary constraints result in directional selective pressure leading to variations in enamel thickness, we test the hypothesis that these two populations will exhibit significant differences in wear and enamel thickness patterns. Occlusal wear patterns were scored in upper permanent second molars (UM2) of 64 Neolithic and 311 medieval subadult and adult individuals. Enamel thickness was evaluated by microtomography in subsamples of 17 Neolithic and 25 medieval individuals. Eight variables describing enamel thickness were assessed. The results show that oblique molar wear is dominant in the Neolithic sample (87%), while oblique wear affects only a minority (42%) of the medieval sample. Moreover, in the Neolithic molars, where buccolingually directed oblique wear is dominant and greatest enamel lost occurs in the distolingual quadrant, thickest enamel is found where occlusal stresses are the most important-on the distolingual cusp. These results reveal a correlation between molar wear pattern and enamel thickness that has been associated to dietary changes. In particular, relatively thicker molar enamel may have evolved as a plastic response to resist wear.

  13. Improving the Communication Pattern in Matrix-Vector Operations for Large Scale-Free Graphs by Disaggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlemann, Verena [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Vassilevski, Panayot S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-10-28

    Matrix-vector multiplication is the key operation in any Krylov-subspace iteration method. We are interested in Krylov methods applied to problems associated with the graph Laplacian arising from large scale-free graphs. Furthermore, computations with graphs of this type on parallel distributed-memory computers are challenging. This is due to the fact that scale-free graphs have a degree distribution that follows a power law, and currently available graph partitioners are not efficient for such an irregular degree distribution. The lack of a good partitioning leads to excessive interprocessor communication requirements during every matrix-vector product. Here, we present an approach to alleviate this problem based on embedding the original irregular graph into a more regular one by disaggregating (splitting up) vertices in the original graph. The matrix-vector operations for the original graph are performed via a factored triple matrix-vector product involving the embedding graph. And even though the latter graph is larger, we are able to decrease the communication requirements considerably and improve the performance of the matrix-vector product.

  14. An Analysis of Communicative Language Functions in the Speech Patterns of Bilingual Korean and Mexican Immigrant Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Sook Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For children from immigrant families, opportunities to develop additive bilingualism exist, yet bilingual attainment has varied widely. Given the significance of language development opportunities in home settings, this study examines the home language use of 20 second-generation children (ages 6-8 of Mexican and Korean descent in the United States. Using a language function framework, we provide a descriptive analysis of the communicative functions performed by these children and how their proficiency level, the interlocutors, and their home settings may influence their language use. Data include English and heritage language proficiency assessments, interviews with children and their mothers, and multiple video recordings of home interactions.  Findings show little variation in the kinds of language functions performed by these children who mainly used language to convey or seek factual information, unless they were involved in imaginary play.  Moreover, children found creative ways to communicate different linguistic functions as needed, even among those with limited proficiency. Interestingly, the Mexican American children had a greater tendency to use more heritage language in the home than the Korean American children, who used more English. The children rarely engaged in intersentential code-switching.  Implications for educators, parents, and researchers are discussed.

  15. Alive communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Alan; Garvey, Andrea

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a theoretical model, based on a dynamic systems perspective and the metaphor of aliveness in communication. Traditional concepts and methods for the study of communication are relatively static and based on the metaphor of signal and response. These traditional methods lend themselves to relatively simplified measures of frequencies and durations, sequences and co-occurrences: a model of objectified communication. The concept of alive communication focuses on the dynamically changing aspects of communication using three related components: coregulation, ordinary variability, and innovation. Like living organisms, alive communication develops over time as it forms dynamically stable patterns. Aliveness can be applied to communication at any age, in any species, between species, in any form including time-delayed practices using written symbols, and with non-living objects. The model provides a tool for evaluating the "life-likeness" of communication with animate and inanimate objects and robotic devices, and for assessing and treating communicative difficulties--in which aliveness is missing--within and between dyads/families.

  16. 夫妻对沟通模式感知差异与双方婚姻质量的关系%Consistency of Perceived Communication Patterns by Couples and Their Marital Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦涛; 方晓义

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨夫妻对沟通模式的感知差异及其与双方婚姻质量的关系.方法:采用问卷法共收集421对夫妻感知到的沟通模式及婚姻质量的数据.结果:①根据夫妻双方对婚姻沟通模式的感知将夫妻匹配成四个类型,其中夫妻积极一致型占26.1%;夫妻消极一致型占44.6%;夫积极-妻消极型占14.7%;夫消极-妻积极型占13.6%.②夫妻双方的婚姻质量在四类不同的沟通模式匹配类型上存在显著差异,均表现为夫妻积极一致型和自身积极配偶消极型显著高于自身消极配偶积极型,而后者显著高于夫妻消极一致型.结论:夫妻对沟通模式的感知一致性及沟通模式是否为积极型均与夫妻双方的婚姻质量有关.%Objective: To explore the relationship between perceived consistencies of perceived communication patterns by couple and their marital quality. Methods: 421 couples were asked to report their perceived communication pattern and marital quality. Results: ①There were four different couple subtypes based on perceived consistencies of their communication pattern, i.e. consistently perceived positive communication pattern, consistently perceived negative communication pattern; husband perceived positive while wife perceived negative communication pattern, and husband perceived negative while husband perceived positive communication pattern. The proportions of the four subtypes were 26.1%,44.6%, 14.7%, and 13.6% respectively. ②There was significantly difference of marital quality among the four communication subtypes. Specifically, the individual marital quality of consistently positive type and him/herself positive while the partner negative type were significantly higher than the type which him/herself was negative while the partner was positive;the latter was significantly higher than that of consistently negative type. Conclusion: Both whether the couples perceived their communication pattern consistently or

  17. Analyzing the Effects of Family Communication Patterns on the Decision to Disclose a Health Issue to a Parent: The Benefits of Conversation and Dangers of Conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Alexie; Maliski, Ryan; Warner, Benjamin

    2016-07-15

    Family can be a key site of support for individuals who are diagnosed with a health issue, as long as the health condition is known within the family unit. This online experiment investigated variables that influence the likelihood that college students will disclose a hypothetical health issue to a parent. Family communication patterns (FCP) theory informed this analysis by outlining the role of FCP in disclosure dynamics among college students and their parents. Through structural equation modeling, a novel mediation model of FCP demonstrated that conformity indirectly reduced the likelihood to disclose through the constraint on conversation. The sensitivity of the hypothetical health condition did not moderate the relationship of conformity on likelihood to disclose through conversation. However, regardless of FCP, respondents were less likely to disclose sensitive health issues.

  18. Talking the talk, walking the walk: social network norms, communication patterns, and condom use among the male partners of female sex workers in La Romana, Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Clare; Latkin, Carl; Sweat, Michael D; Moreno, Luis; Ellen, Jonathan; Kerrigan, Deanna

    2009-06-01

    Male partners of female sex workers are rarely targeted by HIV prevention interventions in the commercial sex industry, despite recognition of their central role and power in condom use negotiation. Social networks offer a naturally existing social structure to increase male participation in preventing HIV. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between social network norms and condom use among male partners of female sex workers in La Romana, Dominican Republic. Male partners (N =318) were recruited from 36 sex establishments to participate in a personal network survey. Measures of social network norms included 1) perceived condom use by male social network members and 2) encouragement to use condoms from social network members. Other social network characteristics included composition, density, social support, and communication. The primary behavioral outcome was consistent condom use by male partners with their most recent female sex worker partner during the last 3 months. In general, men reported small, dense networks with high levels of communication about condoms and consistent condom use. Multivariate logistic regression revealed consistent condom use was significantly more likely among male partners who perceived that some or all of their male social network members used condoms consistently. Perceived condom use was, in turn, significantly associated with dense networks, expressing dislike for condoms, and encouragement to use condoms from social network members. Findings suggest that the tight social networks of male partners may help to explain the high level of condom use and could provide an entry point for HIV prevention efforts with men. Such efforts should tap into existing social dynamics and patterns of communication to promote pro-condom norms and reduce HIV-related vulnerability among men and their sexual partners.

  19. Prediction of optical communication link availability: real-time observation of cloud patterns using a ground-based thermal infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Clément; Cros, Sylvain; Saint-Antonin, Laurent; Schmutz, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    The growing demand for high-speed broadband communications with low orbital or geostationary satellites is a major challenge. Using an optical link at 1.55 μm is an advantageous solution which potentially can increase the satellite throughput by a factor 10. Nevertheless, cloud cover is an obstacle for this optical frequency. Such communication requires an innovative management system to optimize the optical link availability between a satellite and several Optical Ground Stations (OGS). The Saint-Exupery Technological Research Institute (France) leads the project ALBS (French acronym for BroadBand Satellite Access). This initiative involving small and medium enterprises, industrial groups and research institutions specialized in aeronautics and space industries, is currently developing various solutions to increase the telecommunication satellite bandwidth. This paper presents the development of a preliminary prediction system preventing the cloud blockage of an optical link between a satellite and a given OGS. An infrared thermal camera continuously observes (night and day) the sky vault. Cloud patterns are observed and classified several times a minute. The impact of the detected clouds on the optical beam (obstruction or not) is determined by the retrieval of the cloud optical depth at the wavelength of communication. This retrieval is based on realistic cloud-modelling on libRadtran. Then, using subsequent images, cloud speed and trajectory are estimated. Cloud blockage over an OGS can then be forecast up to 30 minutes ahead. With this information, the preparation of the new link between the satellite and another OGS under a clear sky can be prepared before the link breaks due to cloud blockage.

  20. Congruence-Incongruence Patterns in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Couples' Genetic Determinist Beliefs and Perceived Control over Genes: Implications for Clinical and Public Health Genomic Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne L; Smith, Rachel A; Hong, Soo Jung; Worthington, Amber

    2015-06-01

    Genomics makes possible the isolation of multiple genes as co-factors that increase, but do not determine, risk for many adult-onset medical conditions, including alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). Those diagnosed with an adult-onset medical condition, such as AATD, are often married and make decisions about testing and care as a couple. We examined genetic essentialist and threat beliefs, focusing on beliefs about the genetic contribution to disease susceptibility and severity, as well as perceptions of control related to genes and health for married couples (N =59), in which one spouse has been tested for genetic mutations associated with AATD. The intraclass correlation for spouses' beliefs about genetic essentialism was strong and statistically significant, but the associations for their other beliefs were not. Incongruence between AATD participants and their spouses regarding genes' influence on disease severity directly related to incongruent perceptions of control and genetic contribution to disease susceptibility. Results revealed an inverse relationship to AATD participants' perceptions of behavioral control and a direct relationship to their beliefs about genes' influence on disease severity. This suggests a pattern of incongruence in which AATD participants have low levels of perceived control over genes' influence on health and high levels of perceived genetic influence on disease severity compared to spouses. With public health communication efforts lagging behind the science of genomics, insights regarding the congruence or incongruence associated with married couples' beliefs about genes' influence on disease afford pathways to guide clinical and public health communication about genomics.

  1. Changing patterns of under- and over-nutrition in South African children-future risks of non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinabhai, Champaklal C; Taylor, Myra; Sullivan, Keith R

    2005-03-01

    Under- and over-nutrition in children in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa was investigated comparing data collected from primary school children in a rural district (643 children aged 8-11 years in 1994) with secondary data from the National Schools Study (16,179 children, 4-11 years in 1994), the Vitamin A Consultative Group Study (408 children, 2-5 years in 1994) and the Income Dynamics Study (1,593 children, 2-11 years in 1998). Stunting and wasting (WHO/NCHS guidelines) and overweight and obesity (International Obesity Task Force guidelines) were retrospectively analysed from these studies and compared in the children aged 4-5 and 8-11 years. There was moderate stunting in 10-25%, wasting in 1-6%, 5-24% were overweight and 1-10% obese. Girls in the National Schools Study (pchildren are changing and might indicate the early stages of a complex nutritional transition. Action is required to prevent the future risk of non-communicable diseases.

  2. A cross-cultural examination of the mediating role of family support and parental advice quality on the relationship between family communication patterns and first-year college student adjustment in the United States and Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Dorrance Hall, Elizabeth; McNallie, Jenna; Custers, Kathleen; Timmermans, Elisabeth; Wilson, Steven R; Van den Bulck, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how college students’ family communication environments influence their adjustment during the first year of college in two distinct cultures: Belgium (n = 513) and the United States (n = 431). Three structural equation models were tested to determine the mediating effects of (a) perceived family support, (b) quality of academic advice from parents, and (c) quality of social advice from parents on associations between family communication patterns (FCPs) and student adju...

  3. Patterns of prefrontal dysfunction in alcoholics with and without Korsakoff's syndrome, patients with Parkinson's disease, and patients with rupture and repair of the anterior communicating artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, Courtney L; Howard, Julie A; Cronin-Golomb, Alice; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2006-09-01

    This study compared patterns of frontal-lobe dysfunction in alcoholics with Korsakoff's syndrome (KS: n = 9), non-Korsakoff alcoholics (AL: n = 28), patients with Parkinson's disease (PD: n = 18), and patients with rupture and repair of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA: n = 4) relative to healthy non-neurological control (NC) participants (n = 70). The tests administered were sensitive to functions of dorsolateral prefrontal and orbito-frontal subsystems. Measures included perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST-pe), errors on object alternation (OA), errors on Trails B, number of words generated on the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT), and number of categories completed on the WCST (WCST-cc). KS patients were as impaired as AL participants on orbitofrontal measures and, on dorsolateral prefrontal measures, were impaired relative to AL participants, whose performance did not differ from controls. Patients with PD also were impaired on tests of orbitofrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal functioning but to a lesser extent than the KS patients. Moreover, most of the PD deficits were driven by the impaired performance of patients whose initial symptoms were on the right side of the body. The ACoA patients were significantly impaired on tests of orbitofrontal but not dorsolateral prefrontal functioning relative to the control group. Together, the results confirm different patterns of frontal-system impairments in patient groups having compromised frontal lobe functioning consequent to varying etiologies.

  4. Communicating health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, A

    1995-01-01

    Routine production of communication materials without paying attention to utilization, field test, and impact analysis is ineffective. The concept of information, education, and communication (IEC) should encompass voluntary activity of health education in a tradition of innovation. One seminal factor may be the communication technologies developed by the National Technology Missions. The missions were participatory by seeking solutions among communities and analyzing health issues from the perspective of those directly involved, rather than from the top down. The prime focus of the national drinking water mission was convenience, hence messages concentrating on health advantages were ignored. At this juncture, influencing health behavior required decentralization reflecting local cultures. Thus community-based partners became the foundation of a strategy of communicating safe water. As national strategies emerged in each of the technology missions, communication addressed advocacy of the need for political will, dissemination of technical information, and influencing patterns of behavior. Despite learning a new understanding, the danger exists that IEC remains just another label of mass communication with posters, advertisements, brochures, radio, and television. Decisions on contraceptive choice and use requires more than just accurate information; it requires the power to make such a decision. A new approach demands a priority for communication skills taking into account people's aspirations. The HIV-AIDS crisis underlines the urgency with which communication has to respond to health challenges. A series of experiments facilitated by the World Conservation Union helped build communication capabilities among environmental groups working in Latin America, Africa, and India. The International Reference Center on Water and Sanitation initiated pilot communication projects in West Africa for community health.

  5. Short communication: grazing pattern of dairy cows that were selected for divergent residual feed intake as calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorini, P; Waghorn, G C; Kuhn-Sherlock, B; Romera, A J; Macdonald, K A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and assess differences in the grazing pattern of 2 groups of mature dairy cows selected as calves for divergent residual feed intake (RFI). Sixteen Holstein-Friesian cows (471±31kg of body weight, 100 d in milk), comprising 8 cows selected as calves (6-8 mo old) for low (most efficient: CSCLowRFI) and 8 cows selected as calves for high (least efficient: CSCHighRFI) RFI, were used for the purpose of this study. Cows (n=16) were managed as a single group, and strip-grazed (24-h pasture allocation at 0800h) a perennial ryegrass sward for 31 d, with measurements taken during the last 21 d. All cows were equipped with motion sensors for the duration of the study, and jaw movements were measured for three 24-h periods during 3 random nonconsecutive days. Measurements included number of steps and jaw movements during grazing and rumination, plus fecal particle size distribution. Jaw movements were analyzed to identify bites, mastication (oral processing of ingesta) during grazing bouts, chewing during rumination, and to calculate grazing and rumination times for 24-h periods. Grazing and walking behavior were also analyzed in relation to the first meal of the day after the new pasture was allocated. Measured variables were subjected to multivariate analysis. Cows selected for low RFI as calves appeared to (a) prioritize grazing and rumination over idling; (b) take fewer steps, but with a higher proportion of grazing steps at the expense of nongrazing steps; and (c) increase the duration of the first meal and commenced their second meal earlier than CSCHighRFI. The CSCLowRFI had fewer jaw movements during eating (39,820 vs. 45,118 for CSCLowRFI and CSCHighRFI, respectively), more intense rumination (i.e., 5 more chews per bolus), and their feces had 30% less large particles than CSCHighRFI. These results suggest that CSCLowRFI concentrate their grazing activity to the time when fresh pasture is allocated, and graze more efficiently

  6. Pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Theodoridis, Sergios

    2003-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a scientific discipline that is becoming increasingly important in the age of automation and information handling and retrieval. Patter Recognition, 2e covers the entire spectrum of pattern recognition applications, from image analysis to speech recognition and communications. This book presents cutting-edge material on neural networks, - a set of linked microprocessors that can form associations and uses pattern recognition to ""learn"" -and enhances student motivation by approaching pattern recognition from the designer's point of view. A direct result of more than 10

  7. Animal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gisela

    2014-11-01

    Animal communication is first and foremost about signal transmission and aims to understand how communication occurs. It is a field that has contributed to and been inspired by other fields, from information technology to neuroscience, in finding ever better methods to eavesdrop on the actual 'message' that forms the basis of communication. Much of this review deals with vocal communication as an example of the questions that research on communication has tried to answer and it provides an historical overview of the theoretical arguments proposed. Topics covered include signal transmission in different environments and different species, referential signaling, and intentionality. The contention is that animal communication may reveal significant thought processes that enable some individuals in a small number of species so far investigated to anticipate what conspecifics might do, although some researchers think of such behavior as adaptive or worth dismissing as anthropomorphizing. The review further points out that some species are more likely than others to develop more complex communication patterns. It is a matter of asking how animals categorize their world and which concepts require cognitive processes and which are adaptive. The review concludes with questions of life history, social learning, and decision making, all criteria that have remained relatively unexplored in communication research. Long-lived, cooperative social animals have so far offered especially exciting prospects for investigation. There are ample opportunities and now very advanced technologies as well to tap further into expressions of memory of signals, be they vocal or expressed in other modalities. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:661-677. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1321 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. [Leadership and communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Michael; Barth, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Medical leadership requires specific communication skills in order to meet professional demands. Communicative behaviour is usually highly automated and not necessarily conscious. Managerial communication competes against elaborated but not role-specific behaviour patterns, especially in critical situations. Accordingly, competent medical leadership requires the awareness of individual communication habits as well as the knowledge and ability to use conversation techniques suitable for a specific situational context. The training of leadership-related communication techniques requires the de-automation of existing skills and a problem-oriented construction and re-automation of new communication techniques.

  9. Interlimb communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas

    A continual coordination between the two legs is necessary for maintaining a symmetric walking pattern and adapting to changes in the external environment. Recent evidence in animals and humans suggests that spinal interneuronal circuits under supraspinal control may mediate communication between...... the lower limbs. The overall objective of the present thesis was to further investigate and elucidate neural pathways underlying interlimb communication in humans, focusing primarily on the possible interlimb connections to the biceps femoris muscle. The major aims were 1) to investigate whether interlimb...... walking (Study IV). The results of the this thesis provide new insights into the neural mechanisms underlying human interlimb communication, as well as their functional relevance to human locomotion. Although it is difficult to propose the exact neural pathways mediating interlimb reflexes...

  10. Adoption and Use of Internet Technologies in Health Communication: Examining Disparities in Diffusion Patterns, Health Information Sources, and Patient-Provider Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip Minter

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the impact of internet technologies on the field of health communication. Access and use of health communication technologies has and will continue to become increasingly important to manage and treat chronic conditions and other ailments, particularly in the context of health care reform that promotes improved quality…

  11. Adoption and Use of Internet Technologies in Health Communication: Examining Disparities in Diffusion Patterns, Health Information Sources, and Patient-Provider Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip Minter

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the impact of internet technologies on the field of health communication. Access and use of health communication technologies has and will continue to become increasingly important to manage and treat chronic conditions and other ailments, particularly in the context of health care reform that promotes improved quality…

  12. Patterns of prefrontal dysfunction in alcoholics with and without Korsakoff’s syndrome, patients with Parkinson’s disease, and patients with rupture and repair of the anterior communicating artery

    OpenAIRE

    Dirksen, Courtney L; Howard, Julie A.; Cronin-Golomb, Alice; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2006-01-01

    This study compared patterns of frontal-lobe dysfunction in alcoholics with Korsakoff’s syndrome (KS: n = 9), non-Korsakoff alcoholics (AL: n = 28), patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD: n = 18), and patients with rupture and repair of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA: n = 4) relative to healthy non-neurological control (NC) participants (n = 70). The tests administered were sensitive to functions of dorsolateral prefrontal and orbito-frontal subsystems. Measures included perseverativ...

