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Sample records for delusional misidentification syndrome

  1. Delusional misidentification syndromes in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melca, Isabela A; Rodrigues, Clarissa L; Serra-Pinheiro, Maria A; Pantelis, Christos; Velakoulis, Dennis; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2013-06-01

    Delusional misidentification syndromes (DMS) have been rarely reported in patients with conditions other than schizophrenia-related disorders, diffuse brain disease (dementia) and focal neurological illness. In this report, we describe DMS (i.e. Capgras and Fregoli syndromes) in two patients with severe and treatment resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), one with paranoid personality disorder (PPD) and the other with a pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) not otherwise specified. While our findings highlight an interesting phenomenon (the occurrence of DMS in OCD), it is presently unclear whether this association is rare or underreported. Misidentification syndromes might be the ultimate result of a combination of obsessive fears and preexisting cognitive bias/deficits, such as mistrustfulness (in PPD) or poor theory of mind (in PDD).

  2. Delusional Misidentification Syndromes and Paranoid Schizophrenia: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Sousa-Ferreira; Tânia Moreira; Márcia Mendes; Sérgio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Delusional misindentification syndromes are divided into Capgras syndrome, Fregoli syndrome, subjective double syndrome and intermetamorphosis syndrome. The main feature is a failure to identify itself  and/or others. These phenomena are relatively rare, etiologically heterogeneous and occur mainly in the setting of schizophrenic disorder, affective disorders and organic diseases. Aims: Present a case report of a patient with three delusional misindentification syndromes and r...

  3. Delusional misidentification syndrome and other unusual delusions in advanced Parkinson's disease.

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    Moro, Adriana; Munhoz, Renato Puppi; Moscovich, Mariana; Arruda, Walter O; Teive, Hélio A G

    2013-08-01

    Unusual delusional syndromes are rare protean diseases with speculative etiopathogenic mechanisms. Seven consecutive patients with advanced PD were evaluated over a 15-year period at the Movement Disorders Unit in the Neurology Service, Hospital de Clínicas, Federal University of Paraná, and the Paraná State Parkinson's Patients Association. We describe advanced Parkinson's disease patients presenting with unusual delusional syndromes, including cases of Ekbom, Othello, Capgras' and Diogenes syndromes, reduplicative paramnesia and mirrored-self misidentification. There are a few isolated reports of unusual neuropsychiatric disorders in patients with PD. We believe that these syndromes associated with advanced PD in elderly patients presenting with cognitive impairment and polypharmacy are probably often underestimated. Neurologists should be aware for these rare and treatable conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuropsychological relationships in paranoid schizophrenia with and without delusional misidentification syndromes. A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykouras, L; Typaldou, M; Mourtzouchou, P; Oulis, P; Koutsaftis, C; Dokianaki, F; Michalopoulou, P G; Havaki-Kontaxaki, M; Christodoulou, C

    2008-08-01

    Delusional misidentification syndromes (DMSs) and schizophrenia are strongly associated, since the former occur predominantly in the context of paranoid schizophrenia. However, the possible underlying neuropsychological relationships between DMSs and paranoid schizophrenia have not been thoroughly investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether DMSs in paranoid schizophrenia are associated with a distinct neuropsychological substrate indicative of differential bilateral frontal and right hemisphere dysfunction. We compared two matched groups of paranoid schizophrenic patients with (N=22) and without (N=22) DMS(s) on a battery of neuropsychological tests assessing mainly frontal and right hemisphere functions. No statistically significant differences were detected between the two groups. Our findings are indicative of a bilateral frontal and right hemisphere dysfunction of equal severity in both DMS and non-DMS patients with paranoid schizophrenia.

  5. Delusional misidentifications and duplications: right brain lesions, left brain delusions.

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    Devinsky, Orrin

    2009-01-01

    When the delusional misidentification syndromes reduplicative paramnesia and Capgras syndromes result from neurologic disease, lesions are usually bifrontal and/or right hemispheric. The related disorders of confabulation and anosognosis share overlapping mechanisms and anatomic pathology. A dual mechanism is postulated for the delusional misidentification syndromes: negative effects from right hemisphere and frontal lobe dysfunction as well as positive effects from release (i.e., overactivity) of preserved left hemisphere areas. Negative effects of right hemisphere injury impair self-monitoring, ego boundaries, and attaching emotional valence and familiarity to stimuli. The unchecked left hemisphere unleashes a creative narrator from the monitoring of self, memory, and reality by the frontal and right hemisphere areas, leading to excessive and false explanations. Further, the left hemisphere's cognitive style of categorization, often into dual categories, leads it to invent a duplicate or impostor to resolve conflicting information. Delusions result from right hemisphere lesions. But it is the left hemisphere that is deluded.

  6. Finding the imposter: brain connectivity of lesions causing delusional misidentifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, R Ryan; Laganiere, Simon; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Prasad, Sashank; Fox, Michael D

    2017-02-01

    SEE MCKAY AND FURL DOI101093/AWW323 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Focal brain injury can sometimes lead to bizarre symptoms, such as the delusion that a family member has been replaced by an imposter (Capgras syndrome). How a single brain lesion could cause such a complex disorder is unclear, leading many to speculate that concurrent delirium, psychiatric disease, dementia, or a second lesion is required. Here we instead propose that Capgras and other delusional misidentification syndromes arise from single lesions at unique locations within the human brain connectome. This hypothesis is motivated by evidence that symptoms emerge from sites functionally connected to a lesion location, not just the lesion location itself. First, 17 cases of lesion-induced delusional misidentifications were identified and lesion locations were mapped to a common brain atlas. Second, lesion network mapping was used to identify brain regions functionally connected to the lesion locations. Third, regions involved in familiarity perception and belief evaluation, two processes thought to be abnormal in delusional misidentifications, were identified using meta-analyses of previous functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. We found that all 17 lesion locations were functionally connected to the left retrosplenial cortex, the region most activated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of familiarity. Similarly, 16 of 17 lesion locations were functionally connected to the right frontal cortex, the region most activated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of expectation violation, a component of belief evaluation. This connectivity pattern was highly specific for delusional misidentifications compared to four other lesion-induced neurological syndromes (P Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Identification, recognition and misidentification syndromes. A psychoanalytical perspective.

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    Stéphane eThibierge

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Misidentification syndromes are currently often understood as cognitive disorders of either the sense of uniqueness (Margariti & Kontaxakis, 2006 or the recognition of people (Ellis, Lewis, 2001. It is however necessary to consider how a normal sense of uniqueness or a normal people recognition are acquired by normal or neurotic subjects. It will be shown here that the normal conditions of cognition can be considered as one of the possible forms of a complex structure and not as just a setting for our sense and perception data. The consistency and the permanency of the body image in neurosis is what permits that we recognize other people and ourselves as unique beings. These consistency and permanency are related to object repression, as shown by neurological disorders of body image (somatoparaphrenia, which cause the object to come to the foreground in the patient’s words (Thibierge and Morin, 2010. In misidentification syndromes, as in other psychotic syndromes, one can also observe a damage of the specular image as well as an absence of object repression. This leads us to question whether, in the psychiatric disorders related to a damaged specular image, cognition disorders can be studied and managed using the same methods as for neurotic patients.

  8. Delusional disorder, somatic type: olfactory reference syndrome in a patient with delusional trimethylaminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Natalia; Wystrach, Carter; Bolton, Michael; Shaywitz, Jonathan; IsHak, Waguih William

    2013-06-01

    Delusions of foul body odors (often referred to as olfactory reference syndrome [ORS]) currently fall under the category of delusional disorder, somatic type (DDST), in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). We present the case of a 51-year-old man with no previous psychiatric history who presented with perceived foul odors that he delusionally attributed to trimethylaminuria (TMAU). TMAU is a rare metabolic disorder associated with foul body odors. The patient also experienced severe concurrent mood symptoms because of social isolation resulting from his delusion about his body odors. After considerable discussion of differential diagnoses, a diagnosis of DDST was ultimately made, given the patient's unrelenting nonbizarre delusions and lack of insight pertaining to his body odors. However, this case proved to be very useful in exploring the diagnostic challenges in this type of disorder and recent discussions of ORS and its proposed inclusion in the DSM-5.

  9. Othello syndrome. Preventing a tragedy when treating patients with delusional disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marcia A; Kummerow, Andreas M; Mgutshini, Tennyson

    2010-08-01

    Othello syndrome, sometimes referred to as delusional, pathological, morbid, or erotic jealousy, is a rare delusional disorder with high-risk implications. This article provides an overview of Othello syndrome and includes an individual example as well as a review of the literature. Pharmacological interventions and dialectical behavior therapy are discussed as options for pathological jealousy. Nursing considerations and assessment strategies of delusional jealousy are described for identification and evaluation of risk factors. Patient safety is addressed, and collaborative interventions are proposed for treatment. Staff development for the treatment team is advocated to help staff identify delusional patients and act prudently to avert possible tragic consequences associated with Othello syndrome.

  10. An Experimental Investigation of the Phenomenology of Delusional Beliefs in People with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Frances; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2005-01-01

    There is evidence that Asperger syndrome is associated with delusional beliefs. Cognitive theories of delusions in psychosis literature propose a central role for impaired theory of mind ability in the development of delusions. The present study investigates the phenomenology of delusional ideation in Asperger syndrome. Forty-six individuals with…

  11. The misidentification of Clerambault's and Kandinsky-Clerambault's syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, V; Kaptsan, A; Witztum, E

    2001-06-01

    Eponymic terms or eponyms are labels describing phenomena that reflect the name(s) of the person(s) who first described the phenomena. Using a similar term to describe different forms of pathology leads to a muddle. In this paper, we describe "Clerambault's syndrome" and "Kandinsky-Clerambault's syndrome" and discuss and clarify the confusion surrounding these different syndromes.

  12. Misidentifications in Pirandello's plays and short stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Kilcline, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Luigi Pirandello was an Italian playwright, novelist, short story writer, poet, and one of the leading dramatists of the twentieth century. Pirandello used his plays and short stories to express his life philosophy which included the irony and bitterness of self-deception. In his works, his characters possess highly complex personalities, portrayed by ongoing and overlapping conflicts between illusion and reality. These manifestations of double personalities and confusion between imagination and reality are today known as psychopathological phenomena, classified as both delusional misidentification and reduplication syndromes. Here, individuals misidentify and reduplicate places, people, or events. These delusional syndromes (Capgras, Frégoli, intermetamorphosis, syndrome of subjective doubles) occur primarily in psychiatric illnesses (i.e. schizophrenia) and organic illnesses (i.e. right hemispheric stroke). For Pirandello, reality was highly subjective in all humans. However, misidentification and reduplication syndromes can manifest when this subjectivity gets out of control. With his works, Pirandello made philosophical concepts which had previously only been discussed by intellectuals available to a much larger audience. Pirandello continued to elaborate upon this concept of mutable ego, established by Blaise Pascal in the 1600s and carried on by the French psychologist Alfred Binet. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Severe water intoxication and secondary depressive syndrome in relation to delusional infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai J

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Jianbo Lai,1 Qiaoqiao Lu,1 Yi Xu,1,2 Shaohua Hu1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2The Key Laboratory of Mental Disorder’s Management in Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: This study presents a case of severe water intoxication in a female patient with delusional infestation. Self-induced excessive water ingestion is a rare medical condition, which has not been reported in patients with delusional infestation yet. The patient in this case study was a 60-year-old Chinese woman, who was admitted to our hospital because of a feeling of skin infestation. She suffered from loss of consciousness and generalized tonic–clonic seizure after drinking 12 L of water during bowel cleansing before colonoscopy. Sufficient laboratory and imaging examinations were performed to exclude other possible causes of severe hyponatremia, such as hypothyroidism, diabetes insipidus, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone. Besides, the cystic lesion in the posterior pituitary revealed by cranial magnetic resonance imaging was not accountable for her delusional symptoms as well as excessive drinking behavior. Her delusional symptoms were in complete remission with a combination of risperidone and aripiprazole. However, nearly 3 months after discharge, this patient suffered from depressed mood and was diagnosed with depressive syndrome, and even attempted suicide. This case highlights the possibility of self-induced water intoxication in patients with delusional infestation, inevitably adding to the complexity of the disease, and indicates the necessity of precautions for secondary psychotic or mood problems after symptomatological remission. Keywords: delusional infestation, depressive syndrome, suicide, water intoxication

  14. The Comorbidity of Reduplicative Paramnesia, Intermetamorphosis, Reverse-Intermetamorphosis, Misidentification of Reflection, and Capgras Syndrome in an Adolescent Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Ozden Arısoy; A. Evren Tufan; Rabia Bilici; Sarper Taskiran; Zehra Topal; Nuran Demir; M. Akif Cansız

    2014-01-01

    Case Report The Comorbidity of Reduplicative Paramnesia, Intermetamorphosis, Reverse-Intermetamorphosis, Misidentification of Reflection, and Capgras Syndrome in an Adolescent Patient Ozden ArJsoy,1 A. Evren Tufan,2 Rabia Bilici,3 Sarper Taskiran,4 Zehra Topal,2 Nuran Demir,2 andM. Akif CansJz2 1 Department of Psychiatry, Abant Izzet Baysal University Medical Faculty, 14280 Bolu, Turkey 2Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Abant Izzet Baysal University Medic...

  15. Delusional Infestation in a Patient with Renal Failure, Metabolic Syndrome, and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease Treated with Aripiprazole: A Case Report

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    Carpiniello, Bernardo; Pinna, Federica; Tuveri, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    Delusional infestation is an aspecific psychiatric condition manifested either as a primary psychotic disorder or a secondary disorder induced by a wide range of very different medical conditions. Both primary and secondary delusional infestations seem to respond to typical and atypical antipsychotics. The latter are considered the first-line treatment although the use of second-generation antipsychotics featuring a higher metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal tolerability is preferable in secondary cases, which often occur in patients with multiple, severe medical conditions. We report a case of a 72-year-old patient affected by delusional infestation associated with severe renal failure, metabolic syndrome, hypertensive cardiopathy, and chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:22174718

  16. Delusional Infestation in a Patient with Renal Failure, Metabolic Syndrome, and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease Treated with Aripiprazole: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Carpiniello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delusional infestation is an aspecific psychiatric condition manifested either as a primary psychotic disorder or a secondary disorder induced by a wide range of very different medical conditions. Both primary and secondary delusional infestations seem to respond to typical and atypical antipsychotics. The latter are considered the first-line treatment although the use of second-generation antipsychotics featuring a higher metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal tolerability is preferable in secondary cases, which often occur in patients with multiple, severe medical conditions. We report a case of a 72-year-old patient affected by delusional infestation associated with severe renal failure, metabolic syndrome, hypertensive cardiopathy, and chronic cerebrovascular disease.

  17. [Delusional disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Marion; Llorca, Pierre-Michel

    2015-02-01

    Delusional disorders are divided in French nosography into three clinical disease entities: paranoid delusions, psychose hallucinatoire chronique, and paraphrenia. Their common characteristics are a late start, a chronic evolution, no cognitive impairment and no dissociation. Delusio- nal syndrome is often at the forefront with a predominant mechanism characterizing each disorder (interpretation for paranoid delusions, hallucination for psychose hallucinatoire chronique and imagination for paraphrenia). Although these disorders are less sensitive to the medication than schizophrenia, care is based on second generation antipsychotic treatment, in association with psychotherapy and social care. The aim of treatment is to alleviate delusion intensity to improve global functioning and to prevent violent incidents or suicide attempt.

  18. Normal pressure hydrocephalus presenting as delusional disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srivastava, Shruti; Bhatia, Manjeet Singh; Gautam, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    ... to a diagnosis of delusional disorder, schizophrenia, depression or dementia. [2] These delusional disorders are known as organic delusional disorders (ODDs) and are syndromes produced by neurological disease or toxic metabolic disorders and are associated, mainly with limbic system and basal ganglia dysfunction. [3],[4] Epidemiology of ODD is not ...

  19. Capgras-like syndrome in a patient with an acute urinary tract infection

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    Salviati M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Massimo Salviati, Francesco Saverio Bersani, Francesco Macrì, Marta Fojanesi, Amedeo Minichino, Mariana Gallo, Francesco De Michele, Roberto Delle Chiaie, Massimo BiondiDepartment of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Delusional misidentification syndromes are a group of delusional phenomena in which patients misidentify familiar persons, objects, or themselves, believing that they have been replaced or transformed. In 25%–40% of cases, misidentification syndromes have been reported in association with organic illness. We report an acute episode of Capgras-like delusion lasting 8 days, focused on the idea that people were robots with human bodies, in association with an acute urinary infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case report associating urinary tract infection with Capgras-like syndrome. Awareness of the prevalence of delusional misidentification syndromes associated with acute medical illness should promote diligence on the part of clinicians in recognizing this disorder.Keywords: delusional misidentification, Capgras syndrome, urinary tract infection, psychosis

  20. Delusional infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenmann, Roland W; Lepping, Peter

    2009-10-01

    This papers aims at familiarizing psychiatric and nonpsychiatric readers with delusional infestation (DI), also known as delusional parasitosis. It is characterized by the fixed belief of being infested with pathogens against all medical evidence. DI is no single disorder but can occur as a delusional disorder of the somatic type (primary DI) or secondary to numerous other conditions. A set of minimal diagnostic criteria and a classification are provided. Patients with DI pose a truly interdisciplinary problem to the medical system. They avoid psychiatrists and consult dermatologists, microbiologists, or general practitioners but often lose faith in professional medicine. Epidemiology and history suggest that the imaginary pathogens change constantly, while the delusional theme "infestation" is stable and ubiquitous. Patients with self-diagnosed "Morgellons disease" can be seen as a variation of this delusional theme. For clinicians, clinical pathways for efficient diagnostics and etiology-specific treatment are provided. Specialized outpatient clinics in dermatology with a liaison psychiatrist are theoretically best placed to provide care. The most intricate problem is to engage patients in psychiatric therapy. In primary DI, antipsychotics are the treatment of choice, according to limited but sufficient evidence. Pimozide is no longer the treatment of choice for reasons of drug safety. Future research should focus on pathophysiology and the neural basis of DI, as well as on conclusive clinical trials, which are widely lacking. Innovative approaches will be needed, since otherwise patients are unlikely to adhere to any study protocol.

  1. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome as a Consequence of Delusional Food Refusal: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, David D; Schroeder, Ryan W; Heinrichs, Robin J; Baade, Lyle E

    2015-12-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency, typically resulting from malnutrition secondary to chronic alcohol abuse. Less often, other conditions can lead to malnutrition and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We describe a 35-year-old man who developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with a typical neurologic and neuropsychological presentation after somatic delusions led him to refuse to eat. Cases like his serve to heighten awareness of the interplay between psychiatric and neurologic conditions, their sometimes atypical pathogenesis, and the value to primary care providers of consulting with psychiatrists, neurologists, and neuropsychologists when managing patients with possible Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  2. Capgras syndrome associated with limbic encephalitis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herval Ribeiro Soares Neto

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with insidious onset and slowly progressive cognitive impairment, behavioral symptoms, temporal lobe seizures and delusional thoughts typical of delusional misidentification syndromes. Clinical presentation along with extensive diagnostic work-up revealed limbic encephalitis secondary to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient underwent immunotherapy with high-dose corticosteroid but no significant improvement was observed. No specific treatment for lymphoma was performed because the patient died of septic shock following a nosocomial respiratory infection. Delusional misidentification syndromes are an unusual and unique form of cognitive impairment in which a patient consistently misidentifies persons, places, objects, or events. Capgras syndrome is the most common subtype of this disorder, being defined by the recurrent and transient belief that someone close has been substituted by an imposter. These entities are generally associated with neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disturbances. Rare reports of associations between misidentification syndromes and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis have been published, but no papers address a correlation with limbic encephalitis or lymphoma.

  3. Clinical features of delusional jealousy in elderly patients with dementia.

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    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Ikeda, Manabu

    2015-06-01

    Delusional jealousy is a psychotic syndrome characterized by a belief in the infidelity of one's spouse that reaches delusional intensity. Although delusional jealousy has been described in relation to organic psychosis, little is known concerning the actual role of delusional jealousy in dementia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical features of delusional jealousy and possible mechanisms whereby delusional jealousy arises in patients with dementia. We studied 208 consecutive outpatients with dementia (diagnosis based on DSM-III-R criteria; mean [SD] age of 77.0 [8.0] years; study period: September 2011-August 2012). Delusional jealousy was defined as a false belief derived from a pathological jealousy that makes the patient believe that his or her spouse is unfaithful. The prevalence of delusional jealousy was compared between Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and vascular dementia. Patients with and without delusional jealousy were compared in terms of general characteristics. In addition, each patient with delusional jealousy and their primary caregivers were interviewed about the clinical features of the syndrome. Of the 208 patients with dementia, 18 (8.7%) showed delusional jealousy. The prevalence of delusional jealousy in patients who had dementia with Lewy bodies (26.3%) was significantly higher than that in patients with Alzheimer's disease (5.5%) (P delusional jealousy in regard to gender (P = 1.00), age (P = .81), educational attainment (P = .29), presence of other persons living with the couple (P = .22), and Mini-Mental State Examination score (P = .47). On the other hand, delusional jealousy was preceded by the onset of serious physical diseases in nearly half of the patients. Delusional jealousy resolved within 12 months after treatment in 15 of 18 patients (83%). Although delusional jealousy is a considerable problem in dementia, the prognosis of delusional jealousy in demented patients appears to be

  4. Delusional parasitosis with alcohol dependence: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Dave, Austin Fernandes, Anup Bharati, Avinash De Sousa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Delusional parasitosis is a syndrome with which most psychiatrists are familiar. However, most reports consist of case reports or small series. We present here a case report of delusional parasitosis of an extremely bizarre nature in a case of alcohol dependence that responded to pimozide, haloperidol and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT.

  5. Neuropsychological aspects of delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamid, Mona; Brüne, Martin

    2008-06-01

    Delusional disorders (DDs) are clinically rare syndromes characterized by false beliefs that are held with firm conviction despite counterevidence. The neuropsychology of DDs is poorly understood. Two partially opposing models--a cognitive bias model and a cognitive deficit model--have received mixed empiric support, partly because most research has been carried out in patients with paranoid schizophrenia, with which the nosologic association of DDs is unknown. Based on these models, we review empiric findings concerning the neuropsychology of DDs (narrowly defined). We conclude that DDs can best be seen as extreme variations of cognitive mechanisms involved in rapid threat detection and defensive harm avoidance. From this viewpoint, the two models seem to be complementary in explanatory power rather than contradictory. Future research may help to clarify the question of gene-environment interaction involvement in the formation of delusional beliefs.

  6. Genetics and delusional disorder.

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    Cardno, Alastair G; McGuffin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article gives an overview of genetic research approaches and their application to delusional disorder. Most studies have been based on small samples and have had other methodological limitations, so it is not clear whether there is a genetic contribution to the aetiology of delusional disorder. It is unlikely that delusional disorder is strongly related genetically to affective disorder or schizophrenia, but more subtle relationships cannot be ruled out. The rarity of multiply affected families prohibits linkage studies and, to date, molecular genetic investigations have been mainly limited to small association studies of dopamine receptor polymorphisms. A range of considerably larger, epidemiologically rigorous studies is required, but the uncommonness and other features of the disorder put strong limitations on the prospects for ascertaining adequate samples.

  7. Deficits in Executive and Memory Processes in Delusional Disorder: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Inmaculada Ibanez-Casas; Enrique De Portugal; Nieves Gonzalez; Kathryn A McKenney; Haro, Josep M.; Judith Usall; Miguel Perez-Garcia; Cervilla, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] Delusional disorder has been traditionally considered a psychotic syndrome that does not evolve to cognitive deterioration. However, to date, very little empirical research has been done to explore cognitive executive components and memory processes in Delusional Disorder patients. This study will investigate whether patients with delusional disorder are intact in both executive function components (such as flexibility, impulsivity and updating components) and memory processes...

  8. [Delusional jealousy and obsessive love--causes and forms].

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    Bogerts, Bernhard

    2005-02-10

    Obsessive love and delusional jealousy as persistent mental disorders, are well-known but rare psychiatric conditions, the prevalence of which is estimated to be less than 0.1%. Delusional jealousy should not be confused with exaggerated "pathological" jealousy, which is characterized by excessive suspicion and possessiveness on the part of individuals who, as a rule, suffer from considerably disordered self-esteem. As a paranoid development, delusional jealousy occurs in particular among male chronic alcoholics. As in all delusional disorders, trivial events are evaluated with unshakeable certainty as proof of the correctness of the delusive notion. Obsessive love is seen predominantly in women. In the differential diagnosis, other mental disorders such as schizophrenia, manic or organic brain syndrome must be excluded.

  9. Delusional parasitosis: lessons learnt.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, Kashif

    2012-01-31

    Delusional parasitosis manifests in the patient\\'s firm belief that they have skin symptoms due to an infestation with insects. Patients often refuse to seek psychiatric care. This study reassessed patients with delusional parasitosis in order to review and learn from them, which is important due to the significant morbidity of this condition and the therapeutic difficulties it presents to the dermatologist. Between 1995 and 2008, 13 patients with delusional parasitosis (6 men, 7 women; mean age 46 years) were included in this retrospective study. Mean duration of follow-up was 50.1 months. Nine patients were treated with pimozide, but only two had complete remission. Four were treated with sulpiride with two reported partial remissions. Risperidone was given to four patients, resulting in one partial remission. Eight patients were seen in the last 6 months and five were lost to follow-up. These findings highlight the difficulties encountered in diagnosing delusional parasitosis, the lack of response to neuroleptic medication, compliance problems and the dermatologist\\'s dilemma of managing a psychiatric condition in a dermatological setting.

  10. Delusional parasitosis in ENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar; Peter, Ranjit; Bhat, Shrinivas

    2008-12-01

    Otolaryngologists in India often encounter patients with various insects presenting as foreign bodies in the ear and nose. However they overlook the possibility of the clinical entity that has come to be known as delusional parasitosis. Three patients presented in our OPD with this condition and their case reports are discussed.

  11. Obsessive versus delusional jealousy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batinic, Borjanka; Duisin, Dragana; Barisic, Jasmina

    2013-09-01

    Although obsessive jealousy is a highly disturbing disorder, frequently it goes unrecognized, as most attention is paid to delusional jealousy, being the more prominent clinical phenomenon. In order to distinguish obsessive from delusional jealousy, the basic clinical characteristics of these two types of jealousy are presented, as well as the mechanism of their respective genesis, and the differences which we must be aware of in order to prevent misdiagnosis and consequent wrong treatment choices. The theoretical considerations are supported by case presentations providing a clear picture of the phenomena discussed. Unlike delusional jealousy, characterized by the presence of strong, false beliefs that the partner is unfaithful, individuals with obsessive jealousy suffer from unpleasant and irrational jealous ruminations that the partner could be unfaithful, accompanied by compulsive checking of partners' behaviour, which is recognised by the patient as ego-dystonic. This jealousy resembles obsessive-compulsive phenomenology more closely. Despite the differences, both forms of jealousy result in significant distress for patients and intimate relationships, and carry the risk of abuse, homicide and/or suicide. Delusional jealousy is a psychotic disorder and should be treated mainly with antipsychotics, while obsessive jealousy resembles obsessive-compulsive disorder and should be treated with SSRIs and cognitive-behavioural therapy. Regardless of the presence or absence of insight into the disorder, one of the key factors in the treatment of pathological jealousy is to motivate the sufferers for pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions.

  12. Treatments for delusional disorder.

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    Skelton, Mike; Khokhar, Waqqas Ahmad; Thacker, Simon P

    2015-05-22

    Delusional disorder is commonly considered to be difficult to treat. Antipsychotic medications are frequently used and there is growing interest in a potential role for psychological therapies such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in the treatment of delusional disorder. To evaluate the effectiveness of medication (antipsychotic medication, antidepressants, mood stabilisers) and psychotherapy, in comparison with placebo in delusional disorder. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Trials Register (28 February 2012). Relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating treatments in delusional disorder. All review authors extracted data independently for the one eligible trial. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis with a fixed-effect model. Where possible, we calculated illustrative comparative risks for primary outcomes. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again with a fixed-effect model. We assessed the risk of bias of the included study and used the GRADE approach to rate the quality of the evidence. Only one randomised trial met our inclusion criteria, despite our initial search yielding 141 citations. This was a small study, with 17 people completing a trial comparing CBT to an attention placebo (supportive psychotherapy) for people with delusional disorder. Most participants were already taking medication and this was continued during the trial. We were not able to include any randomised trials on medications of any type due to poor data reporting, which left us with no usable data for these trials. For the included study, usable data were limited, risk of bias varied and the numbers involved were small, making interpretation of data difficult. In particular there were no data on outcomes such as global state and behaviour, nor any information on possible adverse effects.A positive effect for CBT was found for social self esteem

  13. Phenotypic cognitive impairment in late-onset delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ben S; Kotsopoulos, Eleftheria J; Yamin, Sami

    2014-06-01

    Previous use of heterogeneous diagnostic criteria and insensitive cognitive measures has impeded clarification of the extent and type of cognitive impairment specific to late-onset delusional disorder. We examined whether clinical presentations of late-onset delusional disorder are associated with prodromal or established dementia, and whether it might be a discrete clinical syndrome characterized by its own profile of cognitive impairment. Nineteen patients with late-onset delusional disorder from a hospital psychiatric service and 20 patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type (AD) from an outpatient memory clinic were recruited in a consecutive case series. All patients underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessment that included general intellectual function, executive function, new learning and delayed memory, language, processing speed, and visuo-perceptual skills. Late-onset delusional disorder patients showed moderate impairment to conceptual reasoning, visual object recognition, processing speed, and confrontation naming. Severe impairment appeared in visuo-perceptual planning and organization, and divided attention. Compared with the Alzheimer's disease (AD) group, the late-onset delusional disorder group demonstrated significantly poorer visuo-perceptual skills but a significantly better capacity to consolidate information into delayed memory. A high rate of marked cognitive impairment occurs in late-onset delusional disorder. There was evidence of a conceptual reasoning deficit, plus the presence of a visuo-perceptual impairment affecting object recognition. This impairment profile can explain the genesis and maintenance of the observed delusions. Understanding late-onset delusional disorder as other than a purely psychiatric phenomenon or a precursor to AD will lead to better assessment and management approaches.

  14. A laboratory analogue of mirrored-self misidentification delusion: the role of hypnosis, suggestion, and demand characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Michael H; Barnier, Amanda J; Langdon, Robyn; Cox, Rochelle E; Polito, Vince; Coltheart, Max

    2013-12-01

    Mirrored-self misidentification is the delusional belief that one's own reflection in the mirror is a stranger. In two experiments, we tested the ability of hypnotic suggestion to model this condition. In Experiment 1, we compared two suggestions based on either the delusion's surface features (seeing a stranger in the mirror) or underlying processes (impaired face processing). Fifty-two high hypnotisable participants received one of these suggestions either with hypnosis or without in a wake control. In Experiment 2, we examined the extent to which social cues and role-playing could account for participants' behaviour by comparing the responses of 14 hypnotised participants to the suggestion for impaired face processing (reals) with those of 14 nonhypnotised participants instructed to fake their responses (simulators). Overall, results from both experiments confirm that we can use hypnotic suggestion to produce a compelling analogue of mirrored-self misidentification that cannot simply be attributed to social cues or role-playing.

  15. Cognitive neuropsychiatry and delusional belief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltheart, Max

    2007-08-01

    Cognitive neuropsychiatry is a new field of cognitive psychology which seeks to learn more about the normal operation of high-level aspects of cognition such as belief formation, reasoning, decision making, theory of mind, and pragmatics by studying people in whom such processes are abnormal. So far, the high-level cognitive process most widely studied in cognitive neuropsychiatry has been belief formation, investigated by examining people with delusional beliefs. This paper describes some of the forms of delusional belief that have been examined from this perspective and offers a general two-deficit cognitive-neuropsychiatric account of delusional belief.

  16. Gender-related features of persistent delusional disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustmann, Tobias; Pillmann, Frank; Marneros, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents gender-related features of Delusional Disorder. It is part of the Halle Delusional Syndromes Study (HADES-Study). All inpatients fulfilling the DSM-IV/ICD-10 criteria of Delusional Disorder/Persistent Delusional Disorder (DD) during a 14-year period were included and followed up for an average of 10.8 years. Gender distribution was almost equal, women became ill significantly later than men, and almost all women had a stable diagnosis-in contrast to men. The great majority of women, at the end of the follow-up period, had an unremitted DD. Women more frequently had low social functioning at admission, but then were more compliant and received more frequently pharmacological medication. There were no differences in the delusional topic and no differences regarding long-term disability and autarky. In spite of previous reports, the HADES-Study found no gender difference in the frequency of DD. However, men tended more frequently to change into schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. In these cases, the DD might have been a prodrome of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, which manifests later in life. Although in both female and male DD patients, the majority remained unremitted, almost none of them lost their autarky (independent living). While women more frequently received psychopharmacological medication, their DD was usually found to be unremitted.

  17. Mirror agnosia and the mirrored-self misidentification delusion: a hypnotic analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Michael H; Cox, Rochelle E; Barnier, Amanda J; Langdon, Robyn; Coltheart, Max

    2012-05-01

    Mirrored-self misidentification is the delusional belief that one's reflection in the mirror is a stranger. Current theories suggest that one pathway to the delusion is mirror agnosia (a deficit in which patients are unable to use mirror knowledge when interacting with mirrors). This study examined whether a hypnotic suggestion for mirror agnosia can recreate features of the delusion. Ten high hypnotisable participants were given either a suggestion to not understand mirrors or to see the mirror as a window. Participants were asked to look into a mirror and describe what they saw. Participants were tested on their understanding of mirrors and received a series of challenges. Participants then received a detailed postexperimental inquiry. Three of five participants given the suggestion to not understand mirrors reported seeing a stranger and maintained this belief when challenged. These participants also showed signs of mirror agnosia. No participants given the suggestion to see a window reported seeing a stranger. Results indicate that a hypnotic suggestion for mirror agnosia can be used to recreate the mirrored-self misidentification delusion. Factors influencing the effectiveness of hypnotic analogues of psychopathology, such as participants' expectations and interpretations, are discussed.

  18. Delusional versus nondelusional body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Serafino G; Knoesen, Natalie P; Castle, David J

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed demographic and clinical features in 65 subjects with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and compared the 39 (60%) with the delusional form (receiving an additional diagnosis of delusional disorder, somatic type) with those who did not meet delusionality criteria. Delusional and nondelusional patients did not statistically differ on most demographic and clinical variables. Delusional patients, however, had significantly more severe BDD symptoms at both baseline and follow-up assessments than those of nondelusional patients. Furthermore, poorer insight was significantly associated with more severe BDD symptoms at both baseline and follow-up. Overall improvement in BDD symptom severity was similar for the 2 groups. Our results support other studies in the view that BDD and its delusional variant have more similarities than differences and that the delusional variant may be simply a more severe form of BDD. Implications for the diagnostic classification of BDD and future research directions are discussed. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cognitive-behavioural therapy and recovery of a delusional dysmorphophobia case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Yust, Carlos; Delgado-Ríos, Patricia; Escudero-Pérez, Silvia

    2017-02-01

    We present the application of cognitive-behavioural therapy in a clinical case diagnosed with delusional dysmorphophobia. The psychometric scales used for evaluation were the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia, Beck Anxiety and Depression inventories, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale along with the degree of conviction in the delusional belief and in alternative explanations, and social functioning measured by patient reporting. The therapy included cognitive and behavioural techniques: evidence analysis, search for alternative explanations, logical and functional analysis, reality testing, progressive relaxation techniques, in vivo and imaginal exposure therapy. Evaluations were performed before and after the treatment and then at follow-up after 12 and 24 months. Progressively, the delusional conviction disappeared. There were significant improvements at an emotional level and the patient recovered social and work  functioning. The need to use psychological treatments for people with delusional disorder as first choice treatment must be considered.

  20. Delusional disorder: an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Joseph; Krishnadas, Ranjit; Gopalakrishnan, Rajesh; Kuruvilla, Anju

    2014-10-01

    Delusions with a sexual theme are rare, but when present are usually seen in patients with schizophrenia or other chronic psychotic disorders. We report a case of delusional disorder, with a single belief of a sexual theme. This report focuses on the management issues, wherein a combination of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions proved helpful.

  1. Delusional Disorder: An Unusual Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Noel; Ranjit Krishnadas; Rajesh Gopalakrishnan; Anju Kuruvilla

    2014-01-01

    Delusions with a sexual theme are rare, but when present are usually seen in patients with schizophrenia or other chronic psychotic disorders. We report a case of delusional disorder, with a single belief of a sexual theme. This report focuses on the management issues, wherein a combination of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions proved helpful.

  2. Delusional Disorder in a Patient with Corpus Callosum Agenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, M. S.; Saha, Rashmita; Doval, Nimisha

    2016-01-01

    Agenesis of corpus callosum is rare and associated neuropsychiatric abnormalities reported are epilepsy, Asperger’s syndrome, learning problems, depression, schizophrenia, conduct disorder and conversion symptoms. Schizophrenia is the most common psychiatric disorder reported among corpus callosum agenesis. We report a rare case of delusional disorder with corpus callosum agenesis and seizure disorder. The patient presented with delusions of persecution towards younger brother and mother, dis...

  3. Deficits in executive and memory processes in delusional disorder: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez-Casas, Inmaculada; De Portugal, Enrique; Gonzalez, Nieves; McKenney, Kathryn A; Haro, Josep M; Usall, Judith; Perez-Garcia, Miguel; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Delusional disorder has been traditionally considered a psychotic syndrome that does not evolve to cognitive deterioration. However, to date, very little empirical research has been done to explore cognitive executive components and memory processes in Delusional Disorder patients. This study will investigate whether patients with delusional disorder are intact in both executive function components (such as flexibility, impulsivity and updating components) and memory processes (such as immediate, short term and long term recall, learning and recognition). A large sample of patients with delusional disorder (n = 86) and a group of healthy controls (n = 343) were compared with regard to their performance in a broad battery of neuropsychological tests including Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Colour-Word Stroop Test, and Complutense Verbal Learning Test (TAVEC). When compared to controls, cases of delusional disorder showed a significantly poorer performance in most cognitive tests. Thus, we demonstrate deficits in flexibility, impulsivity and updating components of executive functions as well as in memory processes. These findings held significant after taking into account sex, age, educational level and premorbid IQ. Our results do not support the traditional notion of patients with delusional disorder being cognitively intact.

  4. Deficits in executive and memory processes in delusional disorder: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Ibanez-Casas

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Delusional disorder has been traditionally considered a psychotic syndrome that does not evolve to cognitive deterioration. However, to date, very little empirical research has been done to explore cognitive executive components and memory processes in Delusional Disorder patients. This study will investigate whether patients with delusional disorder are intact in both executive function components (such as flexibility, impulsivity and updating components and memory processes (such as immediate, short term and long term recall, learning and recognition. METHODS: A large sample of patients with delusional disorder (n = 86 and a group of healthy controls (n = 343 were compared with regard to their performance in a broad battery of neuropsychological tests including Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Colour-Word Stroop Test, and Complutense Verbal Learning Test (TAVEC. RESULTS: When compared to controls, cases of delusional disorder showed a significantly poorer performance in most cognitive tests. Thus, we demonstrate deficits in flexibility, impulsivity and updating components of executive functions as well as in memory processes. These findings held significant after taking into account sex, age, educational level and premorbid IQ. CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not support the traditional notion of patients with delusional disorder being cognitively intact.

  5. Abductive inference and delusional belief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltheart, Max; Menzies, Peter; Sutton, John

    2010-01-01

    Delusional beliefs have sometimes been considered as rational inferences from abnormal experiences. We explore this idea in more detail, making the following points. First, the abnormalities of cognition that initially prompt the entertaining of a delusional belief are not always conscious and since we prefer to restrict the term "experience" to consciousness we refer to "abnormal data" rather than "abnormal experience". Second, we argue that in relation to many delusions (we consider seven) one can clearly identify what the abnormal cognitive data are which prompted the delusion and what the neuropsychological impairment is which is responsible for the occurrence of these data; but one can equally clearly point to cases where this impairment is present but delusion is not. So the impairment is not sufficient for delusion to occur: a second cognitive impairment, one that affects the ability to evaluate beliefs, must also be present. Third (and this is the main thrust of our paper), we consider in detail what the nature of the inference is that leads from the abnormal data to the belief. This is not deductive inference and it is not inference by enumerative induction; it is abductive inference. We offer a Bayesian account of abductive inference and apply it to the explanation of delusional belief.

  6. Neuropsychological profile of delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leposavić, Ivana; Leposavić, Ljubica; Jasović-Gasić, Miroslava

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies concerned with neuropsychological aspect of delusions, were mainly focused on specific forms of this disorder, such as Cotard or Capgras type of delusions. Comparatively small numbers of investigations were concerned with cognitive deficiencies accompanying the delusions. The substance of this study includes the detection of neuropsychological dysfunctions in patients with delusional disorder, and tracing of these cognitive distortions to appropriate brain regions. The investigation is designed as a comparative study. Inpatients with delusion are compared with normal subjects from the aspect of the following cognitive functions: attention, memory, visuospatial and visuoconstruction organization, executive ability, verbal divergent thinking. Attention, memory (verbal modality) and psychomotor skill tasks are most susceptible to delusional effects. The neuropsychological profile of patients with delusional disorder includes impediment of complex attention modalities. From this primary disorder, there also stems a disorder of verbal memory in the sense of reduced recognition. These cognitive distortions suggest a dysfunction of the anterior regions of the cerebrum, mainly of the prefrontal and sinistral temporal regions.

