WorldWideScience

Sample records for delta wetlands change

  1. Changes of Coastal Wetland Ecosystems in the Yellow River Delta and Protection Countermeasures to Them

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Guangzhou; Zhang, Xuliang; Zhang, Zhaohui; Xu, Zongjun

    2013-01-01

    Coastal wetlands in the Yellow River Delta are typical new wetland ecosystems in warm temperate zone. In recent years, influenced by natural and human factors, these coastal wetlands in the Yellow River Delta have undergone changes of landscape fragmentation, vegetation degradation, pollution, species reduction, and harmful exotic species invasion. These changes have influenced sustainable and healthy development of marine economy of the Yellow River Delta. To protect natural ecological envir...

  2. Changes of Coastal Wetland Ecosystems in the Yellow River Delta and Protection Countermeasures to Them

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangzhou; CUI; Xuliang; ZHANG; Zhaohui; ZHANG; Zongjun; XU

    2013-01-01

    Coastal wetlands in the Yellow River Delta are typical new wetland ecosystems in warm temperate zone. In recent years, influenced by natural and human factors, these coastal wetlands in the Yellow River Delta have undergone changes of landscape fragmentation, vegetation degradation, pollution, species reduction, and harmful exotic species invasion. These changes have influenced sustainable and healthy development of marine economy of the Yellow River Delta. To protect natural ecological environment of the Yellow River Delta, the authors recommended that it should establish and improve policies, laws and regulations of wetland protection; carry out wetland resource investigation and assessment and monitoring; strengthen comprehensive protection and control of wetland; reduce wetland degradation and promote sustainable use of wetland.

  3. Wetland Change Detection in Protected and Unprotected Indus Coastal and Inland Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, M. H. Ali; Sultan, M.; Riaz Khan, M.; Zhang, L.; Kozlova, M.; Malik, N. Abbas; Wang, S.

    2017-09-01

    Worth of wetland sites lies in their ecological importance. They enhance ecosystem via provision of ecological services like improving water quality, groundwater infiltration, flood risk reduction and biodiversity regulation. Like other parts of the world Pakistan is also facing wetlands degradation. Ecological and economic significance of wetlands was recognized officially in 1971 as Pakistan became signatory of Ramsar wetland convention. Wetlands provide habitat to species of ecological and economic importance. Despite being recognized for international importance, Ramsar figures state that almost half of Pakistan's wetlands are at moderate or prominent level threat. Wetlands ecosystems are deteriorating at a rapid rate, if uncontrolled this trend may lead to substantial losses. Therefore, management of these resources demands regular monitoring. Present study is dedicated to assessing levels of change overtime in three distinct types of wetlands in Pakistan i.e. Indus delta a coastal wetland, Uchhali complex an inland wetland which are both protected sites while another site Nurri Lagoon which is not sheltered under any category of protected areas. Remotely sensed data has remarkable applications in change detection. Multitemporal Landsat images were used to map changes occurring from 2006 to 2016. Results reveal that wetland area has considerably decreased for all types. Both protected sites have experienced degradation though impact is comparatively lesser than unprotected Nurri lagoon. Significance of protection strategies cannot be denied, it is recommended that mere declaration of a site protected area is not sufficient. It is equally important to control non-point pollutants and ensuring the compliance of conservation strategy.

  4. WETLAND CHANGE DETECTION IN PROTECTED AND UNPROTECTED INDUS COASTAL AND INLAND DELTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Ali Baig

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Worth of wetland sites lies in their ecological importance. They enhance ecosystem via provision of ecological services like improving water quality, groundwater infiltration, flood risk reduction and biodiversity regulation. Like other parts of the world Pakistan is also facing wetlands degradation. Ecological and economic significance of wetlands was recognized officially in 1971 as Pakistan became signatory of Ramsar wetland convention. Wetlands provide habitat to species of ecological and economic importance. Despite being recognized for international importance, Ramsar figures state that almost half of Pakistan’s wetlands are at moderate or prominent level threat. Wetlands ecosystems are deteriorating at a rapid rate, if uncontrolled this trend may lead to substantial losses. Therefore, management of these resources demands regular monitoring. Present study is dedicated to assessing levels of change overtime in three distinct types of wetlands in Pakistan i.e. Indus delta a coastal wetland, Uchhali complex an inland wetland which are both protected sites while another site Nurri Lagoon which is not sheltered under any category of protected areas. Remotely sensed data has remarkable applications in change detection. Multitemporal Landsat images were used to map changes occurring from 2006 to 2016. Results reveal that wetland area has considerably decreased for all types. Both protected sites have experienced degradation though impact is comparatively lesser than unprotected Nurri lagoon. Significance of protection strategies cannot be denied, it is recommended that mere declaration of a site protected area is not sufficient. It is equally important to control non-point pollutants and ensuring the compliance of conservation strategy.

  5. Wetland loss due to land use change in the Lower Paraná River Delta, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Y V; Quintana, R D; Radeloff, V C; Gavier-Pizarro, G I

    2016-10-15

    Wetland loss is a global concern because wetlands are highly diverse ecosystems that provide important goods and services, thus threatening both biodiversity and human well-being. The Paraná River Delta is one of the largest and most important wetland ecosystems of South America, undergoing expanding cattle and forestry activities with widespread water control practices. To understand the patterns and drivers of land cover change in the Lower Paraná River Delta, we quantified land cover changes and modeled associated factors. We developed land cover maps using Landsat images from 1999 and 2013 and identified main land cover changes. We quantified the influence of different socioeconomic (distance to roads, population centers and human activity centers), land management (area within polders, cattle density and years since last fire), biophysical variables (landscape unit, elevation, soil productivity, distance to rivers) and variables related to extreme system dynamics (flooding and fires) on freshwater marsh conversion with Boosted Regression Trees. We found that one third of the freshwater marshes of the Lower Delta (163,000ha) were replaced by pastures (70%) and forestry (18%) in only 14years. Ranching practices (represented by cattle density, area within polders and distance to roads) were the most important factors responsible for freshwater marsh conversion to pasture. These rapid and widespread losses of freshwater marshes have potentially large negative consequences for biodiversity and ecosystem services. A strategy for sustainable wetland management will benefit from careful analysis of dominant land uses and related management practices, to develop an urgently needed land use policy for the Lower Delta.

  6. Benthic foraminifera as indicators of habitat change in anthropogenically impacted coastal wetlands of the Ebro Delta (NE Iberian Peninsula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Xavier; Trobajo, Rosa; Ibáñez, Carles; Cearreta, Alejandro; Brunet, Manola

    2015-12-15

    Present-day habitats of the Ebro Delta, NE Iberian Peninsula, have been ecologically altered as a consequence of intensive human impacts in the last two centuries (especially rice farming). Benthic foraminiferal palaeoassemblages and sediment characteristics of five short cores were used to reconstruct past wetland habitats, through application of multivariate DCA and CONISS techniques, and dissimilarity coefficients (SCD). The timing of environmental changes was compared to known natural and anthropogenic events in order to identify their possible relationships. In deltaic wetlands under altered hydrological conditions, we found a decrease in species diversity and calcareous-dominated assemblages, and a significant positive correlation between microfaunal changes and organic matter content. Modern analogues supported palaeoenvironmental interpretation of the recent evolution of the Delta wetlands. This research provides the first recent reconstruction of change in the Ebro Delta wetlands, and also illustrates the importance of benthic foraminifera for biomonitoring present and future conditions in Mediterranean deltas.

  7. Surface elevation change and susceptibility of coastal wetlands to sea level rise in Liaohe Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-dong; Wang, Ming; Lu, Xian-guo; Jiang, Ming

    2016-10-01

    The Liaohe Delta in China is an ecologically and commercially important wetland system under threat from sea level rise and marsh subsidence. Sediments deposited in coastal marshes could offer wetlands a potentially important means for adjusting surface elevation with rising sea level, yet coastal wetland stability in Liaohe Delta is not well understood due to limited data from long-term experiments. In this study, wetland surface elevation and vertical accretion were measured from 2011 to 2015 using a surface elevation table (SET) and feldspar marker horizons in two Phragmites and two Suaeda marshes receiving Liaohe River water. The analysis shows that the Phragmites marshes exhibited higher rates of marsh accretion and elevation change than the Suaeda marshes. The two Phragmites marsh sites had average surface elevation change rates at 8.8 and 9.3 mm yr-1, vertical accretion at 17.4 and 17.6 mm yr-1, and shallow subsidence at 8.6 and 8.3 mm yr-1. The average rates of elevation change, vertical accretion, and shallow subsidence at two Suaeda marsh sites were 5.8 and 6.3 mm yr-1, 13.6 and 14.8 mm yr-1, and 7.8 and 8.5 mm yr-1, respectively. The trends suggest that coastal marshes in Liaohe Delta are experiencing changes in average soil elevation that range from a net increase of 0.3 mm y-1 to 6.9 mm y-1 relative to averaged sea level rise in Bohai Sea reported by the 2016 State Oceanic Administration People's Republic of China projection (2.4-5.5 mm y-1), which indicated that the four wetland sites would adjust to the sea level rise and even continue to gain elevation, especially for the Phragmites sites. Nevertheless, the vulnerability of coastal wetlands in Liaohe Delta need further assessment considering the accelerated sea level rise, the high rate of subsidence, and the declining sediment delivery owing to anthropogenic activities such as dam constructions in the river basin.

  8. Soil organic carbon storage changes in coastal wetlands of the modern Yellow River Delta from 2000 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil carbon sequestration plays an essential role in mitigating atmospheric CO2 increases and the subsequently global greenhouse effect. The storages and dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC of 0–30 cm soil depth in different landscape types including beaches, reservoir and pond, reed wetland, forest wetland, bush wetland, farmland, building land, bare land (severe saline land and salt field in the modern Yellow River Delta (YRD were studied based on the data of the regional survey and laboratory analysis. The landscape types were classified by the interpretation of remote sensing images of 2000 and 2009, which were calibrated by field survey results. The results revealed an increase of 10.59 km2 in the modem YRD area from 2000 to 2009. The SOC density varied ranging from 0.73 kg m−2 to 4.25 kg m−2 at depth of 0–30 cm. There were approx. 3.559 × 106 t and 3.545 × 106 t SOC stored in the YRD in 2000 and 2009, respectively. The SOC storages changed greatly in beaches, bush wetland, farm land and salt field which were affected dominantly by anthropogenic activities. The area of the YRD increased greatly within 10 years, however, the small increase of SOC storage in the region was observed due to landscape changes, indicating that the modern YRD was a potential carbon sink and anthropogenic activity was a key factor for SOC change.

  9. Soil organic carbon storage changes in coastal wetlands of the modern Yellow River Delta from 2000 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil carbon sequestration plays an essential role in mitigating CO2 increases and the subsequently global greenhouse effect. The storages and dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC of 0–30 cm soil depth in different landscape types including beaches, reservoir and pond, reed wetland, forest wetland, bush wetland, farmland, building land, bare land (severe saline land and salt field in the modern Yellow River Delta (YRD, were studied based on the data of the regional survey and laboratory analysis. The landscape types were classified by the interpretation of remote sensing images of 2000 and 2009, which was calibrated by field survey results. The results revealed an increase of 10.59 km2 in the modem YRD area from 2000 to 2009. The SOC density varied ranging from 0.73 kg m−2 to 21.60 kg m−2 at depth of 30 cm. There were ~3.97 × 106 t and 3.98 × 106 t SOC stored in the YRD in 2000 and 2009, respectively. The SOC storages changed greatly in beaches, bush wetland, farm land and salt field which were affected dominantly by anthropogenic activities. The area of the YRD increased greatly within 10 yr, however, the small increase of SOC storage in the region was observed due to landscape changes, indicating that the modern YRD was a potential carbon sink and anthropogenic activity was a key factor for SOC change.

  10. Mangrove wetland ecosystems in Ganges-Brahmaputra delta in Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shafi Noor ISLAM; Albrecht GNAUCK

    2008-01-01

    The Sundarbans is one of the productive man-grove wetland ecosystems in the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta in Bangladesh. The delta is undergoing rapid eco-logical changes due to human activity. In the present study, surface water salinity data from 13 rivers of the Sundarbans were collected in order to investigate the sal-ine water intrusion in the mangrove wetlands. Results demonstrate that saline water has penetrated the upstream area as river water salinity has increased signifi-cantly in 1976 compared to the year 1968. The soil and river water salinity data also shows that it has crossed the water salinity threshold line in most parts of the Sundarbans wetlands. These observations are due to the construction of Farakka Barrage in 1975, which reduced the water discharge of the Ganges River from 3700 m3/s in 1962 to 364 m3/s in 2006. The shortage of freshwater dis-charge to the deltaic area is trailing active ecosystems function, especially in the dry season in the south western region in Bangladesh. The objective of this study is to understand and analyze the present degraded mangrove wetland ecosystems and their negative impacts. The find-ings of this study would contribute to the formulation of the mangrove wetland ecosystems management plan inthe Ganges delta of Bangladesh.

  11. Variation in Assemblages of Small Fishes and Microcrustaceans After Inundation of Rarely Flooded Wetlands of the Lower Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siziba, Nqobizitha; Chimbari, Moses J.; Masundire, Hillary; Mosepele, Ketlhatlogile; Ramberg, Lars

    2013-12-01

    Water extraction from floodplain river systems may alter patterns of inundation of adjacent wetlands and lead to loss of aquatic biodiversity. Water reaching the Okavango Delta (Delta), Botswana, may decrease due to excessive water extraction and climate change. However, due to poor understanding of the link between inundation of wetlands and biological responses, it is difficult to assess the impacts of these future water developments on aquatic biota. Large floods from 2009 to 2011 inundated both rarely and frequently flooded wetlands in the Delta, creating an opportunity to examine the ecological significance of flooding of wetlands with widely differing hydrological characteristics. We studied the assemblages of small fishes and microcrustaceans, together with their trophic relationships, in temporary wetlands of the lower Delta. Densities of microcrustaceans in temporary wetlands were generally lower than previously recorded in these habitats. Microcrustacean density varied with wetland types and hydrological phase of inundation. High densities of microcrustaceans were recorded in the 2009 to 2010 flooding season after inundation of rarely flooded sites. Large numbers of small fishes were observed during this study. Community structure of small fishes differed significantly across the studied wetlands, with poeciliids predominant in frequently flooded wetlands and juvenile cichlids most abundant in rarely flooded wetlands (analysis of similarity, P wetlands. This result matched our prediction that rarely flooded wetlands would be more productive; hence, they supported greater populations of microcrustaceans and cichlids, which are aggressive feeders. However, the predominance of microcrustaceans in the guts of small fishes (wetlands are highly accessible by fish. We predict that a decline in the amount of water reaching the Delta will negatively affect fish recruitment, particularly the cichlids that heavily exploited the rarely flooded wetlands. Cichlids are

  12. Variation in assemblages of small fishes and microcrustaceans after inundation of rarely flooded wetlands of the lower Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siziba, Nqobizitha; Chimbari, Moses J; Masundire, Hillary; Mosepele, Ketlhatlogile; Ramberg, Lars

    2013-12-01

    Water extraction from floodplain river systems may alter patterns of inundation of adjacent wetlands and lead to loss of aquatic biodiversity. Water reaching the Okavango Delta (Delta), Botswana, may decrease due to excessive water extraction and climate change. However, due to poor understanding of the link between inundation of wetlands and biological responses, it is difficult to assess the impacts of these future water developments on aquatic biota. Large floods from 2009 to 2011 inundated both rarely and frequently flooded wetlands in the Delta, creating an opportunity to examine the ecological significance of flooding of wetlands with widely differing hydrological characteristics. We studied the assemblages of small fishes and microcrustaceans, together with their trophic relationships, in temporary wetlands of the lower Delta. Densities of microcrustaceans in temporary wetlands were generally lower than previously recorded in these habitats. Microcrustacean density varied with wetland types and hydrological phase of inundation. High densities of microcrustaceans were recorded in the 2009 to 2010 flooding season after inundation of rarely flooded sites. Large numbers of small fishes were observed during this study. Community structure of small fishes differed significantly across the studied wetlands, with poeciliids predominant in frequently flooded wetlands and juvenile cichlids most abundant in rarely flooded wetlands (analysis of similarity, P fishes of fishes (fishes may also be an important regulatory mechanism of microcrustacean assemblages during large floods when inundated terrestrial patches of wetlands are highly accessible by fish. We predict that a decline in the amount of water reaching the Delta will negatively affect fish recruitment, particularly the cichlids that heavily exploited the rarely flooded wetlands. Cichlids are an important human food source, and their decline in fish catches will negatively affect livelihoods. Hence, priority in

  13. Climate Change and Intertidal Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline M. Ross

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause—the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the “squeeze” experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change.

  14. Climate change and intertidal wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Pauline M; Adam, Paul

    2013-03-19

    Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause-the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the "squeeze" experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change.

  15. Assessing Niger-Delta Wetland Resources: A Case-Study of Mangrove Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwan, R. H.; Ndimele, P. E.; Whenu, O. O.; Anetekhai, M. A.; Essien-Ibok, M. A.; Erondu, E. S.

    2016-02-01

    The Niger Delta is located in the Atlantic coast of Southern Nigeria and is the world's second largest delta with a coastline of about 450km. The Niger Delta region occupies a surface area of about 112,110km2, representing about 12% of Nigeria's total surface area. The Delta's environment can be broken down into four ecological zones: coastal barrier islands, mangrove swamp forests, freshwater swamps, and lowland rainforests. The mangrove swamps of Niger Delta, which is the largest delta in Africa constitute the dominant wetland ecosystem in the Niger Delta region and covers an area of about 1,900km2. Mangroves constitute important nurseries for fishes, crustaceans, sponges, algae and other invertebrates, and also acts as a sink, retaining pollutants from contaminated tidal water. The Niger Delta mangrove together with the creeks and rivers are a major source of food and livelihood for about 30 million people, which represents more than 17% of Nigeria's population. Other ecosystem services provided by this unique environment are flood control, ground water re-fill, reservoir of biodiversity, fuel wood, cultural values etc. This ecosystem also plays important role in climate change mitigation because of its high blue carbon sequestration potential. This is particularly important because of continuous gas flaring in Niger Delta from petroleum operations, which releases carbon dioxide among other gases into the atmosphere. This wetland is potentially a good site for ecotourism and also qualifies to be a world heritage site and Ramsar site if proper steps are taken. The benefits derivable from this fragile ecosystem are under severe threat by anthropogenic stressors. These include the installation of pipelines and seismic exploration by oil companies, crude oil pollution, deforestation, urbanization etc. This paper discusses the extent of depletion and loss of mangrove ecosystem in the Niger Delta region and the value of its goods and services.

  16. 78 FR 13643 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Delta Wetlands Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... Proposed Delta Wetlands Project in San Joaquin and Contra Costa Counties, CA, Corps Permit Application... of Intent. ] SUMMARY: Delta Wetland Properties (Applicant) has applied for a Department of Army... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Delta Wetlands Project (prepared in 2001) is required. Delta...

  17. Tracking Nile Delta vulnerability to Holocene change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Marriner

    Full Text Available Understanding deltaic resilience in the face of Holocene climate change and human impacts is an important challenge for the earth sciences in characterizing the full range of present and future wetland responses to global warming. Here, we report an 8000-year mass balance record from the Nile Delta to reconstruct when and how this sedimentary basin has responded to past hydrological shifts. In a global Holocene context, the long-term decrease in Nile Delta accretion rates is consistent with insolation-driven changes in the 'monsoon pacemaker', attested throughout the mid-latitude tropics. Following the early to mid-Holocene growth of the Nile's deltaic plain, sediment losses and pronounced erosion are first recorded after ~4000 years ago, the corollaries of falling sediment supply and an intensification of anthropogenic impacts from the Pharaonic period onwards. Against the backcloth of the Saharan 'depeopling', reduced river flow underpinned by a weakening of monsoonal precipitation appears to have been particularly conducive to the expansion of human activities on the delta by exposing productive floodplain lands for occupation and irrigation agriculture. The reconstruction suggests that the Nile Delta has a particularly long history of vulnerability to extreme events (e.g. floods and storms and sea-level rise, although the present sediment-starved system does not have a direct Holocene analogue. This study highlights the importance of the world's deltas as sensitive archives to investigate Holocene geosystem responses to climate change, risks and hazards, and societal interaction.

  18. Tidal wetland conservation and restoration for flood mitigation in estuaries and deltas: examples and global potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmerman, Stijn; Smolders, Sven; Stark, Jeroen; meire, patrick

    2014-05-01

    Low-lying and densely populated deltas and estuaries are world widely exposed to flood risks caused by storm surges. On the one hand, global change is increasing these flood risks through accelerating sea level rise and increasing storm intensity, but on the other hand, local-scale human impacts on deltas and estuaries are in many cases even more increasing the vulnerability to floods. Here we address the degradation and reclamation of tidal wetlands (i.e. salt marshes in the temperate zone and mangroves in the tropical zone) as a major source for increasing vulnerability to flooding of estuaries and deltas. Firstly, we present examples of flood mitigation by tidal wetland conservation and restoration, and secondly we explore the potentials and limitations for global application of this approach of ecosystem-based flood defense (see Temmerman et al. 2013). First, we use the Scheldt estuary (SW Netherlands and Belgium) as an example where historic wetland reclamation has importantly contributed to increasing flood risks, and where tidal marsh restoration on the previously reclaimed land is nowadays brought into large-scale practice as an essential part of the flood defense system. Based on data and hydrodynamic modelling, we show that large-scale historic marsh reclamation has largely reduced the water storage capacity of the estuary and has reduced the friction to propagating flood waves, resulting in an important landward increase of tidal and storm surge levels. Hydrodynamic model scenarios demonstrate how tidal and storm surge propagation through the estuary are affected by tidal marsh properties, including the surface area, elevation, vegetation and position of marshes along the estuary. We show that nowadays tidal wetland creation on previously reclaimed land is applied as an essential part of the flood defense system along the Scheldt estuary. Secondly, a global analysis is presented of the potential application of tidal wetlands in flood mitigation in

  19. Recent Subsidence and Erosion at Diverse Wetland Sites in the Southeastern Mississippi Delta Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Robert A.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kelso, Kyle W.

    2009-01-01

    A prior study (U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1216) examined historical land- and water-area changes and estimated magnitudes of land subsidence and erosion at five wetland sites in the Terrebonne hydrologic basin of the Mississippi delta plain. The present study extends that work by analyzing interior wetland loss and relative magnitudes of subsidence and erosion at five additional wetland sites in the adjacent Barataria hydrologic basin. The Barataria basin sites were selected for their diverse physical settings and their recent (post-1978) conversion from marsh to open water. Historical aerial photography, datum-corrected marsh elevations and water depths, sediment cores, and radiocarbon dates were integrated to evaluate land-water changes in the Mississippi delta plain on both historical and geological time scales. The thickness of the organic-rich sediments (peat) and the elevation of the stratigraphic contact between peat and underlying mud were compared at marsh and open-water sites across areas of formerly continuous marsh to estimate magnitudes of recent delta-plain elevation loss caused by vertical erosion and subsidence of the wetlands. Results of these analyses indicate that erosion exceeded subsidence at most of the study areas, although both processes have contributed to historical wetland loss. Comparison of these results with prior studies indicates that subsidence largely caused rapid interior wetland loss in the Terrebonne basin before 1978, whereas erosional processes primarily caused more gradual interior wetland loss in the Barataria basin after 1978. Decadal variations in rates of relative sea-level rise at a National Ocean Service tide gage, elevation changes between repeat benchmark-leveling surveys, and GPS height monitoring at three National Geodetic Survey Continuously Operating Reference Stations indicate that subsidence rates since the early 1990s are substantially lower than those previously reported and are similar in

  20. IMPACTS OF WETLAND DEGRADATION IN NIGER DELTA NIGERIA AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE IN FLOOD CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enwere Chidimma Loveline

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available  Wetlands perform a wide variety of functions that include flood control, ground water recharge, shore line stabilization, storm protection and climate moderation. However, despite these huge wetland functions, it has witnessed poor appreciation and dreadful conditions. Niger Delta has witnessed constant coastal erosion and rising sea level, this has led to large portions of the landmass being eroded. This paper aims to review some environmental effects of flooding in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria to provide the desired knowledge of role that wetlands play in reducing flood impacts. However, having witnessed the flood, the experience opened my eyes to the environmental challenges facing Niger Delta with respect to Wetlands degradation, poor perception of wetland values and functions, poor environmental practices and non-implementation of environmental regulations. This memorable experience rekindled the desire and motivation to seek a solution to wetland degradation with the aim of recognizing significance of wetlands at the centre of achieving both livelihood and biodiversity improvements to address coastal flooding problem.The study therefore concludes that wetlands are very significant in flood control and thus the conservation and restoration of wetlands, should put in place measures to reduce wetland destruction.International Journal of EnvironmentVolume-4, Issue-3, June-August 2015Page: 177-184

  1. Community-based restoration of desert wetlands: the case of the Colorado River delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta; Mark Briggs; Yamilett Carrillo-Guerroro; Edward P. Glenn; Miriam Lara-Flores; Martha Roman-Rodriguez

    2005-01-01

    Wetland areas have been drastically reduced through the Pacific Flyway and the Sonoran Desert, with severe consequences for avian populations. In the Colorado River delta, wetlands have been reduced by 80 percent due to water management practices in the Colorado River basin. However, excess flows and agricultural drainage water has restored some areas, providing...

  2. Climate change and the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, Michael; Anderson, Jamie; Anderson, Michael L.; Brown, Larry R.; Cayan, Daniel; Maurer, Edwin P.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change amounts to a rapidly approaching, “new” stressor in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta system. In response to California’s extreme natural hydroclimatic variability, complex water-management systems have been developed, even as the Delta’s natural ecosystems have been largely devastated. Climate change is projected to challenge these management and ecological systems in different ways that are characterized by different levels of uncertainty. For example, there is high certainty that climate will warm by about 2°C more (than late-20th-century averages) by mid-century and about 4°C by end of century, if greenhouse-gas emissions continue their current rates of acceleration. Future precipitation changes are much less certain, with as many climate models projecting wetter conditions as drier. However, the same projections agree that precipitation will be more intense when storms do arrive, even as more dry days will separate storms. Warmer temperatures will likely enhance evaporative demands and raise water temperatures. Consequently, climate change is projected to yield both more extreme flood risks and greater drought risks. Sea level rise (SLR) during the 20th century was about 22cm, and is projected to increase by at least 3-fold this century. SLR together with land subsidence threatens the Delta with greater vulnerabilities to inundation and salinity intrusion. Effects on the Delta ecosystem that are traceable to warming include SLR, reduced snowpack, earlier snowmelt and larger storm-driven streamflows, warmer and longer summers, warmer summer water temperatures, and water-quality changes. These changes and their uncertainties will challenge the operations of water projects and uses throughout the Delta’s watershed and delivery areas. Although the effects of climate change on Delta ecosystems may be profound, the end results are difficult to predict, except that native species will fare worse than invaders. Successful

  3. Water Rights for Wetlands in the Bear River Delta

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the basic premise and functioning of water rights in Utah and how water rights affect wetlands, specifically those in the northern region of the state. It includes the history of Utah water rights and the basic components of prior appropriation doctrine, and gives an example of using water rights for wetlands by explaining how the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge works with neighboring water users to secure water for its wetlands.

  4. Causes of Wetland Degradation and Ecological Restoration in the Yellow River Delta Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jian-feng; Sun Qi-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Yellow River delta (YRD) is one of the biggest deltas that there is a large area of wetland in the world. Thanks to soil(sands) sediment carried by the Yellow River, there was averagely the newly formed land 21.3 km2in YRD. During the development of petroleum industry and urban expansion, wetlands were degraded due to population growth, irrational land use, in addition to adverse natural eco-environment such as lower precipitation, higher soil evaporation and soil salinazation. The major ecological measures to restore degraded wetland concerned with ensuring water supply, especially establishing perfect irrigation works; protecting virgin plant communities and assisting them to regenerate by the way of site preparation, improving living surroundings; introducing salt-tolerant plants to increase vegetation species and plant coverage, thereby enhancing the capability of wetland to combat contamination and pollution through plant remediation, uptake, absorption, etc. Finally making a comprehensive land use plan,accordingly removing deleterious facilities.

  5. N, P, and heavy metal dynamics in wetlands and lakes of the Danube Delta, Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lajtha, K.; Keller, B.; Jamil, A. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)]|[Boston Univ., MA (United States)]|[Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The Danube Delta stands at the interface between the Danube and the western Black Sea. Although it is assumed that such extensive wetlands can effectively filter nutrients and pollutants from surrounding waters, recent anthropogenic factors such as increased loading from upstream sources, dredging, channelization, and engineering impoundments may all serve to decrease the filtering potential of the marshes. We sampled sediments, water, and mussels from lakes, and plants and sediments from marshes along an eastward gradient as well as with distance from a main channel in the Delta to examine controls on filtering efficiency. N and P in water decreased with distance from the western gateway, although the magnitude of this decrease varied among years with changes in hydrology. Heavy metals in roots of Phragmites did not vary predictably over this gradient, although concentrations in roots from dredged channel sediments were significantly higher than in roots from natural marshes. Accumulation in mussels reflected hydrologic flow within the Delta, which may be significantly altered by channelization and dredging.

  6. Ecosystem Service Value for the Common Reed Wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, Northeast China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Siyuan; Laws, Edward A.; Costanza, Robert;

    2016-01-01

    and societal developments. Although the direct and indirect services provided by such wetlands make valuable contributions to human welfare, wetlands are often given little weight in policy decisions, because ecosystem services are not fully “captured” in commercial markets or adequately quantified in terms...... comparable with the values of economic services and manufactured capital. In this study the value of 10 of 17 ecosystem services provided by the reed wetlands in the Liaohe Delta was estimated by using market pricing, shadow projects, and benefit transfer methods. The value of the 10 services provided...... by the 800 km2 of reed wetland totaled approximately US $2.68 billion. Remarkably, aquaculture and the production of pulp from reeds accounted for only 19% of the total value of the reed wetland services. About 32% of the value of the ecosystem services was attributed to non-consumptive recreation, an easily...

  7. Plant community, primary productivity, and environmental conditions following wetland re-establishment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.L.; Fujii, R.

    2010-01-01

    Wetland restoration can mitigate aerobic decomposition of subsided organic soils, as well as re-establish conditions favorable for carbon storage. Rates of carbon storage result from the balance of inputs and losses, both of which are affected by wetland hydrology. We followed the effect of water depth (25 and 55 cm) on the plant community, primary production, and changes in two re-established wetlands in the Sacramento San-Joaquin River Delta, California for 9 years after flooding to determine how relatively small differences in water depth affect carbon storage rates over time. To estimate annual carbon inputs, plant species cover, standing above- and below-ground plant biomass, and annual biomass turnover rates were measured, and allometric biomass models for Schoenoplectus (Scirpus) acutus and Typha spp., the emergent marsh dominants, were developed. As the wetlands developed, environmental factors, including water temperature, depth, and pH were measured. Emergent marsh vegetation colonized the shallow wetland more rapidly than the deeper wetland. This is important to potential carbon storage because emergent marsh vegetation is more productive, and less labile, than submerged and floating vegetation. Primary production of emergent marsh vegetation ranged from 1.3 to 3.2 kg of carbon per square meter annually; and, mid-season standing live biomass represented about half of the annual primary production. Changes in species composition occurred in both submerged and emergent plant communities as the wetlands matured. Water depth, temperature, and pH were lower in areas with emergent marsh vegetation compared to submerged vegetation, all of which, in turn, can affect carbon cycling and storage rates. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  8. The influence of salinity and restoration on wetland soil microbial communities and carbon cycling in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; He, S.; Windham-Myers, L.; Tringe, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to increase the average salinity of the San Francisco Bay-Delta watershed as sea levels rise and alpine snow volume decreases. Wetland soil microbial communities are responsible for cycling greenhouse gases and their response to climate change will heavily influence whether increasing salinity will have a negative or positive effect on the net greenhouse gas budgets of wetlands. To better understand the underlying factors determining the balance of greenhouse gas flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater to full seawater in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range of wetland plant types and restoration states. We determined a suite of soil biogeochemical parameters including moisture, carbon and nutrient contents, pH, sulfate, chloride, and trace metal concentrations. The results of our microbial diversity survey (16S rRNA gene Illumina tag sequencing) showed that salinity and sampling location were the primary drivers of belowground microbial community composition. Freshwater wetland soils, with lower sulfate concentrations, produced more methane than saline sites and we found a parallel increase in the relative abundance of methanogen populations in the high-methane samples. Surprisingly, wetland restoration status did not significantly alter microbial community composition, despite orders of magnitude greater methane flux in restored wetlands compared to reference sites. Deeper metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing in a restored wetland allowed us to further evaluate the roles of methanogen abundance and activity in shaping soil methane production. Our study links belowground microbial communities with their greenhouse gas production, providing a mechanistic microbial framework for assessing climate change feedbacks in wetland soils resulting from sea

  9. Distribution of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in coastal wetland soil related land use in the Modern Yellow River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junbao; Zhan, Chao; Li, Yunzhao; Zhou, Di; Fu, Yuqin; Chu, Xiaojing; Xing, Qinghui; Han, Guangxuan; Wang, Guangmei; Guan, Bo; Wang, Qing

    2016-11-01

    The delivery and distribution of nutrients in coastal wetland ecosystems is much related to the land use. The spatial variations of TOC, TN, NH4+-N, NO3--N and TP and associated soil salinity with depth in 9 kinds land uses in coastal zone of the modern Yellow River Delta (YRD) was evaluated based on monitoring data in field from 2009 to 2015. The results showed that the average contents of soil TOC, TN, NO3--N, NH4+-N and TP were 4.21 ± 2.40 g kg-1, 375.91 ± 213.44, 5.36 ± 9.59 and 7.20 ± 5.58 and 591.27 ± 91.16 mg kg-1, respectively. The high N and C contents were found in cropland in southern part and low values in natural wetland, while TP was relatively stable both in profiles and in different land uses. The land use, land formation age and salinity were important factors influencing distributions of TOC and N. Higher contents of TOC and N were observed in older formation age lands in whole study region, while the opposite regulation were found in new-born natural wetland, indicating that the anthropogenic activities could greatly alter the original distribution regulations of nutrients in coastal natural wetlands by changing the regional land use.

  10. Wetland vegetation in Manzala lagoon, Nile Delta coast, Egypt: Rapid responses of pollen to altered nile hydrology and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, C.E.; Stanley, J.-D.; Horton, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    The pollen record in a sediment core from Manzala lagoon on the Nile delta coastal margin of Egypt, deposited from ca. AD 1860 to 1990, indicates rapid coastal wetland vegetation responses to two primary periods of human activity. These are associated with artificially altered Nile hydrologic regimes in proximal areas and distal sectors located to ???1200 km south of Manzala. Freshwater wetland plants that were dominant, such as Typha and Phragmites, decreased rapidly, whereas in the early 1900s, brackish water wetland species (e.g., Amaranthaceae) increased. This change occurred after closure of the Aswan Low Dam in 1902. The second major modification in the pollen record occurred in the early 1970s, after Aswan High Dam closure from 1965 to 1970, when Typha pollen abundance increased rapidly. Massive population growth occurred along the Nile during the 130 years represented by the core section. During this time, the total volume of lagoon water decreased because of conversion of wetland areas to agricultural land, and input of organic-rich sediment, sewage (municipal, agricultural, industrial), and fertilizer in Manzala lagoon increased markedly. Although the wetland plant community has continued to respond to increasingly intensified and varied human-induced pressures in proximal sectors, the two most marked changes in Manzala pollen best correlate with distal events (i.e., closure of the two dams at Aswan). The study also shows that the two major vegetation changes in Manzala lagoon each occurred less than 10 years after closure upriver of the Low and High dams that markedly altered the Nile regime from Upper Egypt to the coast. ?? 2011, the Coastal Education & Research Foundation (CERF).

  11. Environmental flows and its evaluation of restoration effect based on LEDESS model in Yellow River Delta wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.G.; Lian, Y.; Huang, C.; Wang, X.J.; Wang, R.L.; Shan, K.; Pedroli, B.; Eupen, van M.; Elmahdi, A.; Ali, M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to freshwater supplement scarcity and heavy human activities, the fresh water wetland ecosystem in Yellow River Delta is facing disintegrated deterioration, and it is seriously affecting the health of the Yellow River ecosystem. This paper identifies the restoration objectives of wetland aiming

  12. Projecting the Hydrologic Impacts of Climate Change on Montane Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Yeun; Ryan, Maureen E; Hamlet, Alan F; Palen, Wendy J; Lawler, Joshua J; Halabisky, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    Wetlands are globally important ecosystems that provide critical services for natural communities and human society. Montane wetland ecosystems are expected to be among the most sensitive to changing climate, as their persistence depends on factors directly influenced by climate (e.g. precipitation, snowpack, evaporation). Despite their importance and climate sensitivity, wetlands tend to be understudied due to a lack of tools and data relative to what is available for other ecosystem types. Here, we develop and demonstrate a new method for projecting climate-induced hydrologic changes in montane wetlands. Using observed wetland water levels and soil moisture simulated by the physically based Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model, we developed site-specific regression models relating soil moisture to observed wetland water levels to simulate the hydrologic behavior of four types of montane wetlands (ephemeral, intermediate, perennial, permanent wetlands) in the U. S. Pacific Northwest. The hybrid models captured observed wetland dynamics in many cases, though were less robust in others. We then used these models to a) hindcast historical wetland behavior in response to observed climate variability (1916-2010 or later) and classify wetland types, and b) project the impacts of climate change on montane wetlands using global climate model scenarios for the 2040s and 2080s (A1B emissions scenario). These future projections show that climate-induced changes to key driving variables (reduced snowpack, higher evapotranspiration, extended summer drought) will result in earlier and faster drawdown in Pacific Northwest montane wetlands, leading to systematic reductions in water levels, shortened wetland hydroperiods, and increased probability of drying. Intermediate hydroperiod wetlands are projected to experience the greatest changes. For the 2080s scenario, widespread conversion of intermediate wetlands to fast-drying ephemeral wetlands will likely reduce

  13. Carbon Sequestration in Mediterranean Tidal Wetlands: San Francisco Bay and the Ebro River Delta (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, J.; Fennessy, S.; Ibanez, C.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal wetlands accumulate soil carbon at relatively rapid rates, in large part because they build soil to counteract increases in sea-level rise. Because of the rapid rates of carbon sequestration, there is growing interest in evaluating carbon dynamics in tidal wetlands around the world; however, few measurements have been completed for mediterranean-type tidal wetlands, which tend to have relatively high levels of soil salinity, likely affecting both plant productivity and decomposition rates. We measured sediment accretion and carbon sequestration rates at tidal wetlands in two mediterranean regions: the San Francisco Bay Estuary (California, USA) and the Ebro River Delta (Catalonia, Spain). Sampling sites within each region represented a range of conditions in terms of soil salinity and plant communities, and these sites serve as potential analogs for long-term carbon sequestration in restored wetlands, which could receive credits under emerging policies for carbon management. Within San Francisco Bay, we collected six sediment cores per site at four salt marshes and two brackish tidal wetlands (two transects with three stations per transect at each site) in order to identify spatial variation both within and among wetlands in the Estuary. At the Ebro Delta, individual sediment cores were collected across 14 tidal wetland sites, including salt and brackish marshes from impounded areas, river mouths, coastal lagoon, and open bay settings. Cores were collected to 50 cm, and cores were dated using 137Cs and 210Pb. Most sites within San Francisco accreted 0.3-0.5 cm/yr, with slightly higher rates of accretion at low marsh stations; accretions rates based on 137Cs were slightly higher than those based on 210Pb, likely because of the shorter time frame covered by 137Cs dating. Accretion rates from the Ebro Delta sites were similar although more variable, with rates based on 137Cs ranging from 0.1 to 0.9 cm/yr and reflecting the wide range of conditions and management

  14. Changes of Urban Wetland Landscape Pattern and Impacts of Urbanization on Wetland in Wuhan City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuelei; NING Longmei; YU Jing; XIAO Rui; LI Tao

    2008-01-01

    In this study, remote sensing data of Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China in 1996-2001 were selected to ex-tract wetland landscape information. Several landscape indices were used to evaluate the changes of landscape patternwithin the five years, including patch number, patch density, patch fractal dimension, landscape diversity, dominance,evenness, and fragmentation indexes. Then, transformation probabilities of wetland landscapes into non-wetland land-scapes were calculated based on Markov Model, and on these grounds the relationship between changes of wetlandlandscape pattern and urban construction was analyzed. The results showed that fragmentation degree of all wetlandtypes increased, lake area declined, and dominance of natural wetland decreased. The reasons for these results weremainly because of urban construction. According to the features of abundant wetland in Wuhan City, we suggested thatprotection of wetland landscape should cooperate with urban construction, which means wetland should become im-portant part of urban landscape.

  15. Land and water grabbing in an east african coastal wetland : the case of the Tana delta

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphanie Duvail; Claire Médard; Olivier Hamerlynck; Dorothy Wanja Nyingi

    2012-01-01

    The delta of the Tana river in Kenya, an important wetland in Eastern Africa, is at a major turning point. Key decisions regarding its future are on the verge of being made, some of which may dramatically alter its characteristics. At present, in a landscape that is a mosaic of floodplains and forests of high biodiversity, small-scale farming, fishing and livestock-keeping are the main activities practised by the local communities, all relying on the occurrence of floods in November and May. ...

  16. Ecohydrologic Response of a Wetland Indicator Species to Climate Change and Streamflow Regulation: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E. M.; Gorelick, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Peace-Athabasca Delta ("Delta") in northeastern Alberta, Canada, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance. Delta ecohydrology is expected to respond rapidly to upstream water demand and climate change, with earlier spring meltwater, decreased springtime peak flow, and a decline in springtime ice-jam flooding. We focus on changes in the population and distribution of muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus), an ecohydrologic indicator species. We present a conceptual model linking hydrology and muskrat ecology. Our conceptual model links seven modules representing (1) upstream water demand, (2) streamflow and snowmelt, (3) floods, (4) the water balance of floodplain lakes, (5) muskrat habitat suitability, (6) wetland vegetation, and (7) muskrat population dynamics predicted using an agent-based model. Our goal is to evaluate the effects of different climate change and upstream water demand scenarios on the abundance and distribution of Delta muskrat, from present-2100. Moving from the current conceptual model to a predictive quantitative model, we will rely on abundant existing data and Traditional Ecological Knowledge of muskrat and hydrology in the Delta.

  17. Characterizing wetland change at landscape scale in Jiangsu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chi; Sheng, Sheng; Zhou, Wen; Cui, Lijuan; Liu, Maosong

    2011-08-01

    Human activities produced great impacts on wetlands worldwide. Taking Jiangsu Province, China, as a representative wetland region subject to extensive human activities, the aim of this study is to understand the conversion trajectory and spatial differentiation in wetland change from a multi-scale perspective. Based on multi-temporal Landsat images, it was found that the natural wetlands decreased by 11.2% from 1990 to 2006 in Jiangsu Province. Transition matrices showed that the conversion of natural wetlands to human-made wetlands (mostly aquaculture ponds) was the major form of natural wetland reduction, accounting for over 60% of the reduction. Percentage reduction and area reduc tion of natural wetlands were respectively quantified within different wetland cover zones using a moving window analysis. Average percentage reduction showed a decreasing tendency with increasing wetland cover. The high-cover and mid-cover zone presented the largest area reduction at the scales of 1-2 km and 4-8 km, respectively. Local hotspots of natural wetland reduction were mapped using the equal-interval and quantile classification schemes. The hotspots were mostly concentrated in the Lixiahe marshes and the coastal wetland areas. For the area reduction hotspots, the quantile classification presented larger area and more patches than the equal-interval classification; while an opposite result was shown for the percentage reduction hotspots. With respect to the discontinuous distribution of the natural wetlands, area reduction could be more appropriate to represent reduction hotspots than percentage reduction in the study area. These findings could have useful implications to wetland conservation.

  18. Hydrological adjustment and flooding control of wetlands in the Liaohe Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The function of estuary wetland on hydrological adjustment and flooding control is studied in this paper.It is estimated that theevapotranspiration in the reed field during growth season(June to October) is 722.9 mm, which is 37.5% higher than large water body(E601:525.9 mm).The water replacement rate in the reed field can reach 95 % only when the rains continuously for 11 days and the precipitationreached 912 mm.For the water balance in the paddy field, the total water requirement ranges between 1920 and 1860 mm, among which,31% is from precipitation, and the left is provided by reservoirs.The water usage efficiency is 0.35 at present productivity.Based on thelandscape characteristics and functionalities on flooding control, 5 functional zones are designed for the Liaohe Delta: key protected area;underground storage area; flooding discharge area; flood diversion area in emergency; and flood control drainage area.

  19. Vegetation, substrate and hydrology in floating marshes in the Mississippi river delta plain wetlands, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasser, C.E.; Gosselink, J.G.; Swenson, E.M.; Swarzenski, C.M.; Leibowitz, N.C.

    1996-01-01

    In the 1940s extensive floating marshes (locally called 'flotant') were reported and mapped in coastal wetlands of the Mississippi River Delta Plain. These floating marshes included large areas of Panicum hemitomon-dominated freshwater marshes, and Spartina patens/Scirpus olneyi brackish marshes. Today these marshes appear to be quite different in extent and type. We describe five floating habitats and one non-floating, quaking habitat based on differences in buoyancy dynamics (timing and degree of floating), substrate characteristics, and dominant vegetation. All floating marshes have low bulk density, organic substrates. Nearly all are fresh marshes. Panicum hemitomon floating marshes presently occur within the general regions that were reported in the 1940's by O'Neil, but are reduced in extent. Some of the former Panicum hemitomon marshes have been replaced by seasonally or variably floating marshes dominated, or co-dominated by Sagittaria lancifolia or Eleocharis baldwinii. ?? 1996 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  20. Factors influencing CO2 and CH4 emissions from coastal wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Olsson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many factors are known to influence greenhouse gas emissions from coastal wetlands, but it is still unclear which factors are most important under field conditions when they are all acting simultaneously. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of water table, salinity, soil temperature and vegetation on CH4 emissions and ecosystem respiration (Reco from five coastal wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, northeast China: two Phragmites australis (common reed wetlands, two Suaeda salsa (sea blite marshes and a rice (Oryza sativa paddy. Throughout the growing season, the Suaeda wetlands were net CH4 sinks whereas the Phragmites wetlands and the rice paddy were net CH4 sources emitting 1.2–6.1 g CH4 m−2 y−1. The Phragmites wetlands emitted the most CH4 per unit area and the most CH4 relative to CO2. The main controlling factors for the CH4 emissions were water table, temperature and salinity. The CH4 emission was accelerated at high and constant (or managed water tables and decreased at water tables below the soil surface. High temperatures enhanced CH4 emissions, and emission rates were consistently low (4 m−2 h at soil temperatures 18 ppt, the CH4 emission rates were always low (4 m−2 h−1 probably because methanogens were outcompeted by sulphate reducing bacteria. Saline Phragmites wetlands can, however, emit significant amounts of CH4 as CH4 produced in deep soil layers are transported through the air-space tissue of the plants to the atmosphere. The CH4 emission from coastal wetlands can be reduced by creating fluctuating water tables, including water tables below the soil surface, as well as by occasional flooding by high-salinity water. The effects of water management schemes on the biological communities in the wetlands must, however, be carefully studied prior to the management in order to avoid undesirable effects on the wetland communities.

  1. Factors influencing CO2 and CH4 emissions from coastal wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, L.; Ye, S.; Yu, X.; Wei, M.; Krauss, K. W.; Brix, H.

    2015-08-01

    Many factors are known to influence greenhouse gas emissions from coastal wetlands, but it is still unclear which factors are most important under field conditions when they are all acting simultaneously. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of water table, salinity, soil temperature and vegetation on CH4 emissions and ecosystem respiration (Reco) from five coastal wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, Northeast China: two Phragmites australis (common reed) wetlands, two Suaeda salsa (sea blite) marshes and a rice (Oryza sativa) paddy. Throughout the growing season, the Suaeda wetlands were net CH4 sinks whereas the Phragmites wetlands and the rice paddy were net CH4 sources emitting 1.2-6.1 g CH4 m-2 yr-1. The Phragmites wetlands emitted the most CH4 per unit area and the most CH4 relative to CO2. The main controlling factors for the CH4 emissions were water table, temperature, soil organic carbon and salinity. The CH4 emission was accelerated at high and constant (or managed) water tables and decreased at water tables below the soil surface. High temperatures enhanced CH4 emissions, and emission rates were consistently low ( 18 ppt, the CH4 emission rates were always low (bacteria. Saline Phragmites wetlands can, however, emit significant amounts of CH4 as CH4 produced in deep soil layers are transported through the air-space tissue of the plants to the atmosphere. The CH4 emission from coastal wetlands can be reduced by creating fluctuating water tables, including water tables below the soil surface, as well as by occasional flooding by high-salinity water. The effects of water management schemes on the biological communities in the wetlands must, however, be carefully studied prior to the management in order to avoid undesirable effects on the wetland communities.

  2. Direct use values of selected vegetation resources in the Okavango delta wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mmopelwa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The economic benefits generated by wetlands and the costs associated with their degradation or loss are frequently overlooked. This often leads to decisions that stimulate wetland conversion and degradation.  An important step towards correcting this situation and countering this neglect is to establish the true values of a wetland’s ecosystem goods and services.  This study attempts to estimate the direct use values of native plants, such as palm leaves for basketry, grass for thatching, fuelwood, edible fruits and plant parts used by three villages adjacent to the Okavango Delta during the 2003 calendar year.  Other sources of ecosystem goods and services, such as fishing, floodplain farming and tourism, were not considered in this study.  The average annual value per household of these harvested resources is generally higher than that of similar resources found in other southern African wetlands, owing to higher consumption rates. The overall total direct use value of plant resources, including household income contributions “in kind”, was estimated at US$1 434 per household for 2003 (or US$43.41/ha. This value is almost equal to the average household financial income of US$1 416/year. The net present value of the overall benefit from the direct use of the vegetative resources is estimated at US$101.9 million. This clearly indicates the value of the use of natural resources and their contribution to livelihoods and quality of life.  This value is so significant that economic development planners ought to incorporate it into development planning. They should not conceive infrastructure development that would jeopardise the communities’ access to these natural resources without any well-developed mitigation strategy.

  3. Ecological Effects of Roads on the Plant Diversity of Coastal Wetland in the Yellow River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhao Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The 26 sample sites in 7 study plots adjacent to asphalt road and earth road in coastal wetland in the Yellow River Delta were selected to quantify plant diversity using quadrat sampling method in plant bloom phase of July and August 2012. The indice of βT and Jaccard’s coefficient were applied to evaluate the species diversity. The results showed that the plant diversities and alien plants were high in the range of 0–20 m to the road verge. There were more exotics and halophytes in plots of asphalt roadside than that of earth roadside. However, proportion of halophytes in habitats of asphalt roadsides was lower than that of earth roadside. By comparing β-diversity, there were more common species in the asphalt roadsides than that in the earth roadsides. The similarity of plant communities in studied plots of asphalt roadsides and earth roadsides increased with increasing the distance to road verge. The effect range of roads for plant diversity in study region was about 20 m to road verge. Our results indicate that the construction and maintenance of roads in wetland could increase the plant species diversities of communities and risk of alien species invasion.

  4. Conversion or conservation? Understanding wetland change in northwest Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Amy E; Cumming, Graeme S

    2008-01-01

    Wetlands are more threatened than any other ecosystem type, with losses exceeding 50% of their original extent worldwide. Despite the small portion of the Earth's surface that they comprise, wetlands contribute significantly to global ecosystem services. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the location and rate of change in wetland amount in the Tempisque Basin of northwest Costa Rica is predictable from landscape setting. Our results demonstrate that a strong potential exists for developing predictive models of wetland conversion based on an understanding of wetland location and surrounding trends of land use. We found that topography was the single most important predictor of wetland conversion in this area, entraining other conversion processes, and that spatial patterns of wetland loss could consistently be predicted from landscape-level variables. Areas with highest probabilities of conversion were found in the most accessible, non-protected regions of the landscape. While Palo Verde National Park made a substantial contribution to wetland conservation, our results highlight the dependence of lower-lying protected areas on upland processes, adding a little-addressed dimension of complexity to the dialogue about protected area management. Conservation strategies aimed at reducing wetland loss in tropical habitats will benefit from careful analysis of the dominant land use system(s) at a relatively broad scale, and the subsequent development of management and policy responses that take into account dynamic opportunities and constraints in the landscape.

  5. Land and Water Grabbing in an East African Coastal Wetland: The Case of the Tana Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Duvail

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The delta of the Tana river in Kenya, an important wetland in Eastern Africa, is at a major turning point. Key decisions regarding its future are on the verge of being made, some of which may dramatically alter its characteristics. At present, in a landscape that is a mosaic of floodplains and forests of high biodiversity, small-scale farming, fishing and livestock-keeping are the main activities practised by the local communities, all relying on the occurrence of floods in November and May. Private investors with the backing of governmental bodies or parastatals, including the river basin authority, have planned the conversion of the lower Tana into irrigated sugar cane and Jatropha curcas plantations for biofuel production. In this paper, we discuss the land and water grabbing aspect of this new biofuel production trend, 'grabbing' being defined as cases of land acquisition or water abstraction where established user-rights and public interests are disregarded. We focus on two case studies: a planned large-scale sugar cane plantation in the central floodplain and a large-scale Jatropha curcas plantation on the floodplain terraces. We demonstrate through a water budget analysis that their potential impacts on the water balance and quality, on the environment of the Tana delta and therefore on the flood-dependent livelihoods have not been adequately addressed in the Environmental Impact Assessment documents.

  6. Understanding the Effects of Climate and Water Management on Carbon and Energy Fluxes for Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Von Dessonneck, T.; Keating, K.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Hatala, J.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Byrd, K. B.; Windham-Myers, L.; Detto, M.; Fujii, R.

    2011-12-01

    Our research efforts focus on the differences in carbon and energy fluxes due to the effects of water management on two 3.5-hectare restored wetlands on Twitchell Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta). These flux measurements are part of an ongoing, long-term study investigating management techniques to mitigate subsidence through atmospheric carbon sequestration and soil carbon storage. Wetlands were established in 1997, with the western wetland managed at a water depth of 25cm and the eastern wetland managed at a depth of 55cm. Over the past 14 years, the western pond has developed into a dense canopy of emergent marsh species with some floating vegetation. The eastern wetland is a combination of the same emergent marsh species and floating vegetation as the western wetland, but it also includes areas of open water, submerged vegetation, and algae. Carbon and energy flux measurements are collected using the eddy covariance method, comprised of a CSAT3 sonic anemometer, an open-path CO2/H2O infrared gas analyzer, and a closed-path tunable diode laser fast methane sensor. The Delta is a unique place as the temperate climate and clear summer skies are conducive for maximum daily CO2 uptake rates to be on the order of 30 μmol m-2 s-1 or higher. These elevated rates of CO2 uptake were measured in the eastern wetland during 2002 through 2004. However, in 2010, maximum CO2 uptake rates were only about 10 μmol m-2 s-1. We hypothesize that large mats of accumulating senescent material have slowed or stopped the growth of the emergent marsh species, which were not present during the measurements taken in 2002 through 2004. Additionally, we added CH4 flux measurements in 2010, and the anaerobic conditions created by permanent flooding resulted in rates of 250 nmol m-2 s-1 or higher. CH4 values are some of the highest observed compared to other Delta flux studies (rice, pasture, and natural wetlands), which yield measurements ranging from 10 - 100 nmol m-2 s-1

  7. Seasonal Change in Wetland Coherence as an Aid to Wetland Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Brisco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Water is an essential natural resource, and information about surface water conditions can support a wide variety of applications, including urban planning, agronomy, hydrology, electrical power generation, disaster relief, ecology and preservation of natural areas. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR is recognized as an important source of data for monitoring surface water, especially under inclement weather conditions, and is used operationally for flood mapping applications. The canopy penetration capability of the microwaves also allows for mapping of flooded vegetation as a result of enhanced backscatter from what is generally believed to be a double-bounce scattering mechanism between the water and emergent vegetation. Recent investigations have shown that, under certain conditions, the SAR response signal from flooded vegetation may remain coherent during repeat satellite over-passes, which can be exploited for interferometric SAR (InSAR measurements to estimate changes in water levels and water topography. InSAR results also suggest that coherence change detection (CCD might be applied to wetland monitoring applications. This study examines wetland vegetation characteristics that lead to coherence in RADARSAT-2 InSAR data of an area in eastern Canada with many small wetlands, and determines the annual variation in the coherence of these wetlands using multi-temporal radar data. The results for a three-year period demonstrate that most swamps and marshes maintain coherence throughout the ice-/snow-free time period for the 24-day repeat cycle of RADARSAT-2. However, open water areas without emergent aquatic vegetation generally do not have suitable coherence for CCD or InSAR water level estimation. We have found that wetlands with tree cover exhibit the highest coherence and the least variance; wetlands with herbaceous cover exhibit high coherence, but also high variability of coherence; and wetlands with shrub cover exhibit high coherence, but

  8. Factors influencing CO2 and CH4 emissions from coastal wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, Northeast China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, L.; Ye, S.; Wei, M.

    2015-01-01

    temperature and vegetation on CH4 emissions and ecosystem respiration (Reco) from five coastal wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, northeast China: two Phragmites australis (common reed) wetlands, two Suaeda salsa (sea blite) marshes and a rice (Oryza sativa) paddy. Throughout the growing season, the Suaeda...

  9. Plant biodiversity changes in Carboniferous tropical wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleal, C. J.; Uhl, D.; Cascales-Miñana, B.; Thomas, B. A.; Bashforth, A. R.; King, S. C.; Zodrow, E. L.

    2012-08-01

    Using a combination of species richness, polycohort and constrained cluster analyses, the plant biodiversity of Pennsylvanian (late Carboniferous) tropical wetlands ("coal swamps") has been investigated in five areas in Western Europe and eastern North America: South Wales, Pennines, Ruhr, Saarland and Sydney coal basins. In all cases, species richness expansion followed an essentially logistic curve typical of that associated with ecologically closed habitats, with niche saturation being achieved in about three million years. The resulting steady-state ("climax") coal swamp vegetation had a local-scale (within an area of c. 0.1 ha) species diversity in South Wales of 16 ± 7 and Simpson Diversity Indices of 4.53 ± 2.55, which are very similar to values obtained from studies on North American coal swamp vegetation. Landscape diversity (within an area 105 km2) varied between 50 and 100 species in the lower to middle Westphalian Stage, falling to about 40-50 species in the upper Westphalian Stage. Regional-scale diversity (within an area > 105 km2) is difficult to estimate but was at least 120 species. Species turn-over was typically very low, at about 4 species per million years, but there were a number of intervals of more rapid species turn-over in the early Langsettian, late Duckmantian, early Bolsovian and middle Asturian times, which are recognised today as biozonal boundaries. The swamps were mostly subject to ecological stasis during early and middle Westphalian times, although they contracted locally in response to drying of substrates. Later in Westphalian times, however, the swamps were subject to regional-scale changes in composition and aerial extent, probably in response to climate change. The coal swamps had a much lower species diversity compared to modern-day tropical rain forests.