  13. Discussion of Online Communication’s Shaping Effect on the Pattern of Human Communicative Practices%网络人际互动对人类交往实践样态的崭新形塑

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴满意; 景星维

    2015-01-01

    人类在不同的历史时期交往互动实践的出场方式上有着不同的路径与表现形态,呈现出鲜明的阶段性与历史演进的有序化、层级化特征。其中,作为网缘式的网络人际互动交往实践形态的出场,无疑是人类社会交往实践活动与形态的顶层制序,形塑着人类交往实践的崭新格局。网络人际互动创制了人类交往实践新的技术规则与逻辑、新的人伦规则与逻辑、新的经济化规则与逻辑、新的网络习俗与逻辑。网络人际互动生成着人类交往实践的新型权力关系,建构了人类交往实践活动崭新的“意义—权力”场域。%In different historical period human being’s intercommunication practice has different passages and forms of expression,displaying striking periodicity,the sequential and hierarchical features of evolvement.Among the communi-cative practices and patterns in human society,undoubtedly the appearance of online communication as a type of net mar-gin should take a stance at the top layer and has been shaping a brand-new pattern for human communication.Online communicative practices had created the human communicative practices’new technical rules and logic,new ethics rules and logic,new economy rules and logic,new network customs and logic.Online communicative practices are generating the human communicative practices of new type of relations,and constructing the new “meaning-power”field of commu-nicative activities.

  14. IPTV对中国电视传播形态的改变与发展趋势%Change to Communication Pattern of China's TV Media by IPTV and Its Development Trend

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐生权

    2012-01-01

    As the converging product of TV media and Network media,IPTV comes to people as a new revolutionary media.Its hyperlink——style communication content,nonconforming linear communication process and interactive communication model have changed the communication characteristics of traditional TV media.As the best entry point of convergence of three networks,an important part of new media pattern and the rudiment of Social TV,IPTV will have a continued development.%IPTV作为电视媒介与网络媒介融合的产物,自问世起就以一种变革性的新媒介形态出现在世人面前,IPTV"超链接形态"的传播内容,不完全线性的传播过程,双向互动的传播模式都改变了传统电视媒体的传播特性,而作为媒介融合的产物,IPTV将作为"三网融合"的最佳切入点,新媒介格局的重要组成部分和社交电视的雏形继续发展下去。

  15. Student-Teachers' Verbal Communication Patterns during Their Teaching Practice in "Studies for the Environment" Subject in Early Greek Primary Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrakis, George; Karagianni, Aggeliki; Pani, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the quality of student-teachers' (STs') verbal communication during their teaching practice on the "Studies for the Environment" subject, and identifies potential factors affecting it. Forty-one teaching sessions were analysed revealing that STs dominate classroom talking by having almost an equal number of utterances…

  16. Parent-Reported Patterns of Loss and Gain in Communication in 1- to 2-Year-Old Children Are Not Unique to Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignell, Amanda; Williams, Katrina; Prior, Margot; Donath, Susan; Reilly, Sheena; Bavin, Edith L.; Eadie, Patricia; Morgan, Angela T.

    2017-01-01

    We compared loss and gain in communication from 1 to 2 years in children later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (n = 41), language impairment (n = 110) and in children with typical language development at 7 years (n = 831). Participants were selected from a prospective population cohort study of child language (the Early Language in…

  17. Internet use and web communication networks, sources of social support, and forms of suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injury among adolescents: different patterns between genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Fang-Yi; Yang, Hao-Jan

    2015-04-01

    The relationships of Internet use, web communication, and sources of social support with adolescent self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITBs) in Taiwan were investigated. The study sample of 391 12 to 18-year-olds was selected from nine public high schools. Findings show that girls are more likely to have SITBs, except for suicide gestures. Web communication is a risk factor for SITBs in boys but not in girls. Family support is protective in both genders. Support from friends is protective and support from significant others was a risk factor for suicide plans in girls. Support from virtual social communities can have both positive and negative effects on adolescent SITBs, with different effects by gender.

  18. Successful health communication in epileptology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Steven C

    2017-01-01

    Advances in communication technologies have had an impact on virtually every aspect of daily life and have shaped the ways that persons with epilepsy learn about their disorder; communicate with their care providers, families and friends; and are viewed by society. This paper discusses drivers of changing communication patterns in epileptology and barriers that remain, available tools to enhance communication among and between all stakeholders, and potential future developments. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Satellite Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  20. 面向网络传播形态的公嬲信息预警模式研究%Early Warning Pattern of Public Crisis Information Based on the Status of Network Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠志斌

    2012-01-01

    通过研究公共危机网络传播与现实危机发展的互动机理,提出将公共危机网络传播形态作为危机预警的对象,建立基于多层次网络信息挖掘、大聚合信息关联分析和“传播形态一危机情境”比对的网络信息预警模式,推动我国公共危机管理由“事件驱动”向“风险驱动”的转型。%After the analysis on the status of crisis communication in cyberspace, the paper brings up an early warning pattern of pub- lic crisis information based on the multi-dimensional network information mining and the contrasting between communication status and crisis situation. This new early warning pattern will promote the crisis management transform from ' event-driven' to ' risk-driven' in our country

  1. Postcultural Communication?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Iben

    2015-01-01

    When we as scholars use the concept of intercultural communication in its classic definition, as communication between people with different cultural backgrounds, we perpetuate the notion that national differences influence communication more than other differences; in doing so, ethnic minorities...

  2. Variations in clique and community patterns in protein structures during allosteric communication: investigation of dynamically equilibrated structures of methionyl tRNA synthetase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amit; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2008-11-04

    The allosteric concept has played a key role in understanding the biological functions of proteins. The rigidity or plasticity and the conformational population are the two important ideas invoked in explaining the allosteric effect. Although molecular insights have been gained from a large number of structures, a precise assessment of the ligand-induced conformational changes in proteins at different levels, ranging from gross topology to intricate details, remains a challenge. In this study, we have explored the conformational changes in the complexes of methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS) through novel network parameters such as cliques and communities, which identify the rigid regions in the protein structure networks (PSNs) constructed from the noncovalent interactions of amino acid side chains. MetRS belongs to the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (aaRS) family that plays a crucial role in the translation of genetic code. These enzymes are modular with distinct domains from which extensive genetic, kinetic, and structural data are available, highlighting the role of interdomain communication. The network parameters evaluated here on the conformational ensembles of MetRS complexes, generated from molecular dynamics simulations, have enabled us to understand the interdomain communication in detail. Additionally, the characterization of conformational changes in terms of cliques and communities has also become possible, which had eluded conventional analyses. Furthermore, we find that most of the residues participating in cliques and communities are strikingly different from those that take part in long-range communication. The cliques and communities evaluated here for the first time on PSNs have beautifully captured the local geometries in detail within the framework of global topology. Here the allosteric effect is revealed at the residue level via identification of the important residues specific for structural rigidity and functional flexibility in MetRS. This ought

  3. Computer Attitude, and the Impact of Personal Characteristics and Information and Communication Technology Adoption Patterns on Performance of Teaching Faculty in Higher Education in Ghana, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi-Apau, Josephine A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined computer attitude, and the impact of personal characteristics and ICT adoption patterns on performance of multidisciplinary teaching faculty in three public universities in Ghana. A cross-sectional research of mixed methods was applied in collecting data and information. Quantitative data from 164 respondents were analyzed…

  4. The Influence of Organisational Defensive Patterns on Innovation Capacity and Learning of Information and Communication Technology: An Empirical Study in Hong Kong Transport Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hon Keung; Cheng, Alison Lai Fong

    2010-01-01

    Organisational defensive patterns, including skilled incompetence, organisational defensive routines and fancy footwork, are considered to be a hindrance to effective learning and innovation capacity building in all organisations. The purpose of this research is to investigate: 1) the perceptions of the influence of organisational defensive…

  5. Strategizing Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulbrandsen, Ib Tunby; Just, Sine Nørholm

    not determine the success of strategic communication. Rather, contextual factors such as competition, technological developments, global cultural trends and local traditions as well as employees’ skills and attitudes will determine the organization’s communicative success. This holds true regardless...... and less on the plan to communicate. Against the backdrop of the comprehensive changes to communication in and about organizations brought about by the rise of digital communication technologies and related contextual developments, Strategizing Communication provides better and more up to date tools...

  6. Connecting with patients and instilling realism in an era of emerging communication possibilities: a review on palliative care communication heading to telecare practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gurp, J.; Hasselaar, J.; van Leeuwen, E.; Hoek, P.; Vissers, K.; van Selm, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Appropriate palliative care communication is pivotal to optimizing the quality of life in dying patients and their families. This review aims at describing communication patterns in palliative care and discussing potential relations between communication patterns and upcoming telecare in

  7. Connecting with patients and instilling realism in an era of emerging communication possibilities: A review on palliative care communication heading to telecare practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurp, J. Van; Hasselaar, J.; Leeuwen, E. van; Hoek, P.; Vissers, K.; Selm, M. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Appropriate palliative care communication is pivotal to optimizing the quality of life in dying patients and their families. This review aims at describing communication patterns in palliative care and discussing potential relations between communication patterns and upcoming telecare in

  8. Comparing Political Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Pfetsch, Barbara; Esser, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the maturation of comparative political communications as a sub-discipline and defines its conceptual core. It then lays out the concept of “political communication system”. At the macro-level, this model captures the patterns of interaction between media and politics as social systems; at the micro-level it captures the interactions between media and political actors as individuals or organizations. Comparative research in this tradition focuses on the structure of pol...

  9. Communications article

    KAUST Repository

    Fariborzi, Hossein

    2017-07-20

    Seamless, covert communications using a communications system integrated or incorporated within an article of clothing is described. In one embodiment, the communications system is integrated or incorporated into a shoe insole and includes a haptic feedback mechanism, a communications module, a flexible pressure sensor, and a battery. The communications module includes a wireless communications module for wireless communications, a wired interface for wired communications, a microcontroller, and a battery charge controller. The flexible pressure sensor can be actuated by an individual\\'s toe, for example, and communication between two communications nodes can be achieved using coded signals sent by individuals using a combination of long and short presses on the pressure sensor. In response to the presses, wireless communications modules can transmit and receive coded signals based on the presses.

  10. The Changing Pattern of Hospital Admission to Medical Wards: Burden of non-communicable diseases at a hospital in a developing country

    OpenAIRE

    Noor, Sufian K.; Elmadhoun, Wadie M.; Bushara, Sarra O.; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the pattern of hospital admissions and patient outcomes in medical wards at Atbara Teaching Hospital in River Nile State, Sudan. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2013 to July 2014 and included all patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital during the study period. Morbidity and mortality data was obtained from medical records. Diseases were categorised using the World Healt...

  11. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Self-patterned aluminium interconnects and ring electrodes for arrays of microcavity plasma devices encapsulated in Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. S.; Park, S.-J.; Eden, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Automatic formation of Al interconnects and ring electrodes, fully encapsulated by alumina, in planar arrays of Al2O3/Al/Al2O3 microcavity plasma devices has been accomplished by electrochemical processing of Al foil. Following the fabrication of cylindrical microcavities (50-350 µm in diameter) in 127 µm thick Al foil, virtually complete anodization of the foil yields azimuthally symmetric Al electrodes surrounding each cavity and interconnects between adjacent microcavities that are produced and simultaneously buried within a transparent Al2O3 film without the need for conventional patterning techniques. The diameter and pitch of the microcavities prior to anodization, as well as the anodization process parameters, determine which of the microcavity plasma devices in a one- or two-dimensional array are connected electrically. Data presented for 200 µm diameter cavities with a pitch of 150-225 µm illustrate the patterning of the interconnects and electrode connectivity after 4-10 h of anodization in oxalic acid. Self-patterned, linear arrays comprising 25 dielectric barrier devices have been excited by a sinusoidal or bipolar pulse voltage waveform and operated in 400-700 Torr of rare gas. Owing to the electrochemical conversion of most of the Al foil into Al2O3, the self-formed arrays exhibit an areal capacitance ~82% lower than that characteristic of previous Al/Al2O3 device arrays (Park et al 2006 J. Appl. Phys. 99 026107).

  12. Communication Networks: The Hidden Organizational Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T. Harrell

    1976-01-01

    Communication networks are simply regular patterns of communication between people in an organization. Such networks are essential since they provide the basic structure or informal organizational chart through which information is exchanged throughout the organization. (Author)

  13. Participatory Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    This user guide on participatory communication aims to answer the following questions: What do we mean when we say participatory communication? What are the practical implications of working with participatory communication strategies in development and social change processes? What practical...... experiences document that participatory communication adds value to a development project or program? Many communication practitioners and development workers face obstacles and challenges in their practical work. A participatory communication strategy offers a very specific perspective on how to articulate......, tools, and experiences on how to implement participatory communications strategies. It is targeted toward government officials, World Bank staff, develompent workers in the field, and civil society....

  14. Short communication: Milk meal pattern of dairy calves is affected by computer-controlled milk feeder set-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Margit Bak

    2009-01-01

    . Thus, the development from small and frequent milk meals to fewer and larger meals reported by studies of natural suckling was also found among high-fed calves on a computer-controlled milk feeder. Irrespectively of minimum number of milk portions, the low-fed calves had more unrewarded visits...... to the computer-controlled milk feeder, indicating that they were attempting to get more milk. The results of the present study suggest that offering a high milk allowance and avoiding restriction on meal pattern may result in a feeder use that more closely resembles natural suckling....

  15. ARIMA模型在达尔文通信模式研究中的运用%An Application of ARIMA model in Study of Darwin's Mail Communication Pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏士超; 高亮; 孙士钊; 李林灿

    2013-01-01

    首先利用ARIMA模型,研究了进化论的提出者查尔斯·达尔文(Charles R.Darwin,1809/02/12-1882/04/19)从1866到1879年期间的通信量变化规律,并根据模型优化的AIC和BIC准则求得ARIMA优化模型.接着,应用ARIMA优化模型,对达尔文1880至1881年的月通信数量的时间序列进行了预测.预测的月通信数量与实际通信数量的对比说明,ARIMA优化模型拟合效果良好,并能够较好的反映达尔文学术生涯后期实际通信量的时间变化规律.研究结果表明,ARIMA优化模型可以作为一种研究人类通信模式的有效模型加以广泛应用.%In this paper,time series of Charles R.Darwin's mail communication is investigated by ARIMA model.This time series is about Darwin's mail volume,including sent from and received by Darwin,during 1866 to 1879.According to BIC criterion,we get a group of parameters for ARIMA model.To forecast the Darwin's mail volume during 1880 to 1881,we employ ARIMA model with previously obtained parameters.The results show that the forecast of ARIMA model fit well with the real mail volume during 1880 to 1881,and ARIMA model with given parameters can reflect the time evolution of Darwin's mail communication in his scientific career.The results also show that the ARIMA model can be widely used as an effective model to study the human's mail communication pattern.

  16. The impact of Sleep Time-Related Information and Communication Technology (STRICT) on sleep patterns and daytime functioning in American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polos, Peter G; Bhat, Sushanth; Gupta, Divya; O'Malley, Richard J; DeBari, Vincent A; Upadhyay, Hinesh; Chaudhry, Saqib; Nimma, Anitha; Pinto-Zipp, Genevieve; Chokroverty, Sudhansu

    2015-10-01

    This cross-sectional study explored the extent and impact of mobile device-based Sleep Time-Related Information and Communication Technology (STRICT) use among American adolescents (N = 3139, 49.3% female, mean age = 13.3 years). Nearly 62% used STRICT after bedtime, 56.7% texted/tweeted/messaged in bed, and 20.8% awoke to texts. STRICT use was associated with insomnia, daytime sleepiness, eveningness, academic underperformance, later bedtimes and shorter sleep duration. Moderation analysis demonstrated that the association between STRICT use and insomnia increased with age, the association between STRICT use and daytime sleepiness decreased with age, and the association between STRICT use and shorter sleep duration decreased with age and was stronger in girls. Insomnia and daytime sleepiness partially mediated the relationship between STRICT use and academic underperformance. Our results illustrate the adverse interactions between adolescent STRICT use and sleep, with deleterious effects on daytime functioning. These worrisome findings suggest that placing reasonable limitations on adolescent STRICT use may be appropriate.

  17. CSR communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golob, Ursa; Podnar, Klement; Elving, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to introduce the special issue on CSR communication attached to the First International CSR Communication Conference held in Amsterdam in October 2011. The aim of the introduction is also to review CSR communication papers published in scholarly journals in order to make...... a summary of the state of CSR communication knowledge. Design/methodology/approach – The existing literature on CSR communication was approached via systematic review. with a combination of conventional and summative qualitative content analysis. The final dataset contained 90 papers from two main business...... communications. The most important outlets for CSR communication-related topics are Journal of Business Ethics and Corporate Communications: An International Journal. Originality/value – This paper represents the first attempt to perform a systematic and comprehensive overview of CSR communication papers...

  18. Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kobylarek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the problem of models of communication in science. The formal division of communication processes into oral and written does not resolve the problem of attitude. The author defines successful communication as a win-win game, based on the respect and equality of the partners, regardless of their position in the world of science. The core characteristics of the process of scientific communication are indicated , such as openness, fairness, support, and creation. The task of creating the right atmosphere for science communication belongs to moderators, who should not allow privilege and differentiation of position to affect scientific communication processes.

  19. Communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Deborah

    2015-03-01

    The front-line nurse is responsible for providing direct patient care, patient satisfaction, care coordination, policy, safety, and communication during a 12-hour shift. Every nurse has the opportunity to make a positive impact on patient outcomes through day-to-day advocacy for patients, nurses, and the nursing profession. Communication is a means of advocacy that provides the avenue to which a positive impact can be made. There are multiple barriers to effective communication in the day-to-day communication of the front-line nurse. Interprofessional communication and shared governance models offer ways to improve communication within nursing and within a systems approach.

  20. The pattern of complaints about Australian wind farms does not match the establishment and distribution of turbines: support for the psychogenic, 'communicated disease' hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Chapman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: With often florid allegations about health problems arising from wind turbine exposure now widespread, nocebo effects potentially confound any future investigation of turbine health impact. Historical audits of health complaints are therefore important. We test 4 hypotheses relevant to psychogenic explanations of the variable timing and distribution of health and noise complaints about wind farms in Australia. SETTING: All Australian wind farms (51 with 1634 turbines operating 1993-2012. METHODS: Records of complaints about noise or health from residents living near 51 Australian wind farms were obtained from all wind farm companies, and corroborated with complaints in submissions to 3 government public enquiries and news media records and court affidavits. These are expressed as proportions of estimated populations residing within 5 km of wind farms. RESULTS: There are large historical and geographical variations in wind farm complaints. 33/51 (64.7% of Australian wind farms including 18/34 (52.9% with turbine size >1 MW have never been subject to noise or health complaints. These 33 farms have an estimated 21,633 residents within 5 km and have operated complaint-free for a cumulative 267 years. Western Australia and Tasmania have seen no complaints. 129 individuals across Australia (1 in 254 residents appear to have ever complained, with 94 (73% being residents near 6 wind farms targeted by anti wind farm groups. The large majority 116/129(90% of complainants made their first complaint after 2009 when anti wind farm groups began to add health concerns to their wider opposition. In the preceding years, health or noise complaints were rare despite large and small-turbine wind farms having operated for many years. CONCLUSIONS: The reported historical and geographical variations in complaints are consistent with psychogenic hypotheses that expressed health problems are "communicated diseases" with nocebo effects likely

  1. Living antennas on communication satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumholt, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Crises change the global pattern of communication. The communications problems occur because the satellites are optimized to cover specific geographic areas, and these areas cannot be altered once the satellites are in Earth orbit. An effective solution to the problem is to equip communication...... satellites with "living" antennas that can adjust their radiation coverage areas according to the new demands. The development of living antennas is, therefore, among the focus areas identified and supported by the European Space Agency, ESA....

  2. Data communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preckshot, G.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining computer communication systems used in nuclear power plants. The recommendations cover three areas important to these communications systems: system design, communication protocols, and communication media. The first area, system design, considers three aspects of system design--questions about architecture, specific risky design elements or omissions to look for in designs being reviewed, and recommendations for multiplexed data communication systems used in safety systems. The second area reviews pertinent aspects of communication protocol design and makes recommendations for newly designed protocols or the selection of existing protocols for safety system, information display, and non-safety control system use. The third area covers communication media selection, which differs significantly from traditional wire and cable. The recommendations for communication media extend or enhance the concerns of published IEEE standards about three subjects: data rate, imported hazards and maintainability.

  3. Communication (action with communicative content).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, M T

    2010-01-01

    The term Communication generally designate the transmission of a message of concepts, feelings or needs from a speaker to a receiver by means of verbal or no verbal language. The pragmatic approach to human communication has put in evidence a further implication of this concept: every behaviour therefore has a value even when it is not intentional. Recently, a more dynamic concept of communication has been elaborated where communication means communicative action. This interpretation is the starting point for the theory of the "communicative acting" and subsequently of the so called discourse ethic elaborated by J. Habermas.

  4. Communicative Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭燕

    2016-01-01

    Writing, like all other aspects of language , is communicative.Communicative writing takes an important part in English learn-ing.Communicative writing assignments train students to turn personal observations into impersonal prose , avoid value judgments unwelcome in the sciences, and write with economy and precision .In the English language classroom , however, writing often lacks this.Why?There are lots of reasons , as there are lots of ways to make the writing we do with students more communicative .

  5. Participatory Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    This user guide on participatory communication aims to answer the following questions: What do we mean when we say participatory communication? What are the practical implications of working with participatory communication strategies in development and social change processes? What practical......, tools, and experiences on how to implement participatory communications strategies. It is targeted toward government officials, World Bank staff, develompent workers in the field, and civil society....

  6. Existential Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Charles C.

    Focusing on the seminal work "Being and Nothingness," this paper explores the implications of the ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre for the study of communication in society. The paper redefines communication from an existential point of view, explores some implications of this redefinition for the study of communication within the social…

  7. Existential Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Charles C.

    Focusing on the seminal work "Being and Nothingness," this paper explores the implications of the ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre for the study of communication in society. The paper redefines communication from an existential point of view, explores some implications of this redefinition for the study of communication within the social setting, and…

  8. Communication Links

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This interactive tutorial helps learners to: Identify key upward, lateral, downward, and informal communication links in their organizations. , Reflect on the benefits, control, satisfaction, information filters, and feedback mechanism of various communication links in the organizations. OCL1000 Communicating Change in Complex Organizations

  9. Stereotypes Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuli; Deng, Dongyuan

    2009-01-01

    We live in a world, which is becoming a Global Village in which information and communication attract people's attention more than ever before. Our desire to communicate with strangers and our relationships with them depend on the degree to which we are effective in communicating with them. There are so many factors restricting or improving…

  10. Existential Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Charles C.

    Focusing on the seminal work "Being and Nothingness," this paper explores the implications of the ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre for the study of communication in society. The paper redefines communication from an existential point of view, explores some implications of this redefinition for the study of communication within the social…

  11. Cultural Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  12. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  13. The Impact of Technology on Superintendent Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Victoria L.