  7. Prevalence of delusional jealousy in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyka, Michael; Schmidt, Peggy

    2011-03-01

    Delusional jealousy is a known risk factor for violence and homicide, but little is known about its prevalence in psychiatric disorders. We therefore reviewed retrospectively the psychopathological symptoms at admission and discharge, assessed with the AMDP system, of all patients admitted to the Psychiatric Hospital, University of Munich, Germany, from January 2000 through December 2008 (n=14,309). We identified 72 cases of delusional jealousy (0.5% of the whole sample). The prevalence was highest in schizophrenia and other psychoses (1.3%), and more of the patients with delusional jealousy were men (43 of 72, 59.7%). One-fifth (15 of 72, 20.8%) of the patients with delusional jealousy were aggressive at admission (vs. 6.2% of the total sample). We conclude that delusional jealousy is a comparatively rare phenomenon that is most frequent in schizophrenia and related psychoses. Quite a number of affected patients are aggressive, which may indicate a risk of future violence.

  8. Midbrain activation during Pavlovian conditioning and delusional symptoms in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Liana; Honey, Garry D; King, Julia R L; Whalley, Heather C; McIntosh, Andrew M; Levita, Liat; Hughes, Mark; Johnstone, Eve C; Day, Mark; Lawrie, Stephen M; Hall, Jeremy

    2010-12-01

    Recent theories have suggested that the inappropriate activation of limbic motivational systems in response to neutral stimuli may underlie the development of delusions in schizophrenia. To investigate the activation of the amygdala, midbrain, and ventral striatum during an aversive pavlovian conditioning task in patients with schizophrenia and healthy control participants using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Cross-sectional case-control functional neuroimaging study. Academic medical center. Twenty patients with DSM-IV-diagnosed schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 20 healthy control participants. Regional brain activation as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygen level-dependent responses, and delusional symptom severity on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Patients with schizophrenia showed abnormal activation of the amygdala, midbrain, and ventral striatum during conditioning. Activation of the midbrain in response to neutral rather than aversive cues during conditioning was correlated with the severity of delusional symptoms in the patient group (corrected P = .04). Inappropriate activation of the midbrain in response to neutral stimuli during conditioning is associated with the severity of delusional symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

  9. [Delusional disorder: clinical picture and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenitza, Irene María

    2012-01-01

    In 1987, the revision of the DSM-III reintroduced the concept of paranoia under the name of delusional disorder. Most of the actual evidence about the pharmacological treatment of this disorder is derived from case series and case reports. Antipsychotics have been used for the treatment of delusional disorder since 1970s, with pimozide as a first line drug. The introduction of second generation antipsychotics changed the treatment of the disorder. In spite of the available information, delusional disorder remains to this day a controversial and complex disorder.

  10. Delusional Disorder in a Patient with Corpus Callosum Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, M S; Saha, Rashmita; Doval, Nimisha

    2016-12-01

    Agenesis of corpus callosum is rare and associated neuropsychiatric abnormalities reported are epilepsy, Asperger's syndrome, learning problems, depression, schizophrenia, conduct disorder and conversion symptoms. Schizophrenia is the most common psychiatric disorder reported among corpus callosum agenesis. We report a rare case of delusional disorder with corpus callosum agenesis and seizure disorder. The patient presented with delusions of persecution towards younger brother and mother, disturbed sleep and reduced appetite. She had a history of seizure disorder of ten years duration, which was controlled with carbamazepine and levetiracetam. Neurological examination was normal. On MRI, corpus callosum agenesis was detected. She was put on an atypical antipsychotic quetiapine to which her psychiatric symptoms responded completely.

  11. Olanzapine vs Sulpiride in Treating Delusional Syndrome after Acute Cerebral Vascular Disease%奥氮平与舒必利治疗急性脑血管疾病后妄想综合征比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐斌

    2013-01-01

    目的观察奥氮平治疗急性脑血管疾病后妄想综合征的疗效。方法 急性脑血管疾病后妄想综合征病人100例,分为2组奥氮平组50例,男性28例,女性22例,年龄(60±S11)岁,给予奥氮平2.5mg/d逐渐加至5~10mg/d、PO×4周;舒必利组50例,男性26例,女性24例,年龄(62±S13)岁,给予舒必利0.3g/d逐渐加至0.4~0.6g/d、PO×4周。结果奥氮平组和舒必利组经过4WK的治疗后总有效率分别为88%和83%(P>0.05)、两组在2周末有效率分别为78%和26%(P<0.05)。结论 奥氮平治疗急性脑血管疾病后妄想综合征与舒必利对比显效早、药物不良反应少且轻。%Objective:To observe the effects of olanzapine for curing delusions syndrome after acute cerebral vascular disease(ACVD).Method:One hundred patients with ACVD were divided into two groups; olanzapine group (50 patients) male28, female22, age(60±12)a. were given olanzapine 2.5mg/d with gradual increase dosage of 5~10>mg/d, po× 4wk;Sulpiride group of 50 patients, M26, F24, age(62±13)a, sulpiride 0.3g/d also with gradual increase of dosage into 0.4~0.6g/d, po for 4weeks. Result: After 4weeks, the general effective rates of olanzapine group and sulpivide group were 88% and 80%, respectively(P>0.05), those of two group by the end of 2weeks were 78% and 26%, respectively(P<0.05). Conclusion: Delusional syndrome disappearing after ACVD with olanzapine is earlier than sulpiride with more effective results and less adverse reactions.

  12. A systematic literature review on delusional parasitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohammed Lutfi Al-Imam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To collect detailed up-to-date knowledge, using a detailed systematic review of the literature, that is specific to the condition of Ekbom Syndrome, also known as Delusional Parasitosis (DP. This article will review: Historical facts, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, subtypes and related conditions, associated diseases, psychosocial impact, economic considerations and treatment. Background: DP is a psychiatric condition and can be the earliest sign of a major psychotic illness. The condition was described as early as the late 17th century in France. The etiology is neuro-chemical. The classic “matchbox” and “specimen” signs can lead to a successful diagnosis. Treatment is via a multidisciplinary approach. Methods: A detailed search strategy was utilized across six databases led by pre-specified keywords (62 in number, followed by the application of database-specific filters to scrutinize the hierarchy of literature, from guidelines, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials to medical papers with weak evidence, including anecdotal reports. One article was translated from French. Results: Forty references were used to extract the most relevant data. This article is divided into sections of topics, starting from methodology to a conclusion. Conclusion: This review article will enable the medical researcher to obtain a detailed perspective of the condition of DP. Thus, a researcher can seek the highest available evidence from the literature and use it as a starting point for his original research.

  13. Delusional Parasitosis: Clinical Features, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Karakus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Delusional parasitosis is a delusional disorder in which the patient has the false and persistent belief that he is infested by some type of parasite or small living creatures. The disease has been called under different names such as “Ekbom syndrome” or psychogenic parasitosis in the last century. Delusional parasitosis is divided into primary, secondary functional and secondary organic groups. The female-to-male ratio in delusional parasitosis is approximately 2:1.Delusional parasitosis is associated in 5-15% of shared psychotic disorder and can run within a family (folie a familie. The diagnosis is one of exclusion, and other diseases that can also cause a sensation of itching should be considered, investigated, and treated if present. Lack of treatment might cause delusional symptoms to gain chronicity, and might further complicate treatment response. Antipsychotics, antidepressants, electroconvulsive therapy, and in the presence of dermatological lesions some topical dermatological agents and antihistaminics are used in the treatment of this disorder.

  14. The prevalence of delusional disorder in prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburello, Anthony C; Bajgier, Joanna; Reeves, Rusty

    2015-03-01

    Delusional disorder has important implications for forensic psychiatrists, as delusions are not infrequently related to criminal behavior. Thus, we hypothesized that delusional disorder is over-represented in correctional populations. We conducted a retrospective chart review of the electronic medical records from 2000 to 2012 of New Jersey Department of Corrections inmates who remained incarcerated as of March 2012. Potential cases of delusional disorder were initially identified by using a search for current or past diagnoses of such disorders or other diagnoses that could be misdiagnosed cases. After an initial chart review identified an inmate as having probable delusional disorder according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria, the diagnosis was confirmed by at least one concurring independent review. We estimate a point prevalence of 0.24 percent for delusional disorder in our population, which is eight times higher than that expected in the community. © 2015 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  15. Are delusional contents replayed during dreams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Armando; Aletti, Giacomo; Carboni, Martina; Cavallotti, Simone; Limosani, Ivan; Manzone, Marialaura; Scarone, Silvio

    2013-09-01

    The relationship between dream content and waking life experiences remains difficult to decipher. However, some neurobiological findings suggest that dreaming can, at least in part, be considered epiphenomenal to ongoing memory consolidation processes in sleep. Both abnormalities in sleep architecture and impairment in memory consolidation mechanisms are thought to be involved in the development of psychosis. The objective of this study was to assess the continuity between delusional contents and dreams in acutely psychotic patients. Ten patients with a single fixed and recurring delusional content were asked to report their dreams during an acute psychotic break. Sixteen judges with four different levels of acquaintance to the specific content of the patients' delusions were asked to group the dreams, expecting that fragments of the delusional thought would guide the task. A mathematical index (f,t) was developed in order to compare correct groupings between the four groups of judges. Most judges grouped the dreams slightly above chance level and no relevant differences could be found between the four groups [F(3,12)=1.297; p=n.s.]. Scoring of dreams for specific delusional themes suggested a continuity in terms of dream and waking mentation for two contents (Grandiosity and Religion). These findings seem to suggest that at least some delusional contents recur within patients' dreams. Future studies will need to determine whether such continuity reflects ongoing consolidation processes that are relevant to current theories of delusion formation and stabilization.

  16. Ziprasidone in the Treatment of Delusional Parasitosis

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    P. Contreras-Ferrer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Delusional parasitosis is characterized by a patient’s fixed false belief of being infested with parasites or small creatures. The first-line treatment options are typical antipsychotics such as pimozide. However, the accompanying extrapyramidal side effects might limit their use. We report on a patient with a good response to pimozide combined with ziprasidone. Ziprasidone is an atypical antipsychotic drug with a lower risk of extrapyramidal symptoms; thus, it might be considered a good first or second treatment option for delusional parasitosis.

  17. Autopsy-confirmed hippocampal-sparing Alzheimer's disease with delusional jealousy as initial manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Iritani, Shuji; Hattori, Miho; Sekiguchi, Hirotaka; Matsunaga, Shinji; Habuchi, Chikako; Torii, Youta; Umeda, Kentaro; Ozaki, Norio; Yoshida, Mari; Fujita, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is clinically characterized by gradual onset over years with worsening of cognition. The initial and most prominent cognitive deficit is commonly memory dysfunction. However, a subset of AD cases has less hippocampal atrophy than would be expected relative to the predominance of cortical atrophy. These hippocampal-sparing cases have distinctive clinical features, including the presence of focal cortical clinical syndromes. Given that previous studies have indicated that severe hippocampal atrophy corresponds to prominent loss of episodic memory, it is likely that memory impairment is initially absent in hippocampal-sparing AD cases. Here, we report on a patient with an 8-year history of delusional jealousy with insidious onset who was clinically diagnosed as possible AD and pathologically confirmed to have AD with relatively preserved neurons in the hippocampus. This patient had delusional jealousy with a long pre-dementia stage, which initially was characterized by lack of memory impairment. Head magnetic resonance imaging findings showed preserved hippocampal volume with bilateral enlarged ventricles and mild-to-moderate cortical atrophy. Head single-photon emission computed tomography revealed severely decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the right temporal lobe. The resolution of the delusion was attributed to pharmacotherapy by an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, suggesting that the occurrence of delusional jealousy was due to the disease process of AD. Although the neural basis of delusional jealousy remains unclear, this hippocampal-sparing AD case may be classified as an atypical presentation of AD.

  18. Social cognition in "pure" delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bömmer, Isabel; Brüne, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Introduction. Delusional disorders are characterised by monothematic, "encapsulated" and incorrigible false beliefs and misinterpretations of social signals. Due to the rarity of cases with "pure" delusional disorder (DD) in clinical settings most studies of social cognition in delusional patients have focused on patients with paranoid schizophrenia. In the present study we sought to examine emotion recognition, theory of mind abilities, and pragmatic language comprehension in patients with delusional disorder. Methods. Social cognition was assessed in 21 patients recruited over a 3-year period who were diagnosed with delusional disorder, paranoid, erotomanic, or jealous type. In addition to an emotion recognition and theory of mind test battery, we included a novel German Proverb Test, which has been found indicative of subtle theory of mind deficits in schizophrenic patients. Executive functioning was assessed using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Psychopathology was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS). Patients' task performance was compared to a group of 22 healthy control persons paralleled for verbal intelligence, education, and age. Results. Patients with DD made significantly more perseverative errors in the WCST, they performed more poorly on the theory of mind tasks and the proverb test, but were unimpaired in basic emotion recognition abilities relative to controls. When executive functioning was co-varied out, the group differences in theory of mind disappeared, whereas the greater propensity of patients with DD to interpret proverbs literally remained significant. Conclusions. In "pure" DD the basic social cognitive abilities appear to be preserved. Difficulties in metaphorical speech comprehension and executive functioning could, however, indicate more subtle social cognitive deficits in these patients.

  19. Delusional Disorder in a Patient with Corpus Callosum Agenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rashmita; Doval, Nimisha

    2016-01-01

    Agenesis of corpus callosum is rare and associated neuropsychiatric abnormalities reported are epilepsy, Asperger’s syndrome, learning problems, depression, schizophrenia, conduct disorder and conversion symptoms. Schizophrenia is the most common psychiatric disorder reported among corpus callosum agenesis. We report a rare case of delusional disorder with corpus callosum agenesis and seizure disorder. The patient presented with delusions of persecution towards younger brother and mother, disturbed sleep and reduced appetite. She had a history of seizure disorder of ten years duration, which was controlled with carbamazepine and levetiracetam. Neurological examination was normal. On MRI, corpus callosum agenesis was detected. She was put on an atypical antipsychotic quetiapine to which her psychiatric symptoms responded completely. PMID:28208982

  20. Nuclear counter effect and pi-e misidentification

    CERN Document Server

    Zürcher, D

    2000-01-01

    The e sup+-/pi sup+- discrimination within the CMS(1) ECAL is investigated using GEANT simulations and the 1998 test beam results. If one takes into account the energy left in the ECAL crystals alone (i.e. without read-out effects), the probability that a pi sup+- leaves more than 95% of its initial energy decreases from about 0.01% for 10 GeV to about 0.001% for 50 GeV. The Nuclear Counter Effect within the Avalanche Photo-Diodes (APD) enhances the probability of an electron misidentification. With the expected value of this effect (approx 100 MeV), this probability appears then to be between 0.2% and 0.01% for initial momenta varying, respectively, between 5 and 50 GeV. Important consequences of the pion-electron misidentification could appear in the form of new possible backgrounds for physics channels.

  1. HIGH PREVALENCE OF DELUSIONAL PARASITOSIS IN AN INDIAN SETTING

    OpenAIRE

    Hebbar, Sudhir; Ahuja, N.; Chandrasekaran, R.

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiology and the study of subtypes of delusional disorders is a poorly researched area. This study tries to fill this lacuna and provides the evidence contrary to the accepted fact that the persecutory type is the most common subtype of persistent delusional disorder (paranoia). Out of 4234 patients who attended psychiatry outpatient department during the year 1994-1997, 45 patients received the ICD-10 diagnosis of persistent delusional disorder. Charts of these patients were used for the...

  2. Delusional Disorder, Erotomanic Type, Exacerbated by Social Media Use

    OpenAIRE

    Justin Faden; Jonathan Levin; Ronak Mistry; Jessica Wang

    2017-01-01

    Erotomania is an uncommon form of delusional disorder in which an individual has an unfounded belief that another is in love with him. Previous case reports have shown that social media networks may play a role in worsening delusional beliefs. We report the case of a 24-year-old male college student that utilized social media to stalk a female college student, resulting in his suspension from school and hospitalization. The student was diagnosed with delusional disorder, erotomanic type, and ...

  3. [Acute delusional disorder with dissociative symptoms--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małyszczak, Krzysztof; Pawłowski, Tomasz; Tersa, Kamila

    2006-01-01

    Delusions are amongst the main symptoms of schizophrenia. Delusional states may be caused by stress, somatic illness, or may be idiopathic, such as the persistent delusional disorder. Determination of a cause is usually difficult, but it is really important for the treatment. A case report of acute delusional disorder complicated by dissociative symptoms, suggesting an organic cause of the disorder is presented. Delirium caused by neuroleptic intoxication was an additional complication. Detailed informations gathered from relatives and psychological examinations made it possible to determine personality disorder as a ground, and stress as a precipitating factor of acute delusional disorder. Hospitalisation and psychological support helped in getting rid of the psychotic symptoms.

  4. Delusional disorder as a partial psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opjordsmoen, Stein

    2014-03-01

    In his textbook from 1838, Esquirol made the first comprehensive psychopathological description of paranoia, which he labeled partial psychosis. This was a condition with encapsulated, well organized, and persistent delusions. These are defended with a great deal of emotions and sharp argument. The individual appears quite convincing, especially because he or she otherwise behaves rationally. The intellectual capacity is used to achieve defined goals according to the delusional content. This condition is difficult to uncover because of dissimulation and adaptation. The frequency in the population is unknown, but the condition is rare in psychiatric treatment facilities, and usually only when the persons become litigious or criminal. In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, the condition is covered by the concept of delusional disorder, but that concept also comprises benign acute/subacute conditions as well as cases that turn out to have the diagnosis changed to schizophrenia.

  5. Folie a Famille: Delusional parasitosis affecting all the members of a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Elizabeth

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Delusional parasitosis (Ekbom syndrome is an uncommon psychiatric disorder that presents with a delusion of being infested with parasites. Treatment of this condition is difficult as patients with this paranoid disorder reject psychiatric diagnosis and treatment and often consult a dermatologist. Sharing the delusional beliefs of the paranoid patient by other people living in close emotional bonding with him/her could occur. We report here the clinically interesting phenomenon of delusion of parasitosis occurring simultaneously in all the members of a family. There was a pathological bonding between the members of the family who all presented to the dermatologist and rejected treatment. Dermatologists need to be aware of this uncommon clinical picture.

  6. Paranoid atmospheres: Psychiatric knowledge and delusional realities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlimme Jann E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper I investigate the topic of paranoid atmospheres. This subject is especially of interest with respect to persons who are deluded, and also, I will demonstrate, sheds light upon the psychiatrist's "gaze" and knowledge of delusions. In my argument I will follow a path initially outlined by Karl Jaspers (1883-1969: modern psychiatric diagnosis of delusions is a diagnosis of form and not content. Jaspers' emphasis on the form of delusions enables psychiatrists to be self-critical about their professional knowledge and, consequently, prevent the development of dogmatic attitudes. In accord with Jaspers, my argument will focus on the basic structure of delusions and highlight the difference between delusional realities and non-delusional realities, a difference that follows from the possibility of self-criticism of one's own conscious and explicit convictions. I will demonstrate the importance of self-criticism with regard to paranoid atmospheres and also to psychiatric knowledge. In this manner, an understanding of delusions as lived experience will be developed, which argues that an escalation of the influence of delusional convictions, resulting in a profoundly paranoid atmosphere, is most problematic for the deluded person. To acknowledge this insight mirrors the need for a self-critique of psychiatric discourse, encourages an empathic and respectful relationship between professionals and deluded patients, and enables deluded persons to restrict their paranoid atmosphere. It is the main conclusion of my paper that a deluded person cannot do (with respect to his delusional convictions what a psychiatrist must do (with respect to his psychiatric knowledge and his own existential convictions in order to prevent a profoundly paranoid atmosphere in their relationship: be self-critical.

  7. Delusional infestation: are you being bugged?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakkar A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Angeli Thakkar, Kenneth GJ Ooi, Nagi Assaad, Minas Coroneo Department of Ophthalmology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: This case report documents a 58-year-old male who presented to the clinic with a 12-month history of a burrowing sensation in his eyelids that he attributed to a parasitic infestation. After being extensively investigated and reviewed by relevant specialties, no evidence of parasitic infestation was found. He was diagnosed with and treated for blepharitis. Psychiatric referral for presumed delusional infestation (DI was recommended. Despite this, he remained insistent in his belief of infestation, and was inevitably lost to follow-up. DI, previously known as delusional parasitosis, is a rare delusional disorder where affected individuals have a fixed, false belief that they have a parasitic infestation. Diagnosis can be challenging. Practitioners need to evaluate between primary and secondary DI carefully, as management differs depending on the etiology. Despite this, patients diagnosed with primary DI tend to be resistant to psychiatric referral. This report aims to optimize management by giving the reader a guideline for appropriate investigations and advice on patient approach. It is important to recognize hallmark features of DI to minimize self-inflicted trauma and associated psychosocial consequences. Effective treatment for DI is available, and devastating consequences, including blindness, can be avoided. Keywords: delusions, parasitosis, infestation, ocular trauma

  8. Delusional Disorders—Are They Simply Paranoid Schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marneros, Andreas; Pillmann, Frank; Wustmann, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article tries to give an answer to the question of whether International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) persistent delusional disorder (PDD) or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) delusional disorder (DD) is simply paranoid schizophrenia (PS). Because ICD-10 PDD and DSM-IV DD are identical, we use DD as a synonym. Methods: A prospective and longitudinal study compared all inpatients with DD treated at the Halle-Wittenberg university hospital during a 14-year period with a previously investigated selected cohort of patients with PS. Sociodemographic data, symptomatology, course, and outcome parameters were examined using standardized instruments. The duration of the follow-up period in patients with DD was 10.8 years and for the PS patients 12.9 years. Results: Significant differences between DD and PS were found: DD patients are, in comparison to patients with PS, significantly older at onset. Less of their first-degree relatives have mental disorders. They less frequently come from a broken home situation. First-rank symptoms, relevant negative symptoms, and primary hallucinations did not occur in patients with DD. Patients with DD were less frequently hospitalized, and the duration of their hospitalization was shorter. Their outcome is much better regarding employment, early retirement due to the disorder, and psychopharmacological medication. They more often had stable heterosexual partnerships and were autarkic. They had lower scores in the Disability Assessment Scale and in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. The diagnosis of DD is very stable over time. Conclusions: The findings of this study support the assumption that DDs are a separate entity and only exceptionally can be a prodrome of schizophrenia. PMID:21078814

  9. Delusional disorders--are they simply paranoid schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marneros, Andreas; Pillmann, Frank; Wustmann, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    This article tries to give an answer to the question of whether International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) persistent delusional disorder (PDD) or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) delusional disorder (DD) is simply paranoid schizophrenia (PS). Because ICD-10 PDD and DSM-IV DD are identical, we use DD as a synonym. A prospective and longitudinal study compared all inpatients with DD treated at the Halle-Wittenberg university hospital during a 14-year period with a previously investigated selected cohort of patients with PS. Sociodemographic data, symptomatology, course, and outcome parameters were examined using standardized instruments. The duration of the follow-up period in patients with DD was 10.8 years and for the PS patients 12.9 years. Significant differences between DD and PS were found: DD patients are, in comparison to patients with PS, significantly older at onset. Less of their first-degree relatives have mental disorders. They less frequently come from a broken home situation. First-rank symptoms, relevant negative symptoms, and primary hallucinations did not occur in patients with DD. Patients with DD were less frequently hospitalized, and the duration of their hospitalization was shorter. Their outcome is much better regarding employment, early retirement due to the disorder, and psychopharmacological medication. They more often had stable heterosexual partnerships and were autarkic. They had lower scores in the Disability Assessment Scale and in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. The diagnosis of DD is very stable over time. The findings of this study support the assumption that DDs are a separate entity and only exceptionally can be a prodrome of schizophrenia.

  10. Coexistência das síndromes de Capgras e Frégoli associadas à redução de volume frontotemporal e hiperintensidades em substância branca cerebral Coexistence of Capgras and Frégoli syndromes associated to frontotemporal volume reduction and cerebral white matter hyperintensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizela Turkiewicz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Transtornos delirantes de identificação são condições nas quais os pacientes identificam de maneira patologicamente equivocada pessoas, lugares, objetos ou eventos. Esses transtornos têm sido categorizados em quatro diferentes subtipos: Capgras, Frégoli, intermetamorfose e síndrome do duplo subjetivo. Tais síndromes podem estar presentes em diferentes transtornos psiquiátricos, como esquizofrenia e transtornos do humor, bem como em diferentes doenças neurológicas, como Alzheimer, Parkinson, lesões cerebrais traumáticas ou vasculares. OBJETIVOS: Descrever e discutir um caso de coexistência entre as síndromes de Capgras e Frégoli em uma paciente com esquizofrenia paranoide e com alterações cerebrais. MÉTODOS: Entrevista psiquiátrica e ressonância magnética de crânio. RESULTADOS: A paciente apresentava hiperintensidades periventriculares em aquisição flair e de substância branca subcortical concentradas principalmente na região frontotemporal direita, bem como perda do volume da região frontotemporal bilateral. DISCUSSÃO: As alterações descritas podem representar substrato orgânico das síndromes dos transtornos delirantes de identificação. Os delírios nas síndromes de Capgras e Frégoli podem ocorrer como resultado de uma desconexão têmporo-límbica-frontal direita, resultando em uma impossibilidade de associar memórias prévias a novas informações, levando consequentemente a alterações na capacidade de reconhecimento. Ademais, uma perda do volume de tais regiões cerebrais também pode desempenhar papel importante no desenvolvimento de tais síndromes delirantes de identificação.BACKGROUND: Delusional misidentification syndromes are conditions in which the patients pathologically misidentify people, places, objects or events. They have been categorized in four subtypes: Capgras, Frégoli, intermetamorphosis and subjective double syndromes. Such syndromes may be present in patients with

  11. Delusional infestation: an Australian multicentre study of 23 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M M A; Iredell, J R; Packham, D R; O'Sullivan, M V N; Hudson, B J

    2015-04-01

    Delusional infestation remains a debilitating condition that is therapeutically challenging for clinicians. This case series identifies 23 patients with delusional infestation in an Australian setting. The majority of patients are women and unlikely to have a psychiatric comorbid background. The use of unnecessary anti-parasitic medication is prevalent. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  12. Paranoid Disorders: The Core of Truth behind the Delusional System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffman, Mordecai

    1981-01-01

    The first paper in a series of articles reporting the findings, life course, and psychiatric outcomes of a group of 34 families where at least one member of the family developed a delusional system. Discusses several issues regarding the genesis, ways of reinforcement, and perpetuation of the delusional ideation. (Author)

  13. INDUCED DELUSIONAL DISORDER IN AN ADOLESCENT : A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, K.; Manickam, L. Sam S.

    1997-01-01

    Induced delusional disorder or folie a deux in a 19 year old girl from India whose 16 years old younger sister had paranoid schizophrenia is described. Transient sharing of delusional beliefs by those living with the patients may be an extension of unsubstantiated beliefs held by the community.

  14. Atypical delusional content in a case of persistent delusional disorder: freud revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Jayaprakash; Arumugam, Shanmugiah; Thamizh, Jaiganesh S

    2014-10-01

    Persistent delusional disorder is diagnosed when a person exhibits non-bizzare delusions of at least 1 month's duration that cannot be attributed to other psychiatric disorders. Delusions are subdivided according to their content into various types. Here we report a case with unusual content of delusion.

  15. Atypical Delusional Content in a Case of Persistent Delusional Disorder: Freud Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaprakash Ramasamy; Shanmugiah Arumugam; Thamizh, Jaiganesh S.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent delusional disorder is diagnosed when a person exhibits non-bizzare delusions of at least 1 month′s duration that cannot be attributed to other psychiatric disorders. Delusions are subdivided according to their content into various types. Here we report a case with unusual content of delusion.

  16. Familial aggregation of delusional proneness in schizophrenia and bipolar pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürhoff, Franck; Szöke, Andrei; Méary, Alexandre; Bellivier, Frank; Rouillon, Frédéric; Pauls, David; Leboyer, Marion

    2003-07-01

    Clinical, familial, and, more recently, genetic linkage studies suggest that overlapping genetic susceptibility might contribute to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. To identify a potential psychotic dimension common to families of both bipolar and schizophrenia probands, the authors tested if delusional proneness was observed among first-degree relatives of bipolar and schizophrenia probands. The authors included 32 schizophrenia probands and 61 bipolar probands and their respective first-degree relatives (N=63 and N=59). They were all interviewed with the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies, and delusional proneness was assessed with a self-report questionnaire, the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory. Schizophrenia and bipolar probands were subdivided into subgroups according to the intensity of delusional symptoms assessed by Peters et al. Delusions Inventory scores, and the authors compared delusional proneness in their respective first-degree relatives. Familial aggregation of delusional proneness was demonstrated, since Peters et al. Delusions Inventory scores were higher among nonschizophrenic first-degree relatives of schizophrenia probands with productive symptoms and among first-degree relatives of bipolar probands with psychotic features during their affective episodes. The authors also found an intrafamilial correlation of delusional proneness scores in nonaffected siblings of schizophrenia and bipolar probands. Delusional proneness appears to be an inherited predisposition common to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. In the future, this dimension might be valuable when used as a quantitative phenotype in linkage and association studies.

  17. Delusional disorder: Study from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Biswas, Parthasarathy; Avasthi, Ajit

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to study sociodemographic profile, clinical parameters including comorbidity, usefulness of antipsychotics especially atypicals, family history, and follow-up rates for delusional disorder. The records of all subjects who were seen in the Department of Psychiatry during a period of 10 years (i.e. 1994-2003) were reviewed. Eighty-eight subjects fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled. The sample consisted predominantly of female subjects (55.7%), most of the total subjects were married and had favorable social functioning. The most common delusion was persecutory (54.5%), followed by delusion of reference (46.6%). The majority of the subjects had a comorbid psychiatric disorder. Education was negatively correlated with age at onset and positively correlated with the number of delusions. Age at onset was negatively correlated with total number of delusions. The sociodemographic profile of delusional disorder is consistent across various cultures, has high comorbidity and, when treated appropriately, responds to various antipsychotic agents.

  18. Delusional versus nondelusional body dysmorphic disorder: recommendations for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Hart, Ashley S; Simpson, Helen Blair; Stein, Dan J

    2014-02-01

    The core feature of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is distressing or impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defects in one's physical appearance. BDD beliefs are characterized by varying degrees of insight, ranging from good (ie, recognition that one's BDD beliefs are not true) through "absent insight/delusional" beliefs (ie, complete conviction that one's BDD beliefs are true). The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd ed., rev. (DSM-III-R) and The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) classified BDD's nondelusional form in the somatoform section of the manual and its delusional form in the psychosis section, as a type of delusional disorder, somatic type (although DSM-IV allowed double-coding of delusional BDD as both a psychotic disorder and BDD). However, little or no evidence on this issue was available when these editions were published. In this article, we review the classification of BDD's delusional and nondelusional variants in earlier editions of DSM and the limitations of their approaches. We then review empirical evidence on this topic, which has become available since DSM-IV was developed. Available evidence indicates that across a range of validators, BDD's delusional and nondelusional variants have many more similarities than differences, including response to pharmacotherapy. Based on these data, we propose that BDD's delusional and nondelusional forms be classified as the same disorder and that BDD's diagnostic criteria include an insight specifier that spans a range of insight, including absent insight/delusional BDD beliefs. We hope that this recommendation will improve care for patients with this common and often-severe disorder. This increased understanding of BDD may also have implications for other disorders that have an "absent insight/delusional" form.

  19. Awareness of illness and suicidal behavior in delusional disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Molina-Andreu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The relationship between insight and suicidal behavior among psychotic patients is poorly studied and possibly mediated by clinical variables. Objectives Our goal was to investigate clinical differences in suicidal and non-suicidal delusional disorder (DD patients, and to evaluate the relationship between insight, psychotic and depressive symptoms. Methods Cross-sectional study in 64 consecutive DD patients. For assessment, we used the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-17, the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS, the Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP, and the first three items of the SUMD scale for insight. The sample was divided according to the presence of suicide attempts. To investigate psychopathological associations, bivariate correlation coefficients were used. Age at onset served as covariate in subsequent analyses. Results Suicidal DD patients had higher depressive symptoms and were more frequently admitted than non-suicidal patients. A logistic regression model confirmed that insight, depressive symptoms and age at onset were predictors of suicidal behavior. Unawareness of the effects of medication was negatively related to depressive symptoms. After adjustment, depressive symptoms were weakly correlated to better insight into the effects of medication. No other statistically significant correlations were found. Discussion Depressive symptoms, insight and age at onset of disease may be potential predictors of suicidal behavior in DD patients.

  20. A Psychopathological Comparison between Delusional Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Negro, José Eduardo; Ibáñez-Casas, Inmaculada; de Portugal, Enrique; Lozano-Gutiérrez, Vanessa; Martínez-Leal, Rafael; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2017-01-01

    To contribute to a better differential clinical categorisation of delusional disorder (DD) versus schizophrenia (SZ) and to add and complete evidence from previous clinical studies of DD compared to schizophrenia. A cross-sectional study using a clinical sample of 275 patients (132 patients with DD) was studied. Patients were consecutively attending public clinics located in urban and rural areas in both Andalusia and Catalonia (Spain). All participants met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for either DD or SZ. Data were gathered on sociodemographics, illness duration, Barona-Index estimation of intelligence quotient (IQ), and global functioning, along with a thorough psychopathological assessment using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Comparisons between both groups were calculated using χ(2), Student t, and multivariate analysis of covariance tests. Patients with DD were older (mean [SD], 50.3 [14.6] years vs. 36.6 [11.1] years; t = 8.597; P ≤ 0.0001), were more frequently married (45.4% vs. 10.8%; χ(2) = 38.569; P ≤ 0.0001), and had a higher mean estimated premorbid IQ (111.4 vs. 105.4; t = 2.609; P ≤ 0.01). On the other hand, SZ patients were predominantly male (71.4% vs. 48.9%; χ(2) = 14.433; P ≤ 0.0001) and had greater work-related disability than DD patients (20.5% vs. 50.3%; χ(2) = 19.564; P ≤ 0.001). Overall, the DD group showed a less severe PANSS psychopathology than SZ group. Thus, total mean (SD) PANSS scores for schizophrenia and delusional disorder, respectively, were 76.2 (22.4) versus 54.1 (18.4) ( t = -8.762; P ≤ 0.0001). Moreover, patients with DD showed a better global functioning than those with SZ (62.7 [13.2] vs. 51.9 [16.9]; F = 44.114; P ≤ 0.0001). DD is a milder and distinct disorder compared to SZ in terms of psychopathology and global functionality.

  1. Delusional parasitosis with folie à deux: A case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Neena Sanjiv; Vispute, Chetan Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is characterized by single hypochondriacal delusion in which patient feels he/she is infested with insects. The authors present a case series of three cases of DP with shared psychotic disorder (folie à deux) in which one individual developed a delusional belief in the context of a close relationship with another person or people who already had an established delusional idea. All patients of DP were assessed in the outpatient department of Psychiatry of a tertiary care hospital. Diagnosis of DP was made on detail clinical history and supporting clinical findings. All our primary cases had DP and the accompanying relatives of our patients had folie à deux as they shared the belief of parasite infestation which was firm and persisted despite evidence to the contrary. The primary cases of delusional parasitosis responded well to oral risperidone. The intensity of the belief in the secondary person also reduced with improvement in the symptoms of the patients. PMID:26257494

  2. Delusional parasitosis with folie à deux: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Neena Sanjiv; Vispute, Chetan Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is characterized by single hypochondriacal delusion in which patient feels he/she is infested with insects. The authors present a case series of three cases of DP with shared psychotic disorder (folie à deux) in which one individual developed a delusional belief in the context of a close relationship with another person or people who already had an established delusional idea. All patients of DP were assessed in the outpatient department of Psychiatry of a tertiary care hospital. Diagnosis of DP was made on detail clinical history and supporting clinical findings. All our primary cases had DP and the accompanying relatives of our patients had folie à deux as they shared the belief of parasite infestation which was firm and persisted despite evidence to the contrary. The primary cases of delusional parasitosis responded well to oral risperidone. The intensity of the belief in the secondary person also reduced with improvement in the symptoms of the patients.

  3. Delusional Disorder, Erotomanic Type, Exacerbated by Social Media Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, Justin; Levin, Jonathan; Mistry, Ronak; Wang, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Erotomania is an uncommon form of delusional disorder in which an individual has an unfounded belief that another is in love with him. Previous case reports have shown that social media networks may play a role in worsening delusional beliefs. We report the case of a 24-year-old male college student that utilized social media to stalk a female college student, resulting in his suspension from school and hospitalization. The student was diagnosed with delusional disorder, erotomanic type, and started on risperidone. He showed little improvement and was transferred to another facility. This is the first identified case of social media triggering or exacerbating delusional disorder. We recommend increasing education on the ramifications of sharing personal information on social media.

  4. Delusional Disorder, Erotomanic Type, Exacerbated by Social Media Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Faden

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erotomania is an uncommon form of delusional disorder in which an individual has an unfounded belief that another is in love with him. Previous case reports have shown that social media networks may play a role in worsening delusional beliefs. We report the case of a 24-year-old male college student that utilized social media to stalk a female college student, resulting in his suspension from school and hospitalization. The student was diagnosed with delusional disorder, erotomanic type, and started on risperidone. He showed little improvement and was transferred to another facility. This is the first identified case of social media triggering or exacerbating delusional disorder. We recommend increasing education on the ramifications of sharing personal information on social media.

  5. Delusional Disorder, Erotomanic Type, Exacerbated by Social Media Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jonathan; Mistry, Ronak; Wang, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Erotomania is an uncommon form of delusional disorder in which an individual has an unfounded belief that another is in love with him. Previous case reports have shown that social media networks may play a role in worsening delusional beliefs. We report the case of a 24-year-old male college student that utilized social media to stalk a female college student, resulting in his suspension from school and hospitalization. The student was diagnosed with delusional disorder, erotomanic type, and started on risperidone. He showed little improvement and was transferred to another facility. This is the first identified case of social media triggering or exacerbating delusional disorder. We recommend increasing education on the ramifications of sharing personal information on social media. PMID:28367347

  6. Delusional Parasitosis : Series Of 25 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia M S

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A series 25 cases of delusional parasitosis is being reported. There were three cases below 45 years, 12 cases between 46-45 years and 11 cases above 55 years of age, 64% cases were females. A majority of cases (92% had insidious onset. The duration of symptoms in all the cases (except one was 6 months or more. 13 cases presented with infestation with insects over body and 10 cases with insects crawling over scalp. There were three cases each with diabetes mellitus and leprosy. Three cased had dementia, 2 cases had depression and one case presented with trichotillomania. Pimozide was used in22 cases, amitriptyline in 2 cases and fluoxetine in one. 14 cases (52% showed complete remission while receiving drug, 8 cases showed partial improvement and 3 cases did not respond.

  7. Paliperidone: another treatment option for delusional parasitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınöz, Ali Ercan; Tosun Altınöz, Şengül; Küçükkarapınar, Melike; Coşar, Behçet

    2014-12-01

    Patients with delusional parasitosis (DP) have a fixed belief of being infested by small pathogens. Typical and atypical antipsychotics are widely used for treating DP. There are limited controlled trials about the treatment of DP and the most useful antipsychotic agent is still unknown. Paliperidone treatment for DP will be demonstrated through two cases. One of these cases had previously used pimozide but had not responded to treatment. Both cases had remission from symptoms with paliperidone. There are only two case reports published about paliperidone treatment for DP. Paliperidone appears to have promise in the treatment of DP; however, more case reports and controlled trials are required. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  8. Delusional parasitosis--study of 3 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanumantha K

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available Delusional disorder-somatic (parasitosis type is a rare psychiatric disorder which poses a challenge to diagnostic and therapeutic skills. Pimozide, a highly specific dopamine blocker has shown promising results in the 3 cases illustrated here. These cases were seen over a period of 3 years. All the three patients believed that an insect has entered through the ear and is burrowing tracts/laying multiple eggs. They approached the ENT surgeons or neurosurgeon with a fear that their brain will be invaded. On psychiatric evaluation, no past or present history of major psychiatric illness was found. Premorbid personalities were well adjusted. Only for two patients, acute moderate stressors were detected. Delusions disappeared by the end of 2 wks but therapy was continued for 5 months.