  10. The legacy of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, J.Z.; De Fontaine, C. S.; Deverel, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, many extensive wetlands, such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California (hereafter, the Delta), have been drained for agriculture, resulting in land-surface subsidence of peat soils. The purpose of this project was to study the in situ effects of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Delta. Peat cores were retrieved from four drained, farmed islands and four relatively undisturbed, marsh islands. Core samples were analyzed for bulk density and percent organic carbon. Macrofossils in the peat were dated using radiocarbon age determination. The peat from the farmed islands is highly distinct from marsh island peat. Bulk density of peat from the farmed islands is generally greater than that of the marsh islands at a given organic carbon content. On the farmed islands, increased bulk density, which is an indication of compaction, decreases with depth within the unoxidized peat zone, whereas, on the marsh islands, bulk density is generally constant with depth except near the surface. Approximately 5580 of the original peat layer on the farmed islands has been lost due to land-surface subsidence. For the center regions of the farmed islands, this translates into an estimated loss of between 29005700 metric tons of organic carbon/hectare. Most of the intact peat just below the currently farmed soil layer is over 4000 years old. Peat loss will continue as long as the artificial water table on the farmed islands is held below the land surface. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  11. Integrated hydrological modelling of a managed coastal Mediterranean wetland (Rhone delta, France: initial calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chauvelon

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model of a heavily managed coastal Mediterranean wetland. The hydrosystem studied , called ``Ile de Camargue', is the central part of the Rhone river delta. It comprises flat agricultural drainage basins, marshes, and shallow brackish lagoons whose connection to the sea is managed. This hydrosystem is subject to strong natural hydrological variability due to the combination of a Mediterranean climate and the artificial hydrological regime imposed by flooded rice cultivation. To quantify the hydrological balance at different spatial and temporal scales, a simplified model is developed — including the basin and the lagoons — using a time step that enables the temporal dynamic to be reproduced that is adapted to data availability. This modelling task takes into account the functioning of the natural and anthropogenic components of the hydrosystem. A conceptual approach is used for modelling drainage from the catchment, using a GIS to estimate water input for rice irrigation. The lagoon system is modelled using a two-dimensional finite element hydrodynamic model. Simulated results from the hydrodynamic model run under various hydro-climatic forcing conditions (water level, wind speed and direction, sea connection are used to calculate hydraulic exchanges between lagoon sub units considered as boxes. Finally, the HIC ('Hydrologie de l’Ile de Camargue' conceptual model is applied to simulate the water inputs and exchanges between the different units, together with the salt balance in the hydrosystem during a calibration period. Keywords: water management,conceptual hydrological model, hydrodynamic model, box model, GIS, Rhone delta, Camargue.

  12. Defining the ecogeomorphic succession of land building for freshwater, intertidal wetlands in Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olliver, Elizabeth A.; Edmonds, Douglas A.

    2017-09-01

    Land building in deltaic environments occurs when sediment discharged from a river mouth is deposited subaqueously and transitions to subaerial land. The transition from subaqueous deposition to subaerial land is a critical process that marks the creation of relatively stable land, yet it is unclear what controls the speed and style of this transition. We define how this transition, herein termed the land building succession, varies in time and space for the freshwater, intertidal wetlands in Wax Lake Delta, LA. Using remote sensing and field data we classify land cover into sediment, water, or vegetation classes at maximum and minimum biomass. We see two succession patterns within Wax Lake Delta. Deltaic islands near the apex are initially covered by sediment and open water. Through time, open water and sediment coverage decreases as vegetation coverage increases. On the other hand, distal islands show little sediment exposure through time. In both cases, all deltaic islands become covered with vegetation by 2015. As vegetation colonizes the island, the topography organizes into two platforms vertically separated by ∼0.35 m. The lower, intertidal platform occurs in the island interiors and is commonly inundated by water and dominated by subaqueous or floating vegetation. The upper, subaerial platform occurs along island edges and is dominated by a variety of vegetation species including Salix nigra, Colocasia esculenta, and Polygonum punctatum. It takes an average of ∼10 years for the intertidal platform to transition to the subaerial platform. These two platforms are separated by the tidal range measured in Atchafalaya Bay, and the different vegetation communities occupying each platform suggest they are a manifestation of multiple stable states and arise due to vegetation and sedimentation feedbacks.

  13. Paleoenvironmental history of a drained tidal freshwater wetland in the Sacramento Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. J.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2001-12-01

    The McCormack-Williamson Tract is a large island situated in the Sacramento Delta, California, USA. This leveed 1,600-acre parcel of land is slated for restoration by The Nature Conservancy, with the goal of reverting the island from intensive agricultur e to a historical tidal freshwater wetland and floodplain. To design a suitable restoration strategy, it is necessary to determine the past and present biogeomorphic processes that have operated at the study site using three cores that have been collected from the island. The length of the cores range from about 12-14 m depth and bottom out at a maximum radiocarbon age of 40,100 years before present. The lithostratigraphic facies that are identified in the cores include Holocene floodplain and channel d eposits, Scirpus marshes and associated mudflats. Pleistocene glaciofluvial outwash is recorded only in the southern section of island. Pollen and spore analyses reveal that Scirpus marshes occupied the northwest section of the site during the mid-late H olocene. Channels, riparian woodlands, and floodplain habitats occupied the remaining sections of the island throughout the Holocene. Charcoal data indicates that fire was not a significant type of disturbance, whereas the lack of pollen coupled with widespread inorganic sedimentation in many sections of the cores suggests that flooding was a frequent form of disturbance on the island throughout the Holocene. Elemental analysis, coupled with pollen data, clearly show the onset of agriculture as a land-use practice in more recent times. In combination, these data provide base-line studies that are suitable to assist in guiding restoration efforts on the island.Ahttp://lawr.ucdavis.edu/faculty/gpast/delta.html

  14. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kathleen B; Manker, Craig R; Pigati, Jeffrey S

    2015-11-24

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated (14)C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming.

  15. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kathleen; Manker, Craig; Pigati, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming.

  16. Climate change impact on wetland forest plants of SNR Zasavica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čavlović Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are among the most vulnerable habitats on the planet. Very complex forest ecosystems are also parts of wetlands. Research and analysis of forest vegetation elements, leads to a conclusion about ecological conditions of wetlands. The aim of the paper is detail forest vegetation study, and analyzing the impact of climate changes on wetland forest vegetations of the strict protection area at the SNR Zasavica Ramsar site. Field research was carried out by using Braun-Blanquet’s Zurich-Montpelier school method. Phytogeographical elements and life forms of plants were determined subsequently, in order to get indicator values of wetland plants. Coupled Regional Climate Model (CRCM, EBU-POM was used for the climate simulations. Exact climatic variables for the site were determined by downscaling method. Climatic variables reference values were taken for the period of 1961-1990, and climate change simulations for the period 2071-2100 (A1B and A2. Indicator values of forest plants taken into consideration were humidity and temperature; therefore, ecological optimums were determined in scales of humidity and temperature. Regional Climate Model shows that there will be a long and intensive dry period in the future, with high temperatures from April till October. Continental winter will be more humid, with higher precipitation, especially in February. Based on the analysis of results it was concluded that wetlands are transitional habitats, also very variable and therefore vulnerable to changes. The changes may lead to the extinction of some plant species.

  17. Implications of agricultural land use change to ecosystem services in the Ganges delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, G M Tarekul; Islam, A K M Saiful; Shopan, Ahsan Azhar; Rahman, Md Munsur; Lázár, Attila N; Mukhopadhyay, Anirban

    2015-09-15

    Ecosystems provide the basis for human civilization and natural capital for green economy and sustainable development. Ecosystem services may range from crops, fish, freshwater to those that are harder to see such as erosion regulation, carbon sequestration, and pest control. Land use changes have been identified as the main sources of coastal and marine pollution in Bangladesh. This paper explores the temporal variation of agricultural land use change and its implications with ecosystem services in the Ganges delta. With time agricultural lands have been decreased and wetlands have been increased at a very high rate mainly due to the growing popularity of saltwater shrimp farming. In a span of 28 years, the agricultural lands have been reduced by approximately 50%, while the wetlands have been increased by over 500%. A large portion (nearly 40%) of the study area is covered by the Sundarbans which remained almost constant which can be attributed to the strict regulatory intervention to preserve the Sundarbans. The settlement & others land use type has also been increased to nearly 5%. There is a gradual uptrend of shrimp and fish production in the study area. The findings suggest that there are significant linkages between agricultural land use change and ecosystem services in the Ganges delta in Bangladesh. The continuous decline of agricultural land (due to salinization) and an increase of wetland have been attributed to the conversion of agricultural land into shrimp farming in the study area. Such land use change requires significant capital, therefore, only investors and wealthier land owners can get the higher profit from the land conversion while the poor people is left with the environmental consequences that affect their long-term lives and livelihood. An environmental management plan is proposed for sustainable land use in the Ganges delta in Bangladesh.

  18. Predicting the persistence of coastal wetlands to global change stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntenspergen, G.; McKee, K.; Cahoon, D.; Grace, J.; Megonigal, P.

    2006-01-01

    Despite progress toward understanding the response of coastal wetlands to increases in relative sea-level rise and an improved understanding of the effect of elevated CO2 on plant species allocation patterns, we are limited in our ability to predict the response of coastal wetlands to the effects associated with global change. Static simulations of the response of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise using LIDAR and GIS lack the biological and physical feedback mechanisms present in such systems. Evidence from current research suggests that biotic processes are likely to have a major influence on marsh vulnerability to future accelerated rates of sea-level rise and the influence of biotic processes likely varies depending on hydrogeomorphic setting and external stressors. We have initiated a new research approach using a series of controlled mesocosm and field experiments, landscape scale studies, a comparative network of brackish coastal wetland monitoring sites and a suite of predictive models that address critical questions regarding the vulnerability of coastal brackish wetland systems to global change. Specifically, this research project evaluates the interaction of sea level rise and elevated CO2 concentrations with flooding, nutrient enrichment and disturbance effects. The study is organized in a hierarchical structure that links mesocosm, field, landscape and biogeographic levels so as to provide important new information that recognizes that coastal wetland systems respond to multiple interacting drivers and feedback effects controlling wetland surface elevation, habitat stability and ecosystem function. We also present a new statistical modelling technique (Structural Equation Modelling) that synthesizes and integrates our environmental and biotic measures in a predictive framework that forecasts ecosystem change and informs managers to consider adaptive shifts in strategies for the sustainable management of coastal wetlands.

  19. Plant biodiversity changes in Carboniferous tropical wetlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleal, C. J.; Uhl, D.; Cascales-Miñana, B.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of species richness, polycohort and constrained cluster analyses, the plant biodiversity of Pennsylvanian (late Carboniferous) tropical wetlands (“coal swamps”) has been investigated in five areas in Western Europe and eastern North America: South Wales, Pennines, Ruhr, Saarland...

  20. Analysis of wetland change in the Songhua River Basin from 1995 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, L. H.; Jiang, W. G.; Luo, Z. L.; He, X. H.; Liu, Y. H.

    2014-03-01

    Wetlands in the Songhua River Basin in both 1995 and 2008 were mapped from land use/land cover maps generated from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery. These maps were then divided into two categories, i.e. artificial wetland and natural wetland. From 1995 to 2008, the total area of wetland in the Songhua River Basin increased from 93 072.3 km2 to 99 179.6 km2 a net increase of 6107.3 km2. The area of natural wetland decreased by 4043.7 km2 while the area of artificial wetland increased by 10 166.2 km2. Swamp wetland and paddy field wetland became the dominant wetlands and the swamp wetland in the east of the Heilong River system and the north of the Wusuli River system disappeared, being transformed into paddy field wetland. The diversity of wetland landscape is worsening and the distribution of wetland landscape is becoming more unbalanced; the fragmentation of natural wetland has intensified whereas the patch connectivity of artificial wetland has increased. Changes in natural wetlands were primarily caused by climate and socio-economic changes, while changes in artificial wetland were mainly caused by the growth of population and gross domestic product.

  1. Macroclimatic change expected to transform coastal wetland ecosystems this century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Christopher A.; Osland, Michael J.; Grace, James B.; Stagg, Camille L.; Day, Richard H.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Enwright, Nicholas M.; From, Andrew; McCoy, Meagan L.; McLeod, Jennie L.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal wetlands, existing at the interface between land and sea, are highly vulnerable to climate change. Macroclimate (for example, temperature and precipitation regimes) greatly influences coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. However, research on climate change impacts in coastal wetlands has concentrated primarily on sea-level rise and largely ignored macroclimatic drivers, despite their power to transform plant community structure and modify ecosystem goods and services. Here, we model wetland plant community structure based on macroclimate using field data collected across broad temperature and precipitation gradients along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. Our analyses quantify strongly nonlinear temperature thresholds regulating the potential for marsh-to-mangrove conversion. We also identify precipitation thresholds for dominance by various functional groups, including succulent plants and unvegetated mudflats. Macroclimate-driven shifts in foundation plant species abundance will have large effects on certain ecosystem goods and services. Based on current and projected climatic conditions, we project that transformative ecological changes are probable throughout the region this century, even under conservative climate scenarios. Coastal wetland ecosystems are functionally similar worldwide, so changes in this region are indicative of potential future changes in climatically similar regions globally.

  2. Multidecadal Fluvial Sediment Fluxes to Deltas under Environmental Change Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Frances; Darby, Stephen; Nicholls, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sediment delivery is vital to sustain delta environments on which over half a billion people live worldwide. Due to factors such as subsidence and sea level rise, deltas sink relative to sea level if sediment is not delivered to and retained on their surfaces. Deltas which sink relative to sea level experience flooding, land degradation and loss, which endangers anthropogenic activities and populations. The future of fluvial sediment fluxes, a key mechanism for sediment delivery to deltas, is uncertain due to complex environmental changes which are predicted to occur over the coming decades. This research investigates fluvial sediment fluxes under environmental changes in order to assess the sustainability of delta environments under potential future scenarios up to 2100. Global datasets of climate change, reservoir construction, and population and GDP as proxies for anthropogenic influence through land use changes are used to drive the catchment numerical model WBMsed, which is being used to investigate the effects of these environmental changes on fluvial sediment delivery. This process produces fluvial sediment fluxes under multiple future scenarios which will be used to assess the future sustainability of a selection of 8 vulnerable deltas, although the approach can be applied to deltas worldwide. By modelling potential future scenarios of fluvial sediment flux, this research contributes to the prognosis for delta environments. The future scenarios will inform management at multiple temporal scales, and indicate the potential consequences for deltas of various anthropogenic activities. This research will both forewarn managers of potentially unsustainable deltas and indicate those anthropogenic activities which encourage or hinder the creation of sustainable delta environments.

  3. RESPONSES OF WETLAND ECO-SECURITY TO LAND USE CHANGE IN WESTERN JILIN PROVINCE, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-qiang; ZHANG Bai; YANG Guang; WANG Zong-ming; ZHANG Shu-qing

    2005-01-01

    By the use of the software of ARCGIS, dynamic changes of the landscape elements, landscape structure,conversion processes of the landscape gradients and the responses of wetland eeo-security to land use/cover changes (LUCC) in the western Jilin Province were studied from 1930 to 2000. The results show that the landscape elements of grassland, wetland, forestland and water area shrank rapidly, and wetlands underwent huge losses in the study period due to the conversion from wetland into arable land and grassland in large quantities. The responses of wetland eco-security to LUCC were inverse evolvement of wetland vegetation, loss of biodiversity, water deficiency in wetland ecosystem, the changes of the heterogeneity of wetlands and the fragmentation of the wetland habitats. Suggestions were given for protection of wetlands and the regional sustainable development.

  4. The legacy of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Christian S. de Fontaine,; Steven J. Deverel,

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, many extensive wetlands, such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California (hereafter, the Delta), have been drained for agriculture, resulting in land-surface subsidence of peat soils. The purpose of this project was to study the in situ effects of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Delta. Peat cores were retrieved from four drained, farmed islands and four relatively undisturbed, marsh islands. Core samples were analyzed for bulk density and percent organic carbon. Macrofossils in the peat were dated using radiocarbon age determination. The peat from the farmed islands is highly distinct from marsh island peat. Bulk density of peat from the farmed islands is generally greater than that of the marsh islands at a given organic carbon content. On the farmed islands, increased bulk density, which is an indication of compaction, decreases with depth within the unoxidized peat zone, whereas, on the marsh islands, bulk density is generally constant with depth except near the surface. Approximately 55–80% of the original peat layer on the farmed islands has been lost due to landsurface subsidence. For the center regions of the farmed islands, this translates into an estimated loss of between 2900-5700 metric tons of organic carbon/hectare. Most of the intact peat just below the currently farmed soil layer is over 4000 years old. Peat loss will continue as long as the artificial water table on the farmed islands is held below the land surface.

  5. [Quantitative relationship between molecular structure of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and enthalpy change (deltaH), entropy change (deltaS') in chromatographic process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Dai, Chaozheng

    2005-09-01

    The relationship between the rule of chromatographic retention value and molecular structure is an important part in the research of chromatographic thermodynamics. The topological index structural parameter JG and the topological index adjoining parameter LJ are put forward. Parameter J(G) describes the correlation of quantity and position of chlorine atoms in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) molecules. Parameter L(J) describes the ortho-position correlation of chlorine atoms in PCB molecules. The relational expression between the PCB molecular structures and their enthalpy change (deltaH), entropy change (deltaS') in chromatographic process was discovered. The values of enthalpy change and entropy change for about 140 kinds of polychlorinated biphenyls in chromatographic process on three stationary phases, DB-1, DB-5 and DB-1701, were determined. In comparison with deltaH and deltaS' of the experimental data those calculated from the relational expression had the average relative deviations for deltaH and deltaS' are 0.56% -0.97% and 0.55% - 1.06%, respectively.

  6. Wetland shoreline recession in the Mississippi River Delta from petroleum oiling and cyclonic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.; Ramsey, Elijah

    2016-11-01

    We evaluate the relative impact of petroleum spill and storm surge on near-shore wetland loss by quantifying the lateral movement of coastal shores in upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana (USA), between June 2009 and October 2012, a study period that extends from the year prior to the Deepwater Horizon spill to 2.5 years following the spill. We document a distinctly different pattern of shoreline loss in the 2 years following the spill, both from that observed in the year prior to the spill, during which there was no major cyclonic storm, and from change related to Hurricane Isaac, which made landfall in August 2012. Shoreline erosion following oiling was far more spatially extensive and included loss in areas protected from wave-induced erosion. We conclude that petroleum exposure can substantially increase shoreline recession particularly in areas protected from storm-induced degradation and disproportionally alters small oil-exposed barrier islands relative to natural erosion.

  7. Wetland shoreline recession in the Mississippi River Delta from petroleum oiling and cyclonic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.; Ramsey III, Elijah W.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the relative impact of petroleum spill and storm surge on near-shore wetland loss by quantifying the lateral movement of coastal shores in upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana (USA), between June 2009 and October 2012, a study period that extends from the year prior to the Deepwater Horizon spill to 2.5 years following the spill. We document a distinctly different pattern of shoreline loss in the 2 years following the spill, both from that observed in the year prior to the spill, during which there was no major cyclonic storm, and from change related to Hurricane Isaac, which made landfall in August 2012. Shoreline erosion following oiling was far more spatially extensive and included loss in areas protected from wave-induced erosion. We conclude that petroleum exposure can substantially increase shoreline recession particularly in areas protected from storm-induced degradation and disproportionally alters small oil-exposed barrier islands relative to natural erosion.

  8. Mitigation of two pyrethroid insecticides in a Mississippi Delta constructed wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constructed wetlands are a suggested best management practice to help mitigate agricultural runoff before entering receiving aquatic ecosystems. A constructed wetland system (180 m x 30 m) comprised of a sediment retention basin and two treatment cells was used to determine fate and transport of sim...

  9. Reactive and unreactive iron minerals hosting arsenic within seasonal wetland sediments of the Mekong Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, J.; Schaefer, M.; Lezama, J.; Dittmar, J.; Fendorf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Millions of people in the deltaic regions of S/SE Asia regularly consume arsenic contaminated groundwater. Within the Mekong Delta of Cambodia, for example, arsenic persists within the groundwater despite being flushed by several pore volumes of recharge. The identity and reactivity of the minerals contributing to the persistence of arsenic in the deltaic aquifers remain elusive. Here we seek to define the molecular form of the arsenic and its host phases along defined flow paths in seasonally saturated wetlands: i) a grassland flooded for ~ 3 - 4 months of the year (Grassland) and ii) an abandoned river channel saturated for ~ 5 - 6 months (Oxbow). Sediment cores were retrieved by pounding aluminum cores into a fresh profile exposed by successive excavation. The cores were sealed with melted wax in the field and stored at 4 °C until processed. Depths of 0.2 to 6 m were sampled at the Grassland site and 0.2 to 4 m at the Oxbow site. Sediments were dried under 95%N2/5%H2 atmosphere. A 1 M HCl extraction dissolving the 'reactive' iron (predominantly poorly crystalline iron oxides) solubilized 3 - 7 % of the total iron in the Grassland site and 8 - 41 % in the Oxbow site. A citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction was performed to extract reducible iron (predominantly iron oxides), accounting for 35 - 50 % of the total iron in the Grassland site and 27 - 44 % in the Oxbow site. Correspondingly, least squares fitting of k3 - weighted chi(k) iron extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra showed that goethite and hematite together comprised 34 - 50 % of the iron mineralogy in the mineral sediments of the Grassland site and 24 - 38 % of those in the Oxbow site. The remaining iron minerals present were predominantly silicates. Iron EXAFS spectra were obtained for the post-CBD extracted sediments, theoretically containing only non-reducible iron. Least squares fitting of the bulk (pre-CBD extracted) sediments was performed a second time with the

  10. Adaptive wetland management in an uncertain and changing arid environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Downard

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands in the arid western United States provide rare and critical migratory bird habitat and constitute a critical nexus within larger social-ecological systems (SES where multiple changing land-use and water-use patterns meet. The Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Utah, USA, presents a case study of the ways that wetland managers have created adaptive management strategies that are responsive to the social and hydrological conditions of the agriculture-dominated SES within which they are located. Managers have acquired water rights and constructed infrastructure while cultivating collaborative relationships with other water users to increase the adaptive capacity of the region and decrease conflict. Historically, water management involved diversion and impoundment of water within wetland units timed around patterns of agricultural water needs. In the last 20 years, managers have learned from flood and drought events and developed a long-term adaptive management plan that specifies alternative management actions managers can choose each year based on habitat needs and projected water supply. Each alternative includes habitat goals and target wetland water depth. However, wetland management adapted to agricultural return-flow availability may prove insufficient as population growth and climate change alter patterns of land and water use. Future management will likely depend more on negotiation, collaboration, and learning from social developments within the SES than strictly focusing on water management within refuge boundaries. To face this problem, managers have worked to be included in negotiations with regional water users, a strategy that may prove instructive for other wetland managers in agriculture-dominated watersheds.

  11. Forecasting climate change impacts on the distribution of wetland habitat in the Midwestern United states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garris, Heath W; Mitchell, Randall J; Fraser, Lauchlan H; Barrett, Linda R

    2015-02-01

    Shifting precipitation patterns brought on by climate change threaten to alter the future distribution of wetlands. We developed a set of models to understand the role climate plays in determining wetland formation on a landscape scale and to forecast changes in wetland distribution for the Midwestern United States. These models combined 35 climate variables with 21 geographic and anthropogenic factors thought to encapsulate other major drivers of wetland distribution for the Midwest. All models successfully recreated a majority of the variation in current wetland area within the Midwest, and showed that wetland area was significantly associated with climate, even when controlling for landscape context. Inferential (linear) models identified a consistent negative association between wetland area and isothermality. This is likely the result of regular inundation in areas where precipitation accumulates as snow, then melts faster than drainage capacity. Moisture index seasonality was identified as a key factor distinguishing between emergent and forested wetland types, where forested wetland area at the landscape scale is associated with a greater seasonal variation in water table depth. Forecasting models (neural networks) predicted an increase in potential wetland area in the coming century, with areas conducive to forested wetland formation expanding more rapidly than areas conducive to emergent wetlands. Local cluster analyses identified Iowa and Northeastern Missouri as areas of anticipated wetland expansion, indicating both a risk to crop production within the Midwest Corn Belt and an opportunity for wetland conservation, while Northern Minnesota and Michigan are potentially at risk of wetland losses under a future climate.

  12. 辽河三角洲湿地生物多样性功能评价%Evaluation of Biodiversity Function of Liaohe River Delta Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金爽

    2013-01-01

      在辽河三角洲湿地生物多样性调查的基础上,对辽河三角洲生物多样性进行评价,主要包括物种多样性和生态系统多样性。按照生物多样性评价标准,辽河三角洲湿地生物多样性处于一般水平,需要加大湿地生物多样性的保护力度。%The Liaohe River Delta wetland, located in the estuary confluence of Liaohe River and Daliaohe River, enjoy the reputations of being “biological gene bank”,”natural botanical garden”,”paradise for birds”, and”natural fishing farm”. Based on the survey data of the Liaohe River Delta wetland biodiversity, an evaluation of was conducted on biodiversity of the delta wetland, including species diversity and ecosystem diversity. According to the evaluation criteria, the richness of biodiversity in the Liaohe River Delta wetland is at a normal level. Therefore, conservation of biodiversity of the wetland needs to be further strengthened.

  13. Comparative assessment of the vulnerability and resilience of deltas : extended version with 14 deltas : synthesis report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucx, T.; Driel, van W.F.; Boer, de H.; Graas, S.; Langenberg, V.; Marchand, M.; Guchte, van de C.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, deltas host dense populations and are important centres of agricultural and industrial production, and economic activity. Many deltas are areas of great ecological importance as well, featuring wetlands of high and unique biodiversity. Deltas are vulnerable to changes by natural forces an

  14. Factors influencing CO2 and CH4 emissions from coastal wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, Northeast China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, L.; Ye, S.; Wei, M.

    2015-01-01

    to the atmosphere. The CH4 emission from coastal wetlands can be reduced by creating fluctuating water tables, including water tables below the soil surface, as well as by occasional flooding by high-salinity water. The effects of water management schemes on the biological communities in the wetlands must, however......Many factors are known to influence greenhouse gas emissions from coastal wetlands, but it is still unclear which factors are most important under field conditions when they are all acting simultaneously. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of water table, salinity, soil...... temperature and vegetation on CH4 emissions and ecosystem respiration (Reco) from five coastal wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, northeast China: two Phragmites australis (common reed) wetlands, two Suaeda salsa (sea blite) marshes and a rice (Oryza sativa) paddy. Throughout the growing season, the Suaeda...

  15. Research on Monitoring the Wetland Landcover Change Based on the Moderate Resolution Remote Sensing Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M.; Yuan, X.; Sun, L.

    2015-04-01

    Wetland is important natural resource. The main method to monitor the landcover change in wetland natural reserve is to extract and analyze information from remote sensing image. In this paper, the landcover information is extracted, summarized and analyzed by using multi-temporal HJ and Landsat satellite image in Zhalong natural reserve, Heilongjiang, China. The method can monitor the wetland landcover change accurately in real time and long term. This paper expounds the natural factors and human factors influence on wetland land use type, for scientific and effective support for the development of the rational use of wetlands in Zhalong natural wetland reserve.

  16. Global coastal wetland change under sea-level rise and related stresses: The DIVA Wetland Change Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas; Schuerch, Mark; Nicholls, Robert J.; Hinkel, Jochen; Lincke, Daniel; Vafeidis, A. T.; Reef, Ruth; McFadden, Loraine; Brown, Sally

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamic Interactive Vulnerability Assessment Wetland Change Model (DIVA_WCM) comprises a dataset of contemporary global coastal wetland stocks (estimated at 756 × 103 km2 (in 2011)), mapped to a one-dimensional global database, and a model of the macro-scale controls on wetland response to sea-level rise. Three key drivers of wetland response to sea-level rise are considered: 1) rate of sea-level rise relative to tidal range; 2) lateral accommodation space; and 3) sediment supply. The model is tuned by expert knowledge, parameterised with quantitative data where possible, and validated against mapping associated with two large-scale mangrove and saltmarsh vulnerability studies. It is applied across 12,148 coastal segments (mean length 85 km) to the year 2100. The model provides better-informed macro-scale projections of likely patterns of future coastal wetland losses across a range of sea-level rise scenarios and varying assumptions about the construction of coastal dikes to prevent sea flooding (as dikes limit lateral accommodation space and cause coastal squeeze). With 50 cm of sea-level rise by 2100, the model predicts a loss of 46-59% of global coastal wetland stocks. A global coastal wetland loss of 78% is estimated under high sea-level rise (110 cm by 2100) accompanied by maximum dike construction. The primary driver for high vulnerability of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise is coastal squeeze, a consequence of long-term coastal protection strategies. Under low sea-level rise (29 cm by 2100) losses do not exceed ca. 50% of the total stock, even for the same adverse dike construction assumptions. The model results confirm that the widespread paradigm that wetlands subject to a micro-tidal regime are likely to be more vulnerable to loss than macro-tidal environments. Countering these potential losses will require both climate mitigation (a global response) to minimise sea-level rise and maximisation of accommodation space and sediment supply (a regional

  17. Detecting wetland changes in Shanghai, China using FORMOSAT and Landsat TM imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Bo; Zhou, Yun-xuan; Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Yuan, Qing

    2015-07-14

    Understanding the state of wetland ecosystems and their changes at the national and local levels is critical for wetland conservation, management, decision-making, and policy development practices. This study analyzed the wetlands in Shanghai, a province-level city, using remote sensing, image processing, and geographic information systems (GIS) techniques based on the Chinese national wetland inventory procedure and standards. FORMOSAT imagery acquired in 2012 and Navy nautical charts of the Yangtze estuarine area were used in conjunction with object-oriented segmentation, expert interpretation, and field validation to determine wetland status. Landsat imagery from 1985, 1995, 2000, 2003 and 2013 as well as social-economic data collected from 1985 to 2013 were used to further assess wetland changes. In 2013, Shanghai contained 376,970.6 ha of wetlands, and 78.8% of all wetlands were in marine or estuarine systems. Estuarine waters comprised the single largest wetland category. Between the first national wetland inventory in 2003 and the second national wetland inventory in 2013, Shanghai lost 50,519.13 ha of wetlands, amounting to a mean annual loss rate of 1.2% or an 11.8% loss over the decade. Declines were proportionately higher in marine and estuarine wetlands, with an annual loss of 1.8%, while there was a sharp increase of 1882.6% in constructed water storage areas for human uses. Diking, filling, impoundment and reclamation, which are all attributable to the economic development and urbanization associated with population increases, were the major factors that explained the gain and loss of wetlands. Additional factors affecting wetland losses and gains include sediment trapping by the hydropower system, which reduces supply to the estuary and erodes wetlands, and sediment trapping by the jetties, spur dikes, and diversion bulwark associated with a navigation channel deepening project, which has the converse effect, increasing saltmarsh wetland area at

  18. Detecting wetland changes in Shanghai, China using FORMOSAT and Landsat TM imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bo; Zhou, Yun-Xuan; Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Yuan, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the state of wetland ecosystems and their changes at the national and local levels is critical for wetland conservation, management, decision-making, and policy development practices. This study analyzed the wetlands in Shanghai, a province-level city, using remote sensing, image processing, and geographic information systems (GIS) techniques based on the Chinese national wetland inventory procedure and standards. FORMOSAT imagery acquired in 2012 and Navy nautical charts of the Yangtze estuarine area were used in conjunction with object-oriented segmentation, expert interpretation, and field validation to determine wetland status. Landsat imagery from 1985, 1995, 2000, 2003 and 2013 as well as social-economic data collected from 1985 to 2013 were used to further assess wetland changes. In 2013, Shanghai contained 376970.6 ha of wetlands, and 78.8% of all wetlands were in marine or estuarine systems. Estuarine waters comprised the single largest wetland category. Between the first national wetland inventory in 2003 and the second national wetland inventory in 2013, Shanghai lost 50519.1 ha of wetlands, amounting to a mean annual loss rate of 1.2% or an 11.8% loss over the decade. Declines were proportionately higher in marine and estuarine wetlands, with an annual loss of 1.8%, while there was a sharp increase of 1882.6% in constructed water storage areas for human uses. Diking, filling, impoundment and reclamation, which are all attributable to the economic development and urbanization associated with population increases, were the major factors that explained the gain and loss of wetlands. Additional factors affecting wetland losses and gains include sediment trapping by the hydropower system, which reduces supply to the estuary and erodes wetlands, and sediment trapping by the jetties, spur dikes, and diversion bulwark associated with a navigation channel deepening project, which has the converse effect, increasing saltmarsh wetland area at

  19. On models for landscape connectivity:a case study of the new-born wetland of the Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The models for landscape connectivity are distinguished into models for line connectivity,vertex connectivity, network connectivity and patch connectivity separately. Because the models for line connectivity, for vertex connectivity, and for network connectivity have long been studied and have become ripe, the model for patch connectivity is paid special attention in this paper. The patch connectivity is defined as the average movement efficiency (minimizing movement distance) of animal migrants or plant propagules in patches of a region under consideration. According to this definition, a model for landscape connectivity is mathematically deduced to apply to GIS data. The application of model for patch connectivity in the new-bom wetland of the Yellow River Delta shows patch connectivity has a negative interrelation with human impact intensity and landscape diversity.

  20. Morphological change in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Xu, Y.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Sassi, M.G.; Zheng, J.; Chen, X.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) have been investigated using bathymetric charts, underwater Digital Elevation Models, remote sensing data and Geographic Information Systems. Water depths were extracted from digitized charts to explore the accretion–erosion characteristics of thr

  1. Measurements and interpretation of delta C sup 13 of methane from termites, rice paddies, and wetlands in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, S.C.; Zimmerman, P.R.; Cumberbatch, C.; Greenberg, J.P.; Westberg, C. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1988-12-01

    Ratios of C{sup 13}/C{sup 12} have been measured in methane from a variety of sources in tropical Kenya. Ranges of delta-C{sup 13} in CH{sub 4} for termites (most values range from {minus}56 to {minus}64{per thousand}, one is at {minus}44{per thousand}), one is at approximately {minus}73{per thousand}, rice paddies (range {minus}57 to {minus}63{per thousand}), and wetlands (range-45 to {minus}50{per thousand} for Lake Baringo, approximately {minus}55{per thousand} in the Moloi River, approximately {minus}62{per thousand} and approximately {minus}31{per thousand} in two swamp areas) are presented. The data are interpreted with the help of additional measurements of delta-C{sup 13} of CO{sub 2} gas, and organic carbon in plant material, termite bodies, and termite fungus combs. The implications of these findings are related to the problem of studying the atmospheric methane budget. 40 refs., 2 figs. 5 tabs.

  2. Ecosystem Service Value for the Common Reed Wetlands in the Liaohe Delta, Northeast China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Siyuan; Laws, Edward A.; Costanza, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The largest reed field in the world, with an area of 1000 km2 in 1953, is located in the Liaohe Delta, which lies in the five-point-in-a-line economic strategic zone of northeastern China. However, the area of reeds has declined dramatically in recent years to accommodate oil field infrastructure...

  3. Linking Historic Wetland Soil Accretion and Sea-Level Rise Data with Landcover Change in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, J. R.; Brown, L. N.; MacDonald, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal marsh loss in the US due to sea-level rise and other anthropogenic factors has important ramifications for carbon sequestration, endangered species habitat, water quality, and myriad other ecosystem services. We compiled 486 reports of 137Cs dated cores from coastal marshes in North America and compared vertical accretion rates to relative sea-level rise (RSLR) from the nearest NOAA tide gauge between 1963 and the core collection year. There was a positive linear correlation between RSLR and vertical accretion. When RSLR was greater than 5 mm/yr RSLR outpaced accretion on average indicating a possible limitation to positive feedback within the system. We also calculated net-accretion (vertical accretion - RSLR) and summarized regional variation according to both coastal zone and watershed boundaries. From 1963 to present the West Coast has been the most historically resilient to RSLR, the Gulf Coast has been the most vulnerable, and the East Coast has been intermediate and variable. We compared regional trends in net-accretion to land cover change using 1996-2010 Coastal Change Analysis Program maps with freshwater wetland area constrained by tidal categories from the National Wetlands Inventory. Watersheds with historic net-accretion falling below -3.9 mm/yr in the Gulf Coast were much more likely to have massive losses of coastal wetland area from 1996-2010, up to 10% of 1996 wetland area in some cases. Areas with higher net-accretion did not show change, except for some gains in the San Francisco Bay. The Mississippi Delta mouth is a notable data anomaly with positive historical net-accretion as well as a net-loss of wetland surface to open water which may identify an important limitation of soil coring techniques in areas with dynamic sediment deposition.

  4. Analyzing trophic transfer of heavy metals for food webs in the newly-formed wetlands of the Yellow River Delta, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Baoshan, E-mail: cuibs@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang Qijun [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang Kejiang [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Liu Xinhui; Zhang Honggang [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Nine heavy metals sampled from water, sediments, and aquatic organisms in the newly-formed wetlands of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China were analyzed to evaluate their concentrations and trophic transfer in food webs. The stable carbon ({delta}{sup 13}C) and nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) isotopes were used to investigate trophic interactions. Results show that most of heavy metals detected in water and sediments are lower than that in Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta. The longest food web is approximately 4 with the highest trophic level of birds. The difference of heavy metal concentrations between endangered Saunders's Gull and other three kinds of protected birds is not obvious. Cd, Zn, and Hg were identified to have an increase with the trophic level (TL), while As, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb show an opposite trend, however, the biomagnification of the selected nine heavy metals in the food webs is not significant. - Highlights: > Heavy metal content in newly-formed wetlands is lower than that in similar regions. > There is a trophic level-dependent accumulation of heavy metals in food webs. > The longest food web is approximately 4 with the highest trophic level of birds. > Cd, Zn, and Hg were identified to increase with the trophic level. > The difference of metal content between Saunders's Gull and other birds isn't obvious. - The newly-formed wetlands show slight heavy metal contamination and weak biomagnification through the food webs in the Yellow River Delta.

  5. DYNAMIC CHANGES OF THE WETLAND AND ITS DRIVING FORCES IN FUJIN REGION IN SANJIANG PLAIN, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Qiang; CHEN Ming; WANG Dan-Dan; ZHANG Bai; ZHANG Shu-Qing

    2005-01-01

    Wetland is a kind of key natural resources. However, the wetlands have been shrinking rapidly in Sangjiang Plain and its functions have been degrading. These all hold back the sustainable development of human communities, and lead to great change in the land use /cover (LUCC), consequently caused global changes in climate, water cycling, etc.. Taken Fujin region as a case study, spatial and temporal dynamic processes of wetland and its driving forces were analyzed from 1954 to 2000 in this paper. It showed that the wetlands had been reduced from 52×104 ha to 11×104 ha in areas during the nearly 50 years . The percentage of wetland areas reduced from 61.27% to 12.39%. On the other hand, cultivated land increased from 22×104 ha to 60×104 ha in areas. The percentage of the areas increased from 25.31% to 70.45%. Further quantitative analysis of the wetland landscape conversion characteristics and the correlation analysis between the change of wetland areas and population increase were made. The results showed that 40×104 ha wetlands had been converted to cultivated land within half of a century; the correlation between the rate of wetland loss and that of population increased is nearly -0.922. So it was concluded that the main driving force of wetland shrinkage in Fujin region was the colonization of human being.

  6. Characterization of change in the Harike wetland, a Ramsar site in India, using landsat satellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabwoga, Samson Okongo; Thukral, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The increasing population in the developing countries has rendered wetlands vulnerable to land use changes. Remote sensing offers a rapid and efficient means of data acquisition of ecosystems in time and space. The present study was undertaken to identify changes in the Harike wetland, a Ramsar site in the state of Punjab, India; and identify causal factors, as well as vulnerable areas threatened from the land cover changes. Unsupervised classification and post-classification change detection techniques were applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data of 16-10-1989, 22-10-2000 and 26-10-2010. Images were classified into five land cover classes (1) Waterbody, (2) Wetland I, (3) Wetland II, (4) Barren land and (5) Agricultural land. Land cover change is characterized mainly by a decrease in the wetland area, as indicated by decrease in wetland vegetation and an increase in non-wetland areas, characterized by increasing agricultural and barren land areas. Overall, the wetland shrunk by 13% from 1989 to 2010, with the north-eastern side experiencing maximum shrinkage. The wetland needs immediate reclamation to check it from further shrinkage so as to save its biodiversity.

  7. 基于遥感影像的黄河三角洲湿地景观演变及驱动因素分析%Analysis of wetland landscape evaluation and its driving factors in Yellow River Delta based on remote sensing image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢晓宁; 张静怡; 洪佳; 王玲玲

    2016-01-01

    为揭示1973-2013年黄河三角洲湿地景观演变情况及其驱动因素,更好地服务于区域湿地生态保护和恢复,利用1973-2013年9期Landsat卫星影像,构建了黄河三角洲湿地景观数据库。阐述了黄河三角洲湿地景观组成现状、分布规律和阶段特征,并结合黄河入海水沙及社会经济数据,探讨了其驱动力。研究表明:1)黄河三角洲湿地以自然湿地为主,近40 a来湿地总面积呈下降趋势,且以自然湿地向人工湿地和非湿地的转换为主要特征,湿地景观破碎化趋势严重;2)黄河三角洲湿地景观面积的整体下降趋势与黄河入海水沙的整体减少有较好的函数关系,且以输沙量对自然湿地景观,尤其是咸水湿地景观变化趋势的影响更强,径流量则对淡水湿地景观的影响更为突出。3)黄河三角洲湿地景观面积变化亦具有阶段性特征,这是由于黄河来水来沙量的显著周期性变化,叠加上持续扩大的人类活动影响所致。该研究分析了黄河三角洲湿地景观格局演变规律,并定性探讨了主要驱动因素,相关结论对区域湿地保护和恢复具有一定参考意义。%As one of the most active regions in the world, the Yellow River Delta has a large-area wetland which plays a significant role in balancing the regional eco-environment. However, in the past decades, increasingly severe natural and human environment have formed great threat to the Yellow River Delta wetland. Researches are urged to make clear what exactly has changed and which factors exactly result in it in order to put forward the measures of instructions on regional wetland protection. Therefore, a wetland landscape database that contained 9 land use maps of the Yellow River Delta in the year 1973, 1979, 1985,1992, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2013 was constructed with artificial visual interpretation as method and Landsat-MSS/TM/ETM/OLI satellite images

  8. Prerequisites for understanding climate-change impacts on northern prairie wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anteau, Michael J.; Wiltermuth, Mark T.; Post van der Burg, Max; Pearse, Aaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) contains ecosystems that are typified by an extensive matrix of grasslands and depressional wetlands, which provide numerous ecosystem services. Over the past 150 years the PPR has experienced numerous landscape modifications resulting in agricultural conversion of 75–99 % of native prairie uplands and drainage of 50–90 % of wetlands. There is concern over how and where conservation dollars should be spent within the PPR to protect and restore wetland basins to support waterbird populations that will be robust to a changing climate. However, while hydrological impacts of landscape modifications appear substantial, they are still poorly understood. Previous modeling efforts addressing impacts of climate change on PPR wetlands have yet to fully incorporate interacting or potentially overshadowing impacts of landscape modification. We outlined several information needs for building more informative models to predict climate change effects on PPR wetlands. We reviewed how landscape modification influences wetland hydrology and present a conceptual model to describe how modified wetlands might respond to climate variability. We note that current climate projections do not incorporate cyclical variability in climate between wet and dry periods even though such dynamics have shaped the hydrology and ecology of PPR wetlands. We conclude that there are at least three prerequisite steps to making meaningful predictions about effects of climate change on PPR wetlands. Those evident to us are: 1) an understanding of how physical and watershed characteristics of wetland basins of similar hydroperiods vary across temperature and moisture gradients; 2) a mechanistic understanding of how wetlands respond to climate across a gradient of anthropogenic modifications; and 3) improved climate projections for the PPR that can meaningfully represent potential changes in climate variability including intensity and duration of wet and dry periods. Once

  9. Creating a Safe Operating Space for Wetlands in a Changing Climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, A.J.; Alcorlo, P.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Morris, E.P.; Espinar, J.L.; Bravo, M.; Bustamante, J.; Diaz-Delgado, R.; Koelmans, A.A.; Mateo, R.; Mooij, W.M.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, M.; Nes, van E.H.; Scheffer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Many of the world's wetlands may be profoundly affected by climate change over the coming decades. Although wetland managers may have little control over the causes of climate change, they can help to counteract its effects through local measures. This is because direct anthropogenic impacts, such

  10. Possible impacts of climate change on wetlands and its biota in the Brazilian Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    DF Barros; ALM Albernaz

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands cover approximately 6% of the Earth's surface. They are frequently found at the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and are strongly dependent on the water cycle. For this reason, wetlands are extremely vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Mangroves and floodplain ecosystems are some of the most important environments for the Amazonian population, as a source of proteins and income, and are thus the types of wetlands chosen for this review. Some of the main c...

  11. Assessment of heavy metals contamination in soil profiles of roadside Suaeda salsa wetlands in a Chinese delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaojun; Wang, Qinggai; Zhang, Guangliang; Bai, Junhong; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shuai

    2017-02-01

    Five sampling sites (Sites A, B, C, D and E) were selected along a 250 m sampling zone covered by Suaeda salsa, which is perpendicular to a road, in the Yellow River Delta of China. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 40cm in these five sampling sites to investigate the profile distributions and toxic risks of heavy metals. Concentrations of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry (ICP-AAS). The results showed that in each sampling site, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn have approximately constant concentrations along soil profiles and did not show high contamination compared with the values of probable effect levels (PELs). All soils exhibited As and Ni contamination at all sampling sites compared with other heavy metals. The index of geo-accumulation (Igeo) values for As in the 20-30 cm soil layer at Site B was grouped into Class Ⅳ(2 grouped into Class Ⅳ(2 contribution ratios to the ∑TUs in Suaeda salsa wetlands. Correlation analysis (CA) and principal components analysis (PCA) revealed that Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn might derive from the common sources, Cd might originate from another, while As might have more complex sources in this study area.

  12. Impacts of climate change on land-use and wetland productivity in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashford, Benjamin S.; Adams, Richard M.; Wu, JunJie; Voldseth, Richard A.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Werner, Brett; Johnson, W. Carter

    2016-01-01

    Wetland productivity in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is closely linked to climate. A warmer and drier climate, as predicted, will negatively affect the productivity of PPR wetlands and the services they provide. The effect of climate change on wetland productivity, however, will not only depend on natural processes (e.g., evapotranspiration), but also on human responses. Agricultural land use, the predominant use in the PPR, is unlikely to remain static as climate change affects crop yields and prices. Land use in uplands surrounding wetlands will further affect wetland water budgets and hence wetland productivity. The net impact of climate change on wetland productivity will therefore depend on both the direct effects of climate change on wetlands and the indirect effects on upland land use. We examine the effect of climate change and land-use response on semipermanent wetland productivity by combining an economic model of agricultural land-use change with an ecological model of wetland dynamics. Our results suggest that the climate change scenarios evaluated are likely to have profound effects on land use in the North and South Dakota PPR, with wheat displacing other crops and pasture. The combined pressure of land-use and climate change significantly reduces wetland productivity. In a climate scenario with a +4 °C increase in temperature, our model predicts that almost the entire region may lack the wetland productivity necessary to support wetland-dependent species.

  13. Delta Morphodynamics Matters! Ecosystem Services, Poverty and Morphodynamic Change in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Mega-Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, R. J.; Adger, N.; Allan, A.; Darby, S. E.; Hutton, C.; Matthews, Z.; Rahman, M.; Whitehead, P. G.; Wolf, J.

    2013-12-01

    The world's deltas are probably the most vulnerable type of coastal environment, and they face multiple stresses in the coming decades. These stresses include, amongst others, local drivers due to land subsidence, population growth and urbanisation within the deltas, regional drivers due to changes in catchment management (e.g. upstream land use and dam construction), as well as global climate change impacts such as sea-level rise. At the same time, the ecosystem services of river deltas support high population densities, with around 14% of the global population inhabiting deltas. A large proportion of these people experience extremes of poverty and they are therefore severely exposed to vulnerability from environmental and ecological stress and degradation. In areas close to or below the poverty boundary, both subsistence and cash elements of the economy tend to rely disproportionately heavily on ecosystem services which underpin livelihoods. Therefore, to sustainably manage delta environments they must be viewed as complex social-environmental systems where change is only partially driven by physical drivers such as sea level rise and climate change, and human-induced development activities are also critical. Here we outline a new conceptual framework for the development of methods to understand and characterise the key drivers of change in ecosystem services that affect the environment and economic status of populous deltas, focusing specifically on the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) mega-delta. The GBM delta is characterised by densely populated coastal lowlands with significant poverty, with livelihoods supported to a large extent by natural ecosystems such as the Sunderbahns (the largest mangrove forest in the world). However, the GBM delta is under severe development pressure due to many growing cities. At present the importance of ecosystems services to poverty and livelihoods is poorly understood. This is due to due to the complexity of interactions

  14. Mackenzie River Delta morphological change based on Landsat time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesakoski, Jenni-Mari; Alho, Petteri; Gustafsson, David; Arheimer, Berit; Isberg, Kristina

    2015-04-01

    Arctic rivers are sensitive and yet quite unexplored river systems to which the climate change will impact on. Research has not focused in detail on the fluvial geomorphology of the Arctic rivers mainly due to the remoteness and wideness of the watersheds, problems with data availability and difficult accessibility. Nowadays wide collaborative spatial databases in hydrology as well as extensive remote sensing datasets over the Arctic are available and they enable improved investigation of the Arctic watersheds. Thereby, it is also important to develop and improve methods that enable detecting the fluvio-morphological processes based on the available data. Furthermore, it is essential to reconstruct and improve the understanding of the past fluvial processes in order to better understand prevailing and future fluvial processes. In this study we sum up the fluvial geomorphological change in the Mackenzie River Delta during the last ~30 years. The Mackenzie River Delta (~13 000 km2) is situated in the North Western Territories, Canada where the Mackenzie River enters to the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean near the city of Inuvik. Mackenzie River Delta is lake-rich, productive ecosystem and ecologically sensitive environment. Research objective is achieved through two sub-objectives: 1) Interpretation of the deltaic river channel planform change by applying Landsat time series. 2) Definition of the variables that have impacted the most on detected changes by applying statistics and long hydrological time series derived from Arctic-HYPE model (HYdrologic Predictions for Environment) developed by Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. According to our satellite interpretation, field observations and statistical analyses, notable spatio-temporal changes have occurred in the morphology of the river channel and delta during the past 30 years. For example, the channels have been developing in braiding and sinuosity. In addition, various linkages between the studied

  15. On river cross-sectional change in the Niger Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abam, T. K. S.; Omuso, W. O.

    2000-08-01

    A network of dominantly distributary river systems dissects the superficial deposits of the Niger Delta comprising alluvial sediments. Changes in river cross-sections are instigated mainly by bank failures, fluctuations in discharge, and bed degradation by fluvial processes. The relative importance of factors causing river cross-sectional change was ranked, based on a deterministic sensitivity technique involving partial differentiation of soil properties, flow characteristics, and geometrical parameters of the river channels. Analysis suggests that steep bank inclination and high flow velocity/discharge are the major causes of cross-sectional change, while interlocking of soil grains is the major erosion-restraining factor. Sensitivity coefficients were used further to generate susceptibility indices, indicating the vulnerability of channel cross-sections to change. Based on this, the risks of channel cross-sectional change were compared at different sites.

  16. The Effects of Climate Change Perceptions on Willingness to Fund the Prevention of Wetland Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Ross G.; Petrolia, Daniel R.; Kim, Tae-Goun

    2010-01-01

    Using contingent valuation, we estimate willingness to pay for prevention of wetland loss in coastal Louisiana, and indentify the factors that influence respondent choice, specifically climate change perceptions. Eighty two percent of respondents were willing to pay for some form of wetland loss prevention.

  17. Regulators of coastal wetland methane production and responses to simulated global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmella Vizza; William E. West; Stuart E. Jones; Julia A. Hart; Gary A. Lamberti

    2017-01-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of methane (CH4) emissions to the atmosphere, which vary along salinity and productivity gradients. Global change has the potential to reshape these gradients and therefore alter future contributions of wetlands to the global CH4 budget. Our study examined CH4...

  18. The Effect of Climate Change on Optimal Wetlands and Waterfowl Management in Western Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitey, P.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Warmer temperatures and a decrease in precipitation in the 21st century could severely deplete wetlands in the prairie pothole region of western Canada. In this study, we employ linear regression analysis to determine the casual effect of climate change on wetlands in this region, with temperature,

  19. The Effect of Climate Change on Optimal Wetlands and Waterfowl Management in Western Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitey, P.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Warmer temperatures and a decrease in precipitation in the 21st century could severely deplete wetlands in the prairie pothole region of western Canada. In this study, we employ linear regression analysis to determine the casual effect of climate change on wetlands in this region, with temperature,

  20. Vegetation Changes and Partitioning of Selenium in 4-Year-Old Constructed Wetlands Treating Agricultural Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    The knowledge of vegetation management and the partitioning of selenium (Se) in treatment wetlands is essential for long-term effective operation of constructed wetlands treating Se-laden agricultural tile-drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Vegetation changes in six vegetated wetl...

  1. 近20年来珠江三角洲滨海湿地景观的变化特征%Variations of Coastal Wetland Landscapes in the Pearl River Delta in the Last 20 Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李婧; 王爱军; 李团结

    2011-01-01

    Wetland types and landscape variations in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) during the last 20 years (from 1986 to 2005) were studied based on 4 Landsat TM satelite remote sensing images. The results show that the Pearl River estuary has been influenced intensively by the human activities, and the wetland area can only make up less than half of the whole coastal area. Even within the wetlands, the most are the artificial wetlands. Since 1986, the types of wetlands have changed distinctly. The land area used for the human constructions increases greatly, whereas the wetland area increased slowly before 2000 and decreased after 2000. The change in the wetland lanscape index is relatively small and the diversity index,the evenness index and the fractal dimension index tend to decrease slightly. The richness index and the habitat fragmentation index also increase slightly. However, the gallery density index decreases notably.A degradation of the coastal wetlands occurrs, to some extent, in the Pearl River estuary. Particuarly after 2000, the degradation of the coastal wetlands tended to intensify. Therefore, the pretection and restoration to the coastal wetlands, especially to the natural wetlands, should be enhanced.%用4景1986-2005年的Landsat TM卫星遥感影像作为数据源,结合野外调查,研究20a来珠江口滨海湿地的类型与景观变化情况.结果显示,珠江口地区受人类活动影响剧烈;湿地面积占据滨海地区面积不足一半,而湿地中,绝大部分又为人工湿地.从1986年起,湿地类型变化显著,人工建设用地的面积大大增加,湿地面积在2000年前缓慢增加,2000年后出现下降趋势.湿地景观指数变化相对较小,多样性、均匀度、分形维数略呈下降趋势,优势度和内部生境破碎化指数略呈上升趋势,廊道密度指数下降较显著.珠江口滨海湿地出现了一定程度的退化,尤其是2000年后湿地退化有加快趋势,对滨海湿地,特别是天然湿地的

  2. Adaptation services of floodplains and wetlands under transformational climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloff, Matthew; Lavorel, Sandra; Wise, Russell M; Dunlop, Michael; Overton, Ian C; Williams, Kristen J

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation services are the ecosystem processes and services that benefit people by increasing their ability to adapt to change. Benefits may accrue from existing but newly used services where ecosystems persist or from novel services supplied following ecosystem transformation. Ecosystem properties that enable persistence or transformation are important adaptation services because they support future options. The adaptation services approach can be applied to decisions on trade-offs between currently valued services and benefits from maintaining future options. For example, ecosystem functions and services of floodplains depend on river flows. In those regions of the world where climate change projections are for hotter, drier conditions, floods will be less frequent and floodplains will either persist, though with modified structure and function, or transform to terrestrial (flood-independent) ecosystems. Many currently valued ecosystem services will reduce in supply or become unavailable, but new options are provided by adaptation services. We present a case study from the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia, for operationalizing the adaptation services concept for floodplains and wetlands. We found large changes in flow and flood regimes are likely under a scenario of +1.6°C by 2030, even with additional water restored to rivers under the proposed Murray-Darling Basin Plan. We predict major changes to floodplain ecosystems, including contraction of riparian forests and woodlands and expansion of terrestrial, drought-tolerant vegetation communities. Examples of adaptation services under this scenario include substitution of irrigated agriculture with dryland cropping and floodplain grazing; mitigation of damage from rarer, extreme floods; and increased tourism, recreational, and cultural values derived from fewer, smaller wetlands that can be maintained with environmental flows. Management for adaptation services will require decisions on where intervention can

  3. Catalyzing action towards the sustainability of deltas: deltas as integrated socio-ecological systems and sentinels of regional and global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Tessler, Z. D.; Brondizio, E.; Overeem, I.; Renaud, F.; Sebesvari, Z.; Nicholls, R. J.; Anthony, E.

    2016-12-01

    Deltas are highly dynamic and productive environments: they are food baskets of the world, home to biodiverse and rich ecosystems, and they play a central role in food and water security. However, they are becoming increasingly vulnerable to risks arising from human activities, land subsidence, regional water management, global sea-level rise, and climate extremes. Our Belmont Forum DELTAS project (BF-DELTAS: Catalyzing actions towards delta sustainability) encompasses an international network of interdisciplinary research collaborators with focal areas in the Mekong, Ganges Brahmaputra, and the Amazon deltas. The project is organized around five main modules: (1) developing an analytical framework for assessing delta vulnerability and scenarios of change (Delta-SRES), (2) developing an open-acess, science-based integrative modeling framework for risk assessment and decision support (Delta-RADS), (3) developing tools to support quantitative mapping of the bio-physical and socio-economic environments of deltas and consolidate bio-physical and social data within shared data repositories (Delta-DAT), (4) developing Global Delta Vulnerability Indices (Delta-GDVI) that capture current and projected scenarios for major deltas around the world , and (5) collaborating with regional stakeholders to put the science, modeling, and data into action (Delta-ACT). In this talk, a research summary will be presented on three research domains around which significant collaborative work was developed: advancing biophysical classification of deltas, understanding deltas as coupled socio-ecological systems, and analyzing and informing social and environmental vulnerabilities in delta regions.