    2009-01-01

    Technological advances have revolutionized the communication patterns and behaviors of district leaders. In this information-based society, the ability of the leader to select the form of communication most appropriate to the context and situation qualifies his or her effectiveness at communication. The findings emerging from this study highlight…

  14. Building Relationship Communication Skills for Transformational Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiola, Edward O.

    1995-01-01

    The most important skill for the transformational leader is building relationships through positive and effective communication. Provides guidelines for supporting and encouraging group members, setting the tone for the group, modeling communication behaviors, use of voice patterns, active listening, reflective communication (paraphrasing),…

  15. Communicative Language Teaching: Making It Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1987-01-01

    A classroom-based study of communicative language practices of English as a second language teachers revealed the persistence of non-communicative patterns of interaction, while a follow-up study demonstrated that it was possible for teachers to foster more communicative language use. (Author/CB)

  16. Communicative Language Teaching: Making It Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1987-01-01

    A classroom-based study of communicative language practices of English as a second language teachers revealed the persistence of non-communicative patterns of interaction, while a follow-up study demonstrated that it was possible for teachers to foster more communicative language use. (Author/CB)

  17. Communication theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Irene F.; Stelter, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Communication theory covers a wide variety of theories related to the communication process (Littlejohn, 1999). Communication is not simply an exchange of information, in which we have a sender and a receiver. This very technical concept of communication is clearly outdated; a human being...... is not a data processing device. In this chapter, communication is understood as a process of shared meaning-making (Bruner, 1990). Human beings interpret their environment, other people, and themselves on the basis of their dynamic interaction with the surrounding world. Meaning is essential because people...... ascribe specific meanings to their experiences, their actions in life or work, and their interactions. Meaning is reshaped, adapted, and transformed in every communication encounter. Furthermore, meaning is cocreated in dialogues or in communities of practice, such as in teams at a workplace or in school...

  18. Strategizing Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulbrandsen, Ib Tunby; Just, Sine Nørholm

    not determine the success of strategic communication. Rather, contextual factors such as competition, technological developments, global cultural trends and local traditions as well as employees’ skills and attitudes will determine the organization’s communicative success. This holds true regardless......Strategizing Communication offers a unique perspective on the theory and practice of strategic communication. Written for students and practitioners interested in learning about and acquiring tools for dealing with the technological, environmental and managerial challenges, which organizations face...... when communicating in today’s mediascape, this book presents an array of theories, concepts and models through which we can understand and practice communication strategically. The core of the argument is in the title: strategizing – meaning the act of making something strategic. This entails looking...

  19. Pattern languages in HCI: A critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Dearden, A.; Finlay, J

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a critical review of patterns and pattern languages in human-computer interaction (HCI). In recent years, patterns and pattern languages have received considerable attention in HCI for their potential as a means for developing and communicating information and knowledge to support good design. This review examines the background to patterns and pattern languages in HCI, and seeks to locate pattern languages in relation to other approaches to interaction design. The revie...

  20. Pattern languages in HCI: a critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Dearden, Andy; Finlay, J

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a critical review of patterns and pattern languages in human-computer interaction (HCI). In recent years, patterns and pattern languages have received considerable attention in HCI for their potential as a means for developing and communicating information and knowledge to support good design. This review examines the background to patterns and pattern languages in HCI, and seeks to locate pattern languages in relation to other approaches to interaction design. The review ...

  1. [Verbal communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Fulvio; Panini, Roberta; Ameri, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    The communication is an action that occupies a lot of part of the life of every individual and understands a whole activity that the purpose has to reach a preset goal: the communication obligatorily foresees the presence of a recipient/receiving.During communication we used both the word, but also the gesture and the way of do/say. The oral communication represents the most complete system however, evolved, end and thin to communicate, able to also express concepts and thoughts and not only behaviors: with it he can also lie and to supply misinformation. The oral communication also possesses an important temporal value, in how much you/he/she can define him now, the before and the then, but also the ability to determine the human relationships, because it participates in to define the different roles in which broadcasting station and receiver are found at that time. The truest power of the words is that to create, to maintain, to modify other people's behaviors; a natural correlation exists that is between communication and behavior. The final objective of the communication results therefore that to create or to modify the relationships and the human behaviors; in other terms we can be affirmed that the words can determine the reality. The true ragion to be to communicate is the purpose however, that who speaks he/she wants to reach: it is a voluntary, both mental and physical effort, that originates from a need both explicit and implicit of whom sends forth the message.

  2. Postcultural Communication?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Iben

    2015-01-01

    When we as scholars use the concept of intercultural communication in its classic definition, as communication between people with different cultural backgrounds, we perpetuate the notion that national differences influence communication more than other differences; in doing so, ethnic minorities...... in multicultural societies are silently/verbally excluded from national communities. The aim of the article is to develop a theoretical position, which is able to conceptualize intercultural communication in complex multicultural societies and function as a frame for empirical analysis. The theoretical position...... is presented as a postcultural prism composed by practice theory (Schatzki 1996, Reckwitz 2002, Nicolini 2012, Kemmis 2012), Intersectionality (Brah, Phoenix, Collins Rahsack) and positioning theory (Harre & Langenhove 1998)....

  3. Communicating up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Chief communicators at many U.S. institutions are interested in forging closer ties with governing boards. Proponents say such relationships can increase board trust and confidence in communicators before a crisis occurs, making it easier to manage the institution's reputation and limit negative publicity when one does. At some institutions, such…

  4. Interracial Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tina M.

    2004-01-01

    This course explores the inextricable and multidimensional relationships among race, culture, and communication by providing students with an extensive theoretical framework to enhance their understanding of interracial communication. Specific attention is geared toward the construction of one's own racial and ethnic identity as well as those of…

  5. Industrial Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Dan

    Intended for seniors planning a career in industry as skilled laborers, this specialized course in Industrial Communications offers the student basic communications skills which he will need in his work and in his daily life. Since class activities center around short, factual oral reports, class size will be limited to 20, providing a maximum of…

  6. A content analysis of research on religion and spirituality in general communication and health communication journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville Miller, Ann; Teel, Simone

    2011-10-01

    Little research has been conducted within the field of communication regarding the intersection of religious faith and health communication. One step toward addressing the existing gap in health communication literature is to establish an accurate picture of the present state of affairs. The purpose of this study was to describe publication patterns in communication journals over the past 10 years with respect to the intersection and faith and health communication. We conducted a content analysis on four broad-based communication journals that have been identified as central in the communication field, and two health communication journals. We present results regarding specific health conditions, nationalities, faith communities, channels of communication, domains of religion, and purposes of communication studied; methods used; trends in publication across time and communication journals; and comparison to other disciplines.

  7. Botnet Detection by Monitoring Similar Communication Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Zeidanloo, Hossein Rouhani

    2010-01-01

    Botnet is most widespread and occurs commonly in today's cyber attacks, resulting in serious threats to our network assets and organization's properties. Botnets are collections of compromised computers (Bots) which are remotely controlled by its originator (BotMaster) under a common Command-and-Control (C&C) infrastructure. They are used to distribute commands to the Bots for malicious activities such as distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, spam and phishing. Most of the existing Botnet detection approaches concentrate only on particular Botnet command and control (C&C) protocols (e.g., IRC,HTTP) and structures (e.g., centralized), and can become ineffective as Botnets change their structure and C&C techniques. In this paper at first we provide taxonomy of Botnets C&C channels and evaluate well-known protocols which are being used in each of them. Then we proposed a new general detection framework which currently focuses on P2P based and IRC based Botnets. This proposed framework is ...

  8. Mobile social closeness and communication patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Dantu, Ram

    2010-01-01

    As mobile networks expand rapidly to facilitate the rising number of mobile phone population, more mobile social services are being developed and offered. To create an efficient social functionality, characteristics of mobile social network must be studied. Social closeness is one of the basic fundamentals of any kind of social networking. In this paper, closeness in mobile social network is the subject of the study, from which social grouping scheme is proposed and validated against the feed...

  9. Communications Patterns in a Symbolic Multiprocessor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    8217IIIfitit -haLt it Ila, "I’ratedI munch m(iIre’ frepull’nt ly tiham anyv of the flit ’If. Iw~ 1ii ;1" it 11f1 pihro( tr4 lIII ()jif t hotwE touifi’s...with Iskradelta Inc., Jozef Stefan Institute, and Edvard Kardelj University, Yugoslavia. .5.- [15] W.C. Brantley, K.P. McAuliffe, and J. Weiss. RP3

  10. Scholarly Communication and Authorship Patterns in Language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-02

    Oct 2, 2016 ... socio-economic and political life of any individual is propelled by the use of language. ... covering mainly English language titles from North America and ... the databases (Singh, 2013; Ezema & Asogwa, 2014) while others ...

  11. Pattern Formation in Hydrozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Stefan

    The fresh water polyp Hydra is famous for its ability to regenerate missing structures. Even aggregates of single cells transform eventually into normally shaped animals. This indicates a communication within the tissue and within the aggregates which determines the spatial pattern of gene expression. Such pattern-forming systems are thought to play a decisive role in the control of self-organization during embryogenesis. Marine and fresh water hydrozoa appear to allow an access to such a system. Although the molecular components are still mostly unknown, the regulatory properties of the pattern-forming system are increasingly well understood, and this may help eventually to identify the components involved.

  12. Intercultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Modiga

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of culture has become one of strategic importance for all disciplines studying human and social universe, being invested today with multiple explanatory connotations. Meanwhile, conjunction and theoretical approaches we witness interference, under the imperative of interdisciplinary vision lead us, often up to a damaging confusion between communication and culture. Distinction between symbolic and instrumental, of culture and civilization are necessary to not confuse the contents of symbolic culture media of communication technology. An inventory of issues and social transformations that have acquired an indisputable relevance in contemporary development equation surgery is necessary but difficult. It should be mentioned two of them, given their global significance: the rediscovery of culture as a defining factor of the social and importance that have acquired communication processes in living societies. In fact, between the two aspects there is a relationship of inherent and consubstantiality, validated by actual historical experience. Culture and Communication is now a binomial with terms interchangeably, the two processes intertwined in a single block. Welding of the two dimensions was otherwise devoted to the vocabulary of social sciences and humanities through the concepts of culture media and intercultural communication. If we examine the paradigm shift in the theoretical space of the last century, the most surprising phenomena that we observe is that theories concerning communication space literally invaded the area that was traditionally reserved for theories about culture. For theorists today, communication is a structural constituent and all definitions, descriptions and characterizations that build on contemporary culture.

  13. Science communication as political communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheufele, Dietram A

    2014-09-16

    Scientific debates in modern societies often blur the lines between the science that is being debated and the political, moral, and legal implications that come with its societal applications. This manuscript traces the origins of this phenomenon to professional norms within the scientific discipline and to the nature and complexities of modern science and offers an expanded model of science communication that takes into account the political contexts in which science communication takes place. In a second step, it explores what we know from empirical work in political communication, public opinion research, and communication research about the dynamics that determine how issues are debated and attitudes are formed in political environments. Finally, it discusses how and why it will be increasingly important for science communicators to draw from these different literatures to ensure that the voice of the scientific community is heard in the broader societal debates surrounding science.

  14. Science communication as political communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2014-01-01

    Scientific debates in modern societies often blur the lines between the science that is being debated and the political, moral, and legal implications that come with its societal applications. This manuscript traces the origins of this phenomenon to professional norms within the scientific discipline and to the nature and complexities of modern science and offers an expanded model of science communication that takes into account the political contexts in which science communication takes place. In a second step, it explores what we know from empirical work in political communication, public opinion research, and communication research about the dynamics that determine how issues are debated and attitudes are formed in political environments. Finally, it discusses how and why it will be increasingly important for science communicators to draw from these different literatures to ensure that the voice of the scientific community is heard in the broader societal debates surrounding science. PMID:25225389

  15. General human activity patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Mollgaard, Anders; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics and interplay between human communication, movement, and social proximity by analyzing data collected from smartphones distributed among 638 individuals. The main question we consider is: to what extent do individuals act according to patterns shared across an entire population? Based on statistics of the entire population, we successfully predict 71\\% of the activity and 85\\% of the inactivity involved in communication, movement, and social proximity. We find that individual level statistics only result in marginally better predictions, indicating a high degree of shared activity patterns across the population. Finally, we predict short-term activity patterns using a generalized linear model, which suggests that a simple linear description might be sufficient to explain a wide range of actions, whether they be of social or of physical character.

  16. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  17. Communicating EAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    Since the early years of electro acoustic music great self-awareness is found among the field’s composers who often and willingly have communicated historical chronology, thoughts about analysis, aesthetic directions and rivalries. This we find both in relation to the historical studios (Schaeffe......Since the early years of electro acoustic music great self-awareness is found among the field’s composers who often and willingly have communicated historical chronology, thoughts about analysis, aesthetic directions and rivalries. This we find both in relation to the historical studios......’s communication of EAM and Sound Art....

  18. Efficient Translation of Pelargonium line pattern virus RNAs Relies on a TED-Like 3´-Translational Enhancer that Communicates with the Corresponding 5´-Region through a Long-Distance RNA-RNA Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Pérez, Marta; Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Ruiz, Leticia; Hernández, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Cap-independent translational enhancers (CITEs) have been identified at the 3´-terminal regions of distinct plant positive-strand RNA viruses belonging to families Tombusviridae and Luteoviridae. On the bases of their structural and/or functional requirements, at least six classes of CITEs have been defined whose distribution does not correlate with taxonomy. The so-called TED class has been relatively under-studied and its functionality only confirmed in the case of Satellite tobacco necrosis virus, a parasitic subviral agent. The 3´-untranslated region of the monopartite genome of Pelargonium line pattern virus (PLPV), the recommended type member of a tentative new genus (Pelarspovirus) in the family Tombusviridae, was predicted to contain a TED-like CITE. Similar CITEs can be anticipated in some other related viruses though none has been experimentally verified. Here, in the first place, we have performed a reassessment of the structure of the putative PLPV-TED through in silico predictions and in vitro SHAPE analysis with the full-length PLPV genome, which has indicated that the presumed TED element is larger than previously proposed. The extended conformation of the TED is strongly supported by the pattern of natural sequence variation, thus providing comparative structural evidence in support of the structural data obtained by in silico and in vitro approaches. Next, we have obtained experimental evidence demonstrating the in vivo activity of the PLPV-TED in the genomic (g) RNA, and also in the subgenomic (sg) RNA that the virus produces to express 3´-proximal genes. Besides other structural features, the results have highlighted the key role of long-distance kissing-loop interactions between the 3´-CITE and 5´-proximal hairpins for gRNA and sgRNA translation. Bioassays of CITE mutants have confirmed the importance of the identified 5´-3´ RNA communication for viral infectivity and, moreover, have underlined the strong evolutionary constraints that may

  19. Efficient Translation of Pelargonium line pattern virus RNAs Relies on a TED-Like 3´-Translational Enhancer that Communicates with the Corresponding 5´-Region through a Long-Distance RNA-RNA Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Blanco-Pérez

    Full Text Available Cap-independent translational enhancers (CITEs have been identified at the 3´-terminal regions of distinct plant positive-strand RNA viruses belonging to families Tombusviridae and Luteoviridae. On the bases of their structural and/or functional requirements, at least six classes of CITEs have been defined whose distribution does not correlate with taxonomy. The so-called TED class has been relatively under-studied and its functionality only confirmed in the case of Satellite tobacco necrosis virus, a parasitic subviral agent. The 3´-untranslated region of the monopartite genome of Pelargonium line pattern virus (PLPV, the recommended type member of a tentative new genus (Pelarspovirus in the family Tombusviridae, was predicted to contain a TED-like CITE. Similar CITEs can be anticipated in some other related viruses though none has been experimentally verified. Here, in the first place, we have performed a reassessment of the structure of the putative PLPV-TED through in silico predictions and in vitro SHAPE analysis with the full-length PLPV genome, which has indicated that the presumed TED element is larger than previously proposed. The extended conformation of the TED is strongly supported by the pattern of natural sequence variation, thus providing comparative structural evidence in support of the structural data obtained by in silico and in vitro approaches. Next, we have obtained experimental evidence demonstrating the in vivo activity of the PLPV-TED in the genomic (g RNA, and also in the subgenomic (sg RNA that the virus produces to express 3´-proximal genes. Besides other structural features, the results have highlighted the key role of long-distance kissing-loop interactions between the 3´-CITE and 5´-proximal hairpins for gRNA and sgRNA translation. Bioassays of CITE mutants have confirmed the importance of the identified 5´-3´ RNA communication for viral infectivity and, moreover, have underlined the strong evolutionary

  20. Apologies in business communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jūratė Ruzaitė

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to examine the routine of apologizing in spoken business communication. Being face-threatening acts, apologies are of special importance in communication. Since apologies express sincerity and are remedial acts, apologizing helps to enhance mutual respect and to keep the relationship between colleagues stable, which is especially important in business communication. The present analysis focuses on four main expressions of explicit apologies, i.e. apologies with sorry, I apologise, pardon and excuse me. The data have been obtained from the sub-corpus of the British National Corpus, which includes transcripts of business communication and amounts to 1,321,844 words. The analysis accounts for the general frequency of different forms of apology in business communication as well as their frequency in relation to gender. The paper also focuses on the most typical patterns of apologies and argues that apologies range from neutral to highly emphatic or tentative. Finally, the present analysis investigates what is commonly apologised for in business settings.

  1. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  2. COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Podgórecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the most significant factors that influence interpersonal and group communication in multicultural environment in education. It highlights main theories of intercultural communication and its effectiveness as well as ones which deal with coping with conflicts in the intercultural environment. In contemporary times, which require working in multicultural environment, communicative skills become more and more important. In teachers’ work cultural awareness and being openminded about differences between nations and cultures are essential. These skills are especially important while there is a need to avoid or overcome problems, conflicts which may occur. The author shows the significance of these factors. The article closes with the recommendations and clues concerning effective intercultural communication.

  3. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... chapters represent review articles covering the most relevant areas of the field. They are written with the goal of providing students with comprehensive introductions. Further they offer a supply of numerous references to the relevant literature. Besides its usefulness as a textbook, this will make...

  4. Communicating biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Shifting from risk-calculation orientations focusing on populations to preparedness perspectives that model uncertainty through scenario-based projections, biosecurity debates redefined notions of "health" and "security." Nevertheless, a key focus of biosecurity discussions--the domain labeled "communication"--has not been fundamentally rethought, even as it has expanded and professionalized. Bracketing preconceived ideas about the term's content, the article traces debates about biosecurity "communication" from the 1990s to the present, drawing on ethnography and textual analysis. Using a notion of biocommunicability, the cultural modeling of how discourse is produced, circulates, and is received, the article analyzes assumptions regarding subjects, subject-positions, objects, spatializing and temporalizing practices, scales, economies of affect, and regimes of ethics that are built into discourse about "communication." Ironically, the conviction that "communication" is of marginal importance as a focus of critical inquiry, seemingly shared by most medical anthropologists, enables these assumptions to fundamentally shape discussions of biosecurity and emergency management.

  5. Communication breakdown?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas

    2017-04-01

    In response to Brian Clegg's feature article “Speaking a different language” (February pp34-37), in which he suggests that a good science communicator anticipates the kind of questions the audience will want to have answered.

  6. Aesthetic Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, aesthetics is defined as a manner of reinforcing the connectivity, or Anschlusswert, of communication. Without changing the content, a message can be made more attractive, strengthening the receiver's willingness to be attentive and accepting. As communic......Based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, aesthetics is defined as a manner of reinforcing the connectivity, or Anschlusswert, of communication. Without changing the content, a message can be made more attractive, strengthening the receiver's willingness to be attentive and accepting....... As communication inevitably makes use of a sensuous medium, such as light or sound, all communication has an aesthetic dimension. In the 19th Century, an important distinction was made between pure and applied art, following Immanuel Kant's separation of theory of knowledge, moral theory and aesthetic theory....... Whereas pure art is produced in order to be observed, applied art has to fulfill practical purposes as well. Modern organizations, defined as systems of communication, may use art works to embellish and define themselves. But they inevitably use applied art as a practical tool in their normal...

  7. CULTURAL “FACES” OF INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    different patterns of interpersonal communication in the two cultures. .... emotional communication, self disclosure, verbal and nonverbal expressions in general .... are any differences between fathers and their adolescent sons in terms of self ...

  8. New Media Technology in Developing Effective Organizational Internal Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Kholisoh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article was intended to investigate various benefits of Whatsapp Messenger application for an effective intenal communication in PT Euro Management Indonesia. In addition, this research also aimed to map the organizational internal communication pattern through the use of Whatsapp Messenger application. The research used theories of organizaional communication, new media communication pattern, and computer mediated communication (CMC. Moreover, paradigm used in the research was constructivist with qualitative approach and the research method was case study. The research result finds that the use of new media Whatsapp Messenger as a tool of communication can build effective internal communication in PT Euro Management Indonesia. Moreover, it also shows that the internal organizational communication pattern in PT Euro Management Indonesia used in Whatsapp Messenger application is conversation pattern.

  9. Eysenck's BIG THREE and Communication Traits: Three Correlational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCroskey, James C.; Heisel, Alan D.; Richmond, Virginia P.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the relationship between H. Eysenck's personality dimensions (extraversion, neuroticsm, and psychoticism) and communication variables, in three separate studies encompassing more than a dozen communication variables. Finds consistent patterns across the three studies. (SR)

  10. Communicating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, G. J.; McCaffrey, M. S.; Kiehl, J. T.; Schmidt, C.