  9. Delusional infestations: case series, differential diagnoses, and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H; Nesbitt, Lee T

    2014-01-01

    Physicians are not infrequently consulted by distraught patients with delusions of infestation who believe that they are infested with external or internal parasites and describe a crawling sensation of bugs or worms on or under their skin. Internet search engines were queried with the keywords as search terms to examine the latest articles on delusional infestations in order to describe presenting manifestations, differential diagnoses, and effective management strategies. The demographic and behavioral features of delusional infestations have remained constant and include: (1) onset in well-educated, middle-aged adults who are pet owners; (2) production of purported specimens of causative parasites; (3) pesticide overtreatment of themselves, their households, and pets; (4) excessive cleaning or vacuuming of households; (5) intense anger and resentment directed at physicians failing to confirm their self-diagnoses; and (6) sharing delusional symptoms with spouses or relatives. Although some reports have suggested that cases of delusional infestation are increasing today in the tropics, most studies have confirmed a stable incidence over time and similar disorder demographics worldwide. However, management strategies for delusional infestations have changed significantly over time with second generation, atypical antipsychotics offering safer adverse effect profiles and better prognoses than earlier therapies with first generation, typical antipsychotics. The most effective management strategies for delusional infestations include empathetic history-taking and active listening to the patient, careful exclusion of true parasitoses, and a therapeutic regimen that includes a second generation neuroleptic agent.

  10. Machiavellianism and executive functioning in patients with delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüne, Martin; Basilowski, Miriam; Bömmer, Isabel; Juckel, Georg; Assion, Hans-Jörg

    2010-02-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that patients with Delusional Disorder are impaired in executive functioning that affects performance on social cognitive tasks. In patients with Parkinson's disease, poor executive control induces an increase in "Machiavellianism," a term that refers to opportunistic behaviors that aim at exploiting and manipulating others. Accordingly, the association between Machiavellianism in Delusional Disorder and executive functioning deficits was examined. Machiavellianism and executive functioning were measured in 22 patients with Delusional Disorder and compared with a group of 22 healthy controls matched for sex, (premorbid) intelligence, and education. Patients and controls did not differ regarding Machiavellianism scores, education level, or intelligence. However, patients with Delusional Disorder performed more poorly on an executive functioning task. Impaired executive functioning was associated with greater Machiavellianism, particularly cynical views on human nature, but not with intelligence or illness duration. Similar to findings in patients with Parkinson's disease, Machiavellianism in Delusional Disorder was associated with poorer executive functioning. This finding indicates that frontal lobe dysfunction may influence interpersonal attitudes and personality in Delusional Disorder.

  11. Othello Syndrome Secondary to Ropinirole: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakali Pal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a forty-two-year-old man with no previous psychiatric history who developed delusional jealousy (Othello Syndrome associated with ropinirole treatment. Ropinirole is a commonly used dopamine receptor agonist, which was being used to treat his Parkinson’s disease, and his delusional symptoms resolved entirely with ropinirole dose reduction.

  12. Olfactory Reference Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Evrensel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory reference syndrome is a delusional disorder in which the patient persistently and falsely believes that his or her body emits a foul odor. The disease is considered a variant of somatic type of delusional disorder under the diagnostic systems. Similarities between olfactory reference syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder have also been noted. The etiopathogenesis of the disorder has not yet been clarified. Antidepressants, antipsychotics and psychotherapy are used in the treatment of this disorder. The aim of this article was to review clinical features, neurobiology, differantial diagnosis, classification problems and treatment of olfactory reference syndrome.

  13. The problem of delusional ugliness: is it really body dysmorphic disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; Kalaf, Juliana; Versiani, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    Currently, the DSM-IV allows individuals with dysmorphic delusions to be diagnosed with either delusional body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and delusional disorder, somatic type (DDST). However, given the growing acceptance of a dimensional perspective in psychopathology, it is conceivable that future editions of the DSM may recommend the exclusion of the diagnosis of DDST whenever isolated dysmorphic delusions are present, arguing that the latter should be considered no more than a symptom of BDD. But is the concept of DDST condemned to extinction in favor of that of delusional BDD? While some studies suggest that non-delusional and delusional BDD/DDST may be indistinguishable from the clinical, neuroanatomical, and therapeutic perspectives, several facts support the utility of the DDST concept. Firstly, DDST is a wider construct than delusional BDD. Secondly, it is unclear whether DDST in general (as opposed to delusional BDD) belongs to the obsessive-compulsive spectrum. Thirdly, differential pharmacological response may not be an adequate criteria for blending non-delusional and delusional BDD/DDST. Fourthly, "delusional" BDD may not be delusional at all. Finally, there is more about delusion than just an "extreme" conviction. Future studies are urgently needed in order to substantiate our judgement regarding the existence of diagnostic limits between delusional BDD and DDST with dysmorphic delusions.

  14. Impairment in visual and spatial perception in schizophrenia and delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardoy, Maria Carolina; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Catena, Mario; Hardoy, Maria Julieta; Cadeddu, Mariangela; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Carpiniello, Bernardo

    2004-06-30

    The Judgment of Line Orientation Test, a visuospatial processing task, was administered to normal subjects, to schizophrenic patients and to patients with delusional disorder. Significantly better performance was seen in the normal subjects than in the schizophrenic and delusional patients. Delusional patients, in turn, showed better performance than the schizophrenic patients. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Modeling misidentification errors that result from use of genetic tags in capture-recapture studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, J.; Brownie, C.; Pollock, K.H.; Link, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Misidentification of animals is potentially important when naturally existing features (natural tags) such as DNA fingerprints (genetic tags) are used to identify individual animals. For example, when misidentification leads to multiple identities being assigned to an animal, traditional estimators tend to overestimate population size. Accounting for misidentification in capture-recapture models requires detailed understanding of the mechanism. Using genetic tags as an example, we outline a framework for modeling the effect of misidentification in closed population studies when individual identification is based on natural tags that are consistent over time (non-evolving natural tags). We first assume a single sample is obtained per animal for each capture event, and then generalize to the case where multiple samples (such as hair or scat samples) are collected per animal per capture occasion. We introduce methods for estimating population size and, using a simulation study, we show that our new estimators perform well for cases with moderately high capture probabilities or high misidentification rates. In contrast, conventional estimators can seriously overestimate population size when errors due to misidentification are ignored. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  16. Risperidone for the treatment of delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fear, Christopher F; Libretto, Susan E

    2002-01-01

    The overlap between diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia and delusional disorder (DD) may cause diagnostic confusion. This is important if response to treatment differs. Risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic, is established in the treatment of schizophrenia, although less so in other psychotic conditions. We report the case of a woman who developed DD, persecutory type, at the age of 50 years. Treatment with sulpiride 200-800 mg daily caused side-effects of drowsiness and 'hangover' and, consequently, non-compliance. Written informed consent was gained for a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of risperidone, initiated at 1 mg daily and increasing to 2 mg daily. Significant improvement was found, as assessed by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Symptom Schedule and Maudsley Assessment of Delusions Schedule. We believe that this is the first case study reporting the resolution of persecutory DD with risperidone. A controlled clinical trial of risperidone in the treatment of patients with DD is warranted. (Int J Psych Clin Pract 2002; 6: 113-116).

  17. [Reproductive variables and gynaecological service use in delusional disorder outpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Molina-Andreu, Oriol; Penadés Rubio, Rafael; Catalán Campos, Rosa; Bernardo Arroyo, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Oestrogens have been hypothesized to have a protective effect in psychotic disorders. Women with schizophrenia have a later age of menarche, fewer pregnancies and earlier age of menopause. However, little information is available focusing on delusional disorder (DD). We aimed to evaluate gynaecological variables and psychopathology, and rates of gynaecological service use in female DD outpatients. Fourty-six outpatients with DD (DSM-IV-TR) were attended at the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, from 2008 to 2013. Demographic and clinical variables, as well as gynaecological features were recorded in twenty-five women with DD. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-17 for depression, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for psychopathology, Personal and Social Performance for functionality, and Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale were assessed. Mean age of menarche (SD) was 12.83(1.54) years, mean age of menopause 48.73(2.69), mean age at onset of DD was 48.70(13.03). 48% of the sample did not receive gynaecological attention in the last 2-3 years. No statistically significant correlations were found between age at menopause and age at onset of DD. Age at menopause showed a tendency to be negatively correlated with Personal and Social Performance total scores (r = -0.431; P = .074), and was positively associated with suicidal ideation intensity (r = 0.541; P = .038). However, after controlling for social support variables, this relationship was no longer significant. Although a small sample size, this is the first study to specifically examine gynaecological variables in DD. Low compliance rates in gynaecological service use were found. No correlations between age at menopause and clinical variables were statistically significant. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Delusional and psychotic disorders in juvenile myotonic dystrophy type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Delphine; Willekens, Diane; de Die-Smulders, Christine; Frijns, Jean-Pierre; Steyaert, Jean

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the clinically derived hypothesis of a relatively high incidence of delusional and psychotic disorders in adolescents with juvenile Myotonic Dystrophy type-1 (DM1). Twenty-seven subjects of age 16-25 with juvenile DM1 and their parents were invited to have a clinical psychiatric interview, and to complete an ASEBA behavior checklist (YSR, ASR, CBCL, and ABCL). We diagnosed a Delusional Disorder in 19% of our patients and a Psychotic Disorder not otherwise specified in another 19%. These two groups of patients had a significantly worse level of clinically defined general functioning. It is clinically relevant to investigate in patients with juvenile DM the symptom of delusions and the presence of a delusional and psychotic disorder, and to consider the presence of juvenile DM in youngsters presenting with such a thought disorder. These disorders compromise the general functioning of the subjects and are often to some extent treatable. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Severe psychoses in the elderly--schizophrenia and delusional disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaslahti, Tiina; Alanen, Hanna-Mari; Leinonen, Esa

    2011-01-01

    The number of persons over 65 years of age with schizophrenia will increase in the future. Geriatric schizophrenia involves bizarre delusions and hallucinations similar to those occurring in younger schizophrenic patients. Delusions of an elderly delusional disorder patient focusing on the family and environment easily lead to social withdrawal. Persons becoming ill with initial psychosis at an older age should be subjected to thorough diagnostic examinations. Organic brain diseases constitute the major differential diagnostic illnesses. Second generation antipsychotics are the first-line drugs in the treatment of geriatric schizophrenia and delusional disorder. The patients benefit from a regular therapeutic contact and treatment of associated diseases.

  20. Modeling misidentification errors in capture-recapture studies using photographic identification of evolving marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, J.; Pollock, K.H.; Brownie, C.; Webster, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Misidentification of animals is potentially important when naturally existing features (natural tags) are used to identify individual animals in a capture-recapture study. Photographic identification (photoID) typically uses photographic images of animals' naturally existing features as tags (photographic tags) and is subject to two main causes of identification errors: those related to quality of photographs (non-evolving natural tags) and those related to changes in natural marks (evolving natural tags). The conventional methods for analysis of capture-recapture data do not account for identification errors, and to do so requires a detailed understanding of the misidentification mechanism. Focusing on the situation where errors are due to evolving natural tags, we propose a misidentification mechanism and outline a framework for modeling the effect of misidentification in closed population studies. We introduce methods for estimating population size based on this model. Using a simulation study, we show that conventional estimators can seriously overestimate population size when errors due to misidentification are ignored, and that, in comparison, our new estimators have better properties except in cases with low capture probabilities (Society of America.

  1. Body dysmorphic disorder, dysmorphophobia or delusional disorder—somatic subtype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, V.K.; Krishnaram, V.D.

    2006-01-01

    Excessive concern about the appearance of one's body is the hallmark of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). A case with recurrent intrusive preoccupation and concern about the appearance of the face, ritualistic behaviours associated with this preoccupation, resulting in social and interpersonal difficulties is presented. The difficulty to draw a discrete boundary between BDD and a delusional disorder of somatic type is highlighted. PMID:20703349

  2. Delusional disorder-somatic type (or body dysmorphic disorder) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to distinguish cases of delusional disorder of somatic subtype from severe ... Similarly, the treatment of such disorders with antipsychotics has been documented. .... dysthymia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, panic disorder ... anxiety and mild degrees of depression and preoccupation, preceded the onset of ...

  3. Compulsive masturbation in a patient with delusional disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Karia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compulsive masturbation is a type of paraphilia related disorder in which a person engages in masturbatory behavior to such an extent that it causes socio-occupational dysfunction. The psychiatric co-morbidities associated with it include mood and anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, etc. Here, we report a case of a patient with the delusional disorder having compulsive masturbation.

  4. Reevaluation of RAPD markers involved in a case of stingray misidentification (Dasyatidae: Dasyatis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, V V; Rolim, L S; Vaz, L A L; Furtado-Neto, M A A

    2012-10-25

    We investigated a reported case of stingray Dasyatis americana misidentification not detected in a published study using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. If the referred specimen (landed by fisheries in Ceará, northeastern Brazil) was misidentified (as Dasyatis centroura) in the field, why did its RAPD data fail to clarify the mistake? Was it due to limitations of RAPD markers or perhaps to a taxonomic issue? Contrary to our initial expectations, neither of these hindered the detection of the misidentification. After reanalyzing the primary genetic data associated with the misidentified specimen (PCR gel photographs and/or matrices of presence/absence of markers for six RAPD primers), we found that the RAPD markers were sufficient to correctly assign the misidentified specimen to its proper species identity. In the original study, the specimen misidentification was neither noticed by the authors nor apparent in the published article due to how their results were interpreted and presented.

  5. Impaired integration of disambiguating evidence in delusional schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, N; Veckenstedt, R; Moritz, S; Balzan, R P; Woodward, T S

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that a cognitive bias against disconfirmatory evidence (BADE) is associated with delusions. However, small samples of delusional patients, reliance on difference scores and choice of comparison groups may have hampered the reliability of these results. In the present study we aimed to improve on this methodology with a recent version of the BADE task, and compare larger groups of schizophrenia patients with/without delusions to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients, a population with persistent and possibly bizarre beliefs without psychosis. A component analysis was used to identify cognitive operations underlying the BADE task, and how they differ across four groups of participants: (1) high-delusional schizophrenia, (2) low-delusional schizophrenia, (3) OCD patients and (4) non-psychiatric controls. As in past studies, two components emerged and were labelled 'evidence integration' (the degree to which disambiguating information has been integrated) and 'conservatism' (reduced willingness to provide high plausibility ratings when justified), and only evidence integration differed between severely delusional patients and the other groups, reflecting delusional subjects giving higher ratings for disconfirmed interpretations and lower ratings for confirmed interpretations. These data support the finding that a reduced willingness to adjust beliefs when confronted with disconfirming evidence may be a cognitive underpinning of delusions specifically, rather than obsessive beliefs or other aspects of psychosis such as hallucinations, and illustrates a cognitive process that may underlie maintenance of delusions in the face of counter-evidence. This supports the possibility of the BADE operation being a useful target in cognitive-based therapies for delusions.

  6. Successful Ziprasidone Monotherapy in a Case of Delusional Parasitosis: A One-Year Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico De Berardis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delusional parasitosis is characterized by the false idea that own body is infested by invisible mites, insects, or other parasites. This case report describes a 24-year-old woman with delusional parasitosis who was treated with ziprasidone monotherapy (120 mg/day with a complete remission of delusion and followed for one year without symptom recurrences. These findings, although preliminary, indicate that further investigation of ziprasidone monotherapy for the treatment of delusional parasitosis is warranted in further trials.

  7. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Sandeep; Nehra, Ritu; Bhateja, Gaurav; Kulhara, Parmanand; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. Aim: To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods: Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia ...

  8. Delusional disorder-somatic type (or body dysmorphic disorder) and schizophrenia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, B A

    2010-03-01

    With regard to delusional disorder-somatic subtype there may be a relationship with body dysmorphic disorder. There are reports that some delusional disorders can evolve to become schizophrenia. Similarly, the treatment of such disorders with antipsychotics has been documented. This report describes a case of delusional disorder - somatic type - preceding a psychotic episode and its successful treatment with an antipsychotic drug, thus contributing to what has been documented on the subject.

  9. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Sandeep; Nehra, Ritu; Bhateja, Gaurav; Kulhara, Parmanand; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. Aim: To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods: Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia ...

  10. Uncovering a latent multinomial: Analysis of mark-recapture data with misidentification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, W.A.; Yoshizaki, J.; Bailey, L.L.; Pollock, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    Natural tags based on DNA fingerprints or natural features of animals are now becoming very widely used in wildlife population biology. However, classic capture-recapture models do not allow for misidentification of animals which is a potentially very serious problem with natural tags. Statistical analysis of misidentification processes is extremely difficult using traditional likelihood methods but is easily handled using Bayesian methods. We present a general framework for Bayesian analysis of categorical data arising from a latent multinomial distribution. Although our work is motivated by a specific model for misidentification in closed population capture-recapture analyses, with crucial assumptions which may not always be appropriate, the methods we develop extend naturally to a variety of other models with similar structure. Suppose that observed frequencies f are a known linear transformation f = A???x of a latent multinomial variable x with cell probability vector ?? = ??(??). Given that full conditional distributions [?? | x] can be sampled, implementation of Gibbs sampling requires only that we can sample from the full conditional distribution [x | f, ??], which is made possible by knowledge of the null space of A???. We illustrate the approach using two data sets with individual misidentification, one simulated, the other summarizing recapture data for salamanders based on natural marks. ?? 2009, The International Biometric Society.

  11. Psychological aspects of simulation delusional symptoms in expert practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozova M. V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers relevant to the differentiated and science-based expert qualifications psychological aspects of simulation delusional disorder. The results obtained in the pilot study aimed techniques persons in the simulated forensic psychiatric mental illness allowed on the basis of statistical, including cluster, identify specific analysis of this contingent combination of cognitive-style characteristics with features of mental activity and creativity. It was found that certain constellation of cognitive controllers features the process of consolidation, the level and quality of fancy products with an appropriate motivational installation is predispozitciej formation and presentation of delusional constructions. The authors highlighted as key: tolerance unrealistic experience, medium-high level of creativity, polenezavisimsot which, when paired with various aspects of intellectual activity contribute to the creation of certain kvazibredovyh concepts.

  12. Delusional infestation with unusual pathogens: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, P; Miller, J; Musters, C; Taylor, R E; Bewley, A P

    2011-10-01

    Delusional infestation (DI) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by a fixed, false belief that the patient is infested with extracorporeal agents. It is known by several names, including the more commonly used term 'delusional parasitosis'. The psychiatric disease is responsible for the cutaneous pathology. About 90% of patients with DI seek help from dermatologists, and most reject psychiatric referral. Thus, effective management requires incorporation of psychiatric principles. We report three cases of DI with inanimate materials, and examine 'Morgellons' disease. We believe that patients with unusual presentations of DI are likely to be seen more commonly in the future. These patients appear to be a subgroup of DI, and may be even more difficult to treat than other patients with DI. © The Author(s). CED © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Normal pressure hydrocephalus presenting as delusional disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH is caused by aqueductal stenosis resulting in syndrome of gait disturbance, cognitive impairment, and urinary incontinence. Late onset psychosis should be evaluated thoroughly to rule out any organic cause. We present the case of a female patient presenting with delusions, gait disturbances, urinary incontinence in her 50s.

  14. Normal pressure hydrocephalus presenting as delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shruti; Bhatia, Manjeet Singh; Gautam, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is caused by aqueductal stenosis resulting in syndrome of gait disturbance, cognitive impairment, and urinary incontinence. Late onset psychosis should be evaluated thoroughly to rule out any organic cause. We present the case of a female patient presenting with delusions, gait disturbances, urinary incontinence in her 50s.

  15. Delusional disorder and schizophrenia: a comparative study across multiple domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, V; Cuesta, M J

    2016-10-01

    Delusional disorder (DD) is an under-researched condition and its relationship to schizophrenia (SZ) controversial. This study aimed to further characterize DD and to examine multi-domain evidence for the distinction between DD and SZ. Using univariate analyses we examined 146 subjects with DD, 114 subjects with paranoid SZ and 244 subjects with non-paranoid SZ on 52 characteristics from several domains including demographics, risk factors, premorbid features, illness characteristics, index episode features, delusional-related features, response to treatment and outcome. In a further step, we searched for independent associations of the examined characteristics with DD v. SZ. Univariate analyses showed that DD differed from either form of SZ in 40 characteristics, the pattern of findings indicated that paranoid SZ was much more similar to non-paranoid SZ than DD. Relative to subjects with SZ, those with DD were more likely to have drug abuse before illness onset, better premorbid sexual adjustment, later age at illness onset, higher levels of affective symptoms and lack of insight, poorer response to antipsychotic medication, better functioning in the domains of personal care, paid work and social functioning; last, subjects with DD had fewer but more severe delusions and higher ratings of conviction of delusional experience than those with SZ. Predominance of jealousy and somatic delusions was confined to subjects with DD. DD and SZ represent two distinct classes of disorders, the differential features of DD being of nosological, aetiological and therapeutic relevance.

  16. Structural and functional brain changes in delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicens, Victor; Radua, Joaquim; Salvador, Raymond; Anguera-Camós, Maria; Canales-Rodríguez, Erick J; Sarró, Salvador; Maristany, Teresa; McKenna, Peter J; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith

    2016-02-01

    Delusional disorder has been the subject of very little investigation using brain imaging. To examine potential structural and/or functional brain abnormalities in this disorder. We used structural imaging (voxel-based morphometry, VBM) and functional imaging (during performance of the n-back task and whole-brain resting connectivity analysis) to examine 22 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for delusional disorder and 44 matched healthy controls. The patients showed grey matter reductions in the medial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral insula on unmodulated (but not on modulated) VBM analysis, failure of de-activation in the medial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex during performance of the n-back task, and decreased resting-state connectivity in the bilateral insula. The findings provide evidence of brain abnormality in the medial frontal/anterior cingulate cortex and insula in delusional disorder. A role for the former region in the pathogenesis of delusions is consistent with several other lines of evidence. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  17. An examination of delusional thinking and cognitive styles in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuschagne, Izelle; Castle, David J; Dunai, Judy; Kyrios, Michael; Rossell, Susan L

    2010-08-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by severe dissatisfaction with one's appearance. The aim of this study was to examine belief characteristics in BDD, particularly delusional beliefs and their relationship to other cognitive styles. Fourteen DSM-IV BDD patients and 14 matched control participants completed questionnaires that measured delusions, creative experiences, self-esteem, self-ambivalence, depression and anxiety symptoms. BDD patients endorsed three times as many delusional beliefs as controls, but the number of delusional ideas in the BDD sample was on a continuum and did not divide patients into two discrete groups. Additionally, the BDD group had higher fantasy proneness, lower self-esteem, higher self-ambivalence and higher depression and anxiety. The data support the conceptualization of BDD as a single disorder with varying degrees of delusional thinking and suggests that BDD should not be dichotomized according to the presence or absence of delusional thinking, as is currently the case in the DSM-IV.

  18. Prospective study of the course of delusional themes in first-episode non-affective psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellersgaard, Ditte; Mors, Ole; Thorup, Anne

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The stability of delusional themes in psychotic disorders is only sparsely lit. The study aims to investigate the stability of delusional themes over a period of time in patients with first-episode non-affective psychosis. METHODS: The data were drawn from a randomized controlled trial of 547...... first-episode patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, the OPUS trial. A subsample of 411 patients met our inclusion criteria. They were interviewed at the time of first treatment contact, and at years 1, 2 and 5 after onset. The delusional themes of the 411 patients were classified by applying...... principal component analysis to the patients' scores on 12 items of delusions from the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms in Schizophrenia, SAPS. The course of the patients' predominant delusional themes was analysed afterwards. RESULTS: The 12 delusional themes from SAPS were converted into five...

  19. Prospective study of the course of delusional themes in first-episode non-affective psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellersgaard, Ditte; Mors, Ole; Thorup, Anne; Jørgensen, Per; Jeppesen, Pia; Nordentoft, Merete

    2014-11-01

    The stability of delusional themes in psychotic disorders is only sparsely lit. The study aims to investigate the stability of delusional themes over a period of time in patients with first-episode non-affective psychosis. The data were drawn from a randomized controlled trial of 547 first-episode patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, the OPUS trial. A subsample of 411 patients met our inclusion criteria. They were interviewed at the time of first treatment contact, and at years 1, 2 and 5 after onset. The delusional themes of the 411 patients were classified by applying principal component analysis to the patients' scores on 12 items of delusions from the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms in Schizophrenia, SAPS. The course of the patients' predominant delusional themes was analysed afterwards. The 12 delusional themes from SAPS were converted into five groups using principal component analysis. At all three follow ups there were almost equal proportions of patients with the predominant delusion being from the same group of delusional themes as at baseline and of patients with the predominant delusion being from another group of delusional themes than at baseline. The predominant delusional theme at the time of first treatment contact was seen to be only of some predictive value to the predominant delusional theme at the later follow-up points in patients with first-episode non-affective psychosis. This stresses the importance of a systematic assessment of different delusional themes in the continued monitoring of early signs of psychotic relapse and at each psychotic episode. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Jet$\\to$Tau Misidentification Probability with 2016 pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$=13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The jet to tau misidentification probability for W+Jet events has been summarised in the note. The analysis is performed with the LHC 13 TeV pp collision data collected by the CMS detector in the year 2016.

  1. Delusional disorders in dermatology: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, David T; Romm, Sharon; Combs, Heidi; Olson, Jonathan; Kirby, Phil

    2008-06-15

    There are several unique psychiatric disorders that are likely to present to a dermatologist because of their accompanying skin complaints. Delusions of parasitosis (DP) is a fixed, false belief of parasitic infestation that may lead patients to compulsively self-mutilate while attempting to remove the non-existent parasites. Morgellons disease is a controversial condition characterized by a fixed belief that fibers that are imbedded or extruding from the skin; this condition is likely in the spectrum of DP. Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a preoccupation with an imagined defect in appearance that causes significant distress and is associated with time consuming rituals, isolation, depression, and increased risk of suicide. Olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) is a preoccupation with body odor leading to the stigmata of shame, embarrassment, and social isolation. This brief review examines each of these conditions and their management because any one of them may present to a dermatologist.

  2. Impacts of Species Misidentification on Species Distribution Modeling with Presence-Only Data

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    Hugo Costa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Spatial records of species are commonly misidentified, which can change the predicted distribution of a species obtained from a species distribution model (SDM. Experiments were undertaken to predict the distribution of real and simulated species using MaxEnt and presence-only data “contaminated” with varying rates of misidentification error. Additionally, the difference between the niche of the target and contaminating species was varied. The results show that species misidentification errors may act to contract or expand the predicted distribution of a species while shifting the predicted distribution towards that of the contaminating species. Furthermore the magnitude of the effects was positively related to the ecological distance between the species’ niches and the size of the error rates. Critically, the magnitude of the effects was substantial even when using small error rates, smaller than common average rates reported in the literature, which may go unnoticed while using a standard evaluation method, such as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Finally, the effects outlined were shown to impact negatively on practical applications that use SDMs to identify priority areas, commonly selected for various purposes such as management. The results highlight that species misidentification should not be neglected in species distribution modeling.

  3. Prevalence of premorbid personality disorder and its clinical correlates in patients with delusional disorder.

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    de Portugal, Enrique; Díaz-Caneja, Covadonga M; González-Molinier, Manuel; de Castro, María Jesús; del Amo, Victoria; Arango, Celso; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2013-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of premorbid Personality Disorder (PD) and its relationship with clinical correlates in patients with Delusional Disorder (DD). Eighty-six outpatients with DD whose diagnoses were confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I (SCID-I) Disorders (psychosis module) were evaluated for premorbid PD utilizing the Standardized Assessment of Personality (SAP). Psychopathology was assessed using Module B of SCID-I and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS); psychosocial functioning was evaluated with the Global Assessment of Functioning scale. Premorbid intelligence was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition, vocabulary subtest. A sociodemographic-clinical questionnaire was completed. Sixty-four percent of the patients had at least one premorbid PD, the most common being paranoid PD (38.4%), followed by schizoid PD (12.8%). The presence of at least one premorbid PD was significantly associated with higher scores for psychopathology, in particular, on the affective dimension of DD symptoms. However, the presence of premorbid PD was not associated with psychosocial functioning. Each of the premorbid PD was associated with different psychopathological profiles. Premorbid PD is a relevant phenomenon in DD, given its high prevalence and comorbidity, its influence on clinical correlates and its potential ability to predict specific sub-syndromes.

  4. A new perspective on delusional states: Evidence for claustrum involvement

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    Cristina Maria Patru

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Delusions are a hallmark positive symptom of schizophrenia, although they are also associated with a wide variety of other psychiatric and neurological disorders. The heterogeneity of clinical presentation and underlying disease, along with a lack of experimental animal models, make delusions exceptionally difficult to study in isolation, either in schizophrenia or other diseases. To date, no detailed studies have focused specifically on the neural mechanisms of delusion, although some studies have reported characteristic activation of specific brain areas or networks associated with them. Here we present a novel hypothesis and extant supporting evidence implicating the claustrum, a relatively poorly understood forebrain nucleus, as a potential common center for delusional states.

  5. Intraoral Morgellons disease or delusional parasitosis: a first case report.

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    Dovigi, Allan J

    2010-08-01

    Morgellons disease is a new emerging disease that is still controversial and believed to be, by some practitioners, as nothing more than delusional parasitosis. The Center for Disease Control has recently launched an epidemiological investigation into this disease due to the increased number of reports. A first case is reported of an oral lesion and symptoms consistent with Morgellons disease. The nature of the characteristic fibers associated with the intraoral lesion is investigated. Research has started at a number of institutions to elucidate the nature of this emerging disease.

  6. Effects of positive and negative delusional ideation on memory.

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    Sugimori, Eriko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between levels of delusional ideation (whether positive or negative delusions) and the activation and distortion of memory by using pairs of positive and negative adjectives describing personality traits where those adjectives had similar meanings. We presented one of each pair of adjectives in the learning phase. Immediately after the learning phase in Experiment 1, we asked whether each adjective had been presented. Participants with high (positive or negative) delusional ideation were more likely to indicate that they had learned adjectives that they had not actually learned. This finding suggested that non-learned positive (or negative) adjectives that were associated with learned negative (or positive) adjectives were more likely to be activated in participants prone to positive (or negative) delusional ideation. However, in Experiment 2, two forced-choice tests were conducted immediately after the learning phase. In this context, participants, regardless of their proneness to delusional ideation, could almost always correctly distinguish what had and had not been presented, suggesting that the activation of learned items was still stronger than that for non-learned items in the immediate test. As time passed, the proportion of false alarms for positive or negative adjectives was higher in the two forced-choice tests among those with high proneness to (positive or negative) delusional ideation, suggesting that participants with delusional ideation were increasingly likely to depend on internal conditions for retrieval over time. Nous avons examiné la relation entre les niveaux d'idéation illusoire (qu'elle soit positive ou négative) et l'activation et la distorsion de la mémoire, en utilisant des paires d'adjectifs positifs et négatifs à significations similaires décrivant des traits de personnalité. Nous avons présenté un membre de chaque paire d'adjectifs lors d'une phase d'apprentissage. Dans une première exp

  7. Delusional disorder and oncology: review of the literature and case report.

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    Pearman, Timothy P

    2013-01-01

    Delusional disorder is an infrequent diagnosis in outpatient clinical practice. While delusional thought processes are a fairly common part of symptom clusters in chronic psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, true delusional disorders are believed to be fairly rare. In this article, we review scientific data on incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of delusional disorders. This was done by PubMed search utilizing the search terms "delusional disorder," "oncology," "diagnosis," and "treatment." Relevant articles were excluded if they dealt predominantly with schizophrenia instead of primary delusional disorder. We present a case of a patient diagnosed with follicular lymphoma and an apparent longstanding history of persecutory delusions. The patient's symptoms eventually led to intervention in the oncology practice involving the medical center faculty and staff, as well as local police and the court system. Delusional disorder is an under-researched condition, and limited information is known regarding the treatment of this condition when it impacts upon medical care. Future research directions are proposed.

  8. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Grover, Sandeep; Nehra, Ritu; Bhateja, Gaurav; Kulhara, Parmanand; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-07-01

    Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. All three groups were matched on age, sex, and level of education. The two patient groups were also matched on duration of illness. In general, patients with delusional disorder performed worst than healthy controls and patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed in between the other two groups. Compared with healthy controls, both patients with delusional disorder and patients with paranoid schizophrenia were significantly impaired on different tests of attention and visual learning and memory. Compared with patients with paranoid schizophrenia, patients with delusional disorder had more impairment different tests of attention, visual learning and memory, verbal working memory, and executive functions. Patients with delusional disorder exhibit cognitive dysfunctions that are very similar to schizophrenia, but are more severe in intensity. The resemblance of cognitive profiles suggests that the two disorders may have similar etiological basis.

  9. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

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    Sandeep Grover

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. Aim: To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods: Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. All three groups were matched on age, sex, and level of education. The two patient groups were also matched on duration of illness. Results: In general, patients with delusional disorder performed worst than healthy controls and patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed in between the other two groups. Compared with healthy controls, both patients with delusional disorder and patients with paranoid schizophrenia were significantly impaired on different tests of attention and visual learning and memory. Compared with patients with paranoid schizophrenia, patients with delusional disorder had more impairment different tests of attention, visual learning and memory, verbal working memory, and executive functions. Conclusion: Patients with delusional disorder exhibit cognitive dysfunctions that are very similar to schizophrenia, but are more severe in intensity. The resemblance of cognitive profiles suggests that the two disorders may have similar etiological basis.

  10. Abnormal gray and white matter volume in delusional infestation.

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    Wolf, Robert Christian; Huber, Markus; Depping, Malte Sebastian; Thomann, Philipp Arthur; Karner, Martin; Lepping, Peter; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the neural basis of delusional infestation (DI), the delusional belief to be infested with pathogens. Case series and the response to anti-dopaminergic medication indicate disruptions in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the striatum (caudate, putamen), but did not allow for population-based inference. Here, we report the first whole-brain structural neuroimaging study to investigate gray and white matter abnormalities in DI compared to controls. In this study, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry to investigate gray and white matter volume in 16 DI patients and 16 matched healthy controls. Lower gray matter volume in DI patients compared to controls was found in left medial, lateral and right superior frontal cortices, left anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral insula, left thalamus, right striatal areas and in lateral and medial temporal cortical regions (p<0.05, cluster-corrected). Higher white matter volume in DI patients compared to controls was found in right middle cingulate, left frontal opercular and bilateral striatal regions (p<0.05, cluster-corrected). This study shows that structural changes in prefrontal, temporal, insular, cingulate and striatal brain regions are associated with DI, supporting a neurobiological model of disrupted prefrontal control over somato-sensory representations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A dimensional comparison between delusional disorder, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

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    Muñoz-Negro, José E; Ibanez-Casas, Inmaculada; de Portugal, Enrique; Ochoa, Susana; Dolz, Montserrat; Haro, Josep M; Ruiz-Veguilla, Miguel; de Dios Luna Del Castillo, Juan; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2015-12-01

    Since the early description of paranoia, the nosology of delusional disorder has always been controversial. The old idea of unitary psychosis has now gained some renewed value from the dimensional continuum model of psychotic symptoms. 1. To study the psychopathological dimensions of the psychosis spectrum; 2. to explore the association between psychotic dimensions and categorical diagnoses; 3. to compare the different psychotic disorders from a psychopathological and functional point of view. This is an observational study utilizing a sample of some 550 patients with a psychotic disorder. 373 participants had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 137 had delusional disorder and 40 with a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder. The PANSS was used to elicit psychopathology and global functioning was ascertained using the GAF measure. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the PANSS items were performed to extract psychopathological dimensions. Associations between diagnostic categories and dimensions were subsequently studied using ANOVA tests. 5 dimensions - manic, negative symptoms, depression, positive symptoms and cognitive - emerged. The model explained 57.27% of the total variance. The dimensional model was useful to explained differences and similarities between all three psychosis spectrum categories. The potential clinical usefulness of this dimensional model within and between clinical psychosis spectrum categories is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Parentage testing and effect of misidentification on the estimation of breeding value in Gir cattle

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    Erica E. Baron

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A correct relationship among sires is essential for an efficient breeding program. Microsatellite markers were used in progeny tests, to assess the paternity of seventy-four probable offspring of nine Gir dairy sires. A 36% misidentification rate was observed; however, these errors had minimal effects on the ranking of the nine bulls with regard to their genetic values. The results suggest that paternity tests should be performed in breeding programs, in order to prevent inappropriate paternities from influencing the genetic value of bulls in the future.

  13. [Clinical significance of suicidal behaviour in delusional disorder: a 44 case-series descriptive study].

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    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Molina-Andreu, Oriol; Penadés Rubio, Rafael; Catalán Campos, Rosa; Bernardo Arroyo, Miguel

    2014-04-07

    Suicidal behaviour in delusional disorder (DD) has been poorly studied. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of clinically significant depression, suicidal ideation and behaviour in these patients, and to relate them with psychotic or depressive symptoms. A cross-sectional study including 44 outpatients with DD (DSM-IV-TR) was conducted. Demographic and clinical data, as well as scores in clinical assessment scales: Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Personal and Social Performance Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (17-item version) and Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale, were recorded. The sample was divided into 2 groups according to presence or absence of comorbid depression (CD). Fifteen patients (34.1%) had CD, 14 (31.8%) suicidal ideation and 7 (15.9%) suicidal behaviour in the previous 2 years. Patients with CD had an earlier age at onset and for a first psychiatric appointment, and had higher scores on the PANSS general subscale (p=0,043) and in intensity of suicidal ideation (p=0,001). In our sample, patients with DD and CD have more frequently suicidal ideation and behaviour than those without CD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Comorbidity of delusional disorder with bipolar disorder: report of four cases.

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    Vicens, V; Sarró, S; McKenna, P J

    2011-11-01

    Although it is accepted that patients with delusional disorder can show co-existing depression, comorbidity with bipolar disorder is not a recognised feature. Case report of patients who showed both delusional disorder and mania or hypomania. The patients were examined using lifetime structured psychiatric interview where possible. Four patients are described who met criteria for delusional disorder, with durations ranging from 2 to 15 years, and also experienced one or more episodes of mania or hypomania. Case reports cannot quantify a clinical association. These cases suggest that there is an association between delusional disorder and affective disorder which goes beyond the occurrence of depressive symptoms in the disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Brief Report: Delusional Disorder in a Male Adolescent with High-Functioning PDDNOS.

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    Kurita, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the case of a delusional disorder associated with high functioning pervasive developmental disorder in an 18-year-old Japanese male. Effective drug treatment with bromperidol and trihexyphenydil is reported. (DB)

  16. “Worm crawling inside my brain”: a rare case of delusional parasitosis

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    Sekh Afrar Alam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Delusional parasitosis is a disorder in which persons suffering have a firm and unshakeable belief of harbouring some parasite or worm in his/her body. In today’s nosology, it has been placed under delusional disorder-somatic type in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5 (297.1 and under persistent delusional disorders in the tenth revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10 (F22. Existing literature has extensively described this condition to affect mainly the skin with some instances of affecting the oral mucosa and the intestine. We are reporting a rare case of delusional disorder of parasite infestation in the brain.

  17. Involuntary medication treatment for competency restoration of 22 defendants with delusional disorder.

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    Herbel, Bryon L; Stelmach, Hans

    2007-01-01

    There are no published data on the rates of competency restoration for adjudicated incompetent felony criminal defendants diagnosed with delusional disorder. A retrospective record review was conducted of all incompetent defendants with the principal diagnosis of delusional disorder who had undergone involuntary medication treatment for competency restoration during a 13-year period at a federal psychiatric prison hospital. Of the 181 defendants who were involuntarily medicated for competency restoration during this period, 22 had delusional disorder. Seventeen (77%) of the defendants with delusional disorder improved sufficiently for the forensic evaluators to opine that they had been restored to competency after involuntary treatment with antipsychotic medication. These results are similar to the published data of the relatively high rates of competency restoration for incompetent defendants with diagnosed schizophrenia.

  18. Suicidal Ideation and Suicidal Behaviour in Delusional Disorder: A Clinical Overview

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    Alexandre González-Rodríguez; Oriol Molina-Andreu; Víctor Navarro Odriozola; Cristóbal Gastó Ferrer; Rafael Penadés; Rosa Catalán

    2014-01-01

    Background. Most of the existing studies suggest that suicide is one of the leading causes of premature death in patients with chronic psychotic disorders. However, very few studies have specifically investigated suicidal behaviour in patients with delusional disorder. Thus, our objective was to review the literature regarding the percentage of lifetime ideation and suicidal behaviour in delusional disorder in order to provide suggestions for clinical practice. Methods. MEDLINE and PsycINFO w...

  19. Delusional versus nondelusional body dysmorphic disorder: clinical features and course of illness.

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    Phillips, K A; Menard, W; Pagano, M E; Fay, C; Stout, R L

    2006-03-01

    DSM-IV's classification of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is controversial. Whereas BDD is classified as a somatoform disorder, its delusional variant is classified as a psychotic disorder. However, the relationship between these BDD variants has received little investigation. In this study, we compared BDD's delusional and nondelusional variants in 191 subjects using reliable and valid measures that assessed a variety of domains. Subjects with delusional BDD were similar to those with nondelusional BDD in terms of most variables, including most demographic features, BDD characteristics, most measures of functional impairment and quality of life, comorbidity, and family history. Delusional and nondelusional subjects also had a similar probability of remitting from BDD over 1 year of prospective follow-up. However, delusional subjects had significantly lower educational attainment, were more likely to have attempted suicide, had poorer social functioning on several measures, were more likely to have drug abuse or dependence, were less likely to currently be receiving mental health treatment, and had more severe BDD symptoms. However, when controlling for BDD symptom severity, the two groups differed only in terms of educational attainment. These findings indicate that BDD's delusional and nondelusional forms have many more similarities than differences, although on several measures delusional subjects evidenced greater morbidity, which appeared accounted for by their more severe BDD symptoms. Thus, these findings offer some support for the hypothesis that these two BDD variants may constitute the same disorder. Additional studies are needed to examine this issue, which may have relevance for other disorders with both delusional and nondelusional variants in DSM.