  4. ANALYSIS OF HABITAT PATTERN CHANGE OF RED-CROWNED CRANES IN THE LIAOHE DELTA USING SPATIAL DIVERSITY INDEX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ling; LI Xiu-zhen; HU Yuan-man; GUO Du-fa

    2003-01-01

    Habitat pattern change of red-crowned c ranes (Grus japonensis) in the 1iaohe Delta between 1988 and1998 was analyzed with the help of Spatial Diversity Index based on renote sensing data and field investigation. The re-sult showed that the influence from human activities on the wetland habitat of red-crowned cranes was prominent with thedevelopment of oil and agricultural exploitation, and the habitat pattern of red-crowned cranes had been obviouslychanged by the human disturbance during the ten years. The areas with high Spatial Diversity values ( SD≥0. 65) andthat with mid-high values (0. 5 ≤ SD < 0. 65), which constituted the main part of suitable habitat of red-crownedcranes, had reduced to 9142ha and 5576ha respectively, with the shrinking of natural land cover, such as reed and Suae-da community. The habitat pattern became more fragmented, which was caused by roads and wells during oil explo-ration. It was indicated that the suitability and quality of habitat for red-crowned cranes in the Liaohe Delta were degrad-ed in the last decade. The results also showed that diversity index could reflect the habitat suitability of red-crownedcranes quantitatively and describe the spatial pattern of the habitat explicitly. This study will provide a scientific basisfor habitat protection of red-crowned cranes and other rare species in wetlands.

  5. Studying the impact of climate change on coastal aquifers and adjacent wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigter, Tibor; Ribeiro, Luís.; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Samper, Javier; Fakir, Younes; Fonseca, Luís.; Monteiro, José Paulo; Nunes, João. Pedro; Pisani, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    program, assessing the impact of climate change on coastal groundwater resources and dependent ecosystems. These resources are often intensively exploited, potentially leading to saltwater intrusion and the degradation of groundwater and dependent wetlands. Climate change may increase this problem in Mediterranean regions, due to the combined effect of rising sea levels and decreasing aquifer recharge. CLIMWAT aims to address this problem by employing a multimethodological approach involving climate scenarios, surface and groundwater flow and transport modeling, as well as hydrochemical indicator and ecological diversity indices. Research is performed in three coastal areas: the Central Algarve in Portugal, the Ebro delta in Spain and the Atlantic Sahel in Morocco. The mean annual temperatures are 17.4 ° C, 17.2 ° C and 17.5 ° C, respectively, whereas mean annual rainfall is lower in the Atlantic Sahel (390 mm) than in the Ebro Delta (520 mm) and the Central Algarve (660 mm). Work package (WP) 1 involves the collection of existing data (in a GIS environment), baseline characterization and the selection of monitoring locations. These include wells and springs of official (water level/quality) monitoring networks, as well as additional observation points selected at strategic locations, including the wetlands receiving groundwater and adjacent aquifer sectors. In WP2 the climate scenarios are selected and integrated in hydrological models (SWAT, GISBALAN), which are developed and calibrated with existing data, prior to scenario modeling. The main focus of this WP is to estimate the evolution of surface runoff and groundwater recharge under climate change. Data on climate change scenarios and model projections are compiled from: (i) the PRUDENCE project; (ii) the ENSEMBLES project; (iii) IPCC scenarios and projections, AR4; (iv) AEMet (Spanish Meteorological Agency) for generation of regional scenarios of climate change in Spain. For Morocco, where runoff is

  6. Global change accelerates carbon assimilation by a wetland ecosystem engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Joshua S.; Hager, Rachel N.; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Mozdzer, Thomas J.

    2015-11-01

    The primary productivity of coastal wetlands is changing dramatically in response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, nitrogen (N) enrichment, and invasions by novel species, potentially altering their ecosystem services and resilience to sea level rise. In order to determine how these interacting global change factors will affect coastal wetland productivity, we quantified growing-season carbon assimilation (≈gross primary productivity, or GPP) and carbon retained in living plant biomass (≈net primary productivity, or NPP) of North American mid-Atlantic saltmarshes invaded by Phragmites australis (common reed) under four treatment conditions: two levels of CO2 (ambient and +300 ppm) crossed with two levels of N (0 and 25 g N added m-2 yr-1). For GPP, we combined descriptions of canopy structure and leaf-level photosynthesis in a simulation model, using empirical data from an open-top chamber field study. Under ambient CO2 and low N loading (i.e., the Control), we determined GPP to be 1.66 ± 0.05 kg C m-2 yr-1 at a typical Phragmites stand density. Individually, elevated CO2 and N enrichment increased GPP by 44 and 60%, respectively. Changes under N enrichment came largely from stimulation to carbon assimilation early and late in the growing season, while changes from CO2 came from stimulation during the early and mid-growing season. In combination, elevated CO2 and N enrichment increased GPP by 95% over the Control, yielding 3.24 ± 0.08 kg C m-2 yr-1. We used biomass data to calculate NPP, and determined that it represented 44%-60% of GPP, with global change conditions decreasing carbon retention compared to the Control. Our results indicate that Phragmites invasions in eutrophied saltmarshes are driven, in part, by extended phenology yielding 3.1× greater NPP than native marsh. Further, we can expect elevated CO2 to amplify Phragmites productivity throughout the growing season, with potential implications including accelerated spread

  7. Climate change and wetland loss impacts on a western river's water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Records, R. M.; Arabi, M.; Fassnacht, S. R.; Duffy, W. G.; Ahmadi, M.; Hegewisch, K. C.

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of potential stream water quality conditions under future climate is critical for the sustainability of ecosystems and the protection of human health. Changes in wetland water balance under projected climate could alter wetland extent or cause wetland loss (e.g., via increased evapotranspiration and lower growing season flows leading to reduced riparian wetland inundation) or altered land use patterns. This study assessed the potential climate-induced changes to in-stream sediment and nutrient loads in the snowmelt-dominated Sprague River, Oregon, western US. Additionally, potential water quality impacts of combined changes in wetland water balance and wetland area under future climatic conditions were evaluated. The study utilized the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) forced with statistical downscaling of general circulation model (GCM) data from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) using the Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogs (MACA) method. Our findings suggest that, in the Sprague River, (1) mid-21st century nutrient and sediment loads could increase significantly during the high-flow season under warmer, wetter climate projections or could change only nominally in a warmer and somewhat drier future; (2) although water quality conditions under some future climate scenarios and no wetland loss may be similar to the past, the combined impact of climate change and wetland losses on nutrient loads could be large; (3) increases in stream total phosphorus (TP) concentration with wetland loss under future climate scenarios would be greatest at high-magnitude, low-probability flows; and (4) loss of riparian wetlands in both headwaters and lowlands could increase outlet TP loads to a similar degree, but this could be due to distinctly different mechanisms in different parts of the watershed.

  8. Ecosystem Service Changes and Livelihood Impacts in the Maguri-Motapung Wetlands of Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi D. Bhatta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands provide a diverse range of ecosystem services supporting livelihoods of many people. Despite their value, wetlands are continuously being degraded. There is scant information on individual wetlands, people’s dependency and their exploitation at a local scale. We therefore assessed wetland ecosystem services, the drivers of change and impacts of those drivers on ecosystem services and people’s dependency through a case study of the Maguri-Motapung Beel wetlands of Assam, India. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected through household surveys, focus group discussions, key informant interviews and community workshops. The analyses showed a total of 29 ecosystem services, and high dependency on these with five out of seven livelihood strategies sourced from ecosystem services. Over-exploitation of wetland resources and siltation were reported as the major direct drivers of change with impacts on both ecosystem services and people’s livelihoods. Drastic decreases in availability of thatch, fish stocks, fodder and tourism were observed. This suggests that there is an urgent need for a comprehensive participatory management plan. Actions are needed to maintain the Maguri-Motapung Beel wetlands and the flow of services in order to sustain people’s livelihoods in the area. With an estimated 50% global loss of wetlands in the last century and the loss of 5,000 square kilometers a year in Asia alone, the loss of ecosystem services and livelihood impacts shown in our study may be typical of what is occurring in the region and perhaps globally.

  9. 现代黄河三角洲滨海湿地生态水文环境脆弱性%Vulnerability of ecological environment in the modern Yellow River delta wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高茂生; 叶思源; 张国臣

    2012-01-01

    The ecological environment of the modern Yellow River delta wetland is getting more vulnerable under the influence of sea level rise, storm tide, shortage of discharge, extreme precipitation or evaporation, as well as human activities. A coastal wetland groundwater model was constructed by using Cl as a simulated factor. The results suggest that the change in shallow groundwater quality of the wetland depends upon the natural factors such as strong cutoff in the lower reaches and storm tide and human engineering activities. The coastal wetland would be submerged in the north without damp proof when the height of the storm tide reaches 2.4 m. The depth gradients of shallow groundwater and brackish water in sediments in the studied coastal delta wetland are the key factors to the vulnerability of ecological environment. The desalination of brackish water is derived by the joint action of groundwater dynamics, hydrochemistry and ocean tidal process.%受大气降水、黄河水位断流、风暴潮和人类工程活动等因素影响,现代黄河三角洲滨海湿地生态水文环境极其脆弱和敏感.本文运用地下水数值模拟方法,通过构建滨海湿地水文模型,以氯离子作为模拟因子,预测滨海湿地地下水趋势性变化.计算结果显示,湿地水位和盐度对湿地生长和发育起控制作用;黄河持续断流和强烈风暴潮对湿地水质影响明显;当风暴潮引起增水幅度超过正常潮高的2.4m,会造成沿海低地特别是北部未受防潮大坝保护的滨海湿地淹没.

  10. Implications for sustainability of a changing agricultural mosaic in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, C. E.; Deverel, S. J.; Jacobs, P.; Kelsey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Transformed from the largest wetland system on the west coast of the United States to agriculture, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is an extreme teaching example of anthropogenic threats to sustainability. For over 6,000 years, over 280,000 ha of intertidal freshwater marsh accreted due to seal level rise and sediment deposition. Farming of organic soils since 1850 resulted in land subsidence caused primarily by oxidation. Over 2 billion cubic meters of soil were lost resulting in elevations on Delta islands ranging from -1 to -8 m and increased risk of levee failures and water supply disruption. Alteration of water flows and habitat caused dramatic declines in aquatic species. A cycle in which oxidation of organic soils leads to deepening of drainage ditches to maintain an aerated root zone which in turn results in sustained oxidation and subsidence is perpetuated by the momentum of the status quo despite evidence that agricultural practices are increasingly unsustainable. Flooding of the soils breaks the oxidation/subsidence cycle. We assessed alternate land uses and the carbon market as a potential impetus for change. Using the peer-reviewed and locally calibrated SUBCALC model, we estimated net global warming potential for a range of scenarios for a representative island, from status quo to incorporating significant proportions of subsidence-mitigating land use. We analyzed economic implications by determining profit losses or gains when a simulated GHG offset market is available for wetlands using a regional agricultural production and economic optimization model, We estimated baseline GHG emissions at about 60,000 tons CO2-e per year. In contrast, modeled implementation of rice and wetlands resulted in substantial emissions reductions to the island being a net GHG sink. Subsidence would be arrested or reversed where these land uses are implemented. Results of economic modeling reveal that conversion to wetlands can have significant negative farm financial

  11. Quantifying climate change mitigation potential in Great Plains wetlands for three greenhouse gas emission scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Kristin B.; Ratliff, Jamie L.; Wein, Anne; Bliss, Norman B.; Sleeter, Benjamin M.; Sohl, Terry L.; Li, Zhengpeng

    2015-01-01

    We examined opportunities for avoided loss of wetland carbon stocks in the Great Plains of the United States in the context of future agricultural expansion through analysis of land-use land-cover (LULC) change scenarios, baseline carbon datasets and biogeochemical model outputs. A wetland map that classifies wetlands according to carbon pools was created to describe future patterns of carbon loss and potential carbon savings. Wetland avoided loss scenarios, superimposed upon LULC change scenarios, quantified carbon stocks preserved under criteria of carbon densities or land value plus cropland suitability. Up to 3420 km2 of wetlands may be lost in the region by 2050, mainly due to conversion of herbaceous wetlands in the Temperate Prairies where soil organic carbon (SOC) is highest. SOC loss would be approximately 0.20 ± 0.15 megagrams of carbon per hectare per year (MgC ha−1 yr−1), depending upon tillage practices on converted wetlands, and total ecosystem carbon loss in woody wetlands would be approximately 0.81 ± 0.41 MgC ha−1 yr−1, based on biogeochemical model results. Among wetlands vulnerable to conversion, wetlands in the Northern Glaciated Plains and Lake Agassiz Plains ecoregions exhibit very high mean SOC and on average, relatively low land values, potentially creating economically competitive opportunities for avoided carbon loss. This mitigation scenarios approach may be adapted by managers using their own preferred criteria to select sites that best meet their objectives. Results can help prioritize field-based assessments, where site-level investigations of carbon stocks, land value, and consideration of local priorities for climate change mitigation programs are needed.

  12. Climate change threatens coexistence within communities of Mediterranean forested wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what are the conditions sustaining tree diversity in Mediterranean wet forests under future scenarios of altered hydrological regimes. The core of the work is a quantitative, dynamic model describing the coexistence of different Mediterranean tree species, typical of arid or semi-arid wetlands. Two kind of species, i.e. Hygrophilous (drought sensitive, flood resistant) and Non-hygrophilous (drought resistant, flood sensitive), are broadly defined according to the distinct adaptive strategies of trees against water stress of summer drought and winter flooding. We argue that at intermediate levels of water supply the dual role of water (resource and stress) results in the coexistence of the two kind of species. A bifurcation analysis allows us to assess the effects of climate change on the coexistence of the two species in order to highlight the impacts of predicted climate scenarios on tree diversity. Specifically, the model has been applied to Mediterranean coastal swamp forests of Central Italy located at Castelporziano Estate and Circeo National Park. Our results show that there are distinct rainfall thresholds beyond which stable coexistence becomes impossible. Regional climatic projections show that the lower rainfall threshold may be approached or crossed during the XXI century, calling for an urgent adaptation and mitigation response to prevent biodiversity losses.

  13. Climate change threatens coexistence within communities of Mediterranean forested wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Di Paola

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what are the conditions sustaining tree diversity in Mediterranean wet forests under future scenarios of altered hydrological regimes. The core of the work is a quantitative, dynamic model describing the coexistence of different Mediterranean tree species, typical of arid or semi-arid wetlands. Two kind of species, i.e. Hygrophilous (drought sensitive, flood resistant and Non-hygrophilous (drought resistant, flood sensitive, are broadly defined according to the distinct adaptive strategies of trees against water stress of summer drought and winter flooding. We argue that at intermediate levels of water supply the dual role of water (resource and stress results in the coexistence of the two kind of species. A bifurcation analysis allows us to assess the effects of climate change on the coexistence of the two species in order to highlight the impacts of predicted climate scenarios on tree diversity. Specifically, the model has been applied to Mediterranean coastal swamp forests of Central Italy located at Castelporziano Estate and Circeo National Park. Our results show that there are distinct rainfall thresholds beyond which stable coexistence becomes impossible. Regional climatic projections show that the lower rainfall threshold may be approached or crossed during the XXI century, calling for an urgent adaptation and mitigation response to prevent biodiversity losses.

  14. Changes of wetland landscape patterns in Dadu River catchment from 1985 to 2000, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laibin HUANG; Junhong BAI; Denghua YAN; Bin CHEN; Rong XIAO; Haifeng GAO

    2012-01-01

    Based on the interpretation and vector processing of remote sensing images in 1985 and 2000,the spatial changes of wetland landscape patterns in Dadu River catchment in the last two decades were studied using spatial analysis method.Supported by Apack software,the indices of wetland landscape pattern were calculated,and the information entropy (IE) was also introduced to show the changes of wetland landscape information.Results showed that wetland landscape in this region was characteristic of patch-corridor-matrix configuration and dominantly consisted of natural wetlands.Landscape patterns changed a little with low fragment and showed concentrated distribution with partial scattered distribution during the period from 1985 to 2000.The values of patch density and convergence index kept stable,and the values of diversity,evenness indices and IE showed a slight decrease,while dominance and fractal dimension indices were increased.All types of wetland landscapes had higher adjacency probabilities with grassland landscape in 1985 and 2000,and there was extremely weak hydrological link and large spatial gap among river,glacier,reservoir and pond wetlands due to low adjacency matrix values.Since their cumulative contribution exceeded 81% through the PCA analysis,the agriculture activities would be the main driving force to the landscape changes during the past 15 years.

  15. Quantifying area changes of internationally important wetlands due to water consumption in LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verones, Francesca; Pfister, Stephan; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2013-09-03

    Wetlands harbor diverse species assemblages but are among the world's most threatened ecosystems. Half of their global area was lost during the last century. No approach currently exists in life cycle impact assessment that acknowledges the vulnerability and importance of wetlands globally and provides fate factors for water consumption. We use data from 1184 inland wetlands, all designated as sites of international importance under the Ramsar Convention, to develop regionalized fate factors (FF) for consumptive water use. FFs quantify the change of wetland area caused per m(3)/yr water consumed. We distinguish between surface water-fed and groundwater-fed wetlands and develop FFs for surface water and groundwater consumption. FFs vary over 8 (surface water-fed) and 6 (groundwater-fed) orders of magnitude as a function of the site characteristics, showing the importance of local conditions. Largest FFs for surface water-fed wetlands generally occur in hyper-arid zones and smallest in humid zones, highlighting the dependency on available surface water flows. FFs for groundwater-fed wetlands depend on hydrogeological conditions and vary largely with the total amount of water consumed from the aquifer. Our FFs translate water consumption into wetland area loss and thus become compatible with life cycle assessment methodologies of land use.

  16. Climate change and wetland loss impacts on a Western river's water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Records

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of potential stream water quality conditions under future climate is critical for the sustainability of ecosystems and protection of human health. Changes in wetland water balance under projected climate could alter wetland extent or cause wetland loss. This study assessed the potential climate-induced changes to in-stream sediment and nutrients loads in the historically snow melt-dominated Sprague River, Oregon, Western United States. Additionally, potential water quality impacts of combined changes in wetland water balance and wetland area under future climatic conditions were evaluated. The study utilized the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT forced with statistical downscaling of general circulation model (GCM data from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5 using the Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogs (MACA method. Our findings suggest that in the Sprague River (1 mid-21st century nutrient and sediment loads could increase significantly during the high flow season under warmer-wetter climate projections, or could change only nominally in a warmer and somewhat drier future; (2 although water quality conditions under some future climate scenarios and no wetland loss may be similar to the past, the combined impact of climate change and wetland losses on nutrient loads could be large; (3 increases in stream total phosphorus (TP concentration with wetland loss under future climate scenarios would be greatest at high-magnitude, low-probability flows; and (4 loss of riparian wetlands in both headwaters and lowlands could increase outlet TP loads to a similar degree, but this could be due to distinctly different mechanisms in different parts of the watershed.

  17. Wetland InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  18. Long-term change in limnology and invertebrates in Alaskan boreal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, R.M.; Lovvorn, J.R.; Heglund, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Climate change is more pronounced at high northern latitudes, and may be affecting the physical, chemical, and biological attributes of the abundant wetlands in boreal forests. On the Yukon Flats, located in the boreal forest of northeast Alaska, wetlands originally sampled during 1985-1989 were re-sampled for water chemistry and macroinvertebrates in summer 2001-2003. Wetlands sampled lost on average 19% surface water area between these periods. Total nitrogen and most metal cations (Na, Mg, and Ca, but not K) increased between these periods, whereas total phosphorus and chlorophyll a (Chl a) declined. These changes were greater in wetlands that had experienced more drying (decreased surface area). Compared with 1985-1989, densities of cladocerans, copepods, and ostracods in both June and August were much higher in 2002-2003, whereas densities of amphipods, gastropods, and chironomid larvae were generally lower. In comparisons among wetlands in 2002-2003 only, amphipod biomass was lower in wetlands with lower Chl a, which might help explain the decline of amphipods since the late 1980s when Chl a was higher. The decline in Chl a corresponded to greatly increased zooplankton density in June, suggesting a shift in carbon flow from scrapers and deposit-feeders to water-column grazers. Declines in benthic and epibenthic deposit-feeding invertebrates suggest important food web effects of climate change in otherwise pristine wetlands of the boreal forest. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  19. Strategic Environmental Assessment Framework for Landscape-Based, Temporal Analysis of Wetland Change in Urban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizo, Anton; Noble, Bram F.; Bell, Scott

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents and demonstrates a spatial framework for the application of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in the context of change analysis for urban wetland environments. The proposed framework is focused on two key stages of the SEA process: scoping and environmental baseline assessment. These stages are arguably the most information-intense phases of SEA and have a significant effect on the quality of the SEA results. The study aims to meet the needs for proactive frameworks to assess and protect wetland habitat and services more efficiently, toward the goal of advancing more intelligent urban planning and development design. The proposed framework, adopting geographic information system and remote sensing tools and applications, supports the temporal evaluation of wetland change and sustainability assessment based on landscape indicator analysis. The framework was applied to a rapidly developing urban environment in the City of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, analyzing wetland change and land-use pressures from 1985 to 2011. The SEA spatial scale was rescaled from administrative urban planning units to an ecologically meaningful area. Landscape change assessed was based on a suite of indicators that were subsequently rolled up into a single, multi-dimensional, and easy to understand and communicate index to examine the implications of land-use change for wetland sustainability. The results show that despite the recent extremely wet period in the Canadian prairie region, land-use change contributed to increasing threats to wetland sustainability.

  20. Strategic Environmental Assessment Framework for Landscape-Based, Temporal Analysis of Wetland Change in Urban Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizo, Anton; Noble, Bram F; Bell, Scott

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents and demonstrates a spatial framework for the application of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in the context of change analysis for urban wetland environments. The proposed framework is focused on two key stages of the SEA process: scoping and environmental baseline assessment. These stages are arguably the most information-intense phases of SEA and have a significant effect on the quality of the SEA results. The study aims to meet the needs for proactive frameworks to assess and protect wetland habitat and services more efficiently, toward the goal of advancing more intelligent urban planning and development design. The proposed framework, adopting geographic information system and remote sensing tools and applications, supports the temporal evaluation of wetland change and sustainability assessment based on landscape indicator analysis. The framework was applied to a rapidly developing urban environment in the City of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, analyzing wetland change and land-use pressures from 1985 to 2011. The SEA spatial scale was rescaled from administrative urban planning units to an ecologically meaningful area. Landscape change assessed was based on a suite of indicators that were subsequently rolled up into a single, multi-dimensional, and easy to understand and communicate index to examine the implications of land-use change for wetland sustainability. The results show that despite the recent extremely wet period in the Canadian prairie region, land-use change contributed to increasing threats to wetland sustainability.

  1. Assessing Wetland Methane Emission Changes in the Conterminous U.S. from 1973 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Zhu, Z.; Sleeter, B. M.; Zhu, Q.; Soulard, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Climate and human land use are the main drivers of terrestrial ecosystem methane (CH4) emissions. Wetland expansion and contraction, methane production and release, as well as the interactions of methane with the carbon cycle, are processes critical to the examination of climate change mitigation strategies. This study uses the parallel Integrated Biosphere Simulator (pIBIS) and the State-and-Transition Simulation Model (ST-Sim) to simulate the climate-driven and land-use-driven CH4 emissions in the U.S. from 1973 to 2010. The ST-Sim model is used to backcast annual historical wetland cover from 2010 to 1973 based on recent baseline wetland maps (i.e. National Land Cover Dataset and National Wetland Inventory), historical land cover change trends, and probabilistic spatial multipliers. The pIBIS model is used to simulate the change of wetland water table depth and the production, oxidation, and transportation processes of CH4. Simulations are performed at 1-km spatial resolution using Department of Energy super-computing resources. Post-simulation programs are developed to analyze the spatial distribution and temporal trends of CH4 emissions in relation to inter-annual wetland area variation and climate (rainfall and temperature) variation. Relationships between CH4 emission and carbon sequestration and CO2 emission are also analyzed. Keywords: climate change, land cover change, land use change, greenhouse gas, biogeochemical model

  2. Remote sensing and GIS for wetland inventory, mapping and change analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, L-M; Finlayson, C M; Nagabhatla, N

    2009-05-01

    A multiple purpose wetland inventory is being developed and promoted through partnerships and specific analyses at different scales in response to past uncertainties and gaps in inventory coverage. A partnership approach is being promoted through the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands to enable a global inventory database to be compiled from individual projects and analyses using remote sensing and GIS. Individual projects that are currently part of this global effort are described. They include an analysis of the Ramsar sites' database to map the distribution of Ramsar sites across global ecoregions and to identify regions and wetland types that are under-represented in the database. Given the extent of wetland degradation globally, largely due to agricultural activities, specific attention is directed towards the usefulness of Earth Observation in providing information that can be used to more effectively manage wetlands. As an example, a further project using satellite data and GIS to quantify the condition of wetlands along the western coastline of Sri Lanka is described and trends in land use due to changes in agriculture, sedimentation and settlement patterns are outlined. At a regional scale, a project to map and assess, using remote sensing, individual wetlands used for agriculture in eight countries in southern Africa is also described. Land cover and the extent of inundation at each site is being determined from a multi-temporal data set of images as a base for further assessment of land use change. Integrated fully within these analyses is the development of local capacity to plan and undertake such analyses and in particular to relate the outcomes to wetland management and to compile data on the distribution, extent and condition of wetlands globally.

  3. [Changes of wetland landscape pattern in Dayang River Estuary based on high-resolution remote sensing image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Zhao, Dong-zhi; Zhang, Feng-shou; Wei, Bao-quan

    2011-07-01

    Based on the comprehensive consideration of the high resolution characteristics of remote sensing data and the current situation of land cover and land use in Dayang River Estuary wetland, a classification system with different resolutions of wetland landscape in the Estuary was established. The landscape pattern indices and landscape transition matrix were calculated by using the high resolution remote sensing data, and the dynamic changes of the landscape pattern from 1984 to 2008 were analyzed. In the study period, the wetland landscape components changed drastically. Wetland landscape transferred from natural wetland into artificial wetland, and wetland core regional area decreased. Natural wetland's largest patch area index descended, and the fragmentation degree ascended; while artificial wetland area expanded, its patch number decreased, polymerization degree increased, and the maximum patch area index had an obvious increasing trend. Increasing human activities, embankment construction, and reclamation for aquaculture were the main causes for the decrease of wetland area and the degradation of the ecological functions of Dayang River Estuary. To constitute long-term scientific and reasonable development plan, establish wetland nature reserves, protect riverway, draft strict inspective regimes for aquaculture reclamation, and energetically develop resource-based tourism industry would be the main strategies for the protection of the estuarine wetland.

  4. Heavy metals pollution in soil profiles from seasonal-flooding riparian wetlands in a Chinese delta: Levels, distributions and toxic risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangliang; Bai, Junhong; Zhao, Qingqing; Jia, Jia; Wen, Xiaojun

    2017-02-01

    Soil profile samples were collected in seasonal-flooding riparian wetlands in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China in autumn and spring to investigate the levels, distributions and toxic risks of heavy metals in soil profiles. Total elemental contents of Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry (ICP-AAS). Results indicated that the contents of determined heavy metals showed non-negligible depth variations (coefficient of variation > 10%), and their distribution patterns were irregular. Compared with other heavy metals, both As and Cd presented higher enrichment factors (EF) based on the classification of EF values (moderate enrichment for As while significant enrichment for Cd). Cluster analysis (CA) and principal components analysis (PCA) revealed that Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn might derive from the common source, while As and Cd shared another similar source. The toxic unit (TU) values of these heavy metals did not exceed probable effect levels (PEL) except for Ni. Both As and Ni showed higher contributions to the sum of TU (∑TUs), which indicated they were the primary concerns of heavy metals pollution. Generally, As, Cd and Ni should be paid more attention for wetlands managers and policy makers to avoid potential ecotoxicity in the study area. The findings of this study could contribute to the prevention and control of heavy metals pollution in estuarine wetlands.

  5. Projected wetland densities under climate change: habitat loss but little geographic shift in conservation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, Helen R; Skagen, Susan K; Barsugli, Joseph J; Rashford, Benjamin S; Reese, Gordon C; Hoeting, Jennifer A; Wood, Andrew W; Noon, Barry R

    2016-09-01

    Climate change poses major challenges for conservation and management because it alters the area, quality, and spatial distribution of habitat for natural populations. To assess species' vulnerability to climate change and target ongoing conservation investments, researchers and managers often consider the effects of projected changes in climate and land use on future habitat availability and quality and the uncertainty associated with these projections. Here, we draw on tools from hydrology and climate science to project the impact of climate change on the density of wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA, a critical area for breeding waterfowl and other wetland-dependent species. We evaluate the potential for a trade-off in the value of conservation investments under current and future climatic conditions and consider the joint effects of climate and land use. We use an integrated set of hydrological and climatological projections that provide physically based measures of water balance under historical and projected future climatic conditions. In addition, we use historical projections derived from ten general circulation models (GCMs) as a baseline from which to assess climate change impacts, rather than historical climate data. This method isolates the impact of greenhouse gas emissions and ensures that modeling errors are incorporated into the baseline rather than attributed to climate change. Our work shows that, on average, densities of wetlands (here defined as wetland basins holding water) are projected to decline across the U.S. Prairie Pothole Region, but that GCMs differ in both the magnitude and the direction of projected impacts. However, we found little evidence for a shift in the locations expected to provide the highest wetland densities under current vs. projected climatic conditions. This result was robust to the inclusion of projected changes in land use under climate change. We suggest that targeting conservation towards wetland

  6. Projected wetland densities under climate change: Habitat loss but little geographic shift in conservation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, Helen; Skagen, Susan; Barsugli, Joseph J.; Rashford, Benjamin S.; Reese, Gordon C.; Hoeting, Jennifer A.; Wood, Andrew W.; Noon, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change poses major challenges for conservation and management because it alters the area, quality, and spatial distribution of habitat for natural populations. To assess species’ vulnerability to climate change and target ongoing conservation investments, researchers and managers often consider the effects of projected changes in climate and land use on future habitat availability and quality and the uncertainty associated with these projections. Here, we draw on tools from hydrology and climate science to project the impact of climate change on the density of wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of the USA, a critical area for breeding waterfowl and other wetland-dependent species. We evaluate the potential for a trade-off in the value of conservation investments under current and future climatic conditions and consider the joint effects of climate and land use. We use an integrated set of hydrological and climatological projections that provide physically based measures of water balance under historical and projected future climatic conditions. In addition, we use historical projections derived from ten general circulation models (GCMs) as a baseline from which to assess climate change impacts, rather than historical climate data. This method isolates the impact of greenhouse gas emissions and ensures that modeling errors are incorporated into the baseline rather than attributed to climate change. Our work shows that, on average, densities of wetlands (here defined as wetland basins holding water) are projected to decline across the U.S. Prairie Pothole Region, but that GCMs differ in both the magnitude and the direction of projected impacts. However, we found little evidence for a shift in the locations expected to provide the highest wetland densities under current vs. projected climatic conditions. This result was robust to the inclusion of projected changes in land use under climate change. We suggest that targeting conservation towards wetland

  7. Effect of environmental change on the morphology of tidally influenced deltas over multi-decadal timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angamuthu, Balaji; Darby, Stephen; Nicholls, Robert

    2017-04-01

    An understanding of the geomorphological processes affecting deltas is essential to improve our understanding of the risks that deltas face, especially as human impacts are likely to intensify in the future. Unfortunately, there is limited reliable data on river deltas, meaning that the task of demonstrating the links between morphodynamic and environmental change is challenging. This presentation aims to answer the questions of how delta morphology evolves over multi-decadal timescales under multiple drivers, focussing on tidally-influenced deltas, as some of these, such as the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) delta are heavily populated. A series of idealised model simulations over 102 years were used to explore the influence of three key drivers on delta morphodynamics, both individually and together: (i) varying combinations of water and sediment discharges from the upstream catchment, (ii) varying rates of relative sea-level rise (RSLR), and (iii) selected human interventions within the delta, such as polders, cross-dams and changing land cover. Model simulations revealed that delta progradation rates are more sensitive to variations in water discharge than variations in fluvial sediment supply. Unlike mere aggradation during RSLR, the delta front experienced aggradational progradation due to tides. As expected, the area of the simulated sub-aerial delta increases with increasing sediment discharge, but decreases with increasing water discharge. But, human modifications are important. For example, the sub-aerial delta shrinks with increasing RSLR, but it does not when the sub-aerial delta is polderised, provided the polders are restricted from erosion. However, the polders are vulnerable to flooding as they lose relative elevation and can make the delta building process unsustainable. Cross-dams built to steer zones of land accretion within the delta accomplish their local goal, but may not result in net land gain at the scale of the delta. Applying these

  8. Modelling Multidecadal Fluvial Sediment Fluxes to Deltas Under Future Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, F. E.; Darby, S. E.; Nicholls, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    As low lying coastal regions deltas are prone to land loss, degradation, and flooding due to relative sea level rise. These processes endanger delta populations and infrastructure, a situation which is increasingly exacerbated by anthropogenic activities. The flux of fluvial sediment to deltas is a first order control on delta aggradation and thus the potential for the surface elevation of a delta to be maintained or rise relative to sea level. Aggradation may occur without anthropogenic interference, but it can also be induced by controlled flooding. This research investigates how future environmental changes through to 2100 will influence fluvial sediment delivery to a selection of 10 vulnerable deltas, thereby contributing to the understanding of relative sea level change projections for these fragile coastal systems. The key environmental changes investigated in this study include anthropogenic climate change, reservoir construction, and land cover changes induced by changes in agricultural practices and vegetation cover. The effects of these environmental changes on fluvial sediment delivery are being evaluated using the catchment numerical model WBMsed, which is being calibrated for the selection of deltas using historical reference data. As a test case, the inputs for modelling current and future sediment fluxes to the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta are refined using economic and population projections as proxies for anthropogenic influences on delta catchments. This research will contribute to the prognosis for vulnerable deltas and inform their short- and long-term management by indicating the consequences of anthropogenic activities which affect delta elevation and sustainability via altering fluvial sediment processes. While this could give forewarning for the residents and managers of unsustainable deltas, it could also be used as an argument for or against various anthropogenic activities.

  9. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms in wetlands – fameless actors in carbon cycling and climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael ePester

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater wetlands are a major source of the greenhouse gas methane but at the same time can function as carbon sink. Their response to global warming and environmental pollution is one of the largest unknowns in the upcoming decades to centuries. In this review, we highlight the role of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM in the intertwined element cycles of wetlands. Although regarded primarily as methanogenic environments, biogeochemical studies have revealed a previously hidden sulfur cycle in wetlands that can sustain rapid renewal of the small standing pools of sulfate. Thus, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, which frequently occurs at rates comparable to marine surface sediments, can contribute up to 36–50% to anaerobic carbon mineralization in these ecosystems. Since sulfate reduction is thermodynamically favored relative to fermentative processes and methanogenesis, it effectively decreases gross methane production thereby mitigating the flux of methane to the atmosphere. However, very little is known about wetland SRM. Molecular analyses using dsrAB [encoding subunit A and B of the dissimilatory (bisulfite reductase] as marker genes demonstrated that members of novel phylogenetic lineages, which are unrelated to recognized SRM, dominate dsrAB richness and, if tested, are also abundant among the dsrAB-containing wetland microbiota. These discoveries point towards the existence of so far unknown SRM that are an important part of the autochthonous wetland microbiota. In addition to these numerically dominant microorganisms, a recent stable isotope probing study of SRM in a German peatland indicated that rare biosphere members might be highly active in situ and have a considerable stake in wetland sulfate reduction. The hidden sulfur cycle in wetlands and the fact that wetland SRM are not well represented by described SRM species explains their so far neglected role as important actors in carbon cycling and climate change.

  10. Implications for future survival of delta smelt from four climate change scenarios for the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Larry R.; Bennett, William A.; Wagner, R. Wayne; Morgan-King, Tara; Knowles, Noah; Feyrer, Frederick; Schoellhamer, David H.; Stacey, Mark T.; Dettinger, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the position of the low salinity zone, a habitat suitability index, turbidity, and water temperature modeled from four 100-year scenarios of climate change were evaluated for possible effects on delta smelt Hypomesus transpacificus, which is endemic to the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. The persistence of delta smelt in much of its current habitat into the next century appears uncertain. By mid-century, the position of the low salinity zone in the fall and the habitat suitability index converged on values only observed during the worst droughts of the baseline period (1969–2000). Projected higher water temperatures would render waters historically inhabited by delta smelt near the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers largely uninhabitable. However, the scenarios of climate change are based on assumptions that require caution in the interpretation of the results. Projections like these provide managers with a useful tool for anticipating long-term challenges to managing fish populations and possibly adapting water management to ameliorate those challenges.

  11. Hydrology and Ecology of the Colorado River Delta in the Face of Changing Climate and Land Use Practices: the Next Fifty Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.

    2007-12-01

    The Lower Colorado River Delta in the U.S. and Mexico is an internationally important aquatic biome, supporting fresh water and estuarine wetlands and a riparian corridor rich in avian and other wildlife. These rich ecosystems could be severely harmed by invasive species interacting with projected climate change and land use practices over the next 50 years. It is critical to measure land cover and monitor ecosystem and land use changes because these ecosystems are supported by fresh and brackish water flows originating from flood control releases and agricultural return flows in the U.S. and Mexico. Most climate models project a drying trend in the Colorado River watershed due to global warming, decreasing the frequency of flood releases to the Delta. Total basin water storage in the reservoir system is expected to be reduced by 32-40 percent, and flow volume is expected to meet demands in only 59-75 percent of years in 50 years. The frequency of spills (years in which water is released from the reservoirs to the Delta) will decrease under a global warming scenario. However, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and ENSO events will continue to introduce variability into river flows, and there will still be years in which water is spilled to the Delta. Agricultural return flows will decrease as more water is diverted from agriculture to metropolitan use in both countries. The salinity of the ground water in Mexico, which currently supports cottonwood and willow trees in the riparian corridor, is increasing at a rate of about 20 ppm per year, and in 50 years it might be too saline for cottonwoods and willows. The riparian zone may become dominated by saltcedar and other salt-tolerant shrubs, degrading the habitat for birds and other wildlife. As flows to the Delta diminish, monitoring and active restoration projects to maintain trees and wetlands will be needed to preserve habitat value.

  12. Song Hong (Red River) delta evolution related to millennium-scale Holocene sea-level changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Susumu; Hori, Kazuaki; Saito, Yoshiki; Haruyama, Shigeko; Vu, Van Phai; Kitamura, Akihisa

    2003-11-01

    The Song Hong (Red River) delta occurs on the northwest coast of the South China Sea. Its evolution in response to Holocene sea-level changes was clarified on the basis of sedimentary facies and 14 radiocarbon dates from the 40 m long Duy Tien core from the delta plain, and using previously reported geological, geomorphological, and archaeological data. The delta prograded into the drowned valley as a result of early Holocene inundation from 9 to 6 cal. kyr BP, as sea-level rise decelerated. The sea-level highstand at +2-3 m from 6 to 4 cal. kyr BP allowed widespread mangrove development on the delta plain and the formation of marine notches in the Ha Long Bay and Ninh Binh areas. During sea-level lowering after 4 cal. kyr BP, the former delta plain emerged as a marine terrace, and the delta changed into the present tide- and wave-influenced delta with accompanying beach ridges. Delta morphology, depositional pattern, and sedimentary facies are closely related to Holocene sea-level changes. In particular, falling sea level at 4 cal. kyr BP had a major impact on the evolution of the Song Hong delta, and is considered to be linked to climate changes.

  13. Monitored landscape change of Lake Baiyangdian wetland with dynamic reed area based on remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; He, Lei; Zhang, Shengwei; Lei, Yuping

    2009-09-01

    Lake Baiyangdian, a largest wetland ecosystem in North China Plain, has dried up on seven occasions since the 1960s. In recent years, more than one billion of cubic meters of water from upstream reservoirs and Yellow river have been transported to the lake to rescue the shrinking wetlands. Since the Lake Baiyangdian was actually composed of 143 small lakes and more than 70 villages with large or small area of cropland, dynamic distribution of aquatic plants in wetland such as reed and associated growth condition of these allowed to monitor the changes of wetland landscape and water quality to support the policy applications of water conveyance and wetland environmental treatment and control. Assisted with ground survey analyses and Landsat TM image, the MODIS 250 m time series Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), given its combination of medium spatial and high temporal resolution, were applied to detect the unique rapid growth stage of reed in the spring from adjacent crops such as winter wheat, cotton, and spring maize, of which has a similar phenology in development of leaf area index, and dynamic reed areas were mapped in recent decade. Landscape changes of the wetland were analyzed using maps of reed area and hydrological data.

  14. NATURAL FACTORS FOR DETERIORATION OF COASTAL WETLAND IN THE YELLOW RIVER DELTA%黄河三角洲滨海湿地损失和退化的自然因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚长新; 袁红明; 孟祥君; 李绍全

    2011-01-01

    黄河三角洲滨海湿地的损失和功能退化是对环境变化的响应,主要受自然因素控制.黄河入海水沙是形成滨海湿地的物质基础.自20世纪70年代以来黄河水沙减少,新生湿地的形成速率变小;波浪、潮汐、风暴潮、地面下沉和海平面上升等因素导致了滨海湿地的损失,湿地的面积呈减小趋势.由于淡水资源的短缺导致滨海湿地土壤严重的盐碱化和干旱灾害,限制了湿地植被的发育,湿地功能退化.黄河冲淡水的减弱甚至消失,导致滨海湿地海水的盐度升高,温度降低,物理环境平衡遭到破坏,生物多样性明显降低.%The area reduction and function deterioration of the coastal wetland in the Yellow River Delta,as a response to climate change, is basically controlled by natural factors. Water and sediment from the Yellow River are the fundamental materials for the survival of the coastal wetland. The rate of increment of coastal wetland has slowed down as the water and sediment discharges of the Yellow River decreased since last seventies. The joint action of the factors, such as wave, tide, storm surges, land subsidence and sea level rise has led to area loss and the negative growth of the wetland in the last decade. Owing to water shortage, soil salinization and the drought frequently happened in the coastal wetland, the diluted water from the Yellow River is nearly disappeared. It results in the increase in salinity and decrease in surface water temperature in the offshore water, the damage of environment and the reduction in biodiversity.

  15. Understanding Land Use and Land Cover Dynamics from 1976 to 2014 in Yellow River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baolei Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term intensive land use/cover changes (LUCCs of the Yellow River Delta (YRD have been happening since the 1960s. The land use patterns of the LUCCs are crucial for bio-diversity conservation and/or sustainable development. This study quantified patterns of the LUCCs, explored the systematic transitions, and identified wetland change trajectory for the period 1976–2014 in the YRD. Landsat imageries of 1976, 1984, 1995, 2006, and 2014 were used to derive nine land use classes. Post classification change detection analysis based on enhanced transition matrix was applied to identify land use dynamics and trajectory of wetland change. The five cartographic outputs for changes in land use underlined major decreases in natural wetland areas and increases in artificial wetland and non-wetland, especially aquafarms, salt pans and construction lands. The systematic transitions in the YRD were wetland degradation, wetland artificialization, and urbanization. Wetland change trajectory results demonstrated that the main wetland changes were wetland degradation and wetland artificialization. Coastline change is the subordinate reason for natural wetland degradation in comparison with human activities. The results of this study allowed for an improvement in the understanding of the LUCC processes and enabled researchers and planners to focus on the most important signals of systematic landscape transitions while also allowing for a better understanding of the proximate causes of changes.

  16. Waterbird Population Changes in the Wetlands at Chongming Dongtan in the Yangtze River Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhijun; Wang, Yong; Gan, Xiaojing; Li, Bo; Cai, Yinting; Chen, Jiakuan

    2009-06-01

    We studied the changes in wetland habitats and waterbird communities between the 1980s and the 2000s at Chongming Dongtan, a Ramsar site in the Yangtze River estuary, an ecologically important region. This region is an important stopover site for shorebirds along the East Asian-Australasian flyway and is extensively used by waterfowl. A net loss of 11% of the wetland area was estimated during study periods at Chongming Dongtan. The change was dependent on wetland types: while the area of artificial habitats such as paddy fields and aquacultural ponds more than doubled, more than 65% of natural habitats including sea bulrush ( Scirpus mariqueter) and common reed ( Phragmites australis) marshes were lost over the two decades. An exotic plant species introduced from North America, smooth cordgrass ( Spartina alterniflora), occupied 30% of the vegetated intertidal zone by the 2000s. Although waterbird species richness did not change between the 1980s (110) and the 2000s (111), 13 species found in 1980s were replaced by 14 newly recorded species. Moreover, there were more species with declining trends (58) than with increasing trends (19). The population trends of species were affected by residential status and habitat types. Transients, wintering migrants, and habitat specialists were more likely to show declining trends compared to those breeding at Dongtan (including year-round and summer residents) and habitat generalists. Furthermore, species associated mainly with natural wetlands were more likely to decline than those associated mainly with artificial wetlands. These patterns suggest that the loss and change of wetland habitats at Chongming Dongtan adversely affected local population dynamics and might have contributed to the global decline of some waterbird species. Because Chongming Dongtan provides stopover and wintering habitats for many migratory waterbirds, protection and restoration of natural wetlands at Chongming Dongtan are urgently needed.

  17. Sediment accumulation in prairie wetlands under a changing climate: The relative roles of landscape and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skagen, Susan; Burris, Lucy E.; Granfors, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Sediment accumulation threatens the viability and hydrologic functioning of many naturally formed depressional wetlands across the interior regions of North America. These wetlands provide many ecosystem services and vital habitats for diverse plant and animal communities. Climate change may further impact sediment accumulation rates in the context of current land use patterns. We estimated sediment accretion in wetlands within a region renowned for its large populations of breeding waterfowl and migrant shorebirds and examined the relative roles of precipitation and land use context in the sedimentation process. We modeled rates of sediment accumulation from 1971 through 2100 using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) with a sediment delivery ratio and the Unit Stream Power Erosion Deposition model (USPED). These models predicted that by 2100, 21–33 % of wetlands filled completely with sediment and 27–46 % filled by half with sediments; estimates are consistent with measured sediment accumulation rates in the region reported by empirical studies. Sediment accumulation rates were strongly influenced by size of the catchment, greater coverage of tilled landscape within the catchment, and steeper slopes. Conservation efforts that incorporate the relative risk of infilling of wetlands with sediments, thus emphasizing areas of high topographic relief and large watersheds, may benefit wetland-dependent biota.

  18. Index-based framework for assessing climate change impact on wetlands in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Joanna; Marcinkowski, Paweł; Utratna, Marta; Szcześniak, Mateusz; Piniewski, Mikołaj; Okruszko, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is expected to impact the water cycle through changing the precipitation levels, river streamflows, soil moisture dynamics and therefore pose a threat to groundwater and surface-water fed wetlands and their biodiversity. We examined the past trends and future impacts of climate change on streamflow and soil water content. Simulation results from 1971 to 2000 (historical period) and from 2021 to 2100 (future period) were obtained with the use of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Hydrological modelling was driven by a set of nine EUROCORDEX Regional Climate Models under two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP's) of greenhouse gas concentration trajectories: 4.5 and 8.5. A special focus was made on water dependent habitats within the Special Areas of Conservation (SAC's) of the Natura 2000 network located within Odra and Vistula River basins in Poland. A habitat assessment was carried out to distinguish groundwater and surface water fed wetlands. By establishing threshold values of streamflow at bankfull flow we were able to identify flood events. Changes in frequency of the floods informed about the alteration to the water supply for wetlands reliant on inundation. The groundwater-fed wetlands were assessed on the basis of the soil water content. The model outputs were used to develop indices which were calculated for the climate change scenarios. Comparisons of simulated trends in soil water content and streamflow dynamics with average annual precipitation showed largely consistent patterns. The developed indicators are sensitive to projected changes in hydrologic regime in the conditions of changing climate. The results show influence of climate change on floodplain and groundwater-fed wetlands and show the number and kind of wetlands threatened in different regions of Poland. SAC's will play an important role of buffers and water regulators as soil water content in SAC's is projected to be higher than average for the future scenarios.

  19. Aircraft MSS data registration and vegetation classification of wetland change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, E.J.; Jensen, J.R.; Ramsey, Elijah W.; Mackey, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    Portions of the Savannah River floodplain swamp were evaluated for vegetation change using high resolution (5a??6 m) aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Image distortion from aircraft movement prevented precise image-to-image registration in some areas. However, when small scenes were used (200-250 ha), a first-order linear transformation provided registration accuracies of less than or equal to one pixel. A larger area was registered using a piecewise linear method. Five major wetland classes were identified and evaluated for change. Phenological differences and the variable distribution of vegetation limited wetland type discrimination. Using unsupervised methods and ground-collected vegetation data, overall classification accuracies ranged from 84 per cent to 87 per cent for each scene. Results suggest that high-resolution aircraft MSS data can be precisely registered, if small areas are used, and that wetland vegetation change can be accurately detected and monitored.

  20. Identifying and Assessing Robust Water Allocation Plans for Deltas Under Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Dan; Werners, Saskia E.; Huang, He Qing; Ludwig, Fulco

    2016-01-01

    Water scarcity threatens economic growth, social cohesion, and environmental sustainability in many deltas. This situation is likely to worsen due to future climate change. To reduce water scarcity and limit salt water intrusion in deltas, many countries have launched policies to allocate water r

  1. Possible impacts of climate change on wetlands and its biota in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DF Barros

    Full Text Available Wetlands cover approximately 6% of the Earth's surface. They are frequently found at the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and are strongly dependent on the water cycle. For this reason, wetlands are extremely vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Mangroves and floodplain ecosystems are some of the most important environments for the Amazonian population, as a source of proteins and income, and are thus the types of wetlands chosen for this review. Some of the main consequences that can be predicted from climate change for wetlands are modifications in hydrological regimes, which can cause intense droughts or inundations. A possible reduction in rainfall can cause a decrease of the areas of mangroves and floodplains, with a consequent decline in their species numbers. Conversely, an increase in rainfall would probably cause the substitution of plant species, which would not be able to survive under new conditions for a long period. An elevation in water temperature on the floodplains would cause an increase in frequency and duration of hypoxic or anoxic episodes, which might further lead to a reduction in growth rates or the reproductive success of many species. In mangroves, an increase in water temperature would influence the sea level, causing losses of these environments through coastal erosion processes. Therefore, climate change will likely cause the loss of, or reduction in, Amazonian wetlands and will challenge the adaptability of species, composition and distribution, which will probably have consequences for the human population that depend on them.

  2. Possible impacts of climate change on wetlands and its biota in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, D F; Albernaz, A L M

    2014-11-01

    Wetlands cover approximately 6% of the Earth's surface. They are frequently found at the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and are strongly dependent on the water cycle. For this reason, wetlands are extremely vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Mangroves and floodplain ecosystems are some of the most important environments for the Amazonian population, as a source of proteins and income, and are thus the types of wetlands chosen for this review. Some of the main consequences that can be predicted from climate change for wetlands are modifications in hydrological regimes, which can cause intense droughts or inundations. A possible reduction in rainfall can cause a decrease of the areas of mangroves and floodplains, with a consequent decline in their species numbers. Conversely, an increase in rainfall would probably cause the substitution of plant species, which would not be able to survive under new conditions for a long period. An elevation in water temperature on the floodplains would cause an increase in frequency and duration of hypoxic or anoxic episodes, which might further lead to a reduction in growth rates or the reproductive success of many species. In mangroves, an increase in water temperature would influence the sea level, causing losses of these environments through coastal erosion processes. Therefore, climate change will likely cause the loss of, or reduction in, Amazonian wetlands and will challenge the adaptability of species, composition and distribution, which will probably have consequences for the human population that depend on them.

  3. Deciphering the record of short-term base-level changes in Gilbert-type deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobo, Katarina; Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Nemec, Wojciech

    2016-04-01

    The geometrical relationship of fluvial topset to subaqueous foreset in a Gilbert-type delta may be 'sigmoidal' (transitional) or 'oblique' (erosional), which is generally attributed - respectively - to a rise or fall of the delta shoreline's time-distance trajectory and considered to reflect base-level changes. However, since every episode of a base-level fall forces the fluvial distributary system to cut down, the delta-brink sigmoidal signature of a preceding base-level rise tends to be removed. The geometrical record of short-term base-level changes in a Gilbert-type delta thus tends to be obliterated by fluvial erosion. The issue addressed in this presentation is whether the fully-preserved foreset to bottomset deposits may serve as a key for deciphering the base-level history of an ancient Gilbert-type delta. Outcrop studies of Plio-Pleistocene Gilbert-type deltas at the southern margin of the Corinth Rift, Greece, reveal a genetic relationship between the delta-brink morphodynamics controlled by base level behaviour and the processes of subaqueous sediment dispersal on the delta slope and in its foot zone. The component facies are deposits of turbidity currents (whether slope-derived brief surges or longer-duration hyperpycnal flows), cohesionless debrisflows and loose-gravel debrisfalls. The development of sigmoidal delta-brink architecture appears to be accompanied by deposition of a debrite-dominated facies assemblage (DFA) of delta foreset beds, thought to form when the aggrading delta front tends to store sediment and undergoes discrete gravitational collapses. Development of oblique delta-brink architecture is accompanied by deposition of a turbidite-dominated facies assemblage (TFA) of foreset beds, which is thought to form when the delta-front accommodation decreases and the sediment carried by hyperpycnal effluent largely bypasses the front. The alternation of TFA and DFA facies assemblages in delta foreset is thus attributed to changes in delta

  4. Wetlands Retention and Optimal Management of Waterfowl Habitat under Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withey, P.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a positive mathematical programming model to investigate the impact of climate change on land use in the prairie pothole region of western Canada, with particular focus on wetlands retention. We examine the effect of climate change and biofuel policies that are implemented to mitigate

  5. Wetlands Retention and Optimal Management of Waterfowl Habitat under Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withey, P.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a positive mathematical programming model to investigate the impact of climate change on land use in the prairie pothole region of western Canada, with particular focus on wetlands retention. We examine the effect of climate change and biofuel policies that are implemented to mitigate cli

  6. Emerging role of wetland methane emissions in driving 21st century climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Stenke, Andrea; Li, Xin; Hodson, Elke L; Zhu, Gaofeng; Huang, Chunlin; Poulter, Benjamin

    2017-09-05

    Wetland methane (CH4) emissions are the largest natural source in the global CH4 budget, contributing to roughly one third of total natural and anthropogenic emissions. As the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after CO2, CH4 is strongly associated with climate feedbacks. However, due to the paucity of data, wetland CH4 feedbacks were not fully assessed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. The degree to which future expansion of wetlands and CH4 emissions will evolve and consequently drive climate feedbacks is thus a question of major concern. Here we present an ensemble estimate of wetland CH4 emissions driven by 38 general circulation models for the 21st century. We find that climate change-induced increases in boreal wetland extent and temperature-driven increases in tropical CH4 emissions will dominate anthropogenic CH4 emissions by 38 to 56% toward the end of the 21st century under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP2.6). Depending on scenarios, wetland CH4 feedbacks translate to an increase in additional global mean radiative forcing of 0.04 W·m(-2) to 0.19 W·m(-2) by the end of the 21st century. Under the "worst-case" RCP8.5 scenario, with no climate mitigation, boreal CH4 emissions are enhanced by 18.05 Tg to 41.69 Tg, due to thawing of inundated areas during the cold season (December to May) and rising temperature, while tropical CH4 emissions accelerate with a total increment of 48.36 Tg to 87.37 Tg by 2099. Our results suggest that climate mitigation policies must consider mitigation of wetland CH4 feedbacks to maintain average global warming below 2 °C.

  7. A remote sensing approach for connecting the historic 2011 Mississippi River flood to wetland sedimentation on the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, Federico; Colella, Simone; Volpe, Gianluca; Khan, Nicole; Macelloni, Leonardo; Santoleri, Rosalia; Horton, Benjamin; Jerolmack, Douglas

    2013-04-01

    Wetlands in the Mississippi River deltaic plain are deteriorating in part because levees and control structures starve them of sediment. In Spring of 2011 a record breaking flood brought discharge on the lower Mississippi River to dangerous levels, forcing managers to divert additional water to the adjacent Atchafalaya River Basin. Here we quantify differences between the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River inundation and sediment-plume patterns using field-calibrated satellite data, and assess the impact these outflows had on wetland sedimentation. Since standard products available from MyOcean were not suitable for this purpose an ad hoc processing was developed to establish a relationship between field suspended sediment concentration (SSC) data and the corrected MODIS reflectance at 645 nm. We show that the focused, high-momentum jet from the leveed Mississippi delivered sediment far offshore. In contrast, the plume from the Atchafalaya was more diffuse; diverted water inundated a large area, and sediment was trapped within the coastal current. Maximum sedimentation (up to several centimetres) occurred in the Atchafalaya Basin despite the larger sediment load carried by the Mississippi. Little accumulation occurred along the shoreline between these river sources. The correspondence between zones of high shoreline deposition, and coastal SSC patterns indentified from satellite data, is strongly suggestive of plume-derived deposition on marshes. Our findings allow us to set an hydrodynamic theory that provides a mechanistic link between river-mouth dynamics and wetland sedimentation patterns, which is relevant for plans to restore deltaic wetlands.