    2010-12-01

    We are in an era of rapidly changing communication media, which is driving a major evolution in the modes of communicating science. In the past, a mainstay of scientific communication in popular media was through science “translators”; science journalists and presenters. These have now nearly disappeared and are being replaced by widespread dissemination through, e.g., the internet, blogs, YouTube and journalists who often have little scientific background and sharp deadlines. Thus, scientists are required to assume increasing responsibility for translating their scientific findings and calibrating their communications to non-technical audiences, a task for which they are often ill prepared, especially when it comes to controversial societal issues such as tobacco, evolution, and most recently climate change (Oreskes and Conway 2010). Such issues have been politicized and hi-jacked by ideological belief systems to such an extent that constructive dialogue is often impossible. Many scientists are excellent communicators, to their peers. But this requires careful attention to detail and logical explanation, open acknowledgement of uncertainties, and dispassionate delivery. These qualities become liabilities when communicating to a non-scientific audience where entertainment, attention grabbing, 15 second sound bites, and self assuredness reign (e.g. Olson 2009). Here we report on a program initiated by NCAR and UCAR to develop new approaches to science communication and to equip present and future scientists with the requisite skills. If we start from a sound scientific finding with general scientific consensus, such as the warming of the planet by greenhouse gases, then the primary emphasis moves from the “science” to the “art” of communication. The art cannot have free reign, however, as there remains a strong requirement for objectivity, honesty, consistency, and above all a resistance to advocating particular policy positions. Targeting audience

  11. Why Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    "Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and can't, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it." - Robert Frost In this age of digital soap boxes and half-truths, the importance of geoscientists as communicators cannot be underestimated, nor has there been a more important time for researchers to stand up and demand to be heard. So why is there still such an overwhelming public perception that scientists are poor communicators, and what can we do to change this? In this work I will present an overview of a number of successful initiatives that have been developed at Manchester Metropolitan University, and beyond, to ensure that science is communicated to a large variety of people, from policy makers to members of the local community. I will also present an overview of the emerging field of Science Communication, how it has changed in the past few decades from a one-way diatribe to a two-way discussion, and how this represents a possible new direction and career path for geoscientists. Anne Roe, the noted American psychologist, told us, "nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." As geoscientists, we have a professional and moral obligation to ensure that we not only research the facts, but that we also present them in an informative and engaging manner, so that the rest of humanity can benefit from the fruits of our labour.

  12. Sources of variability in human communicative skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volman, Inge; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Toni, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    When established communication systems cannot be used, people rapidly create novel systems to modify the mental state of another agent according to their intentions. However, there are dramatic inter-individual differences in the implementation of this human competence for communicative innovation. Here we characterize psychological sources of inter-individual variability in the ability to build a shared communication system from scratch. We consider two potential sources of variability in communicative skills. Cognitive traits of two individuals could independently influence their joint ability to establish a communication system. Another possibility is that the overlap between those individual traits influences the communicative performance of a dyad. We assess these possibilities by quantifying the relationship between cognitive traits and behavior of communicating dyads. Cognitive traits were assessed with psychometric scores quantifying cooperative attitudes and fluid intelligence. Competence for implementing successful communicative innovations was assessed by using a non-verbal communicative task. Individual capacities influence communicative success when communicative innovations are generated. Dyadic similarities and individual traits modulate the type of communicative strategy chosen. The ability to establish novel communicative actions was influenced by a combination of the communicator's ability to understand intentions and the addressee's ability to recognize patterns. Communicative pairs with comparable systemizing abilities or behavioral inhibition were more likely to explore the search space of possible communicative strategies by systematically adding new communicative behaviors to those already available. No individual psychometric measure seemed predominantly responsible for communicative success. These findings support the notion that the human ability for fast communicative innovations represents a special type of complex collaborative activity.

  13. Communication & Management

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Calendar of courses for September to December 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titles Dates Language Quality Management 18, 19 September Bilingual Managing Teams 19, 20, 21 September English Communicating Effectively - Residential 20, 21, 22 septembre Bilingual (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact 26, 27, 28 September Bilingual Introduction to Leadership 4, 5, 6 October Bilingue IProject Scheduling & Costing 12, 13 October English CDP-SL part 1 Several sessions Dates to be fixed English or French Personal Awareness & Impact 23, 24 October Bilingual Communicating to Convince 23, 24, 25 October Bilingual CDP-GL part 2 25, 26, 27 October English CDP-GL part 1 Dates to be fixed Bilingual Risk Management 20, 21 December Bilingual Communication curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titles Dates Language Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 18, 19 s...

  14. Management & Communication

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Calendar of courses for September to December 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titles Dates Language Quality Management 18, 19 September Bilingual Managing Teams 19, 20, 21 September English Communicating Effectively - Residential 20, 21, 22 septembre Bilingual (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact 26, 27, 28 September Bilingual Introduction to Leadership 4, 5, 6 October Bilingue IProject Scheduling & Costing 12, 13 October English CDP-SL part 1 Several sessions Dates to be fixed English or French Personal Awareness & Impact 23, 24 October Bilingual Communicating to Convince 23, 24, 25 October Bilingual CDP-GL part 2 25, 26, 27 October English CDP-GL part 1 Dates to be fixed Bilingual Risk Management 20, 21 December Bilingual Communication curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titles Dates Language Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 18, 19 sept...

  15. Communication & Management

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2006-01-01

    Calendar of courses for September to December 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titles Dates Language Quality Management 18, 19 September Bilingual Managing Teams 19, 20, 21 September English Communicating Effectively - Residential 20, 21, 22 septembre Bilingual (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact 26, 27, 28 September Bilingual Introduction to Leadership 4, 5, 6 October Bilingue IProject Scheduling & Costing 12, 13 October English CDP-SL part 1 Several sessions Dates to be fixed English or French Personal Awareness & Impact 23, 24 October Bilingual Communicating to Convince 23, 24, 25 October Bilingual CDP-GL part 2 25, 26, 27 October English CDP-GL part 1 Dates to be fixed Bilingual Risk Management 20, 21 December Bilingual Communication curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titles Dates Language Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 18, 19 s...

  16. Scholarly Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Romary, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The chapter tackles the role of scholarly publication in the research process (quality, preservation) and looks at the consequences of new information technologies in the organization of the scholarly communication ecology. It will then show how new technologies have had an impact on the scholarly communication process and made it depart from the traditional publishing environment. Developments will address new editorial processes, dissemination of new content and services, as well as the development of publication archives. This last aspect will be covered on all levels (open access, scientific, technical and legal aspects). A view on the possible evolutions of the scientific publishing environment will be provided.

  17. Digital communication

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Apurba

    2010-01-01

    ""Digital Communications"" presents the theory and application of the philosophy of Digital Communication systems in a unique but lucid form. This book inserts equal importance to the theory and application aspect of the subject whereby the authors selected a wide class of problems. The Salient features of the book are: the foundation of Fourier series, Transform and wavelets are introduces in a unique way but in lucid language; the application area is rich and resemblance to the present trend of research, as we are attached with those areas professionally; a CD is included which contains code

  18. Communications standards

    CERN Document Server

    Stokes, A V

    1986-01-01

    Communications Standards deals with the standardization of computer communication networks. This book examines the types of local area networks (LANs) that have been developed and looks at some of the relevant protocols in more detail. The work of Project 802 is briefly discussed, along with a protocol which has developed from one of the LAN standards and is now a de facto standard in one particular area, namely the Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP). Factors that affect the usage of networks, such as network management and security, are also considered. This book is divided into three se

  19. Communicating EAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    Since the early years of electro acoustic music great self-awareness is found among the field’s composers who often and willingly have communicated historical chronology, thoughts about analysis, aesthetic directions and rivalries. This we find both in relation to the historical studios (Schaeffe......Since the early years of electro acoustic music great self-awareness is found among the field’s composers who often and willingly have communicated historical chronology, thoughts about analysis, aesthetic directions and rivalries. This we find both in relation to the historical studios...

  20. Constructive communication

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Richard Ellis is a consultant in communications and the successful author of 'Communication for Engineers'. In each chapter he highlights key points and situations, and provides exercises to consolidate what has already been learnt. The book ends with a 'toolbox' of useful information on subjects such as writing letters, spelling, punctuation, using abbreviations, studying for exams, using libraries and training.Written in clear, informative English, with the emphasis on the practical, this book is essential reading for both students and professionals in the con

  1. Interreligious Communication (Definition, Concepts, Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Bashir

    2016-01-01

    concepts, and by highlighting the similarities in order to create an international society having a general religious discourse with no tension but peaceful coexistence. According to this definition, the interreligious communication can be regarded as a vast field of specific inter and cross cultural communication and by focusing on it and after creating its necessary literature it is possible to mix the three fields of interreligious cultural studies, interreligious dialogue and religious cross cultural communication and cause to strengthen and deepen the relationship among different religions. The most important purpose of interreligious communication in present era is to firstly emphasize the similarities of religions in both attitude and action using the three central elements of common understanding, highlighting and institutionalizing and secondly after locating the tension backgrounds and removing them and thirdly by following a proper strategy for appropriate communication, the road for a better and more purposeful communication will be paved. The communication should be based on strengthening the similar points rather than convincing the followers of other religions. To achieve this purpose various tools in three levels of authority, elites and common people should be applied. The most important obstacle for interreligious communication is the radical and extremist movements in different religions. Also the most important barrier for interreligious cooperation in cross religious communication is having a pluralistic conception towards such cooperation. Islamic republic of Iran as the pioneer in promoting religious attitude in present era and because of having successful experience in putting religious patterns into practice and in social life, should take action in making proper policy to develop the three fields of structures, programs and human sources for the purpose of interreligious communication.

  2. Crisis Communication: The Business Communicator's Strategies for Communicating under Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielhaber, Mary E.

    1990-01-01

    Uses the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear plant accident to illustrate the communication problems embedded in a crisis. Describes the reactions created by the stress related to crisis. Suggests business communication strategies for improving communication to the public. (SR)

  3. Information and Communication Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaila, Heidi Kristiina

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and development of the information and communication sector has been rapid in rural Viet Nam over 2006–14, and a true information and communication technology (ICT) revolution has taken place. This chapter examines household ownership and use of ICT. It studies the geographic...... and demographic differences across ownership of technology, especially phones and the Internet, and the determinants of ICT adoption. First, it finds that expansion of telephones has been much more rapid than the expansion of the Internet. Second, it finds that even though in 2014 internet users were relatively...... wealthier and more educated than households with phones on average, the adoption patterns of these two technologies are very similar. ICT adoption is driven by education and income, as well as wealth and ownership of other technology....

  4. Pattern matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hak (Tony); J. Dul (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPattern matching is comparing two patterns in order to determine whether they match (i.e., that they are the same) or do not match (i.e., that they differ). Pattern matching is the core procedure of theory-testing with cases. Testing consists of matching an “observed pattern” (a pattern

  5. Magnetostatic communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, William D.

    2008-02-26

    A system for providing communication of information by modulating a magnetostatic field with a magnetostatic transmitter that modulates said magnetostatic field to contain the information and detecting the information in the modulated field at a distance with a magnetostatic detector that detects the modulated magnetic field containing the information.

  6. Communication Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Margaret

    1976-01-01

    Basic to Library-College thought is the Communication Way. Such a construct is theoretical in the sense it combines the structure of a discipline and the structure of a literature into a system which enables the learner to see that finding and thinking about given subject matter is a unified process. (Author)

  7. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  8. Core Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Greg; Ross, J. D.; Mulder, David

    2011-01-01

    The website--it is where people go to find out anything and everything about a school, college, or university. In the relatively short life of the Internet, institutional websites have moved from the periphery to center stage and become strategically integral communications and marketing tools. As the flow of information accelerates and new…

  9. Health communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mariann B.

    communication changes from information to conversation and negotiation of a chared understanding and challenges the concept of professionalism. The success of conversations depends on the interactions and the capacity to deal with several voices in a complex context. The study discusses the opportunity...

  10. Health communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mariann B.

    communication changes from information to conversation and negotiation of a chared understanding and challenges the concept of professionalism. The success of conversations depends on the interactions and the capacity to deal with several voices in a complex context. The study discusses the opportunity...... to develop this “skill” in health education and to refine the capacity in practice using creativity and artistic approaches....

  11. Quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cariolaro, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This book demonstrates that a quantum communication system using the coherent light of a laser can achieve performance orders of magnitude superior to classical optical communications Quantum Communications provides the Masters and PhD signals or communications student with a complete basics-to-applications course in using the principles of quantum mechanics to provide cutting-edge telecommunications. Assuming only knowledge of elementary probability, complex analysis and optics, the book guides its reader through the fundamentals of vector and Hilbert spaces and the necessary quantum-mechanical ideas, simply formulated in four postulates. A turn to practical matters begins with and is then developed by: ·         development of the concept of quantum decision, emphasizing the optimization of measurements to extract useful information from a quantum system; ·         general formulation of a transmitter–receiver system ·         particular treatment of the most popular quantum co...

  12. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  13. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  14. On the Expressiveness of Intensional Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Given-Wilson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The expressiveness of communication primitives has been explored in a common framework based on the pi-calculus by considering four features: synchronism (asynchronous vs synchronous, arity (monadic vs polyadic data, communication medium (shared dataspaces vs channel-based, and pattern-matching (binding to a name vs testing name equality. Here pattern-matching is generalised to account for terms with internal structure such as in recent calculi like Spi calculi, Concurrent Pattern Calculus and Psi calculi. This paper explores intensionality upon terms, in particular communication primitives that can match upon both names and structures. By means of possibility/impossibility of encodings, this paper shows that intensionality alone can encode synchronism, arity, communication-medium, and pattern-matching, yet no combination of these without intensionality can encode any intensional language.

  15. Human Communication--A New Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeish, John

    1978-01-01

    Pavlov's organism-in-the-environment model was adapted to a functional analysis of communication, expecially abstract and symbolic activities. A classification of discrimination response and reinforcement patterns was given. (CP)

  16. Communicating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Nicholas

    2009-10-01

    Introduction: what this book is about and why you might want to read it; Prologue: three orphans share a common paternity: professional science communication, popular journalism, and literary fiction are not as separate as they seem; Part I. Professional Science Communication: 1. Spreading the word: the endless struggle to publish professional science; 2. Walk like an Egyptian: the alien feeling of professional science writing; 3. The future's bright? Professional science communication in the age of the internet; 4. Counting the horse's teeth: professional standards in science's barter economy; 5. Separating the wheat from the chaff: peer review on trial; Part II. Science for the Public: What Science Do People Need and How Might They Get It?: 6. The Public Understanding of Science (PUS) movement and its problems; 7. Public engagement with science and technology (PEST): fine principle, difficult practice; 8. Citizen scientists? Democratic input into science policy; 9. Teaching and learning science in schools: implications for popular science communication; Part III. Popular Science Communication: The Press and Broadcasting: 10. What every scientist should know about mass media; 11. What every scientist should know about journalists; 12. The influence of new media; 13. How the media represents science; 14. How should science journalists behave?; Part IV. The Origins of Science in Cultural Context: Five Historic Dramas: 15. A terrible storm in Wittenberg: natural knowledge through sorcery and evil; 16. A terrible storm in the Mediterranean: controlling nature with white magic and religion; 17. Thieving magpies: the subtle art of false projecting; 18. Foolish virtuosi: natural philosophy emerges as a distinct discipline but many cannot take it seriously; 19. Is scientific knowledge 'true' or should it just be 'truthfully' deployed?; Part V. Science in Literature: 20. Science and the Gothic: the three big nineteenth-century monster stories; 21. Science fiction: serious

  17. Astronomy Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.; Madsen, C.

    2003-07-01

    Astronomers communicate all the time, with colleagues of course, but also with managers and administrators, with decision makers and takers, with social representatives, with the news media, and with the society at large. Education is naturally part of the process. Astronomy communication must take into account several specificities: the astronomy community is rather compact and well organized world-wide; astronomy has penetrated the general public remarkably well with an extensive network of associations and organizations of aficionados all over the world. Also, as a result of the huge amount of data accumulated and by necessity for their extensive international collaborations, astronomers have pioneered the development of distributed resources, electronic communications and networks coupled to advanced methodologies and technologies, often much before they become of common world-wide usage. This book is filling up a gap in the astronomy-related literature by providing a set of chapters not only of direct interest to astronomy communication, but also well beyond it. The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy nor in communication techniques while providing specific detailed information, as well as plenty of pointers and bibliographic elements. This book will be very useful for researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, computer scientists, sociologists of science, research planners and strategists, project managers, public-relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as for students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space science. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1345-0

  18. Digital communication communication, multimedia, security

    CERN Document Server

    Meinel, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The authors give a detailed summary about the fundamentals and the historical background of digital communication. This includes an overview of the encoding principles and algorithms of textual information, audio information, as well as images, graphics, and video in the Internet. Furthermore the fundamentals of computer networking, digital security and cryptography are covered. Thus, the book provides a well-founded access to communication technology of computer networks, the internet and the WWW. Numerous pictures and images, a subject-index and a detailed list of historical personalities in

  19. Non Verbal Communication in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt, Carmen Judith Nine

    Differences between American (Anglo) and Latin American cultures, particularly the culture of Puerto Rico, in the area of non-verbal communication (NVC) are examined in this work. Specific contrasts in language and kinesic patterns between the two cultures are illustrated in descriptions of communicative gestures employed by Puerto Ricans in the…

  20. Communication in command and control teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.; Rasker, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    An important factor affecting team performance in Combat Information Centers is communication. Previous research has shown that high-performing teams use effective communication patterns, such as limiting idle chatter during high workload conditions, and sharing information before it is needed.

  1. Interaction of societal development and communication technoloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casimir, G.

    2011-01-01

    Societal development has always been influenced by technology, and by information and communication technology (ICT) in particular. Communication technology has an impact on daily life: Consumption patterns and daily activities change, the concept of a household is affected, and the organisation of

  2. Family Communication on Prime-Time Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Mary Strom

    1993-01-01

    The communication patterns of two family sitcoms were examined as models for viewers. "The Cosby Show" portrays a child-centered family with parents not active in giving direction or modeling supportive communication; whereas "The Simpsons" model an adult-centered family, actively supporting each other and children and giving…

  3. Frameworks: Putting Design Patterns into Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2004-01-01

    Design patterns have made a strong impact on how object-oriented software is designed, implemented, and communicated in industrial projects. Teaching patterns is therefore of great importance. Patterns, however, have a natural catalogue-like nature, that easily misleads us into to lecturing them ...

  4. Intercultural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouaoui ,Merbouh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in international trade, the global economy and the globalization of English usage, more and more students are seeking to study in order to gain intercultural understanding, to achieve individual academic goals. One of the most common reasons for students wanting to study is to improve their English competence and to improve their communicative ability with other people. One effect of the globalization of the English language is a significant increase in the number of intercultural interactions. More people than ever before are involved in interactions with foreigners and communities are becoming increasingly multilingual and multicultural to mix with people from their own community rather than interact or communicate with students from other cultural backgrounds.

  5. Communications technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccia, C. Louis; Sivo, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    The technologies for optimized, i.e., state of the art, operation of satellite-based communications systems are surveyed. Features of spaceborne active repeater systems, low-noise signal amplifiers, power amplifiers, and high frequency switches are described. Design features and capabilities of various satellite antenna systems are discussed, including multiple beam, shaped reflector shaped beam, offset reflector multiple beam, and mm-wave and laser antenna systems. Attitude control systems used with the antenna systems are explored, along with multiplexers, filters, and power generation, conditioning and amplification systems. The operational significance and techniques for exploiting channel bandwidth, baseband and modulation technologies are described. Finally, interconnectivity among communications satellites by means of RF and laser links is examined, as are the roles to be played by the Space Station and future large space antenna systems.

  6. Polyhedral patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui

    2015-10-27

    We study the design and optimization of polyhedral patterns, which are patterns of planar polygonal faces on freeform surfaces. Working with polyhedral patterns is desirable in architectural geometry and industrial design. However, the classical tiling patterns on the plane must take on various shapes in order to faithfully and feasibly approximate curved surfaces. We define and analyze the deformations these tiles must undertake to account for curvature, and discover the symmetries that remain invariant under such deformations. We propose a novel method to regularize polyhedral patterns while maintaining these symmetries into a plethora of aesthetic and feasible patterns.

  7. Communication Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Strate, Simon Wolter; Loznica, Javor; Nærland, Kristoffer; Skipper, Mads Christian; Jensen, Charlotte Haagen

    2013-01-01

    This project focuses on the oil company, Shell, and their way of conducting themselves on social media sites, specifically Facebook and twitter. We establish this by using social media theory, and corporate campaign theories, and applying these to the content that Shell puts out on these particular social media sites. Furthermore, the project establishes a critical evaluation of the weight and presence of social media within modern corporate communication and issue management.

  8. Specialization Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Consel, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Design patterns offer many advantages for software development, but can introduce inefficiency into the final program. Program specialization can eliminate such overheads, but is most effective when targeted by the user to specific bottlenecks. Consequently, we propose that these concepts...... are complementary. Program specialization can optimize programs written using design patterns, and design patterns provide information about the program structure that can guide specialization. Concretely, we propose specialization patterns, which describe how to apply program specialization to optimize uses...... of design patterns. In this paper, we analyze the specialization opportunities provided by specific uses of design patterns. Based on the analysis of each design pattern, we define the associated specialization pattern. These specialization opportunities can be declared using the specialization classes...

  9. Transnational communication and domestic environmental policy learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sietske VEENMAN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to provide patterns of how transnational communication may lead to domestic policy learning. Existing theories of policy learning, policy diffusion and policy convergence assume that transnational communication may lead to domestic policy learning and policy change, but do not suggest general, empirically investigated patterns. Two case studies on the policy of noise abatement around airports and the policy of contaminated land show that different venues in which transnational communication takes place may induce different types of policy change at the national level.