  20. Neuropsychological research in delusional disorder: a comprehensive review.

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    Ibanez-Casas, Inmaculada; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a growing interest in the field of delusions, and different aspects of delusional disorder (DD) have been investigated. However, DD is still one of the most underresearched psychiatric disorders. In this paper, we review the literature on DD and most of the theoretical approaches proposed to explain the development and maintenance of delusions. DD research is infrequent, and delusions in this disorder have been scarcely investigated. We aim to establish the state of the art of delusions research to date and point to the shortage of neuropsychological studies in patients with DD. We also justify the need for future research into the neuropsychological correlates of DD as measured in patients with this disorder given that most previous research has mainly focused on other psychotic conditions. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Suicidal Ideation and Suicidal Behaviour in Delusional Disorder: A Clinical Overview

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    Alexandre González-Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Most of the existing studies suggest that suicide is one of the leading causes of premature death in patients with chronic psychotic disorders. However, very few studies have specifically investigated suicidal behaviour in patients with delusional disorder. Thus, our objective was to review the literature regarding the percentage of lifetime ideation and suicidal behaviour in delusional disorder in order to provide suggestions for clinical practice. Methods. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched from January 1980 to September 2012 using the following keywords: delusional disorder, paranoia, suicidal ideation, and suicidal behaviour. Results. A total of 10 studies were identified and included in the review. The percentage of suicidal behaviour in delusional disorder was established between 8 and 21%, which is similar to schizophrenia. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts were more frequent in patients showing persecutory and somatic delusions in the reviewed studies. Conclusions. To the best of our knowledge this is the first attempt to specifically review the suicide phenomenon in patients with delusional disorder. Interestingly, our results support the notion that percentages of both suicidal ideation and behaviour in delusional disorder are similar to patients with schizophrenia.

  2. Suicidal ideation and suicidal behaviour in delusional disorder: a clinical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Molina-Andreu, Oriol; Navarro Odriozola, Víctor; Gastó Ferrer, Cristóbal; Penadés, Rafael; Catalán, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Background. Most of the existing studies suggest that suicide is one of the leading causes of premature death in patients with chronic psychotic disorders. However, very few studies have specifically investigated suicidal behaviour in patients with delusional disorder. Thus, our objective was to review the literature regarding the percentage of lifetime ideation and suicidal behaviour in delusional disorder in order to provide suggestions for clinical practice. Methods. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched from January 1980 to September 2012 using the following keywords: delusional disorder, paranoia, suicidal ideation, and suicidal behaviour. Results. A total of 10 studies were identified and included in the review. The percentage of suicidal behaviour in delusional disorder was established between 8 and 21%, which is similar to schizophrenia. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts were more frequent in patients showing persecutory and somatic delusions in the reviewed studies. Conclusions. To the best of our knowledge this is the first attempt to specifically review the suicide phenomenon in patients with delusional disorder. Interestingly, our results support the notion that percentages of both suicidal ideation and behaviour in delusional disorder are similar to patients with schizophrenia.

  3. Genetic associations between delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia: A novel etiologic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Monojit; Das, Sujit K; Bera, Nirmal K; Nayak, Chitta R; Chaudhuri, Tapas K

    2006-05-01

    Genetic associations between delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia are not well understood, although involvement of biological factors has been suspected. We investigated the incidence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia, first, to explore a possible immunogenetic etiology of these paranoid disorders and, second, to determine whether they share similar etiologic mechanisms. We employed a nested case-control study design. Psychiatric reference data were available for 38,500 patients attending a hospital-based psychiatric outpatient department between 1998 and 2005. We enrolled 100 patients with delusional disorder and 50 patients with paranoid schizophrenia as the subject cases, using DSM-IV criteria. We considered equivalent numbers of healthy volunteers matched for age and ethnic background as control subjects. All subjects came from an India-born Bengali population. We applied the polymerase chain reaction-based molecular typing method to all patients and healthy subjects. The HLA-A*03 gene is significantly associated with delusional disorder as well as with paranoid schizophrenia. This HLA gene alone or in linkage disequilibrium with other HLA genes or other closely linked non-HLA genes may influence susceptibility to delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia. The study reveals important associations between HLA genes and paranoid disorders. Delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia may share similar etiologic mechanisms. This preliminary observation may help our understanding of the genetic basis of these paranoid disorders.

  4. Subclinical delusional thinking predicts lateral temporal cortex responses during social reflection

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    Brent, Benjamin K.; Coombs, Garth; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Seidman, Larry J.; Moran, Joseph M.; Holt, Daphne J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated associations between delusions in psychotic disorders and abnormalities of brain areas involved in social cognition, including medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), posterior cingulate cortex, and lateral temporal cortex (LTC). General population studies have linked subclinical delusional thinking to impaired social cognition, raising the question of whether a specific pattern of brain activity during social perception is associated with delusional beliefs. Here, we tested the hypothesis that subclinical delusional thinking is associated with changes in neural function, while subjects made judgments about themselves or others [‘social reflection’ (SR)]. Neural responses during SR and non-social tasks, as well as resting-state activity, were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in 22 healthy subjects. Delusional thinking was measured using the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory. Delusional thinking was negatively correlated with responses of the left LTC during SR (r = −0.61, P = 0.02, Bonferroni corrected), and connectivity between the left LTC and left ventral MPFC, and was positively correlated with connectivity between the left LTC and the right middle frontal and inferior temporal cortices. Thus, delusional thinking in the general population may be associated with reduced activity and aberrant functional connectivity of cortical areas involved in SR. PMID:23160817

  5. [Neuropsychological aspects of delusional disorders. Characteristic attributional style or cognitive deficit?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bömmer, I; Brüne, M

    2007-07-01

    "Pure" delusional disorders are clinically rare, and the neuropsychology of such disorders is poorly understood. Whereas "deficit" models suggest a cognitive impairment accounting for the incorrigible fixation of false beliefs, cognitive models propose the existence of a characteristic attributional style in patients to stabilise a fragile self. The cognitive flexibility and attributional style of 21 patients diagnosed with delusional disorder according to ICD-10 were compared with a group of healthy controls paralleled for age, sex, education, and intelligence. Patients with delusional disorders made more errors and more perseverative errors in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test compared with controls. However, these differences were only significant in patients with a comorbid depression. In contrast to earlier studies, patients with delusional disorders did not attribute negative events to external or personal causes more often than healthy controls, but partly tended to show a depressive attributional style. Our results do not support either a cognitive deficit in patients with delusional disorders or a characteristic attributional style. In terms of treatment recommendations, a thorough diagnosis of comorbid depressive disorders in patients with delusional disorders is warranted.

  6. Subclinical delusional thinking predicts lateral temporal cortex responses during social reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Benjamin K; Coombs, Garth; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Seidman, Larry J; Moran, Joseph M; Holt, Daphne J

    2014-03-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated associations between delusions in psychotic disorders and abnormalities of brain areas involved in social cognition, including medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), posterior cingulate cortex, and lateral temporal cortex (LTC). General population studies have linked subclinical delusional thinking to impaired social cognition, raising the question of whether a specific pattern of brain activity during social perception is associated with delusional beliefs. Here, we tested the hypothesis that subclinical delusional thinking is associated with changes in neural function, while subjects made judgments about themselves or others ['social reflection' (SR)]. Neural responses during SR and non-social tasks, as well as resting-state activity, were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in 22 healthy subjects. Delusional thinking was measured using the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory. Delusional thinking was negatively correlated with responses of the left LTC during SR (r = -0.61, P = 0.02, Bonferroni corrected), and connectivity between the left LTC and left ventral MPFC, and was positively correlated with connectivity between the left LTC and the right middle frontal and inferior temporal cortices. Thus, delusional thinking in the general population may be associated with reduced activity and aberrant functional connectivity of cortical areas involved in SR.

  7. Incorrect sequencing and taxon misidentification: an example in the Trichinella genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marucci, G; La Rosa, G; Pozio, E

    2010-09-01

    Molecular analyses such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing are very useful for taxon identification, especially when morphological characters useful for identifying taxa are lacking. However, the use of molecular tools can be the source of taxon misidentification if they are not correctly applied and the results are not critically evaluated and compared with the literature and GenBank data. We describe a case of misidentification of a taxon of the genus Trichinella due to sequencing mistakes, lack of reference material and selection of a single molecular marker. A Trichinella sp. isolate from an Iranian wild boar (Sus scrofa) was identified as belonging to the Nearctic species Trichinella murrelli, through the molecular analysis of the 5S rRNA intergenic spacer region. A successive molecular identification of the same isolate was performed by the International Trichinella Reference Centre in Rome, Italy, using the 5S rRNA intergenic spacer region, the LSU rDNA expansion segment five, and the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2. According to these analyses, the Iranian isolate belonged to Trichinella britovi, a Palaearctic species already described in Iran.

  8. Using hypnosis to disrupt face processing: Mirrored-self misidentification delusion and different visual media

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    Michael H Connors

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mirrored-self misidentification delusion is the belief that one’s reflection in the mirror is not oneself. This experiment used hypnotic suggestion to impair normal face processing in healthy participants and recreate key aspects of the delusion in the laboratory. From a pool of 439 participants, 22 high hypnotisable participants (highs and 20 low hypnotisable participants were selected on the basis of their extreme scores on two separately administered measures of hypnotisability. These participants received a hypnotic induction and a suggestion for either impaired (i self-face recognition or (ii impaired recognition of all faces. Participants were tested on their ability to recognise themselves in a mirror and other visual media – including a photograph, live video, and handheld mirror – and their ability to recognise other people, including the experimenter and famous faces. Both suggestions produced impaired self-face recognition and recreated key aspects of the delusion in highs. However, only the suggestion for impaired other-face recognition disrupted recognition of other faces, albeit in a minority of highs. The findings confirm that hypnotic suggestion can disrupt face processing and recreate features of mirrored-self misidentification. The variability seen in participants’ responses also corresponds to the heterogeneity seen in clinical patients. An important direction for future research will be to examine sources of this variability within both clinical patients and the hypnotic model.

  9. How Frequent is Chronic Multiyear Delusional Activity and Recovery in Schizophrenia: A 20-Year Multi–follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrow, Martin; Jobe, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    To determine how frequent chronic multiyear delusional activity is in modern-day schizophrenia, we studied 200 patients over a 20-year period. We also studied the relation of delusions to hallucinations and thought disorder-disorganization, to work disability, and to later periods of global recovery and assessed several protective factors against delusional activity. The sample was assessed 6 times over 20 years and includes 43 patients with schizophrenia. Participants were evaluated at each follow-up for delusions, hallucinations, thought disorder-disorganization, work disability, and global recovery. Possible protective factors were assessed prospectively at index hospitalization. Twenty-six percent of the patients with schizophrenia were delusional at all follow-ups over the 20 years. Overall, 57% had frequently recurring or persistent delusions. A subgroup of over 25% of the schizophrenia patients had no delusional activity at any of the 6 follow-ups over 20 years. Schizophrenia patients with posthospital delusional activity had increased work disability (P delusional activity after the acute phase. Schizophreniform patients and other types of psychotic disorders are vulnerable to posthospital delusional activity, but less frequently, less severely, and more episodically. Delusional activity is associated with work disability. Internal factors such as good premorbid developmental achievements and favorable prognostic factors are protective factors that reduce the probability of chronic multiyear, delusional activity in schizophrenia (P < .01). PMID:18617485

  10. How frequent is chronic multiyear delusional activity and recovery in schizophrenia: a 20-year multi-follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrow, Martin; Jobe, Thomas H

    2010-01-01

    To determine how frequent chronic multiyear delusional activity is in modern-day schizophrenia, we studied 200 patients over a 20-year period. We also studied the relation of delusions to hallucinations and thought disorder-disorganization, to work disability, and to later periods of global recovery and assessed several protective factors against delusional activity. The sample was assessed 6 times over 20 years and includes 43 patients with schizophrenia. Participants were evaluated at each follow-up for delusions, hallucinations, thought disorder-disorganization, work disability, and global recovery. Possible protective factors were assessed prospectively at index hospitalization. Twenty-six percent of the patients with schizophrenia were delusional at all follow-ups over the 20 years. Overall, 57% had frequently recurring or persistent delusions. A subgroup of over 25% of the schizophrenia patients had no delusional activity at any of the 6 follow-ups over 20 years. Schizophrenia patients with posthospital delusional activity had increased work disability (P delusional activity after the acute phase. Schizophreniform patients and other types of psychotic disorders are vulnerable to posthospital delusional activity, but less frequently, less severely, and more episodically. Delusional activity is associated with work disability. Internal factors such as good premorbid developmental achievements and favorable prognostic factors are protective factors that reduce the probability of chronic multiyear, delusional activity in schizophrenia (P < .01).

  11. Delusional infestation is typically comorbid with other psychiatric diagnoses: review of 54 patients receiving psychiatric evaluation at Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylwa, Sara A; Foster, Ashley A; Bury, Jessica E; Davis, Mark D P; Pittelkow, Mark R; Bostwick, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    Delusional infestation, which encompasses both delusions of parasitosis and delusions of infestation with inanimate objects (sometimes called Morgellons disease), has been said to represent a distinct and encapsulated delusion, that is, a stand-alone diagnosis. Anecdotally, we have observed that patients with delusional infestation often have one or more psychiatric comorbid conditions and that delusional infestation should not be regarded as a stand-alone diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to identify whether patients with delusional infestation have psychiatric comorbid conditions. We therefore identified patients who had been formally evaluated in the Department of Psychiatry during their visit to Mayo Clinic. We retrospectively searched for and reviewed the cases of all patients with delusional infestation seen from 2001 through 2007 at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, and who underwent psychiatric evaluation. The diagnoses resulting from psychiatric evaluation were analyzed. During the 7-year study period, 109 patients seen for delusional infestation at Mayo Clinic were referred to the Department of Psychiatry, 54 (50%) of whom actually followed through with psychiatric consultation. Of these 54 patients, 40 (74%) received additional active psychiatric diagnoses; 14 patients (26%) had delusional infestation alone. Abnormal personality traits were rarely documented. Most patients with delusional infestation have multiple coexisting or underlying psychiatric disorders. Therefore, evaluation by a psychiatrist, when possible, is advised for all patients with delusional infestation. Copyright © 2012 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Studies of the misidentification probability of electrons as photons with the CMS experiment in data recorded in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100366

    In this thesis the estimation of backgrounds for search analyses with photon final states arising from the misidentification of electrons as photons in the CMS detector is studied. To determine the misidentification probability, events containing a Z boson that decays into two electrons are selected and assigned to two event classes using a tag and probe method. The Z-boson resonance is then fitted with template based probability distributions for signal and background. The method is validated in simulation and the results for the first LHC Run I data recorded by CMS in 2015 are presented.

  13. Nature and Extent of Person Recognition Impairments Associated with Capgras Syndrome in Lewy Body Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris M. Fiacconi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Capgras Syndrome (CS adopt the delusional belief that persons well-known to them have been replaced by an imposter. Several current theoretical models of CS attribute such misidentification problems to deficits in covert recognition processes related to the generation of appropriate affective autonomic signals. These models assume intact overt recognition processes for the imposter and, more broadly, for other individuals. As such, it has been suggested that CS could reflect the ‘mirror image’ of prosopagnosia. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether overt person recognition abilities are indeed always spared in CS. Furthermore, we examined whether CS might be associated with any impairments in overt affective judgments of facial expressions. We pursued these goals by studying a patient with Lewy Body Dementia (DLB who showed clear signs of CS, and by comparing him to another patient with DLB who did not experience CS, as well as to a group of healthy control participants. We assessed overt person recognition with three fame recognition tasks, using faces, voices, and names as cues. We also included measures of confidence and probed pertinent semantic knowledge. In addition, participants rated the intensity of fearful facial expressions. We found that CS was associated with overt person recognition deficits when probed with faces and voices, but not with names. Critically, these deficits were not present in the DLB patient without CS. In addition, CS was associated with impairments in overt judgments of affect intensity. Taken together, our findings cast doubt on the traditional view that CS is the mirror-image of prosopagnosia and that it spares overt recognition abilities. These findings can still be accommodated by models of CS that emphasize deficits in autonomic responding, to the extent that the potential role of interoceptive awareness in overt judgments is taken into account.

  14. Echos, Doubles, and Delusions : Capgras Syndrome in Science and Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draaisma, Douwe

    2009-01-01

    Mark Schluter, the main protagonist in Richard Powers's The Echo Maker (2006), suffers from Capgras Syndrome, a disorder characterized by the patient's delusional belief that his near ones are replaced by doubles. Since its initial identification in 1923, Capgras Syndrome has had a two-stage

  15. Delusional parasitosis with hyperthyroidism in an elderly woman: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozten, Eylem; Tufan, Ali Evren; Cerit, Cem; Sayar, Gökben Hızlı; Ulubil, Irem Yalug

    2013-01-10

    Delusional parasitosis is a rare, monosymptomatic psychosis involving a delusion of being infested with parasites. It is commonly observed among female patients over the age of 50. It is classified as a 'delusional disorder' according to the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases and as a 'delusional disorder - somatic type' according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fourth Edition. Delusional parasitosis was reported to be associated with physical disorders such as hypoparathyroidism, Huntington's chorea and Alzheimer's disease, among others. Other than vitamin deficiencies however, a causal relationship has not to date been identified. We present this case due to the rarity of Turkish patients with this condition, its duration of follow-up, and its temporal pattern of symptoms paralleling thyroid function tests. Our patient was a 70-year-old white Anatolian Turkish woman with primary school education who had been living alone for the past five years. She presented to our psychiatry department complaining of 'feeling large worms moving in her body'. The complaints started after she was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism, increased when she did not use her thyroid medications and remitted when she was compliant with treatment. She was treated with pimozide 2mg/day for 20 months and followed-up without any antipsychotic treatment for an additional nine months. At her last examination, she was euthyroid, not receiving antipsychotics and was not having any delusions. Although endocrine disorders, including hyperthyroidism, are listed among the etiological factors contributing to secondary delusional parasitosis, as far as we are aware this is the first case demonstrating a temporal pattern of thyroid hyperfunction and delusions through a protracted period of follow-up. It may be that the treatment of delusional parasitosis depends on clarifying the etiology and that atypical antipsychotics may help in the management of primary delusional

  16. Study of the electron → photon misidentification rate in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Haase, Johannes

    In this thesis, the misidentification of electrons as photons (fake rate) is investigated using the first 7 TeV data of the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. A method for the measurement of the fake rate in data, using pure electrons from the Z0 → e+e− decay, called tag-and-probe, is presented. The results are studied as functions of kinematic variables in order to show effects on the detector performance. A cross check with a so-called truth-matching method in Monte Carlo is applied. In addition, the fake rate for Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking events is estimated and compared with Z0 → e+e− studies.

  17. Poisoning of 'binthamburu' (Ipomoea asarifolia) due to misidentification as 'kankun' (Ipomoea aquatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnatilaka, A; Yakandawala, D; Rupasinghe, N; Ratnayake, K

    2010-06-01

    Ingestion of 'Binthamburu' (Ipomoea asarifolia) by misidentification as 'kankun' (Ipomoea aquatica) as a leafy vegetable causes acute gastrointestinal symptoms and confusion. The authors have encountered four such cases in the past. All cases have been recorded from the dry zone of the country. Both plants are two trailing vines similar in their appearance and preferring the wet habitats. During the course of the day when exposed to sunlight, 'binthamburu' leaves mimic 'kankun' leaves by folding the leaf margins making it difficult to separate the two during harvest and only a closer examination will reveal the difference in their leaf shapes. Ipomoea asarifolia toxicity in human has not been recorded but animal toxicity in North Brazil due to ingestion of Ipomoea asarifolia had been investigated and linked to a toxic substance identified as lectin or LTS.

  18. Misidentification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals in Tripoli, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed O.; Abuzweda, Abdulbaset R.; Alghazali, Mohamed H.; Elramalli, Asma K.; Amri, Samira G.; Aghila, Ezzeddin Sh.; Abouzeed, Yousef M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a nosocomial (hospital-acquired) pathogen of exceptional concern. It is responsible for life-threatening infections in both the hospital and the community. Aims To determine the frequency of MRSA misidentification in hospitals in Tripoli, Libya using current testing methods. Methods One hundred and seventy S. aureus isolates previously identified as MRSA were obtained from three hospitals in Tripoli. All isolates were reidentified by culturing on mannitol salt agar, API 20 Staph System and retested for resistance to methicillin using the cefoxitin disk diffusion susceptibility test and PBP2a. D-tests and vancomycin E-tests (Van-E-tests) were also performed for vancomycin-resistant isolates. Results Of the 170 isolates examined, 86 (51%) were confirmed as MRSA (i.e. 49% were misidentified as MRSA). Fifteen (17%) of the confirmed MRSA strains exhibited inducible clindamycin resistance. Of the 86 confirmed MRSA isolates, 13 (15%) were resistant to mupirocin, 53 (62%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin, 41 (48%) were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and none were resistant to linezolid. Although disc-diffusion testing indicated that 23 (27%) of the isolates were resistant to vancomycin, none of the isolates were vancomycin-resistant by Van-E-test. Conclusions Misidentification of nosocomial S. aureus as MRSA is a serious problem in Libyan hospitals. There is an urgent need for the proper training of microbiology laboratory technicians in standard antimicrobial susceptibility procedures and the implementation of quality control programs in microbiology laboratories of Libyan hospitals. PMID:21483574

  19. On the nature of intuitive and delusional thought: its implications in clinical work with psychotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, Franco

    2003-10-01

    The author tries to differentiate intuitive imagination from delusional imagination and hypothesises that psychosis alters the system of intuitive thinking, which consequently cannot develop in a dynamic and selective way. Scholars of different disciplines, far removed from psychoanalysis, such as Einstein, Hadamard or Poincaré, believe that intuitive thinking works in the unconscious by means of hidden processes, which permit a creative meeting of ideas. Thanks to Bion's work, psychoanalysts have begun to understand that waking thinking is unconsciously intertwined with dream-work. The delusional construction is similar to a dreamlike sensorial production but, unlike a real dream, it remains in the waking memory and creates characters which live independently of the 'dreamer's' awareness. It is a dream that never ends. On the contrary, the real dream disappears when it has brought its communicative task to an end. In the analysis of psychotic patients it is very important to analyse the delusional imagination which dominates the personality and continuously transforms the mental state, twisting emotional truth. The delusional imagination is so deeply rooted in the patient's mental functioning that, even after systematic analysis, the delusional world, which had seemed to disappear, re-emerges under new configurations. The psychotic core remains encapsulated; it produces unsteadiness and may induce further psychotic states in the patient. The author reports some analytic material of a patient, who, after a delusional episode treated with drugs, shows a vivid psychotic functioning. Some considerations are added on the nature of the psychotic state and on the therapeutic approach used to transform the delusional structure. This paper particularly deals with the difficulty in working through the psychotic episode and in 'deconstructing'the delusional experience because of the terror connected with it. In the reported case, the analytic work changed the delusional

  20. Corollary Discharge Failure in an Oculomotor Task Is Related to Delusional Ideation in Healthy Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaëlle Malassis

    Full Text Available Predicting the sensory consequences of saccadic eye movements likely plays a crucial role in planning sequences of saccades and in maintaining visual stability despite saccade-caused retinal displacements. Deficits in predictive activity, such as that afforded by a corollary discharge signal, have been reported in patients with schizophrenia, and may lead to the emergence of positive symptoms, in particular delusions of control and auditory hallucinations. We examined whether a measure of delusional thinking in the general, non-clinical population correlated with measures of predictive activity in two oculomotor tasks. The double-step task measured predictive activity in motor control, and the in-flight displacement task measured predictive activity in trans-saccadic visual perception. Forty-one healthy adults performed both tasks and completed a questionnaire to assess delusional thinking. The quantitative measure of predictive activity we obtained correlated with the tendency towards delusional ideation, but only for the motor task, and not the perceptual task: Individuals with higher levels of delusional thinking showed less self-movement information use in the motor task. Variation of the degree of self-generated movement knowledge as a function of the prevalence of delusional ideation in the normal population strongly supports the idea that corollary discharge deficits measured in schizophrenic patients in previous researches are not due to neuroleptic medication. We also propose that this difference in results between the perceptual and the motor tasks may point to a dissociation between corollary discharge for perception and corollary discharge for action.

  1. Neural correlates of delusional infestation responding to aripiprazole monotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponson L

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Laura Ponson,1,2 Frédéric Andersson,1 Wissam El-Hage1,2 1Université François-Rabelais de Tours, Inserm, Imagerie et Cerveau UMR U930, Tours, France, 2CHRU de Tours, Clinique Psychiatrique Universitaire, Tours, France Background: The pathophysiology and appropriate pharmacological interventions for delusional infestation remain unknown.Case presentation: Here, we report a case of primary delusional infestation successfully treated with aripiprazole. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate brain structures and functional modifications. Before antipsychotic treatment, pre- versus post-treatment fMRI images revealed a marked increase in brain activation in the supplementary motor area (SMA.Conclusion: Our results highlight the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in the treatment of delusional infestation and the possible role of SMA dysfunction in delusional infestation. Indeed, our results suggest that psychiatric improvement of delusional infestation is associated with normalization of brain activity, particularly in the SMA. Keywords: supplementary motor area, antipsychotics, fMRI

  2. A Systematic Review on the Pharmacological Treatment of Delusional Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Negro, José Eduardo; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacological treatment is the criterion standard in delusional disorder (DD). No second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) is specifically authorized for the treatment of DD. To evaluate the evidence available on pharmacological treatments in adults with DD and to compare first-generation antipsychotics (FGA) versus SGA. A systematic review on pharmacological treatment of DD following the PRISMA methodology was conducted. We selected the best evidence available and analyzed it critically assessing both, biases and quality, to finally perform a narrative and quantitative synthesis. The evidence available was mainly limited to observational studies and case series. There were no randomized clinical trials. Three hundred eighty-five DD cases were included (177 of which were on SGAs). Overall, antipsychotics achieved a good response in 33.6%% of the patients. As a group, FGAs showed significant superiority compared to SGAs (good response rates were 39% vs 28%, respectively). We did not find superiority of any specific antipsychotic over another. There is no strong evidence to make definite recommendations, although antipsychotics in general seem to be an effective treatment for DD with a slight superiority in favor of FGAs as compared with SGAs. Existent data are, albeit, scarce and specific clinical trials on DD, are strongly recommended.

  3. Delusional confusion of dreaming and reality in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsley, Erin; Donjacour, Claire E H M; Scammell, Thomas E; Lammers, Gert Jan; Stickgold, Robert

    2014-02-01

    We investigated a generally unappreciated feature of the sleep disorder narcolepsy, in which patients mistake the memory of a dream for a real experience and form sustained delusions about significant events. We interviewed patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls to establish the prevalence of this complaint and identify its predictors. Academic medical centers in Boston, Massachusetts and Leiden, The Netherlands. Patients (n = 46) with a diagnosis of narcolepsy with cataplexy, and age-matched healthy healthy controls (n = 41). N/A. "Dream delusions" were surprisingly common in narcolepsy and were often striking in their severity. As opposed to fleeting hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations of the sleep/wake transition, dream delusions were false memories induced by the experience of a vivid dream, which led to false beliefs that could persist for days or weeks. The delusional confusion of dreamed events with reality is a prominent feature of narcolepsy, and suggests the possibility of source memory deficits in this disorder that have not yet been fully characterized.

  4. Empirical redefinition of delusional disorder and its phenomenology: the DELIREMP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Portugal, Enrique; González, Nieves; del Amo, Victoria; Haro, Josep M; Díaz-Caneja, Covadonga M; Luna del Castillo, Juan de Dios; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2013-04-01

    Since Kraepelin, the controversy has persisted surrounding the nature of delusional disorder (DD) as a separate nosological entity or its clinical subtypes. Nevertheless, there has been no systematic study of its psychopathological structure based on patient interviews. Our goal was to empirically explore syndromic subentities in DD. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 86 outpatients with DSM-IV-confirmed DD using SCID-I. Psychopathological factors were identified by factor analysis of PANSS scores. The association between these factors and clinical variables (as per standardized instruments) was analyzed using uni- and multivariate techniques. PANSS symptoms were consistent with four factors (Paranoid, Cognitive, Schizoid, and Affective dimensions), accounting for 59.4% of the total variance. The Paranoid Dimension was associated with premorbid paranoid personality disorder, more adverse childhood experiences, chronic course, legal problems, worse global functioning, and poorer treatment adherence and response. The Cognitive Dimension was associated with poorer cognitive functioning, premorbid substance abuse, comorbid somatic diseases, mainly non-prominent visual hallucinations, fewer comorbid depressive disorders, and poorer global functioning. The Schizoid Dimension was associated with being single, a family history of schizophrenia, premorbid personality disorders (largely schizoid and schizotypal), non-prominent auditory hallucinations, and dysthymia. Finally, the Affective Dimension was associated with a family history of depression, premorbid obsessive personality, somatic delusions, absence of reference delusions, tactile and olfactory hallucinations, depressive and anxiety disorders, risk of suicide, and higher perceived stress. The identification and clinical validation of four separate psychopathological dimensions in DD provide evidence toward a more accurate conceptualization of DD and its types. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Antipsychotic response in delusional disorder and schizophrenia: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Catalán, Rosa; Penadés, Rafael; Ruiz, Victoria; Torra, Mercè; Bernardo, Miquel

    2016-07-01

    Scientific evidence focused on the treatment response in delusional disorder (DD) patients is scarce, and the findings are controversial. Our goal was to compare the antipsychotic response at the 12-week followup between patients diagnosed with DD and patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and to identify potential response dimensions. A prospective, observational, cohort study with 12-week follow-up was conducted with DD and schizophrenia patients matched for sex, age and cumulative years of disease. The following scales were assessed: Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS; 5-factors), Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP), Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI), and Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Treatment response was defined as a ≥30% reduction in the total PANSS score. Linear and logistic regression models were used to investigate the potential predictive value of psychopathological variables for the antipsychotic response. Response percentages in DD and schizophrenia were 61.5% and 69.2%, respectively. The duration of untreated psychosis, antipsychotic dosage, and diagnosis did not predict antipsychotic response. In the whole sample, improvement in positive symptoms was significantly associated with the clinical global improvement (p=0.006), explaining almost 20% of the variance in the model. Within the DD group, improvement in cognitive symptoms explained 30% of the variance in clinical global improvement. Both response percentages and required antipsychotic doses were similar between DD and schizophrenia. Changes in positive symptoms were associated with clinical global improvement in the entire sample, and improvement in cognitive symptoms was correlated with global improvement exclusively in DD.

  6. Working memory dysfunction in delusional disorders: an fMRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oflaz, Serap; Akyuz, Fatma; Hamamci, Andac; Firat, Zeynep; Keskinkılıç, Cahit; Kilickesmez, Ozgur; Cihangiroglu, Mutlu

    2014-09-01

    Delusional disorder (DD) is a rare and understudied psychiatric disorder. There is limited number of studies concerning cognitive characteristics in DD. Using an established working memory paradigm with variable levels of memory load, we investigated alterations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain regions in patients with DD. This case control study included 9 patients with DD and 9 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and education level. Diagnosis of DD was confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I. The severity of the symptoms was evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. All patients were asked to perform 0-back and 2-back tasks during fMRI experiments. Functional imaging was performed using the 3.0 T Philips whole-body scanner using an 8-channel head coil. Participants with DD had less neural activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in fMRI scans obtained during performance tasks. On the other hand, neural activation of the left and right superior temporal gyrus, left middle and inferior temporal gyrus, right and left posterior cingulate gyrus, right amygdala, left and right fusiform gyrus was more prominent in patients with DD in comparison with the control group. Patients with DD had dysfunction in the prefrontal, temporal and limbic regions of the brain in particular, during performance tasks of working memory. Our findings were in line with the findings of the early reports on deficient functioning in temporal or limbic regions of the brain. Further, patients with DD displayed prefrontal dysfunction as seen in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Delusional disorder in old age and the risk of developing dementia: a nationwide register-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørner, Alex; Lopez, Ana G; Lauritzen, Lise

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether very late first-contact delusional disorder carries a risk for later development of dementia. METHODS: By linkage of the psychiatric and the somatic nationwide registers of all out- and in-patients with hospital contact in Denmark, we included all 60+ patients...... with first ever from 1 January 1994 to 31 December 2001 with the index main diagnosis: delusional disorder. First contact osteoarthritis patients as well as the general population were used as controls. A total of 1,437 patients with persistent delusional disorder and 7,302 patients with osteoarthritis were......-contact delusional disorder had an 8.14 (95% CI, 6.51; 10.19) times increased rate of subsequently developing dementia compared with very late first contact osteoarthritis patients. Compared with the general population the rate ratio was 5.49 (95% CI, 4.81; 6.26). CONCLUSION: Very late first-contact delusional...

  8. Delusional Parasitosis in a Female Treated with Mixed Amphetamine Salts: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Buscarino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To explore factors underlying the onset of delusional parasitosis; a condition in which an individual has a fixed, false belief that he/she is infested with insects. Case Description. MJ is a 57-year-old female who presents with symptoms of fatigue and AD/HD. Upon treatment with extended release mixed amphetamine salts, the patient displayed symptoms of delusional parasitosis. After eventual discontinuation of this medication, her delusions resolved. Comments. In order to maintain confidentiality, all identifying information was removed. To this end, please note that MJ is a fictitious name.

  9. A descriptive case-register study of delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Portugal, Enrique; González, Nieves; Haro, Josep M; Autonell, Jaume; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2008-03-01

    A few empirically based studies' data on delusional disorder (DD) exist. We aim to describe sociodemographic and clinical correlates of DD and to identify clinical profiles associated to DD and its subtypes. This is a case-register study based on all those subjects attending community mental health services within a geographically well-defined area. Four hundred and sixty-seven patients had been diagnosed as DD cases at psychiatric services serving a catchment area of some 607,494 inhabitants living in South Barcelona (Spain) during a three-year period (2001-2003). A thorough systematic review of computerised medical records was used to establish DSM-IV diagnosis, rendering a valid sample of 370 patients who fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for DD. Independent variables gathered include sociodemographic data, family and personal psychiatric history, and comorbid diagnoses on all DSM-IV axes (including GAF). We used descriptive and univariate statistical methods to explore sample frequencies and correlates across DD types. The mean age of the patients was 55 years and the sample had a mean GAF score of 51 suggesting a poor functionality; 56.5% of the patients were female. The most frequent DD types were persecutory (48%), jealous (11%), mixed (11%) and somatic (5%), whilst 23% qualified for the NOS type. Most frequent symptoms identified were self-reference (40%), irritability (30%), depressive mood (20%) and aggressiveness (15%). Hallucinations were present in 16% of the patients (6% tactile; 4% olfactory). Nearly 9% had a family history of schizophrenia (higher among those with the jealous subtype) and 42% had a comorbid axis II diagnosis (mostly paranoid personality disorder). Depression was significantly more frequent among the persecutory and jealous types. Finally, global functioning was significantly better among jealous and mixed types and worse amongst erotomanic and grandiose cases (p=0.008). In the absence of other similar empirical data, this modest study

  10. The life history of Lactobacillus acidophilus as a probiotic: a tale of revisionary taxonomy, misidentification and commercial success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Matthew; Plummer, Sue; Marchesi, Julian; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2013-12-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a commercially significant bacterial probiotic, originally isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract and designated Bacillus acidophilus in 1900. Throughout the development of methods to identify and characterise bacteria, L. acidophilus has undergone multiple taxonomic revisions and is now the type species of a phylogenetic subgroup in the highly diverse and heterogeneous Lactobacillus genus. As a result of the limitations of differentiating phenotypically similar species by morphological and biochemical means and revisionary nature of Lactobacillus taxonomy, the characterisation of L. acidophilus has struggled with misidentification and misrepresentation. In contrast, due to its global use as a probiotic supplement in functional foods, L. acidophilus sensu stricto is now one of the most well-characterised Lactobacillus species. Here, we establish the provenance of L. acidophilus strains, unpicking historical and current misidentifications of L. acidophilus, and reviewing the probiotic, genomic and physiological characteristics of this important Lactobacillus species.

  11. Misidentifications of specific forms of cross-frequency coupling: three warnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eHYAFIL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cross-frequency coupling between neural oscillations has received increased attention over the last decade, as it is believed to underlie a number of cognitive operations in different brain systems. Coupling can take different forms as it associates the phase, frequency and/or amplitude of coupled oscillations. These specific forms of coupling are a signature for the underlying network physiology and probably relate to distinct cognitive functions. Here I discuss three caveats in data analysis that can lead to mistake one specific form of cross-frequency coupling for another: 1, bicoherence assesses the level of phase-amplitude and not of phase-phase coupling as commonly accepted; 2, a test for phase-amplitude coupling can indeed signal phase-frequency coupling when the higher frequency signal is extracted using a too narrow band; 3, An oscillation whose frequency fluctuates may induce spurious amplitude anticorrelations between neighbouring frequency bands. I indicate practical rules to avoid such misidentifications and correctly identify the specific nature of cross-frequency coupled signals.

  12. Tau energy scale and $\\mu \\rightarrow \\tau$ misidentification rate estimated with early 2016 data using Z events.

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note presents results of the tau energy scale ($\\tau$~ES) measured using $\\mathrm{Z\\rightarrow \\tau_{\\mu} \\tau_{h}}$, and $\\mu \\rightarrow \\tau$ misidentification rate measured using $\\mathrm{Z\\rightarrow \\mu \\mu}$. Both measurements were made with 6.3 fb$^{-1}$ of pp data at $\\mathrm{\\sqrt{s}} = 13$~TeV collected by the CMS detector in first half of 2016.

  13. Misidentification of Yersinia pestis by automated systems, resulting in delayed diagnoses of human plague infections--Oregon and New Mexico, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourdjman, Mathieu; Ibraheem, Mam; Brett, Meghan; Debess, Emilio; Progulske, Barbara; Ettestad, Paul; McGivern, Teresa; Petersen, Jeannine; Mead, Paul

    2012-10-01

    One human plague case was reported in Oregon in September 2010 and another in New Mexico in May 2011. Misidentification of Yersinia pestis by automated identification systems contributed to delayed diagnoses for both cases.

  14. Concomitant development of hypersexuality and delusional jealousy in patients with Parkinson's disease: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Michele; Lucetti, Claudio; Baldacci, Filippo; Del Dotto, Paolo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2014-11-01

    Both impulse-control disorders and delusional jealousy (DJ) may be considered non-motor side-effects of dopamine agonist therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to investigate the possible concomitant development of these features in PD and their clinical correlates. We performed a cross-sectional investigation in 1063 consecutive PD patients with the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's disease and the Parkinson's Psychosis Questionnaire. 81 patients presented ICDs (prevalence 7.61%) and 23 patients presented DJ (17 males, 6 females; prevalence 2.16%). 9 male PD patients presented both DJ and ICDs (39.13% of patients with DJ, 11.11% of patients with ICDs; prevalence of 0.84% in the whole PD sample), with a concomitant onset of delusional jealousy and hypersexuality in 8 cases and a concomitant onset of delusional jealousy and pathological gambling in 2 cases. Hypersexuality and delusional jealousy may occur independently in PD patients "on" dopamine agonist therapy, but may develop together probably reflecting a common alteration of sexuality (sexual arousal and jealousy) The presence of both of these clinical features and sexuality more in general should be investigated when features of either one of them appear. Further confirmation is needed in larger samples of patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Successful treatment of polydipsia, water intoxication, and delusional jealousy in an alcohol dependent patient with clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetić, Branimir; Aukst-Margetić, Branka; Zarković-Palijan, Tija

    2006-09-30

    The beneficial effect of clozapine on polydipsia and water intoxication in patients with schizophrenia has been demonstrated many times. The authors report a successful clozapine treatment of polydipsia, intermittent water intoxication, and delusional jealousy of an alcoholic. This is a rare case of clozapine treatment of a non-schizophrenic patient affected by polydipsia.