  8. Mapping Inundation and Changes in Wetland Extent with L-band SAR: A Combined Data and Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galantowicz, J. F.; Samanta, A.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate mapping of seasonal and inter-annual changes in inundation and wetland extent is a key requisite for the estimation of greenhouse gas (GHG, e.g., methane) emissions from land surfaces to the atmosphere. This task would benefit from the 1- to 3-km spatial resolution L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and 3-day revisit time of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, planned for launch in 2014. With a view to utilizing this unique capability, we propose a method for mapping the fraction of area inundated using a combination of semi-empirical models of radar backscatter and L-band SAR data. Inundation exhibits a characteristic radar backscatter that is affected by a set of factors, including roughness of soil and water surfaces, and presence of vegetation cover. Further, the impact of vegetation cover on radar backscatter from underlying soil and/or water surface will depend on biome type. The effects of these factors on both the like-polarized (HH, VV) and cross-polarized (HV) radar backscatter was investigated using semi-empirical models. A key step in devising an inundation fraction retrieval algorithm is to benchmark and calibrate the backscatter simulated with semi-empirical models against SAR data. This task was undertaken using data from the Phased Array L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) instrument onboard Japan's Earth Resources Satellite's (JERS, e.g., Fig. 1). This calibration was performed in the following way. First, using a Monte-Carlo type of approach, a large set of random backscatter samples was extracted from different landcover classes, including dry forests and clear-cut areas, inundated forests (wetlands), and open water. Second, mean backscatter was calculated at varying spatial resolutions: 100 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, 3 km and 10 km. Third, the mean model backscatter was set to the mean PALSAR backscatter for each landcover class, but the model dispersion was retained. Finally, using these calibrated values

  9. Observation of Wetland Dynamics with Global Navigation Satellite Signals Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffada, C.; Shah, R.; Nghiem, S. V.; Cardellach, E.; Chew, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland dynamics is crucial to changes in both atmospheric methane and terrestrial water storage. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5) highlights the role of wetlands as a key driver of methane (CH4) emission, which is more than one order of magnitude stronger than carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the centennial time scale. Among the multitude of methane emission sources (hydrates, livestock, rice cultivation, freshwaters, landfills and waste, fossil fuels, biomass burning, termites, geological sources, and soil oxidation), wetlands constitute the largest contributor with the widest uncertainty range of 177-284 Tg(CH4) yr-1 according to the IPCC estimate. Wetlands are highly susceptible to climate change that might lead to wetland collapse. Such wetland destruction would decrease the terrestrial water storage capacity and thus contribute to sea level rise, consequently exacerbating coastal flooding problems. For both methane change and water storage change, wetland dynamics is a crucial factor with the largest uncertainty. Nevertheless, a complete and consistent map of global wetlands still needs to be obtained as the Ramsar Convention calls for a wetlands inventory and impact assessment. We develop a new method for observations of wetland change using Global Navigation Satellite Signals Reflectometry (GNSS-R) signatures for global wetland mapping in synergy with the existing capability, not only as a static inventory but also as a temporal dataset, to advance the capability for monitoring the dynamics of wetland extent relevant to addressing the science issues of CH4 emission change and terrestrial water storage change. We will demonstrate the capability of the new GNSS-R method over a rice field in the Ebro Delta wetland in Spain.

  10. Impacts of Climate Change and Anthropogenic Activities on the Ecological Restoration of Wetlands in the Arid Regions of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As an important part of the global ecosystem, wetlands and their dynamics greatly influence regional eco-environment systems. To understand the distributions, change processes and temporal-spatial characteristics of the wetlands of the inland river basin in an arid region (Heihe River Basin, HRB, this paper employed multi-source remote sensing data to facilitate multi-temporal monitoring of the HRB wetland using a wetland information extraction method. First, we performed monitoring of these wetlands for the years 2000, 2007, 2011 and 2014; then, we analyzed the variation characteristics of the spatial-temporal dynamics of the wetlands in the HRB over the last 15 years via the landscape dynamic change model and the transformation matrix. In addition, we studied the possible driving mechanisms of these changes. The research results showed that the total area of the HRB wetlands had decreased by 2959.13 hectares in the last 15 years (Since 2000, and the annual average loss was −1.09%. The dynamics characterizing the HRB wetlands generally presented a trend of slow increase after an initial decrease, which can be classified into three stages. From 2000 to 2007, the total wetland area rapidly decreased; from 2007 to 2011, the area slowly decreased; and from 2011 to 2014, the area gradually increased. The dynamic changing processes characterizing the wetland resources were ascribed to a combination of natural processes and human activities. The main driving mechanisms of wetland dynamic changes include climatic conditions, upper reach water inflows, population, water resources, cultivated area, and policy. The findings of this study can served as reference and support for the conservation and management of wetland resources in the HRB.

  11. Correlation of eco-hydrographic benefit and height increment of Robinia pseudoacacia stand with climatic environmental factors in Yellow River Delta Wetland of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Peng; YANG Hui-ling; ZHANG Guang-can; ZHOU Ze-fu

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between eco-hydrographic benefit of forest vegetation and climatic environmental factors is one of the focuses in the research on environmental protection and ecosystem countermeasures in Wetland. The runoff, sediment and soil moisture rate dynamics in Robinia pseudoacacia plantation and its clearcut area were investigated in the natural runoff experiment plots in Yellow River Delta Wetland, Shandong Province, China. The correlation of height increment of R. pseudoacacia with nine climate factors such as light, water, heat, etc. was analyzed by stepwise regression analysis. The results showed that the amounts of runoff and sediment in clearcut area of R. pseudoacacia were 53.9%-150.8% and 172.8%-387.1% higher than that in Robinia pseudoacacia plantation, respectively. The runoff peak value in R. pseudoacacia stand was obviously lower than that in clerarcut area, meantime, the occurrence of runoff peak in R. pseudoacacia stand was 25 min later than in its clerarcut area. The soil moisture rates in R. pseudoacacia stand and its clearcut varied periodically with annual rainfall precipitation in both dry season and humid season. The annual mean soil moisture rate in R. pseudoacacia stand was 23.3%-25.6% higher than that in its clearcut area. Meanwhile, a regression model reflecting the correlation between the height increment of R. pseudoacacia and climatic factors was developed by stepwise regression procedure method. It showed that the light was the most important factor for the height increment of R. pseudoacacia, followed by water and heat factors.

  12. Development of the reed bed in Matsalu wetland, Estonia: responses to neotectonic land uplift, sea level changes and human influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Meriste

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied reed bed development in Matsalu wetland and the Kasari River delta, Estonia, since the late 18th century using historical schemes, topographical maps and aerial photographs. Our aim was to understand the mechanisms controlling reed distribution in Matsalu wetland, the largest coastal wetland of the eastern Baltic Sea occupying an area of about 25 km2. Natural development of the reed bed in Matsalu Bay and the Kasari delta is mainly controlled by shoreline displacement due to post-glacial neotectonic land uplift. The dredging of the Kasari delta in the 1920s–1930s caused a rapid seaward migration of reed bed communities due to the dispersal of fragmented rhizomes on the shallow sea bottom and along the canal banks reaching Matsalu Bay, while the landward parts of the former wetland were occupied by meadow communities. The expansion of the reed bed started in between the 1951s and 1970s and a maximum extent of 27 km2 was gained by the late 1970s at the peak of eutrophication. In the last decades the reed bed development has been influenced by sea level rise and increased intensity of cyclonic activity in the Baltic Sea, which has caused the deterioration of the reed bed that was weakened by eutrophication due to nutrient inflow from agricultural landscapes mainly in the 1960s–1980s.

  13. Morphological changes at Godavari delta region due to waves, currents and the associated physical processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sastry, J.S.; Vethamony, P.; Swamy, G.N.

    the speed of 200 cm/sec. The morphological changes due to the effect of river discharge during various seasons and the development of Godavari sand spit off Kakinada and its influence to delta modification are detailed....

  14. Integrating ecosystem services and climate change responses in coastal wetlands development plans for Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarwar, M.H.; Hein, L.G.; Rip, F.I.; Dearing, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the integration of ecosystem services and climate change adaptation in development plans for coastal wetlands in Bangladesh. A new response framework for adaptation is proposed, based on an empirical analysis and consultations with stakeholders, using a modified version of the

  15. Integrating ecosystem services and climate change responses in coastal wetlands development plans for Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarwar, M.H.; Hein, L.G.; Rip, F.I.; Dearing, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the integration of ecosystem services and climate change adaptation in development plans for coastal wetlands in Bangladesh. A new response framework for adaptation is proposed, based on an empirical analysis and consultations with stakeholders, using a modified version of the DP

  16. Wetland inundation mapping and change monitoring using landsat and airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a new approach for mapping wetland inundation change using Landsat and LiDAR intensity data. In this approach, LiDAR data were used to derive highly accurate reference subpixel inundation percentage (SIP) maps at the 30-m resolution. The reference SIP maps were then used to est...

  17. Climate change impacts on freshwater wetland hydrology and vegetation cover cycling along a regional aridity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global mean temperature may increase up to 6°C by the end of this century and together with precipitation change may steepen regional aridity gradients, impacting the hydrology, productivity, diversity, and ecosystem goods and services from freshwater wetlands, where the water balance is tightly cou...

  18. Impact Analysis of Coastal Engineering Projects on Mangrove Wetland Area Change with Remote Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the past decades, two large scale coastal engineering projects have been carried out in the Deep Bay surrounded by Shenzhen City and Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. One project is Shenzhen River channel regulation and the other is the sea reclamation along the seashore on the Shenzhen side. The two projects are very close to the two national nature reserves, specifically Futian in Shenzhen and Mai Po in Hong Kong, which are important wetland ecosystems worldwide. This paper aims to identify and monitor the mangrove wetland changes with time series of Landsat Thematic Mapper images pre and post to the two engineering projects being launched. Coupled analysis of the image interpretation results and tidal data acquired at the same time in the context of the two works reveals that the mangrove wetland area has increased from year 1989 to 1994, and has changed little from year 1994 to 2002. Binary coding is applied to reveal the distribution image of mangrove at each phase, and the coding image shows that the construction of the two coastal engineering projects has caused frequent changes in mangrove spatial distribution. The study also shows that the change is not significant regarding to the precision of the method and the natural evolution of mangrove wetland, and the projects do not cause apparently influences upon the two national mangrove conservation zones at least for the research time period.

  19. Created mangrove wetlands store belowground carbon and surface elevation change enables them to adjust to sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Cormier, Nicole; Osland, Michael J.; Kirwan, Matthew L.; Stagg, Camille L.; Nestlerode, Janet A.; Russell, Marc J.; From, Andrew; Spivak, Amanda C.; Dantin, Darrin D.; Harvey, James E.; Almario, Alejandro E.

    2017-01-01

    Mangrove wetlands provide ecosystem services for millions of people, most prominently by providing storm protection, food and fodder. Mangrove wetlands are also valuable ecosystems for promoting carbon (C) sequestration and storage. However, loss of mangrove wetlands and these ecosystem services are a global concern, prompting the restoration and creation of mangrove wetlands as a potential solution. Here, we investigate soil surface elevation change, and its components, in created mangrove wetlands over a 25 year developmental gradient. All created mangrove wetlands were exceeding current relative sea-level rise rates (2.6 mm yr−1), with surface elevation change of 4.2–11.0 mm yr−1 compared with 1.5–7.2 mm yr−1 for nearby reference mangroves. While mangrove wetlands store C persistently in roots/soils, storage capacity is most valuable if maintained with future sea-level rise. Through empirical modeling, we discovered that properly designed creation projects may not only yield enhanced C storage, but also can facilitate wetland persistence perennially under current rates of sea-level rise and, for most sites, for over a century with projected medium accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 6.0). Only the fastest projected accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 8.5) led to widespread submergence and potential loss of stored C for created mangrove wetlands before 2100.

  20. Mitigation of negative ecological and socio-economic impacts of the Diama dam on the Senegal River Delta wetland (Mauritania, using a model based decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Duvail

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The delta of the River Senegal was modified substantially by the construction of the Diama dam in 1986 and the floodplain and estuarine areas on the Mauritanian bank were affected severely by the absence of floods. In 1994, managed flood releases were initiated in the Bell basin (4000 ha of the Diawling National Park, as part of a rehabilitation effort. The basin was designated as a joint management area between traditional users and the Park authority and a revised management plan was developed through a participatory approach based on a topographical, hydro-climatic, ecological and socio-economic data. Hydraulic modelling was developed as a tool to support stakeholder negotiations on the desired characteristics of the managed flood releases. Initially, a water balance model was developed. The data were then integrated into a one-dimensional hydraulic model, MIKE 11 (DHI, 2000. When associated with a Digital Elevation Model and a Geographic Information System, (Arc View, the model provided a dynamic description of floods. Flood extent, water depth and flood duration data were combined with ecological and socio-economic data. The water requirements of the different stakeholders were converted to flood scenarios and the benefits and constraints analysed. A consensus scenario was reached through a participatory process. The volume of flood release required to restore the delta does not affect hydro-power generation, navigation or intensive irrigation, for which the dams in the basin were constructed. Hydraulic modelling provided useful inputs to stakeholder discussions and allows investigation of untested flood scenarios. Keywords: wetland restoration, water use conflicts, equity, Senegal River delta, Mauritania, Diawling National Park

  1. Mapping the change of Phragmites australis live biomass in the lower Mississippi River Delta marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina

    2017-07-28

    Multiyear remote sensing mapping of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was carried out as an indicator of live biomass composition of the Phragmites australis (hereafter Phragmites) marsh in the lower Mississippi River Delta (hereafter delta) from 2014 to 2017. Maps of NDVI change showed that the Phragmites condition was fairly stable between May 2014 and July 2015. From July 2015 to April 2016 NDVI change indicated Phragmites suffered a widespread decline in the live biomass proportion.  Between April and September 2016, most marsh remained unchanged from the earlier period or showed improvement; although there were pockets of continued decline scattered throughout the lower delta. From September 2016 to May 2017 a pronounced and widely exhibited decline in the condition of Phragmites marsh again occurred throughout the lower delta. This final NDVI change mapping supported field observations of Phragmites decline during the same period.

  2. Canadian SAR remote sensing for the Terrestrial Wetland Global Change Research Network (TWGCRN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Shannon; Brisco, Brian; Cull, Andrew; Gallant, Alisa L.; Sadinski, Walter J.; Thompson, Dean

    2010-01-01

    The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) has more than 30 years of experience investigating the use of SAR remote sensing for many applications related to terrestrial water resources. Recently, CCRS scientists began contributing to the Terrestrial Wetland Global Change Research Network (TWGCRN), a bi-national research network dedicated to assessing impacts of global change on interconnected wetland-upland landscapes across a vital portion of North America. CCRS scientists are applying SAR remote sensing to characterize wetland components of these landscapes in three ways. First, they are using a comprehensive set of RADARSAT-2 SAR data collected during April to September 2009 to extract multi-temporal surface water information for key TWGCRN study landscapes in North America. Second, they are analyzing polarimetric RADARSAT-2 data to determine areas where double-bounce represents the primary scattering mechanism and is indicative of flooded vegetation in these landscapes. Third, they are testing advanced interferometric SAR techniques to estimate water levels with RADARSAT-2 Fine Quad polarimetric image pairs. The combined information from these three SAR analysis activities will provide TWGCRN scientists with an integrated view and monitoring capability for these dynamic wetland-upland landscapes. These data are being used in conjunction with other remote sensing and field data to study interactions between landscape and animal (birds and amphibians) responses to climate/global change.

  3. Sensitivity of a prairie wetland to increased temperature and seasonal precipitation changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poiani, K.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Johnson, W.C. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States); Kittel, T.G.F. [Univ. Corp. for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)]|[Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We assessed the potential effects of increased temperature and changes in amount and seasonal timing of precipitation on the hydrology and vegetation of a semi-permanent prairie wetland in North Dakota using a spatially-defined, rule-based simulation model. Simulations were run with increased temperatures of 2{degree}C combined with a 10 percent increase or decrease in total growing season precipitation. Changes in precipitation were applied either evenly across all months or to individual seasons (spring, summer, or fall). The response of semi-permanent wetland P1 was relatively similar under most of the seasonal scenarios. A 10 percent increase in total growing season precipitation applied to summer months only, to fall months only, and over all months produced lower water levels compared to those resulting from the current climate due to increased evapotranspiration. Wetland hydrology was most affected by changes in spring precipitation and runoff. Vegetation response was relatively consistent across scenarios. Seven of the eight seasonal scenarios produced drier conditions with no open water and greater vegetation cover compared to those resulting from the current climate. Only when spring precipitation increased did the wetland maintain an extensive open water area (49 percent). 36 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Relationship between landscape structure metrics and wetland nutrient retention function: a case study of Liaohe Delta, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Jongman, R.H.G.; Hu, Y.; Bu, Y.; Bu, R.; Harms, B.; Bregt, A.K.; He, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between landscape pattern and the function of nutrient reduction in the natural reed marsh of Liaohe Delta is studied with the help of some landscape metrics. The results discovered that not all the metrics selected are explanative in representing the function of nutrient reduction.

  5. Coastal Wetland Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: the Role of Macroclimatic Drivers along the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, M. J.; Enwright, N.; Day, R. H.; Gabler, C. A.; Stagg, C. L.; From, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Across the globe, macroclimatic drivers greatly influence coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. However, changing macroclimatic conditions are rarely incorporated into coastal wetland vulnerability assessments. Here, we quantify the influence of macroclimatic drivers upon coastal wetland ecosystems along the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) coast. From a global perspective, the NGOM coast provides several excellent opportunities to examine the effects of climate change upon coastal wetlands. The abundant coastal wetland ecosystems in the region span two major climatic gradients: (1) a winter temperature gradient that crosses temperate to tropical climatic zones; and (2) a precipitation gradient that crosses humid to semi-arid zones. We present analyses where we used geospatial data (historical climate, hydrology, and coastal wetland coverage) and field data (soil, elevation, and plant community composition and structure) to quantify climate-mediated ecological transitions. We identified winter climate and precipitation-based thresholds that separate mangrove forests from salt marshes and vegetated wetlands from unvegetated wetlands, respectively. We used simple distribution and abundance models to evaluate the potential ecological effects of alternative future climate change scenarios. Our results illustrate and quantify the importance of macroclimatic drivers and indicate that climate change could result in landscape-scale changes in coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. These macroclimate-mediated ecological changes could affect the supply of some ecosystem goods and services as well as the resilience of these ecosystems to stressors, including accelerated sea level rise. Collectively, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating macroclimatic drivers within future-focused coastal wetland vulnerability assessments.

  6. Wetlands as a Record of Climate Change and Hydrological Response in Arid Rift Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, G. M.

    2004-12-01

    Of all the terrestrial depositional settings, rift basins typically provide the greatest accommodation space, and consequently have some of the longest records of continental sedimentation. Lake deposits were the only rift component studied for records of long-term climatic change and for testing hypotheses of orbital forcing. Recently, the continuing quest for the paleontological and cultural records of human origins entombed in the sedimentary rocks of the East African Rift System raised questions concerning hydrologic and biologic response to climatic change. Additional issues are the impact of climate on paleolandscapes and the environmental stresses that might have affected human evolution. Other important indicators of rift hydrology, such as springs and wetlands are now emerging as viable records of climate change. Rift valley basins are shallow, hydrologically closed systems that are responsive to shifts in climate, and specifically sensitive to changes in the hydrologic budget (P-ET). Long term wet-dry cycles in the low latitudes are thought to be astronomically controlled, i.e. Milankovitch precession cycles (19-23 ka). In the tropics, precipitation (P) varies with changes in solar insolation which fluctuates Lake levels are known to fluctuate in response to change in hydrologic budget and wetlands appear to respond similarly. Springs and groundwater-fed wetlands are common, however the sources and sustainability of water or what geologic factors lead to the formation and longevity of wetlands is not well established. It appears that rainfall is trapped on topographic highs (rift fault blocks and volcanoes). This meteoric water infiltrates quickly through porous volcanic rocks and is stored in aquifers and released slowly. As a component of the rift hydrologic system, wetlands appear to be reliable indicators of rainfall fluctuations on both Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch time scales. Wetland sediments are commoner in the geologic record during times

  7. Wetlands in changed landscapes: the influence of habitat transformation on the physico-chemistry of temporary depression wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Matthew S; Day, Jenny A

    2014-01-01

    Temporary wetlands dominate the wet season landscape of temperate, semi-arid and arid regions, yet, other than their direct loss to development and agriculture, little information exists on how remaining wetlands have been altered by anthropogenic conversion of surrounding landscapes. This study investigates relationships between the extent and type of habitat transformation around temporary wetlands and their water column physico-chemical characteristics. A set of 90 isolated depression wetlands (seasonally inundated) occurring on coastal plains of the south-western Cape mediterranean-climate region of South Africa was sampled during the winter/spring wet season of 2007. Wetlands were sampled across habitat transformation gradients according to the areal cover of agriculture, urban development and alien invasive vegetation within 100 and 500 m radii of each wetland edge. We hypothesized that the principal drivers of physico-chemical conditions in these wetlands (e.g. soil properties, basin morphology) are altered by habitat transformation. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (distance-based Redundancy Analysis) indicated significant associations between wetland physico-chemistry and habitat transformation (overall transformation within 100 and 500 m, alien vegetation cover within 100 and 500 m, urban cover within 100 m); although for significant regressions the amount of variation explained was very low (range: ∼2 to ∼5.5%), relative to that explained by purely spatio-temporal factors (range: ∼35.5 to ∼43%). The nature of the relationships between each type of transformation in the landscape and individual physico-chemical variables in wetlands were further explored with univariate multiple regressions. Results suggest that conservation of relatively narrow (∼100 m) buffer strips around temporary wetlands is likely to be effective in the maintenance of natural conditions in terms of physico-chemical water quality.

  8. Wetlands in changed landscapes: the influence of habitat transformation on the physico-chemistry of temporary depression wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Bird

    Full Text Available Temporary wetlands dominate the wet season landscape of temperate, semi-arid and arid regions, yet, other than their direct loss to development and agriculture, little information exists on how remaining wetlands have been altered by anthropogenic conversion of surrounding landscapes. This study investigates relationships between the extent and type of habitat transformation around temporary wetlands and their water column physico-chemical characteristics. A set of 90 isolated depression wetlands (seasonally inundated occurring on coastal plains of the south-western Cape mediterranean-climate region of South Africa was sampled during the winter/spring wet season of 2007. Wetlands were sampled across habitat transformation gradients according to the areal cover of agriculture, urban development and alien invasive vegetation within 100 and 500 m radii of each wetland edge. We hypothesized that the principal drivers of physico-chemical conditions in these wetlands (e.g. soil properties, basin morphology are altered by habitat transformation. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (distance-based Redundancy Analysis indicated significant associations between wetland physico-chemistry and habitat transformation (overall transformation within 100 and 500 m, alien vegetation cover within 100 and 500 m, urban cover within 100 m; although for significant regressions the amount of variation explained was very low (range: ∼2 to ∼5.5%, relative to that explained by purely spatio-temporal factors (range: ∼35.5 to ∼43%. The nature of the relationships between each type of transformation in the landscape and individual physico-chemical variables in wetlands were further explored with univariate multiple regressions. Results suggest that conservation of relatively narrow (∼100 m buffer strips around temporary wetlands is likely to be effective in the maintenance of natural conditions in terms of physico-chemical water quality.

  9. Futures Analysis of Urban Land Use and Wetland Change in Saskatoon, Canada: An Application in Strategic Environmental Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Sizo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a scenario-based approach to strategic environmental assessment (SEA for wetland trend analysis and land use and land cover (LUC modeling in an urban environment. The application is focused on the Saskatoon urban environment, a rapidly growing urban municipality in Canada’s prairie pothole region. Alternative future LUC was simulated using remote sensing data and city spatial planning documentation using a Markov Chain technique. Two alternatives were developed and compared for LUC change and threats to urban wetland sustainability: a zero alternative that simulated trends in urban development and wetland conservation under a business as usual scenario, in the absence of prescribed planning and zoning actions; and an alternative focused on implementation of current urban development plans, which simulated future LUC to account for prescribed wetland conservation strategies. Results show no improvement in future wetland conditions under the city’s planned growth and wetland conservation scenario versus the business as usual scenario. Results also indicate that a blanket wetland conservation strategy for the city may not be sufficient to overcome the historic trend of urban wetland loss; and that spatially distributed conservation rates, based on individual wetland water catchment LUC peculiarities, may be more effective in terms of wetland conservation. The paper also demonstrates the challenges to applied SEA in a rapidly changing urban planning context, where data are often sparse and inconsistent across the urban region, and provides potential solutions through LUC classification and prediction tools to help overcome data limitations to support land use planning decisions for wetland conservation.

  10. Regional ecological risk assessment of in the Liaohe River Delta wetlands%辽河三角洲湿地区域生态风险评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付在毅; 许学工; 林辉平; 王宪礼

    2001-01-01

    Ecological risk assessment is a new study field. Its objective is to estimate the possibility and magnitude in which some undesired ecological events will occur by using mathematics, probability and other risk analysis techniques. Regional ecological risk assessment is one branch of ecological risk assessment,for which both the receptors and sources of risk must be in regional scale, and the exposure and effects assessment must account their uncertainty and spatial heterogeneity. In the case study of the Liaohe River Delta wetlands.this article inguires into the theory and method of regional ecological risk assessment.   First, we select birds and their habitats as risk receptors after analyzed the landscape framework and ecological function of the wetlands.   Second, we define the mainly risk sources in this region including flood, drought, storm tide and oil pollution events. According to the statistic of the region, the probability and distributing of each kind of risk sources are gained.   Third, the habitat receptor is exposed under risk sources and contacts with bird receptor. Risk sources will affect the habitat elements and the birds will be harmed. In the exposure and hazard analysis, we use ecological index to denote the important degree of each habitat, use fragile index to show their features of anti-risk. Hazard consequences are analyzed, which formed by different risk sources. In order to compare the risk brought by different risk source, we use AHP method to get the weigh of each kind of risk sources.   Finally, risk assessment is the integrated phase of the research. Because of the spatial heterogeneity of risk sources, all risk sources are overlaid in the region, which divides the region into 122 risk areas. Within each risk area there is homogeneous for risk sources but heterogeneous for habitats. So we can get the ecological index and fragile index of each risk area according to the types of habitats in it, then combine

  11. Trends and causes of historical wetland loss, Sabine National Wildlife Refuge, southwest Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Julie C.; Morton, Robert A.; Kelso, Kyle W.

    2011-01-01

    Prior U.S. Geological Survey studies (Open-File Reports 2005-1216 and 2009-1158) examined historical land- and water-area changes and estimated magnitudes of land subsidence and erosion at 10 wetland sites in the Mississippi River delta plain. The present study extends that work by analyzing interior wetland loss and relative magnitudes of subsidence and erosion at five additional wetland sites in Sabine National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in the western chenier plain. The study sites were selected because their geologic setting differed from that of the delta plain; also, although the refuge marshes had been managed partly to minimize wetland loss, interior wetland losses there were extensive. Historical aerial photography, datum-corrected marsh elevations and water depths, and sediment cores were integrated to evaluate historical land- and water-area changes at SNWR.

  12. Implications of climate change for wetland-dependent birds in the Prairie Pothole Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Valerie; Skagen, Susan; Melcher, Cynthia P.

    2016-01-01

    The habitats and food resources required to support breeding and migrant birds dependent on North American prairie wetlands are threatened by impending climate change. The North American Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) hosts nearly 120 species of wetland-dependent birds representing 21 families. Strategic management requires knowledge of avian habitat requirements and assessment of species most vulnerable to future threats. We applied bioclimatic species distribution models (SDMs) to project range changes of 29 wetland-dependent bird species using ensemble modeling techniques, a large number of General Circulation Models (GCMs), and hydrological climate covariates. For the U.S. PPR, mean projected range change, expressed as a proportion of currently occupied range, was −0.31 (± 0.22 SD; range − 0.75 to 0.16), and all but two species were projected to lose habitat. Species associated with deeper water were expected to experience smaller negative impacts of climate change. The magnitude of climate change impacts was somewhat lower in this study than earlier efforts most likely due to use of different focal species, varying methodologies, different modeling decisions, or alternative GCMs. Quantification of the projected species-specific impacts of climate change using species distribution modeling offers valuable information for vulnerability assessments within the conservation planning process.

  13. Impact of climate change on Estonian coastal and inland wetlands. A summary with new results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kont, A.; Lode, E.; Ratas, U.; Rivis, R.; Tonisson, H. (Institute of Ecology, Tallinn University (EE)); Jaagus, J. (Institute of Geography, University of Tartu (EE)); Suursaar, U. (Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu (EE)); Orviku, K. (Merin Ltd, Tallinn (EE)); Endjaerv, E. (Estonian Environment Information Centre, Tallinn (EE))

    2007-07-01

    The natural environment of Estonia is sensitive to climate change due to its location in a transitional zone between areas with different bioclimatic conditions. We studied the NAO index and data on temperature, moisture, wind, and sea level regimes in Estonia and the Baltic Sea region. We also looked at the relationships between meteorological forcing time series and changes in wetlands. The effects of changing climatic conditions are clearly reflected in the data from the station at Tooma mire, where we identified shorter snow-cover duration, decreased soil-frost depth and changed groundwater levels in the bog. In comparing various types of Estonian wetlands under such changing climatic conditions, we also identified greater instability in the character of coastal wetlands compared to that of the inland bogs. We found that the most marked coastal changes in Estonia result from a combination of strong storms, high sea levels induced by storm surge, ice free seas and unfrozen sediments. Finally, we also found that a significant trend in the development of seashore grasslands is the replacement of former meadows by reed beds, shrubberies or woodland. (orig.)

  14. Impact of climate change on water and agriculture: Challenges and possible solutions for the Nile Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, Badr; Arafa, Salah; Farahat, Hany; Badr, Marmar; Gampe, David; Ludwig, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    The Nile-Delta is subjected to continuous changes; including shoreline changes either erosion or accretion, subsidence of the delta, as well as sea level rise due to climate change. The impacts of climate change on the Nile Delta have been addressed on local and international level as the Nile Delta coastal zones are vulnerable to sea level rise. The poster presents recent research activities and findings from the CLIMB project in the Nile Delta and costal zones of Egypt. Lots of field data have been collected such as aquifer geometry data, soil properties data, well data and contamination sources. All of these data support a coupled modeling approach of the land surface hydrological model WASIM-ETH and the hydrological model MOD-Flow to simulate and project the future impact translation of climate projections into hydrological impacts. Results confirm intensified threads to water security. Increasing potential evaporation (in response to increasing temperature) in combination with decreasing water levels in the Nile river, reduced precipitation and groundwater recharge and deteriorating groundwater quality, imposes great challenges to ensure the supply of drinking water and irrigation. Current irrigation strategies are highly inefficient and must be replaced by new and adapted systems. Based on the results of the coupled modeling approach, various scenarios can be evaluated. The vision is to develop a road map for climate change and green economy that maximizes wellbeing of the Egyptian citizens, operates with environmental limits, and is capable of adapting to global environmental change.

  15. A computer model to forecast wetland vegetation changes resulting from restoration and protection in coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jenneke M.; Duke-Sylvester, Scott M.; Carter, Jacoby; Broussard, Whitney P.

    2013-01-01

    The coastal wetlands of Louisiana are a unique ecosystem that supports a diversity of wildlife as well as a diverse community of commercial interests of both local and national importance. The state of Louisiana has established a 5-year cycle of scientific investigation to provide up-to-date information to guide future legislation and regulation aimed at preserving this critical ecosystem. Here we report on a model that projects changes in plant community distribution and composition in response to environmental conditions. This model is linked to a suite of other models and requires input from those that simulate the hydrology and morphology of coastal Louisiana. Collectively, these models are used to assess how alternative management plans may affect the wetland ecosystem through explicit spatial modeling of the physical and biological processes affected by proposed modifications to the ecosystem. We have also taken the opportunity to advance the state-of-the-art in wetland plant community modeling by using a model that is more species-based in its description of plant communities instead of one based on aggregated community types such as brackish marsh and saline marsh. The resulting model provides an increased level of ecological detail about how wetland communities are expected to respond. In addition, the output from this model provides critical inputs for estimating the effects of management on higher trophic level species though a more complete description of the shifts in habitat.

  16. RS- and GIS-based study on landscape pattern change in the Poyang Lake wetland area, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Li, Hui; Bao, Shuming; Wu, Zhongyi; Fu, Weijuan; Cai, Xiaobin; Zhao, Hongmei; Guo, Peng

    2006-10-01

    As wetland has been recognized as an important component of ecosystem, it is received ever-increasing attention worldwide. Poyang Lake wetlands, the international wetlands and the largest bird habitat in Asia, play an important role in biodiversity and ecologic protection. However, with the rapid economic growth and urbanization, landscape patterns in the wetlands have dramatically changed in the past three decades. To better understand the wetland landscape dynamics, remote sensing, geographic information system technologies, and the FRAGSTATS landscape analysis program were used to measure landscape patterns. Statistical approach was employed to illustrate the driving forces. In this study, Landsat images (TM and ETM+) from 1989 and 2000 were acquired for the wetland area. The landscapes in the wetland area were classified as agricultural land, urban, wetland, forest, grassland, unused land, and water body using a combination of supervised and unsupervised classification techniques integrated with Digital Elevation Model (DEM). Landscape indices, which are popular for the quantitative analysis of landscape pattern, were then employed to analyze the landscape pattern changes between the two dates in a GIS. From this analysis an understanding of the spatial-temporal patterns of landscape evolution was generated. The results show that wetland area was reduced while fragmentation was increased over the study period. Further investigation was made to examine the relationship between landscape metrics and some other parameters such as urbanization to address the driving forces for those changes. The urban was chosen as center to conduct buffer analysis in a GIS to study the impact of human-induced activities on landscape pattern dynamics. It was found that the selected parameters were significantly correlated with the landscape metrics, which may well indicate the impact of human-induced activities on the wetland landscape pattern dynamics and account for the driving

  17. Erosion potential of the Yangtze Delta under sediment starvation and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H F; Yang, S L; Xu, K H; Wu, H; Shi, B W; Zhu, Q; Zhang, W X; Yang, Z

    2017-09-05

    Deltas are widely threatened by sediment starvation and climate change. Erosion potential is an important indicator of delta vulnerability. Here, we investigate the erosion potential of the Yangtze Delta. We found that over the past half century the Yangtze's sediment discharge has decreased by 80% due to the construction of >50,000 dams and soil conservation, whereas the wind speed and wave height in the delta region have increased by 5-7%, and the sea level has risen at a rate of 3 mm/yr. According to hydrodynamic measurements and analyses of seabed sediments, the period when bed shear stress due to combined current-wave action under normal weather conditions exceeds the critical bed shear stress for erosion (τ cr ) accounts for 63% of the total observed period on average and can reach 100% during peak storms. This explains why net erosion has occurred in some areas of the subaqueous delta. We also found that the increase with depth of τ cr is very gradual in the uppermost several metres of the depositional sequence. We therefore expect that the Yangtze subaqueous delta will experience continuous erosion under sediment starvation and climate change in the next decades of this century or even a few centuries.

  18. Ecosystem Development after Mangrove Wetland Creation: Plant-Soil Change across a 20-year Chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangrove wetland restoration and creation efforts are increasingly proposed as mechanisms to compensate for mangrove wetland loss. However, ecosystem development and functional equivalence in restored and created mangrove wetlands is poorly understood. We compared a 20-yr chrono...

  19. Density changes in Ga-stabilized delta-Pu, and what they mean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.Wolfer, W; Kubota, A; S?derlind, P; Landa, A; Oudot, B; Sadigh, B; Sturgeon, J B; Surh, M P

    2006-09-08

    Ga-stabilized {delta}-Pu undergoes small changes in density with time. These have been associated with four different causes: an initial reversible expansion that saturates after a short time; a continuous change that can be attributed to the in-growth of helium and actinide daughter products from the radioactive decay of plutonium; possible void swelling; and phase instability. We review our present understanding of these processes and evaluate their contributions to density changes. It is shown that the initial transient expansion is intimately connected with the metastability of the {delta}-phase at ambient temperature.

  20. Extreme floods in the Mekong River Delta under climate change: combined impacts of upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Long; Nguyen Viet, Dung; Kummu, Matti; Lauri, Hannu; Koponen, Jorma; van Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Supit, Iwan; Leemans, Rik; Kabat, Pavel; Ludwig, Fulco

    2016-04-01

    Extreme floods cause huge damages to human lives and infrastructure, and hamper socio-economic development in the Mekong River Delta in Vietnam. Induced by climate change, upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise are expected to further exacerbate future flood hazard and thereby posing critical challenges for securing safety and sustainability. This paper provides a probabilistic quantification of future flood hazard for the Mekong Delta, focusing on extreme events under climate change. We developed a model chain to simulate separate and combined impacts of two drivers, namely upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise on flood magnitude and frequency. Simulation results show that upstream changes and sea level rise substantially increase flood hazard throughout the whole Mekong Delta. Due to differences in their nature, two drivers show different features in their impacts on floods. Impacts of upstream changes are more dominant in floodplains in the upper delta, causing an increase of up to +0.80 m in flood depth. Sea level rise introduces flood hazard to currently safe areas in the middle and coastal delta zones. A 0.6 m rise in relative sea level causes an increase in flood depth between 0.10 and 0.70 m, depending on location by 2050s. Upstream hydrological changes and sea level rise tend to intensify each other's impacts on floods, resulting in stronger combined impacts than linearly summed impacts of each individual driver. Substantial increase of future flood hazard strongly requires better flood protection and more flood resilient development for the Mekong Delta. Findings from this study can be used as quantified physical boundary conditions to develop flood management strategies and strategic delta management plans.

  1. Geochemical and diatom records of recent changes in depositional environment of a tropical wetland, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pande, A.; Nayak, G.N.; Prasad, V.; PrakashBabu, C

    Two mudflat sediment cores collected from a sub-channel (S-61) and the main channel (S-60) of a tropical wetland, along central west coast of India, were investigated for recent changes in depositional environment using geochemical (sediment grain...

  2. 黄河三角洲滨海湿地健康条件评价概念模型%A Conceptual Model for the Assessment of Coastal Wetlands Health in the Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶思源; SMITH Gregory Jame; 高茂生; 丁喜桂; 刘强

    2009-01-01

    滨海湿地健康与生物学特征主要取决于区域上的水文与盐度体制以及景观尺度上的土地利用现状.然而,由于滨海湿地条件评价的指标和标准并不十分清楚,因此,对滨海湿地系统条件进行评价,目前仍是环境科学的难点.中国地质调查局(CGS)青岛海洋地质研究所与美国地质调查局湿地研究中心合作先后为美国密西西比河下游生态环境及中国黄河三角洲(YRD)滨海湿地评价建立了概念模型.本文将陈述YRD湿地评价的概念模型.此模型的建立在于确定滨海湿地当前的条件和随时间改善或退化的过程,以及确定优先管理的区域.CGS项目之所以选取YRD作为滨海湿地的研究对象主要是因为它具有重要的生态意义.由于上游来水减少或黄河断流,该区湿地生境十分脆弱.本文提出此概念模型可为今后湿地条件评价指标确定、调查研究活动和数据采集提供指导.通过该模型的构建,使环境变化可用具体指标来度量,从而服务于滨海湿地生态系统的保护与管理活动.%The physical and biological nature of coastal wetlands is fundamentally controlled by its hydrologic and salinity regimes and by its setting within a landscape mosaic of natural and human land uses. Assessing the health of coastal wetlands, however, remains a problem because no clear set of criteria for estimating this ecosystem. The Qingdao Institute of Marine Geology,China Geological Survey (CGS) and National wetlands research center, U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) joint great efforts to successively develop both conceptual models for coast and environmental geology in the Lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) and evaluating the health condition of coastal wetlands in Yelllow River Delta (YRD). The later effort will be presented in this article. This conceptual model is to identify geologic or anthropogenic processes that control ecosystem structure and function and response to drivers

  3. 黄河三角洲滨海湿地的生物多样性特征及保护对策%Biodiversity Characteristics and Protection Countermeasures of the Coastal Wetlands in the Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绪良; 肖滋民; 徐宗军; 张朝晖

    2011-01-01

    黄河三角洲滨海湿地具有以下生物多样性特点:不同类型的湿地中生物多样性差别显著;生物的态适应类型复杂;生物区系的地理分布成分有一定规律性;资源性动植物物种多;国家重点保护物种和濒危物种多。受自然因素和人为因素的影响,黄河三角洲滨海湿地出现了天然湿地面积减小、土壤盐渍化程度加重、湿地生态服务功能退化、湿地生物多样性水平下降等问题。为了保护黄河三角洲滨海湿地的生物多样性,提出了加强黄河三角洲自然保护区的基础设施建设、实施湿地生态恢复工程、建设黄河三角洲高效生态经济区、加强宣传教育以提高全民生物多样性保护意识、加强黄河三角洲湿地科学研究等对策。%The coastal wetlands in Yellow River Delta have the characteristics of newborn property,quick evolvement,ecolgical fragility,scarcity in types and important ecological function,etc.There are 298 species vascular plants,407 species phytoplankton,1 452 species animal,199 species birds,112 species marine fish,102 species freshwater fish and 121 species other freshwater animals,8 species repitles,6 species amphibians,193 species marine animals,223 species zoobenthos in intertidal wetland and other species.In the coastal wetlands,the biodiversity characters of different wetland types are obviously different,there are most species in uptidal wetlands because of diversity and complexity of habitats there,and there are lest species in intertidalwetlands because the habitats of the intertidal wetlands are single and instable.The plant and animal flora has complicated eco-adapted types of species and regular geographical composition,the vascular plant flora is young.Many species of plant and animal are endangered and are mainly protected by government,the vascular plant flora composition is simple and the woody plant species of the flora are poor.The coastal wetlands in Yellow

  4. Beyond just sea-level rise: considering macroclimatic drivers within coastal wetland vulnerability assessments to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J; Enwright, Nicholas M; Day, Richard H; Gabler, Christopher A; Stagg, Camille L; Grace, James B

    2016-01-01

    Due to their position at the land-sea interface, coastal wetlands are vulnerable to many aspects of climate change. However, climate change vulnerability assessments for coastal wetlands generally focus solely on sea-level rise without considering the effects of other facets of climate change. Across the globe and in all ecosystems, macroclimatic drivers (e.g., temperature and rainfall regimes) greatly influence ecosystem structure and function. Macroclimatic drivers have been the focus of climate change-related threat evaluations for terrestrial ecosystems, but largely ignored for coastal wetlands. In some coastal wetlands, changing macroclimatic conditions are expected to result in foundation plant species replacement, which would affect the supply of certain ecosystem goods and services and could affect ecosystem resilience. As examples, we highlight several ecological transition zones where small changes in macroclimatic conditions would result in comparatively large changes in coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. Our intent in this communication is not to minimize the importance of sea-level rise. Rather, our overarching aim is to illustrate the need to also consider macroclimatic drivers within vulnerability assessments for coastal wetlands. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Beyond just sea-level rise: Considering macroclimatic drivers within coastal wetland vulnerability assessments to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J.; Enwright, Nicholas M.; Day, Richard H.; Gabler, Christopher A.; Stagg, Camille L.; Grace, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their position at the land-sea interface, coastal wetlands are vulnerable to many aspects of climate change. However, climate change vulnerability assessments for coastal wetlands generally focus solely on sea-level rise without considering the effects of other facets of climate change. Across the globe and in all ecosystems, macroclimatic drivers (e.g., temperature and rainfall regimes) greatly influence ecosystem structure and function. Macroclimatic drivers have been the focus of climate-change related threat evaluations for terrestrial ecosystems, but largely ignored for coastal wetlands. In some coastal wetlands, changing macroclimatic conditions are expected to result in foundation plant species replacement, which would affect the supply of certain ecosystem goods and services and could affect ecosystem resilience. As examples, we highlight several ecological transition zones where small changes in macroclimatic conditions would result in comparatively large changes in coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. Our intent in this communication is not to minimize the importance of sea-level rise. Rather, our overarching aim is to illustrate the need to also consider macroclimatic drivers within vulnerability assessments for coastal wetlands.

  6. [Relationships of wetland landscape fragmentation with climate change in middle reaches of Heihe River, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng-Hui; Zhao, Rui-Feng; Zhao, Hai-Li; Lu, Li-Peng; Xie, Zuo-Lun

    2013-06-01

    Based on the 1975-2010 multi-temporal remotely sensed TM and ETM images and meteorological data, in combining with wavelet analysis, trend surface simulation, and interpolation method, this paper analyzed the meteorological elements' spatial distribution and change characteristics in the middle reaches of Heihe River, and elucidated the process of wetland landscape fragmentation in the study area by using the landscape indices patch density (PD), mean patch size (MPS), and patch shape fragment index (FS). The relationships between the wetland landscape fragmentation and climate change were also approached through correlation analysis and multiple stepwise regression analysis. In 1975-2010, the overall distribution patterns of precipitation and temperature in the study area were low precipitation in high temperature regions and high precipitation in low temperature regions, and the main characteristics of climate change were the conversion from dry to wet and from cold to warm. In the whole study period, the wetland landscape fragmentation was mainly manifested in the decrease of MPS, with a decrement of 48.95 hm2, and the increase of PD, with an increment of 0.006 ind x hm(-2).

  7. Detection and Analysis of Coastline and Landuse Change from 1960 to 2012 in Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wang; Cao, Wenfang; Wu, Zhifeng; Tarolli, Paolo; Jia, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Coastline is the sea-land demarcation line in coastal regions. The position and shape of coastline depends on various natural and anthropogenic factors. The change of coastline exerts obvious influence on environment and economy in coastal regions. Therefore, it is important to detect and analysis the change of coastline and landuse for coastal environment and sustainable development. Pearl River Delta (PRD) is one of the most prosperous and fastest growing regions in China. The coastline and landuse in PRD have changed remarkably and continuously during the past decades. In this research, the change of coastline and landuse during 1960 to 2012 was detected with RS and GIS. Furthermore, coastline characteristics of temporal and spatial variation were analyzed with quantitative and spatial approach. And the relationship between the changes of coastline and landuse was explored. Therefore, the impact that urban expansion brought to landscape in coastal zone could be quantitatively analyzed. Finally, local government management on coastal wetland was discussed. The main outcomes of this research are summarized in the following points: (1) The length of coastline in PRD increased from 1134.95km to 1508.02km with annul increasing speed of 7.17km/a. Relatively, the coastline changed more obvious in three period (2004 2006, 2006 2008 and 2008 2010).The annual average change rate of coastline in the three period were -3.45%, 2.85% and 2.98%, respectively. After 2010, the speed of coastline change in PRD became lower. (2) The coastline had a greater increasing amount in the cities of Zhuhai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, where the length of coastline increased 60.81%, 22.00%and 19.71%, respectively. (3) Nansha in Guangzhou, south Zhuhai and Qianhai in Shenzhen gained more newly-added land than any other area in PRD. Their land area increased from 172.34km2 to 303.22km2, 344.70km2 to 603.29km2 and89.62km2 to 145.49km2, respectively. (4) In PRD, construction land expanded 33 times

  8. Characteristics and Process of Land Use Changes in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    As one of the developing countries China has an arable land per capita far below the world's average level. With a high-density population and the quick development of economy and urbanization, the Yangtze River Delta shows the typical characteristics of land use in developed regions of China, which are: high land reclamation rate and low arable land per capita; intensive land use and high output value; and rapid increasing of construction land area and fast diminishing of arable lands. The analysis indicates that the process of the arable land changes in the Yangtze River Delta could be divided into four different change stages over the past 50 years.

  9. Freshwater wetlands: fertile grounds for the invasive Phragmites australis in a climate change context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougas-Tellier, Marie-Andrée; Morin, Jean; Hatin, Daniel; Lavoie, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Climate change will likely affect flooding regimes, which have a large influence on the functioning of freshwater riparian wetlands. Low water levels predicted for several fluvial systems make wetlands especially vulnerable to the spread of invaders, such as the common reed (Phragmites australis), one of the most invasive species in North America. We developed a model to map the distribution of potential germination grounds of the common reed in freshwater wetlands of the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada) under current climate conditions and used this model to predict their future distribution under two climate change scenarios simulated for 2050. We gathered historical and recent (remote sensing) data on the distribution of common reed stands for model calibration and validation purposes, then determined the parameters controlling the species establishment by seed. A two-dimensional model and the identified parameters were used to simulate the current (2010) and future (2050) distribution of germination grounds. Common reed stands are not widespread along the St. Lawrence River (212 ha), but our model suggests that current climate conditions are already conducive to considerable further expansion (>16,000 ha). Climate change may also exacerbate the expansion, particularly if river water levels drop, which will expose large bare areas propitious to seed germination. This phenomenon may be particularly important in one sector of the river, where existing common reed stands could increase their areas by a factor of 100, potentially creating the most extensive reedbed complex in North America. After colonizing salt and brackishwater marshes, the common reed could considerably expand into the freshwater marshes of North America which cover several million hectares. The effects of common reed expansion on biodiversity are difficult to predict, but likely to be highly deleterious given the competitiveness of the invader and the biological richness of freshwater

  10. Freshwater wetlands: fertile grounds for the invasive Phragmites australis in a climate change context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougas-Tellier, Marie-Andrée; Morin, Jean; Hatin, Daniel; Lavoie, Claude

    2015-08-01

    Climate change will likely affect flooding regimes, which have a large influence on the functioning of freshwater riparian wetlands. Low water levels predicted for several fluvial systems make wetlands especially vulnerable to the spread of invaders, such as the common reed (Phragmites australis), one of the most invasive species in North America. We developed a model to map the distribution of potential germination grounds of the common reed in freshwater wetlands of the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada) under current climate conditions and used this model to predict their future distribution under two climate change scenarios simulated for 2050. We gathered historical and recent (remote sensing) data on the distribution of common reed stands for model calibration and validation purposes, then determined the parameters controlling the species establishment by seed. A two-dimensional model and the identified parameters were used to simulate the current (2010) and future (2050) distribution of germination grounds. Common reed stands are not widespread along the St. Lawrence River (212 ha), but our model suggests that current climate conditions are already conducive to considerable further expansion (>16,000 ha). Climate change may also exacerbate the expansion, particularly if river water levels drop, which will expose large bare areas propitious to seed germination. This phenomenon may be particularly important in one sector of the river, where existing common reed stands could increase their areas by a factor of 100, potentially creating the most extensive reedbed complex in North America. After colonizing salt and brackishwater marshes, the common reed could considerably expand into the freshwater marshes of North America which cover several million hectares. The effects of common reed expansion on biodiversity are difficult to predict, but likely to be highly deleterious given the competitiveness of the invader and the biological richness of freshwater

  11. Valuing the recreational benefits of wetland adaptation to climate change: a trade-off between species' abundance and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccioli, Michela; Riera Font, Antoni; Torres Figuerola, Catalina M

    2015-03-01

    Climate change will further exacerbate wetland deterioration, especially in the Mediterranean region. On the one side, it will accelerate the decline in the populations and species of plants and animals, this resulting in an impoverishment of biological abundance. On the other one, it will also promote biotic homogenization, resulting in a loss of species' diversity. In this context, different climate change adaptation policies can be designed: those oriented to recovering species' abundance and those aimed at restoring species' diversity. Based on the awareness that knowledge about visitors' preferences is crucial to better inform policy makers and secure wetlands' public use and conservation, this paper assesses the recreational benefits of different adaptation options through a choice experiment study carried out in S'Albufera wetland (Mallorca). Results show that visitors display positive preferences for an increase in both species' abundance and diversity, although they assign a higher value to the latter, thus suggesting a higher social acceptability of policies pursuing wetlands' differentiation. This finding acquires special relevance not only for adaptation management in wetlands but also for tourism planning, as most visitors to S'Albufera are tourists. Thus, given the growing competition to attract visitors and the increasing demand for high environmental quality and unique experiences, promoting wetlands' differentiation could be a good strategy to gain competitive advantage over other wetland areas and tourism destinations.

  12. Valuing the Recreational Benefits of Wetland Adaptation to Climate Change: A Trade-off Between Species' Abundance and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccioli, Michela; Riera Font, Antoni; Torres Figuerola, Catalina M.

    2015-03-01

    Climate change will further exacerbate wetland deterioration, especially in the Mediterranean region. On the one side, it will accelerate the decline in the populations and species of plants and animals, this resulting in an impoverishment of biological abundance. On the other one, it will also promote biotic homogenization, resulting in a loss of species' diversity. In this context, different climate change adaptation policies can be designed: those oriented to recovering species' abundance and those aimed at restoring species' diversity. Based on the awareness that knowledge about visitors' preferences is crucial to better inform policy makers and secure wetlands' public use and conservation, this paper assesses the recreational benefits of different adaptation options through a choice experiment study carried out in S'Albufera wetland (Mallorca). Results show that visitors display positive preferences for an increase in both species' abundance and diversity, although they assign a higher value to the latter, thus suggesting a higher social acceptability of policies pursuing wetlands' differentiation. This finding acquires special relevance not only for adaptation management in wetlands but also for tourism planning, as most visitors to S'Albufera are tourists. Thus, given the growing competition to attract visitors and the increasing demand for high environmental quality and unique experiences, promoting wetlands' differentiation could be a good strategy to gain competitive advantage over other wetland areas and tourism destinations.

  13. Modeling sediment accumulation in North American playa wetlands in response to climate change, 1940-2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, Lucy; Skagen, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Playa wetlands on the west-central Great Plains of North America are vulnerable to sediment infilling from upland agriculture, putting at risk several important ecosystem services as well as essential habitats and food resources of diverse wetland-dependent biota. Climate predictions for this semi-arid area indicate reduced precipitation which may alter rates of erosion, runoff, and sedimentation of playas. We forecasted erosion rates, sediment depths, and resultant playa wetland depths across the west-central Great Plains and examined the relative roles of land use context and projected changes in precipitation in the sedimentation process. We estimated erosion with the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) using historic values and downscaled precipitation predictions from three general circulation models and three emissions scenarios. We calibrated RUSLE results using field sediment measurements. RUSLE is appealing for regional scale modeling because it uses climate forecasts with monthly resolution and other widely available values including soil texture, slope and land use. Sediment accumulation rates will continue near historic levels through 2070 and will be sufficient to cause most playas (if not already filled) to fill with sediment within the next 100 years in the absence of mitigation. Land use surrounding the playa, whether grassland or tilled cropland, is more influential in sediment accumulation than climate-driven precipitation change.

  14. [Land Use Pattern Change and Regional Sustainability Evaluation of Wetland in Jiaogang Lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Cai, Yi-min; Bai, Yan-ying; Chen, Wei-ping; Yang, Xiu-chao

    2015-06-01

    Changes in land use and sustainability evaluation of wetland in Jiaogang Lake from 1995 to 2013 were analyzed, based on the land use change models and an index system, supported by RS, GIS, and social statistical data. The results showed: (1) dry land, paddy field, and building land were the predominant landscape in the study area. The arable land was mainly converted during 1995-2000, which was driven by the extension of agriculture, and the building land increased significantly during 2010-2013, which was driven by the tourism development. (2) Compared to the beginning research area, the building land increased by 123.3%, and the wetland decreased by 23.15%. The land system was at risk for a low proportion of wetland, scarcity of unused land, and the fragmented landscape. (3) The regional sustainability results were bad level, bad level, poor level, good level, and poor level during the different periods, with some room for improvement. (4) The fitness of regional sustainability in study area yielded satisfactory results in 2010, owing to the rapid growth of regional productivity and the regional stability. Since 2010, with the increasing environmental load, the regional sustainability fell down to the poor level. The obstruction of sustainable development is necessary to be addressed in the study area.

  15. Effects of Climatic Change on Evapotranspiration in Zhalong Wetland, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; XU Shiguo; SUN Leshi

    2006-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) process of plants is controlled by several factors. Besides the physiological factors of plants, height, density, LAI (leaf area index), etc., the change of meteorological factors, such as radiation, temperature,wind and precipitation, can influence ET process evidently, thus remodeling the spatial and temporal distribution of ET.In order to illuminate the effects of meteorological factors on wetland ET, the ET of Zhalong Wetland was calculated from 1961 to 2000, the statistical relationships (models) between ET and maximum temperature (Tmax), minimum temperature (Tmin), precipitation (P) and wind speed at 2m height (U2) were established, and the sensitivity analysis of the variables in the model was performed. The results show that Tmax and Tmin are two dominating factors that influence ET markedly, and the difference of rising rate between Tmax and Tmin determines the change trend of ET. With the climatic scenarios of four General Circulation Models (GCMs), the ET from 2001 to 2060 was predicted by the statistical model.Compared to the period of 1961-2000, the water consumption by ET will increase greatly in the future. According to the scenarios, the rise of Tmax (about 1.5℃ to 3.3℃) and Tmin (about 1.7℃ to 3.5℃) will cause an additional water consumption of 14.0%- 17.8% for reed swamp. The ecological water demand in Zhalong Wetland will become more severe.

  16. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Houston C; Rypel, Andrew L; Jiao, Yan; Haas, Carola A; Gorman, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006-2014) of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896-2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis). Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions.

  17. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houston C Chandler

    Full Text Available The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi, a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006-2014 of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896-2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis. Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions.

  18. The spatial extent of change in tropical forest ecosystem services in the Amazon delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo Barbosa, C. C.; Atkinson, P.; Dearing, J.

    2014-12-01

    Deltas hold major economic potential due their strategic location, close to seas and inland waterways, thereby supporting intense economic activity. The increasing pace of human development activities in coastal deltas over the past five decades has also strained environmental resources and produced extensive economic and sociocultural impacts. The Amazon delta is located in the Amazon Basin, North Brazil, the largest river basin on Earth and also one of the least understood. A considerable segment of the population living in the Amazon delta is directly dependent on the local extraction of natural resources for their livelihood. Areas sparsely inhabited may be exploited with few negative consequences for the environment. However, increasing pressure on ecosystem services is amplified by large fluxes of immigrants from other parts of the country, especially from the semi-arid zone in Northeast Brazil to the lowland forests of the Amazon delta. Here we present partial results from a bigger research project. Therefore, the focus will be on presenting an overview of the current state, and the extent of changes on forest related ecosystem services in the Amazon delta over the last three decades. We aggregated a multitude of datasets, from a variety of sources, for example, from satellite imagery such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the Global Inventory Modelling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and climate datasets at meteorological station level from the Brazilian National Institute of Meteorology (INMET) and social and economic statistics data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) and from the Brazilian Institute of Applied Economic Research (IPEA). Through analysis of socioeconomic and satellite earth observation data we were able to produce and present spatially-explicit information with the current state and transition in forest cover and its impacts to forest

  19. Warmer temperature accelerates methane emissions from the Zoige wetland on the Tibetan Plateau without changing methanogenic community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhao, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Zoige wetland, locating on the Tibet Plateau, accounts for 6.2% of organic carbon storage in China. However, the fate of the organic carbon storage in the Zoige wetland remains poorly understood despite the Tibetan Plateau is very sensitive to global climate change. As methane is an important greenhouse gas and methanogenesis is the terminal step in the decomposition of organic matter, understanding how methane emissions from the Zoige wetland is fundamental to elucidate the carbon cycle in alpine wetlands responding to global warming. In this study, microcosms were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and vegetation on methane emissions and microbial processes in the Zoige wetland soil. A positive correlation was observed between temperature and methane emissions. However, temperature had no effect on the main methanogenic pathway—acetotrophic methanogenesis. Moreover, methanogenic community composition was not related to temperature, but was associated with vegetation, which was also involved in methane emissions. Taken together, these results indicate temperature increases methane emissions in alpine wetlands, while vegetation contributes significantly to methanogenic community composition and is associated with methane emissions. These findings suggest that in alpine wetlands temperature and vegetation act together to affect methane emissions, which furthers a global warming feedback loop. PMID:26109512

  20. Changing spatial concentration of sectoral employment in China’s Pearl River Delta 1990 - 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Fangfang; Boerboom, Luc; Geertman, Stan; Hooimeijer, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Using county-level employment data, we analyse how the spatial concentration of jobs has changed in China's Pearl River Delta (PRD) between 1990 and 2005. Despite unique Chinese policies that exhibit strong influence on the economic landscape, we detect key parallels with the patterns found in class

  1. Changing spatial concentrations of sectorial employment in China's Pearl River Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, F.; Boerboom, L.; Geertman, S.C.M.; Hooimeijer, P.