  10. Pattern matching

    OpenAIRE

    Hak, Tony; Dul, Jan

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPattern matching is comparing two patterns in order to determine whether they match (i.e., that they are the same) or do not match (i.e., that they differ). Pattern matching is the core procedure of theory-testing with cases. Testing consists of matching an “observed pattern” (a pattern of measured values) with an “expected pattern” (a hypothesis), and deciding whether these patterns match (resulting in a confirmation of the hypothesis) or do not match (resulting in a disconfirmat...

  11. Intercultural Communication Ethics and Communication Competence%Intercultural Communication Ethics and Communication Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时婷洁

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates intercultural communication ethics is a vital element to promote intercultural communication competence. Firstly, it defines the concept of intercultural communication ethics; Secondly, it illustrates the relation between ethics and the key point of intercultural communication competence; and finally addresses how intercultural communication ethics can improve intercultural communication competence.

  12. Communication theory

    CERN Document Server

    Goldie, Charles M

    1991-01-01

    This book is an introduction, for mathematics students, to the theories of information and codes. They are usually treated separately but, as both address the problem of communication through noisy channels (albeit from different directions), the authors have been able to exploit the connection to give a reasonably self-contained treatment, relating the probabilistic and algebraic viewpoints. The style is discursive and, as befits the subject, plenty of examples and exercises are provided. Some examples and exercises are provided. Some examples of computer codes are given to provide concrete illustrations of abstract ideas.

  13. Interdisciplinary Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib Callaos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication is fundamental in scientific practice and an integral part of academic work. The practice of communication cannot be neglected by those who are trying to advance scientific research. Effective means should continuously be identified in order to open channels of communication within and among disciplines, among scientists and between scientists and the general public.[1]The increasing importance of interdisciplinary communication has been pointed out by an increasing number of researchers and scholars, as well as in conferences and roundtables on the subject. Some authors even estimate that "interdisciplinary study represents the future of the university."[2] Since interdisciplinary study is "the most underthought critical, pedagogical and institutional concept in modern academy"[3] it is important to think and reflect, and even do some research, on this concept or notion. Research and practice based reflections with regards to this issue are important especially because the increasing complexity and proliferation of scientific research is generating countless specialties, sub-specialties and sub-sub-specialties, with their respective special languages; which were "created for discrete local areas of research based upon the disconnected branches of science."[4] On the other hand, scientific, technical and societal problems are requiring multi- or inter-disciplinary consideration. Consequently, interdisciplinary communication channels are being needed with urgency, and scientific research should be integrated, not just in the context of its discipline, but also in the context of related disciplines. Much more reflection and research should be done on this issue. Research on adequate research integration and communication is urgently required, i.e. meta-research efforts should be done in order to relate research results in an adequate and more useful way. This meta-research effort might be done in the context of each particular

  14. Wildlife Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Kim Arild; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Karstoft, Henrik

    This report contains a progress report for the ph.d. project titled “Wildlife Communication”. The project focuses on investigating how signal processing and pattern recognition can be used to improve wildlife management in agriculture. Wildlife management systems used today experience habituation...

  15. The formation of group norms in computer-mediated communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmes, T; Spears, R; Lea, M

    2000-01-01

    The formation of group norms in computer-mediated communication (CMC) was examined among students who used e-mail as part of a course. A network analysis of group structures revealed that (a) content and form of communication is normative, group norms defining communication patterns within groups, (

  16. The formation of group norms in computer-mediated communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmes, T; Spears, R; Lea, M

    2000-01-01

    The formation of group norms in computer-mediated communication (CMC) was examined among students who used e-mail as part of a course. A network analysis of group structures revealed that (a) content and form of communication is normative, group norms defining communication patterns within groups, (

  17. Submarine Communications .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.B. Singh

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Submarines operating in deep water are virtually cut off from the outer world. It becomes very important and essential to convey survivable and critical information to the submarine during the time it operates under water. Conventional means of radio communication do not serve any useful purpose as the higher frequencies get attenuated very sharply in sea water. At VLF band, which is presently being used by most of the world Navies, signal can penetrate only upto 8-10 m of depth. This depth is not sufficient under hostile environment. ELF is another band where listening depth is around 100 m but data rate is very low. This paper summarizes the various means of communication used to send messages to submarine while cruising at various depths. It seems that in the near future blue-green laser is going to be the vital means of sending large information to a submarine operating much deeper (500-700 m with unrestricted speed.

  18. Cetacean vocal learning and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Vincent M

    2014-10-01

    The cetaceans are one of the few mammalian clades capable of vocal production learning. Evidence for this comes from synchronous changes in song patterns of baleen whales and experimental work on toothed whales in captivity. While baleen whales like many vocal learners use this skill in song displays that are involved in sexual selection, toothed whales use learned signals in individual recognition and the negotiation of social relationships. Experimental studies demonstrated that dolphins can use learned signals referentially. Studies on wild dolphins demonstrated how this skill appears to be useful in their own communication system, making them an interesting subject for comparative communication studies.

  19. Creativity in clinical communication: from communication skills to skilled communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Peter; Young, Bridget

    2011-03-01

    Medical Education 2011: 45: 217-226 Objectives  The view that training in communication skills produces skilled communication is sometimes criticised by those who argue that communication is individual and intuitive. We therefore examine the validity of the concept of communication as a skill and identify alternative principles to underpin future development of this field. Methods  We critically examine research evidence about the nature of clinical communication, and draw from theory and evidence concerning education and evaluation, particularly in creative disciplines. Results  Skilled communication cannot be fully described using the concept of communication skills. Attempts to do so risk constraining and distorting pedagogical development in communication. Current education practice often masks the difficulties with the concept by introducing subjectivity into the definition and assessment of skills. As all clinical situations differ to some extent, clinical communication is inherently creative. Because it is rarely possible to attribute specific effects to specific elements of communication, communication needs to be taught and evaluated holistically. Conclusions  For communication teaching to be pedagogically and clinically valid in supporting the inherent creativity of clinical communication, it will need to draw from education theory and practice that have been developed in explicitly creative disciplines.

  20. Conceptualizing Communicative Practices in Organizations: Genre-based Research in Professional Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachry, Mark, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Explores why researchers have been drawn to genre-based research. Notes that this approach to studying professional communication offers a way of understanding the role of texts in the social ordering of communication in organizations by drawing attention to patterns of repetition and variation in the habits of workplace professionals. (SC)

  1. Communicative Musicality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    how rhythmic organization between mother and infant allow both partners to sustain a coordinated relationship in time (Mazokopaki & Kuguimutzakis), and that vowel sounds expressed in musical ways engage emotions and serve as a vehicle for enculturation as to how to use feelings to share activities...... forms of music, dance, poetry or ceremony; whether they are the universal narratives of a mother and her baby quietly conversing with one another; whether it is the wordless emotional and motivational narrative that sits beneath a conversation between two or more adults or between a teacher and a class....... In the coordination of practical tasks, a shared, intuitively communicated understanding is necessary for success. It is our common musicality that makes it possible for us to share time meaningfully together, in its emotional richness and its structural holding, and for us to participate with anticipation...

  2. Communicating fatigue in general practice and the role of gender

    OpenAIRE

    Meeuwesen, L.; BENSING, J; Brink-Muinen, A. van den

    2002-01-01

    From the viewpoint of quality of care, doctor-patient communication has become more and more important. Gender is an important factor in communication. Besides, cultural norms and values are likely to influence doctor-patient communication as well. This study examined (1) whether or not communication patterns of gender-dyads in general practice consultations differ across and between Western-European countries, and (2) if so, whether these differences continue to exist when controlling for pa...

  3. Plans, ploys, patterns, positions and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulbrandsen, Ib Tunby

    In this article I argue that the field of strategic communication lacks a vocabulary with which to understand, examine and practice the richness and multi-dimensionality of strategic communication. Though there have been several advances and vital contributions to the re-conceptualization of ‘str...... to emergent, from strategic communication as a plan, via ploy, pattern, position, to strategic communication as a perspective.......In this article I argue that the field of strategic communication lacks a vocabulary with which to understand, examine and practice the richness and multi-dimensionality of strategic communication. Though there have been several advances and vital contributions to the re......-conceptualization of ‘strategic’, there appears to be a tendency for the field to replicate a similar divide in the strategic management field, namely between the proponents of strategic communication as being rooted in intent and the proponents of a more emergent understanding of strategy. By offering a translation of Mintzberg...

  4. Array radars solve communication jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H. D.

    1982-04-01

    The possibilities of incorporating mobile radar units as slave stations in communications relay applications during times of disrupted communications is examined. The limitations on uses of search, tracking, and multifunction radars are examined, noting that employment of the mobile system entails some tracking by the master phased-arrays to keep the mobile units in focus. The tracking patterns and dwell times are outlined, and the possibility of 700-1000 dwell times of 1220 microsec duration/sec is mentioned as opening the opportunity for high quality data transmissions. Signal-to-noise ratios are formulated for jamming situations, with offsetting tactical features for the jamming including the directivity and gain of the master antenna, the master station's power aperture product, on-axis to off-axis gain ratio, and antenna positioning ability. A slave station must be equipped with a transponder for communications, which are best achieved with pseudo-random coded waveforms.

  5. Geodesic patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2010-07-26

    Geodesic curves in surfaces are not only minimizers of distance, but they are also the curves of zero geodesic (sideways) curvature. It turns out that this property makes patterns of geodesics the basic geometric entity when dealing with the cladding of a freeform surface with wooden panels which do not bend sideways. Likewise a geodesic is the favored shape of timber support elements in freeform architecture, for reasons of manufacturing and statics. Both problem areas are fundamental in freeform architecture, but so far only experimental solutions have been available. This paper provides a systematic treatment and shows how to design geodesic patterns in different ways: The evolution of geodesic curves is good for local studies and simple patterns; the level set formulation can deal with the global layout of multiple patterns of geodesics; finally geodesic vector fields allow us to interactively model geodesic patterns and perform surface segmentation into panelizable parts. © 2010 ACM.

  6. Foam patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  7. Robots and communication

    CERN Document Server

    Sandry, E

    2015-01-01

    This book explores communication between humans and robots. Using a range of communication theories, it highlights how each theory provides a different perspective on the communication that occurs. The analysis of human interactions with a variety of forms of robot suggests new ways to perceive what communication, and being a communicator, entails.

  8. Using Codes to Communicate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李媛

    2005-01-01

    @@ When we communicate, we want our messages and meanings to be understood. The difficulty is that much of what we do when we communicate comes from our subjective culture. In communications, when we share culture, we share meanings,and when we communicate, we exchange meanings. When we prepare to communicate with strangers from other cultures, we usually begin by learning a language.

  9. Business Communication Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Lavinia Hulea

    2005-01-01

    General communication processes rely on messages implying contents, communication channels, a receiver and clear objectives. Once accepting the importance of defining objectives, three strategies, narrative, implicative, and decisional, seem to be specific for most business communications. While narrative business communications convey information with a view of simply transmitting information and depend on accuracy, complexity, and clarity, implicative business communications convey informat...

  10. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Juan D [Menan, ID; Schmitt, Michael J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Warren F [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  11. Outsourced pattern matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faust, Sebastian; Hazay, Carmit; Venturi, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    on concrete and important functionalities and give the first protocol for the pattern matching problem in the cloud. Loosely speaking, this problem considers a text T that is outsourced to the cloud S by a client C T . In a query phase, clients C 1, …, C l run an efficient protocol with the server S...... that contain confidential data (e.g., health related data about patient history). Our constructions offer simulation-based security in the presence of semi-honest and malicious adversaries (in the random oracle model) and limit the communication in the query phase to O(m) bits plus the number of occurrences...

  12. Global services systems - Space communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepphird, F. H.; Wolbers, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    The requirements projected to the year 2000 for space-based global service systems, including both personal communications and innovative services, are developed based on historic trends and anticipated worldwide demographic and economic growth patterns. The growing demands appear to be best satisfied by developing larger, more sophisticated space systems in order to reduce the size, complexity, and expense of ground terminals. The availability of low-cost ground terminals will, in turn, further stimulate the generation of new services and new customers.

  13. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  14. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  15. DIORAMA Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galassi, Mark C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-05-24

    Diorama is written as a collection of modules that can run in separate threads or in separate processes. This defines a clear interface between the modules and also allows concurrent processing of different parts of the pipeline. The pipeline is determined by a description in a scenario file[Norman and Tornga, 2012, Tornga and Norman, 2014]. The scenario manager parses the XML scenario and sets up the sequence of modules which will generate an event, propagate the signal to a set of sensors, and then run processing modules on the results provided by those sensor simulations. During a run a variety of “observer” and “processor” modules can be invoked to do interim analysis of results. Observers do not modify the simulation results, while processors may affect the final result. At the end of a run results are collated and final reports are put out. A detailed description of the scenario file and how it puts together a simulation are given in [Tornga and Norman, 2014]. The processing pipeline and how to program it with the Diorama API is described in Tornga et al. [2015] and Tornga and Wakeford [2015]. In this report I describe the communications infrastructure that is used.

  16. Evaluating Internal Communication: The ICA Communication Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Gerald M.

    1978-01-01

    The ICA Communication Audit is described in detail as an effective measurement procedure that can help an academic institution to evaluate its internal communication system. Tools, computer programs, analysis, and feedback procedures are described and illustrated. (JMF)

  17. Search Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Morville, Peter

    2010-01-01

    What people are saying about Search Patterns "Search Patterns is a delight to read -- very thoughtful and thought provoking. It's the most comprehensive survey of designing effective search experiences I've seen." --Irene Au, Director of User Experience, Google "I love this book! Thanks to Peter and Jeffery, I now know that search (yes, boring old yucky who cares search) is one of the coolest ways around of looking at the world." --Dan Roam, author, The Back of the Napkin (Portfolio Hardcover) "Search Patterns is a playful guide to the practical concerns of search interface design. It cont

  18. Communication and Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We will not sell or share your name. Communication and Alzheimer's Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print ... stage Communication in the late stage Changes in communication In addition to changes in the brain caused ...

  19. What Is Communicative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Jeremy

    1982-01-01

    Examines word "communicative" and nature of communication and suggests it should not be applied to a methodology. Draws distinction between "communicative" and "noncommunicative" activities while claims each has its place in balanced approach to language teaching. (Author/BK)

  20. Communication and Social Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, W. Lance

    1985-01-01

    Proposes a code for a new communication consciousness that would keep language sensitive and accountable to human experience. Focuses on mass political communication and the tendency toward systematic negative communication inherent in news pronouncements. (PD)

  1. What Is Good Communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzberg, Brian H.

    2000-01-01

    Explores issues entailed in defining good communication including multiple reasonable criteria, competency bias, and communication as a function of context, locus, and abstraction. Claims good communication is a subjective evaluation and not subject to being codified in reductionist models. (NH)

  2. Chladni Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Wence

    2010-01-01

    The report aimed at mathematically describing the Chladni Pattern for a plate based on the equation of motion in two dimensions. It began with deriving the equation of motion of a single point from Newton’s laws, and later derived the equation of motion for the vibration in two dimension, and gave the normal modes through the method of separation of variables. The next was deriving the nodal pattern when the initial conditions and bound- ary conditions were given. At t...

  3. A review on the Integrated Marketing Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, G. Santosh

    2016-01-01

    In the present world of business companies are majorly following the Integrated marketing communication when compared to the traditional marketing communications /marketing mix as a consumer oriented approach that has significantly influenced thinking and acting among all types of companies and organizations facing the realities of competition in the present open economy where the consumer decision is playing a vital role in the purchasing pattern of goods and services that lead to go for IMC...

  4. Intervehicle Communication Research – Communication Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas Stanaitis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently intervehicle communications are attracting much attention from industry and academia. Upcoming standard for intervehicle communication IEEE 802.11p, known as Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE, is still in its draft stage, but already coming into final standardization phase. Problematic, regarding mobile WAVE nodes, are described in several articles, simulations prepared and experiments done. But most of these works do not consider possible maximal communication load. This paper presents intervehicle communication scenario in respect to radio communications, mobility and other aspects of vehicular environments.Article in English

  5. Hábitos de consumo y usos de la fotografía en la era digital entre estudiantes de Comunicación Consumption Patterns and Uses of Photography in Digital Era among Communication Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Marzal Felici

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una investigación sobre los hábitos de consumo y usos de la fotografía entre estudiantes de primer curso de las licenciaturas en periodismo, comunicación audiovisual y publicidad y relaciones públicas, en cuatro universidades españolas (Universidad de Málaga, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Universidad del País Vasco y Universitat Jaume I de Castellón. Como es sabido, la aparición de las tecnologías digitales en el campo de la fotografía ha provocado profundas transformaciones en el panorama fotográfico. Estos cambios han afectado a los procesos de producción, a los modos de distribución y circulación de las imágenes. Pero, sobre todo, ha tenido notables consecuencias en la forma misma de conceptualizar la fotografía como forma de expresión y comunicación, y en los usos de la fotografía, en especial entre los más jóvenes. La digitalización ha contribuido a transformar, asimismo, la propia percepción del medio fotográfico, que merece una reflexión en estos momentos. A tal fin, se ha diseñado una encuesta que ha sido realizada a un total de 467 estudiantes de ciencias de la comunicación de nuestro país. En definitiva, el análisis de las respuestas que ofrece la presente investigación nos ha permitido, por un lado, tomar conciencia sobre cómo se relacionan estos estudiantes de comunicación con el medio fotográfico en la actualidad. Pero, sobre todo, se trata de una investigación que nos ofrece algunas pistas sobre cómo abordar, en plena era digital, la enseñanza de la fotografía en el contexto educativo universitario.This paper presents the results of a research study exploring consumer behaviour and uses of photography among first-year students of the Degrees in Journalism, Audiovisual Communication, and Advertising and Public Relations in four Spanish universities (University of Malaga, University of Santiago de Compostela, University of the Basque Country and Universitat Jaume I in

  6. Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  7. Internet-Based Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    Google the question, "How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?," and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting…

  8. Intercultural Communication and ELT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许玲

    2013-01-01

    Intercultural communication seeks to understand how people from different countries or cultures act, communicate and perceive the world around them. To develop students’culture awareness and intercultural communication skills have been incorporated in ELT curriculum. This paper will focus on culture awareness, cultural disparities and cross-cultural communica-tion in ELT context.

  9. Language and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jack C., Ed.; Schmidt, Richard W., Ed.

    A collection of essays addresses the connection between the study of communication and its sociocultural contexts and the approach to second language teaching based on the concept of communicative competence. Essays include: "From Communicative Competence to Communicative Language Pedagogy" (Michael Canale); "The Domain of Pragmatics" (Bruce…

  10. Overview of communications programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the communications program is to advance critical areas of enabling and enhancing communication technologies that support commercial needs, science, and exploration missions for the 1990's and beyond. The technology program consists of research and technology development in the following areas: RF technology; digital technology; optical communications; mobile communications; and systems integration, test, and evaluation.

  11. Animal and Human Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Lynda

    Several misconceptions regarding the status of human communication systems relative to the systems of other animals are discussed in this paper. Arguments are offered supporting the expansion of the communication discipline to include the study of the communication systems of other species. The "communicative continuity" view which ranks…

  12. Implementation of Communicative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Shazi Shah

    2014-01-01

    In the contemporary age of high professional requirements such as excellent communicative skills, the need for successful learning of communicative skills of English language suggests communicative ability to be the goal of language teaching. In other words, to teach English language using communicative approach becomes essential. Studies to…

  13. Internet-Based Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    Google the question, "How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?," and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting…

  14. Non-Verbal Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, R. A., Ed.

    This inter-disciplinary approach to the subject of non-verbal communication includes essays by linguists, zoologists, psychologists, anthropologists and a drama critic. It begins with a theoretical analysis of communicative processes written from the perspective of a communications engineer, compares vocal communication in animals and man, and…

  15. On Communication Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋娜; 谢有琪

    2012-01-01

    With the development of human society, the social hub enlarges beyond one community to the extent that the world is deemed as a community as a whole. Communication, therefore, plays an increasingly important role in our daily life. As a consequence, communication model or the definition of which is not so much a definition as a guide in communication. However, some existed communication models are not as practical as it was. This paper tries to make an overall contrast among three communication models Coded Model, Gable Communication Model and Ostensive Inferential Model, to see how they assist people to comprehend verbal and non -verbal communication.

  16. Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Gilbert, Ronald W [Morgan Hill, CA

    2011-02-01

    Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a communications device identification method includes providing identification information regarding a group of wireless identification devices within a wireless communications range of a reader, using the provided identification information, selecting one of a plurality of different search procedures for identifying unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices within the wireless communications range, and identifying at least some of the unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices using the selected one of the search procedures.

  17. Organizational Communication: Communication and Motivation in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Ramadanty

    2016-01-01

    nonverbal communication, interpersonal communication leadership and communication climate have a significant role to form employee motivation. Nonverbal communication has slightly strong role in shaping the positive motivation to employee. The role includes body communication, facial communication and eye communication. Interpersonal communication leader is based on the satisfaction level of information between management and employees. Management and transparency in openness in downward communication under the form of information from superiors are by listening the communication between supervisors and employees are running smoothly.

  18. I-centric Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Arbanowski, S; Steglich, S; Popescu-Zeletin, R

    2001-01-01

    During the last years, a variety of concepts for service integration and corresponding systems have gained momentum. On the one hand, they aim for the interworking and integration of classical telecommunications and data communications services. On the other hand, they are focusing on universal service access from a variety of end user systems. Looking at humans' communication behavior and communication space, it is obvious that human beings interact frequently in a set of contexts in their environment (communication space). Following this view, we want to build communication systems on the analysis of the individual communication spaces. The results are communication systems adapted to the specific demands of each individual. The authors introduce I-centric Communication Systems, an approach to design communication systems which adapt to the individual communication space and individual environment and situation. In this context "I" means I, or individual, "Centric" means adaptable to I requirements and a ce...