  16. Delusional parasitosis with hyperthyroidism in an elderly woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozten Eylem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Delusional parasitosis is a rare, monosymptomatic psychosis involving a delusion of being infested with parasites. It is commonly observed among female patients over the age of 50. It is classified as a ‘delusional disorder’ according to the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases and as a ‘delusional disorder - somatic type’ according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fourth Edition. Delusional parasitosis was reported to be associated with physical disorders such as hypoparathyroidism, Huntington’s chorea and Alzheimer’s disease, among others. Other than vitamin deficiencies however, a causal relationship has not to date been identified. We present this case due to the rarity of Turkish patients with this condition, its duration of follow-up, and its temporal pattern of symptoms paralleling thyroid function tests. Case presentation Our patient was a 70-year-old white Anatolian Turkish woman with primary school education who had been living alone for the past five years. She presented to our psychiatry department complaining of ‘feeling large worms moving in her body’. The complaints started after she was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism, increased when she did not use her thyroid medications and remitted when she was compliant with treatment. She was treated with pimozide 2mg/day for 20 months and followed-up without any antipsychotic treatment for an additional nine months. At her last examination, she was euthyroid, not receiving antipsychotics and was not having any delusions. Conclusion Although endocrine disorders, including hyperthyroidism, are listed among the etiological factors contributing to secondary delusional parasitosis, as far as we are aware this is the first case demonstrating a temporal pattern of thyroid hyperfunction and delusions through a protracted period of follow-up. It may be that the treatment of delusional parasitosis depends on clarifying the

  17. Urethral stricture secondary to self-instrumentation due to delusional parasitosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Muhammad Fahmi; Cassidy, Eugene M

    2015-09-15

    Delusional parasitosis is a rare psychiatric disorder which often presents with dermatological problems. Delusional parasitosis, which involves urethral self-instrumentation and foreign body insertion, is exceptionally rare. This is the first case report to date that provides a detailed presentation of the urological manifestation of delusional parasitosis with complications associated with repeated self-instrumentation and foreign body insertion, resulting in stricture formation and requiring perineal urethrostomy. A 45-year-old Irish man was electively admitted for perineal urethrostomy with chronic symptoms of dysuria, haematuria, urethral discharge, and intermittent urinary retention. He reported a 4-year history of intermittent pain, pin-prick biting sensations, and burrowing sensations, and held the belief that his urethra was infested with ticks. He also reported a 2-year history of daily self-instrumentation, mainly injecting an antiseptic using a syringe in an attempt to eliminate the ticks. He was found to have urethral strictures secondary to repeated self-instrumentation. A foreign body was found in his urethra and was removed via cystoscopy. On psychiatric assessment, he displayed a fixed delusion of tick infestation and threatened to surgically remove the tick himself if no intervention was performed. The surgery was postponed due his mental state and he was started on risperidone; he was later transferred to an acute in-patient psychiatric unit. Following a 3-week admission, he reported improvement in his thoughts and distress. Delusional parasitosis is a rare psychiatric disorder. Self-inflicted urethral foreign bodies in males are rare and have high comorbidity with psychiatric disorders; hence, these patients have a low threshold for referral for psychiatric assessment. The mainstay treatment for delusional parasitosis is second-generation antipsychotic drugs.

  18. Parent Misidentification Leading to the Breastfeeding of the Wrong Baby in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Charles W; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 2 month Final Diagnosis: 2 month old 32 weeks’ gestational age preterm infant Symptoms: Prematurity Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Accidental breastfeeding of the wrong baby Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Because there are clear benefits to breast milk over formula for infants, the goal of the World Health Organization is to increase breastfeeding rates. As more women are breastfeeding and providing breast milk to newborns in hospitals, there is increased risk for administration error. Case Report: A hospitalized preterm infant was breastfed by the wrong mother when the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurse failed to properly identify the mother. An infectious disease workup done on the donor mother was negative, but the recipient infant was positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV). Since the donor mother who accidentally breastfed the wrong infant was CMV-negative, the baby in our case had likely been exposed to CMV from his biological mother. The attending physician apologized to all of the family members involved, but the father of one infant continued to express anger. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first case of accidental breastfeeding in a hospital setting to be described in the literature. Parental misidentification and a language barrier led to the error. An infectious disease workup did not find any evidence of disease transmission from this event. Increased attention to minimize breast milk errors is needed. Despite a long history of wet nursing, unregulated breast milk sharing and cross nursing is not recommended. Instead, if a mother cannot provide breast milk herself, pasteurized donor breast milk from breast milk banks is encouraged. PMID:27515898

  19. Parasitismo imaginario: experiencia clínica y diagnóstica Delusional parasitosis: Clinical and Diagnostic Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ólger Calderón-Arguedas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: describir los casos de parasitismo imaginario observados en el Laboratorio de Entomología Médica, Facultad de Microbiología, Universidad de Costa Rica durante 20012011. Métodos: se describen 9 casos cuyas características coincidieron con cuadros de parasitismo imaginario, y se analiza la “evidencia diagnóstica” aportada por algunos de los pacientes como causa de su enfermedad. Resultados: los pacientes refirieron problemas crónicos a nivel de piel y cuero cabelludo con síntomas y signos atribuidos, según su propio criterio, a diferentes tipos de artrópodos. Dichos pacientes ya habían recurrido a consultas previas, sin éxito en el diagnóstico esperado. Las muestras aportadas permitieron identificar artrópodos como psycodinos (Diptera: Psychodinae, psócidos (Psocoptera, moscas (Diptera: Cyclorrhapha, homópteros (Homoptera, hormigas (Hymenoptera: Formicidae, (isópteros y arañas (Arácnida: Aranea los cuales son irrelevantes en cuanto a su importancia médica. También se detectaron granos, fibras vegetales, coágulos de fibrina y trozos de queratina dérmica. Discusión: se hace énfasis al personal clínico y de laboratorio para la ejecución de un correcto diagnóstico e identificación de las posibles causas, antes de proceder a administrar un tratamiento medicamentoso antiparasitarioAim: To describe the cases of delusional parasitosis observed in the Laboratory of Medical Entomology, School of Microbiology, University of Costa Rica during 2001-2011. Methods: Nine cases compatible with delusional parasitosis are described. The “diagnostic evidence” provided by patients as cause of their illness is also analyzed. Results: These patients referred chronic problems on skin and scalp with signs and symptoms attributed, in their opinion, to different types of arthropods. These patients had already been evaluated by a physician and had been unsuccessful with the expected diagnosis. The samples provided included

  20. Charles Bonnet Syndrome: An Often-Misunderstood Clinical Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Joseph M.

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS), a disability in which the individual has visual hallucinations that are complex, persistent, or repetitive, retains full or partial insight into the unreality of the hallucinations, does not have hallucinations in other modalities, and does not have delusional ideation. (Contains 12…

  1. [A case of late-onset schizophrenia with the predominant symptom of delusional perception of the color of food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Manabu; Hinohara, Kei; Yamaga, Kuniaki; Kato, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we report the case of a woman in her late 60s with late-onset schizophrenia in which the predominant symptom was delusional perception of the color of food based on a delusional "rule of colors" system constructed by the patient. This paranoid type schizophrenia is considered a core type of schizophrenia in which first-rank Schneiderian symptoms are initially exhibited. After approximately four years, the chronic phase, characterized by a poor social function, is reached. In this respect, the main psychopathological characteristics of the present case of late-onset schizophrenia are the same as those of typical cases of schizophrenia in young patients. In this study, the patient's delusional "rule of colors" system is analyzed according to Matussek's theory of delusional perception.

  2. How Frequent is Chronic Multiyear Delusional Activity and Recovery in Schizophrenia: A 20-Year Multi–follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Harrow, Martin; Jobe, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    To determine how frequent chronic multiyear delusional activity is in modern-day schizophrenia, we studied 200 patients over a 20-year period. We also studied the relation of delusions to hallucinations and thought disorder-disorganization, to work disability, and to later periods of global recovery and assessed several protective factors against delusional activity. The sample was assessed 6 times over 20 years and includes 43 patients with schizophrenia. Participants were evaluated at each ...

  3. The neurology of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyebode, Femi

    2008-01-01

    The neural basis of psychosis is yet to be fully elucidated. In this review the contribution of schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy, delusional misidentification syndromes and psychotic phenomena, such as auditory and visual hallucinations, to our understanding of the neural basis of psychosis is examined. Schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy is associated with seizures originating from the limbic structures. Reduced seizure frequency, left-sided electrical foci, and neurodevelopmental lesions manifesting as cortical dysgenesis are known to influence the likelihood of developing schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy. The delusional misidentification syndromes are a group of rare psychiatric symptoms in which impairments of face recognition memory are present. These conditions appear also to be associated with organic lesions affecting limbic structures and also involving both the frontal and parietal lobes. There is evidence that right-sided lesions predominate in the aetiology of delusional misidentification syndromes. Thus, the common link between schizophrenia, schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy and delusional misidentification syndromes appears to be involvement of limbic structures in their pathophysiology. Discrete psychotic phenomena such as visual and auditory hallucinations appear to arise from functional changes in the same cortical areas subserving the normal physiological functions of vision and audition but also involving limbic structures. In conclusion, the limbic structures appear to be central to the psychopathology of psychosis but with involvement of frontal and parietal structures. These inquiries are revealing as much about psychosis as they are about the nature of normal brain function.

  4. Delayed-onset post-stroke delusional disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Raíssa B; De Freitas, Gabriel R; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2013-01-01

    Although the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders among patients with cerebrovascular illness is relatively high, there are only few case reports describing post-stroke psychotic symptoms. In general, post-stroke psychoses have been reported to emerge few days after the vascular event and to vanish soon afterwards. In this report, we describe delayed-onset post-stroke delusional disorder, persecutory type. A middle-aged female patient developed a persistent delusional disorder with homicidal behavior about one year after a cerebrovascular accident affecting the right fronto-temporo-parietal region and a long period of chronic post-stroke mixed anxiety and depressive symptoms. Our case suggests that there might be long intervals between stroke and the appearance of psychotic symptoms.

  5. A Rare Form of Major Self-mutilation in a Patient with Delusional Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahbaz Habib Faridi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-mutilation is defined as the intentional, direct injuring of body tissue without suicidal intent. In this article we report the case of a 45-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with a history of incising his abdomen and chopping his intestines into pieces. The patient also brought the chopped pieces along with himself. He was operated on, and a resection and anastomosis was done. Postoperative recovery of the patient was uneventful. After a psychiatric assessment was done, it was found that he was suffering from delusional disorder. Owing to such rare presentation of major self-mutilation in a patient with delusional disorder, this case is being reported here.

  6. Source-based morphometry reveals distinct patterns of aberrant brain volume in delusional infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Robert Ch; Huber, Markus; Lepping, Peter; Sambataro, Fabio; Depping, Malte S; Karner, Martin; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2014-01-03

    Little is known about the neural correlates of delusional infestation (DI), the delusional belief to be infested with pathogens. So far, evidence comes mainly from case reports and case series. We investigated brain morphology in 16 DI patients and 16 healthy controls using structural magnetic resonance imaging and a multivariate data analysis technique, i.e. source-based morphometry (SBM). In addition, we explored differences in brain structure in patient subgroups based on disease aetiology. SBM revealed two patterns exhibiting significantly (pdisorder) and "organic" DI (DI due to a medical condition). In contrast, aberrant white matter volume was only confirmed for the "organic" DI patient subgroup. These results suggest prefrontal, temporal, parietal, insular, thalamic and striatal dysfunction underlying DI. Moreover, the data suggest that aetiologically distinct presentations of DI share similar patterns of abnormal grey matter volume, whereas aberrant white matter volume appears to be restricted to organic cases. © 2013.

  7. Delayed-Onset Post-Stroke Delusional Disorder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raíssa B. Barboza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders among patients with cerebrovascular illness is relatively high, there are only few case reports describing post-stroke psychotic symptoms. In general, post-stroke psychoses have been reported to emerge few days after the vascular event and to vanish soon afterwards. In this report, we describe delayed-onset post-stroke delusional disorder, persecutory type. A middle-aged female patient developed a persistent delusional disorder with homicidal behavior about one year after a cerebrovascular accident affecting the right fronto-temporo-parietal region and a long period of chronic post-stroke mixed anxiety and depressive symptoms. Our case suggests that there might be long intervals between stroke and the appearance of psychotic symptoms.

  8. [Clinical features of the Kandinsky-Clerambault syndrome in schizophrenic patients and prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirkin, S Iu

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with the typology of conditions with a delusional variant of the Kandinsky-Clerambault syndrome in schizophrenia. At the basis of the differentiation there lie different types of delusional disturbances in the structure of which the syndrome is formed. Accordingly, 4 types of conditions have been distinguished: 1. developing in combination with interpretative systematized delusions; 2. interpretative non-systematized delusions; 3. acute fantastic paraphrenic delusions; 4. acute sensual delusions. Certain correlations were demonstrated between these types of delusional disturbances and the indices of the gravity of the schizophrenic process (the form of disease development, quality of negative disturbances, the depths of process intensification, following each of the types of conditions, index of working capacity, duration of attacks). The typology presented is discussed in the light of prognosis of the severity of the development of schizophrenias and its treatment.

  9. Childhood Maltreatment and Young Adulthood Hallucinations, Delusional Experiences, and Psychosis: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu; Kisely, Steve; Scott, James G; Williams, Gail; Clavarino, Alexandra; Strathearn, Lane; Najman, Jake Moses

    2017-09-01

    Child maltreatment is a widespread public health problem associated with a range of mental health disorders later in life. In order to effectively address these disorders, there is a need to understand more about the mental health consequences of different types of child maltreatment. This study examines the associations between prospectively substantiated child maltreatment (ages 0-14 y) and reports of hallucinations and delusional experiences at 21 years after birth. As well, we examined 12-month and lifetime psychotic disorders using data from a longitudinal birth cohort. The study comprised 3752 participants from the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy, a prospective Australian prebirth cohort study. Psychotic experiences and 12-month and lifetime psychosis were measured using the Achenbach Young Adults Self-Report, the Peter's Delusions Inventory, and Composite International Diagnostic Interview at the 21-year follow-up. In adjusted analyses, those children who had experienced any maltreatment and who were emotionally abused and neglected were more likely to report (1) hallucinations and lifetime delusional experiences and (2) more likely to experience lifetime psychosis than their nonabused counterparts. In expanded models, those exposed to multiple forms of maltreatment, in particular with emotional abuse and neglect, had an increased likelihood of hallucinations and delusional experiences. There is an association between child maltreatment, especially emotional abuse and neglect, and later hallucinations, delusional experiences, and psychosis. It is, however, relevant to note that the vast majority of children experiencing childhood maltreatment do not appear to develop psychotic experiences or psychotic disorder. Further research to determine the reasons for highly variable outcomes of child maltreatment is warranted. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights

  10. A case of persistent delusional disorder: Role of dimensions of delusion reappraised

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghya Pal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The themes of delusion have been a subject of interest due to the complex underpinning of several socio-cultural aspects. Although it is defined to be out of keeping with the socio-cultural background, the interplay often poses a diagnostic dilemma. Here, we report an unusual case of persistent delusional disorder involving surgically inserted “Gas” in the background of beliefs arising from relatives, lay press, and nontraditional medicine.

  11. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging volumetry distinguishes delusional disorder from late-onset schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R J; Almeida, O; Levy, R; Graves, P; Graves, M

    1994-10-01

    Late paraphrenia is recognised as a heterogeneous disorder. This is reflected by the division of such patients into schizophrenia and delusional disorder in ICD-10. Earlier imaging studies have suggested that major structural abnormalities may be associated with the onset of psychosis in later life. Fifty late paraphrenics and 35 age-matched healthy controls underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging of the whole brain in the coronal plane. Measurements were made of intracranial and brain volumes and the volumes of the intracerebral and extracerebral cerebrospinal fluid spaces. No differences in intracranial, brain or extracerebral cerebrospinal fluid volumes between patients and controls were found. Late paraphrenic patients had greater lateral and third ventricle volumes than controls and the left lateral ventricle was larger than the right. When the patients were divided into appropriate ICD-10 diagnoses: paranoid schizophrenia (n = 31) and delusional disorder (n = 16), lateral ventricle volumes in the delusional disorder patients were much greater than those of the schizophrenics and almost twice those of controls. Structural brain differences underly diagnostic heterogeneity within late paraphrenia. The brains of late onset schizophrenics are only subtly different from those of healthy elderly individuals.

  12. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of existing pharmacotherapies for delusional disorder: a retrospective case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mews, Marie Rosa; Quante, Arnim

    2013-08-01

    Delusional disorder is an uncommon, yet not rare, psychotic disorder. Because of the distinct lack of high-evidence-level research conducted in this area, no definitive clinical guidelines are available on its treatment. The aim of this article was to summarize the current literature on the pharmacological treatment of delusional disorder in the form of a review, as well as to analyze a series of 6 cases treated at the Department of Psychiatry at "Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin" between 2005 and 2011; in each case paying special attention to the relative efficacy and acceptability of the antipsychotics used. A MEDLINE search was conducted to capture all articles on the treatment of delusional disorder published since 2004. After viewing titles and abstracts, these articles were then assessed for relevance. The files of 6 cases of delusional disorder treated at the previously mentioned clinic were analyzed and information regarding the type of medication, dose, and duration of treatment as well as adverse effects was extracted and summarized. In line with previous studies, it was found that delusional disorder has a moderate prognosis when adequately treated and that noncompliance is often the reason for poor treatment results. Various novel antipsychotics as well as a combination of medication treatment and psychotherapy produced positive results. Generally, adverse effects were easily managed by a reduction in dose or a switch to another antipsychotic, and it was often necessary to try out a number of antipsychotics before arriving at a satisfactory solution.

  13. Interdisciplinary Differential Diagnosis and Care of a Patient with Atypical Delusional Parasitosis due to early HIV-related Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medaglia, John D; VanKirk, Kathryn K; Oswald, Cameron B; Church, L W Preston

    2015-01-01

    To provide a differential diagnosis and recommendations for care for an individual with suspected delusional parasitosis secondary to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A 62-year-old male with sexually acquired, chronic, and well-managed HIV infection was referred for neuropsychological evaluation and treatment recommendations following extensive self-manipulation of a sternoclavicular cystic mass and superficial skin lesions over most of his body. The patient reported that he had pulled long calcified tendrils out of the mass over a period of several weeks and that "encapsulated fat" was flowing beneath his skin. Numerous lab panels were negative for any acute medical pathology. Clinical neuroimaging was unremarkable. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed a profile consistent with mild neurocognitive disorder due to HIV. Medical and behavioral recommendations were made for the management of delusional thought processes consistent with atypical delusional parasitosis and other symptoms. The patient was responsive to carefully crafted provider feedback and his delusional and somatic symptoms decreased significantly with risperidone. This case illustrates the utility of neuropsychological assessment and provider feedback in the diagnosis and care of HIV-related neurocognitive disorder, the context of a delusional disorder.

  14. Delusional disorder in old age and the risk of developing dementia: a nationwide register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kørner, Alex; Lopez, Ana G; Lauritzen, Lise; Andersen, Per K; Kessing, Lars V

    2008-09-01

    To examine whether very late first-contact delusional disorder carries a risk for later development of dementia. By linkage of the psychiatric and the somatic nationwide registers of all out- and in-patients with hospital contact in Denmark, we included all 60+ patients with first ever from 1 January 1994 to 31 December 2001 with the index main diagnosis: delusional disorder. First contact osteoarthritis patients as well as the general population were used as controls. A total of 1,437 patients with persistent delusional disorder and 7,302 patients with osteoarthritis were included. Median follow-up time until first diagnosis of dementia at discharge was 1.87 and 4.40 years, respectively. The probability of getting a dementia diagnosis was estimated using Poisson regression models with dementia as the outcome of interest. Patients with very late first-contact delusional disorder had an 8.14 (95% CI, 6.51; 10.19) times increased rate of subsequently developing dementia compared with very late first contact osteoarthritis patients. Compared with the general population the rate ratio was 5.49 (95% CI, 4.81; 6.26). Very late first-contact delusional disorder increases the risk of subsequently getting a diagnosis of dementia 5-8 times compared with osteoarthritis patients and the general population.

  15. OTHELLO SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiev, Dejan; Danieli, Aljoša; Ocepek, Lidija; Novak, Dominika; Zupančič-Križnar, Nina; Trošt, Maja; Pirtošek, Zvezdan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Othello syndrome (OS) is an organic delusional disorder with prevailing jealousy symptoms presumably appearing as side effect of antiparkinsonian therapy. The clinical spectrum of psychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) is very wide, including symptoms of depresion and anxiety, hallucinations, delusions, with prevalent paranoid symptoms, agitation, delirium and sleep disorders. At our knowledge, just a few cases of patients with PD and OS were reported till now. ...

  16. "It's a hair-dryer…No, it's a drill": misidentification-related false recognitions in younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Manila; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Marchetti, Igor; Lavezzini, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Memory for visual objects, although typically highly accurate, can be distorted, especially in older adults. Here we asked whether also erroneous identifications of visual objects subsequently corrected and replaced by a correct identification might induce false recognitions, and whether this is more likely to occur in older people. For this aim a new paradigm was developed. In the first phase, participants performed a visual object identification task with degraded pictures of objects and produced correct and false but subsequently corrected identifications. In the second phase, participants performed a surprise recognition task in which also false identifications were presented. False identifications elicited false recognitions, with a stronger and more reliable effect in elderly participants, suggesting that correcting the initial visual error is not sufficient to correct the memory for the experience. Moreover, misidentification-related false recognitions coexisted in memory along with correct recognitions of correct identifications. These findings are discussed in relation with age-related deficits in memory updating and strategic retrieval.

  17. A New Perspective on Delusional States – Evidence for Claustrum Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patru, Maria Cristina; Reser, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Delusions are a hallmark positive symptom of schizophrenia, although they are also associated with a wide variety of other psychiatric and neurological disorders. The heterogeneity of clinical presentation and underlying disease, along with a lack of experimental animal models, make delusions exceptionally difficult to study in isolation, either in schizophrenia or other diseases. To date, no detailed studies have focused specifically on the neural mechanisms of delusion, although some studies have reported characteristic activation of specific brain areas or networks associated with them. Here, we present a novel hypothesis and extant supporting evidence implicating the claustrum, a relatively poorly understood forebrain nucleus, as a potential common center for delusional states. PMID:26617532

  18. The psychological consequences of combat exposure: the importance of appraisals and post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology in the occurrence of delusional-like ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michelle L C; Morrison, Anthony P

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the current study is to explore the association between combat experience and the occurrence of delusional-like beliefs. It is hypothesized that negative post-trauma appraisals and positive beliefs about paranoia will be associated with vulnerability to delusional ideas and that veterans who meet criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will be more likely to hold delusional-like ideas. A small-scale survey design was employed in order to ensure that detailed information was gathered concerning battle exposure. Forty-one British war veterans completed questionnaires relating to combat experience, delusional ideation, beliefs about paranoia, appraisals of combat trauma and PTSD symptomatology. Negative post-trauma cognitions and positive and negative beliefs about paranoia were associated with increased predisposition to delusional beliefs; however, the severity of combat experience was not. It was also found that veterans who met criteria for PTSD were more likely to hold delusional-like ideas compared with those who did not. Furthermore, the PTSD group held more negative post-trauma cognitions and more positive beliefs about paranoia. These findings suggest that PTSD symptoms may confer vulnerability to delusional beliefs and that this may be mediated by negative appraisals about the self, the world and dysfunctional beliefs about paranoia. However, it is possible that psychotic-like phenomena confer vulnerability to PTSD. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. Psy-feld: An Innovative Didactic Using the TV Show Seinfeld to Teach Delusional Disorder Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobia, Anthony; Bisen, Viwek; Zimmerman, Aphrodite; Trenton, Adam; Dix, Ebony; Dobkin, Roseanne

    2015-08-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to introduce Psy-feld, an innovative didactic used to review mental disorders through discussion of the interpersonal relationships of the fictional characters created in Larry David's situational comedy, Seinfeld. To introduce this novel didactic, several peripheral Seinfeld characters were selected, who while not afflicted with a psychotic disorder, demonstrate traits that serve to facilitate discussion to review the different subtypes of Delusional Disorder. Psy-feld is a 30-min faculty-facilitated didactic where a selected episode of the sitcom allows for review of multidisciplinary content areas considered germane to the practice of psychiatry. At Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 104 third-year medical students rotated on the Consultation-Liaison Service from July 2011-March 2014 and participated in Psy-feld. Of the 104 students who participated in Psy-feld, 99 completed surveys on the didactic. Students found the didactic to be of high quality, believed it enhanced their learning, and thought that it prepared them for their final SHELF exam. Students also found it enjoyable and preferred the didactic to more traditional forms of teaching such as large group lectures. Psy-feld is an example of an innovative teaching method that medical students found informative in reviewing teaching points of Delusional Disorder.

  20. Paranoid delusional disorder follows social anxiety disorder in a long-term case series: evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, André B; Souza, Thalita Gabínio E; Ricci, Thaysse Gomes; de Souza, Clayton Peixoto; Moryiama, Matheus César; Nardi, Antonio E; Malaspina, Dolores; Kahn, Jeffrey P

    2015-06-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) patients may have self-referential ideas and share other cognitive processes with paranoid delusional disorder (PDD) patients. From an evolutionary perspective, SAD may derive from biologically instinctive social hierarchy ranking, thus causing an assumption of inferior social rank, and thus prompting concerns about mistreatment from those of perceived higher rank. This naturalistic longitudinal study followed four patients with initial SAD and later onset of PDD. These four patients show the same sequence of diagnosed SAD followed by diagnosed PDD, as is often retrospectively described by other PDD patients. Although antipsychotic medication improved psychotic symptoms in all patients, those who also had adjunctive serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors for SAD had much more improvement in both psychosis and social functioning. From an evolutionary perspective, it can be conjectured that when conscious modulation of the SAD social rank instinct is diminished due to hypofrontality (common to many psychotic disorders), then unmodulated SAD can lead to paranoid delusional disorder, with prominent ideas of reference. Non-psychotic SAD may be prodromal or causal for PDD.

  1. The Association between Physical Health and Delusional-Like Experiences: A General Population Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sukanta; Scott, James; Varghese, Daniel; McGrath, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective Delusional-like experiences (DLE) are prevalent in the community. Recent community based studies have found that DLE are more common in those with depression and anxiety disorders, and in those with subclinical symptoms of depression and anxiety. Chronic physical disorders are associated with comorbid depression and anxiety; however, there is a lack of evidence about the association of DLE with common physical conditions. The aim of this study was to explore associations between the common physical disorders and DLE using a large population sample. Methods Subjects were drawn from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007, a national household survey of 8841 residents aged between 16 and 85 years. The presence of DLE, selected common physical disorders and symptoms were assessed using a modified World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) schedule. We examined the relationship between DLE, and physical health-related variables using logistic regression, with adjustments for potential confounding factors. Results Of the 8771, 776 (8.4%) subjects positively endorsed one or more DLE. Of the six physical disorders examined, only diabetes and arthritis were significantly associated with the endorsement of DLE. Of the seven broad physical symptoms explored, only hearing problems were consistently associated with DLE. Conclusion Delusional-like experiences are common in the Australian community, and are associated with selected chronic physical disorders and with impaired hearing. The direction of causality between these variables warrants closer research scrutiny. PMID:21541344

  2. Emotional consequences of intensive care unit delirium and delusional memories after intensive care unit admission : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouwen, Marinus J.; Klijn, Francina A. M.; van den Broek, Brigitte T. A.; Slooter, Arjen J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to review literature exploring the emotional consequences of delirium and delusional memories in intensive care unit patients. Methods: A systematic review was performed using PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsychINFO.

  3. A descriptive retrospective study of the treatment and outpatient service use in a clinical group of delusional disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Molina-Andreu, Oriol; Imaz Gurrutxaga, María Luisa; Catalán Campos, Rosa; Arroyo, Miquel Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Gender differences in attendance rates for appointments in delusional disorder have been poorly studied. Furthermore, delusional disorder is traditionally considered a treatment-resistant disorder. We conducted a longitudinal retrospective study with a one-year follow-up, including 78 delusional disorder patients (DSM-IV-TR), consecutively admitted over a period of 10 years. We performed a follow-up for one year in order to describe demographic and clinical variables, and to compare the therapeutic effectiveness. In this study, due to the non-interventional nature of this study, indirect measures were used to measure treatment effectiveness. The sample was divided into three groups according to the antipsychotic received at the first admission. Twenty-three patients received Risperidone Long-Acting Injection (RILD), 30 oral risperidone, and 25 patients received other oral atypical antipsychotics. Delusional disorder women had a later age at onset and needed a longer duration of hospitalization. No statistically significant differences were found between the three treatment groups as regards demographic data, social and personal functioning, and psychopathology at admission. The RILD group showed higher maintenance rates at the end of the follow-up period. Furthermore, the RILD group required treatment with antidepressants and benzodiazepines less often. We concluded that treatment with RLAI may increase maintenance rates at follow-up in DD patients when compared with other oral atypical antipsychotics. Copyright © 2012 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Somatoparaphrenia: evolving theories and concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Todd E; Venneri, Annalena

    2014-12-01

    Somatoparaphrenia, a syndrome that involves at a minimum unawareness of ownership of a body part, in addition involves productive features including delusional misidentification and confabulation. In this review we describe some of the clinical and neuroanatomical features of somatoparaphrenia highlighting its delusional and confabulatory aspects. Possible theoretical frameworks are reviewed taking into account cognitive, psychodynamic, and philosophical views. We suggest that future studies should approach this syndrome through investigations of structural and functional connectivity and focus on the possible interplay between alterations in major functional networks of the brain, such as the default mode and salience networks, but also take into account motivational variables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Case of ChroniC Mania in a Patient with A Double Diagnosis of Bipolar I and Delusional Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Teles Martins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the case of a 62 year old woman without any significant personal or family psychiatric history prior to being 52, when after a minor head trauma occurring during worktime, she started showing delusional ideas of hypochondri- ac and somatic content believing to have developed a “problem in the head”. Two years later she was admitted to a Psychiatric inpatient unit and diagnosed with a delusional disorder of the somatic subtype. At discharge she maintained the delusional ideas, which, however, were encapsulated from her personality and quiescent, while exhibiting no insight into her psychopatho- logical state. Very shortly thereafter, at follow-up in the outpatient clinic, she stopped all drug therapy (oral antipsychotic drugs. One year later, she was readmitted to the inpatient unit upon worsening of the hypochondriac and somatic delusional ideas. The prescribed medication was switched to depot injection, which she also stopped shortly thereafter. Three years later, being 58 years of age, she began to show manic symptoms of crescendo severity (grandiose delusion-like ideas, elated mood, overactivity, disinhibition, acceleration of thinking, reduced need for sleep and increased pres- sure of speech. This clinical condition gets worse, with persecutory delusional ideas and complex auditory hallucinations and she was admitted to the inpatient unit once more. This time she presents a full manic episode and a Bipolar I affective disorder diagnosis was made. She had a hyperthymic pre-morbid temperament. For the next 4 years, the patient remained somewhat stable with elation of mood, grandiose ideas, increased pressure of speech, eccen- tric clothing and lack of insight to her psychopathological state. Since the beginning of follow up, the patient always kept poor treatment compliance. The authors discuss the evolution and clinical significance of a particular and infrequent type of Bipolar Disorder, chronic mania.

  6. Charge mis-identification determination in the 2 leptons same sign channel of ttH$\\rightarrow$leptons and combination of all ttH$\\rightarrow$leptons channels with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Chomont, Arthur Rene; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Description of the charge misidentification estimation in the channels with 2 same-sign lepton in the ttH multilepton channel. The description of the combined fit of the different multilepton channels is also presented as well as results.

  7. Aripiprazole-induced Hyperprolactinemia in a Young Female with Delusional Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sam Padamadan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is a common adverse effect of antipsychotic medication. Switching over to aripiprazole or adjunctive aripiprazole has been advocated for optimal management of antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. Adjunctive treatment with aripiprazole has been shown to normalize prolactin levels without affecting already achieved improvements in psychotic symptoms. However, here, we present the case of a 36 year old female with delusional disorder who developed symptomatic hyperprolactinemia while on aripiprazole treatment. Dopamine acts as a tonic inhibitor of prolactin secretion through the tubero-infundibular dopaminergic system. Aripiprazole being a partial agonist has a lower intrinsic activity at the D2 receptor than dopamine, allowing it to act as both, a functional agonist and antagonist, depending on the surrounding levels of dopamine. Hence, in the absence of a competing D2 antagonist and the presence of dopamine (the natural agonist), aripiprazole could act as a functional antagonist and thus elevate prolactin levels.

  8. Supersensitivity psychosis and its response to asenapine in a patient with delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2014-01-01

    Supersensitivity psychosis is a recognized complication of long-term antipsychotic treatment, in which patients develop new or reemergent psychotic symptoms, generally accompanied by dyskinetic movements, due to prolonged dopamine receptor blockade and resultant supersensitivity. Though it is most closely associated with schizophrenia and the use of typical antipsychotic agents, it has also been documented in patients with other diagnoses, and in those receiving atypical antipsychotics. There is no established treatment for this condition. In this paper, we describe a patient with persistent delusional disorder, jealous type, who developed a supersensitivity psychosis characterized by persecutory delusions, auditory hallucinations, and thought insertion in association with mild tardive dyskinesia. These symptoms resolved completely following six weeks of treatment with the second-generation antipsychotic asenapine, 20 mg/day. The mechanisms and implications of the patient's symptomatology and response are discussed.

  9. Supersensitivity Psychosis and Its Response to Asenapine in a Patient with Delusional Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Philip Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Supersensitivity psychosis is a recognized complication of long-term antipsychotic treatment, in which patients develop new or reemergent psychotic symptoms, generally accompanied by dyskinetic movements, due to prolonged dopamine receptor blockade and resultant supersensitivity. Though it is most closely associated with schizophrenia and the use of typical antipsychotic agents, it has also been documented in patients with other diagnoses, and in those receiving atypical antipsychotics. There is no established treatment for this condition. In this paper, we describe a patient with persistent delusional disorder, jealous type, who developed a supersensitivity psychosis characterized by persecutory delusions, auditory hallucinations, and thought insertion in association with mild tardive dyskinesia. These symptoms resolved completely following six weeks of treatment with the second-generation antipsychotic asenapine, 20 mg/day. The mechanisms and implications of the patient’s symptomatology and response are discussed.

  10. The social and treatment consequences of a shared delusional disorder in a homeless family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Richard C; Ramos, Erwin

    2011-04-01

    Delusional disorder is defined as a fixed, false belief that is held by a person despite evidence to the contrary. Shared psychotic disorder, also known as folie a' deux, psychosis by association and induced psychotic disorder, is an uncommon and unique psychiatric disorder. It is even more unusual when it occurs within families (folie a' famille). This case report describes the occurrence of a shared delusion within a family consisting of an adults on and two elderly parents. The shared delusion, which was the belief that a large financial settlement was a waiting to be disbursed to the family members by the local law enforcement agency, contributed to their state of homelessness and rejection of all offers of assistance from service providers. The impact of this shared psychotic disorder contributed to the family's state of extreme poverty and homelessness, which, as a consequence, greatly impeded the initiation of evidence-based therapeutic interventions.

  11. Acute Liver Injury with Severe Coagulopathy in Marasmus Caused by a Somatic Delusional Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance L. Stein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Marasmus is a severe form of protein-calorie malnutrition characterized by the depletion of fat stores, muscle wasting, and the lack of edema. In developed countries, marasmus is often the result of anorexia nervosa. Abnormal transaminases with liver synthetic dysfunction have rarely been reported with anorexia nervosa. To our knowledge, we report the first detailed case of acute liver injury with severe coagulopathy (INR>1.5 in a patient with marasmus due to self-induced calorie restriction caused by a somatic delusional disorder. This case highlights the severity of liver injury that may occur with significant weight loss from self-induced calorie restriction and the rapid normalization of this injury with treatment. It is important for clinicians to be aware of patterns of acute liver injury in patients with severe protein-calorie malnutrition, regardless of the underlying cause.

  12. From superstitious behavior to delusional thinking: the role of the hippocampus in misattributions of causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, P; Dowdy, M A; Graves, R E

    1994-12-01

    Nearly half a century ago B. F. Skinner proposed the hypothesis that human superstitiousness would be equivalent to the 'superstitious' behavior displayed by animals in operant situations involving response-independent reinforcement. Surprisingly, no attempt has ever been made to test this equivalence hypothesis experimentally. In the light of recent evidence for a common neurological basis of both superstitious beliefs held by normal subjects and delusional ideas of psychotic patients, Skinner's hypothesis has become topical again. We present an extension of the hypothesis which assumes dysfunction of the medial temporal lobe, in particular of the hippocampus, to be responsible for conditioned superstitions in animals, for common everyday superstitions, and for schizophrenic delusions. This hypothesis is based on (1) the observation of an enhanced 'superstitious' reactivity in hippocampectomized animals, (2) findings of an increased occurrence of popular superstitions in patients with a temporal-limbic epileptic focus, and (3) morphological and pharmacological evidence for schizophrenic delusions to be causally related to hippocampal damage.

  13. Imprisonment, alcohol dependence and risk of delusional disorder: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlon, E; Duburcq, A; Neveu, X; Morvan-Duru, E; Tremblay, R; Rouillon, F; Falissard, B

    2012-06-01

    Compared to the general population, an excess of psychotic illnesses, major depression and dependence disorders among prisoners has been reported. However, the impact of prison on detainees' psychopathology has rarely been studied. To determine the mental disorders liable to develop or regress on entry into prison and over time. Two samples of French prisoners detained in local prisons were interviewed using the same methodology. The first sample consisted of 267 new arrivals. The second was a random sample of 450 prisoners. Diagnoses were assessed using a thorough methodology: each prisoner was interviewed for approximately 2 hours by two clinicians. One of the clinicians used a structured clinical interview, which generates DSM IV diagnoses (MINI plus v 5.0); the second completed the procedure with an open clinical interview. The final DSM IV diagnoses were obtained as a consensus between the two approaches. Multilevel logistic regressions were used to take into account potential confounders. Prevalence rates of mental disorders were substantially higher in prison even for the sample of newcomers (major depression disorder: 24.7%, substance dependence: 17.6% and schizophrenia: 4.1%). Alcohol dependence disorder was significantly more frequent in the sample of newcomers (OR 1.84 [1.01-3.51]). No significant difference was evidenced between samples for substance dependence disorder. Psychotic disorders were significantly less frequent at entry into prison, particularly delusional disorder (OR 0.29 [0.08-0.98]). This study shows the contrasted potential effects of prison on psychopathology: alcohol dependence disorders were significantly more frequent for the newcomers, while the frequency of delusional disorders was lower. This evidence is arguing in favour of the validity of the old concept: prison psychosis. Moreover, prisoners should receive relevant help from clinicians to cope with these disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Names for Ixodidae (Acari: Ixodoidea): valid, synonyms, incertae sedis, nomina dubia, nomina nuda, lapsus, incorrect and suppressed names--with notes on confusions and misidentifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmone, Alberto A; Nava, Santiago

    2014-02-24

    A major, but not exhaustive, literature revision has been made to compile the names of Ixodidae from Linnaeus to present. Names are classified as valid, synonyms, lapsus, incertae sedis, nomina dubia, nomina nuda, incorrect and suppressed. Notes are included for confusions and misidentifications among different tick species. The lists included in this study are neither aimed to be consensual nor focusing to stabilize nomenclature, but rather part of a discussion on the species forming Ixodidae and a potential aid for research on tick taxonomy and phylogeny.

  15. Delusional disorder: no gender differences in age at onset, suicidal ideation, or suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Molina-Andreu, Oriol; Navarro, Víctor; Gastó, Cristóbal; Penadés, Rafael; Catalán, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    To investigate gender differences in age at onset, psychopathology, and suicidal behavior rates in delusional disorder (DD). We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of 97 patients with DD. Demographic and clinical data at baseline were recorded. Gender differences were investigated by applying analysis of covariance, using age at onset and age at first psychiatric consultation as dependent variables, comorbid depression and gender as between-subject factors, and employment status, social support, and DD types as covariates. Seventy-six percent of the patients were women. The average age at onset was 48.76 ± 12.67 years, mean age at first psychiatric consultation was 54.13 ± 13.67 years, and men were more likely to be employed than women (p = 0.041). Despite the earlier age at onset and at first psychiatric consultation in men, these differences tended to disappear when adjusted for potential confounders. There were no significant gender differences in depressive comorbidity, presence of suicidal ideation and behavior, or compliance rates at follow-up. Our findings could not confirm that male and female DD patients differ in age at onset, age at first psychiatric consultation, or suicidal ideation and behavior, even after controlling for potential confounders.

  16. Delusional disorder: no gender differences in age at onset, suicidal ideation, or suicidal behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre González-Rodríguez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate gender differences in age at onset, psychopathology, and suicidal behavior rates in delusional disorder (DD. Methods: We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of 97 patients with DD. Demographic and clinical data at baseline were recorded. Gender differences were investigated by applying analysis of covariance, using age at onset and age at first psychiatric consultation as dependent variables, comorbid depression and gender as between-subject factors, and employment status, social support, and DD types as covariates. Results: Seventy-six percent of the patients were women. The average age at onset was 48.76±12.67 years, mean age at first psychiatric consultation was 54.13±13.67 years, and men were more likely to be employed than women (p = 0.041. Despite the earlier age at onset and at first psychiatric consultation in men, these differences tended to disappear when adjusted for potential confounders. There were no significant gender differences in depressive comorbidity, presence of suicidal ideation and behavior, or compliance rates at follow-up. Conclusions: Our findings could not confirm that male and female DD patients differ in age at onset, age at first psychiatric consultation, or suicidal ideation and behavior, even after controlling for potential confounders.