    2012-01-01

    Using county-level employment data, we analyse how the spatial concentration of jobs has changed in China’s Pearl River Delta (PRD) between 1990 and 2005. Despite unique Chinese policies that exhibit strong influence on the economic landscape, we detect key parallels with the patterns found in class

  2. Changing spatial concentrations of sectorial employment in China's Pearl River Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, F.; Boerboom, L.; Geertman, S.C.M.; Hooimeijer, P.

    2012-01-01

    Using county-level employment data, we analyse how the spatial concentration of jobs has changed in China’s Pearl River Delta (PRD) between 1990 and 2005. Despite unique Chinese policies that exhibit strong influence on the economic landscape, we detect key parallels with the patterns found in

  3. Exploring the climate change concerns of striped catfish producers in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.A.; Truong, M.H.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Leemans, R.; Bosma, R.H.; Silva, De S.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions on and adaptations to climate change impacts of 235 pangasius farmers in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Data were collected using semi-structured household surveys in six provinces, from three regions along the Mekong river branches. A Chi-Square test was used to

  4. Vulnerability and impacts of climate change on forest and freshwater wetland ecosystems in Nepal: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsal, Pramod; Kumar, Lalit; Atreya, Kishor; Pant, Krishna Prasad

    2017-06-01

    Climate change (CC) threatens ecosystems in both developed and developing countries. As the impacts of CC are pervasive, global, and mostly irreversible, it is gaining worldwide attention. Here we review vulnerability and impacts of CC on forest and freshwater wetland ecosystems. We particularly look at investigations undertaken at different geographic regions in order to identify existing knowledge gaps and possible implications from such vulnerability in the context of Nepal along with available adaptation programs and national-level policy supports. Different categories of impacts which are attributed to disrupting structure, function, and habitat of both forest and wetland ecosystems are identified and discussed. We show that though still unaccounted, many facets of forest and freshwater wetland ecosystems of Nepal are vulnerable and likely to be impacted by CC in the near future. Provisioning ecosystem services and landscape-level ecosystem conservation are anticipated to be highly threatened with future CC. Finally, the need for prioritizing CC research in Nepal is highlighted to close the existing knowledge gap along with the implementation of adaptation measures based on existing location specific traditional socio-ecological system.

  5. Agricultural Climate Change and Wetland Agriculture Study under the Climate Change in the Sanjiang Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Minhua; LIU Xingtu; LI Xiujun

    2009-01-01

    With linear curvefitting, Mann-kendall method and Yamamoto method, ≥10 ℃accumulated temperature and precipitation from May to September of 6 meteorological stations (Baoqing, fujin, Jiamusi, Hegang, Jixi and Hulin) from 1978 to 2007 were used to explore 30-year agricultural climate change and trend in the Sanjiang Plain. The results showed that ≥10 ℃ accumulated temperature of the 6 stations have risen by 141.0 ℃ to 287.4 ℃ when estimated by their significant linear trends (n=30, α=0.05) over the last 30 years (1978 to 2007). The rates of warming for the last 30 years range from 4.70 ℃per year to 9.58 ℃ per year. There are not significant linear trends on precipitation from May to September of the 6 stations over the last 30 years. The period of 1978 to 1998 in which ≥10 ℃ accumulated temperature is lower is consistent with that in which there is more precipitation from May to September, and warming and drying period has occurred in the Sanjiang Plain since 1999. Under the background of warming and drying agricultural climate, high yield cultivation of Phragmites australis and establishment of Phragmites australis-fish (crab) symbiosis ecosystem in natural mire are the ways for reasonable use of natural wetland. The area of paddy fields has been increasing from 7.25×104 ha in 1978 to 121.2×104 ha in 2006. It is proposed that paddy field range should not be expanded blindly toward the north in the Sanjiang Plain, and chilling injury forecast and prevention should be pay attention to. In the area that the chilling injury happens frequently, the rotation between rice and other crops should be implemented. Measures, which combine drainage, store and irrigation, should be taken instead of single drainage on comprehensive control of regional low and wet croplands to ensure controlling drought and flood.

  6. CALCULATION AND ANALYSIS ON CHANGE OF AGRICULTURAL WATER CONSUMPTION IN THE CHANGJIANG DELTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The potential evapotranspiration of specific crops in the Changjiang Delta is calculated by using Penman-Monteith method, and an agricultural water consunption model in the area is developed on the basis of agricultural production situation. This model has higher precision compared with actual data and can reflect the actual status of agriculture water need. Considering the meteorological, hydrological, economical development situation of the Changjiang Delta, this paper calculates and analyzes the volumes of agricultural water consumption in 2000, 2010, 2030 and 2050 under different climate change conditions and different development speeds of urbanization in future. The result shows agriculture water demand increases with temperature rising and decreases obviously with cultivated area reducing. For the Changjiang Delta, the volume of agricultural water consumption in the future will less than that of present.

  7. Coping with Climate Change in A densely Populated Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritzema, H.P.; Loon-Steensma, Van J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The expected effects of climate change and economic and population growth have motivated the Netherlands government to reformulate its policies on flood protection and water management. Flood protection and drainage are needed to make this low-lying country habitable and suitable for agriculture and

  8. Climate change and ontological politics in the Dutch Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegwaard, A.; Petersen, A.C.; Wester, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper applies an ontological politics approach for studying how complexity, uncertainty, and ignorance are being dealt with in the Netherlands by looking at how knowledges are produced and incorporated in decision-making on uncertain climate change. On the basis of work done in the Netherlands,

  9. Study on driving forces of wetland change in the Western Liaohe River basin based on random forest model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Menghong; Yang, Changbao; Zhang, Yanhong; Lin, Nan

    2017-05-01

    Based on the platform of RS and GIS, random forest progression model is used for study driving force of wetland change in western Liaohe river basin, five influencing factors which include elevation, slope, temperature, precipitation and population density are chosen to establish random forest progression model about the wetland change and the driving factors. Using the the mean value of the prediction accuracy outside the bag calculated by the model to evaluate the importance of the variables. The result indicates that the coefficient of partial correlation between precipitation and wetland density is the largest among the five influencing factors, followed by temperature, population density, elevation and slope is smallest. The influence of natural factors on the change of wetland density is mainly reflected in precipitation and temperature factors, and the precipitation is obviously higher than that of temperature, under the influence of human factors, the influence of population density factor on wetland density is higher than that of elevation and slope factor. The result shows that in the past 40 years, the human activities in the study area have increased the density of wetland to some extent, but it is not the main factor.

  10. Regional Ecological Risk Assessment of Wetland in the Huanghe River Delta%黄河三角洲湿地区域生态风险评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许学工; 林辉平; 付在毅; 布仁仓

    2001-01-01

    以黄河三角洲为例进行了区域生态风险评价理论和方法的探讨。针对黄河三角洲主要生态风险源洪涝、干旱、风暴潮灾害、油田污染事故以及黄河断流的概率进行了分级评价;并提出度量生态损失与生态风险的指标和公式,分析了风险源的危害作用;运用遥感资料、历史记录、调查数据和地理信息系统(GIS)技术,完成了区域生态风险综合评价;在此基础上提出黄河三角洲的区域生态风险管理对策。%Through the case study of the wetland in the Huanghe River (Yellow River) delta,the concept of regional ecological risk assessment is inquired into,and a set of assessment method was developed.The main process of regional ecological risk assessment includes 5 stages:regional analysis,risk receptor selection,risk sources analysis,exposure and hazard analysis,and integrated risk assessment.Arming at flood,drought,storm tide,petroleum pollution accident and flow breaking in the lower Huanghe River,the probability and distribution of each kind of risk sources are evaluated.The authors bring forward indexes and formulas to measure hazarded degree and risk value of ecosystem.By using remote sensing data,historic record,survey data and by means of geographical information system (GIS),regional ecological risk assessment is finished.On the basis of assessment result,the environmental risk management countermeasure of the Huanghe River delta is advanced.

  11. Soil and periphyton indicators of anthropogenic water-quality changes in a rainfall-driven wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, P.V.

    2011-01-01

    Surface soils and periphyton communities were sampled across an oligotrophic, soft-water wetland to document changes associated with pulsed inputs of nutrient- and mineral-rich canal drainage waters. A gradient of canal-water influence was indicated by the surface-water specific conductance, which ranged between 743 and 963 ??S cm-1 in the canals to as low as 60 ??S cm-1 in the rainfall-driven wetland interior. Changes in soil chemistry and periphyton taxonomic composition across this gradient were described using piecewise regressions models. The greatest increase in soil phosphorus (P) concentration occurred at sites closest to the canal while soil mineral (sulfur, calcium) concentrations increased most rapidly at the lower end of the gradient. Multiple periphyton shifts occurred at the lower end of the gradient and included; (1) a decline in desmids and non-desmid filamentous chlorophytes, and their replacement by a diatom-dominated community; (2) the loss of soft-water diatom indicator species and their replacement by hard-water species. Increased dominance by cyanobacteria and eutrophic diatom indicators occurred closer to the canals. Soil and periphyton changes indicated four zones of increasing canal influence across the wetland: (1) a zone of increasing mineral concentrations where soft-water taxa remained dominant; (2) a transition towards hard-water, oligotrophic diatoms as mineral concentrations increased further; (3) a zone of dominance by these hard-water species; (4) a zone of rapidly increasing P concentrations and dominance by eutrophic taxa. In contrast to conclusions drawn from routine water-chemistry monitoring, measures of chemical and biological change presented here indicate that most of this rainfall-driven peatland receives some influence from canal discharges. These changes are multifaceted and induced by shifts in multiple chemical constituents. ?? 2010 US Government.

  12. Recent morphological changes in the Mekong and Bassac river channels, Mekong delta: The marked impact of river-bed mining and implications for delta destabilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Anthony, Edward J.; Goichot, Marc; Provansal, Mireille; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The Mekong delta, in Vietnam, is the world's third largest delta. Densely populated, the delta has been significantly armoured with engineering works and dykes to protect populations and infrastructure from storms, and shrimp farms from saltwater intrusion. Considerable development pressures in Vietnam and in the upstream countries have resulted in the construction of several dams in China and in important channel-bed aggregate extractions especially in Cambodia. The effects of these developments impact the delta dynamics in various ways. In this study, changes in the channel morphology of the Mekong proper and the Bassac, the two main distributaries in the 250 km-long deltaic reach from the Cambodian border to the coast, were analysed using channel depth data for 1998 and 2008. The channels display important and irregular bed changes over the 10-year comparison period, including significant incision and expansion and deepening of numerous pools. The mean depth of both channels increased by more than 1.3 m. Both channels also showed correlative significant bed material losses: respectively 90 million m3 in the Mekong and 110 million m3 in the Bassac over the 10-year period. These important losses over a relatively short period, and weak correlations between bed incision and hydraulic parameters suggest that the marked morphological changes are not in equilibrium with flow and sediment entrainment conditions, and are therefore not related to changes in river hydrology. We claim that aggregate extraction, currently practised on a very large scale in the Mekong delta channels and upstream of the delta, is the main cause of these recent morphological changes. These changes are deemed to contribute actively to rampant bank erosion in the delta as well as to erosion of the Mekong delta shoreline. Other contributory activities include the numerous dykes and embankments. The role of existing dams in bed losses remains unclear in the absence of reliable data on the Mekong

  13. Sediment record of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Liaohe River Delta wetland, Northeast China: Implications for regional population migration and economic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuanliang; Lin, Tian; Ye, Siyuan; Ding, Xigui; Li, Yuanyuan; Guo, Zhigang

    2017-03-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of a (210)Pb-dated sediment core extracted from the Liaohe River Delta wetland were measured to reconstruct the sediment record of PAHs and its response to human activity for the past 300 years in Northeast China. The concentrations of the 16 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency priority PAHs (∑16PAHs) ranged from 46 to 1167 ng g(-1) in this sediment core. The concentrations of the 16 PAHs (especially 4- and 5+6-ring PAHs) after the 1980s (surface sediments 0-6 cm) were one or two orders of magnitudes higher than those of the down-core samples. The exponential growth of 4-ring and 5+6-ring PAH concentrations after the 1980s responded well to the increased energy consumption and number of civil vehicles resulting from the rapid economic development in China. Prior to 1950, relatively low levels of the 16 PAHs and a high proportion of 2+3-ring PAHs was indicative of biomass burning as the main source of the PAHs. A significant increase in the 2 + 3 ring PAH concentration from the 1860s-1920s was observed and could be attributed to a constant influx of population migration into Northeast China. It was suggested that the link between historical trend of PAHs and population or energy use involves two different economic stages. Typically, in an agricultural economy, the greater the population size, the greater the emission of PAHs from biomass burning, while in an industrial economy, the increase in sedimentary PAH concentrations is closely related to increasing energy consumption of fossil fuels.

  14. Possible adaptation measures of agriculture sector in the Nile Delta to climate change impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Attaher

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The overall agricultural system in the Nile Delta region is considered as one of the highest intensive and complicated agriculture systems in the world. According to the recent studies, the Nile Delta region is one of the highly vulnerable regions in the world to climate change. Sea level rise, soil and water degradation, undiversified crop-pattern, yield reduction, pests and disease severity, and irrigation and drainage management were the main key factors that increased vulnerability of the agriculture sector in that region. The main objective of this study is to conduct a community-based multi-criteria adaptation assessment in the Nile Delta using a preset questionnaire. A list of possible adaptation measures for agriculture sector was evaluated. The results indicated that the Nile Delta growers have strong perceptions to act positively to reduce the impacts of climate change. They reflected the need to improve the their adaptive capacity based on clear scientific message with adequate governmental support to coop with the negative impacts of climate change.

  15. A study of the climate change impacts on fluvial flood propagation in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, P. D. T.; Popescu, I.; van Griensven, A.; Solomatine, D. P.; Trung, N. H.; Green, A.

    2012-12-01

    The present paper investigated the extent of the flood propagation in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta under different projected flood hydrographs, considering the 2000 flood event (the 20-yr return period event, T. V. H. Le et al., 2007) as the basis for computation. The analysis herein was done to demonstrate the particular complexity of the flood dynamics, which was simulated by the 1-D modelling system ISIS used by the Mekong River Commission. The floods of the year 2050 are simulated using a projected sea level rise of +30 cm. The future flood hydrograph changes at Kratie, Cambodia, were also applied for the upstream boundary condition by using an adjusted regional climate model. Two future flood hydrographs were applied at the upstream part of the delta, the first one in a scenario of climate change without considering developments in the Mekong Basin,and the second one in a scenario of climate change taking into account future development of the delta. Analyses were done to identify the areas sensitive to floods, considering the uncertainty of the projection of both the upstream and downstream boundary conditions. In addition, due to the rice-dominated culture in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta, possible impacts of floods on the rice-based farming systems were also analysed.

  16. A study of the climate change impacts on fluvial flood propagation in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. T. Van

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigated the extent of the flood propagation in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta under different projected flood hydrographs, considering the 2000 flood event (the 20-yr return period event, T. V. H. Le et al., 2007 as the basis for computation. The analysis herein was done to demonstrate the particular complexity of the flood dynamics, which was simulated by the 1-D modelling system ISIS used by the Mekong River Commission. The floods of the year 2050 are simulated using a projected sea level rise of +30 cm. The future flood hydrograph changes at Kratie, Cambodia, were also applied for the upstream boundary condition by using an adjusted regional climate model. Two future flood hydrographs were applied at the upstream part of the delta, the first one in a scenario of climate change without considering developments in the Mekong Basin,and the second one in a scenario of climate change taking into account future development of the delta. Analyses were done to identify the areas sensitive to floods, considering the uncertainty of the projection of both the upstream and downstream boundary conditions. In addition, due to the rice-dominated culture in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta, possible impacts of floods on the rice-based farming systems were also analysed.

  17. Development of sea level rise scenarios for climate change assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Thomas W.; Day, Richard H.; Michot, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Rising sea level poses critical ecological and economical consequences for the low-lying megadeltas of the world where dependent populations and agriculture are at risk. The Mekong Delta of Vietnam is one of many deltas that are especially vulnerable because much of the land surface is below mean sea level and because there is a lack of coastal barrier protection. Food security related to rice and shrimp farming in the Mekong Delta is currently under threat from saltwater intrusion, relative sea level rise, and storm surge potential. Understanding the degree of potential change in sea level under climate change is needed to undertake regional assessments of potential impacts and to formulate adaptation strategies. This report provides constructed time series of potential sea level rise scenarios for the Mekong Delta region by incorporating (1) aspects of observed intra- and inter-annual sea level variability from tide records and (2) projected estimates for different rates of regional subsidence and accelerated eustacy through the year 2100 corresponding with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) climate models and emission scenarios.

  18. WISE USE OF WETLAND FOR SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOOD THROUGH PARTICIPATORY APPROACH: A CASE OF ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haq A H M Rezaul; Tapan Kumar Ghosal; Pritam Ghosh; M Aminul Islam

    2005-01-01

    The facts showed that the number of unemployment people is increasing and a large part of them live in the low-lying areas to be facing the challenge from impacts of climate change. So adaptive capacity of the poverty level for sustainable livelihood in vulnerable wetlands is related to coping with local climate change. This paper focuses on soil-less agriculture (Hydroponics) as an alternative source of livelihood means for the communities having no lands for cultivation. Approximately half of Bangladesh is covered with wetlands. The prospect of enormous productivity lies in the development of wetland resources. The soil-less agriculture is an indigenous practice in the middle of southwestern part of Bangladesh. The people who lives within the wetland ecosystems uses locally available paddy straws, water hyacinths and various invasively aquatic plants for making the floating mat or organic bed on which crops, vegetables and seedlings are grown. The productivity of this farming system is much higher than that of terrestrials agricultural and the system can support fisheries of open water. The compost generated from organic refuse bed is a kind of enriched nutrient and can act as a soil conditioner. It would be a major source of nutrients in aquaculture as well. The system is capable to ensure more agriculture production by restoring wetlands from aquatic invasive plant. In addition, the technology included of the system is friendly to ecosystem of wetlands.

  19. Wetland Monitoring Using the Curvelet-Based Change Detection Method on Polarimetric SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schmitt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One fundamental task in wetland monitoring is the regular mapping of (temporarily flooded areas especially beneath vegetation. Due to the independence of weather and illumination conditions, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR sensors could provide a suitable data base. Using polarimetric modes enables the identification of flooded vegetation by means of the typical double-bounce scattering. In this paper three decomposition techniques—Cloude-Pottier, Freeman-Durden, and Normalized Kennaugh elements—are compared to each other in terms of identifying the flooding extent as well as its temporal change. The image comparison along the time series is performed with the help of the Curvelet-based Change Detection Method. The results indicate that the decomposition algorithm has a strong impact on the robustness and reliability of the change detection. The Normalized Kennaugh elements turn out to be the optimal representation for Curvelet-based change detection processing. Furthermore, the co-polarized channels (same transmit and receive polarization in horizontal (HH and vertical (VV direction respectively appear to be sufficient for wetland monitoring so that dual-co-polarized imaging modes could be an alternative to conventional quad-polarized acquisitions.

  20. Determining Water Quality Trends in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Watershed in the Face of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynett, K.; Azimi-Gaylon, S.; Doidic, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Marsh (Delta) is the largest estuary on the West Coast of the Americas and is a resource of local, State, and national significance. The Delta is simultaneously the most critical component of California's water supply, a primary focus of the state's ecological conservation measures, and a vital resource deeply imperiled by degraded water quality. Delta waterbodies are identified as impaired by salinity, excess nutrients, low dissolved oxygen, pathogens, pesticides, heavy metals, and other contaminants. Climate change is expected to exacerbate the impacts of existing stressors in the Delta and magnify the challenges of managing this natural resource. A clear understanding of the current state of the watershed is needed to better inform scientists, decision makers, and the public about potential impacts from climate change. The Delta Watershed Initiative Network (Delta WIN) leverages the ecological benefits of healthy watersheds, and enhances, expands and creates opportunities for greater watershed health by coordinating with agencies, established programs, and local organizations. At this critical junction, Delta WIN is coordinating data integration and analysis to develop better understanding of the existing and emerging water quality concerns. As first steps, Delta WIN is integrating existing water quality data, analyzing trends, and monitoring to fill data gaps and to evaluate indicators of climate change impacts. Available data will be used for trend analysis; Delta WIN will continue to monitor where data is incomplete and new questions arise. Understanding how climate change conditions may affect water quality will be used to inform efforts to build resilience and maintain water quality levels which sustain aquatic life and human needs. Assessments of historical and new data will aid in recognition of potential climate change impacts and in initiating implementation of best management practices in collaboration with

  1. 基于遥感的辽河三角洲湿地生态系统服务价值评估%Value evaluation on ecosystem function of wetland in Liaohe River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    索安宁; 赵冬至; 卫宝泉; 陈艳拢

    2009-01-01

    利用中巴资源卫星对辽河三角洲盘锦湿地类型进行调查的基础上,综合应用环境经济学、资源经济学等方法对辽河三角洲湿地生态系统的服务功能价值进行了评估,得出该区域湿地生态系统的服务功能总价值为90.243×108元RMB.休闲娱乐、大气组分调节、物质生产和水文调节是该区域湿地生态系统服务功能价值的主要贡献者,分别占到系统总服务功能价值的25.93%、25.03%、22.35%和20.44%.%The main Liaohe River Delta is a wetland ecosystem, including the reef swamp, paddy field, mud flat, river, crab and shrimp field, barren mud and met meadow act surveyed by the remote sensing images of China-Brazil resource satellite. The evaluation on the main services in the wetland ecosystem of Liaohe River Delta was done by methods of environmental economics, resource economics, engineer building value and tour value. The total value in the wetland ecosystem services of Liaohe River Delta is about 90.243×108RMB. Among these services, the order of service value is: material output > air ingredients control > leisure service > flood control > habituating protection > culture service > pollution purification, with contribution of 25.93, 25.03, 22.35, 20.44, 3.17, 1.71 and 1.37%, respectively.

  2. Projecting impacts of climate change on hydrological conditions and biotic responses in a chalk valley riparian wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, A. R.; Thompson, J. R.; Acreman, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Projected changes in climate are likely to substantially impact wetland hydrological conditions that will in turn have implications for wetland ecology. Assessing ecohydrological impacts of climate change requires models that can accurately simulate water levels at the fine-scale resolution to which species and communities respond. Hydrological conditions within the Lambourn Observatory at Boxford, Berkshire, UK were simulated using the physically based, distributed model MIKE SHE, calibrated to contemporary surface and groundwater levels. The site is a 10 ha lowland riparian wetland where complex geological conditions and channel management exert strong influences on the hydrological regime. Projected changes in precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, channel discharge and groundwater level were derived from the UK Climate Projections 2009 ensemble of climate models for the 2080s under different scenarios. Hydrological impacts of climate change differ through the wetland over short distances depending on the degree of groundwater/surface-water interaction. Discrete areas of groundwater upwelling are associated with an exaggerated response of water levels to climate change compared to non-upwelling areas. These are coincident with regions where a weathered chalk layer, which otherwise separates two main aquifers, is absent. Simulated water levels were linked to requirements of the MG8 plant community and Desmoulin's whorl snail (Vertigo moulinsiana) for which the site is designated. Impacts on each are shown to differ spatially and in line with hydrological impacts. Differences in water level requirements for this vegetation community and single species highlight the need for separate management strategies in distinct areas of the wetland.

  3. China’s wetland change (1990-2000) determined by remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Two wetland maps for the entire China have been produced based on Landsat data acquired around 1990 and 2000. Wetlands in China have been divided into 3 broad categories with 15 sub-categories except rice fields. In 1990, the total wetland area in China was 355208 km2 whereas in 2000 it dropped to 304849 km2 with a net loss of 50360 km2. During an approximate 10-year period, inland wetland reduced from 318326 to 257922 km2, coastal wetland dropped from 14335 to 12015 km2, while artificial wetland increased from 22546 to 34911 km2. The greatest natural wetland loss occurred in Heilongjiang, Inner Mon- golia, and Jilin with a total loss of over 57000 km2 of wetland. In western China, over 13000 km2 of wetlands were newly formed in Xinjiang, Tibet, and Qinghai. About 12000 km2 of artificial wetlands were also added for fish farm and reservoir constructions. The newly formed wetlands in western China were caused primarily by climate warming over that region whereas the newly created artificial wetlands were caused by economic developments. China’s wetland loss is caused mainly by human activities.

  4. Temperature change and its effect factors in the Yangtze Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Tang, Xu; Cui, Linli; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2007-09-01

    Based on the meteorological data, land use date from TM images and social statistical data, the evidences of regional temperature change with the elements of mean annual temperature, mean annual maximum and minimum temperature, and extreme high and low temperature from 1959 to 2005, were detected, and the impact of human activities on temperature was analyzed in the Yangtze Delta region. The results indicated an increase in mean annual temperature, mean annual maximum and minimum temperature. Mean annual temperature in all cities in the region increased, and the increase rate in winter was greater than that in spring and autumn. The increase of mean annual maximum and minimum temperature was similar to that of mean annual temperature spatially. In 3 stations of Shanghai, Nanjing and Hangzhou, most hot days, least cold days and the highest mean temperature all appeared in the first 5 years in this century. Land use changed greatly, and a large amount of cropland was replaced with residential and constructional areas (R/C areas) from 1980 to 2000 in the Yangtze Delta region. The change of mean annual temperature was partly corresponding to the change of land use. Total registered population increased rapidly in 16 cities of the Yangtze Delta region, and a good linear correlation between the tendency ratio of total registered population and the mean annual temperature in 16 cities from 1978 to 2005. Total amount of energy consumption and GDP increased in 3 provinces of Shanghai, Jiangsu and Zhejiang where the Yangtze Delta located, both the final consumption of energy by industry and GDP had a relatively good linear relationship with the mean annual temperature in Shanghai from 1952 to 2005. This paper will help the understanding and attribution of climate change and simulation of the future response of weather-related disasters under various global change scenarios.

  5. A Model of Ecological Recycling Economy in Liaohe River Delta Wetland%辽河三角洲湿地生态循环经济模式探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于长斌; 刘新宇

    2012-01-01

    辽河三角洲湿地是我国重要的湿地资源之一.随着经济和社会的快速发展,人们对辽河口湿地土壤、水、生物、矿产等资源的掠夺越来越严重,湿地资源过度开发,湿地退化严重,生态环境失衡.因此,如何保护和利用好辽河口湿地资源并实现良性的生态循环经济,已成为迫切需要解决的问题.根据可持续性评价目标提出了建立生态循环经济模式的5大评价标准:生产性、稳定性、保护性、经济可行性和社会承受力,在此基础上探讨了3种生态循环经济模式.%Liaohe River delta was one of the important wetland resources in China. With the rapid development of economy and society, exploitation of wetland resources such as soil, water, organisms, and minerals were increasingly serious. Over exploitation of wetland resources has led to severe wetland degradation and serious ecological imbalance. Therefore, how to protect and make good use of wetland resources and realize the benign ecological recycling economy has become an urgent problem. According to the objectives of assessment of sustainable development, five evaluation criteria were proposed for the model of ecological recycling economy, productivity, stability, protection, economic feasibility and social tolerance. Moreover, 3 models of ecological recycling economy were discussed in the paper.

  6. Characteristics Process of Land Use Changes in the Yangtze River Delta,Chian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PULIJIE; YANGGUISHAN; 等

    2001-01-01

    As one of the developing countries China has an arable land per capita far below the world's average level.With a high-density population an the quick development of economy and urbaniztion,the Yangtze River Delta shows the typical characteristics of land use in developed regions of China,which are:high land reclamation rate and low arable land per capita;intensive land use and high output value;and rapid increasing of construction land area and fast diminishing of arable land.The analysis indicates that the process of the arable land changes in the Yangtze River Delta could be divided into four different change stages over the past 50 years.

  7. Can isolated and riparian wetlands mitigate the impact of climate change on watershed hydrology? A case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, M; Rousseau, A N

    2016-12-15

    The effects of wetlands on stream flows are well established, namely mitigating flow regimes through water storage and slow water release. However, their effectiveness in reducing flood peaks and sustaining low flows is mainly driven by climate conditions and wetland type with respect to their connectivity to the hydrographic network (i.e. isolated or riparian wetlands). While some studies have demonstrated these hydrological functions/services, few of them have focused on the benefits to the hydrological regimes and their evolution under climate change (CC) and, thus, some gaps persist. The objective of this study was to further advance our knowledge with that respect. The PHYSITEL/HYDROTEL modelling platform was used to assess current and future states of watershed hydrology of the Becancour and Yamaska watersheds, Quebec, Canada. Simulation results showed that CC will induce similar changes on mean seasonal flows, namely larger and earlier spring flows leading to decreases in summer and fall flows. These expected changes will have different effects on 20-year and 100-year peak flows with respect to the considered watershed. Nevertheless, conservation of current wetland states should: (i) for the Becancour watershed, mitigate the potential increase in 2-year, 20-year and 100-year peak flows; and (ii) for the Yamaska watershed, accentuate the potential decrease in the aforementioned indicators. However, any loss of existing wetlands would be detrimental for 7-day 2-year and 10-year as well as 30-day 5-year low flows. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Holocene mangrove and coastal environmental changes in the western Ganga–Brahmaputra Delta, India

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    A 50 m-long radiocarbon dated core was studied through sediment and pollen analysis to reconstruct the Holocene mangrove and environmental changes at a coastal site Pakhiralaya in the Sundarban Biosphere Reserve in the western Ganga–Brahmaputra Delta, India. This biosphere reserve harbours a diverse mangrove ecosystem and supports a large number of people living in the area. Pollen and stratigraphic data indicate the existence of a brackish water estuarine mangrove swamp forest in this area d...

  9. Attribution of changes in global wetland methane emissions from pre-industrial to present using CLM4.5-BGC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Rajendra; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Hess, Peter G. M.; Meng, Lei; Riley, William J.

    2016-03-01

    An understanding of potential factors controlling methane emissions from natural wetlands is important to accurately project future atmospheric methane concentrations. Here, we examine the relative contributions of climatic and environmental factors, such as precipitation, temperature, atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, wetland inundation extent, and land-use and land-cover change, on changes in wetland methane emissions from preindustrial to present day (i.e., 1850-2005). We apply a mechanistic methane biogeochemical model integrated in the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5), the land component of the Community Earth System Model. The methane model explicitly simulates methane production, oxidation, ebullition, transport through aerenchyma of plants, and aqueous and gaseous diffusion. We conduct a suite of model simulations from 1850 to 2005, with all changes in environmental factors included, and sensitivity studies isolating each factor. Globally, we estimate that preindustrial methane emissions were higher by 10% than present-day emissions from natural wetlands, with emissions changes from preindustrial to the present of +15%, -41%, and -11% for the high latitudes, temperate regions, and tropics, respectively. The most important change is due to the estimated change in wetland extent, due to the conversion of wetland areas to drylands by humans. This effect alone leads to higher preindustrial global methane fluxes by 33% relative to the present, with the largest change in temperate regions (+80%). These increases were partially offset by lower preindustrial emissions due to lower CO2 levels (10%), shifts in precipitation (7%), lower nitrogen deposition (3%), and changes in land-use and land-cover (2%). Cooler temperatures in the preindustrial regions resulted in our simulations in an increase in global methane emissions of 6% relative to present day. Much of the sensitivity to these perturbations is mediated in the model by changes in

  10. Climate change and special habitats in the Blue Mountains: Riparian areas, wetlands, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems [Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Sabine Mellmann-Brown

    2017-01-01

    In the Blue Mountains, climate change is likely to have significant, long-term implications for freshwater resources, including riparian areas, wetlands (box 7.1), and groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs, box 7.2). Climate change is expected to cause a transition from snow to rain, resulting in diminished snowpack and shifts in streamflow to earlier in the season (...

  11. Climate Change Impact On Mekong Delta of Vietnam in recent years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, L. T. X., III

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the climate change signal increase globally. Abnormal changes of weather tends increasingly detrimental to human life, such as natural disasters occur with increasing level of more severe. Climate change is one the biggest challenges, and is a potential threat to humans. The impact of climate change increases the number and extent of the disaster fierce exists as typhoons, floods, droughts ... Global warming and sea level rise increases the area of flooding, saline intrusion and erosion in the delta region may cause farmers to lose the opportunity to produce, source of life their only. Impact of climate change on people in the community, but poor farmers in the developing countries like our country, women are the most severe consequences In this section, we summarize changes in climate on the territory of Vietnam, especially in Mekong Delta evaluate causes and its relationship to changes in global climate and region. Along with the analysis of characteristics of climate changes over time and through space to help the evolution of the standard deviation (average deviation from the standard of the period from 1971 to 2015) may indicate that the characteristic gas scenes took place related to global climate change ... Vietnam's territory stretches over approximately 15 latitude, the terrain is very complex, located in the interior full of tropical Southeast Asia. Vietnam climate strongly influenced by the Asian monsoon, monsoon and Northern Hemisphere especially the ENSO activity in the equatorial region and the Pacific Ocean. Climate Vietnam abundant and diversified, with strong ties to the region and globally.

  12. Paleo-environmental changes in the Yangtze Delta during past 8000 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGQiang; JIANGTong; SHIYafeng; LorenzKING; LIUChunling; MartinMETZLER

    2004-01-01

    The Yangtze Delta is one of the economically most developed areas in China. It is located in the eastern China monsoon region. Archaeological excavations and environment-archaeology studies over many years in this region provide exceptional information about climate changes, development of human civilization and also human-environment interactions. Archaeological excavations made in the study region reveal that the development of Neolithic cultures is not continuous, which may be a result of extreme climatic events. The analysis of 14C-dated buried paleotrees, peat and shell ridges show the rise and fall of human civilization in the study area. The research results presented in this paper confirm that human civilization collapsed six times in the Yangtze Delta, matching six high sea level epoches, peat accumulation and buried paleotrees formation periods respectively. This indicates that human activities in the Yangtze Delta are controlled by local climate changes and changing hydrological conditions. The collapse of the Liangzhu culture (5000 aBP-3800 aBP) in about 4000 aBP, after a tremendous flooding event, followed by a relatively backward Maqiao culture (3800 aBP-3200 aBP) confused researchers and aroused their great interest. The research results in this paper show that the collapse of the Liangzhu culture is a result of several factors, for example war and food shortage, but the flooding event occurred in the late Liangzhu culture epoch is the main factor therein.

  13. Climate Change and Poverty: Sustainable Approach in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogbeibu, A.E. [University of Benin, Benin City, Edo State (Nigeria). Department of Animal and Environmental Biology; Uyigue, E. [Community Research and Development Centre, Benin, Edo State (Nigeria)

    2008-09-30

    The Niger Delta region is the bedrock of Nigeria's oil production, which accounts for 97% of the government total revenue. Since the discovery of oil in the region, oil exploration and exploitation have caused severe climate and environmental changes which have impacted the lives of the inhabitant adversely. Prior to the discovery of oil, the people of the Niger Delta made their living from the exploitation of the resources of the land, water and forest as farmers, fishermen and hunters, this made them attached to and protective of their environment. The devastating impacts of the oil industries on farmland, crops, economic trees, creeks, lakes and other components of the environment are so severe that the people can no longer engage in productive farming, fishing and hunting as they use to do. The most affected groups are women and children. This paper highlights in details the climatic and environmental changes that have occurred in the Niger Delta region and shows the relationship between these changes and poverty. It reveals the weaknesses and deficiencies in the Nigerian Constitution in administering environmental rights to the people and suggests institutional and constitutional solution to the environmental degradation in the region and elsewhere.

  14. Holocene environmental changes in northeast Thailand as reconstructed from a tropical wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Barbara; Klubseang, Wichuratree; Inthongkaew, Suda; Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Blaauw, Maarten; Reimer, Paula J.; Chabangborn, Akkaneewut; Löwemark, Ludvig; Chawchai, Sakonvan

    2012-07-01

    Geochemical variables (TOC, C/N, TS, δ13C) and diatom assemblages were analyzed in a lake sediment sequence from Nong (Lake) Han Kumphawapi in northeast Thailand to reconstruct regional climatic and environmental history during the Holocene. By around c. 10,000-9400 cal yr BP, a large shallow freshwater lake had formed in the Kumphawapi basin. Oxygenated bottom waters and a well-mixed water column were characteristic of this early lake stage, which was probably initiated by higher effective moisture and a stronger summer monsoon. Decreased run-off after c. 6700 cal yr BP favored increased aquatic productivity in the shallow lake. Multiple proxies indicate a marked lowering of the lake level around 5900 cal yr BP, the development of an extensive wetland around 5400 cal yr BP, and the subsequent transition to a peatland. The shift from shallow lake to wetland and later to a peatland is interpreted as a response to lower effective moisture. A hiatus at the transition from wetland to peatland suggests very low accumulation rates, which may result from very dry climatic conditions. A rise in groundwater and lake level around 3200 cal yr BP allowed the re-establishment of a wetland in the Kumphawapi basin. However, the sediments deposited between c. 3200 and 1600 cal yr BP provide evidence for at least two hiatuses at c. 2700-2500 cal yr BP, and at c. 1900-1600 cal yr BP, which would suggest surface dryness and consequently periods of low effective moisture. Around 1600 cal yr BP a new shallow lake became re-established in the basin. Although the underlying causes for this new lake phase remain unclear, we hypothesize that higher effective moisture was the main driving force. This shallow lake phase continued up to the present but was interrupted by higher nutrient fluxes to the lake around 1000-600 cal yr BP. Whether this was caused by intensified human impact in the catchment or, whether this signals a lowering of the lake level due to reduced effective moisture

  15. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  16. Potential control of climatic changes on flood events in the Yangtze Delta during 1100-2002

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGTong; ZHANGQiang; YvesGUERNOND

    2004-01-01

    Wide collection on the historic records of the climatic changes and flood events is performed in the Yangtze Delta. Man-Kendall (MK) method is applied to explore the changing trends of the time series of the flood discharge and the maximum high summer temperature. The research results indicate that the flood magnitudes increased during the transition from the medieval warm interval into the early Little Ice Age. Fluctuating climate changes of the Little Ice Age characterized by arid climate events followed by the humid and cold climate conditions give rise to the frequent flood hazards. Low-lying terrain made the study region prone to the flood hazards, storm fide and typhoon. MK analysis reveals that the jumping point of the time series of the flood discharge changes occurred in the mid-1960s, that of the maximum summer temperature changes in the mid-1990s, andthe exact jump point in 1993. The flood discharge changes are on negative trend before the 1990s, they are on positive tendency after the 1990s; the maximum high summer temperature changes are on negative trend before the 1990s and on positive tendency after the 1990s. These results indicate that the trend of flood discharge matches that of the maximum high summer temperature in the Yangtze Delta. The oecarrence probability of the maximum high summer temperature will be increasing under the climatic wanning scenario and which will in turn increase the oecarrence probability of the flood events. More active solar action epochs and the higher sea surface temperature index (SST index) ofthe south Pacific Ocean area lying between 4°N-4°S and 150°W-90°W correspond to increased annual precipitation, flood discharge and oecarrence frequency of floods in the Yangtze Delta. This is partly beeanse the intensified solar activities and the higher SST index give rise to accelerated hydrological circulation from ocean surface to the continent, resulting in increased precipitation on the continent.

  17. Effect of land use/cover change on land surface temperatures - The Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereher, Mohamed E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study remote sensing techniques were employed to investigate the impact of land use/cover change on land surface temperatures (LST) for a highly dynamic landscape, i.e. the Nile Delta. Land use change was determined from analyzing a 15 years of bi-monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) dataset acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra satellite along with a synchronized 13 years of bi-monthly LST dataset retrieved from MODIS Aqua satellite. Time series analysis for NDVI and LST data was carried out at selected locations experiencing land use change. Mean LST change was determined for each location before and after the land use change. Results indicate that NDVI composite data for 15 years proved sufficient for delineating land use change. Significant spatial changes include the transformation from agriculture to urban land, which increased the LST by 1.7 °C during the 13 years and the transformation of bare land to agriculture, which decreased the LST by 0.52 °C for the same period. Due to the explosive population growth in the Nile Delta, urban encroachment upon agricultural land could, hence, promote a prolonged regional warming by modifying the micro-climate and other climate-related phenomena.

  18. Functional and phylogenetic relatedness in temporary wetland invertebrates: current macroecological patterns and implications for future climatic change scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhí, Albert; Boix, Dani; Gascón, Stéphanie; Sala, Jordi; Batzer, Darold P

    2013-01-01

    In freshwater ecosystems, species compositions are known to be determined hierarchically by large to small‑scale environmental factors, based on the biological traits of the organisms. However, in ephemeral habitats this heuristic framework remains largely untested. Although temporary wetland faunas are constrained by a local filter (i.e., desiccation), we propose its magnitude may still depend on large-scale climate characteristics. If this is true, climate should be related to the degree of functional and taxonomic relatedness of invertebrate communities inhabiting seasonal wetlands. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. First, based on 52 biological traits for invertebrates, we conducted a case study to explore functional trends among temperate seasonal wetlands differing in the harshness (i.e., dryness) of their dry season. After finding evidence of trait filtering, we addressed whether it could be generalized across a broader climatic scale. To this end, a meta-analysis (225 seasonal wetlands spread across broad climatic categories: Arid, Temperate, and Cold) allowed us to identify whether an equivalent climate-dependent pattern of trait richness was consistent between the Nearctic and the Western Palearctic. Functional overlap of invertebrates increased from mild (i.e., Temperate) to harsher climates (i.e., Arid and Cold), and phylogenetic clustering (using taxonomy as a surrogate) was highest in Arid and lowest in Temperate wetlands. We show that, (i) as has been described in streams, higher relatedness than would be expected by chance is generally observed in seasonal wetland invertebrate communities; and (ii) this relatedness is not constant but climate-dependent, with the climate under which a given seasonal wetland is located determining the functional overlap and the phylogenetic clustering of the community. Finally, using a space-for-time substitution approach we suggest our results may anticipate how the invertebrate biodiversity embedded in these

  19. Functional and phylogenetic relatedness in temporary wetland invertebrates: current macroecological patterns and implications for future climatic change scenarios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Ruhí

    Full Text Available In freshwater ecosystems, species compositions are known to be determined hierarchically by large to small‑scale environmental factors, based on the biological traits of the organisms. However, in ephemeral habitats this heuristic framework remains largely untested. Although temporary wetland faunas are constrained by a local filter (i.e., desiccation, we propose its magnitude may still depend on large-scale climate characteristics. If this is true, climate should be related to the degree of functional and taxonomic relatedness of invertebrate communities inhabiting seasonal wetlands. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. First, based on 52 biological traits for invertebrates, we conducted a case study to explore functional trends among temperate seasonal wetlands differing in the harshness (i.e., dryness of their dry season. After finding evidence of trait filtering, we addressed whether it could be generalized across a broader climatic scale. To this end, a meta-analysis (225 seasonal wetlands spread across broad climatic categories: Arid, Temperate, and Cold allowed us to identify whether an equivalent climate-dependent pattern of trait richness was consistent between the Nearctic and the Western Palearctic. Functional overlap of invertebrates increased from mild (i.e., Temperate to harsher climates (i.e., Arid and Cold, and phylogenetic clustering (using taxonomy as a surrogate was highest in Arid and lowest in Temperate wetlands. We show that, (i as has been described in streams, higher relatedness than would be expected by chance is generally observed in seasonal wetland invertebrate communities; and (ii this relatedness is not constant but climate-dependent, with the climate under which a given seasonal wetland is located determining the functional overlap and the phylogenetic clustering of the community. Finally, using a space-for-time substitution approach we suggest our results may anticipate how the invertebrate biodiversity

  20. Modelling contrasting responses of wetland productivity to changes in water table depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Grant

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Responses of wetland productivity to changes in water table depth (WTD are controlled by complex interactions among several soil and plant processes, and hence are site-specific rather than general in nature. Hydrological controls on wetland productivity were studied by representing these interactions in connected hummock and hollow sites in the ecosystem model ecosys, and by testing CO2 and energy fluxes from the model with those measured by eddy covariance (EC during years with contrasting WTD in a shrub fen at Lost Creek, WI. Modelled interactions among coupled processes for O2 transfer, O2 uptake, C oxidation, N mineralization, N uptake and C fixation by diverse microbial, root and mycorrhizal populations enabled the model to simulate complex responses of CO2 exchange to changes in WTD that depended on the WTD at which change was occurring. At the site scale, greater WTD caused the model to simulate greater CO2 influxes and effluxes over hummocks vs. hollows, as has been found at field sites. At the landscape scale, greater WTD caused the model to simulate greater diurnal CO2 influxes and effluxes under cooler weather when water tables were shallow, but also smaller diurnal CO2 influxes and effluxes under warmer weather when water tables were deeper, as was also apparent in the EC flux measurements. At an annual time scale, these diurnal responses to WTD in the model caused lower net primary productivity (NPP and heterotrophic respiration (Rh, but higher net ecosystem productivity (NEP = NPP − Rh, to be simulated in a cooler year with a shallower water table than in a warmer year with a deeper one. This difference in NEP was consistent with those estimated from gap-filled EC fluxes in years with different water tables at Lost Creek and at similar boreal fens elsewhere. In sensitivity tests of the model, annual NEP

  1. Modelling contrasting responses of wetland productivity to changes in water table depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Grant

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Responses of wetland productivity to changes in water table depth (WTD are controlled by complex interactions among several soil and plant processes, and hence are site-specific rather than general in nature. Hydrological controls on wetland productivity were studied by representing these interactions in connected hummock and hollow sites in the ecosystem model ecosys, and by testing CO2 and energy fluxes from the model with those measured by eddy covariance (EC during years with contrasting WTD in a shrub fen at Lost Creek, WI. Modelled interactions among coupled processes for O2 transfer, O2 uptake, C oxidation, N mineralization, N uptake and C fixation by diverse microbial, root, mycorrhizal and shoot populations enabled the model to simulate complex responses of CO2 exchange to changes in WTD that depended on the WTD at which change was occurring. At the site scale, greater WTD caused the model to simulate greater CO2 influxes and effluxes over hummocks vs. hollows, as has been found at field sites. At the landscape scale, greater WTD caused the model to simulate greater diurnal CO2 influxes and effluxes under cooler weather when water tables were shallow, but also smaller diurnal CO2 influxes and effluxes under warmer weather when water tables were deeper, as was also apparent in the EC flux measurements. At an annual time scale, these diurnal responses to WTD in the model caused lower net primary productivity (NPP and heterotrophic respiration (Rh, but higher net ecosystem productivity (NEP = NPP – Rh, to be simulated in a cooler year with a shallower water table than in a warmer year with a deeper one. This difference in NEP was consistent with those estimated from gap-filled EC fluxes in years with different water tables at Lost Creek and at similar boreal fens elsewhere. In sensitivity test of the model, annual NEP

  2. Lessons from the construction of a climate change adaptation plan: A Broads wetland case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R Kerry; Palmieri, Maria Giovanna; Luisetti, Tiziana

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic nature of environmental change in coastal areas means that a flexible "learning by doing" management strategy has a number of advantages. This article lays out the principles of such a strategy and then assesses an actual planning and management process focused on climate change consequences for the Broads wetland on the East coast of England. The management strategy focused on the concept of ecosystem services (stocks and flows) provided by the coastal wetland and the threats and opportunities posed to the area by sea level rise and other climate change impacts. The analysis explores the process by which an adaptive management plan has been formulated and coproduced by a combination of centralized (vertical) and stakeholder social network (horizontal) arrangements. The process values where feasible the ecosystem services under threat and prioritizes response actions. Coastal management needs a careful balance between strategic requirements imposed at a national scale and local schemes that affect regional and/or local communities and social networks. These networks aided by electronic media have allowed groups to engage more rapidly and effectively with policy proposals. However, successful deliberation is conditioned by a range of context specific factors, including the type of social networks present and their relative competitive and/or complementary characteristics. The history of consultation and dialogue between official agencies and stakeholders also plays a part in contemporary deliberation processes and the success of their outcomes. Among the issues highlighted are the multiple dimensions of nature's value; the difficulty of quantifying some ecosystem service changes, especially for cultural services; and the problem of "stakeholder fatigue" complicating engagement arrangements. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:719-725. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. ICESat-Derived Elevation Changes on the Lena Delta and Laptev Sea, Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskett, Reginald

    2014-05-01

    We employ elevation data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) to investigate surface changes across the Lena Delta and sea ice of the coastal Laptev Sea, Siberia during winters of 2003 through 2008. We compare ICESat GLAS-derived elevation changes on sea ice and the Bykovskaya and Sardakhskaya Channels with datum-corrected tide gauge height measurements from Danai, Sannikova and Tiksi stations. We find the coastal sea ice and large inland ice covered channels elevation changes are in phase with the tide-height changes on a same-month-year and datum controlled basis. Furthermore, we find elevation change on tundra drained lake basins to be +0.03 +/- 0.02 m, on average. These findings indicate ICESat GLAS is capable of detection of tide fluxes of ice covered coastal rivers and with a small error range is suitable for investigations of active-layer and permafrost dynamics associated with seasonal freezing (heave) and thawing (subsidence) using repeat-location profiles. Ref.: Muskett, R.R., "ICESat-Derived Elevation Changes on the Lena Delta and Laptev Sea, Siberia," Open Journal of Modern Hydrology, 4 (1), pp. 1-9, 2014. http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperDownload.aspx?paperID=41709.

  4. Potential effects of climate change on the water level, flora and macro-fauna of a large neotropical wetland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Úbeda

    Full Text Available Possible consequences of climate change in one of the world's largest wetlands (Ibera, Argentina were analysed using a multi-scale approach. Climate projections coupled to hydrological models were used to analyse variability in wetland water level throughout the current century. Two potential scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions were explored, both resulting in an increase in the inter-annual fluctuations of the water level. In the scenario with higher emissions, projections also showed a long-term negative trend in water-level. To explore the possible response of biota to such water-level changes, species-area relationships of flora and aerial censuses of macro-fauna were analysed during an extraordinary dry period. Plant species richness at the basin scale was found to be highly resistant to hydrological changes, as the large dimension of the wetland acts to buffer against the water-level variations. However, local diversity decreased significantly with low water levels, leading to the loss of ecosystem resilience to additional stressors. The analysis of macro-fauna populations suggested that wetland provides refuge, in low water periods, for the animals with high dispersal ability (aquatic and migratory birds. On the contrary, the abundance of animals with low dispersal ability (mainly herbivorous species was negatively impacted in low water periods, probably because they are required to search for alternative resources beyond the wetland borders. This period of resource scarcity was also related to increased mortality of large mammals (e.g. marsh deer around water bodies with high anthropogenic enrichment and cyanobacteria dominance. The synergy between recurrent climatic fluctuations and additional stressors (i.e. biological invasions, eutrophication presents an important challenge to the conservation of neotropical wetlands in the coming decades.

  5. Restoring tides to reduce methane emissions in impounded wetlands: A new and potent Blue Carbon climate change intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crooks, Stephen; Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Tang, Jianwu

    2017-01-01

    Coastal wetlands are sites of rapid carbon (C) sequestration and contain large soil C stocks. Thus, there is increasing interest in those ecosystems as sites for anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission offset projects (sometimes referred to as “Blue Carbon”), through preservation of existing C stocks or creation of new wetlands to increase future sequestration. Here we show that in the globally-widespread occurrence of diked, impounded, drained and tidally-restricted salt marshes, substantial methane (CH4) and CO2 emission reductions can be achieved through restoration of disconnected saline tidal flows. Modeled climatic forcing indicates that tidal restoration to reduce emissions has a much greater impact per unit area than wetland creation or conservation to enhance sequestration. Given that GHG emissions in tidally-restricted, degraded wetlands are caused by human activity, they are anthropogenic emissions, and reducing them will have an effect on climate that is equivalent to reduced emission of an equal quantity of fossil fuel GHG. Thus, as a landuse-based climate change intervention, reducing CH4 emissions is an entirely distinct concept from biological C sequestration projects to enhance C storage in forest or wetland biomass or soil, and will not suffer from the non-permanence risk that stored C will be returned to the atmosphere.

  6. Restoring tides to reduce methane emissions in impounded wetlands: A new and potent Blue Carbon climate change intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Kevin D; Crooks, Stephen; Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Tang, Jianwu

    2017-09-20

    Coastal wetlands are sites of rapid carbon (C) sequestration and contain large soil C stocks. Thus, there is increasing interest in those ecosystems as sites for anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission offset projects (sometimes referred to as "Blue Carbon"), through preservation of existing C stocks or creation of new wetlands to increase future sequestration. Here we show that in the globally-widespread occurrence of diked, impounded, drained and tidally-restricted salt marshes, substantial methane (CH4) and CO2 emission reductions can be achieved through restoration of disconnected saline tidal flows. Modeled climatic forcing indicates that tidal restoration to reduce emissions has a much greater impact per unit area than wetland creation or conservation to enhance sequestration. Given that GHG emissions in tidally-restricted, degraded wetlands are caused by human activity, they are anthropogenic emissions, and reducing them will have an effect on climate that is equivalent to reduced emission of an equal quantity of fossil fuel GHG. Thus, as a landuse-based climate change intervention, reducing CH4 emissions is an entirely distinct concept from biological C sequestration projects to enhance C storage in forest or wetland biomass or soil, and will not suffer from the non-permanence risk that stored C will be returned to the atmosphere.

  7. Testing a participatory integrated assessment (PIA approach to select climate change adaptation actions to enhance wetland sustainability: The case of Poyang Lake region in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huang

    2015-06-01

    It should be noted that while the case study evaluated adaptation policies or options to climate change, it was not completed in terms of discussing in detail all the key components of the PIA approach. However, the case study represents the state-of-the-arts research in climate change impact assessment and adaptation option evaluation, particularly in linking with wetland ecosystem sustainability. Findings of the case study have indicated that the potential effects of climate change on wetland sustainability are quite significant. The case has also identified adaptation measures considered by stakeholders to be potentially effective for reducing vulnerability of wetland ecosystems. It is clear that wetland ecosystem sustainability goals will be unachievable without mainstreaming adaptation measures into wetland conservation and health programs under a changing climate.

  8. Changing river courses in the western part of the Ganga-Brahmaputra delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Kalyan

    2014-12-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra delta is the largest on Earth, the product of two of the world's largest and siltiest rivers. It is formed in a basin located over the zone where the Indian plate subducts beneath the Himalaya to the north and the Indo-Burman ranges to the east. The distributaries in the south-western part of the delta remain disconnected from the Ganga-Padma during the lean season, although they are still active in bank erosion and sediment transport during the monsoon. Four distributaries of the Bhagirathi-Hugli (the westernmost branch of the Ganga) have gone dry during known historical period. In many cases, the natural decay of rivers has been exacerbated by the human intervention, especially where rivers are embanked and no allowance made for their migration through meandering and avulsion. In the coastal zone where mangroves were cleared and creeks were embanked since the late 18th century, decay of channels, and advancement of the sea towards inland have been aggravated. The subsequent attempt of flushing the sediment load to the sea from the estuary to improve the status of navigation in the Bhagirathi-Hugli River was not successful to the level of expectation. This paper deals with the decay and changing courses of rivers in the western part of the Ganga-Brahmaputra delta.

  9. Functional integrity of freshwater forested wetlands, hydrologic alteration, and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth A.; Souter, Nicholas J.;

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will challenge managers to balance the freshwater needs of humans and wetlands. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicts that most regions of the world will be exposed to higher temperatures, CO2, and more erratic precipitation, with some regions likely to have alternating episodes of intense flooding and mega-drought. Coastal areas will be exposed to more frequent saltwater inundation as sea levels rise. Local land managers desperately need intra-regional climate information for site-specific planning, management, and restoration activities. Managers will be challenged to deliver freshwater to floodplains during climate change-induced drought, particularly within hydrologically altered and developed landscapes. Assessment of forest health, both by field and remote sensing techniques, will be essential to signal the need for hydrologic remediation. Studies of the utility of the release of freshwater to remediate stressed forested floodplains along the Murray and Mississippi Rivers suggest that brief episodes of freshwater remediation for trees can have positive health benefits for these forests. The challenges of climate change in forests of the developing world will be considered using the Tonle Sap of Cambodia as an example. With little ecological knowledge of the impacts, managing climate change will add to environmental problems already faced in the developing world with new river engineering projects. These emerging approaches to remediate stressed trees will be of utmost importance for managing worldwide floodplain forests with predicted climate changes.

  10. Assessing the long-term hydrological services provided by wetlands under changing climate conditions: A case study approach of a Canadian watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, M.; Rousseau, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    The water content of wetlands represents a key driver of their hydrological services and it is highly dependent on short- and long-term weather conditions, which will change, to some extent, under evolving climate conditions. The impact on stream flows of this critical dynamic component of wetlands remains poorly studied. While hydrodynamic modelling provide a framework to describe the functioning of individual wetland, hydrological modelling offers the opportunity to assess their services at the watershed scale with respect to their type (i.e., isolated or riparian). This study uses a novel approach combining hydrological modelling and limited field monitoring, to explore the effectiveness of wetlands under changing climate conditions. To achieve this, two isolated wetlands and two riparian wetlands, located in the Becancour River watershed within the St Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada), were monitored using piezometers and stable water isotopes (δD - δ18O) between October 2013 and October 2014. For the watershed hydrology component of this study, reference (1986-2015) and future meteorological data (2041-2070) were used as inputs to the PHYSITEL/HYDROTEL modelling platform. Results obtained from in-situ data illustrate singular hydrological dynamics for each typology of wetlands (i.e., isolated and riparian) and support the hydrological modelling approach used in this study. Meanwhile, simulation results indicate that climate change could affect differently the hydrological dynamics of wetlands and associated services (e.g., storage and slow release of water), including their seasonal contribution (i.e., flood mitigation and low flow support) according to each wetland typology. The methodological framework proposed in this paper meets the requirements of a functional tool capable of anticipating hydrological changes in wetlands at both the land management scale and the watershed management scale. Accordingly, this framework represents a starting point towards

  11. Changes in soil organic carbon fractions following remediation of a degraded coastal floodplain wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa; McNaughton, Caitlyn; Pearson, Amy

    2017-04-01

    Coastal floodplain soils and wetland sediments can store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). These environments are also commonly underlain by sulfidic sediments which can oxidise, largely due to drainage of floodplains to decrease water levels, to form coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS). Following oxidation, pH of both soil and water decrease, and acidity and mobilisation of trace metals increases to adversely affect vegetation and adjacent aquatic ecosystems. In extreme cases, vegetation death occurs resulting in the formation of scalds, which are large bare patches. Remediation of these degraded coastal soils generally involves neutralisation of acidity via application of lime and the re-introduction of anoxic conditions by raising water levels. Our understanding of the geochemical changes which occur as a result of remediation is relatively well established. However, SOC stocks and fractions have not been quantified in these coastal floodplain environments. We studied the changes in soil geochemistry and SOC stocks and fractions three years after remediation of a degraded and scalded coastal floodplain. Remediation treatments included raising water levels, and addition of either lime (LO) or lime and mulch (LM) relative to a control (C) site. We found SOC concentrations in the remediated sites (LO and LM) were more than double than that found at site C, reflected in the higher SOC stocks to a depth of 1.6 m. The particulate organic C fraction was higher at sites LO and LM due to increased vegetation and biomass inputs, compared to site C. Therefore, coastal floodplains and wetlands are a large store of SOC and can potentially increase SOC following remediation due to i) reduced decomposition rates with higher water levels and waterlogging, and ii) high C inputs due to rapid revegetation of scalded areas and high rates of biomass production.