  19. 跨文化传播视角下在华留学生的文化民族主义表达模式探析——基于京、津、渝、黔、粤、赣等省市的调研%Cultural nationalism expression pattern of overseas students in China from intercultural communication perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春雷; 李镓

    2012-01-01

    在华留学生在当今对外文化传播过程中起着重要的作用,在全媒体时代甚至直接关系到中国国家形象的构建问题。通过对在华留学生大范围的调研,以问卷调查结合深度访谈形式展开,以此探究该群体在跨文化传播中的群体心理及其文化民族主义的表达模式,并对形成此种文化民族主义表达模式的机制和原因进行深入分析。%Overseas students in China play a vital role in intercultural communication activities nowadays,and they even have a direct impact on establishing Chinese national image in Federated Media age.Therefore,a study of overseas students' mental inclination and psychological disposition has its academic value.It is also meaningful to look at their psychology inclination in the view of cultural nationalism theory.With a large-scale survey conducted among overseas students by means of questionnaire and in-depth interview,this paper focuses on researching their group mind,as well as their cultural nationalism expression pattern in the course of intercultural communication.Meanwhile,this paper analyzes the causes and mechanisms of cultural nationalism expression pattern.

  20. Wireless communication technology NFC

    OpenAIRE

    MÁROVÁ, Kateřina

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this bachelor thesis is to handle the issue of new wireless communication technology NFC (Near Field Communication) including a comparison of advantages and disadvantages of NFC with other wireless technologies (Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, etc.). NFC is a technology for wireless communications between different electronic devices, one of which is typically a mobile phone. Near Field Communication allows wireless communication at very short distance by approaching or enclosing two devices and can...

  1. Silence in Intercultural communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Jun

    2012-01-01

    In communication, most of people's attention focuses on verbal communication, nonverbal language as a means of exchange is often ignored. However, nonverbal language continues sending signals, and most of these signals are sent to conversational partners unconsciously. So correct understanding of these signals will help people improve effectiveness of communication. This article will focus on silence, a major part of nonverbal communication, exploring its communicative functions and cultural differences.

  2. Newnes communications technology handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Geoff

    1994-01-01

    Newnes Communications Technology Handbook provides a discussion on different topics relevant to communications technology. The book is comprised of 39 chapters that tackle a wide variety of concern in communications technology. The coverage of the text includes technologies, such as analog digital communications systems, radio frequency receiver, and satellite systems. The book also discusses some methods and techniques used in communications technology, including mixer signal processing, modulation and demodulation, and spread spectrum techniques. The text will be of great use to engineers, t

  3. Improving Employee Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. R. Pomplun; B. J. Kelley; B. L. Schrader; R. C. Christma; R. H. Tucker

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings and recommendation of the Sandia/California Site Communications Team based on activities during FY98. The important conclusions are that effective communications are everyone's business; careful planning and execution are required for effective communications; and communication planning can be described in steps easily understood by everyone. Included in this report is a quick reference (toolkit) for communication planning and implementation.

  4. Trends in communications satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, Denis J

    1979-01-01

    Trends in Communications Satellites offers a comprehensive look at trends and advances in satellite communications, including experimental ones such as NASA satellites and those jointly developed by France and Germany. The economic aspects of communications satellites are also examined. This book consists of 16 chapters and begins with a discussion on the fundamentals of electrical communications and their application to space communications, including spacecraft, earth stations, and orbit and wavelength utilization. The next section demonstrates how successful commercial satellite communicati

  5. Communication theory and multicellular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, I S; Rose, C

    2011-04-01

    In this Perspective, we propose that communication theory--a field of mathematics concerned with the problems of signal transmission, reception and processing--provides a new quantitative lens for investigating multicellular biology, ancient and modern. What underpins the cohesive organisation and collective behaviour of multicellular ecosystems such as microbial colonies and communities (microbiomes) and multicellular organisms such as plants and animals, whether built of simple tissue layers (sponges) or of complex differentiated cells arranged in tissues and organs (members of the 35 or so phyla of the subkingdom Metazoa)? How do mammalian tissues and organs develop, maintain their architecture, become subverted in disease, and decline with age? How did single-celled organisms coalesce to produce many-celled forms that evolved and diversified into the varied multicellular organisms in existence today? Some answers can be found in the blueprints or recipes encoded in (epi)genomes, yet others lie in the generic physical properties of biological matter such as the ability of cell aggregates to attain a certain complexity in size, shape, and pattern. We suggest that Lasswell's maxim "Who says what to whom in what channel with what effect" provides a foundation for understanding not only the emergence and evolution of multicellularity, but also the assembly and sculpting of multicellular ecosystems and many-celled structures, whether of natural or human-engineered origin. We explore how the abstraction of communication theory as an organising principle for multicellular biology could be realised. We highlight the inherent ability of communication theory to be blind to molecular and/or genetic mechanisms. We describe selected applications that analyse the physics of communication and use energy efficiency as a central tenet. Whilst communication theory has and could contribute to understanding a myriad of problems in biology, investigations of multicellular biology

  6. Channels of Ideological and Political Education:Based on a Pattern of Communication Theory%基于传播学理论模式的高校思想政治教育渠道研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓丽

    2014-01-01

    This article probes into the communication theories of “play theory”,“agenda-setting”theory, Marshall McLuhan's three medium theories, “two levels of propagation theory” and “opinion leaders”, all of which provide the enlightenment for colleges and universities to improve and innovate the ideological and political education channels. Based on these theories, this article gives some advices as to improve and innovate the channels of ideological and political education in colleges and universities.%通过探讨传播学理论中“游戏论”、“议程设置”理论、麦克卢汉的媒介三论、“两级传播理论”与“意见领袖”对于高校思想政治教育渠道改进与创新的启示,着重提出对于高校思想政治教育渠道改进与创新的建议。

  7. Analysis of the Social Functions of Mass Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nie Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The development of mass communication is the result of specific historical conditions; mass communication not only brings the epoch-making revolution of the history, but also profound impact on human consciousness and behavior, which hold the sustained and far-reaching significance in promoting human civilization, freedom of thought and democracy. Through the comprehensive study on the communicational needs and the history of communication industry, and also on the social conditions of technological development, this thesis analyzes the social role of mass media based on the interaction between mass communication and social development from which the dependent pattern can be drawn.

  8. Representing clinical communication knowledge through database management system integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairat, Saif; Craven, Catherine; Gong, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Clinical communication failures are considered the leading cause of medical errors [1]. The complexity of the clinical culture and the significant variance in training and education levels form a challenge to enhancing communication within the clinical team. In order to improve communication, a comprehensive understanding of the overall communication process in health care is required. In an attempt to further understand clinical communication, we conducted a thorough methodology literature review to identify strengths and limitations of previous approaches [2]. Our research proposes a new data collection method to study the clinical communication activities among Intensive Care Unit (ICU) clinical teams with a primary focus on the attending physician. In this paper, we present the first ICU communication instrument, and, we introduce the use of database management system to aid in discovering patterns and associations within our ICU communications data repository.

  9. Pigments, patterns, and fish behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Anna C; Weadick, Cameron J; Shim, Janet; Rodd, F Helen

    2008-12-01

    Color patterns in fish are often multicomponent signals, composed of pigment-based and structural color patches that can be used to communicate within species, in both inter- and intrasexual interactions, and between species. In this review, we discuss some of the roles played by pigment-based elements of color pattern. We begin by discussing general forms of coloration, classifying them by appearance (e.g., cryptic vs. conspicuous) and apparent function (e.g., conspicuous coloration and mating displays, stripes and cooperation, and bars and aggression). We then briefly discuss the roles pigments play in the perception of these color patterns via their presence in the eye. In the last section, we look at the relative importance of carotenoid versus melanic coloration in situations where honest signals to potential rivals and potential mates might be required. In this survey, we have highlighted some recent research, especially studies that consider both the physiological and behavioral processes underlying the evolution and expression of pigment-based color patterns in fish. The nature of pigmented color patterns depends not just on the dynamics of pattern development and physiological regulation, but also on the behavioral roles played by these patterns, both now and in the past. As such, advances in particular fields of study on pigment patterns (physiology, developmental biology, behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology, etc.) will increasingly depend on insights from other fields.

  10. Pseudo-communication vs Quasi-communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Константиновна Черничкина

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of such specific forms of human interaction as quasi- and pseudo-communication. The authors specify the terms which sometimes are used interchangeably. The aim of the conducted research is to find out and demonstrate existing differences and similarities of these communicative phenomena on the basis of theoretical and empirical analysis of the research material in the Russian and English languages. The authors describe communicative features of these phenomena and consider the reasons for such forms of communication and their increased use at present. The research material is represented fiction extracts, film scripts, jokes, print media, a collection of oral speech records both in Russian and English. The authors make use of the following research methods: definitional analysis (to define the terminology of the research, the method of linguistic observation and introspection (to select the communicative situations, the descriptive-analytical method and the method of comparative analysis (to identify similarities and differences of the target phenomena, and the conversational analysis method (to view productivity and effectiveness of a dialogue, etc. The classification of possible forms of their existence in different discourses is suggested. The authors assume that both pseudo- and quasi-communication are characterized as fictitious forms of human interaction with some noticeable violation of the basic communicative model. Pseudo-communication suffers from the discrepancy of the meaning of a coded and decoded message. The authors put forward the main parameters of scientific classification of it as follows: adequate understanding, intentionality, and the stage of communicative action where the failure takes place. At the same time they stress the necessity to distinguish the cases of pseudo talks from phatic and indirect communication. Quasi-communcation is marked by the lack of a real partner and hence

  11. Global Patterns of Human Synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Morales, Alfredo J; Benito, Rosa M; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2016-01-01

    Social media are transforming global communication and coordination and provide unprecedented opportunities for studying socio-technical domains. Here we study global dynamical patterns of communication on Twitter across many scales. Underlying the observed patterns is both the diurnal rotation of the earth, day and night, and the synchrony required for contingency of actions between individuals. We find that urban areas show a cyclic contraction and expansion that resembles heartbeats linked to social rather than natural cycles. Different urban areas have characteristic signatures of daily collective activities. We show that the differences detected are consistent with a new emergent global synchrony that couples behavior in distant regions across the world. Although local synchrony is the major force that shapes the collective behavior in cities, a larger-scale synchronization is beginning to occur.

  12. The Importance of Thought Patterns in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao; Weining

    2014-01-01

    In English teaching,during the communication,students arrange languages to express their ides according to their own thought patterns and they could understand other people’s language simultaneously to form a kind of thought pattern similar to other people’s thought patterns. This paper compares English thought pattern with Chinese thought pattern,and provides some suggestion for English teaching of syntax and translation.

  13. Communication Analysis modelling techniques

    CERN Document Server

    España, Sergio; Pastor, Óscar; Ruiz, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    This report describes and illustrates several modelling techniques proposed by Communication Analysis; namely Communicative Event Diagram, Message Structures and Event Specification Templates. The Communicative Event Diagram is a business process modelling technique that adopts a communicational perspective by focusing on communicative interactions when describing the organizational work practice, instead of focusing on physical activities1; at this abstraction level, we refer to business activities as communicative events. Message Structures is a technique based on structured text that allows specifying the messages associated to communicative events. Event Specification Templates are a means to organise the requirements concerning a communicative event. This report can be useful to analysts and business process modellers in general, since, according to our industrial experience, it is possible to apply many Communication Analysis concepts, guidelines and criteria to other business process modelling notation...

  14. Improving Pathologists' Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintzis, Suzanne

    2016-08-01

    The 2015 Institute of Medicine report on diagnostic error has placed a national spotlight on the importance of improving communication among clinicians and between clinicians and patients [1]. The report emphasizes the critical role that communication plays in patient safety and outlines ways that pathologists can support this process. Despite recognition of communication as an essential element in patient care, pathologists currently undergo limited (if any) formal training in communication skills. To address this gap, we at the University of Washington Medical Center developed communication training with the goal of establishing best practice procedures for effective pathology communication. The course includes lectures, role playing, and simulated clinician-pathologist interactions for training and evaluation of pathology communication performance. Providing communication training can help create reliable communication pathways that anticipate and address potential barriers and errors before they happen.

  15. Proof patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This innovative textbook introduces a new pattern-based approach to learning proof methods in the mathematical sciences. Readers will discover techniques that will enable them to learn new proofs across different areas of pure mathematics with ease. The patterns in proofs from diverse fields such as algebra, analysis, topology and number theory are explored. Specific topics examined include game theory, combinatorics, and Euclidean geometry, enabling a broad familiarity. The author, an experienced lecturer and researcher renowned for his innovative view and intuitive style, illuminates a wide range of techniques and examples from duplicating the cube to triangulating polygons to the infinitude of primes to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Intended as a companion for undergraduate students, this text is an essential addition to every aspiring mathematician’s toolkit.

  16. Pattern classification

    CERN Document Server

    Duda, Richard O; Stork, David G

    2001-01-01

    The first edition, published in 1973, has become a classic reference in the field. Now with the second edition, readers will find information on key new topics such as neural networks and statistical pattern recognition, the theory of machine learning, and the theory of invariances. Also included are worked examples, comparisons between different methods, extensive graphics, expanded exercises and computer project topics. An Instructor's Manual presenting detailed solutions to all the problems in the book is available from the Wiley editorial department.

  17. New Research in Communication Theory: A Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Martha J.

    Recent studies in communication theory are outlined and briefly discussed. Categories of research included are information systems, interpersonal communication, mass communication, organizational communication, intercultural communication, political communication, instructional communication, and health communication. Except for the area of health…

  18. Digital Marketing Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Corniani, Margherita

    2006-01-01

    Digital marketing communication is directed to profiled targets, which are active in the communication process. Every communication flow can ask for an information answer from the market. This opportunity grants immediate feed-backs and feed-forwards, so that digital communication can be easily and cheaply measured; digital communication flows are diffused at costs that are getting lower and lower, but it asks specialized and deep competences to communication managers. The ease in the flowing...

  19. Analytics the Scaling Behavior of Social Relations Pattern in Email Communication Records%基于电子邮件通信记录的社会关系模式标度行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红玲; 郝进欣

    2013-01-01

    This article using the email communication database in a large community between people, analysis to explore the human dynamics on individual and group level. On Individual level, the studying finds the satistical properties of in-terevent time distribution by individual's email send, receive and reply in the community to meet the power-law distribution . On group level, separate the activity of group s email send, receive and reply in the community into three clusters; studying the scale feature of human behavior a in community cluster; found that the time characteristic of cluster shows the power-law index and activity in line with positive relationship. Analysis the power-law index in community member' s behavior of send email, it in line with the Gaussian distribution. The result obtain a more comprehensive understanding of hunman behavior satistical properties on the basis of previous analysis.%利用某大型社区人们之间电子邮件通信数据库,对人类动力学在个体和群体层面进行分析探究.个体层面,研究社区中个体发送、接收、回复电子邮件的时间间隔统计特性均满足幂律分布;群体层面,将社区人群根据接收、发送电子邮件活跃度分为3个集群,分析集群人类行为的标度特性,发现集群含时特性幂律指数与活跃度正相关,分析社区成员发送电子邮件行为幂律指数a值,符合高斯分布.此结论在前人分析基础上对人类行为统计特征获得更全面的认识.

  20. Environmental Fluctuations and Acoustic Data Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    GOALS Couple together analytical and numerical modeling of oceanographic and surface wave processes, acoustic propagation modeling, statistical...acoustic digital data communication systems in shallow water. OBJECTIVES Develop analytical /numerical models, validated with experimental data...simplified geometry simulated. An asymmetric source- receiver geometry results in a striation pattern that is dominated by upward or downward

  1. Speech Communication Via Radio and Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starlin, Glenn; Sherriffs, Ronald

    Designed to serve as a practical introduction to the functions of the broadcast media and as a guide to adjustment to demands imposed by the media on speakers, this book attempts to deal with special problems of the ordinary citizen in preparation for broadcast talks. A first part focuses on the media--changing patterns of communication,…

  2. Transcending Communication Barriers with West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampadu, Lena

    Americans doing business with West Africans are limited in their ability to communicate successfully in that part of the world because of language, stereotyping, and ethnocentrism. Americans must become accustomed to British patterns of speech and writing. Stereotypes of Africa, its people, and its cultures perpetuated by the media keep Americans…

  3. System and Structure: Essays in Communication and Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilden, Anthony

    This book ranges widely over the fields of communication theory, Freudian and Lacanian psychology, and Levi-Straussian anthropology. The primary goal of the book is an examination of the structural and analogic patterns within human communication and exchange. This examination involves discourses upon the computer compared to the human nervous…

  4. Feel the Rhythm - Embedded & embodied communication of a deafblind girl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Lisette; Cox, R.F.A; Janssen, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    How would you communicate if you would not see or hear anything? Although this may seem impossible, this is exactly what deafblind persons have to do each day. When you look at the communication of a deafblind child in detail, interesting patterns like interaction, turn taking, imitation and taking

  5. Communication for Inquiry and Access: Teaching Techniques from Discourse Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Susan; Duranczyk, Irene; Moore, Randy; Hatch, Jay; Jensen, Murray; Somdahl, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Adopting inquiry-based science and mathematics pedagogies changes traditional classroom communication patterns. Linguistic research in science and mathematics classrooms has identified communication techniques that help teachers manage classroom discussions to increase student interaction and a sense of student responsibility for learning. These…

  6. Communication style in primary health care in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Maaroos, H.I.; Tähepöld, H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate doctor-patient communication in consultations of newly qualified general practitioners (GPs) in a newly reorganised health care system and differences in consultation characteristics and communication patterns between new European Union (EU)-countries (Estonia

  7. Teaching about Culture and Communicative Life in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nemi C.

    Basic patterns of culture and communication in India such as world view, reincarnation, concepts of Karma and Dharma, stages of life, the caste system, time orientation, collectivism, hierarchical orientation, language situation, and nonverbal communication norms are an integral part of Hinduism and Indian culture, and have a significant influence…

  8. Operative team communication during simulated emergencies: Too busy to respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W Austin; Jones, Seth; Crowell-Kuhnberg, Adrianna M; O'Keeffe, Dara; Boyle, Kelly M; Klainer, Suzanne B; Smink, Douglas S; Yule, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Ineffective communication among members of a multidisciplinary team is associated with operative error and failure to rescue. We sought to measure operative team communication in a simulated emergency using an established communication framework called "closed loop communication." We hypothesized that communication directed at a specific recipient would be more likely to elicit a check back or closed loop response and that this relationship would vary with changes in patients' clinical status. We used the closed loop communication framework to code retrospectively the communication behavior of 7 operative teams (each comprising 2 surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses) during response to a simulated, postanesthesia care unit "code blue." We identified call outs, check backs, and closed loop episodes and applied descriptive statistics and a mixed-effects negative binomial regression to describe characteristics of communication in individuals and in different specialties. We coded a total of 662 call outs. The frequency and type of initiation and receipt of communication events varied between clinical specialties (P communication events than anesthesiologists. For the average participant, directed communication increased the likelihood of check back by at least 50% (P = .021) in periods preceding acute changes in the clinical setting, and exerted no significant effect in periods after acute changes in the clinical situation. Communication patterns vary by specialty during a simulated operative emergency, and the effect of directed communication in eliciting a response depends on the clinical status of the patient. Operative training programs should emphasize the importance of quality communication in the period immediately after an acute change in the clinical setting of a patient and recognize that communication patterns and needs vary between members of multidisciplinary operative teams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Proactively and In the Heat of the Moment: Administrative Advice for Communication Instructors to Help Students Cope with Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldeck, Jennifer H.

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on the communication instructor's role in helping students avoid or cope with relationship distress and dysfunctional domestic-communication patterns. Suggests interpersonal-communication instructors include units on destructive-relationship patterns, predictors of negative-relationship cycles, and skills training to correct these…

  10. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rushed than you (or your professionals) want. Simple communication skills can help you get what you need – ... at the hospital or during office visits. Good communication skills help you get better results from the ...

  11. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more rushed than you (or your professionals) want. Simple communication skills can help you get what you ... Introduction - Taking Control of Your Medicines - Medicine Assistance Programs - Medicine Checklist - Medication Tracker Communicating with Professionals - Introduction - ...

  12. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than you (or your professionals) want. Simple communication skills can help you get what you need – over ... the hospital or during office visits. Good communication skills help you get better results from the time ...

  13. Trends In Satellite Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, William A.; Stevens, Grady H.; Stevenson, Steven M.; Lekan, Jack; Arth, Clifford H.; Hollansworth, James E.; Miller, Edward F.

    1988-01-01

    Report assesses trends in satellite communication from present to year 2010. Examines restrictions imposed by limited spectrum resource and technology needs created by trends. Personal communications, orbiting switchboards, and videophones foreseen.

  14. Paperbacks in Mass Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Hanno

    1978-01-01

    Lists paperback books on mass communication, divided into six categories: history and biography; appraisals of the press, law, and ethics; cultural, psychological, and social aspects; radio, television, film, photography; international communication; and journalism techniques, miscellaneous. (GW)

  15. Communication System and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Adam M. (Inventor); Strawser, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A communication system for communicating over high-latency, low bandwidth networks includes a communications processor configured to receive a collection of data from a local system, and a transceiver in communication with the communications processor. The transceiver is configured to transmit and receive data over a network according to a plurality of communication parameters. The communications processor is configured to divide the collection of data into a plurality of data streams; assign a priority level to each of the respective data streams, where the priority level reflects the criticality of the respective data stream; and modify a communication parameter of at least one of the plurality of data streams according to the priority of the at least one data stream.

  16. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... phone, at the hospital or during office visits. Good communication skills help you get better results from ... your next appointment . Healthcare professionals talk about why good communication is important A patient describes how he ...

  17. Digital Communication and Modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    2011-01-01

    The course presents the fundamental principles for digital communication, e.g. fixed-wire modems or wireless communication channels, as applied in mobile phones, wireless computer networks or wireless systems in intelligent houses. Based on the functional blocks of a digital communication system......, the fundamental principles for modulation and detection in Gaussian noise is treated. This includes the principles for the determination of the bit-error rate for a digital communication system. During the course, a selection of small Matlab exercises are prepared, for simulation of parts of a communication...... system. Having passed the course, the student will be able to accomplish the following, within the areas shown below: Model for Communication System. Prepare and explain the functional block in a digital communication system, corresponding to the specific course contents. Model for Communication Channel...