  17. Delusional Disorder over the Reproductive Life Span: The Potential Influence of Menopause on the Clinical Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre González-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Recent evidence supports an association between estrogen levels and severity of psychopathology in schizophrenia women. Our main goal was to investigate whether delusional disorder (DD women with premenopausal onset and those with postmenopausal onset differ in demographic and clinical features. Methods. Psychopathological symptoms were assessed in 80 DD women (DSM-IV-TR, at baseline and after six and 24 months. Scores in the PANSS, PSP for functionality, HRSD 17 items, C-SSRS for suicide, and the SUMD were considered outcome variables. For comparison purposes, t- and χ2-tests were performed and nonparametric tests when necessary. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA was conducted for multivariate comparisons. Results. 57 out of 80 DD women completed the study. When unadjusted, DD with premenopausal onset had a longer DUP, higher educational level, and a tendency toward higher rates of gynaecological disorders. Erotomanic type was most frequent in DD women premenopausal onset, and somatic and jealous types were most frequent in those with postmenopausal onset. After 24 months, DD women with premenopausal onset showed higher depressive symptoms and a tendency toward higher rates of psychotic relapses. Conclusions. Our results support that some aspects of psychopathology and insight may differ according to the onset of DD and the reproductive status.

  18. Delusional Disorder over the Reproductive Life Span: The Potential Influence of Menopause on the Clinical Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Molina-Andreu, Oriol; Penadés, Rafael; Garriga, Marina; Pons, Alexandre; Catalán, Rosa; Bernardo, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Recent evidence supports an association between estrogen levels and severity of psychopathology in schizophrenia women. Our main goal was to investigate whether delusional disorder (DD) women with premenopausal onset and those with postmenopausal onset differ in demographic and clinical features. Methods. Psychopathological symptoms were assessed in 80 DD women (DSM-IV-TR), at baseline and after six and 24 months. Scores in the PANSS, PSP for functionality, HRSD 17 items, C-SSRS for suicide, and the SUMD were considered outcome variables. For comparison purposes, t- and χ (2)-tests were performed and nonparametric tests when necessary. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted for multivariate comparisons. Results. 57 out of 80 DD women completed the study. When unadjusted, DD with premenopausal onset had a longer DUP, higher educational level, and a tendency toward higher rates of gynaecological disorders. Erotomanic type was most frequent in DD women premenopausal onset, and somatic and jealous types were most frequent in those with postmenopausal onset. After 24 months, DD women with premenopausal onset showed higher depressive symptoms and a tendency toward higher rates of psychotic relapses. Conclusions. Our results support that some aspects of psychopathology and insight may differ according to the onset of DD and the reproductive status.

  19. Risperidone versus olanzapine in the acute treatment of Persistent Delusional Disorder: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Karishma; Arasappa, Rashmi; Prasad M, Krishna; Zutshi, Amit; Chand, Prabhat K; Murthy, Pratima; Philip, Mariamma; Muralidharan, Kesavan

    2017-07-01

    There is a dearth of prospective trials studying treatment response in Persistent Delusional Disorder (PDD) to guide clinical practice. Available retrospective data indicate good response to second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs). We selected the data of patients prescribed either olanzapine or risperidone from a retrospective chart review of PDD (n=455) at our centre. We compared the two groups olanzapine (n =86) versus risperidone (n =280) on dose, drug adherence, response and adverse effects. The two groups were comparable on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of PDD. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups on adherence (>80%) and response to treatment (>52% good response). Olanzapine was effective at lower mean chlorpromazine equivalents than risperidone. Logistic regression analysis identified shorter mean duration of illness, good adherence and absence of substance dependence as predictors of good response to both drugs. Our study indicates that acute PDD responds well to treatment with both risperidone and olanzapine, provided adherence can be ensured. In the absence of specific treatment guidelines and randomized controlled trials for PDD, our analysis reaffirms the efficacy of SGAs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Clinical course and personality in reactive, compared with nonreactive, delusional disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillmann, Frank; Wustmann, Tobias; Marneros, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Reactive delusional disorder (DD) (with a precipitating factor) has been postulated to differ clinically from nonreactive DD and to show a better prognosis. Our study tests this hypothesis in a sample of patients with persistent DD (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision) or DD (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) followed during a period of more than 10 years. As part of a long-term study on DD, 19 patients with DD and a stressful life event preceding the onset of the disorder were compared with 24 DD patients without such a life event. Diagnoses, social and biographical data, life events, and outcome were assessed by a semistructured interview and validated rating scales. Personality features were assessed by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory and by the Inventory of Clinical Personality Accentuations. Patients with reactive DD tended to be somewhat younger but showed otherwise little differences to patients with nonreactive DD. In particular, there were no differences in the course of the disorder. However, patients with reactive DD were significantly more often in a stable relationship and showed higher values on neuroticism and more pronounced dependent and borderline personality accentuations in dimensional personality measures. Reactive DD was not found to have a better prognosis than nonreactive DD. However, the results suggest an increased vulnerability for interpersonal conflicts in these patients.

  1. Delusional disorder and alcohol abuse in a patient with Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridi, Styliani; Diakogiannis, Ioannis; Michaelides, Michael; Sokolaki, Stavroula; Iacovides, Apostolos; Kaprinis, Georgios

    2008-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) or hepatolenticular degeneration is a rare disorder of copper metabolism that results in copper deposition in brain, liver, kidneys and the cornea. Due to the copper deposits in the brain, neurological and psychiatric symptoms may appear. The psychiatric manifestations may vary from mood disorders, behavioral and personality disorders to cognitive impairment, while psychotic symptoms are rarely reported. The objective of this report was to present an unusual case of WD presenting with nonpersecutory delusional disorder and alcohol abuse in the absence of neurological signs. A 34-year-old male patient, without any previous psychiatric or alcohol abuse history, presented with delusions of jealousy and alcohol abuse when he discontinued his treatment for WD. Although the patient had no previous symptoms or neurological signs, he was receiving treatment for WD for 3 years, after being diagnosed with the disease during family precautionary examination, since his brother developed symptomatic WD. The patient started combined pharmacotherapy, and after 3 months of follow-up the psychiatric manifestations were controlled sufficiently. Although WD is rarely associated with alcohol abuse and delusions of jealousy, this disease should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of these psychiatric manifestations.

  2. Diagnosis, assessment and management of delusional jealousy in Parkinson's disease with and without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugi, Giulio; Poletti, Michele; Logi, Chiara; Berti, Caterina; Romano, Anna; Del Dotto, Paolo; Lucetti, Claudio; Ceravolo, Roberto; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2013-09-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may present delusional jealousy (DJ). In a previous cross-sectional prevalence study we identified 15 cognitively preserved and five demented PD patients with DJ. The current study aimed at evaluating their clinical (motor and non-motor) characteristics and the pharmacological treatments associated with DJ, and its subsequent pharmacological management. Patients were assessed by neurologists and psychiatrists using the Hoehn and Yahr scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Efficacy of DJ management was evaluated in follow-up visits. All patients were in therapy with dopamine agonists. A subgroup of five cognitively preserved patients developed DJ after a short period of treatment of therapy with dopamine agonists, while other patients developed DJ after a longer period of dopaminergic treatment. Psychiatric comorbidities were common in cognitively preserved and in demented patients. The pharmacological management included the interruption of dopamine agonists in two patients and the reduction of dopamine agonist dose plus the use of antipsychotics in other patients. These clinical data suggest that the management of medicated PD patients should include investigation for the presence of DJ and the evaluation of clinical characteristics potentially relevant to the prevention or the early recognition of delusions.

  3. Possibility of the misidentification of contaminated microdiamonds in UHP metamorphic rocks: An example of diamond grains in Dabie garnet clinopyroxenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Y.; Igarashi, M.; Tsai, C.; Iwasaki, I.; Liou, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Extracted diamonds from crushed UHP metamorphic rocks always have some possibilities of misidentification by the contamination during crushing. In-situ Raman spectroscopy using polished thin sections or polished sections is necessary for the identification of microdiamonds in UHP metamorphic rocks. Even in in-situ observation that we use thin sections for the microdiamond identification by laser Raman spectroscopy, we have to pay attentions to the risk of the contamination during cutting with diamond blades, polishing with diamond paste/spray because most metamorphic diamonds are μm size and extremely rare, except for those from the Kokchetav Massif. Particularly, on the microdiamond grains which are not entirely included in the host crystals (e.g., garnet, zircon), we should carefully observe those occurrences, the positions and the coexisting materials in the host crystal under an optical microscope. If host crystals have holes or pits, the contamination of abrasive diamond and other shavings is highly probable. When acquired Raman spectra of microdiamonds are not clear (e.g., weak intensity, broad bands, low P/B ratio, mixture with other materials near diamond band), we have to keep in mind that several organic materials used in polished thin section making will make "noise" to Raman spectra of diamonds. During our study of lamellae and inclusions in clinopyroxene of Grt clinopyroxenite (no. 95-9A) from Raobazhai, North Dabie of central China, we found that several microdiamond grains in three holes of one clinopyroxene crystal. Microdiamond grains were positively identified by laser Raman spectrometry; Ar+ laser: 514.5 cm-1, 10 mW laser power, and 1 μm Φ laser beam. Typical diamond Raman band at about 1332 cm-1 (strong intensity and small FWHM) was detected. These microdiamond grains were not completely included in the host, and occurred as captured in a "hole" of clinopyroxene. On the basis of the observation with a reflected light microscope and the multi

  4. Jumping to Conclusions About the Beads Task? A Meta-analysis of Delusional Ideation and Data-Gathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert Malcolm; McKay, Ryan; Coltheart, Max; Langdon, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that delusional and delusion-prone individuals have a tendency to gather less data before forming beliefs. Most of the evidence for this “jumping to conclusions” (JTC) bias comes from studies using the “beads task” data-gathering paradigm. However, the evidence for the JTC bias is mixed. We conducted a random-effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from 38 clinical and nonclinical samples (n = 2,237) to investigate the relationship between data gathering in the beads task (using the “draws to decision” measure) and delusional ideation (as indexed by the “Peters et al Delusions Inventory”; PDI). We found that delusional ideation is negatively associated with data gathering (r s = −0.10, 95% CI [−0.17, −0.03]) and that there is heterogeneity in the estimated effect sizes (Q-stat P = .03, I 2 = 33). Subgroup analysis revealed that the negative association is present when considering the 23 samples (n = 1,754) from the large general population subgroup alone (r s = −0.10, 95% CI [−0.18, −0.02]) but not when considering the 8 samples (n = 262) from the small current delusions subgroup alone (r s = −0.12, 95% CI [−0.31, 0.07]). These results provide some provisional support for continuum theories of psychosis and cognitive models that implicate the JTC bias in the formation and maintenance of delusions. PMID:25616503

  5. Clinical Presentation and Course of Persistent Delusional Disorder: Data From a Tertiary Care Center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Karishma R; Arasappa, Rashmi; Prasad, Krishna M; Zutshi, Amit; Chand, Prabhat K; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Murthy, Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Despite its long history as a psychiatric diagnosis, little is known about the sociodemographic and clinical profile of persistent delusional disorder (PDD) or its subtypes, treatment response, and outcomes, particularly in India. We examined the clinical characteristics and course of PDD in patients presenting to a tertiary neuropsychiatry center in India. A retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with PDD (ICD-10) between January 2000 and May 2014 was conducted. Sociodemographic and clinical data including age at onset, total duration of the illness, clinical symptoms and treatment, hospitalizations, occupational functioning, and follow-up were extracted from the files. The study was approved by the institute ethics committee. The sample (N = 455) consisted of 236 men and 219 women. The mean age at onset was 32.36 ± 10.47 years. The most common delusion was infidelity (n = 203, 44.6%) followed by persecution (n = 149, 32.7%). Hallucinations were present in 78 (17.1%), depressive symptoms in 187 (41.1%), and comorbid substance dependence in 61 (13.4%) subjects; 141 subjects (31.0%) had a family history of mental illness. Follow-up data were available for 308 subjects, of whom 285 (92.5%) reported good compliance with medication. Of the subjects, 163 (52.9%) showed a good response to treatment. The diagnosis of PDD remained unchanged in 274 of 308 subjects (88.9%). In our center, PDD appears to be uncommon and has a near-equal gender representation. Infidelity was the most common delusion, which is in contrast to the reported literature. The diagnosis of PDD appears to be stable with good response to atypical antipsychotics if compliance can be ensured.

  6. Argyrophilic grain disease as a neurodegenerative substrate in late-onset schizophrenia and delusional disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Shigeto; Yokota, Osamu; Ikeda, Chikako; Takeda, Naoya; Ishizu, Hideki; Kuroda, Shigetoshi; Sudo, Koichiro; Terada, Seishi; Murayama, Shigeo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-06-01

    To study the relationship between neurodegenerative diseases including argyrophilic grain disease (AGD) and late-onset schizophrenia and delusional disorders (LOSD; onset ≥40 years of age), we pathologically examined 23 patients with LOSD, 71 age-matched normal controls, and 22 psychiatric disease controls (11 depression, six personality disorder, two bipolar disorders, and three neurotic disorders cases). In all LOSD cases (compared to age-matched normal controls), the frequencies of Lewy body disease (LBD), AGD, and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) were 26.1 % (11.3 %), 21.7 % (8.5 %), and 4.3 % (0.0 %), respectively. There was no case of pure Alzheimer's disease (AD). The total frequency of LBD, AGD, and CBD was significantly higher in LOSD cases than in normal controls. Argyrophilic grains were significantly more severe in LOSD than in controls, but were almost completely restricted to the limbic system and adjacent temporal cortex. In LOSD patients whose onset occurred at ≥65 years of age (versus age-matched normal controls), the frequencies of LBD and AGD were 36.4 % (19.4 %) and 36.4 % (8.3 %), respectively, and AGD was significantly more frequent in LOSD patients than in normal controls. In LOSD patients whose onset occurred at <65 years of age, the frequencies of LBD, AGD, and CBD were 16.7, 8.3, and 8.3 %, comparable to those of age-matched normal controls (10.2, 5.1, and 0.0 %). In all psychiatric cases, delusion was significantly more frequent in AGD cases than in cases bearing minimal AD pathology alone. Given these findings, LOSD patients may have heterogeneous pathological backgrounds, and AGD may be associated with the occurrence of LOSD especially after 65 years of age.

  7. Reducing Delusional Conviction Through a Cognitive-Based Group Training Game: A Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser eKhazaal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: Michael’s Game is a card game targeting the ability to generate alternative hypotheses to explain a given experience. The main objective was to evaluate the effect of MG on delusional conviction as measured by the primary study outcome: the change in scores on the conviction subscale of the Peters Delusions Inventory (PDI-21. Other variables of interest were the change in scores on the distress and preoccupation subscales of the PDI-21, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale, and belief flexibility assessed with the Maudsley Assessment of Delusions Schedule. Methods: We performed a parallel, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled superiority trial comparing treatment as usual plus participation in Michael’s Game (MG with treatment as usual plus being on a waiting list (TAU in a sample of adult outpatients with psychotic disorders and persistent positive psychotic symptoms at inclusion. Results: The 172 participants were randomised, with 86 included in each study arm. Assessments were performed at inclusion (T1: baseline, at 3 months (T2: post-treatment, and at 6 months after the second assessment (T3: follow-up. At T2, a positive treatment effect was observed on the primary outcome, the PDI-21 conviction subscale (p=0.005. At T3, a sustained effect was observed for the conviction subscale (p=0.002. Further effects were also observed at T3 on the PDI-21 distress (p=0.002 and preoccupation subscales (p=0.001, as well as on one of the MADS measures of belief flexibility (anything against the belief (p=0.001. Conclusions: The study demonstrated some significant beneficial effect of MG. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN37178153/Funding: Swiss National Science Foundation Grant 32003B-121038

  8. Delusional experience awareness gap between patients and treating doctors - Self-reported EPDS questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemoto, Kousuke; Tsuda, Hisamitsu; Goji, Hiroko; Tadokoro, Yukari; Oshima, Tomohiro; Tachimori, Hisateru; DeToffol, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    Although early and rapid recognition of a psychotic trend in patients with epilepsy certainly pay dividends, there is no handy assessment instrument for screening because of multiple intrinsic difficulties such as lack of a standard screener as well as a reliability gap for screeners between help-seeking and general populations. On the other hand, the predominance of positive symptoms at the initial stage of psychosis is a promising aspect of this specific group. The following specific questions were examined. Is there a measurable difference between the assessment of the treating doctor and the real feelings of the patient? How well does the attained score correspond to the clinical diagnosis? The self-reported Emotions with Persecutory Delusions Scale (EPDS) questionnaire, previously validated in a general population, was used as the assessment tool for psychotic trend in 79 outpatients with epilepsy. Independent from scoring by the patients, the treating doctors also expressed their impressions about the same patients using the same scoring tool. Stepwise multiple regression analysis of the EPDS scores of both doctors and patients revealed that a clinical diagnosis of psychosis was the only independent variable significantly related to EPDS score. Also, there was a significant difference between the EPDS scores of the patients and those of the doctors, in favor of the former. Clinical diagnosis of psychosis proved to be the most powerful determinant of EPDS score independent from other clinical factors. The awareness gap between doctors and patients based on EPDS score revealed that treating doctors often clearly underestimate the psychotic trend of their patients. Our findings suggest that such simple tests as EPDS, with a narrow focus on attenuated delusional symptoms, may help screen for an early psychotic episode in patients with epilepsy that may otherwise not be diagnosed by their physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Predicting the occurrence, conviction, distress, and disruption of different delusional experiences in the daily life of people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zeev, Dror; Morris, Scott; Swendsen, Joel; Granholm, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Recent research has shown that negative emotional states of increased anxiety and sadness prospectively predict the occurrence of persecutory ideation, but it is not known whether these findings extend to other subtypes of delusions. The current study explored whether these negative emotional states, as well as hallucinations, biased reasoning style (ie, jumping to conclusions), and negative self-esteem prospectively predict the occurrence and various dimensions of delusions of control, reference, and grandiosity in real time, as they occur in daily life. One hundred and thirty community-dwelling participants with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder completed laboratory measures and momentary self-reports generated by a personal digital assistant multiple times per day, over 7 consecutive days. Analyses were time lagged allowing simultaneous examination of person-level and within-person time-varying relationships among the variables. Approximately, half of the participants reported having at least one delusional experience during the week, and approximately, a quarter of those individuals reported experiencing all 3 delusion subtypes. Hallucinations were a significant predictor of the occurrence of delusions of control and reference over the subsequent hours of the same day, but negative emotional states of anxiety and sadness were not. Negative self-esteem predicted the frequency of all 3 delusion subtypes during the week, and a reasoning style characterized by reduced information gathering was a significant predictor of the frequency of delusions of control. Delusional dimensions of conviction, distress, and disruption had different associations with the variables tested for each delusion subtype.

  10. Unexpected subthreshold autism spectrum in a 25-year-old male stalker hospitalized for delusional disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Liliana; Dalle Luche, Riccardo; Cerliani, Corrado; Bertelloni, Carlo Antonio; Gesi, Camilla; Carmassi, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    This paper highlights the clinical challenges faced when assessing patients with stalking behaviors with psychotic disorders, suggesting the need for an accurate assessment of adult autism spectrum symptoms. A 25-year-old man with a diagnosis of delusional disorder, erotomanic type, was hospitalized for acute psychotic symptoms occurred in the framework of a repeated stalking behavior towards his ex girlfriend. When assessed for adult autism spectrum symptoms upon an accurate clinical evaluation, he reported elevated scores in the mentalizing deficit and social anxiety domains by means of the 14 item Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale (RAADS-14). Authors discuss a possible role of adult (subthreshold) autism spectrum symptoms, generally disregarded in adult psychiatry, on the type of psychotic features and stalking behavior developed that may help for appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Perceptual distortions and delusional thinking following ketamine administration are related to increased pharmacological MRI signal changes in the parietal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James; Kotoula, Vasileia; Dietrich, Craige; De Simoni, Sara; Krystal, John H; Mehta, Mitul A

    2015-09-01

    Ketamine produces effects in healthy humans that resemble the positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. We investigated the effect of ketamine administration on brain activity as indexed by blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal change response, and its relationship to ketamine-induced subjective changes, including perceptual distortion. Thirteen healthy participants volunteered for the study. All underwent a 15-min functional MRI acquisition with a ketamine infusion commencing after 5 min (approx 0.26 mg/kg over 20s followed by an infusion of approx. 0.42 mg/kg/h). Following the scan, participants self-rated ketamine-induced effects using the Psychotomimetic States Inventory. Ketamine led to widespread cortical and subcortical increases in BOLD response (FWE-corrected p parietal cortices reflect ketamine effects on circuits that contribute to its capacity to produce perceptual alterations and delusional interpretations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Clinical features and imaging findings in a case of Capgras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria Luca,1 Andrea Bordone,1 Antonina Luca,2 Andrea Patti,1 Giuseppe Sortino,3 Carmela Calandra11Department of Medical and Surgery Specialties, Psychiatry Unit, 2Department GF Ingrassia, Section of Neuroscience, 3Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Radiology Unit, University Hospital Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania, Sicily, ItalyAbstract: Capgras syndrome consists of the delusional belief that a person or persons have been replaced by doubles or impostors. It can occur in the context of both psychiatric and organic illness, and seems to be related to lesions of the bifrontal and right limbic and temporal regions. Indeed, magnetic resonance imaging has revealed brain lesions in patients suffering from Capgras syndrome. This case study reports the findings of a thorough diagnostic evaluation in a woman suffering from Capgras syndrome and presenting with the following clinical peculiarities: obsessive modality of presentation of the delusional ideation, intrusiveness of such ideation (that even disturbed her sleep, as well as a sense of alienation and utter disgust towards the double. These characteristics bring to mind the typical aspects of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Neuroanatomic investigation, through magnetic resonance imaging, performed on this patient showed alteration of the bilateral semioval centers, which are brain regions associated with the emotion of disgust and often show alterations in subjects suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder. Hence, neuroimaging allows researchers to put forward the hypothesis of a common neuroanatomic basis for Capgras syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder, at least for cases in which the delusional ideation is associated with deep feelings of disgust and presents with a certain pervasiveness.Keywords: Capgras syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, obsessive-compulsive disorder, semioval centers

  13. Combined Use of Morphological and Molecular Tools to Resolve Species Mis-Identifications in the Bivalvia The Case of Glycymeris glycymeris and G. pilosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Anna; Bušelić, Ivana; Thébault, Julien; Featherstone, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and molecular tools were combined to resolve the misidentification between Glycymeris glycymeris and Glycymeris pilosa from Atlantic and Mediterranean populations. The ambiguous literature on the taxonomic status of these species requires this confirmation as a baseline to studies on their ecology and sclerochronology. We used classical and landmark-based morphometric approaches and performed bivariate and multivariate analyses to test for shell character interactions at the individual and population level. Both approaches generated complementary information. The former showed the shell width to length ratio and the valve asymmetry to be the main discriminant characters between Atlantic and Mediterranean populations. Additionally, the external microsculpture of additional and finer secondary ribs in G. glycymeris discriminates it from G. pilosa. Likewise, landmark-based geometric morphometrics revealed a stronger opisthogyrate beak and prosodetic ligament in G. pilosa than G. glycymeris. Our Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses based on COI and ITS2 genes identified that G. glycymeris and G. pilosa form two separate monophyletic clades with mean interspecific divergence of 11% and 0.9% for COI and ITS2, respectively. The congruent patterns of morphometric analysis together with mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenetic reconstructions indicated the separation of the two coexisting species. The intraspecific divergence occurred during the Eocene and accelerated during the late Pliocene and Pleistocene. Glycymeris pilosa showed a high level of genetic diversity, appearing as a more robust species whose tolerance of environmental conditions allowed its expansion throughout the Mediterranean. PMID:27669452

  14. Hypersexual behaviour, frotteurism and delusional jealousy in a young parkinsonian patient during dopaminergic therapy with pergolide: A rare case of iatrogenic paraphilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Floris, Gianluca; Tacconi, Paolo; Loi, Daniela; Marcia, Emanuele; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2006-12-30

    Neuropsychological and psychopathological modifications induced by dopaminergic drugs in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are invariably not taken into sufficient consideration by the neurologist. Among the former, modifications of sexual urges and behaviours are of particular importance with regard to severity and variety of clinical pictures. Although rare, such modifications may assume the connotations of an aberrant sexual behaviour with criminal implications, in line with a diagnosis of paraphilia. The authors report the case of a 51-year-old male PD patient who, after a few years of dopaminergic treatment with pergolide, developed a paraphilic disorder, consistent with DSM-IV TR diagnosis of frotteurism, and delusional jealousy. The patient presented mild motor impairment and lack of or negligible cognitive deterioration, thus providing evidence that these disorders are not typical of advanced PD. Pergolide was reduced and quetiapine, an atypical neuroleptic, was introduced with subsequent subsiding of the paraphilic disorder and improvement of delusional jealousy.

  15. Olfactory Reference Syndrome: Issues for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feusner, Jamie D.; Phillips, Katharine A.; Stein, Dan J.

    2014-01-01

    The published literature on olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) spans more than a century and provides consistent descriptions of its clinical features. The core symptom is preoccupation with the belief that one emits a foul or offensive body odor, which is not perceived by others. This syndrome is associated with substantial distress and disability. DSM-IV and ICD-10 do not explicitly mention ORS but note convictions about emitting a foul body odor in their description of delusional disorder, somatic type. However, the fact that such symptoms can be non-delusional poses a diagnostic conundrum. Indeed, DSM-IV also mentions fears about the offensiveness of one’s body odor in the social phobia text (as a symptom of taijin kyofusho). There also appears to be phenomenological overlap with body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and hypochondriasis. This paper provides a focused review of the literature to address issues for DSM-V, including whether ORS should continue to be mentioned as an example of another disorder or should be included as a separate diagnosis. We present a number of options and preliminary recommendations for consideration for DSM-V. Because research is still very limited, it is unclear how ORS should best be classified. Nonetheless, classifying ORS as a type of delusional disorder appears problematic. Given this syndrome’s consistent clinical description across cultures for more than a century, substantial morbidity, and a small but growing research literature, we make the preliminary recommendation that ORS be included in DSM-V’s Appendix of Criteria Sets Provided for Further Study, and we suggest diagnostic criteria. PMID:20533369

  16. An Adolescent and His Imaginary Companions: From Quasi-Delusional Constructs to Creative Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Simonetta

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I shall describe the psychotherapeutic treatment of a 14-year-old boy, who suffered from mild Asperger's syndrome. This adolescent had a multiplicity of imaginary friends, which protected him from catastrophic feelings of loneliness and deadness, but at the same time interfered with the possibility of establishing meaningful…

  17. Some Unusual Neuropsychological Syndromes: Somatoparaphrenia, Akinetopsia, Reduplicative Paramnesia, Autotopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    Some unusual neuropsychological syndromes are rarely reported in the neuropsychological literature. This paper presents a review of four of these unusual clinical syndromes: (1) somatoparaphrenia (delusional belief in which a patient states that the limb contralateral to a brain pathology, does not belong to him/her); (2) akinetopsia (cortical syndrome in which patient losses the ability to perceive visual motion); (3) reduplicative paramnesia (believe that a familiar place, person, object, or body part has been duplicated); and (4) autotopagnosia (disturbance of body schema involving the loss of ability to localize, recognize, or identify the specific parts of one's body). It is concluded that regardless of their rarity, it is fundamental to take them into consideration in order to understand how the brain organizes cognition; their understanding is also crucial in the clinical analysis of patients with brain pathologies.

  18. A romantic delusion: de Clerambault's syndrome in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Logi, Chiara; Di Fiorino, Andrea

    2012-07-01

    Erotromania (also known as de Clerambault's syndrome) is a rare disorder in which an individual has a delusional belief that a person of a socially higher standing falls in love with her/him. It has rarely been described in older people, but many cases have been reported in conjunction with psychiatric and neurological disorders. The purpose of this paper was to examine the phenomenon of erotomania in people with dementia. We carried out a search of electronic databases for literature on this subject. The search terms used were: erotomania, de Clerambault's syndrome, erotomanic delusion and dementia. The literature on erotomania in the course of dementia consists mostly of case reports and small samples of patients. Misinterpretation of events is common in brain disease, especially with diffuse or multifocal disorders, but erotomania has rarely been reported in dementia. The relationship between dementia and de Clerambault's syndrome remains uncertain. Erotic delusion arising late in life should be thoroughly investigated to rule out organicity.

  19. Misidentification of maternal heart rate as fetal on cardiotocography during the second stage of labor: the role of the fetal electrocardiograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurani, Raisha; Chandraharan, Edwin; Lowe, Virginia; Ugwumadu, Austin; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam

    2012-12-01

    To identify the incidence of fetal heart rate (FHR) accelerations in the second stage of labor and the role of fetal electrocardiograph (ECG) in avoiding misidentification of maternal heart rate (MHR) as FHR. Retrospective observational study. University hospital labor ward, London, UK. Cardiotocograph (CTG) tracings of 100 fetuses monitored using external transducers and internal scalp electrodes. CTG traces that fulfilled inclusion criteria were selected from an electronic FHR monitoring database. Rate of accelerations during external and internal monitoring as well as decelerations for a period of 60 minutes prior to delivery were determined. The role of fetal ECG in differentiating between MHR and FHR trace was explored. Decelerations occurred in 89% of CTG traces during the second stage of labor. Accelerations indicating possible recording of FHR or MHR were found in 28.1 and 10.9% of cases recorded by an external ultrasound transducer as well as internal scalp electrode, respectively. Accelerations coinciding with uterine contractions occurred only in 11.7 and 4% of external and internal recording of FHR, respectively. Absence of 'p-wave' of the ECG waveform was associated with MHR trace. Decelerations were the commonest CTG feature during the second stage of labor. The incidence of accelerations coinciding with uterine contractions was less than half in fetuses monitored using a fetal scalp electrode. Analysing the ECG waveform for the absence of 'p-wave' helps in differentiating MHR from FHR. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. The association between delusional-like experiences, and tobacco, alcohol or cannabis use: a nationwide population-based survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous population-based studies have found that delusional-like experiences (DLE) are prevalent in the community, and are associated with a wide range of mental health disorders including substance use. The aim of the study was to explore the association between DLE and three commonly used substances - tobacco, alcohol and cannabis. Methods Subjects were drawn from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to identify DLE, common psychiatric disorders, and substance use. We examined the relationship between the variables of interest using logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results Of 8 773 participants, 8.4% (n = 776) subjects endorsed one or more DLE. With respect to tobacco use, compared to nonusers, DLE were more common in those who (a) had daily use, (b) commenced usage aged 15 years or less, and (c) those who smoked heavily (23 or more cigarettes per day). Participants with cannabis use disorders were more likely to endorse DLE; this association was most prominent in those with an onset of 16 years or younger. In contrast, the pattern of association between DLE versus alcohol use or dependence was less consistent, however those with early onset alcohol use disorders were more likely to endorse DLE probe items. Conclusions While cannabis use disorders have been previously linked with DLE, our findings linking alcohol and tobacco use and DLE suggest that the influence of these substances on psychosis-related outcomes warrants closer scrutiny in longitudinal prospective studies. PMID:22204498

  1. Delusional disorder and schizophrenia: a comparison of the neurocognitive and clinical characteristics in first-episode patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C L M; Lee, E H M; Chang, W C; Chan, S K W; Lin, J; Xu, J Q; Chen, E Y H

    2015-10-01

    Delusional disorder (DD) is thought to be distinct from schizophrenia (SZ). However, few systematic investigations have been conducted on DD because of the difficulty in ascertaining a representative sample size. Existing knowledge has been mostly generated from inpatient cohorts, which may be biased towards a more severe sample. We compared the demographic, clinical and cognitive differences between 71 patients with first-episode DD and 71 age-matched patients with first-episode SZ. Participants were consecutively recruited from a population-based territory-wide study of early psychosis in Hong Kong targeting first-episode psychosis. Basic demographic information, premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis, pathways to care, symptomatology, social, occupational, and cognitive functioning were comprehensively assessed using standardized measurements. Patients with DD had less premorbid schizoid and schizotypal traits compared to patients with SZ. More patients with DD were married compared to patients with SZ. However, at first episode, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to the duration of untreated psychosis, pathways to care, symptom severity, neurocognitive performance, treatment, and functioning. Our findings challenge previous thinking that patients with DD had better functioning than patients with SZ. This study not only provides an updated perspective into conceptualizing the clinical differences between DD and SZ, but also expands the descriptive account of the two disorders to include the neurocognitive dimension.

  2. Intention, false beliefs, and delusional jealousy: Insights into the right hemisphere from neurological patients and neuroimaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Summary Jealousy sits high atop of a list comprised of the most human emotional experiences, although its nature, rationale, and origin are poorly understood. In the past decade, a series of neurological case reports and neuroimaging findings have been particularly helpful in piecing together jealousy’s puzzle. In order to understand and quantify the neurological factors that might be important in jealousy, we reviewed the current literature in this specific field. We made an electronic search, and examined all literature with at least an English abstract, through Mars 2010. The search identified a total of 20 neurological patients, who experienced jealousy in relation with a neurological disorder; and 22 healthy individuals, who experienced jealousy under experimental neuroimaging settings. Most of the clinical cases of reported jealousy after a stroke had delusional-type jealousy. Right hemispheric stroke was the most frequently reported neurological disorder in these patients, although there was a wide range of more diffuse neurological disorders that may be reported to be associated with different other types of jealousy. This is in line with recent neuroimaging data on false beliefs, moral judgments, and intention [mis]understanding. Together the present findings provide physicians and psychologists with a potential for high impact in understanding the neural mechanisms and treatment of jealousy. By combining findings from case reports and neuroimaging data, the present article allows for a novel and unique perspective, and explores new directions into the neurological jealous mind. PMID:21169919

  3. The association between family history of mental disorder and delusional-like experiences: a general population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Daniel; Saha, Sukanta; Scott, James D; Chan, Raymond C K; McGrath, John J

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have indicated that isolated delusional-like experiences (DLE) are common in the general population. Furthermore, there is preliminary evidence to suggest that these experiences are more common in those with a family history of mental disorders. We had the opportunity to explore the association between family history of a wide range of mental disorders and DLE in an Australian general population survey. The Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007 examined 8,841 adult community residents. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to generate various DSM-IV lifetime diagnoses and to assess DLE. The participants were asked to report mental disorders in their first-degree relatives. The influence of family history of mental disorders on DLE endorsement was assessed with logistic regression, with adjustments for age, sex, and the presence of comorbid psychiatric diagnoses in the respondents. A family history of anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or alcohol or illicit drug abuse/dependence was each significantly associated with endorsement of DLE, and these associations remained significant when we adjusted for the presence of mental illness in the respondents. When we examined a more restrictive definition of DLE, only a family history of depression and schizophrenia remained significantly associated with DLE. DLE are associated with a family history of a wide range of mental disorders. These findings suggest that familial factors associated with DLE may be shared with a wide range of common mental disorders. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Delusional development in child autism at the onset of puberty: vicissitudes of psychic dimensionality between disintegration and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisagni, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Although the psychogenetic hypotheses on child autism have been superseded, psychoanalysis can still reflect on the relational exchange and its sensory aspects in concomitance with the mental development of these patients. Without making generalizations as regards the pathogenesis, but considering the specific features of each autistic child, it may be possible to achieve an integration of those islands of competence that make up these patients' limited personal heritage. Such integration may be reached through the analysis of representational, emotional and relational transformations. The first part of this article describes the case of an autistic child in treatment from the age of four on a four-times-weekly basis who, during puberty, developed severe formal thought disorders together with delusional and hallucinatory formations. The second part develops some post-Jungian theoretical contributions, such as the concept of self as nothingness and the idea of the unsaturated archetype, so as to evaluate the function of some a-priori concepts in support of the analyst's position. These concepts are considered in relation to Bion's model of transformation, and to the formulations on dimensional awareness, especially on the shift from a two-dimensionality to three-dimensionality view, as well as to the rhythm of the object's presence and absence.

  5. Intention, false beliefs, and delusional jealousy: insights into the right hemisphere from neurological patients and neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Jealousy sits high atop of a list comprised of the most human emotional experiences, although its nature, rationale, and origin are poorly understood. In the past decade, a series of neurological case reports and neuroimaging findings have been particularly helpful in piecing together jealousy's puzzle. In order to understand and quantify the neurological factors that might be important in jealousy, we reviewed the current literature in this specific field. We made an electronic search, and examined all literature with at least an English abstract, through Mars 2010. The search identified a total of 20 neurological patients, who experienced jealousy in relation with a neurological disorder; and 22 healthy individuals, who experienced jealousy under experimental neuroimaging settings. Most of the clinical cases of reported jealousy after a stroke had delusional-type jealousy. Right hemispheric stroke was the most frequently reported neurological disorder in these patients, although there was a wide range of more diffuse neurological disorders that may be reported to be associated with different other types of jealousy. This is in line with recent neuroimaging data on false beliefs, moral judgments, and intention [mis]understanding. Together the present findings provide physicians and psychologists with a potential for high impact in understanding the neural mechanisms and treatment of jealousy. By combining findings from case reports and neuroimaging data, the present article allows for a novel and unique perspective, and explores new directions into the neurological jealous mind.

  6. Psychiatric illness presenting with a sexual complaint and management by psychotropic medications: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychman, Michael; Carter, Jeanne; Amsterdam, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Sexual medicine healthcare professionals, who do not normally examine men and women with psychiatric disorders, need to be aware that those with psychiatric disorders can and do present with sexual medicine problems. In particular, psychiatric individuals may present with a variety of delusions including those that have sexual content or sexual implications. The rare disorder of reverse delusional misidentification syndrome may be encountered in schizophrenic patients and may be best managed by the combined team effort of a sexual medicine specialist and psychiatrist. To report a case study that reiterates the assessment and sexual medicine management of a female with sexual dysfunction who believed she was transforming into a male. Case report of a woman who attended an outpatient clinic in an academic medical center. A 60-year-old woman with a history of paranoid schizophrenia presented to a gynecologist for ovarian cancer screening. Evaluation revealed complaints that the patient's ovaries were testes that produced sperm and her clitoris was a penis capable of erection and ejaculation. Gynecological examination revealed only atrophic vaginitis. The patient was treated with local minimally absorbed vaginal estrogens and referred for psychological assessment and counseling. Psychotropic medication compliance was encouraged, weekly psychotherapy was continued, and delusional symptoms were minimized. Sexual medicine healthcare providers should be prepared to manage sex health concerns of men and women with psychiatric disorders, including delusional misidentification syndrome, in conjunction with a psychiatrist.

  7. Scheie syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hurler syndrome) MPS II (Hunter syndrome) MPS IV (Morquio syndrome) MPS III (Sanfilippo syndrome) Causes Scheie syndrome ... Autosomal recessive Cloudy cornea Hearing loss Hurler syndrome Morquio syndrome Review Date 4/20/2015 Updated by: ...

  8. The association between delusional-like experiences, and tobacco, alcohol or cannabis use: a nationwide population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saha Sukanta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous population-based studies have found that delusional-like experiences (DLE are prevalent in the community, and are associated with a wide range of mental health disorders including substance use. The aim of the study was to explore the association between DLE and three commonly used substances - tobacco, alcohol and cannabis. Methods Subjects were drawn from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to identify DLE, common psychiatric disorders, and substance use. We examined the relationship between the variables of interest using logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results Of 8 773 participants, 8.4% (n = 776 subjects endorsed one or more DLE. With respect to tobacco use, compared to nonusers, DLE were more common in those who (a had daily use, (b commenced usage aged 15 years or less, and (c those who smoked heavily (23 or more cigarettes per day. Participants with cannabis use disorders were more likely to endorse DLE; this association was most prominent in those with an onset of 16 years or younger. In contrast, the pattern of association between DLE versus alcohol use or dependence was less consistent, however those with early onset alcohol use disorders were more likely to endorse DLE probe items. Conclusions While cannabis use disorders have been previously linked with DLE, our findings linking alcohol and tobacco use and DLE suggest that the influence of these substances on psychosis-related outcomes warrants closer scrutiny in longitudinal prospective studies.

  9. Service Use for Mental Health Problems in People with Delusional-Like Experiences: A Nationwide Population Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sukanta; McGrath, John; Scott, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective Previous population-based studies have found that delusional-like experiences (DLEs) are prevalent in the community, and are associated with a wide range of mental health disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate mental health service use by people with DLEs. Methods Subjects were drawn from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007 of 8 841community residents aged between 16 and 85 years. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used to identify DLEs. Service utilization was assessed using a module that elicited information about hospital admissions, consultations with various health professionals, and prescription medication use. This study focussed on service use for mental health problems. We used logistic regression to examine the association, adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results Of 8 773 included participants, 8.4% (n = 776) positively endorsed one or more DLEs. With respect to consultations for mental health needs, individuals who endorsed DLEs were more likely to consult health professionals compared with those who did not endorse DLEs. Individuals with DLEs were also more likely to use prescription medicine. When we repeated the main analysis in a subgroup excluding any CIDI diagnosis of mental health disorders the results remained largely unchanged. Conclusions DLEs are common in the general population, and individuals with DLEs have an increased rate of accessing services for their mental health needs. Individuals endorsing both DLEs and increased help-seeking may identify a group of vulnerable people who have increased risk of developing psychotic illnesses later in life. This needs closer scrutiny in longitudinal prospective studies. PMID:23991012

  10. [Don Quijote, a lucid mad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Fernández, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    The case of a 50-year-old hidalgo who believed to be transformed into a knight-errant named Don Quijote is a megalomaniac systematized delusion of transformation of the self, a delusion of metamorphosis in reference to the patient's own identity. The outward projection of this syndrome produces some delusional misidentifications of others, things and animals and include elements of a persecutory delusion which increase the grandiosity of the self. At the same time the hidalgo was maniac with a pathway of bipolar disorder. The phenomenon of donquijotismo is described as the defence of wasted causes and Sancho Panza as an illiterate Sócrates.