  12. Changing water quality in the Middle Mahakam Lakes: Water quality trends in a context of rapid deforestation, mining and palm oil plantation development in Indonesia's Middle Mahakam wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, E.B.P. de; Ragas, A.M.J.; Nooteboom, G.; Mursidi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of Indonesia's wetlands is continuing at a rapid pace. People living in the Middle Mahakam Lakes (MML) region, part of a major wetland area in Indonesia, have observed various negative changes in their local environment, especially with regard to water quality. We verify these local

  13. Slow Wetland Response to Hydrological Change: Press Response or Regime Shift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, P.; Kattel, G.

    2015-12-01

    Lakes vary in response to minor disturbances and, where stabilising feedbacks exist, tend to return to a particular stable state. If the disturbance is strong enough the stabilising forces may be overcome and the lake passes a threshold whereby it shifts into a new state controlled by a new suite of negative feedbacks. A typical switch in state is thought to occur in shallow lake systems whereby a pulse of sediment or nutrients may drive an increase in phytoplankton impacting the light regime. This impacts negatively on submerged plants which results in greater entrainment of benthic sediments and release of buried nutrients. These strengthen the competitive advantage of phytoplankton and entrench the lake in a new state. Multiple diatom-based sedimentary records of change in wetlands in the lower River Murray, Australia, have revealed assemblage turnover following river regulation and the impoundment of the estuary. Typically, benthic and epiphytic flora have yielded to planktonic and disturbance taxa indicative the loss of aquatic plants and a decline in the light regime consistent with regime shift theory. This evidence is supported by changes in the remains of macrophytes, cladocerans and stable isotopes which reveal the loss of plants and the shift to a pelagic system. However, rather than exhibiting flickering before changing abruptly, these systems have changed gradually over several decades. It could be argued that this represents a slow response to a threshold change. Alternatively, it is merely an ongoing response to the persistent pressure exerted by increased fluxes of sediments and nutrients.

  14. Ecosystem level methane fluxes from tidal freshwater and brackish marshes of the Mississippi River Delta: Implications for coastal wetland carbon projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Krauss, Ken W.; Johnson, Darren J.; Raynie, Richard C.; Killebrew, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate from seawater inhibits methane production in tidal wetlands, and by extension, salinity has been used as a general predictor of methane emissions. With the need to reduce methane flux uncertainties from tidal wetlands, eddy covariance (EC) techniques provide an integrated methane budget. The goals of this study were to: 1) establish methane emissions from natural, freshwater and brackish wetlands in Louisiana based on EC; and 2) determine if EC estimates conform to a methane-salinity relationship derived from temperate tidal wetlands with chamber sampling. Annual estimates of methane emissions from this study were 62.3 g CH4/m2/yr and 13.8 g CH4/m2/yr for the freshwater and brackish (8–10 psu) sites, respectively. If it is assumed that long-term, annual soil carbon sequestration rates of natural marshes are ~200 g C/m2/yr (7.3 tCO2e/ha/yr), healthy brackish marshes could be expected to act as a net radiative sink, equivalent to less than one-half the soil carbon accumulation rate after subtracting methane emissions (4.1 tCO2e/ha/yr). Carbon sequestration rates would need case-by-case assessment, but the EC methane emissions estimates in this study conformed well to an existing salinity-methane model that should serve as a basis for establishing emission factors for wetland carbon offset projects.

  15. Transformations of Urbanising Delta Landscape. An Historic Examination of Dealing with the Impacts of Climate Change for the Kaoping River Delta in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Kun Chung

    2014-10-01

    system along the main stream in the plains protects delta cities against floods, which enables rapid urbanisation. Population growth in delta cities increases food demand, which causes the intensive agricultural cultivation of mountain areas.B. The dike system narrows the original riverbed in the river basin, which raises the water level of the river during storms. This situation blocks the drainage outlets of delta cities and induces higher frequencies of urban inundations.C. The dike system along the main stream in the plains has significantly changed the surface flowing path of river and dramatically decreased the recharge of groundwater in foothills. It causes serious land subsidence in coastal areas when the ground cannot obtain sufficient groundwater.D. The dike system and the bridges of transportation crossing river has resulted in the lag-sedimentation of the river in the river basin. When a significant amount of river sand deposits in the riverbed rather than being transited to the estuary to supply the demand for sand along the coast, it induces serious erosion in the coast. 
Following this context, this study organised a five day workshop in Kaohsiung, ‘Workshop on Water Environment Development in Kaohsiung’ in 2012 to further examine the results derived from Chapters 3 and 4, and to demonstrate how a 3-layer approach can work between multiple disciplines as a platform for collaboration.
This workshop followed the theoretical framework of the 3-layers to explore the entire Kaoping River catchment area and its two tributary basins as the chosen local-scale sites: the Meinong River and the Love River. This workshop gives the best demonstration of how to practically utilise the 3-layer approach to organise multiple- disciplinary work, and then to make an integrated plan. The results and process of this workshop are also generalised as a framework, which could be applied to other cases. 

  16. Successional changes and water quality in artificial wetlands at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Army and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service created five wetlands on Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) during the summer and fall of 1991. These wetlands were...

  17. Ecological consequences of changing hydrological conditions in wetland forests of coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard F. Keim; Jim L. Chambers; Melinda S. Hughes; J. Andrew Nyman; Craig A. Miller; Blake J. Amos; William H. Conner; John W. Day; Stephen P. Faulkner; Emile S. Gardiner; Sammy L. King; Kenneth W. McLeod; Gary P. Shaffer

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale and localized alterations of processes affecting deltaic coastal wetlands have caused the complete loss of some coastal wetland forests and reduced the productivity and vigor of many areas in coastal Louisiana. This loss and degradation threatens ecosystem functions and the services they provide. This paper summarizes ecological relationships controlled by...

  18. Monitoring groundwater storage change in Mekong Delta using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aierken, A.; Lee, H.; Hossain, F.; Bui, D. D.; Nguyen, L. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Mekong Delta, home to almost 20 million inhabitants, is considered one of the most important region for Vietnam as it is the agricultural and industrial production base of the nation. However, in recent decades, the region is seriously threatened by variety of environmental hazards, such as floods, saline water intrusion, arsenic contamination, and land subsidence, which raise its vulnerability to sea level rise due to global climate change. All these hazards are related to groundwater depletion, which is the result of dramatically increased over-exploitation. Therefore, monitoring groundwater is critical to sustainable development and most importantly, to people's life in the region. In most countries, groundwater is monitored using well observations. However, because of its spatial and temporal gaps and cost, it is typically difficult to obtain large scale, continuous observations. Since 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravimetry mission has delivered freely available Earth's gravity variation data, which can be used to obtain terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes. In this study, the TWS anomalies over the Mekong Delta, which are the integrated sum of anomalies of soil moisture storage (SMS), surface water storage (SWS), canopy water storage (CWS), groundwater storage (GWS), have been obtained using GRACE CSR RL05 data. The leakage error occurred due to GRACE signal processing has been corrected using several different approaches. The groundwater storage anomalies were then derived from TWS anomalies by removing SMS, and CWS anomalies simulated by the four land surface models (NOAH, CLM, VIC and MOSAIC) in the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS), as well as SWS anomalies estimated using ENVISAT satellite altimetry and MODIS imagery. Then, the optimal GRACE signal restoration method for the Mekong Delta is determined with available in-situ well data. The estimated GWS anomalies revealed continuously decreasing

  19. Wetland biogeochemistry and ecological risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Huang, Laibin; Gao, Haifeng; Zhang, Guangliang

    2017-02-01

    Wetlands are an important ecotone between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and can provide great ecological service functions. Soils/sediments are one of the important components of wetland ecosystems, which support wetland plants and microorganisms and influence wetland productivity. Moreover, wetland soils/sediments serve as sources, sinks and transfers of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and chemical contaminants such as heavy metals. In natural wetland ecosystems, wetland soils/sediments play a great role in improving water quality as these chemical elements can be retained in wetland soils/sediments for a long time. Moreover, the biogeochemical processes of the abovementioned elements in wetland soils/sediments can drive wetland evolution and development, and their changes will considerably affect wetland ecosystem health. Therefore, a better understanding of wetland soil biogeochemistry will contribute to improving wetland ecological service functions.

  20. Focus on the impact of climate change on wetland ecosystems and carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lei; Roulet, Nigel; Zhuang, Qianlai; Christensen, Torben R.; Frolking, Steve

    2016-10-01

    The renewed growth in atmospheric methane (CH4) since 2007 after a decade of stabilization has drawn much attention to its causes and future trends. Wetlands are the single largest source of atmospheric CH4. Understanding wetland ecosystems and carbon dynamics is critical to the estimation of global CH4 and carbon budgets. After approximately 7 years of CH4 related research following the renewed growth in atmospheric CH4, Environmental Research Letters launched a special issue of research letters on wetland ecosystems and carbon dynamics in 2014. This special issue highlights recent developments in terrestrial ecosystem models and field measurements of carbon fluxes across different types of wetland ecosystems. The 14 research letters emphasize the importance of wetland ecosystems in the global CO2 and CH4 budget.

  1. Exploring the climate change concerns of striped catfish producers in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh Lam; Truong, Minh Hoang; Verreth, Johan Aj; Leemans, Rik; Bosma, Roel H; De Silva, Sena S

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions on and adaptations to climate change impacts of 235 pangasius farmers in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Data were collected using semi-structured household surveys in six provinces, from three regions along the Mekong river branches. A Chi-Square test was used to determine the association between variables, and a logit regression model was employed to identify factors correlated with farmer's perception and adaptation. Less than half of respondents were concerned about climate change and sought suitable adaptation measures to alleviate its impacts. Improving information on climate change and introducing early warning systems could improve the adaptive capacity of pangasius farmers, in particularly for those farmers, who were not concerned yet. Farmers relied strongly on technical support from government agencies, but farmers in the coastal provinces did not express the need for training by these institutions. This contrasting result requires further assessment of the effectiveness of adaptation measures such as breeding salinity tolerant pangasius.

  2. Distribution patterns and changes of aquatic plant communities in Napahai Wetland in northwestern Yunnan Plateau,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Derong XIAO; Kun TIAN; Hua YUAN; Yuming YANG; Ningyun LI; Shouguo XU

    2008-01-01

    Using GPS technology and community research methods for plant communities,we investigated the distribution patterns of aquatic plant communities in the high plateaus of the Napahai Wetlands,Yunnan,China,as well as the species changes of plant communities compared with that of 24 years ago since 2005.We found that the types and numbers of aquatic plant communities have changed.Some pollution-tolerant,nutrient-loving plant communities such as Scirpus tabernaemontani,Zizania caduciflora,Myriophyllum spicatum,and Azolla imbricata flourished,while the primary aquatic plant com-munities were reduced or even disappeared.The number of aquatic plant communities were increased from nine to 12 with the addition of two new emergent plant com-munities and one new floating-leaved plant community.The increase in emergent plant communities was signifi-cant.From east to west and from south to north,various types of plant communities were continuously distributed,including floating-leaved plant communities,emergent plant communities and submerged plant communities.The composition of the communities became more com-plicated and the number of accompanying species increased,while the percentage ratio of dominant plant species declined.In 2005,the coverage of emergent plant communities was the largest (528.42 hm2) followed by submerged plant communities (362.50 hm2) and the float-ing-leaf plant communities was the smallest (70.23 hm2).The variations in the distribution of aquatic plant com-munities in the Napahai Wetlands reflect the natural responses to the change of the wetland ecological envir-onment.This study indicates that human disturbances have led to an inward movement of the wetland shoreline,a decrease in water quality and a reduction in wetland habitat.

  3. Hydrogen isotope variability in prairie wetland systems: implications for studies of migratory connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Lauren E; Clark, Robert G; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes (delta2H) are often used to infer the origins of migratory animals based on the strong correlation between deuterium content of tissues and long-term patterns of precipitation. However, the extreme flood and drought dynamics of surface waters in prairie wetland systems could mask these expected correlations. We investigated H isotopic variability in an aquatic food web associated with Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) that rely heavily on wetland-derived aerial insects for food. We evaluated isotopic turnover and incorporation of environmental water into tissue, processes that could affect H isotopic composition. Wetland water and aquatic invertebrates showed intra- and interannual H isotopic variation mainly related to evaporation and the amount and timing of precipitation. Snails showed rapid turnover of tissue deuterium and a large contribution of environmental water to their tissues. Swallow feather deuterium (delta2Hf) was variable but did not clearly follow changes in any of the food web compartments measured. Instead, isotopic variability may have been driven by shifts in the type or relative amounts of grey consumed and types of wetlands used. Nevertheless, despite relatively high variance in delta2Hf, the majority of birds fell within the predicted range of delta2Hf for the study area, revealing that significant trophic averaging occurred. However, both (presumed) diet shifts and variable hydrological conditions have the potential to greatly increase variance that must be considered when assigning origins of migratory animals based on delta2H.

  4. The Perceptions to Climate Change among Rural Farming Households in the Niger Delta Area, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emaziye, P. O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the perceptions to climate change among rural farming households in the Niger Delta Area, Nigeria. The basic objective was to determine the rural farming household’s perception to climate change in the Area and the specific objective was to determine the direction of change of the climate change indicators (whether increasing, decreasing or constant. Multistage sampling procedure was sampled 739 rural farming households (respondents for the study. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistic. Socio – economic profile of the respondents indicated that 37.69% of rural farming households falls between the age bracket of 47 to 51 years and majority (60.0% having educational qualification below secondary school level. The study also reveals 76% had no extension contact during the farming season and 78.6% of respondents are not aware of the phenomenon of climate change. The study noticed an increasing change in the climate change indicators except longer raining season that is decreasing in the Area. The perception to the cause of climate indicators was mostly attributed to natural occurrence by God/gods (67.7%. Awareness campaign on climate change is recommended in the rural areas for climate change information.

  5. Tidal flat erosion of the Huanghe River Delta due to local changes in hydrodynamic conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Yonggang; ZHENG Jiewen; YUE Zhongqi; LIU Xiaolei; SHAN Hongxian

    2014-01-01

    An ideal nature system for the study of post-depositional submarine mass changing under wave loading was selected in the inter-tidal platform of the subaqueous Huanghe River Delta, a delta formed during pe-riod from 1964 to 1976 as the Huanghe River discharged into the Bohai Gulf by Diaokou distributary. A road embankment constructed for petroleum recovery on the inter-tidal platform in 1995 induced the essential varieties of hydrodynamic conditions on the both sides of the road. With both sides sharing similarities in (1) initial sedimentary environment, (2) energetic wave loading, (3) differential hydrodynamic conditions in later stages, (4) enough long-range action, and (5) extreme shallow water inter-tidal platforms;the study is representative and feasible as well. Two study sites were selected on each side of the road, and a series of measurements, samplings, laboratory experiments have been carried out, including morphometry, hydro-dynamic conditions, sediment properties, granularity composition, and fractal dimension calculation of the topography in the two adjacent areas. It was observed that in the outer zone, where wave loading with high magnitude prevailed, the tidal flat was bumpy and exhibited a high erosion rate and high fractal dimension. Further, the fractal dimension diminished quickly, keeping with the enlarging of calculative square size. However in the inner zone, where the hydrodynamic condition was weak, the tidal flat was flat and exhibited a low erosion rate and low fractal dimensions;the fractal dimension diminished with the enlarging of calcu-lative square size. The fractal dimensions in the different hydrodynamic areas equalized increasingly as the calculative square size accreted to threshold, indicating that the hydrodynamic condition plays a significant role in topography construction and submarine delta erosion process. Additionally, the later differentiation of sediment properties, granularity composition, microstructure

  6. Farmers' Perceived Risks of Climate Change and Influencing Factors: A Study in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Dang, Hoa; Li, Elton; Nuberg, Ian; Bruwer, Johan

    2014-08-01

    Many countries are confronting climate change that threatens agricultural production and farmers' lives. Farmers' perceived risks of climate change and factors influencing those perceived risks are critical to their adaptive behavior and well-planned adaptation strategies. However, there is limited understanding of these issues. In this paper, we attempt to quantitatively measure farmers' perceived risks of climate change and explore the influences of risk experience, information, belief in climate change, and trust in public adaptation to those perceived risks. Data are from structured interviews with 598 farmers in the Mekong Delta. The study shows that perceived risks to production, physical health, and income dimensions receive greater priority while farmers pay less attention to risks to happiness and social relationships. Experiences of the events that can be attributed to climate change increase farmers' perceived risks. Information variables can increase or decrease perceived risks, depending on the sources of information. Farmers who believe that climate change is actually happening and influencing their family's lives, perceive higher risks in most dimensions. Farmers who think that climate change is not their concern but the government's, perceive lower risks to physical health, finance, and production. As to trust in public adaptation, farmers who believe that public adaptive measures are well co-ordinated, perceive lower risks to production and psychology. Interestingly, those who believe that the disaster warning system is working well, perceive higher risks to finance, production, and social relationships. Further attention is suggested for the quality, timing, and channels of information about climate change and adaptation.

  7. Changes in heavy metal mobility and availability from contaminated wetland soil remediated with combined biochar-compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Yang, Zhaoxue; Tang, Lin; Zeng, Guangming; Yu, Man; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Haipeng; Qian, Yingying; Li, Xuemei; Luo, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    The combination of biochar and compost has been proven to be effective in heavy metals contaminated wetland soil restoration. However, the influence of different proportions between biochar and compost on immobilization of heavy metals in soil has been less studied up to date. Therefore, we investigated the effect of different ratios of biochar-compost mixtures on availability and speciation distribution of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) in wetland soil. The results showed that applying all amendment combinations into wetland soil increased gradually the total organic carbon (TOC) and water-extract organic carbon (WEOC) as the compost percentage rose in biochar-composts. The higher pH was obtained in a certain biochar addition (20% and 40%) in combinations due to efficient interaction of biochar with compost. All amendments could significantly decrease availability of Cd and Zn mainly from pH change, but increase available Cu concentration as the result of increased water-extract organic carbon and high total Cu content in compost. Moreover, amendments can decrease easily exchangeable fraction and increase reducible of Cd and Zn greatly with increase of compost content in combinations, while amendments containing compost promote transformation of Cu from Fe/Mn oxide and residual fractions to organic bindings. These results demonstrate that different ratios of biochar and compost have a significant effect on availability and speciation of heavy metals in multi-metal-contaminated wetland soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Geomorphic change and sediment transport during a small artificial flood in a transformed post-dam delta: The Colorado River delta, United States and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich R.; Schmidt, John C.; Topping, David J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Rodríguez-Burgueño, Jesús Eliana; Ramírez-Hernández, Jorge; Grams, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado River delta is a dramatically transformed landscape. Major changes to river hydrology and morpho-dynamics began following completion of Hoover Dam in 1936. Today, the Colorado River has an intermittent and/or ephemeral channel in much of its former delta. Initial incision of the river channel in the upstream ∼50 km of the delta occurred in the early 1940s in response to spillway releases from Hoover Dam under conditions of drastically reduced sediment supply. A period of relative quiescence followed, until the filling of upstream reservoirs precipitated a resurgence of flows to the delta in the 1980s and 1990s. Flow releases during extreme upper basin snowmelt in the 1980s, flood flows from the Gila River basin in 1993, and a series of ever-decreasing peak flows in the late 1990s and early 2000s further incised the upstream channel and caused considerable channel migration throughout the river corridor. These variable magnitude post-dam floods shaped the modern river geomorphology. In 2014, an experimental pulse-flow release aimed at rejuvenating the riparian ecosystem and understanding hydrologic dynamics flowed more than 100 km through the length of the delta’s river corridor. This small artificial flood caused localized meter-scale scour and fill of the streambed, but did not cause further incision or significant bank erosion because of its small magnitude. Suspended-sand-transport rates were initially relatively high immediately downstream from the Morelos Dam release point, but decreasing discharge from infiltration losses combined with channel widening downstream caused a rapid downstream reduction in suspended-sand-transport rates. A zone of enhanced transport occurred downstream from the southern U.S.-Mexico border where gradient increased, but effectively no geomorphic change occurred beyond a point 65 km downstream from Morelos Dam. Thus, while the pulse flow connected with the modern estuary, deltaic sedimentary processes were not

  9. RURAL FARMERS’ PERCEPTION OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN CENTRAL AGRICULTURAL ZONE OF DELTA STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.U. Ofuoku

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Farmer perception of their environment is a factor of climate change. Adaptation to climate change requires farmers to realize that the climate has changed and they must identify useful adaptations and implement them. This study analyzed the per-ception of climate change among rural farmers in central agri-cultural zone of Delta State, Nigeria. Climate change studies often assume certain adaptations and minimal examination of how, when, why, and conditions under which adaptations usually take place in any economic and social systems. The study was conducted by survey method on 131 respondents using struc-tured interview schedule and questionnaire. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and linear regression model to test that education, gender, and farming experience influenced farmers’ perception of climate change. The results showed that the farmers were aware of climate change. The identified causes of climate change were ranging from intensified agriculture, population explosion, increased use of fossil fuel, loss of in-digenous know practice to gas flaring. The effects of climate change on crops and livestocks were also identified by the rural farmers. Many of the farmers adapted to climate change by planting trees, carrying out soil conservation practice, changing planting dates, using different crop varieties, installing fans in livestock pens, and applying irrigation. Almost half of them did not adapt to climate change. The linear regression analysis revealed that education, gender, and farming experience influ-enced farmers’ perception of climate change. The major barriers to adaptation to climate change included lack of information, lack of money, and inadequate land.

  10. Land use change detection and impact assessment in Anzali international coastal wetland using multi-temporal satellite images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousazadeh, Roya; Ghaffarzadeh, Hamidreza; Nouri, Jafar; Gharagozlou, Alireza; Farahpour, Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Anzali is one of the 18 Iranian wetlands of international importance listed in Ramsar Convention. This unique ecosystem in the world with high ecological diversity is highly threatened by various factors such as pollutants, sedimentation, unauthorized development of urban infrastructure, over-harvesting of wetland resources, land use changes, and invasive species. Among which, one of the most challenging destructive factors, land use change, was scrutinized in this study. For this, remotely sensed data and Geographical Information System (GIS) were used to detect land changes and corresponding impacts on the study area over a 38-year period from 1975 to 2013.. Changes in the study area were traced in five dominant land-use classes at four time intervals of 1975, 1989, 2007, and 2013. Accordingly, changes in different categories were quantified using satellite images. The methodology adopted in this study includes an integrated approach of supervised classification, zonal and object-oriented image analyses. According to the Kappa coefficient of 0.84 for the land use map of 2013, the overall accuracy of the method was estimated at 89%, which indicated that this method can be useful for monitoring and behavior analysis of other Iranian wetlands. The obtained results revealed extensive land use changes over the study period. As the results suggest, between the years 1975 to 2013, approximately 6500 ha (∼69%) rangeland area degraded. Further, urban and agricultural areas have been extended by 2982 ha (∼74%) and 2228 ha (∼6%), respectively. This could leave a negative impact on water quality of the wetland.

  11. The conservation status of Moroccan wetlands with particular reference to waterbirds and to changes since 1978

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Morgan made detailed descriptions of 24 major Moroccan wetlands visited in 1978, with a total area of 4529 ha (Morgan, N.C., 1982a. An ecological survey of standing waters in North West Africa: III. Site descriptions for Morocco. Biological Conservation, 24, 161–182.). We revisited these sites, and found that 25% of the wetland area had been destroyed by 1999. This loss was con- centrated in wetland types of low salinity ( < 5 g/l NaCl), with a 98% loss of seasonal mesohaline sites,...

  12. Uncertainty In Greenhouse Gas Emissions On Carbon Sequestration In Coastal and Freshwater Wetlands of the Mississippi River Delta: A Subsiding Coastline as a Proxy for Future Global Sea Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. R.; DeLaune, R. D.; Roy, E. D.; Corstanje, R.

    2014-12-01

    The highly visible phenomenon of wetland loss in coastal Louisiana (LA) is examined through the prism of carbon accumulation, wetland loss and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Mississippi River Deltaic region experiences higher relative sea level rise due to coupled subsidence and eustatic sea level rise allowing this region to serve as a proxy for future projected golbal sea level rise. Carbon storage or sequestration in rapidly subsiding LA coastal marsh soils is based on vertical marsh accretion and areal change data. While coastal marshes sequester significant amount of carbon through vertical accretion, large amounts of carbon, previously sequested in the soil profile is lost through annual deterioration of these coastal marshes as well as through GHG emissions. Efforts are underway in Louisiana to access the carbon credit market in order to provide significant funding for coastal restoration projects. However, there is very large uncertainty on GHG emission rates related to both marsh type and temporal (daily and seasonal) effects. Very little data currently exists which addresses this uncertainty which can significantly affect the carbon credit value of a particular wetland system. We provide an analysis of GHG emission rates for coastal freshwater, brackish and and salt marshes compared to the net soil carbon sequestration rate. Results demonstrate that there is very high uncertainty on GHG emissions which can substantially alter the carbon credit value of a particular wetland system.

  13. An introduction to the San Francisco Estuary tidal wetlands restoration series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R. Brown

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of tidal wetlands may provide an important tool for improving ecological health and water management for beneficial uses of the San Francisco Estuary (hereafter “Estuary”. Given the large losses of tidal wetlands from San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in the last 150 years, it seems logical to assume that restoring tidal wetlands will have benefits for a variety of aquatic and terrestrial native species that have declined during the same time period. However, many other changes have also occurred in the Estuary concurrent with the declines of native species. Other factors that might be important in species declines include the effects of construction of upstream dams, large and small water diversions within the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, agricultural pesticides, trace elements from industrial and agricultural activities, and invasions of alien species. Discussions among researchers, managers, and stakeholders have identified a number of uncertainties regarding the potential benefits of tidal wetland restoration. The articles of the Tidal Wetlands Restoration Series address four major issues of concern. Stated as questions, these are: 1. Will tidal wetland restoration enhance populations of native fishes? 2. Will wetland restoration increase rates of methylation of mercury? 3. Will primary production and other ecological processes in restored tidal wetlands result in net export of organic carbon to adjacent habitats, resulting in enhancement of the food web? Will the carbon produced contribute to the formation of disinfection byproducts when disinfected for use as drinking water? 4. Will restored tidal wetlands provide long-term ecosystem benefits that can be sustained in response to ongoing physical processes, including sedimentation and hydrodynamics? Reducing the uncertainty surrounding these issues is of critical importance because tidal wetland restoration is assumed to be a critical tool for enhancement

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE AND ITS IMPACTS ON HUMAN SETTLEMENT IN THE CHANGJIANG RIVER DELTA IN NEOLITHIC AGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang; LIU Chun-ling; ZHU Cheng; JIANG Tong

    2004-01-01

    Dating data,altitude of Neolithic sites,climatic changes from sedimentary records and previous research results were collected and analyzed to detect possible connections between climatic changes and human activities in the Changjiang River Delta in the Neolithic Age.The results indicated that hydrological changes greatly impacted the human activities in the study region.Low-lying geomorphology made the floods and sea level changes become the important factors affecting human activities,especially the altitude change of human settlements.People usually moved to higher places during the periods characterized by high sea level and frequent floods to escape the negative influences from water body expansion,which resulted in cultural hiatus in certain profiles.However,some higher-altitude settlements were not the results of climatic changes but the results of social factors,such as religious ceremony and social status.Therefore,further research will be necessary for the degree and types of impacts of climatic changes on human activities in the study area at that time.

  15. Restoring Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    FERTILE LAND:The Qixing River Wetland in Heilongjiang Province was recently named a wetland of international importance at the Sixth Asian Wetland Symposium held in Wuxi City, east China’s Jiangsu Province, on October 13

  16. Sediment transportation and bed morphology reshaping in Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The Yellow River Delta supports the ecological function as a typical estuarine foreshore wetland. The wetland area is changing greatly every year because of sediment deposition and erosion, which influences the wetland function tremendously. Application of environmental fluid dynamics code (EFDC) to the Yellow River Delta is on the basis of the mobile bed dynamic model and wetting-drying process. Careful calibration is carried out for the numerical model which is set up for the Yellow River Delta, the sediment transport process of the model is compatible to the Yellow River situation. The simulated bed elevation by considering the sediment deposition in the Mouth is particularly focused on, the numerical results are in agreement with the measured bed morphology within 1992 2000. Simulation in this paper indicates that most of the sediment deposited just out of the Mouth which makes the mouth move forward into the sea 2.5 km per year. This paper presents good results in simulation of varying sediment deposition and provides further methods to predict the future morphology and area of the Yellow River Delta.

  17. Scoping Agriculture, Wetland Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is identified as the main cause of wetland degradation and loss. Using a drivers, pressures, state changes, impacts and responses (DPSIR) framework to analyze 90 cases drawn from all parts of the world and all wetland types, this report assesses the character of agriculture - wetlands interactions (AWIs) and their impacts in socio-economic and ecosystem services terms. The report is a technical framework that is used to scope out the relevance and nature of AWIs, identify response...

  18. Characteristics and short-term changes of the Po Delta seafloor morphology through high-resolution bathymetric and backscatter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madricardo, Fantina; Bosman, Alessandro; Kruss, Aleksandra; Remia, Alessandro; Correggiari, Anna; Fogarin, Stefano; Romagnoli, Claudia; Moscon, Giorgia

    2016-04-01

    River deltas are highly dynamical and valuable environments and often undergo strong natural and human-induced actions that need constant monitoring. Whereas remote sensing observations of the sub-aerial part of the delta are very important for the assessment of the morphological changes over long time scales (years-decades), the short time-scale evolution of the submerged part of the system remains often undetermined. In particular, the shallow-water submarine pro-delta front is commonly characterized by active depositional and erosional processes. This area is crucial for the understanding of the fluvial and coastal dynamics. In this study, we applied geophysical investigations to characterize the very shallow-water area of the Po river delta in the northern Adriatic Sea. The modern Po delta is the result of increased sediment flux derived from both climate change (Little Ice Age) and human impact (deforestation and diversion and construction of artificial levees) and in recent years is suffering erosion. Here, we present the results of two high-resolution multibeam echosounder surveys carried out in June 2013 and in September 2014 on the Po river mouth and delta front in the framework of the Ritmare Project. The Po delta front, as other modern deltas, has a complicated morphology, consisting of multiple terminal distributary channels, subaqueous levee deposits, and mouth bars. The high-resolution bathymetric data show that the prodelta slope has a curved shape with an overall southward asymmetry of the submerged delta due to prevalent longshore currents. The 2013 bathymetric map highlights a number of sedimentary features, such as depositional bars, radiating in the prodelta slope with an asymmetric section, with steeper southward lee side. The new bathymetric map collected in 2014 shows impressive changes: in correspondence with the depositional lobes, we observed extensive collapse depressions with bathymetric changes of over 1 m in 15 months and widespread

  19. Remote sensing and GIS analysis for mapping spatio-temporal changes of erosion and deposition of two Mediterranean river deltas: The case of the Axios and Aliakmonas rivers, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, George P.; Kalivas, Dionissios P.; Griffiths, Hywel M.; Dimou, Paraskevi P.

    2015-03-01

    Wetlands are among Earth's most dynamic, diverse and varied habitats as the balance between land and water surfaces provide shelter to a unique mixture of plant and animal species. This study explores the changes in two Mediterranean wetland delta environments formed by the Axios and Aliakmonas rivers located in Greece, over a 25-year period (1984-2009). Direct photo-interpretation of four Landsat TM images acquired during the study period was performed. Furthermore, a sophisticated, semi-automatic image classification method based on support vector machines (SVMs) was developed to streamline the mapping process. Deposition and erosion magnitudes at different temporal scales during the study period were quantified using both approaches based on coastline surface area changes. Analysis using both methods was conducted in a geographical information systems (GIS) environment. Direct photo-interpretation, which formed our reference dataset, showed noticeable changes in the coastline deltas of both study areas, with erosion occurring mostly in the earlier periods (1990-2003) in both river deltas followed by deposition in more recent years (2003-2009), but at different magnitudes. Spatial patterns of coastline changes predicted from the SVMs showed similar trends. In absolute terms SVMs predictions of sediment erosion and deposition in the studied area were different in the order of 5-20% in comparison to photo-interpretation, evidencing the potential capability of this method in coastline changes monitoring. One of the main contributions of our work lies to the use of the SVMs classifier in coastal mapping of changes, since to our knowledge use of this technique has been under-explored in this application domain. Furthermore, this study provides important contribution to the understanding of Mediterranean river delta dynamics and their behaviours, and corroborates the usefulness of EO technology and GIS as an effective tool in policy decision making and successful

  20. Anthropogenic chemicals as drivers of change for coastal ecosystems: wetlands, mangroves and seagrass habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal wetlands, mangrove and seagrass habitats are rapidly declining worldwide which reduces their many ecological services. This presentation summarizes the results of a literature survey conducted to determine scientific understanding of contaminant uptake and toxicity of non...

  1. Vulnerabilities and Adapting Irrigated and Rainfed Cotton to Climate Change in the Lower Mississippi Delta Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saseendran S. Anapalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activities continue to emit potential greenhouse gases (GHG into the atmosphere leading to a warmer climate over the earth. Predicting the impacts of climate change (CC on food and fiber production systems in the future is essential for devising adaptations to sustain production and environmental quality. We used the CSM-CROPGRO-cotton v4.6 module within the RZWQM2 model for predicting the possible impacts of CC on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum production systems in the lower Mississippi Delta (MS Delta region of the USA. The CC scenarios were based on an ensemble of climate projections of multiple GCMs (Global Climate Models/General Circulation Models for climate change under the CMIP5 (Climate Model Inter-comparison and Improvement Program 5 program, that were bias-corrected and spatially downscaled (BCSD at Stoneville location in the MS Delta for the years 2050 and 2080. Four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP drove these CC projections: 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5 (these numbers refer to radiative forcing levels in the atmosphere of 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5 W·m−2, representing the increasing levels of the greenhouse gas (GHG emission scenarios for the future, as used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change-Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC-AR5. The cotton model within RZWQM2, calibrated and validated for simulating cotton production at Stoneville, was used for simulating production under these CC scenarios. Under irrigated conditions, cotton yields increased significantly under the CC scenarios driven by the low to moderate emission levels of RCP 2.6, 4.5, and 6.0 in years 2050 and 2080, but under the highest emission scenario of RCP 8.5, the cotton yield increased in 2050 but declined significantly in year 2080. Under rainfed conditions, the yield declined in both 2050 and 2080 under all four RCP scenarios; however, the yield still increased when enough rainfall was received to meet the water requirements of the crop (in

  2. Constructed Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    these systems can improve water quality, engineers and scientists construct systems that replicate the functions of natural wetlands. Constructed wetlands are treatment systems that use natural processes

  3. Human Impacts On The Bengal Delta's Response To Rapid Climate And Sea-Level Changes: Who Threatens Whom? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodbred, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    The densely populated country of Bangladesh is often cited as being severely threatened by predicted changes in climate and accelerated sea-level rise. Justification for this grave assessment is founded in part on the low-lying nation's frequent inundation by river floods and storm surges, which affect millions of people annually. Indeed, nearly 50% of the delta system lies dispersal system. So how can we assess this system's likely response to environmental change based on such seemingly contradictory patterns from the modern and Holocene delta? A first step would be to acknowledge that flooding and land loss are very different processes, and often negatively correlated. For the Bengal delta in particular, coastal and upland flooding is the very process that maintains the system's stability in the facing of rising seas. While such flooding is a strain on humans, for the natural environment it speaks more to a healthful future than decline. Here I present field-based observations of sediment dispersal in the modern Bengal delta, which demonstrate how the system may remain relatively stable over the next century. However, this potentially acceptable outcome becomes increasingly unlikely if human interferences are considered. For example, short-term strategies to mitigate flooding would likely involve artificial leveeing of the river and the diking of coastal lowlands, both of which would limit sedimentation and diminish relative elevation of the delta surface. Threats upstream of the delta also include river damming to address demands for hydroelectric power and water resources in India, with a resulting decline in sediment discharge to the coast. Ultimately, it may be the impacts of such direct human-modification to the Bengal delta and river systems that outpace - in time and severity - those resulting from climate and sea-level changes alone.

  4. Hazards and Bioremediation of Oil-pollutants in Soil Yellow River Delta and Coastal Wetland%黄河三角洲滨海湿地土壤石油污染危害及生物修复技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦玉广; 刘超; 李秀启; 陈秀丽; 陈有光; 董贯仓; 刘峰; 王亚楠; 冷春梅; 朱士文

    2011-01-01

    概述了黄河三角洲滨海湿地土壤石油污染现状和石油污染物对该地区土壤、水、空气以及对人类自身造成的危害,论述了石油污染土壤的各种生物修复技术特点及适用范围,并对生物修复技术的研究进展进行了热点分析,最后结合“蓝、黄”两大发展战略对黄河三角洲滨海湿地石油污染土壤修复治理进行了展望.%The status of oil-contaminated soil in the Yellow River delta and coastal wetland region and its hazards to soil, water, air, and human being in the area were overviwed in this article. Then varieties of bioremediation techniques, their characteriazation and utilization scope were outlined; and the research focus of the bioremediation was reviewed. In the end, accompanied by two national economic development strategies: "Eco-efficient Yellow River Delta Economic Zone Development Plan" & "Blue Shandong Peninsula Economic Zone Development Plan", the procspect of Oil-contaminated soil remediation was briefly presented.

  5. Alterações eletroquímicas em solos inundados Electrochemical changes in wetland soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Anastácio de Oliveira Camargo

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho tem o objetivo de revisar alguns conceitos da eletroquímica (descritos pela físico-química dos solos inundados. As principais alterações eletroquímicas que ocorrem após a inundação são a diminuição do potencial redox, aumento do pH em solos ácidos e decréscimo em solos alcalinos, aumento da condutividade elétrica e de reações de troca iônica. Essas modificações produzidas no sistema influenciam diretamente o desenvolvimento de plantas através do controle da disponibilidade e toxidez de nutrientes, regulando a absorção na rizosfera.This paper aims to review some concepts on electrochemistry of wetland soils. The main electrochemical changes after inundation are a decrease in redox potential, an increase in pH in acid and a decrease in alkaline soils and increases in conductivity and ion exchange reactions. These modifications in the system might influence plant growth, by affecting the availability on toxicity of nutrients, regulating uptake in the rhizosfere.

  6. Decoupled Changes in Western Niger Delta Primary Productivity and Niger River Discharge Across the Last Deglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, A. O.; Schmidt, M. W.; Slowey, N. C.; Jobe, Z. R.; Marcantonio, F.

    2014-12-01

    Abrupt droughts in West Africa impart significant socio-economic impacts on the developing countries of this region, and yet a comprehensive understanding of the causes and duration of such droughts remains elusive. Much of the summertime rainfall associated with the West African Monsoon (WAM) falls within the Niger River basin and eventually drains into the eastern Gulf of Guinea, contributing to the low sea-surface salinity of this region. Of the limited number of studies that reconstruct Gulf of Guinea salinity through the deglacial, the most comprehensive of those is located ~ 400 km east of the Niger delta and may not be solely influenced by WAM runoff. Here, we present XRF and foraminiferal trace metal data from two new cores located less than 100 km from the Western Niger Delta. Radiocarbon dating of cores Grand 21 (4.72oN, 4.48oE) and Fan 17 (4.81oN, 4.41oE) produced near linear sedimentation rates of 20 cm/kyr and 15 cm/kyr respectively. Elemental sediment compositions from XRF core scanning reveal an abrupt 50% increase in SiO2 between 17-15 ka during Heinrich Event 1. This increase, coeval with increases of CaCO3 (+12%) content and Ba/Ti ratios suggests a large increase in primary productivity during H1. Values then decrease at the onset of the Bolling-Allerod (~14.6 kyr) until a similar, albeit smaller increase is recorded during the Younger Dryas beginning at 12.7 kyr. In contrast, FeO2 and TiO2 are thought to be a proxies of Niger River discharge strength and suggest a more gradual change in riverine discharge across the deglacial that is most likely driven by precession. These proxies suggest Niger River runoff was low from the LGM through Heinrich 1, gradually increasing around 13 ka. FeO2 and TiO2 values then peak between 11.5-7.5 kyr, consistent with the African Humid Period, before gradually decreasing through the mid-late Holocene. This deglacial pattern of riverine input is markedly different from previous reconstructions of WAM variability and

  7. Impacts of Land Use and Cover Change on Land Surface Temperature in the Zhujiang Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Le-Xiang; CUI Hai-Sha; CHANG Jie

    2006-01-01

    Remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) technologies were used to detect land use/cover changes(LUCC) and to assess their impacts on land surface temperature (LST) in the Zhujiang Delta. Multi-temporal Landsat TM and Landsat ETM+ data were employed to identify patterns of LUCC as well as to quantify urban expansion and the associated decrease of vegetation cover. The thermal infrared bands of the data were used to retrieve LST. The results revealed a strong and uneven urban growth, which caused LST to raise 4.56 ℃ in the newly urbanized part of the study area. Overall, remote sensing and CIS technologies were effective approaches for monitoring and analyzing urban growth patterns and evaluating their impacts on LST.

  8. National Wetlands Inventory - Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent, approximate location and type of wetlands and deepwater habitats in the United States and its Territories. These data delineate...

  9. National Wetlands Inventory - Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent, approximate location and type of wetlands and deepwater habitats in the United States and its Territories. These data delineate...

  10. A landscape-scale assessment of above- and belowground primary production in coastal wetlands: Implications for climate change-induced community shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Camille L.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Piazza, Sarai C.; Snedden, Gregg; Steyer, Gregory D.; Fischenich, Craig J; McComas, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Above- and belowground production in coastal wetlands are important contributors to carbon accumulation and ecosystem sustainability. As sea level rises, we can expect shifts to more salt-tolerant communities, which may alter these ecosystem functions and services. Although the direct influence of salinity on species-level primary production has been documented, we lack an understanding of the landscape-level response of coastal wetlands to increasing salinity. What are the indirect effects of sea-level rise, i.e., how does primary production vary across a landscape gradient of increasing salinity that incorporates changes in wetland type? This is the first study to measure both above- and belowground production in four wetland types that span an entire coastal gradient from fresh to saline wetlands. We hypothesized that increasing salinity would limit rates of primary production, and saline marshes would have lower rates of above- and belowground production than fresher marshes. However, along the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coast in Louisiana, USA, we found that aboveground production was highest in brackish marshes, compared with fresh, intermediate, and saline marshes, and belowground production was similar among all wetland types along the salinity gradient. Multiple regression analysis indicated that salinity was the only significant predictor of production, and its influence was dependent upon wetland type. We concluded that (1) salinity had a negative effect on production within wetland type, and this relationship was strongest in the fresh marsh (0–2 PSU) and (2) along the overall landscape gradient, production was maintained by mechanisms at the scale of wetland type, which were likely related to plant energetics. Regardless of wetland type, we found that belowground production was significantly greater than aboveground production. Additionally, inter-annual variation, associated with severe drought conditions, was observed exclusively for belowground

  11. Identification, evaluation and change detection of highly sensitive wetlands in South-Eastern Sri Lanka using ALOS (AVNIR2, PALSAR) and Landsat ETM+ data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Ajith; Fernando, Tamasha; Takeuchi, Wataru; Wickramasinghe, Chathura H.; Samarakoon, Lal

    2014-06-01

    Sri Lanka is an island consists of numerous wetlands and many of these ecosystems have been indiscriminately exploited for a commercial, agricultural, residential and industrial development and waste dumping. Eastern River Basin Region in Sri Lanka is rapidly urbanizing, which leads more threats to the surrounding wetland ecosystems considerably. Therefore, it is important to identify and designated them as reserved areas where necessary in order to protect them under the National Environmental Act of Sri Lanka. Mapping and change detection of wetlands in the selected region is a key requirement to fulfill the above task. GIS and Remote Sensing techniques were used to identify and analyze the wetland eco systems. In this study Landsat ETM+, ALOS-AVNIR2, ALOS-PALSAR images were analyzed for identifying and change detection of wetlands. The secondary information and data were collected through a questionnaire survey to recognize the possible threats and benefits. The collected data and information were incorporated in identification, analyzing and ranking the wetlands. The final outcome of the project is to correlate the satellite data with the field observations to quantify the highly sensitive wetlands to declare as Environmental Protection Areas under the National Environment Act of Sri Lanka.

  12. Characterization of dynamic change of Fan-delta reservoir properties in water-drive development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Shenghe; Xiong Qihua; Liu Yuhong [Univ. of Petroleum Changping, Beijing (China)

    1997-08-01

    Fan-delta reservoir in Huzhuangji oil field of east China, is a typical highly heterogeneous reservoir. The oil field has been developed by water-drive for 10 years, but the oil recovery is less than 12%, and water cut is over 90%, resulting from high heterogeneity and serious dynamic change of reservoir properties. This paper aims at the study of dynamic change of reservoir properties in water-drive development. Through quantitative imaging analysis and mercury injection analysis of cores from inspection wells, the dynamic change of reservoir pore structure in water-drive development was studied. The results show that the {open_quotes}large pore channels{close_quotes} develop in distributary channel sandstone and become larger in water-drive development, resulting in more serious pore heterogeneity. Through reservoir sensitivity experiments, the rock-fluid reaction in water-drive development is studied. The results show the permeability of some distal bar sandstone and deserted channel sandstone becomes lower due to swelling of I/S clay minerals in pore throats. OD the other hand, the permeability of distributary channel and mouth bar sandstone become larger because the authigenic Koalinites in pore throats are flushed away with the increase of flow rate of injection water. Well-logging analysis of flooded reservoirs are used to study the dynamic change of reservoir properties in various flow units. The distribution of remaining oil is closely related to the types and distribution of flow units.

  13. Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes in a hydrologically changed wetland in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Elisa; Berger, Sina; Burger, Magdalena; Forsyth, Jordan; Goebel, Marie; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia; Blodau, Christian; Klemm, Otto

    2015-04-01

    Northern peatlands store about 30 % of the global soil carbon and account for a significant contribution to methane emissions from natural sources. The carbon cycle in peatland ecosystems is very sensitive to hydrological changes so that it is important to quantify and analyze the direction and magnitude of carbon fluxes under such conditions. For example, increased water levels might decrease the carbon dioxide uptake and increase methane emissions. The Luther Bog in Ontario, Canada, has been flooded to create a reservoir in 1952. This changed the hydrological regime of the adjacent areas and the question arises whether the changed ecosystem acts as a sink or source for carbon, and how it affects global warming. In 2014, an eddy covariance measurement station was operated there from May to October to quantify the exchange of water vapor, carbon dioxide and methane between the bog and the atmosphere. The station was located in an area that got wetter through the construction of the dam. The magnitude and direction of the methane fluxes were independent from daily patterns. The constantly high water level excluded the effect of temperature changes on the methane production. A seasonal variation with increased emissions during the summer period was visible despite the slightly decreased water level. However, the difference was small. The study site was found to be a clear methane source. The carbon dioxide fluxes showed typical diurnal courses. Their magnitude was relatively constant during the measurement period apart from a slight decrease in fall. The uptake of carbon clearly overweighed the carbon loss, meaning that the bog is sequestering carbon. However, considering the global warming potential of carbon dioxide and methane the effect on climate change is only slightly negative. This points out that even changed wetland ecosystems can keep their important function of sequestering carbon and thereby counteract global warming. A comparison and combination of this

  14. Drivers and Impacts of Ecological Change on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, G. V., Jr.; Bhatt, U. S.; Jorgenson, T.; Macander, M. J.; Whitley, M. A.; Loehman, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) region is one of the most biologically productive areas of the tundra biome and supports one of the largest indigenous human populations in the Arctic. Much of the YKD lies near sea-level, and the region's warm, thin permafrost is highly susceptible to thaw as temperatures warm. Sea-level rise, sea-ice loss, and changes in the frequency and intensity of storms make coastal ecosystems and infrastructure especially vulnerable. Multi-scale satellite records, coupled with a network of long-term monitoring plots, offer a means of characterizing disturbance processes, the scales at which they operate, and how they manifest in changes to vegetation and habitat. At the regional scale, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) trends have been idiosyncratic relative to circumpolar trends, with coarse-scale (12.5 km) AVHRR time-series indicating strong declines in NDVI that contrast starkly with increases elsewhere in the Arctic. There is evidence that this "browning" is linked to regional climate drivers, including an increase in summer cloudiness; however, interpretation of NDVI trends are complicated by the large extent of surface water on the YKD. Also, the region's wide coastal zone is subject to abrupt, nonlinear dynamics after episodic storms, flooding, and salt-kill of vegetation. The Landsat record offers a means to corroborate trends observed by AVHRR, and to link them with underlying landscape-scale drivers. Landsat excels at pinpointing disturbance "hotspots," as well as directional changes in vegetation at 30 m resolution. Long-term field plots in YKD coastal areas (1994-present) are ideal for characterizing changes to the region's most biologically productive habitats and subsistence areas. These plots indicate a range of vegetation responses across gradients of landscape age; salt-tolerant vegetation has been resilient on younger delta deposits, whereas changes are accelerating on older deposits underlain by permafrost. The

  15. Mapping Landcover/Landuse and Coastline Change in the Eastern Mekong Delta (Viet Nam) from 1989 to 2002 using Remote Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    SOHAIL, ARFAN

    2012-01-01

    There has been rapid change in the landcover/landuse in the Mekong delta, Viet Nam. The landcover/landuse has changed very fast due to intense population pressure, agriculture/aquaculture farming and timber collection in the coastal areas of the delta. The changing landuse pattern in the coastal areas of the delta is threatened to be flooded by sea level rise; sea level is expected to rise 33 cm until 2050; 45 cm until 2070 and 1 m until 2100. The coastline along the eastern Mekong delta has ...

  16. [Land use pattern change in Ejin Delta of Northwest China during 1930-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Yan-yun; Wang, Xiao-li; Chen, Lu

    2015-03-01

    The land use and landscape pattern in the lower reaches of the arid inland river basin is meaningful to water resource allocation. Based on the land use data in 1930, 1961, 1990, 2000, 2010, the purpose of this study was to quantitatively analyze the change of landscape pattern in the Ejin Delta in the lower reaches of the Heihe River Basin, a typical inland river basin in Northwest China. The results showed that the desert area accounted for 73.4% of the total research area in 2010, and the grassland 20.8%. During the past 80 years, the grassland, farmland and construction land increased. The transformation of land use types were characterized by switching to farmland and construction land. The fragmentation and. diversity of the landscape increased, while the dominance of the landscape decreased. The landscape pattern obviously lied on the water resource and had regional diversity. Land use changes tended to make the landscape well-distributed, diverse and fragmentized. At last, the driving factors and ecological environment effects of land use change were discussed. In a word, to ensure harmonious development between human and eco-hydrology, suggestions such as planning ecological resettlement, limiting farmland area, developing precision agriculture and increasing the proportion of ecological water use should be put forward.

  17. Changes in resident attitudes towards tourism development and conservation in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaiwa, Joseph E; Stronza, Amanda L

    2011-08-01

    Negative attitudes of resident communities towards conservation are associated with resource decline in developing countries. In Botswana, Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) was adopted to address this challenge. CBNRM links rural development and conservation. However, the impact of CBNRM on changes of resident attitudes towards conservation and tourism is not adequately researched. This paper, therefore, assesses the impacts of CBNRM on resident attitudes towards tourism development and conservation in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. The study purposively sampled villages of Khwai, Mababe and Sankoyo. Household data using variables like: economic benefits from CBNRM; level of satisfaction with CBNRM; co-management of natural resources between resident communities and government agencies; and collective action was collected. This data was supplemented by secondary and ethnographic data. Using qualitative and quantitative analysis, results indicate changes in resident attitudes from being negative to positive towards tourism and conservation. These changes are triggered by economic benefits residents derived from CBNRM, co-management in resource management; and, collective action of communities in CBNRM development. Positive attitudes towards conservation and tourism are the first building blocks towards achieving conservation in nature-based tourism destinations. As a result, decision-makers should give priority to CBNRM and use it as a tool to achieve conservation and improved livelihoods in nature-based tourism destinations of developing countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Assessing Functions of Forested Wetlands in the Delta Region of Arkansas, Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, Version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    70  Function 3: Cycle nutrients ...to import, store, cycle, and export nutrients (Brinson et al. 1980, Wharton et al. 1982). Although these conditions have changed dramatically in...explorations of the Arkansas Delta in the 16th century, natural levees of the Mississippi and Arkansas Rivers were extensively used for maize agriculture by

  19. Estimating changes in heat energy stored within a column of wetland surface water and factors controlling their importance in the surface energy budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, W.B.; Sumner, D.M.; Castillo, A.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Changes in heat energy stored within a column of wetland surface water can be a considerable component of the surface energy budget, an attribute that is demonstrated by comparing changes in stored heat energy to net radiation at seven sites in the wetland areas of southern Florida, including the Everglades. The magnitude of changes in stored heat energy approached the magnitude of net radiation more often during the winter dry season than during the summer wet season. Furthermore, the magnitude of changes in stored heat energy in wetland surface water generally decreased as surface energy budgets were upscaled temporally. A new method was developed to estimate changes in stored heat energy that overcomes an important data limitation, namely, the limited spatial and temporal availability of water temperature measurements. The new method is instead based on readily available air temperature measurements and relies on the convolution of air temperature changes with a regression-defined transfer function to estimate changes in water temperature. The convolution-computed water temperature changes are used with water depths and heat capacity to estimate changes in stored heat energy within the Everglades wetland areas. These results likely can be adapted to other humid subtropical wetlands characterized by open water, saw grass, and rush vegetation type communities. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Island-terminus evolution related to changing ebb-tidal-delta configuration: Texel, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heteren, S. van; Oost, A.P.; Spek, A.J.F. van der; Elias, E.P.L.

    2006-01-01

    Historical maps of southwest Texel and the adjacent ebb-tidal delta, supplemented with quartz OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) ages of dune sand, span four centuries and show several links between coastal development and ebb-tidal-delta behavior. Updrift inlet migration governed recurved-spit

  1. Holocene sediment budgets of the Rhine Delta (The Netherlands): a record of changing sediment delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, Gijsbert; Cohen, K.M.; Gouw, M.J.P.; Middelkoop, H.; Hoek, W.Z.

    2006-01-01

    Holocene sedimentation in the Rhine-Meuse Delta is facilitated by sea-level rise and tectonics, but most important is the result of the sediment flux received through rivers from the hinterland. The majority of Rhine and Meuse sediment entering the delta was trapped between the apex and

  2. Contamination assessment of arsenic and heavy metals in a typical abandoned estuary wetland--a case study of the Yellow River Delta Natural Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhenglei; Sun, Zhigao; Zhang, Hua; Zhai, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Coastal and estuarine areas are often polluted by heavy metals that result from industrial production and agricultural activities. In this study, we investigated the concentration trait and vertical pattern of trace elements, such as As, Cd, Ni, Zn, Pb, Cu, and Cr, and the relationship between those trace elements and the soil properties in coastal wetlands using 28 profiles that were surveyed across the Diaokouhe Nature Reserve (DKHNR). The goal of this study is to investigate profile distribution characteristics of heavy metals in different wetland types and their variations with the soil depth to assess heavy metal pollution using pollution indices and to identify the pollution sources using multivariate analysis and sediment quality guidelines. Principal component analysis, cluster analysis, and pollution level indices were applied to evaluate the contamination conditions due to wetland degradation. The findings indicated that the concentration of trace elements decreased with the soil depth, while Cd increases with soil depth. The As concentrations in reed swamps and Suaeda heteroptera surface layers were slightly higher than those in other land use types. All six heavy metals, i.e., Ni, Cu, As, Zn, Cr, and Pb, were strongly associated with PC1 (positive loading) and could reflect the contribution of natural geological sources of metals into the coastal sediments. PC2 is highly associated with Cd and could represent anthropogenic sources of metal pollution. Most of the heavy metals exhibited significant positive correlations with total concentrations; however, no significant correlations were observed between them and the soil salt and soil organic carbon. Soil organic carbon exhibited a positive linear relationship with Cu, Pb, and Zn in the first soil layer (0-20 cm); As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the second layer (20-40 cm); and As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the third layer (40-60 cm). Soil organic carbon exhibited only a negative correlation with Cd (P

  3. Stratigraphic signatures of climatic change during the Holocene evolution of the Tigris Euphrates delta, lower Mesopotamia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqrawi, Adnan A. M.

    2001-02-01

    Fluctuations in climate, sea level and sedimentation rates, in addition to the neotectonic activity, during the geological evolution of the Tigris-Euphrates delta (in the last 10,000 years) had resulted in the deposition of various sedimentary units. Previously, five main stratigraphic units, with other sub-units, have been identified by the author during the study of the Holocene deltaic successions of Lower Mesopotamia and as based upon the results of petrological, geochemical, palaeontological and radiometric analyses of his PhD dissertation. Each unit has been produced through various depositional and diagenetic processes in addition to the dominant climate. Such processes together have been clearly recorded in the forms of either the authigenic minerals occurring in each sequence, particularly the Ca-Mg carbonates, evaporites and clay minerals, the biological activities represented by shell remains of molluscs, foraminifers and ostracods, or the preservation of organic matters within organic-rich layers. This review discusses the impact climatic changes had on the accumulated sedimentary facies during the Holocene evolution of the Tigris-Euphrates delta. Arid climate dominated the study area in the early Holocene after a long period of the wetter conditions of Pleistocene. Such a climatic change has resulted in the formation of gypcretes rich in palygorskite and dolomite occurring within the calcareous fluvial-plain muds, similar to the modern fluvial plain deposits. However, the sediments were highly admixed with coarser sandy deposits of playa and aeolian sources in the western desertic margins, and with older reworked sands of Zagros foothills to the Northeast of Lower Mesopotamia. During the mid-Holocene marine invasion, when the climate became wetter as well, brackish-water/marine sedimentary sub-units were deposited, overlying the previous fluvial plain deposits. The deposition started with a transitional sub-unit flourishing over the older early

  4. Simulated Impacts of Climate Change on Current Farming Locations of Striped Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus; Sauvage) in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.A.; Dang, V.H.; Bosma, R.H.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Leemans, R.; Silva, De S.S.