  18. Hargrave's communications dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Hargrave, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Communications terms, definitions, acronyms, charts, equations and related information important to readers in industry, government and academia. Voice and data communications terms are included as well as terminology from peripheral disciplines including optics, computer science, data networks and the Internet.

  19. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rushed than you (or your professionals) want. Simple communication skills can help you get what you need – over ... at the hospital or during office visits. Good communication skills help you get better results from the time ...

  20. [Leadership and communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, R T; Pereira, L L

    1991-08-01

    This study deals with the concepts of leadership and the role of the leader in communicating with his team. It stresses communication's concepts, process and its importance to built all organizations.

  1. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rushed than you (or your professionals) want. Simple communication skills can help you get what you need – ... at the hospital or during office visits. Good communication skills help you get better results from the ...

  2. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rushed than you (or your professionals) want. Simple communication skills can help you get what you need – over ... at the hospital or during office visits. Good communication skills help you get better results from the time ...

  3. Digital Communication and Modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    2011-01-01

    The course presents the fundamental principles for digital communication, e.g. fixed-wire modems or wireless communication channels, as applied in mobile phones, wireless computer networks or wireless systems in intelligent houses. Based on the functional blocks of a digital communication system......, the fundamental principles for modulation and detection in Gaussian noise is treated. This includes the principles for the determination of the bit-error rate for a digital communication system. During the course, a selection of small Matlab exercises are prepared, for simulation of parts of a communication...... system. Having passed the course, the student will be able to accomplish the following, within the areas shown below: Model for Communication System. Prepare and explain the functional block in a digital communication system, corresponding to the specific course contents. Model for Communication Channel...

  4. Communication in Leadership Redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    15. SUBJECT TERMS leadership , communication 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: (U) 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...Analysis of these four competencies of ‗leading‘ provides additional evidence of the synergy between leadership , communication , and influence...rod for leadership communication through a reminder that ―truth is the best [form of communication to influence or persuade]‖ the soldier.124

  5. Teacher's communication skills

    OpenAIRE

    ZIKLOVÁ, Hana

    2010-01-01

    This diploma thesis concerns the area of self-presentation of a teacher and effective use of his communication skills. The thesis is divided into two parts. The first part is theoretical and presents basic concepts of social communication and defines communication skills essential for effective teaching. The practical part is partly based on the output of a questionnaire survey where the author probes knowledge of communication skills of students of pedagogical faculty and how they evaluate t...

  6. Brain basis of communicative actions in language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Natalia; Shtyrov, Yury; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2016-01-15

    Although language is a key tool for communication in social interaction, most studies in the neuroscience of language have focused on language structures such as words and sentences. Here, the neural correlates of speech acts, that is, the actions performed by using language, were investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants were shown videos, in which the same critical utterances were used in different communicative contexts, to Name objects, or to Request them from communication partners. Understanding of critical utterances as Requests was accompanied by activation in bilateral premotor, left inferior frontal and temporo-parietal cortical areas known to support action-related and social interactive knowledge. Naming, however, activated the left angular gyrus implicated in linking information about word forms and related reference objects mentioned in critical utterances. These findings show that understanding of utterances as different communicative actions is reflected in distinct brain activation patterns, and thus suggest different neural substrates for different speech act types.

  7. Optical wireless communications an emerging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Capsoni, Carlo; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Boucouvalas, Anthony; Udvary, Eszter

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on optical wireless communications (OWC), an emerging technology with huge potential for the provision of pervasive and reliable next-generation communications networks. It shows how the development of novel and efficient wireless technologies can contribute to a range of transmission links essential for the heterogeneous networks of the future to support various communications services and traffic patterns with ever-increasing demands for higher data-transfer rates. The book starts with a chapter reviewing the OWC field, which explains different sub-technologies (visible-light, ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) communications) and introduces the spectrum of application areas (indoor, vehicular, terrestrial, underwater, intersatellite, deep space, etc.). This provides readers with the necessary background information to understand the specialist material in the main body of the book, which is in four parts. The first of these deals with propagation modelling and channel characterization of ...

  8. Communication and Your Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Communication and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Communication and Your Newborn Print A A A What's ... first smile — a welcome addition to your baby's communication skills! continue What Should I Do? As soon ...

  9. IBM 3705 Communications Controller

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    The IBM 3705 Communications Controller is a simple computer which attaches to an IBM System/360 or System/370. Its purpose is to connect communication lines to the mainframe channel. It was a first communications controller of the popular IBM 37xx series.

  10. Communication, Coordination, Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nancy Oft; Wiper, Kathie Tippens

    Speech communication teachers at both secondary and postsecondary school levels must cooperate to improve oral communication education. Despite the importance of oral communication skills, speech courses are rarely required in high school. Teachers must tell school boards, higher education boards, and faculties of the importance of speaking and…

  11. Improving Communication in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Anja; Doenmez, Denniz; Hepperle, Clemens

    2011-01-01

    Communication permeates every aspect of an engineer’s work – from clarifying product specifications to shaping social ties. This paper offers an overview of recommendations from literature to improve communication within and among engineering teams. We assume communication problems are often...

  12. Communication, Coordination, Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nancy Oft; Wiper, Kathie Tippens

    Speech communication teachers at both secondary and postsecondary school levels must cooperate to improve oral communication education. Despite the importance of oral communication skills, speech courses are rarely required in high school. Teachers must tell school boards, higher education boards, and faculties of the importance of speaking and…

  13. Communicating with Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Judy

    1992-01-01

    To develop strong channels of communication with teachers, principals must first determine which communication style (intuitor, thinker, sensor, or feeler) each individual favors. Then principals can open one-to-one communication channels, establish effective teaching teams, form more productive committees, and solve problems efficiently. Also,…

  14. Language, Perception, Culture & Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Man-li

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the prospect of introducing language, perception, culture and communication. Starting with some definitions of language, perception, culture and communication, the paper argues for the internal connection among them. It pro⁃vides better understanding of these factors in foreign language learning and encourages learners to achieve the better learning re⁃sult to communicate effectively through language, culture etc.

  15. Improving Internal Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonus, Thaddeus, Ed.

    Guidelines for developing the internal communications of colleges and universities, researching internal communication needs, and increasing information flow through traditional and nontraditional media are provided in 11 articles. Titles and authors include the following: "Work for an Open Internal Communication Policy" (Thaddeus Bonus); "Five…

  16. Communication and Your Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Communication and Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Communication and Your Newborn A A A What's in ... first smile — a welcome addition to your baby's communication skills! continue What Should I Do? As soon ...

  17. Diagnosing Communication Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Carol J.

    This paper addresses the concept of the communication audit, i.e., a fact-finding analysis, interpretation, and reporting process that studies the communication philosophy, structure, flow, and practice of the organization. Reasons for doing a communication audit are identified: (1) to uncover information blockages and organizational hindrances;…

  18. Communication Games: Participant's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupar, Karen R.

    Using a series of communicational games, the author leads the participant through self-awareness, verbal and nonverbal communication, decision-making, problem-solving, and skills in perception, listening, and small group, organizational, and cultural communications. The thesis behind the book is that model-making, role-playing, or other forms of…

  19. Communication Policies in Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekovic, Zdravko; Bjelica, Mihalo

    This report on communication policies in Yugoslavia is part of a larger project, sponsored by UNESCO and intended to analyze communication policies as they exist at public, institutional, and professional levels in selected countries. Included in this report are: (1) the premise of Yugoslavian communication policy; (2) historical development of…

  20. CSR communication: quo vadis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golob, U.; Podnar, K.; Elving, W.J.; Ellerup Nielsen, A.; Thomsen, C.; Schultz, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to introduce the special issue on CSR communication attached to the First International CSR Communication Conference held in Amsterdam in October 2011. The aim of the introduction is also to review CSR communication papers published in scholarly journals in order to make a

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL RISK COMMUNICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ris communication tools in organizations differs in several ways from many of tools and techniques developed for public meetings. The traditional view of risk communication seeks to manage the public outrage ssociated with site-based issues. Organizational risk communication seek...

  2. Intercultural Communicative Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴冬梅

    2009-01-01

    The essay is mainly about the author's comprehension of cultural differences and intercultural communication after reading the book Communication Between Cultures.In addition,the author also analyses three cases with the theories and approaches mentioned in Communication Between Cultures.

  3. Modes of Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewatripont, Mathias; Tirole, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The paper develops a theory of costly communication in which the sender's and receiver's motivations and abilities endogenously determine the communication mode and the transfer of knowledge. Communication is modeled as a problem of moral hazard in teams, in which the sender and receiver select persuasion and message elaboration efforts. The model…

  4. CSR communication: quo vadis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golob, U.; Podnar, K.; Elving, W.J.; Ellerup Nielsen, A.; Thomsen, C.; Schultz, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to introduce the special issue on CSR communication attached to the First International CSR Communication Conference held in Amsterdam in October 2011. The aim of the introduction is also to review CSR communication papers published in scholarly journals in order to make a

  5. Communicative Constitution of Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeneborn, Dennis; Vasquez, Consuelo

    2017-01-01

    The notion of the communicative constitution of organizations (CCO) is at the center of a growing theoretical development within organizational communication studies. CCO scholarship is based on the idea that organization emerges in and is sustained and transformed by communication. This entry pr...

  6. Communication Games in Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Ellen

    1990-01-01

    This article presents a rationale and ways to use communication games in written form to entice deaf children to try new forms of language. It emphasizes the importance of using communicative teaching methods and considering students' communicative adequacy rather than form. Games include picture/object matching games and bingo/lotto games. (JDD)

  7. Measuring Communication in Parallel Communicating Finite Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Bordihn

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Systems of deterministic finite automata communicating by sending their states upon request are investigated, when the amount of communication is restricted. The computational power and decidability properties are studied for the case of returning centralized systems, when the number of necessary communications during the computations of the system is bounded by a function depending on the length of the input. It is proved that an infinite hierarchy of language families exists, depending on the number of messages sent during their most economical recognitions. Moreover, several properties are shown to be not semi-decidable for the systems under consideration.

  8. Communication and the healthy work environment: nurse managers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Sheila Q; Miller, Mindi

    2013-05-01

    A qualitative design was used to decipher the viewpoints of nurse managers about communication trends associated with their leadership roles and unit subcultures. Disruptive behaviors such as poor communication and inadequate teamwork have been associated with patient harm and deficient workplace cultures. However, few studies have focused on nurse managers' perceptions of communication and a healthy workplace. A descriptive qualitative study was conducted using 12 in-depth interviews of 6 nurse managers to better understand communication patterns of managers. Analysis identified 5 themes and 13 subthemes. Workplace processes were identified that either promoted or hindered managers' abilities to set a positive tone and to stay connected to their staff, ensuring effective communication while meeting multiple unit and institutional challenges. Findings can be used to strengthen communication practices, obviate communication disconnects, and ensure a healthy workplace.

  9. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-07

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  10. The 5 P’s of strategic communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulbrandsen, Ib Tunby

    2016-01-01

    In this article I argue that the field of strategic communication lacks a vocabulary with which to understand, examine and practice the richness and multi-dimensionality of strategic communication. Though there have been several advances and vital contributions to the re-conceptualization of ‘str...... to emergent, from strategic communication as a plan, via ploy, pattern, position, to strategic communication as a perspective.......In this article I argue that the field of strategic communication lacks a vocabulary with which to understand, examine and practice the richness and multi-dimensionality of strategic communication. Though there have been several advances and vital contributions to the re......-conceptualization of ‘strategic’, there appears to be a tendency for the field to replicate a similar divide in the strategic management field, namely between the proponents of strategic communication as being rooted in intent and the proponents of a more emergent understanding of strategy. By offering a translation of Mintzberg...

  11. Communication imperialism and dependency: a conceptual clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P S

    1988-01-01

    Communications imperialism has to do with the domination of a country's media activities by another. The ownership, structure, distribution or content of the media in 1 country are affected by pressures from media interests of another country or group out of proportion with those of that country. To determine if this is happening we should consider the country's policies, the private sector;s efforts to export communications elements, and actions of the dominant country against the dominated. The 4 aspects of international media in this situation are television program exportation, foreign ownership and control of media distribution, the infringement of capital opinions on other societies, and the transfer of commercialism and broadcasting norms. In addition to the software and hardware and the other forms of communication such as satellites, computers, and transportation of the mass media, there are the cultural effects on the developing countries. In the case of involuntary of voluntary dependency of the recipient country, the effect of the unbalanced international communication can be harmful or beneficial. Communication dependency may not be harmful to the culture of the recipient country. In determining the theory of unbalanced international communications 3 factors should be considered. There are: the role of the interacting countries, the nature of the dependency of the recipient country, and the beneficial or harmful effect of unbalanced communication pattern on that country.

  12. Multidimensional human dynamics in mobile phone communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Christian; Zignani, Matteo; Capra, Lorenzo; Gaito, Sabrina; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages). Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process.

  13. Multidimensional human dynamics in mobile phone communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Quadri

    Full Text Available In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages. Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process.

  14. Rapid neural discrimination of communicative gestures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redcay, Elizabeth; Carlson, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    Humans are biased toward social interaction. Behaviorally, this bias is evident in the rapid effects that self-relevant communicative signals have on attention and perceptual systems. The processing of communicative cues recruits a wide network of brain regions, including mentalizing systems. Relatively less work, however, has examined the timing of the processing of self-relevant communicative cues. In the present study, we used multivariate pattern analysis (decoding) approach to the analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study the processing dynamics of social-communicative actions. Twenty-four participants viewed images of a woman performing actions that varied on a continuum of communicative factors including self-relevance (to the participant) and emotional valence, while their brain activity was recorded using MEG. Controlling for low-level visual factors, we found early discrimination of emotional valence (70 ms) and self-relevant communicative signals (100 ms). These data offer neural support for the robust and rapid effects of self-relevant communicative cues on behavior.

  15. Patterning mechanisms controlling digit development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate digits are essential structures for movement,feeding and communication.Specialized regions of the developing limb bud including the zone of polarizing activity(ZPA),the apical ectodermal ridge(AER),and the non-ridge ectoderm regulate the patterning of digits.Although a series of signaling molecules have been characterized as patterning signals from the organizing centers,the delicate cellular and molecular mechanisms that interpret how these patterning signals control the detailed digit anatomy remain unclear.Recent studies from model organisms and human hand malformations provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating this process.Here,we review the current understanding of the genetic networks governing digit morphogenesis.

  16. Patterns of Software Development Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Javier Bolaños Castro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available "Times New Roman","serif";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";mso-ansi-language:EN-US;mso-fareast-language:EN-US;mso-bidi-language:AR-SA">This article presents a set of patterns that can be found to perform best practices in software processes that are directly related to the problem of implementing the activities of the process, the roles involved, the knowledge generated and the inputs and outputs belonging to the process. In this work, a definition of the architecture is encouraged by using different recurrent configurations that strengthen the process and yield efficient results for the development of a software project. The patterns presented constitute a catalog, which serves as a vocabulary for communication among project participants [1], [2], and also can be implemented through software tools, thus facilitating patterns implementation [3]. Additionally, a tool that can be obtained under GPL (General Public license is provided for this purpose

  17. Absolutely covert quantum communication

    CERN Document Server

    Bradler, Kamil; Siopsis, George; Weedbrook, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We present truly ultimate limits on covert quantum communication by exploiting quantum-mechanical properties of the Minkowski vacuum in the quantum field theory framework. Our main results are the following: We show how two parties equipped with Unruh-DeWitt detectors can covertly communicate at large distances without the need of hiding in a thermal background or relying on various technological tricks. We reinstate the information-theoretic security standards for reliability of asymptotic quantum communication and show that the rate of covert communication is strictly positive. Therefore, contrary to the previous conclusions, covert and reliable quantum communication is possible.

  18. Data and computer communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallings, W.

    1985-01-01

    The book clarifies and differentiates concepts underlying the field of data and computer communications. It is divided into three parts: 1. Data Communications which is concerned with the exchange of data between two directly connected devices. Within this environment, aspects of transmission, interfacing, link control, and multiplexing are examined. 2. Data Communication Networking - this part examines the internal mechanisms by which communication networks provide a data transfer service for attached devices. 3. Communications Architecture - this part explores the architectural principles and the specific mechanisms required for the exchange of data among computers, terminals and other data processing devices.

  19. COMMUNICATION - ORGANIZATIONS’ WORK DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAVINIA HULEA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication represents a complex process of transmitting messages, owing to which the emitter encodes the information transmitted through a specific channel towards a receiver that will decode it. Owing to communication, organizations transmit to their customers the fact that they are capable of meeting one of their needs, of settling a problem or of offering a profit. Non-verbal and para-verbal communications usually accompany verbal communication. The importance of assimilating the forms of communication is, at an organizational level, a complex device that determines the mastering of certain techniques, procedures, and algorithms of encoding and decoding intricate messages transmitted through various channels.

  20. Advanced quantum communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Evan Robert

    Quantum communication provides several examples of communication protocols which cannot be implemented securely using only classical communication. Currently, the most widely known of these is quantum cryptography, which allows secure key exchange between parties sharing a quantum channel subject to an eavesdropper. This thesis explores and extends the realm of quantum communication. Two new quantum communication protocols are described. The first is a new form of quantum cryptography---relativistic quantum cryptography---which increases communication efficiency by exploiting a relativistic bound on the power of an eavesdropper, in addition to the usual quantum mechanical restrictions intrinsic to quantum cryptography. By doing so, we have observed over 170% improvement in communication efficiency over a similar protocol not utilizing relativity. A second protocol, Quantum Orienteering, allows two cooperating parties to communicate a specific direction in space. This application shows the possibility of using joint measurements, or projections onto an entangled state, in order to extract the maximum useful information from quantum bits. For two-qubit communication, the maximal fidelity of communication using only separable operations is 73.6%, while joint measurements can improve the efficiency to 78.9%. In addition to implementing these protocols, we have improved several resources for quantum communication and quantum computing. Specifically, we have developed improved sources of polarization-entangled photons, a low-loss quantum memory for polarization qubits, and a quantum random number generator. These tools may be applied to a wide variety of future quantum and classical information systems.

  1. 76 FR 17353 - Aviation Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 87 Aviation Communications AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule; suspension of effectiveness. SUMMARY: In this document, the Federal Communications...

  2. Approaches to Teaching Organizational Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses fundamental problems in selecting an approach to organizational communications; the purpose of an organizational communication course; the structure and content of organizational communication coursework; and teaching strategies used in the basic course in organizational communication. (RS)

  3. Communication, concepts and grounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Frank

    2015-02-01

    This article discusses the relation between communication and conceptual grounding. In the brain, neurons, circuits and brain areas are involved in the representation of a concept, grounding it in perception and action. In terms of grounding we can distinguish between communication within the brain and communication between humans or between humans and machines. In the first form of communication, a concept is activated by sensory input. Due to grounding, the information provided by this communication is not just determined by the sensory input but also by the outgoing connection structure of the conceptual representation, which is based on previous experiences and actions. The second form of communication, that between humans or between humans and machines, is influenced by the first form. In particular, a more successful interpersonal communication might require forms of situated cognition and interaction in which the entire representations of grounded concepts are involved.

  4. Crisis Communication Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utz, Sonja; Schultz, Friederike; Glocka, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    in the newspaper condition than in the social media conditions because people consider traditional media as more credible. We also found higher levels of anger in the intentional crisis condition than in the victim crisis condition. Anger in turn was related to reputation, secondary crisis communication......Social media play in today's societies a fundamental role for the negotiation and dynamics of crises. However, classical crisis communication theories neglect the role of the medium and focus mainly on the interplay between crisis type and crisis communication strategy. Building on the recently...... the effects of crisis type. Crisis communication via social media resulted in a higher reputation and less secondary crisis reactions such as boycotting the company than crisis communication in the newspaper. However, secondary crisis communication, e.g. talking about the crisis communication, was higher...

  5. Digital Communication and Modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    2011-01-01

    The course presents the fundamental principles for digital communication, e.g. fixed-wire modems or wireless communication channels, as applied in mobile phones, wireless computer networks or wireless systems in intelligent houses. Based on the functional blocks of a digital communication system...... system. Having passed the course, the student will be able to accomplish the following, within the areas shown below: Model for Communication System. Prepare and explain the functional block in a digital communication system, corresponding to the specific course contents. Model for Communication Channel....... Prepare and explain a model for a communication channel, corresponding to the specific course contents. Modulation Methods. Explain the properties of digital modulation methods, corresponding to the specific course contents. Intersymbol Interference. Explain intersymbol inteference, corresponding...

  6. Communications interface for wireless communications headset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Marc A. (Inventor); Culotta, Jr., Anthony Joseph (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A universal interface adapter circuit interfaces, for example, a wireless communications headset with any type of communications system, including those that require push-to-talk (PTT) signaling. The interface adapter is comprised of several main components, including an RF signaling receiver, a microcontroller and associated circuitry for decoding and processing the received signals, and programmable impedance matching and line interfacing circuitry for interfacing a wireless communications headset system base to a communications system. A signaling transmitter, which is preferably portable (e.g., handheld), is employed by the wireless headset user to send signals to the signaling receiver. In an embodiment of the invention directed specifically to push-to-talk (PTT) signaling, the wireless headset user presses a button on the signaling transmitter when they wish to speak. This sends a signal to the microcontroller which decodes the signal and recognizes the signal as being a PTT request. In response, the microcontroller generates a control signal that closes a switch to complete a voice connection between the headset system base and the communications system so that the user can communicate with the communications system. With this arrangement, the wireless headset can be interfaced to any communications system that requires PTT signaling, without modification of the headset device. In addition, the interface adapter can also be configured to respond to or deliver any other types of signals, such as dual-tone-multiple-frequency (DTMF) tones, and on/off hook signals. The present invention is also scalable, and permits multiple wireless users to operate independently in the same environment through use of a plurality of the interface adapters.