  11. Olfactory reference syndrome: issues for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feusner, Jamie D; Phillips, Katharine A; Stein, Dan J

    2010-06-01

    The published literature on olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) spans more than a century and provides consistent descriptions of its clinical features. The core symptom is preoccupation with the belief that one emits a foul or offensive body odor, which is not perceived by others. This syndrome is associated with substantial distress and disability. DSM-IV and ICD-10 do not explicitly mention ORS, but note convictions about emitting a foul body odor in their description of delusional disorder, somatic type. However, the fact that such symptoms can be nondelusional poses a diagnostic conundrum. Indeed, DSM-IV also mentions fears about the offensiveness of one's body odor in the social phobia text (as a symptom of taijin kyofusho). There also seems to be phenomenological overlap with body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and hypochondriasis. This article provides a focused review of the literature to address issues for DSM-V, including whether ORS should continue to be mentioned as an example of another disorder or should be included as a separate diagnosis. We present a number of options and preliminary recommendations for consideration for DSM-V. Because research is still very limited, it is unclear how ORS should best be classified. Nonetheless, classifying ORS as a type of delusional disorder seems problematic. Given this syndrome's consistent clinical description across cultures for more than a century, substantial morbidity and a small but growing research literature, we make the preliminary recommendation that ORS be included in DSM-Vs Appendix of Criteria Sets Provided for Further Study, and we suggest diagnostic criteria.

  12. An extremely rare case of delusional parasitosis in a chronic hepatitis C patient during pegylated interferon alpha-2b and ribavirin treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geert Robaeys; Jozef De Bie; Marc Van Ranst; Frank Buntinx

    2007-01-01

    During treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients with interferon and ribavirin, a lot of side effects are described. Twenty-three percent to 44% of patients develop depression. A minority of patients evolve to psychosis. To the best of our knowledge, no cases of psychogenic parasitosis occurring during interferon therapy have been described in the literature. We present a 49-year-old woman who developed a delusional parasitosis during treatment with pegylated interferon alpha-2b weekly and ribavirin. She complained of seeing parasites and the larvae of fleas in her stools. This could not be confirmed by any technical examination. All the complaints disappeared after stopping pegylated interferon alpha-2b and reappeared after restarting it. She had a complete sustained viral response.

  13. Delírio de infestação parasitária e transtorno bipolar: relato de caso Delusional parasitosis and bipolar disorder: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Leal Vidal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente relato tem por objetivo descrever o caso de uma paciente portadora de delírio de infestação parasitária comórbido com transtorno bipolar. Trata-se de paciente portadora de transtorno bipolar há mais de 30 anos e que se encontrava com quadro psíquico estabilizado e sem alterações do humor durante as consultas psiquiátricas. Em uma das suas avaliações periódicas, começou a se queixar da presença de vermes que estavam infestando seu corpo, o que já vinha ocorrendo há 8 anos. Estava em uso de carbonato de lítio e não aceitou tomar o antipsicótico prescrito porque já experimentara efeito colateral com essa classe de medicamentos. A associação entre delírio de infestação parasitária e transtorno bipolar é rara, e os autores encontraram apenas um caso semelhante descrito na literatura médica internacional.The objective of the present report is to describe the case of a patient with delusional parasitosis comorbid with bipolar disorder. The patient had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder over 30 years ago and her mental state was stable without any mood disturbances detected during psychiatric visits. During one of her periodic evaluations, the patient started to complain that worms were infesting her body, which had been occurring for the past 8 years. She was taking lithium carbonate and refused to use an antipsychotic because she had experienced side effects after using this class of drugs. The association between delusional parasitosis and bipolar disorder is rare, and we found only one similar case described in the literature.

  14. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System & How it Works Digestive Diseases A-Z Dumping Syndrome What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ... the colon and rectum—and anus. What causes dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome is caused by problems with ...

  15. A case of Fregoli syndrome and Erotomania associated with anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although anemia due to the cobalamin deficiency has been described as a cause of a wide range of psychiatric disorders, the role of iron deficiency anemia in psychiatric disorders remains unexplored. We report a rare case of simultaneous presence of simultaneous presence of Fregoli syndrome with Erotomania which occuring in the context of iron and cobalamin deficiency anemia. The index patient improved after correction of anemia. But what is notable is that the patient continues to be free from psychotic symptoms even after 4 months of discharge. This case report shows a rare combination of two different delusional disorders that might be associated with anemia. This stresses the importance of doing a complete hematological work up in patients with psychiatric disorders.

  16. Paranoia and Delusional Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recovery & Support Treatment Education Housing Managing Your Money Parenting Paying for Care Meaningful Work and Recovery Taking ... A Secondary Footer Menu Home Contact Us Store Career Center Site Policies Site Map Donate Affiliate Login ...

  17. Delusional "pseudotranssexualism" in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borras, Laurence; Huguelet, Philippe; Eytan, Ariel

    2007-01-01

    Twenty percent of all schizophrenic patients experience sexual delusions at some point during the evolution of their illness. Among them, some patients develop the conviction of belonging to the other sex. Although true coexistence of schizophrenia and gender identity disorder is rare, it can be difficult to disentangle the two conditions. We report the case of a 40-year-old male patient with chronic schizophrenia who developed intrusive gender identity preoccupations over the years. Using this clinical case as a starting point, relevant literature is then reviewed and discussed. Long-lasting florid delusions of sex change are unusual but have been noted among patients with schizophrenia. Considering the irreversible consequences of surgery and its medico-legal implications, these patients should be properly detected.

  18. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and ...

  19. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... two medicines that affect the body's level of serotonin are taken together at the same time. The ...

  20. Lycanthropy as a culture-bound syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Khalil, Rami; Dahdah, Pierre; Richa, Sami; Kahn, David A

    2012-01-01

    Lycanthropy is an unusual belief or delusion that one has been transformed into an animal, or behaviors or feelings suggestive of such a belief. We report a case of lycanthropic delusions of becoming a snake in a 47-year-old woman who suffered from a major depressive disorder with psychotic features. We also present a literature review of articles published on the subject in English or French since 1975 identified via a MedLine search using the terms "lycanthropy" or "werewolf." Many case reports have described lycanthropy as a delusional disorder occurring acutely in patients who think they suffer from a demonic possession as a punishment for their acts. In these cases, symptoms are generally rapidly reversible. Lycanthropy seems to be a nonspecific manifestation of many psychiatric diseases, most commonly major depressive disorder with psychotic features. It is largely influenced by the cultural environment of the patient so that the animal species frequently represents the patient's delusional representation of evil. Lycanthropy could be considered a culture-bound syndrome that occurs in association with Axis I, DSM-IV psychiatric pathology.

  1. Gardner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Gardner Syndrome Request Permissions Gardner Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 06/2014 What is Gardner syndrome? Gardner syndrome is a subtype of familial ...

  2. Síndrome de Ekbom acompanhada de automutilação Ekbom's syndrome followed by self-mutilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Domingues Goi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O delírio parasitário (ou síndrome de Ekbom é uma condição rara, onde o paciente apresenta uma forte convicção de que está infestado por pequenos parasitas ou organismos. Muitas vezes, os delírios são tão intensos que levam esses pacientes à automutilação. Relatamos aqui um caso de um senhor de 67 anos, isolado socialmente, solteiro, apresentando delírio parasitário em região perineal, culminando em lesões por automutilação.Delusional parasitosis (or Ekbom's syndrome is a rare condition, in which the patient has a strong conviction that he or she is infested by small parasites or organisms. These delusions are often so intense that they lead the patient to self-mutilation. We report a case of a 67-year-old man, socially isolated, single, with delusional parasitosis in the perineal area, culminating in self-mutilation lesions.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance syndrome, low HDL cholesterol, Metabolic Syndrome, overweight, syndrome x, type 2 diabetes Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Women January 2005 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis ...

  4. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  5. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. Parents may not have any family history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the ...

  6. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Fahr's Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? ... and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Fahr's Syndrome. The goals of this research are to ...

  7. Anxiety and depressive disorders are associated with delusional-like experiences: a replication study based on a National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James; Varghese, Daniel; McGrath, John

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There is growing evidence that delusional-like experiences (DLE) are associated with common mental disorders. In particular, a National Mental Health Survey conducted in Australia during 2007 reported an association between DLE and both anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder (MDD). However, the previous study did not examine this association with respect to subtypes of anxiety disorder nor with severity of MDD. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between DLE and both anxiety disorder and MDD in more detail based on an independent population sample. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Subjects were drawn from the Australian Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 1997 using a stratified multistage area sampling of persons living in private dwellings in all States and Territories of Australia. Participants Approximately 13 600 private dwellings were initially selected with one person aged 18 years or older from each dwelling invited to participate. In total, 10 641 individuals participated in the survey. Primary and secondary outcome measures The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to identify individuals with DLE and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, Fourth Edition (DSM IV) lifetime diagnoses of anxiety disorders and MDD. The influence of various anxiety disorders and MDD on DLE was assessed with logistic regression. Results Having a lifetime diagnosis of either any anxiety disorder or MDD was significantly associated with the endorsement of DLE. The association was found for each of the main anxiety disorders when examined separately. There was a dose–response relationship between increasing severity of MDD and higher odds of DLE endorsement. Conclusions DLE are associated with a wide range of anxiety disorders and are more prevalent in those with MDD. Understanding the relationship between DLE, anxiety disorders and depression may provide insights into shared pathways that underpin

  8. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan Makwana; R. K. Vishnoi; Jai Prakash Soni; Kapil Jetha; Suresh Kumar Verma; Pradeep Singh Rathore; Monika Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    ...,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease...

  9. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  10. 3 misidentification cases of Brucella species by automated microbial identification system and literature review*%细菌自动鉴定仪3例布鲁氏菌误鉴定及文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨婧; 任晓庆; 褚美玲; 马均; 任微; 王璐; 孟冬娅

    2012-01-01

    该在鉴定仪器专家系统中提示需与布鲁氏菌鉴别,有效预防布鲁氏菌引起的实验室获得性感染.有关上述非常见菌感染的文章中若仅有常规细菌鉴定而无分子生物学鉴定的案例,建议慎重报道.%Objective To investigate the reason and limitations of 3 misidentification cases of Brucella species by VTEK2 Compact microbial identification system. Methods Strains were isolated from blood culture of two patients suffering from fever without apparent causes and one from bone marrow culture of a patient having left tibial lesion. The strains were identified through VTKK2 Compact microbial identification system,morphological methods and routine manual biochemical methods. 16S rRNA gene was amplified through PCR and sequenced. The resulting nucleic acid sequences were homologically compared. Results Three slowly growing strains of gram negative curtobacterium were isolated, which were initially identified as Bordetella bronchisepticad case) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (2 cases) through VTEK2 Compact microbial identification system and GN identification card. 16S rRNA gene sequencing results showed 100% matching with Brucella melitensis or Ochrobactrum anthropi, which completely excluded the possibility of Bordetella bronchiseptica. Negative result of motility test excluded Ochrobactrum anthropi. Re-identification of preserved strain through VTKK 2 Compact microbial identification system and GN identification card showed Brucella melitensis. Reviewing literatures,we found that misidentifications of Brucella species using some commercial bacterial identification systems have occurred in the past. Brucella species has been misidentified as Moraxella phenylpyruvica,Ochrobacterium anthropi, Haemophi-lus influenzae biotype IV and Moraxella species. Conclusion 16S rRNA gene sequencing method could be an efficient means of clinically identifying slowly growing gram negative bacilli. Automated microbial identification system might

  11. Síndrome de De Clèrambault: segundo relato de caso em português El síndrome de De Clèrambault: el segundo estudio de caso en portugués De Clèrambault's syndrome: second case study in Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Carlos Calil

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de De Clèrambault, ou erotomania, é a convicção delirante que um paciente pode desenvolver de estar sendo amado por alguém de posição social muito proeminente. A síndrome está alocada entre os transtornos delirantes. Relata-se o caso de uma paciente de 46 anos de idade cujos delírios persistem há 32 anos, mantendo um médico como núcleo de seu sistema delirante.El síntoma básico del síndrome de De Clèrambault o erotomanía, es la convicción delirante que un enfermo puede desarrollar de estar siendo amado por otra persona de posición social más alta. Se ha clasificado la erotomanía entre los desórdenes delirantes. Se ha descrito el caso de una paciente de 46 años de edad cuyos síntomas persisten hace 32 años, manteniendo un médico como núcleo de su sistema delirante.De Clèrambault's syndrome or erotomania is a condition in which a patient develops a delusional belief of being loved by someone belonging to a higher social status. The syndrome is classified as a delusional disorder. The present study describes the case of a 46-year old woman whose symptoms have persisted for 32 years. The focus of her delusional system is a medical practitioner.

  12. Delírio de infestação parasitária e folie à deux: relato de caso Delusional parasitic and folie à deux: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirino Cordeiro Júnior

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Quadros de transtorno psiquiátrico induzido (folie à deux são raros. Porém, sua prevalência pode ser de 5-25% nos casos de delírio de infestação parasitária. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente de 62 anos de idade com sintomas psicóticos que, há cerca de 15 anos, está vivendo com sua irmã mais nova. Como a paciente não estava mais apresentando sintomas, sua irmã decidiu não administrar-lhe mais antipsicótico. A paciente voltou a apresentar quadro psicótico marcado por delírio de infestação parasitária, acompanhado por alucinações visuais. Sua irmã, que não tinha história de qualquer transtorno psiquiátrico prévio, passou a acreditar que realmente a paciente estava infestada e que ela mesma fora contaminada. Esse relato de caso objetiva discutir a associação existente entre folie à deux e delírio de infestação parasitária.Shared psychiatric disorder (folie à deux is a rare condition. But its prevalence can be 5-25% in patients with delusional parasitic infestation. We report the a case of a 62 years-old female with psychotic symptoms. For 15 years, she has lived with her younger sister. Since the patient was well-controled, her sister interrupted her antipsychotic drug administration. So, the patient initiated delusional parasitic infestation accompanied by visual hallucinations. Her sister, who did not have psychiatric history, initiated to believe that the patient was really infested. Moreover, she started to believe that was infested by the patient. This case report aims to discuss the relation between folie à deux and delusional parasitic infestation.

  13. Syndromic autism: II. Genetic syndromes associated with autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Artigas-Pallarés, J; Gabau-Vila, E; Guitart-Feliubadaló, M

    2005-01-01

    ..., tuberous sclerosis, Duchenne's disease, Timothy syndrome, 10p terminal deletion, Cowden syndrome, 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, Myhre syndrome, Sotos syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Goldenhar syndrome, Joubert...

  14. Edwards' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  15. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  16. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ...

  17. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  18. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone ... cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  19. Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... colon cancer may include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Cancer screening for people with Lynch syndrome If you ... et al. Milestones of Lynch syndrome: 1895-2015. Nature Reviews Cancer. http://www.nature.com/nrc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/ ...

  20. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  1. Meckel syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salonen, R; Paavola, P

    1998-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal syndrome with a central nervous system malformation, usually occipital meningoencephalocele, bilaterally large multicystic kidneys with fibrotic changes of the liver, and polydactyly in most cases...

  2. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ...

  3. Apert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  4. Learning about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? What are the symptoms ... syndrome Additional Resources for Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome is a chromosomal condition related to ...

  5. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  6. Fraser syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Kumari M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  7. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  8. Wallenberg's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Wallenberg's Syndrome Information Page Wallenberg's Syndrome Information Page What ... better ways to prevent, treat, and ultimately cure disorders such as Wallenberg’s syndrome. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s ...

  9. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández López, M T; López Otero, M J; Alvarez Vázquez, P; Arias Delgado, J; Varela Correa, J J

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a complex syndrome that occurs as a result of reintroducing nutrition (oral, enteral or parenteral) to patients who are starved or malnourished. Patients can develop fluid-balance abnormalities, electrolyte disorders (hypophosphataemia, hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia), abnormal glucose metabolism and certain vitamin deficiencies. Refeeding syndrome encompasses abnormalities affecting multiple organ systems, including neurological, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular and haematological functions. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in the refeeding syndrome and clinical manifestations have been reviewed. We provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk, reintroduce nutrition cautiously and correct electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies properly.

  10. [Metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Masanori; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, which is consisted of hypertension, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance, is one of the most significant lifestyle-related disorders that lead to cardiovascular diseases. Among many upstream factors that are related to metabolic syndrome, obesity, especially visceral obesity, plays an essential role in its pathogenesis. In recent studies, possible mechanisms which connect obesity to metabolic syndrome have been elucidated, such as inflammation, abnormal secretion of adipokines and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the relationship between obesity and metabolic syndrome; and illustrate how visceral obesity contributes to, and how the treatments for obesity act on metabolic syndrome.

  11. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes.

  12. Revisiting Cotard’s Syndrome: Illustration of Two Psychiatric Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Sousa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cotard’s Syndrome (CS is a rare and severe neuropsychiatric condition in which the central feature is the existence of nihilistic delusions. Controversy has ensued about the precise clinical picture Jules Cotard meant to describe and attempts have been made, more recently, not only to clarify the terminology, but also to define different types of this syndrome and explore its biological basis. Aims: We intend to briefly review the terminology, etiology, epidemiology and differential diagnosis of this syndrome, based on two clinical cases. Methods: Bibliographic search conducted through the electronic databases Medline and Gallica (French National Library, consultation of clinical records and direct interviews with the patients. Results and Conclusions: Typically the patients diagnosed with CS manifest the delusional idea that they are dying or already dead. However, it is also possible that they deny the existence of only some parts of their own body, or the functioning of some organs, and they may even sometimes deny the existence of the external world. We illustrate the case of a 66-year-old woman, diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder, admitted in the context of a severe depressive episode with psychotic symptoms, compatible with CS type II and the case of a young male aged 22, admitted due to a first  psychotic episode with schizophrenia like characteristics, presenting with nihilistic delusions compatible with CS type I.

  13. [Delusional thematic alternation and cyclothymia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizaret, P; Degiovanni, A; Chevrollier, J P; Gaillard, P

    1983-01-01

    The authors discuss the case of a 36 year old woman who, for several years, has been delirious and who has shown signs of an affective disorder, alternatively suffering from hypomanic and depressive episodes. What is most interesting is that she expresses erotomaniac delusions while she is elated and persecutory delusions while she is depressed. The authors propose an psychopathological explanation for her disorder.

  14. Wellens' syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Lai

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of quite rare cause of thoracic pain suspected by emergency physician as Wellens’ syndrome. Wellens’ syndrome is a pattern of electrocardiographic T-wave changes associated with critical, proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD. This syndrome is about 10-15% of all unstable angina in emergency department (ED. The cardiologic consult was obtained in ED and it was not conclusive for a Wellens’ syndrome, so that the diagnostistic planning was wrong. The authors point out the importance of this syndrome in ED and the necessity of an urgent angiographic study as every acute coronary syndrome presented in ED. We remark the importance in ED to recognize these changes associated with critical LAD obstruction and the high risk for anterior wall myocardial infarction.

  15. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L

    2009-06-01

    In its strict sense, the term "autoinflammatory syndromes" comprises the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF), which are caused by mutations of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) and perturbations of the cytokine balance. These include the crypyrinopathies, familial Mediterranean fever, TNF-receptor associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), hyper-IgD and periodic syndrome (HIDS), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, NALP12-HPF, and the Blau syndrome. The diseases are characterized by spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immunity in the absence of ligands. Autoantibodies are usually not found. HPF clinically present with recurrent fever episodes and inflammation, especially of serosal and synovial interfaces and the skin. Intriguingly, PRR-mediated autoinflammtory mechanisms also play a role in a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  16. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  17. Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanti Devi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  18. Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  19. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  20. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  1. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  2. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causi...

  3. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder K. Gupta, Ritu Gupta, Sunil Dutt Sharma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is one of the important chromosomal disorders characterised by loss (total or part ofsex chromosome. The manifestations being peripheral edema, short stature, extra skin fold, webbing ofneck, renal and cardiovascular anomalies, sexual infantilism, learning disability etc. We present here aone month female baby who had classical features of Turner Syndrome. The karyotape analysis wasconsistent with the diagnosis.

  4. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy blood cells. ... anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do ...

  5. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  6. Franceschetti syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Kasat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Franceschetti syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with variable expressivity. It is commonly known as Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS. It is named after E. Treacher Collins who described the essential components of the condition. It affects both genders equally. This article reports a case of TCS in an 18-year-old female.

  7. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L, Strano S, Carbone A, Calvieri C, Giustini S. LEOPARD syndrome. Dermatol Online J . 2008;14(3):7. PMID: 18627709 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18627709 . Sarkozy A, Digilio MC, Dallapiccola B. LEOPARD syndrome. Orphanet J Rare Dis . 2008;3:13. PMID: ...

  8. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  9. Poland syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra Madhur Sharma; Shrawan Kumar; Meghwani, Manoj K.; Agrawal, Ravi P.

    2014-01-01

    Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  10. Poland syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Madhur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  11. TAILOR - tapered discontinuation versus maintenance therapy of antipsychotic medication in patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia or persistent delusional disorder in remission of psychotic symptoms: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stürup, Anne Emilie; Jensen, Heidi Dorthe; Dolmer, Signe; Birk, Merete; Albert, Nikolai; Nielsen, Mai; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Eplov, Lene; Ebdrup, Bjørn H; Mors, Ole; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-09-29

    The aim of the TAILOR trial is to investigate the effect of closely monitored tapering/discontinuation versus maintenance therapy with antipsychotic medication in patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia or persistent delusional disorder and with minimum 3 months' remission of psychotic symptoms. Two hundred and fifty patients will be included from the psychiatric early intervention program, OPUS, in two regions in Denmark. Inclusion criteria are: ICD-10 diagnoses schizophrenia (F20, except F20.6) or persistent delusional disorder (F22), minimum 3 months' remission of psychotic symptoms and in treatment with antipsychotic medication (except clozapine). The patients will be randomized to maintenance therapy or tapering/discontinuation with antipsychotic medication in a 1-year intervention. The tapering/discontinuation group will be using a smartphone application to monitor early warning signs of psychotic relapse. Patients will be assessed at baseline, 1-, 2- and 5-year follow-up regarding psychotic and negative symptoms, side-effects of antipsychotic medication, social functioning, cognitive functioning, perceived health status, patient satisfaction, substance and alcohol use, sexual functioning and quality of life. The primary outcome will be remission of psychotic symptoms and no antipsychotic medication after 1 year. Secondary outcome measures will include: co-occurrence of remission of psychotic symptoms and 0-1-mg haloperidol equivalents of antipsychotic medication after 1-year intervention; antipsychotic dose; antipsychotic side effects; negative symptoms; social functioning; cognitive functioning; and patient satisfaction. Exploratory outcomes will include remission, clinical recovery, substance and alcohol use, sexual functioning, quality of life, self-beliefs of coping and user experience of support from health workers. Safety measures will include death, admissions to psychiatric hospital, severe self-harm and psychotic relapses. The TAILOR trial

  12. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  13. CLOVES syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob; Upton, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of patients with overgrowth syndromes has been identified with congenital lipomatous overgrowth, dysregulated fat deposits, and mixed vascular malformations. The acronym CLOVES was given on a heuristic basis to stand for congenital lipomatous overgrowth (CLO), vascular malformation (V), epidermal nevi (E), and scoliosis and spinal deformities (S). These patients have upper limb anomalies with variable phenotypes. Although hand anomalies alone cannot make the diagnosis, the foot, truncal, cutaneous and spinal anomalies are particularly diagnostic. CLOVES syndrome has emerged as a distinct clinical entity diagnosed by clinical and radiographic examinations. The overgrowth pattern is now easily distinguished from other overgrowth syndromes.

  14. Hubris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair.

  15. HYDROLETHALUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradhana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hydrolethalus Syndrome (HLS is a rare lethal genetic syndrome, recognized as a consequence of a study on Meckle syndrome in Finland .1 HLS is characterized by multiple developmental defects of fetus which include fetal hydrocephalus, agenesis of corpus callosum, absent midline structures of brain, Cleft lip and cleft palate, defective lobulation of lungs, micrognathia and very characteristic abnormality of polydactyly. About 80% of patients have polydactyly, in hands it is postaxial and preaxial in feet with duplicated big toe. A highly characteristic hallux duplex is seen in almost no other situation .2 Club feet is also common.

  16. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  17. Jerusalem syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-el, Y; Durst, R; Katz, G; Zislin, J; Strauss, Z; Knobler, H Y

    2000-01-01

    Jerusalem's psychiatrists expect to encounter, as the millennium approaches, an ever-increasing number of tourists who, upon arriving in Jerusalem, may suffer psychotic decompensation. To describe the Jerusalem syndrome as a unique acute psychotic state. This analysis is based on accumulated clinical experience and phenomenological data consisting of cultural and religious perspectives. Three main categories of the syndrome are identified and described, with special focus on the category pertaining to spontaneous manifestations, unconfounded by previous psychotic history or psychopathology. The discrete form of the Jerusalem syndrome is related to religious excitement induced by proximity to the holy places of Jerusalem, and is indicated by seven characteristic sequential stages.

  18. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  19. Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least once every year. Alternative Names Aortic aneurysm - ... syndrome. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 702. ...

  20. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Life After Diagnosis Support for Chronic Illness Corporate Partnerships Interview with Kristen Hanks Liver Lowdown July ... poor blood clotting and bleeding caused by liver failure. What are the symptoms of Reye syndrome? Reye ...

  1. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  2. Premenstrual syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwan, Irene; Onwude, Joseph Loze

    2015-01-01

    A woman has premenstrual syndrome (PMS) if she complains of recurrent psychological and/or physical symptoms occurring during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and often resolving by the end of menstruation...

  3. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... done? The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), conduct research exploring the molecular and genetic basis of Zellweger syndrome and the other PBDs, ...

  4. Autoinflammatory syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M; Gasbarrini, G; Ghirardello, A; Grandemange, S; Hoffman, H M; Manna, R; Podswiadek, M; Punzi, L; Sebastiani, G D; Touitou, I; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorders are a new and expanding classification of inflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation in the absence of pathogens, autoantibodies or antigen specific T cells. These disorders are caused by primary dysfunction of the innate immune system, without evidence of adaptive immune dysregulation. Innate immune abnormalities include aberrant responses to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) like lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan, prominent neutrophilia in blood and tissues, and dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha) or their receptors. The autoinflammatory diseases comprise both hereditary (Familial Mediterranean Fever, FMF; Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, MKD; TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome, TRAPS; Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndrome, CAPS; Blau syndrome; Pyogenic sterile Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum and Acne syndrome, PAPA; Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis, CRMO) and multifactorial (Crohn's and Behçet's diseases) disorders. Mutations responsible for FMF, TRAPS, CAPS, PAPA are in proteins involved in modulation of inflammation and apoptosis.

  5. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of sitting for a long period of time, climbing stairs, walking, or running. × Definition Piriformis syndrome is a ... of sitting for a long period of time, climbing stairs, walking, or running. View Full Definition Treatment Generally, ...

  6. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart,...

  7. Bart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad Anil

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An infant presenting with extensive aplasia cutis on lower extremities later developed blisters on skin and mucous membrane. Clinical features and histopathological examination of skin favoured the diagnosis of Bart syndrome.

  8. Neurocutaneous Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect kids include: neurofibromatosis, types 1 and 2 (NF1 and NF2) Sturge-Weber syndrome tuberous sclerosis (TS) ... forms of this disorder are neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and Schwannomatosis. NF1 is ...

  9. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... optic nerve (arrow) looks very pale, the vessels (stars) are very thin and there is characteristic pigment, ... syndrome gene have a child together, with each birth there is a: 1-in-4 chance of ...

  10. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne;

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  11. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arachnoldactyly (CCA), which refers to the joint contractures (shortening) that are key features of the syndrome. How ... remain contracted for long periods of time, the muscles can become tight and short, restricting movement. When ...

  12. Isaac's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS ... Support Library Clinical Research Next Steps Pre-Funding: After Review Terms of Award Pre-Award Start-up ...

  13. Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest shape (most often a sunken chest called pectus excavatum) Webbed and short-appearing neck Exams and Tests ... to consider genetic counseling before having children. Images Pectus excavatum References Ali O, Donohoue PA. Noonan syndrome. In: ...

  14. Dressler's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome can cause more-serious complications, including: Cardiac tamponade. Inflammation of the pericardium can cause fluids to ... including: Draining excess fluids. If you develop cardiac tamponade, your doctor will likely recommend a procedure (pericardiocentesis) ...

  15. [Mobius syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladuţiu, Cristina; Duma, Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Mobius syndrom, an anomaly in cranial nerve developement, presents with a remarkable clinical polymorphism. The rare occurence of this pathology and the questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment determined us to make this presentation.

  16. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnostic tests that can identify Down syndrome include: Amniocentesis. A sample of the amniotic fluid surrounding the ... somewhat higher risk of miscarriage than second trimester amniocentesis. Cordocentesis. In this test, also known as percutaneous ...

  17. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obesity ). This body type may be described as "apple-shaped." Insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced ... Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  18. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  19. SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sueli; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D

    2013-05-01

    SAPHO syndrome is a disorder characterized by Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis. As the osteoarticular and skin manifestations often do not occur simultaneously and there are no validated diagnostic criteria, the diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical and imaging investigation is necessary to establish the many differential diagnoses of SAPHO syndrome. The etiopathogenesis involves infectious (probably Propionibacterium acnes), immunologic, and genetic factors. Treatment is based on information gathered from case reports and small series, and is related to specific skin or articular symptoms.

  20. Carpenter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidestrand, Pip; Vasconez, Henry; Cottrill, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that belongs to a group of rare craniosynostosis syndromes (Bull Soc Med Paris 1906;23:1310). Carpenter syndrome is the rarest, with only occasional patients seen. There are 3 common features in all of these syndromes: craniosynostosis (skull base abnormalities, with early fusion in different sutures), midface hypoplasia, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. Clinical features of Carpenter syndrome include peculiar facies, asymmetry of the skull, polydactyly, brachymesophalangy, mild soft tissue syndactyly, obesity, hypogenitalism, congenital heart disease, and mental retardation (J Pediatr 1966;69:1; Am J Roentgenol 1969;106). The brachycephaly is caused by early fusion in the coronal, sagittal, and lambdoidal sutures (Proc R Soc Med Sect Study Dis Child 1909). Most of the affected patients have a surgical procedure between 3 to 9 months of age to open the cranial vault to make space for the brain to grow (Plast Reconstr Surg 1978;62:335). We present a patient with Carpenter syndrome who is unusual in that she is an adult who has never had surgical intervention.

  1. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome A A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  2. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  3. Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of Cancer > Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Request Permissions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 12/2015 What is juvenile polyposis syndrome? Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a ...

  4. Cardiac Syndrome X

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  5. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the ...

  6. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  7. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used are: WAGR Complex Wilms' Tumor-Aniridia-Genitourinary Anomalies-Mental Retardation Syndrome Wilms' Tumor-Aniridia-Gonadoblastoma-Mental Retardation Syndrome Chromosome 11p deletion syndrome 11p deletion syndrome The cause ...

  8. Escobar syndrome mimicing congenital patellar syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Can, Cahit Emre

    2012-01-01

    ...) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome...

  9. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  10. Refeeding syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Swagata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  11. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  12. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  13. Microcephaly syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this article is to review microcephaly from a genetics point of view, especially with regard to the process of identification of syndromes in which small head circumference occurs. Microcephaly can be due to either genetic or environmental causes. It can be the only positive finding or may be part of a syndrome of congenital anomalies. The genetic etiology can be caused by autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked genes or various types of chromosome anomalies. Some of the gene mutations have been identified recently. Syndromic microcephaly is associated with a large number of conditions. Some can be diagnosed, or at least suspected, based on their characteristic facial dysmorphism, and others can be searched for using databases of genetic disorders.

  14. Postconcussional Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method for definite diagnosis, trials searching for both neuroimaging and specific serum biomarkers stil continue. The treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. Information, education, reassurance and multifaceted rehabilitation programmes can be beneficial. There are promising trials reporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of postconcussional syndrome. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 96-109

  15. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network...... of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where...... was particularly high (42%). Most cases of Fraser syndrome (85%) are suspected prenatally, often due to the presence of the association of renal agenesis and cryptophthalmos. In the European population, a high proportion (82%) of pregnancies is terminated, thus reducing the live birth prevalence to a third...

  16. [Serotonin syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lheureux, P; Penaloza, A; De Cottenier, V; Ullmann, U; Gris, M

    2002-10-01

    The serotonin syndrome is a hyperserotoninergic state resulting from an excess of intrasynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine, induced by multiple psychotropic agents, but also non psychiatric drugs. It is a potentially dangerous and sometimes lethal condition. The clinical manifestations usually include cognitive, neuromuscular and autonomic features and are mediated by the action of serotonin on various subtypes of receptors. The main differential diagnosis is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Treatment is mainly supportive. No pharmacological agent has been definitely demonstrated really effective. However, reports of cases treated with the 5-HT2 blockers, including cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine have suggested that these agents could have some efficacy. Serotonin syndrome is a toxic condition which requires heightened clinical awareness among physicians in order to prevent, recognize, and treat the condition promptly.

  17. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José Melo; Gomes, Sónia Melo; Conde, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes (AIS) are a heterogeneous group of congenital diseases characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of fever and local or generalized inflammation, in the absence of infectious agents, detectable auto-antibodies or antigen-specific autoreactive T-cells. These diseases have been much better understood during the past 15 years, mainly due to the marked advances of the Human Genoma Project and its implications in the identification and characterization of genetic mutations. In this paper we make a revision of the classification of AIS and focus our attention specially on the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), in particular the CINCA syndrome that shares many clinical characteristics with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  18. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  19. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  20. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  1. [PFAPA syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Suzete Costa Anjos; Vales, Fernando; Cardoso, Eduardo; Santos, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis and aphthous stomatitis. The bouts of fever can last for days or even weeks. Between crises, patients remain asymptomatic for variable periods. It appears before the age of five and has limited duration (4-8 years). Its aetiopathogeny is unknown. Corticoids are the treatment of choice. Tonsillectomy has been proposed as a solution but remains controversial. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with PFAPA syndrome who underwent tonsillectomy in January, 2008, and we review the literature.

  2. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  3. Eisenmengers syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G;

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right......-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato...

  4. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  5. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  6. Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Risbaf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a dominant autosomal familial disorder. The manifestations begin at an early age and a combination of phenotypic abnormalities such special facial appearance, jaw cysts and skeletal anomalies are seen in this disease. A 22-year-old woman referred to Zahedan Dental School complaining of pain on the left cheek. During the examination, several cutaneous lesions in the neck, pits in palm and sole and multiple jaw cysts were observed. According to the clinical symptoms, lesion biopsy and reports of Gorlin syndrome radiography were presented.

  7. [Wilkie's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognár, Gábor; Ledniczky, György; Palik, Eva; Zubek, László; Sugár, István; Ondrejka, Pál

    2008-10-01

    Loss of retroperitoneal fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions and noxa is believed to be the etiologic factor of superior mesenteric artery syndrome. A case of a 35 years old female patient with severe malnutrition and weight loss is presented, who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Various theories of etiology, clinical course and treatment options of this uncommon disease are discussed. In our case, conservative management was inefficient, while surgical treatment aiming to bypass the obstruction by an anastomosis between the jejunum and the proximal duodenum (duodenojejunostomy) was successful. An interdisciplinary teamwork provides the most beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic result in this often underestimated disease.

  8. Morbihan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Stefano; Persico, Maria Chiara; Francia, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face) in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks).

  9. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  10. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  11. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Althou

  12. Bases psicopatológicas do crime violento: estudo caso-controle retrospectivo de pacientes delirantes criminosos e não-criminosos Psychological bases of violent crime: a retrospectiv case-control study of criminal and non-criminal delusional patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Henrique Teixeira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar os aspectos do delírio que podem estar relacionados à ocorrência de crime violento por pacientes delirantes. MÉTODOS: Estudo caso-controle retrospectivo comparando dois grupos de 30 pacientes psicóticos delirantes. O grupo estudado consiste de pacientes delirantes internados em uma Casa de Custódia do estado de São Paulo, Brasil, e o grupo comparado consiste de pacientes de enfermarias psiquiátricas comuns. Foram utilizadas as escalas PANSS, MINI e MMDAS. RESULTADOS: Em relação às dimensões do delírio, o grupo-caso teve menor pontuação em "inibição de ação por causa do delírio" e "afeto negativo". CONCLUSÃO: Delírios que induzem a inibição de ações aparentemente também reduzem o potencial de ações violentas e, ao contrário do que se afirma correntemente, pacientes delirantes assustados ou com outros afetos negativos associados ao delírio parecem cometer menos atos violentos. Portanto, fatores intrínsecos inerentes a algumas dimensões do delírio podem ser relevantes na ocorrência de crimes violentos cometidos por pacientes psicóticos.OBJECTIVE: To study aspects of the delusion that can be related to the occurrence of violent crime for delusion patients. METHODS: A retrospective case-control study comparing two groups of 30 psychotic delusional patients. The study group consisted of delusional patients imprisoned in a high security forensic hospital in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, and the patients in the comparative group were enrolled in common psychiatric wards. The PANSS, the MINI and the MMDAS scales were used. RESULTS: Regarding the dimensions of delusions, the study group had lower scores in "refraining from acting because of belief" and "negative affect". CONCLUSION: Delusions that induce inhibition of actions apparently also reduce the potential for violent acts and, contrary to current beliefs, delusional patients who are frightened or who have other negative affects associated

  13. Klinefelter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Peynirci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder in males. Variation in clinical presentation and insufficient awareness of this syndrome among clinicians lead to fifty percent of patients remain undetected. Typical clinical features of Klinefelter syndrome are various degrees of hypogonadal symptoms, atrophic testes and gynaecomastia. However, these typical clinical symptoms may not be present in all patients. Even if serum testosterone levels are not markedly low, elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone is a considerable laboratory finding. Definitive diagnosis is made by karyotype analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. It must be kept in mind that this analysis may be normal in rare conditions. Early recognition of patients during puberty and handling them as soon as possible is important. Testosterone replacement therapy results in increased muscle mass, bone mineral density and libido. The patient’s mood and self-esteem improve significantly. In general, patients with Klinefelter syndrome are accepted as infertile, however, assisted reproductive techniques may provide fertilization. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 63-7

  14. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    /or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium...

  15. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach move to your small intestine in an uncontrolled, abnormally fast manner. This is most often related to changes in your stomach associated with surgery. Dumping syndrome can occur after any stomach operation or removal of the esophagus (esophagectomy). Gastric bypass surgery for ...

  16. Brugada Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to look at your heart's electrical activity (electrophysiology study), you'll need to fast for eight to 12 hours before your test. Write down any symptoms you're experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to Brugada syndrome. Write down key personal information, especially any family ...

  17. Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harleen; Chacon, Anna H; Choudhary, Sonal; McLeod, Michael P; Meshkov, Lauren; Nouri, Keyvan; Izakovic, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Bloom Syndrome (BS, MIM #210900) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the BLM gene, which codes for the DNA repair enzyme RecQL3 helicase. Without proper DNA repair mechanisms, abnormal DNA exchange takes place between sister chromatids and results in genetic instability that may lead to cancer, especially lymphoma and acute myelogenous leukemia, lower and upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasias, cutaneous tumors, and neoplasias in the genitalia and urinary tract. BS patients are usually of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and exhibit narrow facial features, elongated limbs, and several dermatologic complications including photosensitivity, poikiloderma, and telangiectatic erythema. The most concerning manifestation of BS is multiple malignancies, which require frequent screenings and strict vigilance by the physician. Therefore, distinguishing between BS and other dermatologic syndromes of similar presentation such as Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome, Erythropoietic Protoporphyria, and Cockayne Syndrome is paramount to disease management and to prolonging life. BS can be diagnosed through a variety of DNA sequencing methods, and genetic testing is available for high-risk populations. This review consolidates several sources on BS sequelae and aims to suggest the importance of differentiating BS from other dermatologic conditions. This paper also elucidates the recently discovered BRAFT and FANCM protein complexes that link BS and Fanconi anemia.

  18. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  19. Chylomicronemia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood. The disorder is passed down through families. Causes Chylomicronemia syndrome can occur due to a rare genetic disorder in which a protein (enzyme) called lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is broken or missing. LpL is normally found in fat and muscle. ...