    2014-01-01

    In Vietnam, culturing striped catfish makes an important contribution to the Mekong Delta's economy. Water level rise during rainy season and salt intrusion during dry season affect the water exchange and quality for this culture. Sea level rise as a consequence of climate change will worsen these i

  5. Coastline changes and sedimentation related with the opening of an artificial channel: the Valo Grande Delta, SE Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mahiques, Michel M; Figueira, Rubens C L; Alves, Daniel P V; Italiani, Diana M; Martins, Cristina C; Dias, João M A

    2014-12-01

    The role played by human activity in coastline changes indicates a general tendency of retreating coasts, especially deltaic environments, as a result of the recent trend of sea level rise as well as the blockage of the transfer of sediments towards the coast, especially due to the construction of dams. This is particularly important in deltaic environments which have been suffering a dramatic loss of area in the last decades. In contrast, in this paper, we report the origin and evolution of an anthropogenic delta, the Valo Grande delta, on the south-eastern Brazilian coast, whose origin is related to the opening of an artificial channel and the diversion of the main flow of the Ribeira de Iguape River. The methodology included the analysis of coastline changes, bathymetry and coring, which were used to determine the sedimentation rates and grain-size changes over time. The results allowed us to recognize the different facies of the anthropogenic delta and establish its lateral and vertical depositional trends. Despite not being very frequent, anthropogenic deltas represent a favorable environment for the record of natural and anthropogenic changes in historical times and, thus, deserve more attention from researchers of different subjects.

  6. From "Duck Factory" to "Fish Factory": Climate induced changes in vertebrate communities of prairie pothole wetlands and small lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Kyle I.; Mushet, David M.; Stockwell, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region’s myriad wetlands and small lakes contribute to its stature as the “duck factory” of North America. The fishless nature of the region’s aquatic habitats, a result of frequent drying, freezing, and high salinity, influences its importance to waterfowl. Recent precipitation increases have resulted in higher water levels and wetland/lake freshening. In 2012–13, we sampled chemical characteristics and vertebrates (fish and salamanders) of 162 Prairie Pothole wetlands and small lakes. We used non-metric multidimensional scaling, principal component analysis, and bootstrapping techniques to reveal relationships. We found fish present in a majority of sites (84 %). Fish responses to water chemistry varied by species. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and brook sticklebacks (Culaea inconstans) occurred across the broadest range of conditions. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) occurred in a smaller, chemically defined, subset. Iowa darters (Etheostoma exile) were restricted to the narrowest range of conditions. Tiger salamanders (Ambystoma mavortium) rarely occurred in lakes with fish. We also compared our chemical data to similar data collected in 1966–1976 to explore factors contributing to the expansion of fish into previously fishless sites. Our work contributes to a better understanding of relationships between aquatic biota and climate-induced changes in this ecologically important area.

  7. Palynological reconstruction of environmental changes in coastal wetlands of the Florida Everglades since the mid-Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiang; Liu, Kam-biu; Platt, William J.; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.

    2015-05-01

    Palynological, loss-on-ignition, and X-ray fluorescence data from a 5.25 m sediment core from a mangrove forest at the mouth of the Shark River Estuary in the southwestern Everglades National Park, Florida were used to reconstruct changes occurring in coastal wetlands since the mid-Holocene. This multi-proxy record contains the longest paleoecological history to date in the southwestern Everglades. The Shark River Estuary basin was formed ~ 5700 cal yr BP in response to increasing precipitation. Initial wetlands were frequently-burned short-hydroperiod prairies, which transitioned into long-hydroperiod prairies with sloughs in which peat deposits began to accumulate continuously about 5250 cal yr BP. Our data suggest that mangrove communities started to appear after ~ 3800 cal yr BP; declines in the abundance of charcoal suggested gradual replacement of fire-dominated wetlands by mangrove forest over the following 2650 yr. By ~ 1150 cal yr BP, a dense Rhizophora mangle dominated mangrove forest had formed at the mouth of the Shark River. The mangrove-dominated coastal ecosystem here was established at least 2000 yr later than has been previously estimated.

  8. A Cursory Review of the Consequences of Human Activities and Land-Use Changes in the Niger Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Hamadina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the manifestation and consequences of human activities on the Niger Delta ecosystem. The Niger Delta is resource-rich and abundantly blessed with expanse of agricultural/aquatic resources and vast reserves of petroleum hydrocarbon. The delta has played prominent roles in the global economic activities, ranging from slave trade, palm oil business and now hydrocarbon export, spanning more than a century ago. The brunt of human activities resulting from the exploitation of Niger Delta resources, affects the ecosystem. The study was carried out using a mixed scale approach involving literature search, landuse/ land cover change detection using Landsat® satellite imageries and sampling and analysis of soils from four representative locations. The magnitude and severity of such effects are contingent not only on natural variables, but also the exploitative activities of man. This study has analysed the interplay of several variables resulting from anthropogenic activities. Information contained in this study is valuable towards understanding and sustainable management of the fragile Niger Delta ecosystem.

  9. From Risk Towards Resilience: Assessing Vulnerability and Adaptability to Climate Change in the Mekong Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, F. H.; Yasuhara, K.; Tamura, M.; Tabayashi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    While efforts to mainstream climate adaptation have only begun in recent years, many developing regions are already taking measures to proof themselves from various natural disasters, including storm surges, flooding, land subsidence, and erosion. In the Asia-Pacific region, one of the most vulnerable in the world, climate resilience is urgently needed due to sea level rise and the increasing frequency and intensity of climate events. Yet, many regions and communities are unprepared due to insufficient awareness of disaster risks. In order to utilize the science of the changing environment more effectively, there is a critical need to understand the social context and perception of those who are affected by climate change. Using the Mekong Delta region in Vietnam as an example, we discuss our current efforts to develop a vulnerability and adaptation index for building climate resilience in the Asia-Pacific Region. A survey of current adaptation efforts in this region will be shown and preliminary findings from our survey to understand the perception of disaster risk in this region will be discussed.

  10. A study of the climate change impacts on fluvial flood propagation in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Dang Tri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigated what would be the flood propagation in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD, due to different projected climate change scenarios, if the 2000 flood event (the most recent highest flood in the history was taken as a base for computation. The analysis herein was done to demonstrate the particular complexity of the flood dynamics. The future floods, on short term horizon, year 2050, were studied by considering the projected sea level rise (SLR (+30 cm. At the same time, future flood hydrograph changes at Kratie, Cambodia were applied for the upstream boundary condition. In this study, the future flood hydrograph was separated into two scenarios in which: (i Scenario 1 was projected in 2050 according to the adjusted regional climate model without any development in the Upper Mekong Basin; and, (ii Scenario 2 was projected as in Scenario 1 but with the development of the Upper Mekong Basin after 2030. Analyses were done to identify the high sensitive areas in terms of flood conditions (i.e. with and without flood according to the uncertainty of the projection of both the upstream and downstream boundary conditions. In addition, due to the rice-dominated culture in the VMD, possible impacts of flood on the rice-based farming systems were analysed.

  11. Now You See Them, Now You Don't: Temporal Change in the Mode and Extent of Connected and Disconnected Boreal Wetlands and Implications for Streamflow Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, C.; Stadnyk, T. A.; Smith, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    In northern Boreal catchments the presence of a multitude of connected and disconnected wetland complexes is commonly believed to play a controlling role on the source and timing of streamflow, effective simulation of which is critical to flow forecasting in changing climates. A key factor in this control is the mode of connectivity between wetlands and downstream rivers, and temporal distribution thereof. The local Lower Nelson River basin, Manitoba, Canada, has an area of approximately 90,000 km2, of which 25% is estimated to be covered by wetlands. Assessment of a decade of aerial imagery indicates variation in the spatial extent of wetlands of up to 50% of the surface area of individual headwater basins on both an inter- and intra-annual basis. Aerial and ground reconnaissance of selected areas indicates that using generalised aerial-based reflectance imagery for land cover classification is hampered by the presence of a number of types of wetlands (treed, shrubby, grassed, open) and shallow groundwater in this flat landscape. The large, remote, catchment area renders detailed ground-truthing impractical. As an alternative, five headwater basins and the main stem of the river are gauged and monitored for stable isotopes of water. In this study linear regression is used to assess linkages between isotopic and wetland extent variation and dominant environmental variables. Mass balance modelling is used to assess the relative merits of a detailed re-analysis of wetland delineation using refined reflectance analysis, soil and isotopic data, and simply assigning wetland extent as a calibration variable. Results indicate that aerial imagery provides a useful tool to assess surface connectivity, but that explicit identification and representation of temporal variation in surface and subsurface connectivity is necessary to adequately estimate timing of streamflow in this flat, wetland-dominated catchment.

  12. Recent morphological changes of the Yellow River (Huanghe) submerged delta: Causes and environmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Pan, Shunqi; Chen, Shenliang

    2017-09-01

    The Yellow River (Huanghe) submerged delta (YRSD) has been under the threat of erosion and retreat during the Anthropocene due to dramatic climatic and anthropogenic changes in the Yellow River basin. The analysis of field data shows that over the period of 1977-2005, the changes in climate (decrease in precipitation and increase in air temperature) and human interventions (increase in water diversion projects) throughout the watershed have resulted in the sharp reductions of river flow and sediment discharges into the Bohai Sea. Consequently, over the decadal timescale, morphological evolution of the YRSD has gone through three stages: i.e. rapid accumulation (5.77 × 108 m3/year) in 1977-1985, moderate accumulation (3.80 × 108 m3/year) in 1986-1995 and slow accumulation (0.91 × 108 m3/year) in 1996-2005. Climatic change within the catchment characterized by the rapid increase of air temperature contributed significantly to the transitions from the rapid accumulation to the moderate accumulation, and to the subsequent slow accumulation. The decadal morphological changes of the YRSD also show peculiar deposition/erosion characteristics over the medium timescale under river input reduction. Within the three decades, the patterns of the main sedimentary body exhibit irregular ellipses with the long axis parallel to the - 5 or - 10 m isobaths and short axis perpendicular to the isobaths. The depocentres of the YRSD are located between the - 10 and - 15 m isobaths close to the respective river mouths, with a high vertical accretion rate of 1.20 m/year. The time series data of annual volumetric change of the YRSD and river sediment load from 1977 to 2005 further demonstrate significant linear positive relationships between deltaic geomorphic change and fluvial input over shorter timescales (annual and 3-year). The critical sediment discharges for maintaining the deposition/erosion equilibrium state of the YRSD over the annual and 3-year timescales are found to be 1

  13. Water requirements for wheat and maize under climate change in North Nile Delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouda, S.; Noreldin, T; Abd El-Latif, K.

    2015-07-01

    Determination of water requirements for wheat and maize under climate change is important for policy makers in Egypt. The objectives of this paper were to calculate (i) ETo and (ii) water requirements for wheat and maize crops grown in five governorates (Alexandria, Demiatte, Kafr El-Sheik, El-Dakahlia and El-Behira) located in North Nile Delta of Egypt under current climate and climate change. ECHAM5 climate model was used to develop A1B climate change scenario in 2020, 2030 and 2040. Monthly values of evapotranspiration (ETo) under the different scenarios in these governorates were calculated using Hargreaves-Samani equation (H-S). Then, these values were regressed on ETo values previously calculated by Penman-Monteith equation (P-M) and linear regression (prediction equations were developed for each governorate). The predicted ETo values were compared to the values of ETo calculated by P-M equation and the deviations between them were very low (RMSE/obs=0.04-0.06 mm and R2 =0.96-0.99). Water requirements for wheat and maize were calculated using BISm model under current climate and in 2020, 2030 and 2040. The results showed that average annual ETo would increase by low percentage in 2020 and 2030. However, in 2040 the increase would reach 8%. Water requirements are expected to increase by 2-3% for wheat and by 10-15% for maize, which would result in reduction of the cultivated area. Thus, it is very important to revise and fix the production system of wheat and maize, in terms of the used cultivars, fertilizer and irrigation application to overcome the risk of climate change. (Author)

  14. Tropical wetlands, climate, and land-use change: adaptation and mitigation opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy Kolka; D. Murdiyarso; J. B. Kauffman; Richard Birdsey

    2016-01-01

    Tropical wetland ecosystems, especially mangroves and peatlands, are carbon (C) rich ecosystems. Globally, tropical mangroves store about 20 PgC, however, deforestation has contributed 10 % of the total global emissions from tropical deforestation, even though mangroves account for only about 0.7 % of the world’s tropical forest area (Donato et al. 2011). Meanwhile,...

  15. Physical and biological changes of suspended particles in a free surface flow constructed wetland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulling, B.T.M.; van den Boomen, R.M.; Claassen, T.H.L.; van der Geest, H.G.; Kappelhof, J.W.N.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2013-01-01

    Suspended particles are considered as contaminants in treated wastewater and can have profound effects on the biological, physical and chemical properties of receiving aquatic ecosystems, depending on the concentration, type and nature of the suspended particles. Constructed wetlands are known to

  16. Water requirements for wheat and maize under climate change in North Nile Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Ouda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of water requirements for wheat and maize under climate change is important for policy makers in Egypt. The objectives of this paper were to calculate (i ETo and (ii water requirements for wheat and maize crops grown in five governorates (Alexandria, Demiatte, Kafr El-Sheik, El-Dakahlia and El-Behira located in North Nile Delta of Egypt under current climate and climate change. ECHAM5 climate model was used to develop A1B climate change scenario in 2020, 2030 and 2040. Monthly values of evapotranspiration (ETo under the different scenarios in these governorates were calculated using Hargreaves-Samani equation (H-S. Then, these values were regressed on ETo values previously calculated by Penman-Monteith equation (P-M and linear regression (prediction equations were developed for each governorate. The predicted ETo values were compared to the values of ETo calculated by P-M equation and the deviations between them were very low (RMSE/obs=0.04-0.06 mm and R2 =0.96-0.99. Water requirements for wheat and maize were calculated using BISm model under current climate and in 2020, 2030 and 2040. The results showed that average annual ETo would increase by low percentage in 2020 and 2030. However, in 2040 the increase would reach 8%. Water requirements are expected to increase by 2-3% for wheat and by 10-15% for maize, which would result in reduction of the cultivated area. Thus, it is very important to revise and fix the production system of wheat and maize, in terms of the used cultivars, fertilizer and irrigation application to overcome the risk of climate change. Additional key words: Triticum spp; Zea mays; Penman-Monteith equation; Hargreaves-Samani equation; BISm model; ECHAM5 climate model; A1B climate change scenario. Abbreviations used: BISm (basic irrigation scheduling model; CCAFS (Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security; ETo (evapotranspiration; H-S (Hargreaves & Samani; Kc (crop coefficient; PI (percentage of increase; P

  17. Eco-geomorphological Response of an Estuarine Wetland to Changes in the Hydraulic Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, A.; Rodrí Guez, J.

    2006-12-01

    In the Hunter Estuary, NSW, Australia, tidal regimes of numerous wetlands have been affected by extensive anthropomorphic intervention, including harbour dredging, land reclamation, and construction of infrastructure. The importance of these wetlands to ecosystem services such as primary productivity, flood attenuation and water quality enhancement has led to an increased effort to rehabilitate degraded sites by reintroduction of tidal flows. Because of the complex and dynamics interactions among hydraulic regime, vegetation and geomorphology, it is difficult to predict how wetlands will respond to the reintroduction of these flows and whether the resulting habitat distribution will achieve desired management outcomes. Eco-geomorphology research conducted at a rehabilitated wetland comprised of mangrove forest and saltmarsh has tracked the response of estuarine vegetation distribution and wetland geomorphology to reinstatement of tidal flows following removal of impediments in 1995. The wetland is an important site for migratory shorebirds and is highly compartmentalized due to the presence of roads and culverts. Our research methodology integrates historical analysis, field measurements and laboratory experiments. Historical analysis matched vegetation evolution obtained from aerial photography to bird roosting habitat use, which is in decline. Field data collection carried out in the last two years included topographic, vegetation and soil surveys; velocity, water quality and water level profiling; and high precision measurements of substrate shallow subsidence and vertical accretion. Laboratory studies focussed on the effects of estuarine vegetation on flow resistance. All this information has allowed for the characterization and conceptualization of the system, which includes zones with different tidal attenuation levels and vegetation distribution. It was found that an increased tidal frame resulting from hydraulic manipulation lead to a landward shift in

  18. Acceptance of Climate Change by Rural Farming Communities in Delta State, Nigeria: Effect of Science and Government Credibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Ukaro Ofuoku

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to examine Delta State rural farming communities’ attitude to climate change in relation to science and government credibility. A preparatory assessment of Delta State rural communities’ understanding of climate change and insights into potential barriers to communication were given by influences on their attitudes. Average of 60.46% of the farmers reported that climate change was occurring and asserted that climate change was the consequence of human activities. Most (91.23% were certain that climate change is adversely affecting their farming businesses. Many (mean=1.40 found climate change information not easily comprehensible. However the farmers have negative view about the credibility of science, but had low levels of confidence in government. They reported that lack of information was a barrier to adaptation to climate change. This suggests that such barrier lies with the Delta State extension service. There is also an indication that government through the public extension service, need to wake up to her responsibilities of sending related information the rural farming communities. The government should consider the local socio-cultural economic and biophysical environment of the farmers the information is meant for.

  19. Changes in vegetative coverage of the Hongze Lake national wetland nature reserve: a decade-long assessment using MODIS medium-resolution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun; Hu, Chuanmin

    2013-01-01

    Wetlands are important ecosystems on Earth. However, global wetland coverage is being reduced due to both anthropogenic and natural effects. Thus, assessment of temporal changes in vegetative coverage, as a measure of the wetland health, is critical to help implement effective management plans and provide inputs for climate-related research. In this work, 596 moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) 250-m resolution images of the Hongze Lake national wetland nature reserve from 2000 to 2009 were used to study the vegetative coverage (above the water surface) of the reserve. Three vegetation indices [normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced VI (EVI), and floating algae index (FAI)] were compared to evaluate their effectiveness in assessing relative changes. FAI was less sensitive than NDVI and EVI to aerosol effects and showed less statistical error than NDVI and EVI. Long-term FAI data revealed clear seasonal cycles in vegetative coverage in the 113-km2 core area of the reserve, with annual maximal coverage relatively stable after 2004. This suggests that the national wetland nature reserve was well protected through the study period. However, vegetative coverage decreased due to the flooding event in 2003. Moreover, correlation analysis showed that annual sunshine duration collectively played a significant role in affecting the wetland vegetative coverage.

  20. Preliminary Study on Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC: Hemispheric Lateralization with Behavioural Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Azuin Suliman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is designed inspired by the fact that there is an interhemisphere asymmetry of the brain region. A lot of researches studied in demonstrating the differences between right and left hemispheres of the brain. The objective of this preliminary study is to observe scientifically the effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC on the hemispheric lateralization with behavioural changes. Two regions of brain are selected, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Behavioural tests, namely heat stress test and novel-object discrimination test (NOD, were done on day seven. The hippocampus and prefrontal cortex regions of the brain were preceded to Western Blot technique in detecting c-fos. As for behavioural tests, heat stress and NOD and c-fos on hippocampus did not show significant differences. Meanwhile, the prefrontal cortex shows significant difference with p < 0.01. With these findings, reasonable dosages of ∆9-THC should be used to have statistically significant differences effects on behavioural tests.

  1. Changes in forest biomass carbon stock in the Pearl River Delta between 1989 and 2003

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kun; GUAN Dongsheng

    2008-01-01

    Forest ecosystems play a significant role in maintaining climate stability at the regional and global scales as an important carbon sink. Regional forest carbon storage and its dynamic changes in the Pearl River Delta have been estimated using the continuous biomass expansion factor (BEF) method based on field measurements of forests plots in different age classes and forest inventory data of three periods (1989-1993, 1994-1998, 1999-2003). The results show that regional carbon storage increased by 16.76%, from 48.57×106 to 56.71×106 tons, 80% of which was stored in forest stands. Carbon storage of other types of vegetation, with the exception of shrubland and woodland, increased. Carbon density of the regional forest increased by 14.31%, from 19.08 to 21.81 ton/hm2. Potential carbon storage of the regional forest may reach 39.96×107 tons when the forest biomass peaks with succession.

  2. The Peace-Athabasca Delta: A Potential Testbed for Hydrologic Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelsky, T. M.; Smith, L. C.

    2006-12-01

    The Peace-Athabasca Delta of Northern Alberta is, at 6000 sq km, among the world's largest inland freshwater deltas. It is internationally recognized as a global center of biodiversity and is both a RAMSAR convention wetland and a United Nations world heritage site. The delta is composed of a series of wide and extremely shallow (<2 m deep) lakes interconnected by a network of distributaries from the Peace and Athabasca Rivers and interspersed with disconnected wetland basins. Topographic slope is very low in most of the delta, with water surface elevations ranging between 213 and 206 m.a.s.l. The delta is largely ice- covered from October through April, but during the open water season water levels are quite variable, with influences coming through changing inputs from the major delta rivers as well as from within the delta. Most notably, wind-driven seiche events on Lake Athabasca can result in rapid increases or decreases in water level of up to 1 m in much of the delta. Because of its extensive open water area, large temporal variability in water surface elevation, and international prominence as a pristine biodiversity hotspot, the Peace-Athabasca Delta represents an ideal location to test future advances in wide-swath altimetry. Ground-based water level monitoring in the Delta has improved in recent years, with a network of 32 pressure-transducer water level monitors with cm-scale accuracy deployed during the summer of 2006 along with two meteorological stations. Such a network, encompassing the majority of the delta, would allow for extensive validation of wide swath altimetry instruments in a variety of different hydrologic environments including river channels, disconnected floodplain basins, and large connected lakes.

  3. Impacts of past climate and sea level change on Everglades wetlands: placing a century of anthropogenic change into a late-Holocene context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, D.A.; Bernhardt, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    We synthesize existing evidence on the ecological history of the Florida Everglades since its inception ~7 ka (calibrated kiloannum) and evaluate the relative impacts of sea level rise, climate variability, and human alteration of Everglades hydrology on wetland plant communities. Initial freshwater peat accumulation began between 6 and 7 ka on the platform underlying modern Florida Bay when sea level was ~6.2 m below its current position. By 5 ka, sawgrass and waterlily peats covered the area bounded by Lake Okeechobee to the north and the Florida Keys to the south. Slower rates of relative sea level rise ~3 ka stabilized the south Florida coastline and initiated transitions from freshwater to mangrove peats near the coast. Hydrologic changes in freshwater marshes also are indicated ~3 ka. During the last ~2 ka, the Everglades wetland was affected by a series of hydrologic fluctuations related to regional to global-scale fluctuations in climate and sea level. Pollen evidence indicates that regional-scale droughts lasting two to four centuries occurred ~1 ka and ~0.4 ka, altering wetland community composition and triggering development of characteristic Everglades habitats such as sawgrass ridges and tree islands. Intercalation of mangrove peats with estuarine muds ~1 ka indicates a temporary slowing or stillstand of sea level. Although sustained droughts and Holocene sea level rise played large roles in structuring the greater Everglades ecosystem, twentieth century reductions in freshwater flow, compartmentalization of the wetland, and accelerated rates of sea level rise had unprecedented impacts on oxidation and subsidence of organic soils, changes/loss of key Everglades habitats, and altered distribution of coastal vegetation.

  4. Pollution assessment and source identifications of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments of the Yellow River Delta, a newly born wetland in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhifeng; Wang, Lili; Niu, Junfeng; Wang, Jingyi; Shen, Zhenyao

    2009-11-01

    The levels and possible sources of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic carbons (PAHs) in the sediments from the Yellow River Delta (YRD) were investigated. The total PAH concentrations ranged from 23.9 to 520.6 microg kg(-1) with a mean value of 150.9 microg kg(-1), indicating low or medium levels compared with reported values of other deltas. The concentrations of the 16 individual PAHs presented varied profiles among different regions. The ecological risk assessment of PAHs showed that adverse effects would rarely occur in the sediments of the YRD based on the effect range-low quotients and the probability risk assessment. The PAH compositions and the principal component analysis (PCA) with multiple linear regression (MLR) uniformly presumed the mixed sources of pyrogenic- and petrogenic-deriving PAHs in the YRD. By PCA with MLR, the contributions of major sources were quantified as 36.4% from oil burning, 33.1% from biomass combustion, and 30.5% from diesel emission sources.

  5. Managing the wetlands. People and rivers: Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, P

    1993-01-01

    At the current population growth rate in Africa, the population will reach 1 billion by 2010. Water is needed to sustain these people, yet rainfall in Africa is erratic. Africans are already confronting a shortage of freshwater. Agriculture supports 66% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa. Sound agricultural development is needed to curb rural-urban migration, but a constant supply of freshwater is essential. Major rivers (the Limpopo in southern Africa and the Save/Sabi in Zimbabwe and Mozambique) now flow only seasonally. The flows of the Chari-Logona, the Nile, and the Zambezi are falling. Continual mismanagement of Africa's river basins coupled with current projections of global climate change will expand desiccation. All but the White Nile and the Zaire rivers flood seasonally every year, thereby expanding Africa's wetlands. Wetlands have been targeted for development projects (e.g., hydroelectric projects and large dams), largely to meet urban-industrial demands. Development planners tend to ignore the economic value of the wetlands. For example, the Niger Inland Delta sustains 550,000 people, 1 million cattle, and 1 million sheep. Wetlands replenish ground water and serve as natural irrigation. River basin planning often results in environmentally disastrous schemes which do not understand local management practices. Hydrologists, engineers, geologists, and economics design these schemes, but sociologists, anthropologists, and development experts should be included. The unfinished Jonglei Canal in southern Sudan would have adversely affected 400,000 pastoralists. The Volta River Authority's Akosombo Dam displaced 84,000 people and flooded the most productive agricultural land in Ghana. A sustainable future in Africa depends on understanding the interactions of human uses and the ways in which they relate to the natural variations in river flow. The IUCN Wetlands Programme, based on the principles of the World Conservation Strategy, is working with

  6. Analyzing qualitative and quantitative changes in coastal wetland associated to the effects of natural and anthropogenic factors in a part of Tianjin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhenglei; Xu, Xuegong; Yan, Lei

    2010-02-01

    Natural and anthropogenic factors in coastal wetland changes are widely discussed in wetland studies. Previous literatures have demonstrated that many factors may cause wetland change and argued that the global climate change and nutrient enrichment may become the most important ones in the next 50 years. Through field investigation, with the help of remote sensing technology and geographic information system, this research discusses the wetland change in Tianjin under the great pressure of rapid economic development, population growth, and sea-level rising. These findings include: (1) the wetland area expanded from 466.50 km 2 to 658.38 km 2 between 1987 and 1998, but it shrank to 550.5 km 2 by the year of 2006. (2) The results show that the groundwater has not been contaminated while the surface water has been polluted. (3) The questionnaire survey shows that the social environment in some specific ways impedes the protection of natural reserve. In order to achieve the harmony between human and nature, feasible countermeasures on how to keep ecological balance should be immediately taken. Consequently, natural conservation and sustainable economic development will be realized.

  7. Response of salt marsh and mangrove wetlands to changes in atmospheric CO2, climate, and sea-level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckee, Karen L.; Rogers, Kerrylee; Saintilan, Neil; Middleton, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal salt marsh and mangrove ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated climate and climate-induced changes. We provide a review of the literature detailing theoretical predictions and observed responses of coastal wetlands to a range of climate change stressors, including CO2, temperature, rainfall, and sea-level rise. This review incorporates a discussion of key processes controlling responses in different settings and thresholds of resilience derived from experimental and observational studies. We specifically consider the potential and observed effects on salt marsh and mangrove vegetation of changes in (1) elevated [CO2] on physiology, growth, and distribution; (2) temperature on distribution and diversity; (3) rainfall and salinity regimes on growth and competitive interactions; and (4) sea level on geomorphological, hydrological, and biological processes.

  8. The contribution of delta subunit-containing GABAA receptors to phasic and tonic conductance changes in cerebellum, thalamus and neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen G Brickley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have made use of the delta subunit-selective allosteric modulator DS2 (4-chloro-N-[2-(2-thienylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-yl benzamide to assay the contribution of delta-GABAARs to tonic and phasic conductance changes in the cerebellum, thalamus and neocortex. In cerebellar granule cells, an enhancement of the tonic conductance was observed for DS2 and the orthosteric agonist THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol. As expected, DS2 did not alter the properties of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic synaptic currents (IPSCs supporting a purely extrasynaptic role for delta-GABAARs in cerebellar granule cells. DS2 also enhanced the tonic conductance recorded from thalamic relay neurons of the visual thalamus with no alteration in IPSC properties. However, in addition to enhancing the tonic conductance DS2 also slowed the decay of IPSCs recorded from layer II/III neocortical neurons. A slowing of the IPSC decay also occurred in the presence of the voltage-gated sodium channel blocker TTX. Moreover, under conditions of reduced GABA release the ability of DS2 to enhance the tonic conductance was attenuated. These results indicate that delta-GABAARs can be activated following vesicular GABA release onto neocortical neurons and that the actions of DS2 on the tonic conductance may be influenced by the ambient GABA levels present in particular brain regions.

  9. From one marsh to another, changing swamps - Exercise of reflexivity within the water and territories system: wetland renaturation / restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Alain; Chauvelon, Philippe; Boutron, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    In relation to the"Plan National en faveur des Zones Humides", the project aims to provide food for thought, from the interdisciplinary articulation , for the development, organizational arrangements and the level of water governance. The methods that will permit to better understand how work studied ecosystems and to measure the anthropogenic and natural part of the functioning of these territories. The methods will be based on a landscape approach and facilitated by the techniques used in landscape ecology making wide use of the techniques from geomatic (GIS, digital photogrammetry, satellite remote sensing...). Additional studies from data collected in the field will also be made in particular to improve our understanding of hydrology, water quality... . The two sites selected by this proposal covers two wetlands of national and international interests. Both are located in natural regional parks (NRP): Alpilles and Camargue, the NRP of Camargue is furthermore included in the "Man and Biosphere Reserve" of the Rhone delta. The first concerns the "Vallée des marais des Baux", the second, the "Salins de Giraud". The complexity of natural and human issues make such territories privileged study sites. Located both in the west of the "Bouches du Rhône" department, these territories have very different human and physical characteristics. We develop in this presentation only the first, the "Vallée des marais des Baux". Under the initiative of several private owners, voluntary marshes restoration experiments are conducted. This area covering about 1300 hectares was originally swamp. Since the Romans, many attempts have succeeded in drying up the area but it's not until 1950-1960 that the technical development allowed to realize so - exception of small areas of relict marsh - implementing development centred on agriculture. Following to major floods in 2003, the sector is defined (Rhône river master plan) as an flood expansion area. Moreover, there is some decline of

  10. Assessing climate change impacts on wetlands in a flow regulated catchment: A case study in the Macquarie Marshes, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Baihua; Pollino, Carmel A; Cuddy, Susan M; Andrews, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Globally wetlands are increasingly under threat due to changes in water regimes as a result of river regulation and climate change. We developed the Exploring CLimAte Impacts on Management (EXCLAIM) decision support system (DSS), which simulates flow-driven habitat condition for 16 vegetation species, 13 waterbird species and 4 fish groups in the Macquarie catchment, Australia. The EXCLAIM DSS estimates impacts to habitat condition, considering scenarios of climate change and water management. The model framework underlying the DSS is a probabilistic Bayesian network, and this approach was chosen to explicitly represent uncertainties in climate change scenarios and predicted ecological outcomes. The results suggest that the scenario with no climate change and no water resource development (i.e. flow condition without dams, weirs or water license entitlements, often regarded as a surrogate for 'natural' flow) consistently has the most beneficial outcomes for vegetation, waterbird and native fish. The 2030 dry climate change scenario delivers the poorest ecological outcomes overall, whereas the 2030 wet climate change scenario has beneficial outcomes for waterbird breeding, but delivers poor outcomes for river red gum and black box woodlands, and fish that prefer river channels as habitats. A formal evaluation of the waterbird breeding model showed that higher numbers of observed nest counts are typically associated with higher modelled average breeding habitat conditions. The EXCLAIM DSS provides a generic framework to link hydrology and ecological habitats for a large number of species, based on best available knowledge of their flood requirements. It is a starting point towards developing an integrated tool for assessing climate change impacts on wetland ecosystems.

  11. How the Second Delta Committee Set the Agenda for Climate Change Adaptation: A Dutch Case Study on Framing Strategies for Policy Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduijn, S.H.; Meijerink, S.V.; Leroy, P.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, the Second State Delta Committee, commissioned by the Dutch Secretary of Public Works and Water Management, provided suggestions on how to defend the Netherlands against the expected impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise, longer periods of drought, more intense periods of rainfa

  12. Sedimentary facies and depositional model of shallow water delta dominated by fluvial for Chang 8 oil-bearing group of Yanchang Formation in southwestern Ordos Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈林; 陆永潮; 吴吉元; 邢凤存; 刘璐; 马义权; 饶丹; 彭丽

    2015-01-01

    A systematic analysis of southwestern Ordos Basin’s sedimentary characteristics, internal architectural element association styles and depositional model was illustrated through core statistics, well logging data and outcrop observations in Chang 8 oil-bearing group. This analysis indicates that shallow water delta sediments dominated by a fluvial system is the primary sedimentary system of the Chang 8 oil-bearing group of the Yanchang Formation in southwestern Ordos Basin. Four microfacies with fine grain sizes are identified: distributary channels, sheet sandstone, mouth bar and interdistributary fines. According to the sandbody’s spatial distribution and internal architecture, two types of sandbody architectural element associations are identified: amalgamated distributary channels and thin-layer lobate sandstone. In this sedimentary system, net-like distributary channels at the delta with a narrow ribbon shape compose the skeleton of the sandbody that extends further into the delta front and shades into contiguous lobate distribution sheet sandstone in the distal delta front. The mouth bar is largely absent in this system. By analyzing the palaeogeomorphology, the palaeostructure background, sedimentary characteristics, sedimentary facies types and spatial distribution of sedimentary facies during the Chang 8 period, a distinctive depositional model of the Chang 8 shallow water fluvial-dominated delta was established, which primarily consists of straight multi-phase amalgamated distributary channels in the delta plain, net-like distributary channels frequently diverting and converging in the proximal delta front, sheet sandstones with dispersing contiguous lobate shapes in the distal delta front, and prodelta or shallow lake mudstones.

  13. Detection of Area Changes in River Mouthbars at the Mekong River Delta using ALOS/PALSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A.; Uehara, K.; Tamura, T.; Saito, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Projected sea-level rise by the year 2100 would be ~1m recently and its negative impact on the coastal zone has been pointed out, particularly for mega-deltas in Asia by the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007). The relative sea-level rise varies with specific conditions and processes over broad spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, long-term monitoring of geomorphological changes in coastal areas over wide areas is of highly interest and importance for coastal management. However, due to limited data availability and accessibility in developing countries, there is not enough systematic coastal monitoring. The Mekong River Delta is one of typical mega-deltas in Asia, which has a low-lying wide delta-plain located in Cambodia to South Vietnam. Sediment and water discharges of the Mekong River are controlled by the monsoon with high and low discharge in summer (wet season) and winter (dry season), respectively. Therefore, technologies such as SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) not affected by the cloud conditions offer potential for monitoring in the monsoon Asia region. In this study, ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR) data acquired over a period from December 2006 to January 2011 are analyzed to investigate the relation between the sea level and the shape of mouthbars in the Mekong River. Level-1.0 PALSAR data were processed, coregistered, and geocoded to make SAR backscatter intensity images. River mouthbars with strong backscatter, which is surrounded by the water with weak backscatter, are successfully extracted using a histogram thresholding algorithm. Estimated areas of river mouthbars, which are located at the central part of the delta and openly faced to the South China Sea, gradually increase on an annual time scale. These river mouthbars are growing to the seaward. Besides this overall increasing trend, seasonal variations of areas are observed; these correlate with

  14. 黄河三角洲新生湿地土壤金属元素空间分布特征%Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Metals in New-born Coastal Wetlands in the Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于君宝; 马向明; 董洪芳; 王慧彬; 陈小兵; 谢文军; 毛培利; 高永军; 单凯; 陈景春

    2011-01-01

    Applying method of samples with transects, the spatial distributions of 12 kinds of soil metal elements (Na, Mg, Ca, Al, Cr, Pb, Sr, Co, Ga, V, Ni and Ti) in the new-born coastal wetland of the Yellow River delta were studied by laying two transects running riverward to seaward. The results showed that, from the Yellow River bank to salt beach, 11 kinds of metals except Ti showed increasing trend gradually. The contents of all of studied metal elements in 0-30 cm soil depth were much higher than those in inland marsh. Comparing with soil background values of the study area, heavy metals of Cr, Pb and Ni were all at light pollution level in soil of the Yellow River Delta. The variation differences in soil profile were significant for all metal elements. The contents of Na and Sr increased with soil depth, while inverse variations of Ca and Mg were observed, the variations of Pb, Co, Ga, V, Ni and Ti contents showed an 'S' shape in soil profile. Correlation analysis showed that there were extremely significant positive correlations of contents of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, NO3~-N and contents of Ca, Mg, Al, V, Co, Ga, Sr, Cr, Ni and Pb in studied soils. The results indicates that the contents of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, NO3--N were key factors for soil adsorption of metal elements in new-born coastal wetlands of the Yellow River Delta%采用样带布点法,研究了黄河三角洲新生滨海湿地从黄河岸边至盐滩不同植物带上12种金属元素(Na、Mg、Ca、Al、Cr、Pb、Sr、Co、Ga、V、Ni和Ti)空间分布特征.结果表明,由黄河岸边至盐滩方向,除Ti以外,土壤中其他11种金属元素含量均呈逐渐升高的趋势;0~30 cm表层土壤中各金属元素含量均高于内陆沼泽;将土壤背景值作为标准,黄河三角洲土壤重金属Cr、Pb和Ni处于轻微污染状态;各金属元素在剖面上的变化差异较大,总体上Na和Sr含量随着剖面深度的增加而逐渐升高,Ca和Mg则表

  15. Mangrove expansion in the Gulf of Mexico with climate change: Implications for wetland health and resistance to rising sea levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Rebecca S.; Allison, Mead A.; Bianchi, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    Black mangroves ( Avicennia spp.) are hypothesized to expand their latitudinal range with global climate change in the 21st century, induced by a reduction in the frequency and severity of coastal freezes, which are known to limit mangrove colony extent and individual tree size. The Gulf of Mexico is a prime candidate for population expansion to occur because it is located at the northward limit of black mangrove habitat. This may come at the expense of existing coastal saline wetlands that are dominantly Spartina spp. marsh grasses. The present study was conducted to focus on the implications of a marsh to mangrove transition in Gulf wetlands, specifically: (1) wetland resistance to accelerating eustatic sea level rise (ESLR) rates; (2) resistance to wave attack in large storms (increased cyclonic storm frequency/intensity is predicted with future climate warming); and (3) organic carbon sequestration and wetland soil geochemistry. Field sites of adjacent and inter-grown Avicennia germinans mangrove and Spartina marsh populations in similar geomorphological setting were selected in back-barrier areas near Port Aransas and Galveston, TX. Elevation surveys in the more mature Port Aransas site indicate mangrove vegetated areas are 4 cm higher in elevation than surrounding marsh on an average regional scale, and 1-2 cm higher at the individual mangrove scale. 210Pb and 137Cs accumulation rates and loss on ignition data indicate that mineral trapping is 4.1 times higher and sediment organics are 1.7 times lower in mangroves at Port Aransas. This additional mineral trapping does not differ in grain size character from marsh accumulation. Elevation change may also be effected by soil displacement of higher root volumes in mangrove cores. Port Aransas porosities are lower in mangrove rooted horizons, with a corresponding increase in sediment strength, suggesting mangrove intervals are more resistant to wave-induced erosion during storm events. Port Aransas mangroves

  16. Inorganic aerosols responses to emission changes in Yangtze River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinyi; Li, Juan; Fu, Joshua S; Gao, Yang; Huang, Kan; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2014-05-15

    The new Chinese National Ambient Air Quality standards (CH-NAAQS) published on Feb. 29th, 2012 listed PM2.5 as criteria pollutant for the very first time. In order to probe into PM2.5 pollution over Yangtze River Delta, the integrated MM5/CMAQ modeling system is applied for a full year simulation to examine the PM2.5 concentration and seasonality, and also the inorganic aerosols responses to precursor emission changes. Total PM2.5 concentration over YRD was found to have strong seasonal variation with higher values in winter months (up to 89.9 μg/m(3) in January) and lower values in summer months (down to 28.8 μg/m(3) in July). Inorganic aerosols were found to have substantial contribution to PM2.5 over YRD, ranging from 37.1% in November to 52.8% in May. Nocturnal production of nitrate (NO3(-)) through heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 was found significantly contribute to high NO3(-) concentration throughout the year. In winter, NO3(-) was found to increase under nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission reduction due to higher production of N2O5 from the excessive ozone (O3) introduced by attenuated titration, which further lead to increase of ammonium (NH4(+)) and sulfate (SO4(2-)), while other seasons showed decrease response of NO3(-). Sensitivity responses of NO3(-) under anthropogenic VOC emission reduction was examined and demonstrated that in urban areas over YRD, NO3(-) formation was actually more sensitive to VOC than NOx due to the O3-involved nighttime chemistry of N2O5, while a reduction of NOx emission may have counter-intuitive effect by increasing concentrations of inorganic aerosols.

  17. Carbon storage in US wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahlik, A. M.; Fennessy, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Wetland soils contain some of the highest stores of soil carbon in the biosphere. However, there is little understanding of the quantity and distribution of carbon stored in our remaining wetlands or of the potential effects of human disturbance on these stocks. Here we use field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment to provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales. We find that wetlands in the conterminous United States store a total of 11.52 PgC, much of which is within soils deeper than 30 cm. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fold more carbon than tidal saltwater sites--indicating their importance in regional carbon storage. Our data suggest a possible relationship between carbon stocks and anthropogenic disturbance. These data highlight the need to protect wetlands to mitigate the risk of avoidable contributions to climate change.

  18. The influence of changes in the market environment on economic production characteristics of Pangasius farming in the Mekong Delta (Vietnam)

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, V.B.; D'Haese, M.; Speelman, S.; D'Haese, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Mekong Delta in Vietnam has become an important production area for pangasius. The importance of the sector in providing an income to many households means that it is relevant to study its economic production characteristics. In this article we use a stochastic cost frontier model to assess the adaptability of the sector. We are particularly interested in the effect of the changing market environment and the exponential growth of the sector on the evolution of production characteristics. ...

  19. Spatiotemporal change of ecological footprint and sustainability analysis for Yangtze Delta Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; WANG Xinjun

    2011-01-01

    In the urbanizing world,the Yangtze Delta Region (YDR) as one of the most developed regions in China,has drawn a lot of the world's attention for the remarkable economic development achieved in the past decades.Nevertheless,the rapid economic development was certain to be accompanied by unprecedented consumption and loss of natural resources.Therefore,the analysis of the ecological situation and driving factors of environmental impact was of great significance to serve the local sustainable development decision-making and build a harmonious society.In this paper,the ecological footprint (EF) was taken as the index of the ecological environmental impact.With the help of Geographic Information System (GIS),we studied the spatiotemporal change of ecological footprint at two scales (region and city) and assessed urban sustainable development ability in YDR.Then we discussed the driving factors that affected the change of ecological footprint by the Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population,Affluence,and Technology (STIRPAT) model.The results showed that increasing trends of regional ecological footprint during 1998-2008 (1.70-2.53 ha/cap) were accompanied by decreasing ecological capacity (0.31-0.25 ha/cap) but expanding ecological deficit (1.39-2.28 ha/cap).The distribution pattern of ecological footprint and the degree of sustainable development varied distinctly from city to city in YDR.In 2008,the highest values of ecological footprint (3.85 ha/cap) and the lowest one of sustainable development index (SDI=1) in YDR were both presented in Shanghai.GDP per capita (A) was the most dominant driving force of EF and the classical EKC hypothesis did not exist between A and EF in 1998-2008.Consequently,increasing in ecological supply and reducing in human demand due to technological advances or other factors were one of the most effective ways to promote sustainable development in YDR.Moreover,importance should be attached to change our definition and measurement of

  20. Dynamic Change of Daqing Wetland Landscape%大庆湿地景观动态变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史丛冰; 王继富; 王影; 刘兴土; 文波龙

    2012-01-01

    基于遥感技术(RS)和地理信息系统(GIS)平台,以2007年SPOT5影像和Landsat TM5遥感图像为基础数据源,结合1986年和2001年数据资料,分析了近20年大庆湿地面积的时空演变过程.针对目前斑块特征对湿地现状进行分析,找出湿地存在的问题,从建立稳定的湿地生态系统、建立重点水域的污染系统控制工程、实施油田开发区退化湿地生态恢复、开展湿地保护宣传教育四方面给出合理建议,从而为有效地保护大庆湿地生态系统及其环境功能提供科学依据.%Based on the technology platfom of Geographic Information Systam and Remote Sensing .using the Landsat TM sensing image and SPOT 5 of 2007, and the data of 1986 and 2001 as the basic data resources, this paper studied the dynamic change of the ecological landscape pattern in the last 20 years. Aiming at the patch characteristics, it analyzed the wetland environment, found out the problems of the wetland and gave rational suggestions. It provided scientific basis for the effective protection of the ecological system and the environmental function in Daqing wetland.

  1. Quantification of Multiple Climate Change and Human Activity Impact Factors on Flood Regimes in the Pearl River Delta of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihan Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal flood regimes have been irreversibly altered by both climate change and human activities. This paper aims to quantify the impacts of multiple factors on delta flood. The Pearl River Delta (PRD, with dense river network and population, is one of the most developed coastal areas in China. The recorded extreme water level (m.s.l. in flood season has been heavily interfered with by varied income flood flow, sea-level rise, and dredged riverbeds. A methodology, composed of a numerical model and the index R, has been developed to quantify the impacts of these driving factors in the the PRD. Results show that the flood level varied 4.29%–53.49% from the change of fluvial discharge, 3.35%–38.73% from riverbed dredging, and 0.12%–16.81% from sea-level rise. The variation of flood flow apparently takes the most effect and sea-level rise the least. In particular, dense river network intensifies the impact of income flood change and sea-level rise. Findings from this study help understand the causes of the the PRD flood regimes and provide theoretical support for flood protection in the delta region.

  2. Macrobenthos of Kakinada Bay in the Godavari delta, East coast of India: comparing decadal changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Dipti; Ganesh, T.; Murty, N. V. S. S.; Raman, A. V.

    2005-03-01

    A one-year study (1995-1996) on the macrobenthos over a spread of (37) hydrographically differing GPS-fixed sites in Kakinada Bay (mean salinity 27.16±0.4) and adjacent mangrove channels (14.78±0.55) in the Godavari delta, one of India's largest estuarine systems, revealed a great preponderance of benthic life. There were 11 diverse taxa represented by 95 species collected through several (303) grab and dredge hauls. Based on Bray-Curtis similarity through hierarchical clustering implemented in PRIMER, it was possible to distinguish the benthos into four assemblages each of which represented sites in the Central and North bay ( Paphia textrix - Typhlocarcinus sp. Assemblage), South-East bay ( Protankyra similis - Paphia malabarica Assemblage), Mangrove Outlets ( Cerithidea cingulata Assemblage) and Mangrove channels ( Diopatra neapolitana Assemblage). Benthos densities (mean nos. dredge haul -1) were highest (299 individuals) at sites close to mangrove outlets. Species diversity (Margalef, d; Shannon-Wiener, H') was low in general ( d 1.244 to 2.251 and H' 0.038 to 1.502). Sediments were mostly clayey-silt in nature except in southeast bay where they are silt-sand. Organic matter (mean) was at or near 1.3%. The observations have revealed marked changes in benthic community structure relative to an earlier investigation held in 1958-1963 in this area. Over the years, species such as Turritella duplicata, Tonna dolium and Placuna placenta found in considerable numbers previously have dwindled. Anomia, Bursa and Atrina and echinoderms, Astropecten indica, Echinodiscus auritus and Temnopleurus toreumaticus and the brachiopod, Lingula sp. of common occurrence in early 60s are absent altogether attributable to long-term natural trends during the intervening years and/or events accompanying human impingement (e.g. industrial and urban growth, port expansion measures, aquaculture, mangrove denudation etc.). Despite such large-scale alterations in benthos community

  3. Urban growth and environmental impacts in Jing-Jin-Ji, the Yangtze, River Delta and the Pearl River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jan; Ban, Yifang

    2014-08-01

    This study investigates land cover changes, magnitude and speed of urbanization and evaluates possible impacts on the environment by the concepts of landscape metrics and ecosystem services in China's three largest and most important urban agglomerations: Jing-Jin-Ji, the Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta. Based on the classifications of six Landsat TM and HJ-1A/B remotely sensed space-borne optical satellite image mosaics with a superior random forest decision tree ensemble classifier, a total increase in urban land of about 28,000 km2 could be detected alongside a simultaneous decrease in natural land cover classes and cropland. Two urbanization indices describing both speed and magnitude of urbanization were derived and ecosystem services were calculated with a valuation scheme adapted to the Chinese market based on the classification results from 1990 and 2010 for the predominant land cover classes affected by urbanization: forest, cropland, wetlands, water and aquaculture. The speed and relative urban growth in Jing-Jin-Ji was highest, followed by the Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta, resulting in a continuously fragmented landscape and substantial decreases in ecosystem service values of approximately 18.5 billion CNY with coastal wetlands and agriculture being the largest contributors. The results indicate both similarities and differences in urban-regional development trends implicating adverse effects on the natural and rural landscape, not only in the rural-urban fringe, but also in the cities' important hinterlands as a result of rapid urbanization in China.

  4. Seasonal Variations of C: N: P Stoichiometry and Their Trade-Offs in Different Organs of Suaeda salsa in Coastal Wetland of Yellow River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fude; Liu, Yuhong; Wang, Guangmei; Song, Ye; Liu, Qing; Li, Desheng; Mao, Peili; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Variations of plant C: N: P stoichiometry could be affected by both some environmental fluctuations and plant physiological processes. However, the trade-off mechanism between them and their influencial factors were not understood completely. In this study, C, N, P contents and their stoichiometry of S. salsa’s plant organs (leaves, stems, and roots), together with their environmental factors including salinity, pH, soil N and soil P, were examined in the intertidal and supratidal habitats of coastal wetlands during the different sampling times (May, July, September, November). The results showed that both plant organ and sampling times affected C, N, and P and stoichiometry of S. salsa in the intertidal and supratidal habitats, however, their influencial conditions and mechanisms were different. In the intertidal habitat, the different slopes of C-P and N-P within interspecific organs suggested that plant P, C:P and N:P of S. salsa were modulated by P concentrations that allocated in the specific organs. However, the slopes of C-N were found to be not significant within interspecific organs, but during the sampling times. These differences of plant N and C:N were related with the physiological demand for N in the specific life history stage. In the supratidal habitat, no significant differences were found in the slopes of C-N, C-P, and N-P within interspecific organs. However, different slopes of C-N among the sampling times also indicated a self-regulation strategy for plant N and C:N of S. salsa in different ontogenetic stages. In contrast to the intertidal habitat, seasonal variations of P, C:P and N:P ratios within interspecific organs reflected the soil P characteristics in the supratidal habitat. Our results showed that the stoichiometric constraint strategy of plant S. salsa in this region was strongly correlated with the local soil nutrient conditions. PMID:26393356

  5. Seasonal Variations of C: N: P Stoichiometry and Their Trade-Offs in Different Organs of Suaeda salsa in Coastal Wetland of Yellow River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fude; Liu, Yuhong; Wang, Guangmei; Song, Ye; Liu, Qing; Li, Desheng; Mao, Peili; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Variations of plant C: N: P stoichiometry could be affected by both some environmental fluctuations and plant physiological processes. However, the trade-off mechanism between them and their influencial factors were not understood completely. In this study, C, N, P contents and their stoichiometry of S. salsa's plant organs (leaves, stems, and roots), together with their environmental factors including salinity, pH, soil N and soil P, were examined in the intertidal and supratidal habitats of coastal wetlands during the different sampling times (May, July, September, November). The results showed that both plant organ and sampling times affected C, N, and P and stoichiometry of S. salsa in the intertidal and supratidal habitats, however, their influencial conditions and mechanisms were different. In the intertidal habitat, the different slopes of C-P and N-P within interspecific organs suggested that plant P, C:P and N:P of S. salsa were modulated by P concentrations that allocated in the specific organs. However, the slopes of C-N were found to be not significant within interspecific organs, but during the sampling times. These differences of plant N and C:N were related with the physiological demand for N in the specific life history stage. In the supratidal habitat, no significant differences were found in the slopes of C-N, C-P, and N-P within interspecific organs. However, different slopes of C-N among the sampling times also indicated a self-regulation strategy for plant N and C:N of S. salsa in different ontogenetic stages. In contrast to the intertidal habitat, seasonal variations of P, C:P and N:P ratios within interspecific organs reflected the soil P characteristics in the supratidal habitat. Our results showed that the stoichiometric constraint strategy of plant S. salsa in this region was strongly correlated with the local soil nutrient conditions.

  6. GIS and Remote Sensing Applications in the Assessment of Change within a Coastal Environment in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund C. Merem

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the Niger Delta region has experienced rapid growth in population and economicv activity with enormous benefits to the adjacent states and the entire Nigerian society. As the region embarks upon an unprecedented phase of economic expansion in the 21st century, it faces several environmental challenges fuelled partly by the pressures caused by human activities such as oil and gas exploration, housing development, and road construction for transportation, economic development and demographic changes. This continued growth has resulted in environmental problems such as coastal wetland loss, habitat degradation, and water pollution, gas flaring, destruction of forest vegetation as well as a host of other issues. This underscores the urgent need to design new approaches for managing remote costal resources in sensitive tropical environments effectively in order to maintain a balance between coastal resource conservation and rapid economic development in developing countries for sustainability. Notwithstanding previous initiatives, there have not been any major efforts in the literature to undertake a remote sensing and GIS based assessment of the growing incidence of environmental change within coastal zone environments of the study area. This project is an attempt to fill that void in the literature by exploring the applications of GIS and remote sensing in a tropical coastal zone environment with emphasis on the environmental impacts of development in the Niger Delta region of Southern Nigeria. To deal with some of the aforementioned issues, several research questions that are of great relevance to the paper have been posed. The questions include, Have there been any changes in the coastal environment of the study area? What are the impacts of the changes? What forces are responsible for the changes? Has there been any major framework in place to deal with the changes? The prime objective of the paper is to provide a novel

  7. Integrated change detection and temporal trajectory analysis of coastal wetlands using high spatial resolution Korean Multi-Purpose Satellite series imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang Hai; Tran, Hien; Sunwoo, Wooyeon; Yi, Jong-hyuk; Kim, Dongkyun; Choi, Minha

    2017-04-01

    A series of multispectral high-resolution Korean Multi-Purpose Satellite (KOMPSAT) images was used to detect the geographical changes in four different tidal flats between the Yellow Sea and the west coast of South Korea. The method of unsupervised classification was used to generate a series of land use/land cover (LULC) maps from satellite images, which were then used as input for temporal trajectory analysis to detect the temporal change of coastal wetlands and its association with natural and anthropogenic activities. The accurately classified LULC maps of KOMPSAT images, with overall accuracy ranging from 83.34% to 95.43%, indicate that these multispectral high-resolution satellite data are highly applicable to the generation of high-quality thematic maps for extracting wetlands. The result of the trajectory analysis showed that, while the variation of the tidal flats in the Gyeonggi and Jeollabuk provinces was well correlated with the regular tidal regimes, the reductive trajectory of the wetland areas belonging to the Saemangeum province was caused by a high degree of human-induced activities including large reclamation and urbanization. The conservation of the Jeungdo Wetland Protected Area in the Jeollanam province revealed that effective social and environmental policies could help in protecting coastal wetlands from degradation.

  8. Indicators of desiccation-driven change in the distal Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringrose, S.; Vanderpost, C.; Matheson, W.; Wolski, P.; Huntsman-Mapila, P.; Murray-Hudson, M.; Jellema, A.

    2007-01-01

    This work seeks to determine whether riparian woody plant variables respond to drying and salinity regimes in the semi-arid distal Okavango Delta, northern Botswana. Structural and compositional variables were obtained from 47 field sites. Mapping using satellite imagery illustrated differences in t

  9. Predicting Dynamic Coastal Delta Change in Response to Sea-Level Rise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Lageweg, W.I.; Slangen, A.B.A.