  7. Teacher Candidates' Communication Skills and Communicator Styles

    OpenAIRE

    Cem ÇUHADAR; Özgür, Hasan; Akgün, Fatma; GÜNDÜZ, Şemseddin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the relationship between the communication skills and the communicator styles of teacher candidates. This research was conducted among the senior class students, studying at Trakya University, Faculty of Education in the fall semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. 205 women and 110 men, in a total of 315 teacher candidates participated in the research. As a result, it has been observed that the teacher candidates bear animated/expressive features the...

  8. Heavy-Tailed Statistics in Short-Message Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Wei; HAN Xiao-Pu; ZHOU Tao; WANG Bing-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Short-message (SM) is one of the most frequently used communication channels in modern society. Bazed on the SM communication records provided by some volunteers, we investigate the statistics of SM communication pattern, including the inter-event time distributions between two consecutive short messages and two conversa-tions, and the distribution of message number contained in a complete conversation. In the individual level, the empirical result raises strong evidence that the human activity pattern, exhibiting a heavy-tailed inter-event time distribution, is driven by a non-Poisson process.

  9. Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, D.; Lashbrook, D.; Mckibben, B.; Gardener, N.; Rivers, T.; Nottingham, G.; Golden, B.; Barfield, B.; Bruening, J.; Wood, D.

    1992-01-01

    A current thrust in satellite communication systems considers a low-Earth orbiting constellations of satellites for continuous global coverage. Conceptual design studies have been done at the time of this design project by LORAL Aerospace Corporation under the program name GLOBALSTAR and by Motorola under their IRIDIUM program. This design project concentrates on the spacecraft design of the GLOBALSTAR low-Earth orbiting communication system. Overview information on the program was gained through the Federal Communications Commission licensing request. The GLOBALSTAR system consists of 48 operational satellites positioned in a Walker Delta pattern providing global coverage and redundancy. The operational orbit is 1389 km (750 nmi) altitude with eight planes of six satellites each. The orbital planes are spaced 45 deg., and the spacecraft are separated by 60 deg. within the plane. A Delta 2 launch vehicle is used to carry six spacecraft for orbit establishment. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize code-division multiple access (spread spectrum modulation) for digital relay, voice, and radio determination satellite services (RDSS) yielding position determination with accuracy up to 200 meters.

  10. The complexity of organizational change: describing communication during organizational turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Organizational researchers and practitioners have been interested in organizational change for some time. Historically, they have directed most of their efforts at improving the efficiency of planned top-down change. These efforts were strategic attempts at altering parameters leading to transformational change. Most efforts failed to meet their intended purposes. Transformational organizational change has not been likely. The legitimate systems have been robust. There has been little systematic investigation of the communication occurring during these efforts. The purpose of this essay is to describe results of a mixed methods research project answering two research questions. (a) How do organizational members communicate during a time of turbulence? (b) What features of this communication suggest the potential for or resistance to transformative change? Comparing the results at the beginning of the period to other periods, gives insight into how social actors communicate and enact the organization during a threshold period where transformational change was possible. Results reveal identifiable patterns of communication as communication strategies, parameters, or basins of attraction. The overall pattern explains how micro communication patterns intersect and how the accumulation of these patterns may resist or accomplish change at a macro level.

  11. Fiber Bragg grating sensor-based communication assistance device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, Srivani; Umesh, Sharath; Pant, Shweta; Srinivas, Talabattula; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2016-08-01

    Improvements in emergency medicine in the form of efficient life supporting systems and intensive care have increased the survival rate in critically injured patients; however, in some cases, severe brain and spinal cord injuries can result in a locked-in syndrome or other forms of paralysis, and communication with these patients may become restricted or impossible. The present study proposes a noninvasive, real-time communication assistive methodology for those with restricted communication ability, employing a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. The communication assistive methodology comprises a breath pattern analyzer using an FBG sensor, which acquires the exhalation force that is converted into strain variations on a cantilever. The FBG breath pattern analyzer along with specific breath patterns, which are programmed to give specific audio output commands, constitutes the proposed fiber Bragg grating sensor-based communication assistive device. The basic communication can be carried out by instructing the patients with restricted communication ability to perform the specific breath patterns. The present approach is intended to be an alternative to the common approach of brain-computer interface in which an instrument is utilized for learning of brain responses.

  12. Cultural Patterns of Soil Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzel, Nikola; Feller, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Living soil supports all terrestrial ecosystems. The only global threat to earth's soils comes from human societies' land use and resource consuming activities. Soil perception and understanding by soil scientists are mainly drawn from biophysical parameters and found within Cartesian rationality, and not, or much less consciously from its rather intangible cultural dimension. But nevertheless, human soil perception, soil awareness, and soil relation are a cultural phenomenon, too. Aiming at soil awareness and education, it is of first order importance for the soil science community and the IUSS to study, discuss and communicate also about the cultural perceptions and representations of soil. For any society, cultural patterns in their relation to soil encompass: (i) General culturally underlying structures like (religious or 'secular') myths and belief systems. (ii) The personal, individual relation to/with and behaviour towards soil. This includes implicit concepts of soil being part integral concepts of landscape because the large majority of humans don't see soil as a distinct object. This communication would be to make evident: (i) the importance of cultural patterns and psychic/psychological background concerning soil, by case studies and overviews on different cultural areas, (ii) the necessity to develop reflections on this topic as well to communicate about soil with large public, as to raise awareness soil scientists to the cultural dimension of soils. A working group was recently founded at IUSS (Division 4) on this topic.

  13. [Style of communication between mission control centers and space crews].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iusupova, A K; Gushchin, V I; Shved, D M; Cheveleva, L M

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with a pilot investigation into the audio communication of cosmonauts with ground controllers. The purpose was to verify in space flight the patterns and trends revealed in model tests of intergroup communication, and to pinpoint the signature of multinational crew communication with 2 national mission control centers (MCCs). The investigation employed authors' content-analysis adapted to the scenario of long-duration mission. The investigation resulted in a phenomenon of double-loop ground-orbit communication, divergence, difference in opinion predictable from the concept formulated by G.T.Beregovoi. Also, there was a notable difference of expressions used by controllers of 2 MCCs.

  14. Quantum cryptography communication technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Yu Rak; Jung, Gwang Il; Jung, Jong Eun; Hong, Seok Boong; Koo, In Soo

    2007-09-15

    Quantum cryptography communication based on quantum mechanics provides and unconditional security between two users. Even though huge advance has been done since the 1984, having a complete system is still far away. In the case of real quantum cryptography communication systems, an unconditional security level is lowered by the imperfection of the communication unit. It is important to investigate the unconditional security of quantum communication protocols based on these experimental results and implementation examples for the advanced spread all over the world. The Japanese report, titled, 'Investigation report on the worldwide trends of quantum cryptography communications systems' was translated and summarized in this report. An unconditional security theory of the quantum cryptography and real implementation examples in the domestic area are investigated also. The goal of the report is to make quantum cryptography communication more useful and reliable alternative telecommunication infrastructure as the one of the cyber security program of the class 1-E communication system of nuclear power plant. Also another goal of this report is to provide the quantitative decision basis on the quantum cryptography communication when this secure communication system will be used in class 1-E communication channel of the nuclear power plant.

  15. The Geospatial Characteristics of a Social Movement Communication Network

    CERN Document Server

    Conover, Michael D; Ferrara, Emilio; McKelvey, Karissa; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Social movements rely in large measure on networked communication technologies to organize and disseminate information relating to the movements' objectives. In this work we seek to understand how the goals and needs of a protest movement are reflected in the geographic patterns of its communication network, and how these patterns differ from those of stable political communication. To this end, we examine an online communication network reconstructed from over 600,000 tweets from a thirty-six week period covering the birth and maturation of the American anticapitalist movement, Occupy Wall Street. We find that, compared to a network of stable domestic political communication, the Occupy Wall Street network exhibits higher levels of locality and a hub and spoke structure, in which the majority of non-local attention is allocated to high-profile locations such as New York, California, and Washington D.C. Moreover, we observe that information flows across state boundaries are more likely to contain framing lang...

  16. Archives, Libraries and Museums as Communicators of Memory in the European Union Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzuch, Zinaida

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Explores the approach to communication of memory in archives, libraries and museums in European Union research projects in 2000-2005. The main objectives were: to identify predominant aspects of heritage communication; to determine whether and how heritage communication was related to memory; to establish patterns of participation in…

  17. [Skilled communication as "intervention" : Models for systematic communication in the healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, M; Mayer, H; Zojer, E

    2015-02-01

    Specific communication training is currently not integrated into anesthesiology curricula. At the same time communication is an important key factor when working with colleagues, in the physician-patient relationship, during management of emergencies and in avoiding or reducing the legal consequences of adverse medical events. Therefore, focused attention should be brought to this area. In other high risk industries, specific communication training has been standard for a long time and in medicine there is an approach to teach and train these soft skills by simulation. Systematic communication training, however, is rarely an established component of specialist training. It is impossible not to communicate whereby nonverbal indications, such as gestures, mimic expression, posture and tone play an important part. Miscommunication, however, is common and leads to unproductive behavior. The cause of this is not always obvious. This article provides an overview of the communication models of Shannon, Watzlawick et al. and Schulz von Thun et al. and describes their limitations. The "Process Communication Model®" (PCM) is also introduced. An overview is provided with examples of how this tool can be used to look at the communication process from a systematic point of view. People have different psychological needs. Not taking care of these needs will result in individual stress behavior, which can be graded into first, second and third degrees of severity (driver behavior, mask behavior and desperation). These behavior patterns become exposed in predictable sequences. Furthermore, on the basis of this model, successful communication can be established while unproductive behavior that occurs during stress can be dealt with appropriately. Because of the importance of communication in all areas of medical care, opportunities exist to focus research on the influence of targeted communication on patient outcome, complications and management of emergencies.

  18. Promoting Parent-Adolescent Communication To Facilitate Healthy Sexual Socialization of Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filomeno, Arlynn H.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews relevant research to identify strengths and weaknesses of parent-adolescent communication patterns relating to adolescent sexual behaviors. Studies show the positive effects of parent-adolescent communication patterns and adolescent sexuality, though man parents fail to address the most critical sexual risks faced by adolescents (sexually…

  19. Designing for Networked Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of design, implementation and integration of computer mediated communication, this book bridges the academic fields of computer science and communication studies. Designing for Networked Communications: Strategies and Development uses an interdisciplinary approach, and presents results from recent......Designing for Networked Communications: Strategies and Development explains how to plan, use, and understand the products and the dynamic social processes and tasks some of the most vital innovations in the knowledge society depend upon– social as well as technological. Focusing on various forms...... and important research in a variety of forms for networked communications. A constructive and critical view of the interplay between the new electronic and the more conventional modes of communication are utilized, while studies of organizational work practices demonstrate that the use of new technologies...

  20. Organizational communication process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Spaho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Managers spend majority of their time communicating in several forms: meeting, face-to –face dis- cussion, letters, emails etc. Also more and more employees realize that communication is a very im- portant part of their work because a lot of their work activities are based on teamwork among workers in different functional groups. This is the reason why communication has become more important in companies. The experience shows that there are significant differences in manners of communication and that it appears to be a very important factor which makes some organizations more successful than others. Communication is the most important for managers because research shows that the spent long period in work time in communication.

  1. Bell scenarios with communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brask, J. B.; Chaves, R.

    2017-03-01

    Classical and quantum physics provide fundamentally different predictions about experiments with separate observers that do not communicate, a phenomenon known as quantum nonlocality. This insight is a key element of our present understanding of quantum physics, and also enables a number of information processing protocols with security beyond what is classically attainable. Relaxing the pivotal assumption of no communication leads to new insights into the nature quantum correlations, and may enable new applications where security can be established under less strict assumptions. Here, we study such relaxations where different forms of communication are allowed. We consider communication of inputs, outputs, and of a message between the parties. Using several measures, we study how much communication is required for classical models to reproduce quantum or general no-signalling correlations, as well as how quantum models can be augmented with classical communication to reproduce no-signalling correlations.

  2. Communicating Your Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    Effective science communication can open doors, accelerate your career and even make you a better scientist. Part of being an effective and productive scientist means being an effective science communicator. The scientist must communicate their work in talks, posters, peer-reviewed papers, internal reports, proposals as well as to the broader public (including law makers). Despite the importance of communication, it has traditionally not been part of our core training as scientists. Today's science students are beginning to have more opportunities to formally develop their science communication skills. Fortunately, new and even more established scientists have a range of tools and resources at their disposal. In this presentation, we will share some of these resources, share our own experiences utilizing them, and provide some practical tools to improve your own science communication skills.

  3. Green symbiotic cloud communications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, H D; Desai, Uday B; Baveja, Brij Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This book intends to change the perception of modern day telecommunications. Communication systems, usually perceived as “dumb pipes”, carrying information / data from one point to another, are evolved into intelligently communicating smart systems. The book introduces a new field of cloud communications. The concept, theory, and architecture of this new field of cloud communications are discussed. The book lays down nine design postulates that form the basis of the development of a first of its kind cloud communication paradigm entitled Green Symbiotic Cloud Communications or GSCC. The proposed design postulates are formulated in a generic way to form the backbone for development of systems and technologies of the future. The book can be used to develop courses that serve as an essential part of graduate curriculum in computer science and electrical engineering. Such courses can be independent or part of high-level research courses. The book will also be of interest to a wide range of readers including b...

  4. Digital Communication and Modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Aasted

    2011-01-01

    system.   Sessions in class with active participation by the students. The time will be divided between lectures and the students solving problems, including simulating digital communication building blocks in Matlab. Combines lectures and hands-on work. Semester: E2011 Extent: 7.5 ects......The course presents the fundamental principles for digital communication, e.g. fixed-wire modems or wireless communication channels, as applied in mobile phones, wireless computer networks or wireless systems in intelligent houses. Based on the functional blocks of a digital communication system......, the fundamental principles for modulation and detection in Gaussian noise is treated. This includes the principles for the determination of the bit-error rate for a digital communication system. During the course, a selection of small Matlab exercises are prepared, for simulation of parts of a communication...

  5. Communication in nuclear emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, Masao [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    In order to take protection measures smoothly at the time of emergency in nuclear power stations and others, it is necessary to prepare information communication facilities mutually among disaster prevention organizations including the state and information transmission network for residents in surrounding areas. The matters decided in ``the measures to be taken for the time being for the countermeasures to prevent disaster in nuclear power stations and others`` are shown. In order to avoid the congestion of communication, the exclusively used communication systems are adopted for disaster prevention organizations, in which facsimile is used to transmit graphic information. The data communication circuits for distributing SPEEDI are installed between Science and Technology Agency, Nuclear Power Safety Technology Center and respective prefectures. The routes, means and order of notices must be confirmed beforehand mutually among the related organizations. As to the general communication for disaster countermeasures, the communication systems in ministries and agencies are described. (K.I.)

  6. Communicable behavior of non-communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Shukla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Communicability of non- communicable diseases can be explained using the prototype of non- communicable diseases. The concept can be further extended to other non- communicable diseases. Diabetes mellitus (DM is regarded as the prototype of non-communicable diseases. Its subtype, type 2 DM is usually associated with obesity. Obesity, in turn, can be attributed to deranged eating habits and lack of physical activity. Eating habits of a person bears a close resemblance to the parental eating habits. Other factors contributing to obesity like alcoholism can also be transmitted from parents to child. Smoking, another factor implicated in DM, can be picked as a habit from peer group as well as family. All these factors implicated directly or indirectly in the pathogenesis of DM are actually components of lifestyle. These lifestyle components can be transmitted both in an inter-generation and intra-generation fashion. And so the chances of transmission of DM (a lifestyle disease in the same fashion cannot be ruled out. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1711-1714

  7. Embryo-maternal communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Esben; Hyttel, Poul; Østrup, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Communication during early pregnancy is essential for successful reproduction. In this review we address the beginning of the communication between mother and developing embryo; including morphological and transcriptional changes in the endometrium as well as epigenetic regulation mechanisms...... directing the placentation. An increasing knowledge of the embryo-maternal communication might not only help to improve the fertility of our farm animals but also our understanding of human health and reproduction....

  8. Securing Near Field Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Kortvedt, Henning Siitonen

    2009-01-01

    Near Field Communication (NFC) specifies a standard for a wireless communication protocol enabling data transfer by keeping two devices close together, about 10 cm maximum. NFC is designed for integration with mobile phones, which can communicate with other NFC phones (peer-to-peer) or read information on tags and cards (reader). An NFC device can also be put in card emulation mode, to offer compatibility with other contactless smart card standards. This enables NFC devices to replace traditi...

  9. Organizational communication process

    OpenAIRE

    Kenan Spaho

    2012-01-01

    Managers spend majority of their time communicating in several forms: meeting, face-to –face dis- cussion, letters, emails etc. Also more and more employees realize that communication is a very im- portant part of their work because a lot of their work activities are based on teamwork among workers in different functional groups. This is the reason why communication has become more important in companies. The experience shows that there are significant differences in manners of ...

  10. Satellite communication engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kolawole, Michael Olorunfunmi

    2013-01-01

    An undeniably rich and thorough guide to satellite communication engineering, Satellite Communication Engineering, Second Edition presents the fundamentals of information communications systems in a simple and succinct way. This book considers both the engineering aspects of satellite systems as well as the practical issues in the broad field of information transmission. Implementing concepts developed on an intuitive, physical basis and utilizing a combination of applications and performance curves, this book starts off with a progressive foundation in satellite technology, and then moves on

  11. Communication and presentation skills

    OpenAIRE

    Lorencová, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with individual factors of communication and basic presentations skills. The theoretical part specifies the basic elements of verbal and non-verbal communication and basic factors connected with preparation and realisation of a presentation. The practical part of the thesis comprises an analysis of impacts of speaker's visual and other communication influences over an audience. The results are applied to a Multimedia Display exhibition taking place during the bachel...

  12. Power Electronics System Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Milosavljevic, Ivana

    1999-01-01

    This work investigates communication issues in high-frequency power converters. A novel control communication network (Power Electronics System Network or PES Net) is proposed for modular, medium and high-power, converters. The network protocol, hardware and software are designed and implemented. The PES Net runs at 125 Mb/s over plastic optical fiber allowing converter switching frequencies in excess of 100 kHz. Communication control is implemented in a fie...

  13. Multimedia communications and networking

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Mario Marques

    2012-01-01

    The result of decades of research and international project experience, Multimedia Communications and Networking provides authoritative insight into recent developments in multimedia, digital communications, and networking services and technologies. Supplying you with the required foundation in these areas, it illustrates the means that will allow for improved digital communications and networks. The book starts with a review of the fundamental concepts, requirements, and constraints in networks and telecommunications. It describes channel disturbances that can hinder system performance--inclu

  14. Cooperative wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Cooperative devices and mechanisms are increasingly important to enhance the performance of wireless communications and networks, with their ability to decrease power consumption and packet loss rate and increase system capacity, computation, and network resilience. Considering the wide range of applications, strategies, and benefits associated with cooperative wireless communications, researchers and product developers need a succinct understanding of relevant theory, fundamentals, and techniques to navigate this challenging field. ""Cooperative Wireless Communications"" provides just that. I

  15. On communicational episteme

    OpenAIRE

    Muniz Sodré

    2007-01-01

    This text aims to discuss the ontological issue about communication processes, by questioning the theoretical foundations of its discourse. First of all we review the informational conception in which communication is understood as a transmission process by classic media studies and by sociological researches on the mass media field. Following this, we approach communication as a hermeneutics concerning the new ways of existing under the multimedia society. Finally we propose the cognitive au...

  16. Teaching intercultural communication skills

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of this tool is to develop your understanding of culture, and the need for awareness in intercultural communication. You will be engaged in learning through reflection, knowledge acquisition and practical activities. Learning outcomes When you have worked through this tool, you will be able to: • Articulate the need for the focus on intercultural communication in current nursing practice; • Discuss the theoretical underpinnings of intercultural communication, a...

  17. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Communications , Computers , Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems that "capture, synthesize and distribute near-real time information to...Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced

  18. The Cultural Pattern of Time in America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑艳

    2009-01-01

    The perceptions of time are influenced by different cultural background. American undmtanding of time is typical of western countries. This paper introduces and explains American cUltural pattern, thus avoiding ~om happemng unpleasant things in the process of cross-cultural communication.

  19. Communication with Roma Patient – a Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrada PARVU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article examines culture-based particularities of communication between doctors and Romani chronic patients.Methods: Qualitative study consisting of 48 semi-structured individual with Roma patients and their careers from two Romanian counties (Iasi and Cluj and 3 focus groups with health mediators. The interviews were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.Results: Answers varied according to participants’ degree of acculturation. The family plays a central role in caring for the patient, accompanies him at doctor visits, and interferes to doctor-patient communication. Communicating with the patient must be tailored to the Roma patients.Conclusion: To optimise communication, medical staff should be aware and respectful of cultural values, customs, and perceptions of the Roma regarding health and illness. Failure to observe these criteria may lead to breach of doctor-patient relationship, and possible failure of medical care. The degrees of individual Roma acculturation into the Romanian culture must be taken into consideration, and adjust the pattern of communication accordingly. The role of health mediators in the communication between medical staff and Romani patients are very important.Practical implications: The dissemination of information regarding the Roma cultural values in regards to illness helps the health services adapt and create a holistic multicultural care model.

  20. FUNDAMENTAL ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT, IN THE CASE OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian Pocovnicu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Efficient communication is one the most important instruments used for the purpose of generating change inside and outside an organization. It can contribute to adjusting attitudes and the manner of approaching the present and future challenges and to changing behavioral patterns. The mission and the objectives of organizational communication are highly interrelated with organizational change and environment characteristics, in which the organization functions. The communication performed by the public administration institution outside is an institutional communication, extra-organizational, which presents the following purposes: strengthening its image, stimulating an environment of trust and affinity from the citizens (Kotler & Lee, 2007. We are of opinion that the management of communication performed by a public administration institution features three fundamental aspects, relevant for institutional communicators when designing and managing the institutional communication: communication efficiency, communication process and the implications of the new information and communication technologies (ICT for this process.