  20. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  1. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  2. [Waardenburg's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimñenez, F; Carbonell, R; Pérez, F; Lozano, I

    1994-01-01

    Reporting one case of this condition type-2 with heterochromia iridis and cochlear deafness. The AA. review the syndrome's components and it nomenclature as well. They discuss about the convenience of including this deviation in the chapter of "diseases of the embryonic neural crest". The specific place of the gene responsibly in the chromosome-2 and the possibilities of genetic counselling are considered.

  3. Waardenburg's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesudian, D P; Jayaraman, M; Janaki, V R; Yesudian, P

    1995-01-01

    Three children in a family of five presented with heterochromia iridis, lateral displacement of inner canthi and varying degrees of sensorineural deafness. All the 3 showed iris atrophy. The father of the children had only heterochromia iridis. A diagnosis of Waardenburg's syndrome Type I was made in the children with the father probably representing a forme fruste of the condition.

  4. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT scan of the chest Joint x-rays Pulmonary function tests Rheumatoid factor test and other blood tests Treatment There is no specific treatment for Caplan syndrome, other than treating any lung and joint disease. ... MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, ...

  5. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  6. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 663-4637) Sotos Syndrome Support Association P.O. Box 4626 Wheaton IL Wheaton, IL 60189 info@sotossyndrome.org http://www.sotossyndrome.org/ Tel: 888-246-7772 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  7. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  8. Reifenstein syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgens are most important during early development in the womb. People with Reifenstein syndrome can have a normal lifespan and be totally healthy, but they may have difficulty conceiving a child. In the most severe cases, boys with outer female genitals ...

  9. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  10. [SAPHO syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary.

  11. Compartment syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aly Saber

    2014-01-01

    Body compartments bound by fascia and limited by bony backgrounds are found in the extremities, buttocks, abdomen and thoracic cavity; conditions that cause intracompartmental swelling and hypertension can lead to ischemia and limb loss.Although compartment syndromes are described in all body regions from head to toe, the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are best characterized for three key body regions: the first is extremity, the second is abdominal, and the third is thoracic compartment syndromes.Thoracic compartment syndrome usually occurs as a result of pathological accumulation of air, fluid or blood in the mediastinum and has traditionally been described in trauma.As the intracranial contents are confined within a rigid bony cage, any increase in volume within thiscompartment as a result of brain oedema or an expanding traumatic intracranial haematoma, leads to a reciprocal decrease in the volume of cerebrospinal fluid and intracranial venous blood volume.Limb compartment syndromes may present either in acute or chronic clinical forms.Intra-abdominal pressure can be measured by direct or indirect methods.While the direct methods are quite accurate, theyare impractical and not feasible for routine practice.Indirect measurement is done through inferior vena cava, gastric, rectal and urinary bladder.Indirect measurement through urinary bladder is the simplest and is considered the method of choice for intra-abdominal pressure measurement.The management of patients with intra-abdominal hypertension is based on four important principles: the first is related to the specific procedures aiming at lowering intra-abdominal pressure and the consequences of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome; the second is for general support and medical management of the critically ill patient; while the third is surgical decompression and the fourth is optimization after surgical decompression.

  12. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading human rights organization for all individuals with Down syndrome. National Down Syndrome Society 8 E 41st Street, 8th Floor New ... New York 10017 800-221-4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & ...

  13. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... Where can I find more information regarding Down Syndrome? National Down Syndrome Society VISIT SITE » Downs Syndrome Association VISIT ...

  14. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Shop NDSS Home » Resources » Wellness » Sexuality » Sexuality & Down Syndrome Sexuality & Down Syndrome Human sexuality encompasses an individual's self-esteem, ...

  15. Otodental syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloch-Zupan Agnès

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The otodental syndrome also named otodental dysplasia, is characterised by a striking dental phenotype known as globodontia, associated with sensorineural high frequency hearing loss and eye coloboma. Globodontia occurs in both primary and permanent dentition, affecting canine and molar teeth (i.e. enlarged bulbous malformed posterior teeth with almost no discernable cusps or grooves. The condition appears to be inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, although sporadic cases have been reported. It is a rare disease, a few families have been described in the literature. In the British family, the locus for oculo-oto-dental syndrome was mapped to 20q13.1 within a 12-cM critical chromosomal region. Dental management is complex, interdisciplinary and will include regular follow up, scheduled teeth extraction and orthodontic treatment. Hearing checks and, if necessary, hearing aids are mandatory, as well as eye examination and ad hoc treatment if necessary.

  16. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and...... necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre......-antibiotic era but has diminished with the advent of antibiotics. This review showed a mortality rate of only 2% of which none of the cases involved fusobacteria. Duration of treatment varied; a 4-6-week course of carbapenem or piperacillin/tazobactam in combination with metronidazole was optimum. Other...

  17. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  18. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Ricard

    2017-03-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the development of venous and/or arterial thromboses, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity (mainly, recurrent fetal losses), in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Some estimates indicate that the incidence of the APS is around 5 new cases per 100,000 persons per year and the prevalence around 40-50 cases per 100,000 persons. The aPL are positive in approximately 13% of patients with stroke, 11% with myocardial infarction, 9.5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis and 6% of patients with pregnancy morbidity. Currently, there is consensus in treating APS patients with thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation and to prevent obstetric manifestations with the use of aspirin and heparin. This review summarizes the main knowledge on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Parinaud's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffie, D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Stefanko, S Z

    1983-02-01

    Five cases of a tumour in the quadrigeminal area have been described, 4 of which could be verified by autopsy. In 2 cases with a metastasis in the tegmentum of the mesencephalon, a Parinaud syndrome was present. In 2 other cases, however, with extensive destruction of the quadrigeminal plate and of the posterior commissure this syndrome was not present. In the 5th case, with a big vascular tumour of the pineal area, disturbances of eye movements and pupils were also lacking. From these observations we may conclude that (1) destruction of the quadrigeminal plate has no influence upon vertical eye movements. (2) destruction of the posterior commissure, in combination with the quadrigeminal plate, is not always followed by disturbances of vertical eye movements. In man it is still not clear which structures are responsible for the performance of vertical eye movements.

  20. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  1. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  2. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  3. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  4. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharon Turban; Paul J Thuluvath; Mohamed G Atta

    2007-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a "functional" and reversible form of renal failure that occurs in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The distinctive hallmark feature of HRS is the intense renal vasoconstriction caused by interactions between systemic and portal hemodynamics. This results in activation of vasoconstrictors and suppression of vasodilators in the renal circulation. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, as well as current and emerging therapies of HRS are discussed in this review.

  5. Postconcussional Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Necla Keskin; Lut Tamam

    2013-01-01

    Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral) symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method f...

  6. Fraser syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay A

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Fraser Syndrome is a rare disorder with only a few cases having been described in Indian literature. We report here a case of a patient aged 16 yr present with primary amenorrhea which is a very unusual mode of presentation. Multiple associated anomalies were present including those of eyelids, eyebrow, face, fingers and genitalia. Chromosome analysis revealed a normal female karyotype. Pituitary gonadotropins were within normal range.

  7. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  8. Gerstmann's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Sukumar, S.; Ferguson, G C

    1996-01-01

    Although Gerstmann's syndrome has been well documented since it was characterised in the latter half of last century, there has not been much literature on it in the last few years. We present a classical case in a patient who was admitted into hospital for an unrelated problem. We conclude that clinical examination still has a valuable role in neurology, despite the availability of excellent imaging techniques.

  9. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease with recurrent thromboses and pregnancy complications (90% are female patients that can be primary and secondary (with concomitant autoimmune disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies are prothrombotic but also act directly with brain tissue. One clinical and one laboratory criterion is necessary for the diagnosis of APS. Positive serological tests have to be confirmed after at least 12 weeks. Clinical picture consists of thromboses in many organs and spontaneous miscarriages, sometimes thrombocytopaenia and haemolytic anaemia, but neurological cases are the most frequent: headaches, stroke, encephalopathy, seizures, visual disturbances, Sneddon syndrome, dementia, vertigo, chorea, balism, transitory global amnesia, psychosis, transversal myelopathy and Guillain-Barre syndrome. About 50% of strokes below 50 years of age are caused by APS. The first line of therapy in stroke is anticoagulation: intravenous heparin or low-weight heparins. In chronic treatment, oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are used, warfarin and aspirin, mostly for life. In resistant cases, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are necessary. Prognosis is good in most patients but some are treatment-resistant with recurrent thrombotic events and eventually death.

  10. Kartagener syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedaa Skeik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nedaa Skeik1–3, Fadi I Jabr41Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Dartmouth Medical School, Hannover, NH, USA; 3New York Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 4Horizon Medical Center, Hospital Medicine, Dickson, TN, USAAbstract: Kartagener syndrome is a rare, ciliopathic, autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes a defect in the action of the cilia lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tube. Patients usually present with chronic recurrent rhinosinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, and bronchiectasis caused by pseudomonal infection. Situs inversus can be seen in about 50% of cases. Diagnosis can be made by tests to prove impaired cilia function, biopsy, and genetic studies. Treatment is supportive. In severe cases, the prognosis can be fatal if bilateral lung transplantation is delayed. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with chronic recurrent upper respiratory infections, pseudomonal pneumonia, and chronic bronchiectasis who presented with acute respiratory failure. She was diagnosed with Kartagener syndrome based on her clinical presentation and genetic studies. She expired on ventilator with refractory respiratory and multiorgan failure.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, immotile cilia syndrome, situs inversus

  11. Crush syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Lovallo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed cases of crush syndrome were described in 1941 in London after victims trapped beneath bombed buildings presented with swollen limbs, hypovolemic shock, dark urine, renal failure, and ultimately perished. The majority of the data and studies on this topic still draw from large databases of earthquake victims. However, in Africa, a continent with little seismic activity, the majority of crush syndrome cases are instead victims of severe beatings rather than earthquake casualties, and clinical suspicion by emergency personnel must be high in this patient group presenting with oliguria or pigmenturia. Damaged skeletal muscle fibres and cell membranes lead to an inflammatory cascade resulting in fluid sequestration in the injured extremity, hypotension, hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia and their complications, and renal injury from multiple sources. Elevations in the serum creatinine, creatine kinase (CK, and potassium levels are frequent findings in these patients, and can help guide critical steps in management. Fluid resuscitation should begin prior to extrication of trapped victims or as early as possible, as this basic intervention has been shown to in large part prevent progression of renal injury to requiring haemodialysis. Alkalinization of the urine and use of mannitol for forced diuresis are recommended therapies under specific circumstances and are supported by studies done in animal models, but have not been shown to change clinical outcomes in human crush victims. In the past 70 years the crush syndrome and its management have been studied more thoroughly, however clinical practice guidelines continue to evolve.

  12. Asperger Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Asperger Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Asperger Syndrome Print A ... the medical community still use the term. About Asperger Syndrome The disorder is named after Hans Asperger, ...

  13. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome.

  14. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care » Associated Conditions » Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Complications of anesthesia (sedation during surgery) occur in ... histories are complicated. Why Would an Individual With Down Syndrome Need A nesthesia? 40-60% of infants born ...

  15. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  16. Heart and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  17. ADHD & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care » Associated Conditions » ADHD & Down Syndrome ADHD & Down Syndrome Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, is a ... age. How Common Is ADD in Children With Down Syndrome? The frequency of ADHD in children with Down ...

  18. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry​ . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  19. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  20. Schizophrenia and delusional disorders with onset in later life Esquizofrenia e transtornos delirantes com início na terceira idade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Hassett

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia-spectrum illness is most commonly associated with an onset in early adulthood. When non-affective psychotic symptoms emerge for the first time in later life, the clinical presentation has both similarities and differences with earlier-onset syndromes. This situation has resulted in continuing debate about the nosological status of late-onset psychosis, and whether there are particular risk factors associated with this late-life peak in incidence. Although early cognitive decline is frequently identified in these patients, studies, to date, have not established if there is a relationship with the dementing illnesses of old age. Sensory impairment, social isolation, and a family history of schizophrenia have been associated with late-onset psychosis, but appear to exert a nonspecific influence on vulnerability. While diagnostic issues remain unresolved, clinicians need to formulate treatment strategies that most appropriately address the constellation of symptoms in the clinical presentation of their psychotic elderly patients.Transtornos mentais do espectro da esquizofrenia são comumente associados a início na primeira fase da vida adulta. Quando sintomas psicóticos não-afetivos emergem pela primeira vez em fases tardias da vida, a apresentação clínica tem semelhanças e diferenças em relação às síndromes de início precoce. Essa situação resultou em debate contínuo sobre o status nosológico da psicose de início tardio e sobre se há fatores de risco associados a esse pico de incidência na terceira idade. Embora déficits cognitivos precoces sejam freqüentemente identificados entre esses pacientes, ainda não foi possível estabelecer se problemas cognitivos estão associados a um quadro demencial dos idosos. Comprometimento sensorial, isolamento social e história familiar de esquizofrenia têm sido associados à psicose de início tardio, mas esses fatores de risco parecem exercer um papel não-específico sobre

  1. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis.

  2. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (Juvenile) Polymyalgia Rheumatica Psoriatic Arthritis Raynaud's Phenomenon Reactive Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren's Syndrome Spinal Stenosis Spondyloarthritis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Juvenile) Takayasu's ...

  3. Raynaud's syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, D G; Dathan, J R

    1985-01-01

    We report three cases of Raynaud's syndrome with digital ischaemic ulceration, in association with carpal tunnel syndrome. In all cases, the aetiology of the Raynaud's syndrome was probably unrelated to the nerve compression. However, symptoms were worse on the side of the median nerve lesion in two patients and worse on the side with the most severe nerve dysfunction in the third; symptoms were relieved by carpal tunnel decompression in two patients. We suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome ma...

  4. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Lata

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension.This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys,where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration,which ultimately results in uraemia.The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites.Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output.Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure,but refractory ascites,and its impact on prognosis is less negative.Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method,nevertheless,only a few patients can receive it.The most suitable "bridge treatments" or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin.Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response.Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS.

  5. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  6. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  7. Eagle Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beytholahi JM

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Eagle's syndrome is characterized by an elongated styloid process and (or calcification of"nstylohyoid ligament besides clinical symptoms. The symptoms are those related to pain when"nswallowing or rotating the neck, headacke, earache, dizziness, intermittent glossitis, sensation of"nforeign body in pharynx and transient syncope. The case which is presented can be considered a very"nrare form of the disease in which complete calcification of the ligament and it's thickening has"noccured. Also there is little relationship between the severity of calcification and severity of symptoms."nA careful and thorough evaluation of each panoramic radiography is emphasized.

  8. HELLP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  9. Jacobsen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  10. Chilaiditi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S D; Cruikshank, J G

    1977-02-01

    The features of the Chilaiditi Syndrome are described, together with the historial background, and a brief review of the literature on the condition is given. The prevalence in our geriatric population was found to be 1% and the 13 cases seen over 22 months are reported briefly. The prevalence increases with age and may be related to the consumption of drugs by the elderly; although in the majority it is asymptomatic, it may, particularly when associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, lead to unnecessary laparotomy. In the geriatric patient, interposition of the bowel should be considered in the differential diagnosis of air under the right hemidiaphragm.

  11. Myofascial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Carli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome is common cause one of musculoskeletal pain and it is characterized by trigger points (TP, limited range of motion in joints and local twitch response (LTR during mechanical stimulation of the TP. Trigger point is a hyperirritable spot in skeletal muscle that is associated with a hypersensitive palpable nodule in a taut band. The spot is tender when pressed and can give rise to characteristic referred pain, motor dysfunction and autonomic phenomena. Palpation is reliable diagnostic criterion for locating TP in patients. Treatment is based on anesthetise TP, stretch and spray, local pression and physical activity.

  12. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  13. Olmsted Syndrome

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    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  14. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentebella, Judy; Kerner, John A

    2009-10-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS) is the result of aggressive enteral or parenteral feeding in a malnourished patient, with hypophosphatemia being the hallmark of this phenomenon. Other metabolic abnormalities, such as hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia, may also occur, along with sodium and fluid retention. The metabolic changes that occur in RFS can be severe enough to cause cardiorespiratory failure and death. This article reviews the pathophysiology, the clinical manifestations, and the management of RFS. The key to prevention is identifying patients at risk and being aware of the potential complications involved in rapidly reintroducing feeds to a malnourished patient.

  15. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  16. Lowe syndrome

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    Loi Mario

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5 bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years.

  17. Cardiorenal syndrome

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    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  18. KBG syndrome

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    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  19. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  20. Sheehan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicli, Fatih; Dokmetas, Hatice Sebila; Acibucu, Fettah

    2013-04-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is characterized by various degrees of hypopituitarism, and develops as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. Increased pituitary volume, small sella size, disseminated intravascular coagulation and autoimmunity are the proposed factors in the pathogenesis of SS. Hormonal insufficiencies, ranging from single pituitary hormone insufficiency to total hypopituitarism, are observed in patients. The first most important issue in the diagnosis is being aware of the syndrome. Lack of lactation and failure of menstrual resumption after delivery that complicated with severe hemorrhage are the most important clues in diagnosing SS. The most frequent endocrine disorders are the deficiencies of growth hormone and prolactin. In patients with typical obstetric history, prolactin response to TRH seems to be the most sensitive screening test in diagnosing SS. Other than typical pituitary deficiency, symptoms such as anemia, pancytopenia, osteoporosis, impairment in cognitive functions and impairment in the quality of life are also present in these patients. Treatment of SS is based on the appropriate replacement of deficient hormones. Growth hormone replacement has been found to have positive effects; however, risk to benefit ratio, side effects and cost of the treatment should be taken into account.

  1. Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, C M; Bremner, W J

    1998-06-22

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder. Affected males carry an additional X chromosome, which results in male hypogonadism, androgen deficiency, and impaired spermatogenesis. Some patients may exhibit all of the classic signs of this disorder, including gynecomastia, small testes, sparse body hair, tallness, and infertility, whereas others, because of the wide variability in clinical expression, lack many of these features. Treatment consists of testosterone replacement therapy to correct the androgen deficiency and to provide patients with appropriate virilization. This therapy also has positive effects on mood and self-esteem and has been shown to protect against osteoporosis, although it will not reverse infertility. Although the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome is now made definitively using chromosomal karyotyping, revealing in most instances a 47,XXY genotype, the diagnosis also can be made using a careful history and results of a physical examination, with the hallmark being small, firm testes. As it affects 1 in 500 male patients and presents with a variety of clinical features, primary care physicians should be familiar with this condition.

  2. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Down Syndrome Print A A ... Help en español El síndrome de Down About Down Syndrome Down syndrome (DS), also called Trisomy 21, is ...

  3. Facts about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Down Syndrome Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... children with Down syndrome. View charts » What is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a condition in which a ...

  4. Burnout Syndrome of Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Semrádová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis covers burnout syndrome of teachers. Defines burnout syndrome, describes its causes and symptoms. Describes teaching as helping profession and focousing on stressful situations at school. In the last chapter described different prevention strategies burnout syndrome. Key words: burnout syndrome, teaching, teacher, helping professions, beginning teacher, stress

  5. Disrupted working memory circuitry and psychotic symptoms in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Montojo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is a recurrent genetic mutation that is highly penetrant for psychosis. Behavioral research suggests that 22q11DS patients exhibit a characteristic neurocognitive phenotype that includes differential impairment in spatial working memory (WM. Notably, spatial WM has also been proposed as an endophenotype for idiopathic psychotic disorder, yet little is known about the neurobiological substrates of WM in 22q11DS. In order to investigate the neural systems engaged during spatial WM in 22q11DS patients, we collected functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data while 41 participants (16 22q11DS patients, 25 demographically matched controls performed a spatial capacity WM task that included manipulations of delay length and load level. Relative to controls, 22q11DS patients showed reduced neural activation during task performance in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS and superior frontal sulcus (SFS. In addition, the typical increases in neural activity within spatial WM-relevant regions with greater memory load were not observed in 22q11DS. We further investigated whether neural dysfunction during WM was associated with behavioral WM performance, assessed via the University of Maryland letter–number sequencing (LNS task, and positive psychotic symptoms, assessed via the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS, in 22q11DS patients. WM load activity within IPS and SFS was positively correlated with LNS task performance; moreover, WM load activity within IPS was inversely correlated with the severity of unusual thought content and delusional ideas, indicating that decreased recruitment of working memory-associated neural circuitry is associated with more severe positive symptoms. These results suggest that 22q11DS patients show reduced neural recruitment of brain regions critical for spatial WM function, which may be related to characteristic behavioral manifestations of the disorder.

  6. PERSONALITY AND PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS IN WOMEN AFFECTED BY POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME (PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta eScaruffi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most prevalent endocrine disorder among fertile women. Studies show reduced quality of life, anxiety, depression, body dissatisfaction, eating disorder and sexual dysfunction, but the etiology of these disturbs remains still debated. The aim of our study is to verify whether this hyperandrogenic syndrome characterizes a strong psycho(pathological personality. Method: Sixty PCOS subjects (mean age 25.8 ± 4.7 yrs were evaluated by antropometric, metabolic, hormonal, clinical and psychological parameters. After the certainty of the diagnosis of PCOS, the Rorschach test, according to Exner's Comprehensive System (CS and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III were administered to each patient. The control group, on which the comparison was carried out, was composed by 40 healthy and aged compared women who were exclusively administered the Rorschach test according to C.S. Results: MCMI-III evidenced axis II DSM-IV personality disorders (4.1% schizoid, depressive, sadistic, negativistic (passive-aggressive and masochistic, 6.1% avoiding, 12.2% dependent, 20.4% histrionic, 16.3% narcissistic, 2.0% obsessive-compulsive and axis I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders: 10.2% anxiety, 2.0%, somatoform disorder and bipolar disorder, 16.3% major depressive disorder. Finally we found 44.9% delusional disorder and 4.1% thought disorder. Rorschach test’s results show 53.1% reduced coping abilities and social skills, 55.1% depression, 30.6% perceptual distortion and cognitive slippage, 24.5% constantly alert and worry, 8.1% at risk for suicide and finally about 50% of our patients had chronic stress.Conclusion: PCOS women have relevant personality and psychiatric disorders, when compared with normal subjects.

  7. Treatment-resistant, five-year long, postpartum-onset Capgras episode resolving after electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Del Casale, Antonio; Ferri, Vittoria Rachele; Di Pietro, Simone; Scatena, Paola; Serata, Daniele; Danese, Emanuela; Sani, Gabriele; Koukopoulos, Alexia E; Angeletti, Gloria; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum psychosis, which rarely presents with Capgras syndrome (delusional misidentification), requires rapid symptom resolution. First-line drugs have important drawbacks, such as delayed onset of clinical response and secretion in breast milk. In this report, we report successful treatment of a treatment-resistant woman presenting with treatment-resistant Capgras syndrome, with onset during postpartum. A 36-year-old woman had presented with Capgras syndrome during postpartum. For more than five years, she believed her son and other family members were substituted by impostors. All adequately administrated treatments were unsuccessful. We suggested electroconvulsive therapy to overcome treatment resistance. After six electroconvulsive therapy sessions, delusions of doubles subsided and other symptoms improved. She was discharged two weeks later with a mood stabilizer and low-dose atypical antipychotic combination and is well at the one-and-a-half-year follow-up. Electroconvulsive therapy followed by a mood stabilizer-antipsychotic drug combination showed rapid, permanent, and effective control of long-standing Capgras syndrome in a young woman. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Leopard syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallapiccola Bruno

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract LEOPARD syndrome (LS, OMIM 151100 is a rare multiple congenital anomalies condition, mainly characterized by skin, facial and cardiac anomalies. LEOPARD is an acronym for the major features of this disorder, including multiple Lentigines, ECG conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. About 200 patients have been reported worldwide but the real incidence of LS has not been assessed. Facial dysmorphism includes ocular hypertelorism, palpebral ptosis and low-set ears. Stature is usually below the 25th centile. Cardiac defects, in particular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mostly involving the left ventricle, and ECG anomalies are common. The lentigines may be congenital, although more frequently manifest by the age of 4–5 years and increase throughout puberty. Additional common features are café-au-lait spots (CLS, chest anomalies, cryptorchidism, delayed puberty, hypotonia, mild developmental delay, sensorineural deafness and learning difficulties. In about 85% of the cases, a heterozygous missense mutation is detected in exons 7, 12 or 13 of the PTPN11 gene. Recently, missense mutations in the RAF1 gene have been found in two out of six PTPN11-negative LS patients. Mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. LS is largely overlapping Noonan syndrome and, during childhood, Neurofibromatosis type 1-Noonan syndrome. Diagnostic clues of LS are multiple lentigines and CLS, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and deafness. Mutation-based differential diagnosis in patients with borderline clinical manifestations is warranted. LS is an autosomal dominant condition, with full penetrance and variable expressivity. If one parent is affected, a 50% recurrence risk is appropriate. LS should be suspected in foetuses with severe cardiac hypertrophy and prenatal DNA test may be performed. Clinical management should

  9. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy.

  10. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Vaccaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS is the collective name of three rare congenital conditions characterised by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. The three known types of TRPS have different modalities of genetic transmission: namely, TRPS I and III are inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, while the cases of TRPS II are essentially sporadic.The diagnosis of the different types of TRPS is based on clinical and radiological findings, eventually integrated by genetic analysis, particularly useful in some cases with the non-classical clinical presentation. Alopecia and structural abnormalities of the nose and the hands should be considered as clinical hallmarks, whereas endocrine disorders, renal alterations, ureteral reflux, heart pathology and bone dysplasia have been documented, in the setting of a multisystem involvement.

  11. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Civardi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The last few years have seen a complete change in the etiopathogenetic features, classification and therapeutic approach of the hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES, a multiorgan targeted blood disease. The discovery of a genetic mutation and the occurrence of a new fusion gene, named FIP1L1-PDGFRA (FIP gene, in some patients allowed the identification of a new myeloproliferative disorder, M-HES: thereafter, the pivotal therapeutic role of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, particularly, imatinib mesylate, was clearly detected. In the same period a new pathogenetic mechanism has been detected: some authors described the presence of a CD3-CD4 +Tcell clone correlating with the overproduction of IL5, a potent eosinophilic cell line stimulating cytokine. As a consequence an international consensus committee proposed a new classification for these syndromes, in accordance with these new pathogenetic features. The disease is characterized by an extensive tissue and organ damage due to an eosinophilic cell infiltration and leading to the release of toxic cytokines and subsequent organ dysfunction. The heart, lungs, gastrointestinal apparatus, skin and central nervous system are affected. Moreover the released cytokines can induce a thrombophilic status and thromboembolic events can occur throughout the body. Aim of the study: We describe the diagnostic procedures that are necessary in order to obtain a correct diagnosis and classification of the disease and to evaluate the presence of an organ and tissue damage. In particular, bone marrow biopsy and cytogenetic examination of blood and marrow are necessary for detecting M-HES cases that are positive for the FIP gene. In these patients, imatinib mesylate has a leading role for obtaining complete remission of the disease in a high percentage of cases. We also examine the therapeutic options for the other forms of the disease: prednisone, interferon, hydroxiurea are effective therapeutic tools in

  12. ADHD and genetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo-Castro, Adriana; D'Agati, Elisa; Curatolo, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    A high rate of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)-like characteristics has been reported in a wide variety of disorders including syndromes with known genetic causes. In this article, we review the genetic and the neurobiological links between ADHD symptoms and some genetic syndromes such as: Fragile X Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis 1, DiGeorge Syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Turner Syndrome, Williams Syndrome and Klinefelter Syndrome. Although each syndrome may arise from different genetic abnormalities with multiple molecular functions, the effects of these abnormalities may give rise to common effects downstream in the biological pathways or neural circuits, resulting in the presentation of ADHD symptoms. Early diagnosis of ADHD allows for earlier treatment, and has the potential for a better outcome in children with genetic syndromes.

  13. Ameloblastic fibroma diagnosis, treatment and propensity for misidentification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gish, Joshua E; Lessin, Michael E

    2013-04-01

    We present a case of a young male with a radiolucency of the posterior mandible that was diagnosed as an ameloblastic fibroma, a mixed lesion derived from odontogenic epithelium and ectomesenchyme. This case report highlights a potential pitfall of this entity that may lead to inaccurate identification and treatment. Initial frozen section analysis yielded a diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma due to histologic similarities. Our report and discussion help to reacquaint the general practitioner with this entity and emphasize the need for routine screening radiographs and close clinical correlation whenever a microscopic diagnosis is rendered.

  14. First Trimester Down Syndrome Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21) or Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) . The first trimester screen is one ... chromosome material that results in Down syndrome or Edwards syndrome , the levels of PAPP-A tend to be ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alport Syndrome Recessive Type MalaCards: alport syndrome Merck Manual Consumer Version My46 Trait Profile Orphanet: Alport syndrome Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) Alport Syndrome Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) The Kidney Foundation of ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Werner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition Adult premature aging syndrome Adult Progeria Werner's Syndrome Werners Syndrome WS Related Information How ... BK, Monnat RJ Jr. Werner and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes: mechanistic basis of human progeroid diseases. Nat ...

  17. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a common birth defect that includes mental retardation and— often— heart problems. Children with Down syndrome have round faces and almond-shaped eyes that ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Donohue syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resistance syndromes. These disorders, which also include Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome and type A insulin resistance syndrome , are ... of the insulin receptor (type A and Rabson-Mendenhall syndromes): a 30-year prospective. Medicine (Baltimore). 2004 ...

  19. Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Duane Syndrome

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    U D Shrestha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (GHS is also known as Oculo-Auriculo-Vertebral (OAV syndrome or Branchial arch syndrome. Duane retraction syndrome (DRS is a congenital disorder of ocular motility characterized by limited abduction, adduction or both. It is unilateral in 80% of cases. The important and interesting part of this eight months old child is presence of GHS with DRS. She has bilateral invol-vement, which is seen in only 5-8% of GHS, as compared to high incidence of unilateral involve-ment. This child also had refractive error of + 6.00/ - 1.5 * 180. At four year of age her vision with glass was 6/9. Children with GHS and DRS should have early eye examination done to treat the problem of refractive error. Keywords: Duane retraction syndrome; goldenhar syndrome, refractive error.

  20. Cushing syndrome in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-12-01

    Cushing syndrome is characterized by truncal obesity, growth deceleration, skin changes, muscle weakness, and hypertension. Cushing syndrome in childhood usually results from the exogenous administration of glucocorticoids. This article presents the causes and discusses the treatment of endogenous Cushing syndrome. It also discusses the clinical and molecular genetics of inherited forms of this syndrome. Cushing syndrome needs to be diagnosed and treated properly when first recognized; improper treatment can turn this otherwise completely curable disorder into a chronic ailment. Barriers to optimal care of a pediatric patient with Cushing syndrome are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Gitelman syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levtchenko Elena N

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gitelman syndrome (GS, also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence of heterozygotes is approximately 1% in Caucasian populations, making it one of the most frequent inherited renal tubular disorders. In the majority of cases, symptoms do not appear before the age of six years and the disease is usually diagnosed during adolescence or adulthood. Transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, sometimes accompanied by abdominal pain, vomiting and fever are often seen in GS patients. Paresthesias, especially in the face, frequently occur. Remarkably, some patients are completely asymptomatic except for the appearance at adult age of chondrocalcinosis that causes swelling, local heat, and tenderness over the affected joints. Blood pressure is lower than that in the general population. Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported occasionally. In general, growth is normal but can be delayed in those GS patients with severe hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. GS is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Mutations in the solute carrier family12, member 3 gene, SLC12A3, which encodes the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC, are found in the majority of GS patients. At present, more than 140 different NCC mutations throughout the whole protein have been identified. In a small minority of GS patients, mutations in the CLCNKB gene, encoding the chloride channel ClC-Kb have been identified. Diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms and biochemical abnormalities (hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. Bartter syndrome (especially type III is the most important genetic disorder to consider in the differential diagnosis of GS. Genetic counseling is important. Antenatal diagnosis for GS

  2. Rare case of nephrotic syndrome: Schimke syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kelly Krislane de Vasconcelos Pedrosa

    Full Text Available Abstract Schimke syndrome corresponds to dysplasia of bone and immunity, associated with progressive renal disease secondary to nephrotic syndrome cortico-resistant, with possible other abnormalities such as hypothyroidism and blond marrow aplasia. It is a rare genetic disorder, with few reports in the literature. The most frequent renal involvement is nephrotic syndrome with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and progressive renal failure. The objective of this study was to report a case of Schimke syndrome, diagnostic investigation and management of the case.

  3. Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyllerman, Mårten

    2013-01-01

    Angelman syndrome combines severe mental retardation, epilepsy, ataxia, speech impairment, and unique behavior with happy demeanor, laughing, short attention span, hyperactivity, and sleep disturbance. Occurrence has been calculated at 1:20000 to 1:12000 constituting about 6% of all children with severe mental retardation and epilepsy. The physical "prototype" includes microcephaly with flat neck, fair skin and hair, wide-spaced teeth, and open mouth with tongue protrusion. Epilepsy is characterized by atypical absences, erratic myoclonus, and occasional tonic-clonic seizures. EEG demonstrates high-amplitude 2-3Hz delta activity with spike and slow-wave discharges and sleep-activated generalized epileptiform discharges. Sodium valproate, benzodiazepines, and priacetam are frequently used and effective. Development is generally slow, the majority attaining independent walking in the first 2.5-6 years. Vocabulary is limited to a few single words with superior speech and object apprehension. The condition is due to a lack of expression of the UBE3A gene on chromosome 15q. Maternal deletions of 15q11-13 produce the most pronounced phenotype (65-70% of probands), uniparental disomy and imprinting center mutations (10%), and UBE3A point mutations (11%) produce milder phenotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Seth S; Sell, Gabrielle L; Zbinden, Mark A; Bird, Lynne M

    2015-07-01

    In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of Angelman syndrome (AS), its molecular and cellular underpinnings, and current treatment strategies. AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive disability, motor dysfunction, speech impairment, hyperactivity, and frequent seizures. AS is caused by disruption of the maternally expressed and paternally imprinted UBE3A, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Four mechanisms that render the maternally inherited UBE3A nonfunctional are recognized, the most common of which is deletion of the maternal chromosomal region 15q11-q13. Remarkably, duplication of the same chromosomal region is one of the few characterized persistent genetic abnormalities associated with autistic spectrum disorder, occurring in >1-2% of all cases of autism spectrum disorder. While the overall morphology of the brain and connectivity of neural projections appear largely normal in AS mouse models, major functional defects are detected at the level of context-dependent learning, as well as impaired maturation of hippocampal and neocortical circuits. While these findings demonstrate a crucial role for ubiquitin protein ligase E3A in synaptic development, the mechanisms by which deficiency of ubiquitin protein ligase E3A leads to AS pathophysiology in humans remain poorly understood. However, recent efforts have shown promise in restoring functions disrupted in AS mice, renewing hope that an effective treatment strategy can be found.

  5. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome irritable bowel syndrome thyroid disease Depression and anxiety disorders are the most common conditions that overlap with PMS. About one half of women seeking treatment for PMS have one of these ...

  6. Brain Fag Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    syndrome. BFS is a tetrad of somatic complaints; cognitive impairments; sleep related complaints; and other somatic impairments. ..... BFS is a history told over time and through space. Divisions ..... Social origins of the brain fag syndrome.

  7. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  8. Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  9. Locked-In Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  10. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  11. Central Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  12. Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  13. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11:11 Size: 10.5 MB November 2014 What Is Marfan Syndrome? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Being Done on Marfan Syndrome? For More Information What Is Connective Tissue? Connective tissue supports many parts ...

  14. Post-Concussion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-concussion syndrome Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Post-concussion syndrome is a complex disorder in which various symptoms — ... sometimes months after the injury that caused the concussion. Concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury that ...

  15. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001311.htm Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes ...

  16. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masoud Poureisa

    2009-01-01

    "nDescription and Definition: Synonym: patau syndrome with an incidence of 1 in 5000 births, this syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities involving virtually every organ system...

  17. Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Into Relieved Are you experiencing symptoms linked to restless legs syndrome (RLS)? Find tools and support to help get ... I couldn’t sleep. Fortunately, I found the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation and learned what type of doctor to ...

  18. Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000242.htm Dubin-Johnson syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS) is a disorder passed down ...

  19. The obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Grootb, Ph. G.

    2008-01-01

    The association of persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies and thromboembolic events, (recurrent) pregnancy loss or both is termed antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in women with the syndrome should be regarded as at high-risk for complications. Optimal management consist

  20. Learning about Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Klinefelter Syndrome What is Klinefelter syndrome? What ... they are referred to a doctor to evaluate learning disabilities. The diagnosis may also be considered in ...

  1. Learning about Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definitions for genetic terms used on this page. Learning About Velocardiofacial Syndrome What is velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS)? ... are formed or work; a characteristic facial appearance; learning problems; and speech and feeding problems. The name ...

  2. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000304.htm Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of ...

  3. Ectopic Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cushing syndrome in which a tumor outside the pituitary gland produces a hormone called adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Causes Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher ...

  4. Organic brain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... state Intoxication from drug or alcohol use Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (a long-term effect of excessive alcohol consumption ... Substance use Transient ischemic attack Vascular dementia Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome Review Date 2/27/2016 Updated by: Amit ...

  5. Gorlin‑Goltz Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Mar-Apr 2014 | Vol 4 | Issue 2 | ... Oral Medicine and Radiology, College of Dental Sciences and Reasearch, Bopal, Ahmeadabad, .... or GGS, Oro-facial-digital syndrome, Noonan syndrome,.

  6. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children who have Tourette syndrome may also have learning disabilities or obsessive-compulsive disorder (thoughts or behaviors that ... my child who has tourette syndrome, involuntary movement, learning disabilities, learning disability, movement disorders, obsessive thoughts, obsessive-compulsive ...

  7. Sheehan's Syndrome (Postpartum Hypopituitarism)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan's syndrome Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Sheehan's syndrome is a condition that affects women who lose a life-threatening amount of blood in childbirth or who have severe low blood pressure ...

  8. Barth Syndrome (BTHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be prescribed to control heart problems. The dietary supplement carnitine has aided some children with Barth syndrome but ... may be prescribed to control heart problems. The dietary supplement carnitine has aided some children with Barth syndrome but ...

  9. Recurrent Goodpasture's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, B. R.; Bear, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Goodpasture's syndrome was diagnosed in a 17-year-old boy with glomerulonephritis and hemoptysis. He was successfully treated with cyclophosphamide, prednisone and courses of plasmapheresis. The syndrome recurred 3 1/2 years later and was again successfully treated.

  10. What Is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome are chorionic villus sampling (CVS) and amniocentesis. These procedures, which carry up to a 1% ... are nearly 100% accurate in diagnosing Down syndrome. Amniocentesis is usually performed in the second trimester between ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: otopalatodigital syndrome type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Oto-palato-digital syndrome, type I Other Diagnosis and ... syndrome faciopalatoosseous syndrome FPO OPD syndrome, type 1 oto-palato-digital syndrome, type I Taybi syndrome Related ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: otopalatodigital syndrome type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Oto-palato-digital syndrome, type II Other Diagnosis and ... syndrome faciopalatoosseous syndrome FPO OPD syndrome, type 2 oto-palato-digital syndrome, type II Taybi syndrome Related ...

  13. Delusional Disorder Arising From a CNS Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupinski, John; Kim, Jihye; Francois, Dimitry

    2017-01-01

    Erotomania arising from a central nervous system (CNS) neoplasm has not been previously described. Here, we present the first known case, to our knowledge, of erotomania with associated persecutory delusions arising following diagnosis and treatment of a left frontal lobe brain tumor.

  14. Ogilvies syndrom efter sectio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, B T; Sørensen, Jette Led; Svaerke, T

    2001-01-01

    Ogilvie's syndrome, acute pseudo-obstruction of the colon, can lead to perforation of the caecum and death. The syndrome is not well known and diagnosis can be difficult to make in time.......Ogilvie's syndrome, acute pseudo-obstruction of the colon, can lead to perforation of the caecum and death. The syndrome is not well known and diagnosis can be difficult to make in time....

  15. Hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ristiniemi, Heli; Perski, Aleksander; Lyskov, Eugene; Emtner, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress is among the most common diagnoses in Sweden, most commonly in the form of exhaustion syndrome (ICD-10 classification - F43.8). The majority of patients with this syndrome also have disturbed breathing (hyperventilation). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome. Thirty patients with exhaustion syndrome and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated with the Nijmegen Symptom Questionnaire (NQ). The participants completed ...

  16. Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is ... the affected eye. What are the signs of Horner’s syndrome? In Horner’s syndrome, the pupil in the ...

  17. Cushing's Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing’s Syndrome in Children by Meg Keil, MS, CRNP How is Cushing’s syndrome (CS) in children different than in adults? · CS ... conditions may cause what is known as pseudo-Cushing’s syndrome. Although this is more common in adults, it ...

  18. Williams Syndrome and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Karen; Wharton, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder with a variety of medical and developmental features, focuses on frequent outward expression of happiness. Analysis of the unique expression of happiness in individuals with Williams syndrome is followed by discussion of this happiness in the context of other dimensions of the syndrome,…

  19. Familial Crouzon syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Samatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition of the craniosynostotic syndromes without syndactyly and with various dentofacial anomalies. Craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis and hypertelorism are the characteristic features of Crouzon syndrome. This report describes the variable clinical features in affected individuals over two generations of a family with dentofacial deformities and review of literature.

  20. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.