    2017-01-01

    The world’s largest deltas are densely populated, of significant economic importance and among the most valuable coastal ecosystems. Projected twenty-first century sea-level rise (SLR) poses a threat to these low-lying coastal environments with inhabitants, resources and ecology becoming

  10. A study of the climate change impacts on fluvial flood propagation in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van, P.D.T.; Popescu, I.; Van Griensven, A.; Solomatine, D.P.; Trung, N.H.; Green, A.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper investigated the extent of the flood propagation in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta under different projected flood hydrographs, considering the 2000 flood event (the 20-yr return period event, T. V. H. Le et al., 2007) as the basis for computation. The analysis herein was done to demo

  11. Morphodynamics of a cyclic prograding delta: the Red River, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maren, D.S. van

    2004-01-01

    River deltas are inhabited by over 60% of the world population, and are, consequently, of paramount agricultural and economical importance. They constitute unique wetland envi ronments which gives river deltas ecological importance as well. Additionally, many deltas contain large accumulations of oi

  12. Coupled Ground- and Space-Based Assessment of Regional Inundation Dynamics to Assess Impact of Local and Upstream Changes on Evaporation in Tropical Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schwerdtfeger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of human land use and climate change are known to be a threat for the health and proper functioning of tropical wetlands. They interfere with the seasonal flood pulse, which is seen as the most important driver for biodiversity and directly controls evaporation. In order to investigate the impact of local and upstream changes on wetlands, a regional assessment of evaporation is crucial but challenging in such often remote and poorly gauged ecosystems. Evaporation is the major water balance component of these wetlands and links the flood pulse with the ecosystem. It can therefore be seen as a proxy for their functioning. In the last decades, information from space became an important data source to assess remote wetland areas. Here, we developed a new approach to quantify regional evaporation driven by inundation dynamics as its dominant control. We used three water and vegetation indices (mNDWI (modified Normalized Difference Water Index, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and EVI (Enhanced Vegetation Index from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance products to assess regional inundation dynamics between the dry and wet seasons. Two years of continual in situ water level measurements at different locations in our study area, the Pantanal wetland of South America, provided the reference to evaluate our method. With process-based modeling that used the inundation dynamics to determine the water available for evaporation, we were able to estimate actual evaporation (AET on a regional scale. Relating AET to changes in discharge due to upstream flow modifications and on local precipitation over the last 13 years, we found that the Pantanal is more vulnerable to alternated inundation dynamics than to changes in local precipitation. We concluded that coupling ground- and space-based information in this remote wetland area is a valuable first step to investigate the status of the Pantanal

  13. Direction and magnitude of change in soil use for a wetland area in Chile: Puren marshes, a priority site for biodiversity conservation (stage 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Varas, Alejandra

    2014-05-01

    Land managers and policymakers need information about soil change caused by anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic factors to predict the effects of management on soil function, compare alternatives, and make decisions. This is particularly relevant in highly fragile ecosystems such as wetlands or humid systems. The wetlands require the presence of three key components: hydric soils, hydrophytic vegetation and wetland hydrology. Therefore, the presence of hydric soils in humid systems is essential for the existence of a wetland. In Chile, one of the geographic zones with the greatest diversity of humid systems is the coast of the Araucanía Region, which contains one of the largest and most threatened humid systems of the region, Puren Marshes, whose soils are only generically described as alluvial terraces and miscellaneous swamp. In this area, studies have reported a high intensity of anthropogenic activity, generating soil erosion, loss of wetland coverage and landscape alteration. For this first stage of a main investigation about the vulnerability of hydric soils to changes in patterns of soil use, the objective was to characterize the variables of soil use in the Puren Marshes and determinate the direction and magnitude of change in soil use in the study area for the period between 1994 and 2007 (the official reports indicate that until 1994, the total area of Puren Marshes was 1147 ha). For the analyses, were used official reports of soil use, the coverages were obtained from the project map databases "Catastro y Evaluación de los Recursos Vegetacionales Nativos de Chile" 1993 and its update for La Araucanía, Regional Government of La Araucanía 2011, DMF CONAF 2010 and IGM 2007. The map information was processed in ARCGIS 9.3.1 software under UTM coordinates, datum WGS 84 and 18 South Time extended. Was developed a multitemporal analysis by construction of transition matrix and confusion matrix. The results obtained show that for the period analysed, the

  14. [Changes in vegetation and soil characteristics under tourism disturbance in lakeside wetland of northwest Yunnan Plateau, Southwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-Yan; Yang, Yong-Xing

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics of vegetation and soil were investigated in Bita Lake and Shudu Lake wetlands in northwest Yunnan Plateau under tourism disturbance. The 22 typical plots in the wetlands were classified into 4 types by TWINSPAN, including primary wetland, light degradation, moderate degradation, and severe degradation. Along the degradation gradient, the plant community density, coverage, species number and Shannon diversity index increased and the plant height decreased in Bita Lake and Shudu Lake wetlands, and Whittaker diversity index increased in Bita Lake wetland. Plant species number, soil organic matter, total nitrogen, porosity, available nitrogen, available phosphorus and available potassium contents were higher in Shudu Lake wetland than in Bita Lake wetland, but the plant density, height, soil total potassium and pH were opposite. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) by importance values of 42 plants and 11 soil variables showed that soil organic matter, total nitrogen and total potassium were the key factors on plant species distribution in Bita Lake and Shudu Lake wetlands under tourism disturbance. TWINSPAN classification and analysis of vegetation-soil characteristics indicated the effects of tourism disturbance in Bita Lake wetland were larger than in Shudu Lake wetland.

  15. Integrated flood risk assessment for the Mekong Delta through the combined assessment of flood hazard change and social vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Heiko; Garschagen, Matthias; Delgado, José Miguel; Viet Dung, Nguyen; Van Tuan, Vo; Thanh Binh, Nguyen; Birkmann, Joern; Merz, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Low lying estuaries as the Mekong Delta in Vietnam are among the most vulnerable areas with respect to climate change impacts. While regular floods are not a threat but an opportunity for livelihoods and income generation, extreme flood events can pose considerable risks to the people living in Deltas. Climate change is expected to increase the frequency of extreme floods globally, which in combination with sea level rise and a likely intensification of cyclone activity creates increased and/or entirely new hazard exposure in the Deltas. Yet, in line with the risk literature and especially the recent IPCC SREX report, flooding risk needs to be understood as deriving from the interaction of physical hazards and the vulnerabilities of exposed elements. Therefore, the paper aims for an integrated risk assessment through combining the most up to date estimates of flood hazard projections under climate change conditions in the Mekong Delta with the assessment of vulnerability patterns. Projections of flood hazard are estimated based the modulation of the flood frequency distribution by atmospheric circulation patterns. Future projections of these patterns are calculated from an ensemble of climate models. A quasi two-dimensional hydrodynamical model of the Delta is then applied to estimate water levels and flood extend. This model is fed with a set of hydrographs which are based on both the derived climate model uncertainty and the bivariate nature of floods in the Mekong Delta. Flood peak is coupled with flood volume in the probabilistic framework to derive synthetic extreme future floods with associated probabilities of occurrence. This flood hazard analysis is combined with static sea level rise scenarios, which alter the lower boundary of the hydrodynamic model and give estimates of the impact on sea level rise on inundation extend and depths. The vulnerability assessment is based on a three step approach. Firstly, vulnerability profiles are developed for different

  16. An integrated framework to assess plausible future livelihood and poverty changes in deltas: an application to coastal Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázár, A. N.; Payo, A.; Nicholls, R. J.; Hutton, C.; Adams, H.; Salehin, M.; Haque, A.; Clarke, D.; Bricheno, L.; Fernandes, J. A.; Rahman, M.; Ahmed, A.; Streatfield, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Deltas represent one of the most densely populated areas in the world. This is especially true for the coastal zone of Bangladesh where more than a thousand people live in each square kilometre of land. Livelihoods, food security and poverty in Bangladesh are strongly dependent on natural resources affected by several factors including climate variability and change, upstream river flow modifications, commercial fish catches in the Bay of Bengal, and engineering interventions such as polderisation. The scarcity of fresh water, saline water intrusion and natural disasters (e.g. river flooding, cyclones and storm surges) have negative impact on drinking water availability and crop irrigation potential; thus severely affect land use and livelihood opportunities of the coastal population. Hydro-environmental changes can be especially detrimental for the well-being of the poorest households that are highly dependent on natural resources. The ESPA Deltas project aims to holistically examine the interaction between the coupled bio-physical environment and the livelihoods of these poor populations in coastal Bangladesh. Here we describe a new integrated model that allows the long-term analysis of the possible changes in this system by linking projected changes in physical processes (e.g. river flows, nutrients), with productivity (e.g. fish, rice), social processes (e.g. access, property rights, migration) and governance/management (e.g. fisheries, agriculture, water and land use management). This integrated approach is designed to provide Bangladeshi policy makers with science-based evidence of possible development trajectories within the coastal delta plain over timescales up to 50 years, including the likely robustness of different governance options on natural resource conservation and poverty levels. This presentation describes the model framework and aims to illustrate the cause-effect relationship in-between changes of the hydro-environment and the livelihoods and

  17. Testing a participatory integrated assessment(PIA) approach to select climate change adaptation actions to enhance wetland sustainability: The case of Poyang Lake region in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Li; YIN; Yongyuan; DU; De-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The necessity of mainstreaming climate adaptation strategies or policies into natural resource management plans has been recognized by the UNFCCC.The IPCC AR5 report suggests a growing demand for research to provide information for a deeper and more useful understanding of climate adaptation options,and indicates a lack of effective methods to meet this increasing demand of policymakers.In this respect,a participatory integrated assessment(PIA) approach is presented in this paper to provide an effective means to mainstream wetland climate change adaptation in rural sustainable development strategies,and thus to reduce climate vulnerability and to enhance rural community livelihood.The PIA approach includes a series of research activities required to assess climate impacts on wetland ecosystems,and to prioritize adaptation responses.A range of adaptation options that address key aspects of the wetland ecosystem resilience and concerns are evaluated against community based on sustainable development indicators.The PIA approach is able to identify desirable adaptation options which can then be implemented to improve wetland ecosystem health and to enhance regional sustainable development in a changing climate.For illustration purpose,the PIA was applied in a case study in Poyang Lake(PYL) region,a critical wetland and water ecosystem in central China with important international biodiversity linkages,and a locale for key policy experiments with ecosystem rehabilitation.The PIA was used to facilitate the integration of wetland climate change adaptation in rural sustainable development actions with multi-stakeholders participation.In particular,the case shows how the PIA can be designed and implemented to select effective and practical climate change adaptation options to enhance ecosystem services management and to reduce resource use conflicts and rural poverty.Worked in partnership with multi-stakeholders and assisted with a multi-criteria decision making tool

  18. Regional review: the hydrology of the Okavango Delta, Botswana—processes, data and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milzow, Christian; Kgotlhang, Lesego; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Meier, Philipp; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    The wetlands of the Okavango Delta accommodate a multitude of ecosystems with a large diversity in fauna and flora. They not only provide the traditional livelihood of the local communities but are also the basis of a tourism industry that generates substantial revenue for the whole of Botswana. For the global community, the wetlands retain a tremendous pool of biodiversity. As the upstream states Angola and Namibia are developing, however, changes in the use of the water of the Okavango River and in the ecological status of the wetlands are to be expected. To predict these impacts, the hydrology of the Delta has to be understood. This article reviews scientific work done for that purpose, focussing on the hydrological modelling of surface water and groundwater. Research providing input data to hydrological models is also presented. It relies heavily on all types of remote sensing. The history of hydrologic models of the Delta is retraced from the early box models to state-of-the-art distributed hydrological models. The knowledge gained from hydrological models and its relevance for the management of the Delta are discussed.

  19. Sediment budgets, transport, and depositional trends in a large tidal delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Tara; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    sediment supply (Wright and Schoellhamer, 2004). Today, one concern is whether the volume of sediment supplied from the upper watershed is sufficient to support ecological function and sustain the Delta landscape and ecosystem in the face of climate change, sea level rise, and proposed restoration associated with the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (http://baydeltaconservationplan.com). Ecosystem health is a management focus and 150,000 acres of restoration is currently proposed, therefore it is of increasingly important to understand the quantity of sediment available for marsh and wetland restoration throughout the Bay Delta Estuary. It is also important to understand the pathways for sediment transport and the sediment budget into each of three Delta regions (figure 1) to guide restoration planning, modeling, and management.

  20. Upregulation of PPARbeta/delta is associated with structural and functional changes in the type I diabetes rat diaphragm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadège Salvi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is associated with alterations in peripheral striated muscles and cardiomyopathy. We examined diaphragmatic function and fiber composition and identified the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha and beta/delta as a factor involved in diaphragm muscle plasticity in response to type I diabetes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Streptozotocin-treated rats were studied after 8 weeks and compared with their controls. Diaphragmatic strips were stimulated in vitro and mechanical and energetic variables were measured, cross bridge kinetics assessed, and the effects of fatigue and hypoxia evaluated. Morphometry, myosin heavy chain isoforms, PPAR alpha and beta/delta gene and protein expression were also assessed. Diabetes induced a decrease in maximum velocity of shortening (-14%, P<0.05 associated with a decrease in myosin ATPase activity (-49%, P<0.05, and an increase in force (+20%, P<0.05 associated with an increase in the number of cross bridges (+14%, P<0.05. These modifications were in agreement with a shift towards slow myosin heavy chain fibers and were associated with an upregulation of PPARbeta/delta (+314% increase in gene and +190% increase in protein expression, P<0.05. In addition, greater resistances to fatigue and hypoxia were observed in diabetic rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Type I diabetes induced complex mechanical and energetic changes in the rat diaphragm and was associated with an up-regulation of PPARbeta/delta that could improve resistance to fatigue and hypoxia and favour the shift towards slow myosin heavy chain isoforms.

  1. Change of Coastal Wetlands in Fuzhou City in Recent 10 Years%近10年福州市滨海湿地变化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏兰; 汪小钦; 陈芸芝

    2011-01-01

    Fuzhou located in the east of Fujian province is one of the areas holding the most abundant wetland resources in Fujian province, which has a large number of coastal wetlands. The coastal wetland ecosystems provides habitat and nursery areas for many commercially important fish and crustaceans. They also play important roles in shoreline protection, chemical buffering, water quality maintenance, recreation and education, and as reservoirs of genetic materials. During the past decades, the distribution and amount of coastal wetlands have been changed due to human activities, urbanization development, and other economic issues imposed on it, which brought on a series of serious damage to wetland resources. Thus, there is an increasing need to master the distribution and dynamic change of coastal wetlands, which is important to protection, rational development and utilization of the coastal wetlands in Fuzhou. It will play a promational role on wetland resources investigation, long-term monitoring and scientific management for the province and even the national in the future, and has a strong practical value and broad application prospects. In this study, in order to monitor the change of the distribution and amount of the coastal wetlands in Fuzhou, Landsat 7 ETM+ image in 2000 and ALOS image in 2009 were used to classify the coastal wetland resources in Fuzhou. In the classification procedure involved, the images in 2000 and 2009 were classified into 9 land use types, including aquatic farm, mudflat, paddy field, river, shallow water, sandy beach, mudflat, marshy meadow, reservoir pond and non-wetland, using the conventional unsupervised Maximum Likelihood Classification Algorithm. To improve information extraction accuracy from the coastal wetlands, the crude results of unsupervised classification were refined and optimized. Then the distribution and the spatio-temporal changes of the coastal wetlands were analyzed and compared using GIS analysis function. The

  2. Historical reconstruction of mangrove expansion in the Gulf of Mexico: Linking climate change with carbon sequestration in coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Thomas S.; Allison, Mead A.; Zhao, Jun; Li, Xinxin; Comeaux, Rebecca S.; Feagin, Rusty A.; Kulawardhana, R. Wasantha

    2013-03-01

    There has been considerable interest in a recently recognized and important sink in the global carbon pool, commonly referred to as "blue carbon". The major goal of this study was to determine the historical reconstruction of mangrove expansion (Avicennia germinans) into salt marshes (Spartina alterniflora) and its effects on carbon sequestration and soil chemistry in wetland soils of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. We used bulk stable isotopic, chemical biomarker analyses, and aerial imagery analysis to identify changes in OC wetland sources, and radiotracers (137Cs and 210Pb) for chronology. Soil cores were collected at two sites at Port Aransas, Texas (USA), Harbor Island and Mud Island. Stable isotopic values of δ13C and δ15N of all soil samples ranged from -26.8 to -15.6‰ and 1.8-10.4‰ and showed a significant trend of increasing depletion for each isotope from bottom to surface soils. The most depleted δ13C values were in surface soils at the Mud Island (Mangrove 2) location. Carbon sequestration rates were greater in mangroves and for the Mud Island Mangrove 1 and the Marsh 1 sites ranged from 253 to 270 and 101-125 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. Lignin storage rates were also greater for mangrove sites and for the Mud Island Mangrove 1 and the Marsh 1 ranged from 19.5 to 20.1 and 16.5 to 12.8 g lignin m-2 yr-1, respectively. Τhe Λ8 and Λ6 values for all cores ranged from 0.5 to 21.5 and 0.4 to 16.5, respectively, and showed a significant increase from bottom to surface sediments. If regional changes in the Gulf of Mexico are to persist and much of the marsh vegetation was to be replaced by mangroves, there could be significant increases on the overall storage and sequestration of carbon in the coastal zone.

  3. Changing Flows, Chaning Livelihoods: Long-Term Changes in Hydro-Ecology and Socio-Economy in the Saskatchewan River Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickert, G. E.; Jardine, T.; Patrick, B.; Abu, R.; Andrews, E. J.; Reed, M.; Steelman, T.; Massie, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Saskatchewan River Delta is North America's largest inland delta, covering 10,000 km2 at the interface of the Great Plains and Boreal forest. Historically, it was the most productive fish and wildlife habitat in the region [BP1] and as such, traditional livelihoods in the local Cree and Métis community were supported by a flourishing fur trade, dense moose populations, and commercial and subsistence fisheries. But water resource development upstream has truncated flood peaks and introduced hydro-peaking with adverse consequences for biological production and these livelihoods. Local science and traditional knowledge, combined with a growing wealth of western science measurements are painting a picture of long-term ecological change. Remote sensing techniques coupled with hydrometric data show strong correlations between surface water coverage area and in-channel flow, thus enabling backcasting and forecasting of inundation patterns. The implications of losses of hydrological connectivity are evaluated using environmental DNA and stable isotope markers of fish movement and avian origins, with a focus on species that are most important for the economy and culture of the delta's people. The work aims to contribute to the setting of environmental flows and the re-licensing of major dams in 2015, as well as to support the development of a community-led water stewardship planning process that is now underway, with a goal of identifying threats to the delta and to make recommendations on threat mitigation. This presentation will describe how this community-informed, interdisciplinary approach aims to understand linkages between water, wildlife and people in this vital ecosystem. [BP1]In what region? This is a redundant statement if talking about the River Delta region. Maybe just take out first half of sentence.

  4. Characterizing land surface change and levee stability in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using UAVSAR radar imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C.; Bawden, G.; Deverel, S.; Dudas, J.; Hensley, S.

    2011-01-01

    The islands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta have been subject to subsidence since they were first reclaimed from the estuary marshlands starting over 100 years ago, with most of the land currently lying below mean sea level. This area, which is the primary water resource of the state of California, is under constant threat of inundation from levee failure. Since July 2009, we have been imaging the area using the quad-polarimetric UAVSAR L-band radar, with eighteen data sets collected as of April 2011. Here we report results of our polarimetric and differential interferometric analysis of the data for levee deformation and land surface change. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  5. Impacts of Land Cover Change on the Carbon Dynamics in Indonesian Tropical Forested Wetlands- Mangroves and Peat Swamp Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, J. B.; Arifanti, V. B.; Basuki, I.; Kurnianto, S.; Novita, N.; Murdiyarso, D.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical wetland forests including mangroves and lowland peat swamp forests contain among the highest carbon stocks of any ecosystem on the planet. This is largely due to the accumulation of deep organic rich soils which have been sequestering carbon for millennia. Depth of organic layers (peats) can exceed 3 m in mangrove and 10 m in the peat swamp forests. The ecosystem carbon stocks may exceed 2000 Mg/ha in mangroves and 5000 Mg/ha in peat swamp forests. Ironically, rates of deforestation of these tropical forests are among the highest in the tropics. With land cover change comes dramatic shifts in carbon stocks, net ecosystem productivity, and greenhouse gas emissions. Land cover change results in carbon losses of practically all aboveground pools as well as losses arising from soil pools. Based upon studies where we have compared stock changes due to land use the carbon emissions arising from land cover change to shrimp ponds and oil palm have ranged from 800-3000 Mg CO2e/ha. The lowered carbon sequestration rates coupled with increased or similar emissions from decomposition results in an ecosystem shift from a carbon sink to a carbon source. Clearly the large carbon stocks, high rates of deforestation, and large emissions resulting from their degradation suggest that these ecosystems should receive great consideration in climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies.

  6. Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

    2002-11-01

    The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years

  7. Effects of Climate Change on the Production and Profitability of Cassava in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Ajayi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nigeria is the single largest producer of cassava in the world with the bulk of the cassava coming out from the Niger Delta region. Human, economic and agricultural activities are currently threatened in the region by vagaries in climatic factors. These vagaries affect the production and profitability of cassava. The study was therefore conducted to assess the effects of climate change on the production and profitability of cassava in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The study made use of a multi-stage sampling technique to select three hundred and sixty respondents across the three highest cassava-producing states (Awka Ibom, Cross Rivers and Ondo in the region. Data for the study were collected with the aid of well-structured questionnaires assisted with interview schedules. Data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics and regression model. The determinants of cassava profitability were farm size, farmers’ experience in cassava cultivation, farmers’ experience in adopting climate change coping strategies, number of climate change coping strategies adopted, costs of input materials in Naira and labour cost in Naira.

  8. Wetland Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Marilyn

    1994-01-01

    Examines what wetland conservation means to different groups of Louisiana's coastal residents. Describes coastal resources, reasons for their deterioration, conservation efforts, and the impact of a public perception that conservation of wetlands is closely tied to conservation of the existing lifestyle. (LZ)

  9. Wetland Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter discusses the state of the science in wetland hydrology by touching upon the major hydraulic and hydrologic processes in these complex ecosystems, their measurement/estimation techniques, and modeling methods. It starts with the definition of wetlands, their benefit...

  10. Freshwater Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  11. Assessment of environmental change and its socio-economic impacts in the mangrove ecological zone of the Niger Delta, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Godstime Kadiri

    The Niger Delta, located in the central part of Southern Nigeria, is endowed with immense Mangrove resources, estimated to be the fourth largest in the world. The term Mangrove refers to salt tolerant species of trees or shrubs that grow on shores and in estuaries located in the coastal tropics and sub-tropical regions of the world. They support highly productive marine food chains. However, Mangrove ecosystems are in serious decline around the world due to the rapid increase in maritime commerce and exploration of mineral resources in the last few decades. These pressures often have immediate consequences on sensitive coastal environments and can potentially impact future human use of coastal space and resources. This dynamic process presents unique opportunities for research to explore the nature and consequences of these pressures. This dissertation focused on the Mangrove ecological zone of the Niger Delta, where resource exploitation and indigenous use of the environment are in direct conflict with important socio-economic implications. Environmental accounting metrics derived from the Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response (DPSIR) framework were used to assess changes in the spatial extent of the Niger Delta Mangrove ecosystem and the socio-economic impacts of the observed changes. Landsat remotely sensed satellite data from the mid-1980s through 2003 was used to assess change in the spatial extent of the Mangrove vegetation in the region. A total of 21,340 hectares of Mangrove forest was determined to be lost over the study period. Field research in the region confirmed that this loss was primarily driven by urbanization and activities of the multinational oil and gas corporations operating in the region. To estimate the socio-economic impacts of the Mangrove loss in the region, neoclassical economic valuation and participatory social valuation approaches were adopted. Results from the economic valuation revealed that the net present value of future income

  12. Simulation of temporal and spatial change of N2O emissions in the Yangtze River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-dong; ZHOU Xiu-ji; CHEN De-liang; OUYANG Zhi-yun; WANG Xiao-ke; Achberger Christine

    2005-01-01

    A biogeochemical model(DNDC) is combined with a plant ecological model to estimate N2O emission from rice paddy fields in the Yangtze River Delta region. The model is driven by local meteorological, soil, and physiological data and is validated for 1999 and 2000 at a site in the region, which showed that the simulated N2O emissions agree fairly well with the observed data. This adds some confidence in the estimated N2O emissions during 1950 and 2000 in the Hangzhou Region. A significant correlation between the N2O emissions and the population for the Hangzhou Region is found, which is due to a combination of increased application of fertilizers and cultivated area.Such a correlation can not be established for the whole Yangtze River Delta region when the data of both urban and rural areas are included. However, when the data from the heavily urbanized areas are excluded, a significant correlation between population and N2O emissions emerges. The results show clearly that both the temporal and the spatial N2O emissions have significant positive relationship with population under traditional farming practice. These results have implications for suitable mitigation options towards a sustainable agriculture and environment in this region.

  13. Structural evidence for conformational changes of Delta class glutathione transferases after ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2012-05-01

    We report four new crystal structures for Delta class glutathione transferases from insects. We compare these new structures as well as several previously reported structures to determine that structural transitions can be observed with ligand binding. These transitions occurred in the regions around the active site entrance, including alpha helix 2, C-terminus of alpha helix 4 including the loop to helix 5 and the C-terminus of helix 8. These structural movements have been reported or postulated to occur for several other glutathione transferase classes; however, this is the first report showing structural evidence of all these movements occurring, in this case in Delta class glutathione transferases. These fluctuations also can be observed occurring within a single structure as there is ligand bound in only one subunit and each subunit is undergoing different conformational transitions. The structural comparisons show reorganizations occur both pre- and post-GSH ligand binding communicated through the subunit interface of the quaternary assembly. Movements of these positions would allow 'breathing' of the active site for substrate entrance, topological rearrangement for varying substrate specificity and final product release.

  14. Enhanced decomposition offsets enhanced productivity and soil carbon accumulation in coastal wetlands responding to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, M.L.; Blum, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal wetlands are responsible for about half of all carbon burial in oceans, and their persistence as a valuable ecosystem depends largely on the ability to accumulate organic material at rates equivalent to relative sea level rise. Recent work suggests that elevated CO2 and temperature warming will increase organic matter productivity and the ability of marshes to survive sea level rise. However, we find that organic decomposition rates increase by about 12% per degree of warming. Our measured temperature sensitivity is similar to studies from terrestrial systems, twice as high as the response of salt marsh productivity to temperature warming, and roughly equivalent to the productivity response associated with elevated CO2 in C3 marsh plants. Therefore, enhanced CO2 and warmer temperatures may actually make marshes less resilient to sea level rise, and tend to promote a release of soil carbon. Simple projections indicate that elevated temperatures will increase rates of sea level rise more than any acceleration in organic matter accumulation, suggesting the possibility of a positive feedback between climate, sea level rise, and carbon emissions in coastal environments.

  15. Recent land use change in the Western Corn Belt threatens grasslands and wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher K; Wimberly, Michael C

    2013-03-05

    In the US Corn Belt, a recent doubling in commodity prices has created incentives for landowners to convert grassland to corn and soybean cropping. Here, we use land cover data from the National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer to assess grassland conversion from 2006 to 2011 in the Western Corn Belt (WCB): five states including North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Iowa. Our analysis identifies areas with elevated rates of grass-to-corn/soy conversion (1.0-5.4% annually). Across the WCB, we found a net decline in grass-dominated land cover totaling nearly 530,000 ha. With respect to agronomic attributes of lands undergoing grassland conversion, corn/soy production is expanding onto marginal lands characterized by high erosion risk and vulnerability to drought. Grassland conversion is also concentrated in close proximity to wetlands, posing a threat to waterfowl breeding in the Prairie Pothole Region. Longer-term land cover trends from North Dakota and Iowa indicate that recent grassland conversion represents a persistent shift in land use rather than short-term variability in crop rotation patterns. Our results show that the WCB is rapidly moving down a pathway of increased corn and soybean cultivation. As a result, the window of opportunity for realizing the benefits of a biofuel industry based on perennial bioenergy crops, rather than corn ethanol and soy biodiesel, may be closing in the WCB.

  16. Examining Sources of Water in Springs, Wetlands, and Oases in Coachella Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Robertson, R.; Hibbs, B.; Kelliher, M.; Andrus, R.

    2007-12-01

    The All American and Coachella Canals were constructed in the 1930's to supply irrigation to the Imperial and Coachella Valleys. The diverted Colorado River water is the only source of water in the valleys, and an extensive series of wetlands have been created by leakage from the unlined portions of these canals. Although the wetlands were natural features prior to canal construction, their extent was limited due to minimal recharge. As of December of 2006 these canals have been completely lined which is predicted to decrease the flow to the wetlands and may affect the flora and fauna they have come to support. Samples were collected prior to the lining of the canal from June to October 2006 from several springs and well locations downgradient from Coachella canal to assess their geochemical and isotopic signatures for comparison to canal and native groundwater sources. Analysis of stable isotopes identified three distinct groups of water: one group consisting of nearly pure Canal water with delta 18O ranging from -11.3 to -11.7 per mille and delta 2H ranging from -84 to - 95 per mille, a second group consisting of nearly pure native groundwater with delta 18O ranging from -7.3 to -8.7 per mille and delta 2H ranging from -59.5 to -71 per mille, and a third group consisting of various mixtures of Canal and native groundwater with delta 18O ranging from -8.7 to -11.1 per mille and delta 2H ranging from -80 to -91 per mille. Minimal isotopic change has occurred in a sampling campaign conducted June, 2007. Continued monitoring of the isotopic and hydrochemical signature of the waters will reveal how quickly they might evolve toward that of native groundwater as a direct result of decreased recharge from the now lined Coachella Canal.

  17. The Secret Lives of Cepheids: Evolutionary Changes and Pulsation-Induced Shock Heating in the Prototype Classical Cepheid {\\delta} Cep

    CERN Document Server

    Engle, Scott G; Harper, Graham M; Neilson, Hilding R; Evans, Nancy Remage

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Secret Lives of Cepheids (SLiC) program has been carried out at Villanova University to study aspects and behaviors of classical Cepheids that are still not well-understood. In this, the first of several planned papers on program Cepheids, we report the current results for delta Cep, the Cepheid prototype. Ongoing photometry has been obtained to search for changes in the pulsation period, light curve morphology and amplitude. Combining our photometry with the times of maximum light compilation by Berdnikov 2000 returns a small period change of dP/dt ~ -0.1006 +/- 0.0002 sec yr^-1. There is also evidence for a gradual light amplitude increase of ~0.011-mag (V-band) and ~0.012-mag (B-band) per decade over the last ~50 years. In addition, HST-COS UV spectrophotometry and XMM-Newton X-ray data were carried out to investigate the high-temperature plasmas present above the Cepheid photospheres. In total, from the five visits (eight exposures) with XMM-Newton, delta Cep is found to be a sof...

  18. Mapping freshwater deltaic wetlands and aquatic habitats at multiple scales with high-resolution multispectral WorldView-2 imagery and Indicator Species Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, C.; Liu, H.; Anenkhonov, O.; Autrey, B.; Chepinoga, V.

    2012-12-01

    near-infrared 2 bands were more useful for discriminating between different vegetated habitats. Analyses demonstrated that the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was valuable for improving the classification accuracy and image texture was particularly useful for separating scrub/shrub wetland from various emergent herbaceous wetlands. Our analysis resulted in the first-ever detailed, quantitative wetland inventory map of the Selenga River Delta, and provides a benchmark for future wetland change detection studies and baseline information for wetland conservation and management efforts for this region.

  19. Influence of anthropogenic alterations on geomorphic response to climate variations and change in San Francisco Bay-Delta and watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florsheim, J.L.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Global warming and attendant sea-level rise may soon impact geomorphic processes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River and San Francisco Bay Delta systems. During the past two centuries, dramatic anthropogenic changes in sediment supply and pervasive structural controls on rivers and floodplains have altered geomorphic responses to floods throughout a zone that extends upstream from tidally influenced areas to dams that regulate flow. Current geomorphic responses to floods differ from natural responses due to historical actions that concentrated the pre-disturbance multiple-channel and flood-basin system into single channels isolated by levees from increasingly developed floodplains and flood bypass channels, altered flow and sediment regimes, and caused subsidence of leveed Delta Islands. A review of historic and current geomorphic responses to floods illustrates the dominance of structural controls on geomorphic changes in the lowland part of the Sacramento-San Joaquin system. Current climate-change projections for CA suggest that the total volume of snowmelt runoff that may be shifted from spring and added to winter flows is roughly 5 maf/yr, similar to the volume currently available for flood storage in Sierra Nevadan reservoirs. Changes in timing of reservoir releases to accommodate these changes could add to either the magnitude or duration of winter flood peaks, each causing different geomorphic responses. Increased wintertime flows that accompany already large floods could increase overbank flood extent, erosion, and sedimentation, or alternatively increase the depth and strength of confined flows and increase the risk of levee failures. Runoff released from reservoirs as a relatively constant addition to winter baseflow would increase the duration of bankfull or possibly "levee-full" flows. This scenario could lead to bank and levee failure through increased saturation and seepage erosion. Projected sea level rise of 1-2 m would compound vulnerability of

  20. An integrated framework to assess future livelihood and poverty changes in deltas: an application to coastal Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Robert J.; Lazar, Attlia; Payo, Andres; Adams, Helen; Salehin, Mashfiqus; Haque, Anisul; Clarke, Derek; Bricheno, Lucy; Fernandes, Jose; Rahman, Mofizur; Ahmed, Ali; Streatfield, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Coastal deltas represent some of the most densely populated areas in the world. A good example is the coastal zone of Bangladesh where there are more than 1000 people/km2 in the rural areas. Livelihoods, food security and poverty in this area is strongly dependent on natural resources affected by several factors including climate variability and change, upstream river flow modifications, commercial fish catches in the Bay of Bengal, and engineering interventions such as polderisation. The scarcity of fresh water, saline water intrusion and natural disasters (e.g. river flooding, cyclones and storm surges) have negative impact on drinking water availability and crop irrigation potential. This severely affects land use and livelihood opportunities of the coastal population. Hydro-environmental changes can be especially detrimental for the well-being of the poorest households that are highly dependent on natural resources. The ESPA Deltas project aims to holistically examine the interaction between the coupled bio-physical environment and the livelihoods of these poor populations in coastal Bangladesh. Here we describe a new integrated model that allows the long-term analysis of the possible changes in this system by linking projected changes in physical processes (e.g. river flows, nutrients), with productivity (e.g. fish catches, rice production), social processes (e.g. access, property rights, migration) and governance/management (e.g. fisheries, agriculture, water and land use management). This includes the development and application of a range of scenarios, including expert-derived scenarios on issues such as climate change, and stakeholder-derived scenarios on more local issues in Bangladesh. This integrated approach is designed to provide Bangladeshi policy makers with science-based evidence of possible development trajectories within the coastal delta plain over timescales up to 50 years, including the likely robustness of different governance options on

  1. Using ecotechnology to address water quality and wetland habitat loss problems in the Mississippi basin: a hierarchical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John W; Yañéz Arancibia, Alejandro; Mitsch, William J; Lara-Dominguez, Ana Laura; Day, Jason N; Ko, Jae-Young; Lane, Robert; Lindsey, Joel; Lomeli, David Zarate

    2003-12-01

    Human activities are affecting the environment at continental and global scales. An example of this is the Mississippi basin where there has been a large scale loss of wetlands and water quality deterioration over the past century. Wetland and riparian ecosystems have been isolated from rivers and streams. Wetland loss is due both to drainage and reclamation, mainly for agriculture, and to isolation from the river by levees, as in the Mississippi delta. There has been a decline in water quality due to increasing use of fertilizers, enhanced drainage and the loss of wetlands for cleaning water. Water quality has deteriorated throughout the basin and high nitrogen in the Mississippi river is causing a large area of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi delta. Since the causes of these problems are distributed over the basin, the solution also needs to be distributed over the basin. Ecotechnology and ecological engineering offer the only ecologically sound and cost-effective method of solving these problems. Wetlands to promote nitrogen removal, mainly through denitrification but also through burial and plant uptake, offer a sound ecotechnological solution. At the level of the Mississippi basin, changes in farming practices and use of wetlands for nitrogen assimilation can reduce nitrogen levels in the River. There are additional benefits of restoration of wetland and riverine ecosystems, flood control, reduction in public health threats, and enhanced wildlife and fisheries. At the local drainage basin level, the use of river diversions in the Mississippi delta can address both problems of coastal land loss and water quality deterioration. Nitrate levels in diverted river water are rapidly reduced as water flows through coastal watersheds. At the local level, wetlands are being used to treat municipal wastewater. This is a cost-effective method, which results in improved water quality, enhanced wetland productivity and increased accretion. The

  2. National Wetlands Inventory Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear wetland features (including selected streams, ditches, and narrow wetland bodies) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National...

  3. Generating a Crop Rotation Dataset for the U.S and its Application in Inferring Land Use Change Induced Wetland Losses in the Prairie Pothole Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahajpal, R.; Zhang, X.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Hurtt, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural management practices plays a major role in the global fluxes of greenhouse gases, soil carbon sequestration and production of ecosystem services. A key component of these practices are the crop rotations selected by the farmer. Here, we present an algorithm to create a crop rotation dataset for the U.S and demonstrate the tradeoffs between the number and accuracy of rotations comprising a state. To generate the rotations, we use the USDA Cropland Data Layer (CDL) available for the entire U.S at a resolution of 30 m from 2010 to 2012. Several studies have generated rotations simply by merging several years of CDL data, resulting in thousands of rotations per state. Alternatively, they tend to aggregate the rotations into a few predefined categories. This over simplification can lead to erroneous acreage values impacting both biogeochemical model estimates and land use change studies. Our algorithm uses the edit distance metric to combine similar rotations to obtain a product which retains the accuracy of CDL while minimizing the number of rotations. We find that 180 unique rotations are needed to represent the entire U.S with an accuracy exceeding 80% when compared to the underlying CDL datasets for rotations from 2010 to 2012. For the agriculturally important and diverse Western corn belt, the number of rotations needed to represent each state with an accuracy exceeding 90% when compared to the CDL dataset, ranges from 3 unique rotations for Iowa to more than 50 for North Dakota. As an application of the dataset, we examine the findings of Wright and Wimberly (1), who reported in a recent issue of PNAS that recent grassland conversion to corn and soybean cropping (GRCS) from 2006 to 2011 in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) is concentrated in the vicinity of wetlands. Their analysis implicitly assumes that all wetlands affected by GRCS in the PPR existed in or after 2006. However, the areal extent of wetlands was based on National Wetland Inventory maps

  4. Changes in CREB and deltaFosB are associated with the behavioural sensitization induced by methylenedioxypyrovalerone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenrostro-Jáuregui, Mario; Ciudad-Roberts, Andres; Moreno, Josep; Muñoz-Villegas, Patricia; López-Arnau, Raúl; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena; Camarasa, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) is a synthetic cathinone which has recently emerged as a designer drug of abuse. The objective of this study was to investigate the locomotor sensitization induced by MDPV in adolescent mice, and associated neuroplastic changes in the nucleus accumbens and striatum through deltaFosB and CREB expression. Behavioural testing consisted of three phases: Phase I: conditioning regimen with MDPV (0.3 mg/kg/day for five days) or saline; Phase II: resting (11 days); Phase III: challenged with MDPV (0.3 mg/kg), cocaine (10 mg/kg) or saline on day 16 for both groups. Mice repeatedly exposed to MDPV increased locomotor activity by 165-200% following acute MDPV or cocaine administration after an 11-day resting period, showing a MDPV-induced sensitization to itself and to cocaine. An explanation for this phenomenon could be the common mechanism of action between these two psychostimulants. Furthermore, the MDPV challenge resulted in higher levels of phospho-CREB in MDPV-conditioned mice compared with MDPV-naive mice, probably due to an up-regulation of the cAMP pathway. Likewise, MDPV exposure induced a persistent increase in the striatal expression of deltaFosB; the priming dose of MDPV also produced a significant increase in the accumbal expression of this transcription factor. This study constitutes the first evidence that an exposure to a low dose of MDPV during adolescence induces behavioural sensitization and provides a neurobiological basis for a relationship between MDPV and cocaine. We hypothesize that, similar to cocaine, both CREB and deltaFosB play a role in the induction of this behavioural sensitization. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. A regional coupled surface water/groundwater model of the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Gumbricht, T.; Kinzelbach, W.

    2006-01-01

    consumed by evapotranspiration. With an approximate size of about 30,000 km(2), the Okavango Delta is the world's largest site protected under the convention on wetlands of international importance, signed in 1971 in Ramsar, Iran. The extended wetlands of the Okavango Delta, which sustain a rich ecology...

  6. Compromised metamorphosis and thyroid hormone changes in wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) raised on reclaimed wetlands on the Athabasca oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersikorn, Blair D., E-mail: blair.hersikorn@usask.c [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5B3 (Canada); Smits, Judit E.G., E-mail: judit.smits@ucalgary.c [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4Z6 (Canada)

    2011-02-15

    The wet landscape approach to oil sands tailings reclamation in the Athabasca Oil Sands region involves creating wetlands from fluid tailings in mined-out pits. We measured time to metamorphosis, thyroid hormone status, and detoxification enzyme (EROD) induction in Wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles raised on reclaimed oil sands wetlands of different ages [young ({<=}7 yr) vs. old (>7 yr)] and compared data with tadpoles raised on reference (control) wetlands. Metamorphosis was delayed or never occurred in tadpoles raised in young tailings; those exposed to older tailings developed similarly to those in reference wetlands. Thyroid hormone disruption likely played an important role in the metamorphosis delay as the T3:T4 ratio was lowest in tadpoles raised in young, tailings-affected wetlands. Our findings suggest tailings wetlands become less toxic with age, and that these amphibians will be able to complete their life cycle in tailing wetlands that have sufficiently detoxified with age. - This work provides guidance for reclamation of oil sands tailings and shows the usefulness of frogs and caging studies in environmental toxicology.

  7. Research on the Wetland Ecotourism Products Development in Chang hu Lake%长湖湿地生态旅游产品开发研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁龙义; 龙利华

    2011-01-01

    介绍了长湖湿地的概况和研究现状,结合湿地的研究理论和长湖自身的特点,提出了长湖湿地生态旅游开发的原则,并列举出长湖湿地旅游产品开发的具体方案,分为特色专项、观光、人文历史和休闲度假生态旅游产品4个系列,其中观鸟、垂钓、"农家乐"等都是长湖非常有特色的旅游开发项目.%The general situation of ChangHu wetland and the current research are introduced in this paper. Combining with the study theory of wetland and the characteristics of Changhu wetland, principles of Changhu wetland ecotourism development are proposed and also the detail programs of tourism product development are listed as: special characteristics, sightseeing, cultural history, leisure vacation and so on. Among them, the bird-watching, fishing and fanning happiness are the most characteristic tourism development project.

  8. Using remote sensing to monitor past changes and assess future scenarios for the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta waterways, California USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria J.; Hestir, Erin; Khanna, Shruti; Ustin, Susan L.

    2017-04-01

    Historically, deltas have been extensively affected both by natural processes and human intervention. Thus, understanding drivers, predicting impacts and optimizing solutions to delta problems requires a holistic approach spanning many sectors, disciplines and fields of expertise. Deltas are ideal model systems to understand the effects of the interaction between social and ecological domains, as they face unprecedented disturbances and threats to their biological and ecological sustainability. The challenge for deltas is to meet the goals of supporting biodiversity and ecosystem processes while also provisioning fresh water resources for human use. We provide an overview of the last 150 years of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta, where we illustrate the parallel process of an increase in disturbances, by particularly zooming in on the current cascading effects of invasive species on geophysical and biological processes. Using remote sensing data coupled with in situ measurements of water quality, turbidity, and species presence we show how the spread and persistence of aquatic invasive species affects sedimentation processes and ecosystem functioning. Our results show that the interactions between the biological and physical conditions in the Delta affect the trajectory of dominance by native and invasive aquatic plant species. Trends in growth and community characteristics associated with predicted impacts of climate change (sea level rise, warmer temperatures, changes in the hydrograph with high winter and low summer outflows) do not provide simple predictions. Individually, the impact of specific environmental changes on the biological components can be predicted, however it is the complex interactions of biological communities with the suite of physical changes that make predictions uncertain. Systematic monitoring is critical to provide the data needed to document and understand change of these delta systems, and to identify successful adaptation

  9. Climate change, water quality, and water-related diseases in the Mekong Delta Basin: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Dung; Huang, Cunrui; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia; Wang, Xiaoming; Nguyen, Minh

    2015-04-01

    Mekong Delta Basin (MDB) is vulnerable to extreme climate and hydrological events. The objectives of this review are to understand of water related health effects exacerbated by climate change and the gaps of knowledge on the relationships between climate conditions, water quality, and water-related diseases in the MDB. The findings indicate that a few studies with qualitative emphases on the relationships between climate and water quality have been conducted in MDB, and they are insufficient to describe the pattern of climate-disease relationship. The diseases caused by chemical contaminants in relation to changes of climate conditions are neglected in MDB. We suggest further studies to examine the influence of short-term variation of climate conditions on water quality and water-related diseases for the purpose of public health and medical prevention, and due to the trans-boundary nature of MDB, developing partnership in data sharing and research collaboration among MDBs countries should be prioritized. © 2015 APJPH.

  10. Dynamic Change and Conservation Strategy of Wetlands in Huanghua%黄骅湿地的动态变化及保护对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玲; 张义文; 焦明; 徐艳菲; 申海鹏

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the dynamic change and the changing cause of wetland in Huanghua from 2001 to 2009, the Landsat satellite images of 2001, 2005 and 2009 was interpreted and processed by ERDAS and ENVI; and relative data was obtained by the method of Change Detection to observe the dynamic change and transforming situation. The results showed that the area of wetland was reducing seriously, and some was converted to artificial wetland. Based on the phenomenon, some protective measures were proposed.%为了研究黄骅湿地2001-2009年的变化情况及变化原因,运用ERDAS和ENVI对2001、2005、2009年美国Landsat卫星影像进行影像判读和数据处理,利用Change Detection方法得到相关数据,探讨其动态变化状况及转化情况.结果表明,黄骅湿地不断减少,其中自然湿地面积大量减少,并部分转为人工湿地.依据这一现象提出了一些保护措施.

  11. Combined monitoring of changes in delta13CH4 and archaeal community structure during mesophilic methanization of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xian; Mazéas, Laurent; Vavilin, Vasily A; Epissard, Jonathan; Lemunier, Mélanie; Mouchel, Jean-Marie; He, Pin-jing; Bouchez, Théodore

    2009-05-01

    Reconstituted municipal solid waste (MSW) with varying contents of putrescible and cellulosic waste was incubated anaerobically under mesophilic conditions. Standard physicochemical parameters were monitored, together with stable isotopic signatures of produced CH(4) and CO(2). delta(13)C values for CH(4) indicated a change of methanogenic metabolism with time. CH(4) was predominantly produced from H(2)/CO(2) at the beginning of the incubations. This period was associated with important shifts in archaeal communities monitored by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and FISH of oligonucleotidic probes targeting specifically 16S rRNA gene of various methanogenic groups. The onset of the active methane generation phase was characterized by an increase of CH(4)delta(13)C, indicating a progressive shift toward an aceticlastic metabolism. When the methane production levelled off, a decrease in the isotopic signature was observed toward values characteristics of hydrogenotrophic metabolism. ARISA profiles were, however, found to be stable from the beginning of the active methane generation phase until the end of the experiment. FISH observation indicated that members of the family Methanosarcinaceae were predominant in the archaeal community during this period, suggesting that these methanogens might exhibit a high metabolic versatility during methanization of waste.

  12. Spatio-temporal variation in small mammal species richness, relative abundance and body mass reveal changes in a coastal wetland ecosystem in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Benjamin Y; Attuquayefio, Daniel K; Owusu, Erasmus H; Musah, Yahaya; Ntiamoa-Baidu, Yaa

    2016-06-01

    Coastal wetlands in Ghana are under severe threat of anthropogenic drivers of habitat degradation and climate change, thereby increasing the need for assessment and monitoring to inform targeted and effective conservation of these ecosystems. Here, we assess small mammal species richness, relative abundance and body mass in three habitats at the Muni-Pomadze Ramsar site of Ghana, and compare these to baseline data gathered in 1997 to evaluate changes in the wetland ecosystem. Small mammals were live-trapped using Sherman collapsible and pitfall traps. We recorded 84 individuals of 10 species in 1485 trap-nights, whereas the baseline study recorded 45 individuals of seven species in 986 trap-nights. The overall trap-success was therefore greater in the present study (5.66 %) than the baseline study (4.56 %). The species richness increased from one to four in the forest, and from zero to eight in the thicket, but decreased from six to four in the grassland. The total number of individuals increased in all habitats, with the dominant species in the grassland shifting from Lemniscomys striatus to Mastomys erythroleucus. Three species, Malacomys edwardsi, Grammomys poensis and Praomys tullbergi are the first records for the Muni-Pomadze Ramsar site. Generally, the average body mass of individual species in the grassland was lower in the present study. The considerable changes in small mammal community structure suggest changes in the wetland ecosystem. The conservation implications of our findings are discussed.

  13. Cultivated Land Changes and Their Driving Forces-A Satellite Remote Sensing Analysis in the Yellow River Delta, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Geng-Xing; G.LIN; J.J.FLETCHER; C.YUILL

    2004-01-01

    Taking Kenli County in the Yellow River Delta, China, as the study area and using digital satellite remote sensing techniques, cultivated land use changes and their corresponding driving forces were explored in this study. An interactive interpretation and a manual modification procedure were carried out to acquire cultivated land information. An overlay method based on classification results and a visual change detection method which was supported by land use maps were employed to detect the cultivated land changes. Based on the changes that were revealed and a spatial analysis between cultivated land use and related natural and socio-economic factors, the driving forces for cultivated land use changes in the study area were determined.The results showed a decrease in cultivated land in Kenli County of 5321.8 ha from 1987 to 1998, i.e.,an average annual decrement of 483.8 ha, which occurred mainly in the central paddy field region and the northeast dry land region. Adverse human activities, soil salinization and water deficiencies were the driving forces that caused these cultivated land use changes.

  14. Hydrogeochemistry and spatio-temporal changes of a tropical coastal wetland system: Veli-Akkulam Lake, Thiruvananthapuram, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajinkumar, K. S.; Revathy, A.; Rani, V. R.

    2017-06-01

    The backwater of Veli-Akkulam, adjoining the Arabian Sea in the south-west part of Indian Peninsula, is a coastal wetland system and forms an integral part of the local ecosystem. In addition to the usual marine interactions, this water body is subjected to anthropogenic interference due to their proximity to the Thiruvananthapuram City urban agglomeration. This paper showcases how an urban agglomeration alters wetland system located within a tropical monsoonal environment. Water samples from this lake together with different feeder streams reveal that the lake is under the threat to eutrophication. A spatio-temporal analysis has shown that the lake and adjacent wetlands are shrinking in a fast pace. Over a period of about seven decades, the lake has shrunk by 28.05 % and the wetlands by 37.81 %. And hence, there is a pressing requirement of eco-management practices to be adopted to protect this lake.

  15. Managing for Resilience in Prairie-Wetland Landscapes of the PPP: Sustaining Habitats and Services under Accelerating Climate Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The project will use baseline data on pre-restoration measures of baseline hydrology and water quality to evaluate the impacts of large scale wetland and prairie...

  16. Restoring Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HAIRONG

    2011-01-01

    Watching flocks of waterfowl taking off and landing in the large expanse of wetland near his home is a favorite pastime of Li Qiwen a middle-aged primary school teacher in Weichang Township,Luobei County in Heilongjiang Province.The wetland is home to hundreds of species of birds,including rare white storks and red-crowned cranes,as well as more common geese and ducks.

  17. Hydrologically Controlled Arsenic Release in Deltaic Wetlands and Coastal Riparian Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, J.; LeMonte, J. J.; Yu, X.; Schaefer, M.; Kocar, B. D.; Benner, S. G.; Rinklebe, J.; Tappero, R.; Michael, H. A.; Fendorf, S. E.; Sparks, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Wetland and riparian zone hydrology exerts critical controls on the biogeochemical cycling of metal contaminants including arsenic. The role of wetlands in driving geogenic arsenic release to groundwater has been debated in the deltas of South and Southeast Asia where the largest impacted human population resides. In addition, groundwater in coastal areas worldwide, such as those in South and Southeast Asia and the Mid-Atlantic of the U.S., is at risk to largely unexplored biogeochemical and hydrologic impacts of projected sea level rise. First, we present data from fresh-sediment incubations, in situ model sediment incubations and a controlled field experiment with manipulated wetland hydrology and organic carbon inputs in the minimally disturbed upper Mekong Delta. Here we show that arsenic release is limited to near-surface sediments of permanently saturated wetlands where both organic carbon and arsenic-bearing solids are sufficiently reactive for microbial oxidation of organic carbon and reduction of arsenic-bearing iron oxides. In contrast, within the deeper aquifer or seasonally saturated sediments, reductive dissolution of iron oxides is observed only when either more reactive exogenous forms of iron oxides or organic carbon are added, revealing a potential thermodynamic restriction to microbial metabolism. Second, in order to assess the potential impacts of sea level rise on arsenic release to groundwater, we determined the changes in arsenic speciation and partitioning in sediment collected from an anthropogenically contaminated coastal riparian zone under controlled Eh regimes in both seawater and freshwater systems. Here we show greater arsenic release under anoxic/suboxic conditions in the freshwater system than in the seawater system, potentially due to high salinity induced microbial inhibition. Collectively, our work shows that shifting hydrologic conditions in deltaic wetlands and tidally influenced zones impacts the extent of arsenic release to

  18. Effects of human-induced environmental changes on benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages of wetlands in Lake Tana Watershed, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezie, Ayenew; Anteneh, Wassie; Dejen, Eshete; Mereta, Seid Tiku

    2017-04-01

    Wetlands of Lake Tana Watershed provide various ecological and socioeconomic functions. However, they are losing their vigor at alarming rate due to unwise management. Hence, there is an urgent need to monitor and assess these resources so as to identify the major drivers of its degradation and to provide information for management decisions. In this context, we aimed to assess the effects of human activities on macroinvertebrate assemblages of wetlands in Lake Tana Watershed. Biotic and abiotic data were collected from 46 sampling sites located in eight wetlands. A total of 2568 macroinvertebrates belonging to 46 families were recorded. Macroinvertebrate metrics such as Biological Monitoring Working Party score, Shannon diversity index, Ephemeroptera and odonata family richness, and total family richness portrayed a clear pattern of decreasing with increasing in human disturbances, whereas Family biotic index score, which is an indicator of organic pollution, increased with increasing in human disturbances. The regression analysis also revealed that livestock grazing, leather tanning, and eucalyptus plantation were important predictors of macroinvertebrate metrics (p wetlands such as farming, leather tanning, solid waste dumping, and effluent discharges were contributed to the degradation of water quality and decreasing in the macroinvertebrate richness and diversity. These alterations could also reduce the availability of wetland products (sedges, craft materials, etc.) and the related ecosystem services. This in turn has an adverse effect on food security and poverty alleviation with considerable impact on communities who heavily depend on wetland products for their livelihood. Therefore, it is essential to formulate wetland policy for achieving wise use goals and necessary legal and institutional backup for sustainable wetland management in Ethiopia.

  19. Status and changes of mangrove forest in Mekong Delta: Case study in Tra Vinh, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Phan Minh; Populus, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Because shrimp culture in the Mekong Delta develops rapidly, it has negatively impacted the environment, socio-economics and natural resources. In particular, mangrove forests have been altered by the shrimp culture. The area of mangrove forests in the region has been reduced and this is seen especially in Tra Vinh province. The results obtained from GIS (Geography Information System) and RS (Remote Sensing) show the status of mangrove forests in Tra Vinh province in 1965, 1995 (Northeastern part of Tra Vinh Province) and 2001. In 1965, the area of mangrove forests was 21,221 ha making up 56% of total land-use, while in 2001 it was 12,797 ha making up 37% of total land-use. Also based on GIS analysis, over the 36 years (1965-2001), the total coverage of mangrove forests have decreased by 50% since 1965. However, the speed of mangrove forest destruction in the period from 1965 to 1995 was much less than that in the period from 1995 to 2001. The average annual reduction in mangrove forest coverage in the first period (1965-1995) was 0.2% whereas it was 13.1% in the later period (1995-2001). For the long time, mangrove deforestation has been caused by war, collection of firewood and clearing for agriculture, and recently, shrimp farming has significantly contributed rate of mangrove destruction.

  20. Short-Term Change Detection in Wetlands Using Sentinel-1 Time Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muro, Javier; Canty, Morton; Conradsen, Knut

    2016-01-01

    as by agricultural practices, whether they are sudden changes, as well as gradual. S1-omnibus is capable of detecting a wider array of short-term changes than when using consecutive pairs of Sentinel-1 images. When compared to the Landsat-based change detection method, both show an overall good agreement, although...

  1. On the statistical analysis of vegetation change: a wetland affected by water extraction and soil acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, ter C.J.F.; Wiertz, J.

    1994-01-01

    A case study is presented on the statistical analysis and interpretation of vegetation change without precise information on environmental change. The changes in a vegetation of a Junco-Molinion grassland are evaluated on the basis of relevés of 1977 and 1988 (20 plots) from a small nature reserve o

  2. Exploring the response of West Siberian wetland methane emissions to future changes in climate, vegetation, and soil microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Bohn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We ran the VIC land surface model over the West Siberian Lowland (WSL, forced with outputs from 32 CMIP5 models for the RCP4.5 scenario, and compared the effects of changes in climate and vegetation (leaf area index in particular on predicted wetland CH4 emissions and other fluxes for the period 2071–2100, relative to the period 1981–2010. We also explored possible responses of soil microbial communities to these changes. Our results suggest that, if soil microbial communities acclimatize to elevated temperatures without changes in species abundances, end-of-century CH4 emissions from the WSL will only rise to 3.6 Tg CH4 yr−1 (6% above historical emissions. In contrast, if microbial species abundances in the north additionally shift to resemble those in the south, CH4 emissions will more than double, to 7.3 Tg CH4 yr−1. Crucially, while historical emissions were concentrated in the southern half of the domain, acclimatization plus microbial population shifts concentrate almost 3/4 of future emissions in the northern half of the domain, where the possible release of carbon with permafrost thaw is a concern. In addition, microbial population shifts disproportionately increase microbial activity in the period during and immediately following snowmelt, when highly labile carbon is first thought to be released from the soil. This work indicates the importance of better constraining the responses of soil microbial communities to changes in climate and vegetation as they are critical determinants of the region's future methane emissions.

  3. What Makes a Wetland a Wetland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions of and activities about various kinds of wetlands. Contains seven learning activities ranging from creating wetland scenes with picture cutouts to actually exploring a wetland. Includes reproducible handouts and worksheets for several of the activities. (TW)

  4. Hurricane impacts on coastal wetlands: A half-century record of storm-generated features from Southern Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, R.A.; Barras, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Temporally and spatially repeated patterns of wetland erosion, deformation, and deposition are observed on remotely sensed images and in the field after hurricanes cross the coast of Louisiana. The diagnostic morphological wetland features are products of the coupling of high-velocity wind and storm-surge water and their interaction with the underlying, variably resistant, wetland vegetation and soils. Erosional signatures include construction of orthogonal-elongate ponds and amorphous ponds, pond expansion, plucked marsh, marsh denudation, and shoreline erosion. Post-storm gravity reflux of floodwater draining from the wetlands forms dendritic incisions around the pond margins and locally integrates drainage pathways forming braided channels. Depositional signatures include emplacement of broad zones of organic wrack on topographic highs and inorganic deposits of variable thicknesses and lateral extents in the form of shore-parallel sandy washover terraces and interior-marsh mud blankets. Deformational signatures primarily involve laterally compressed marsh and displaced marsh mats and balls. Prolonged water impoundment and marsh salinization also are common impacts associated with wetland flooding by extreme storms. Many of the wetland features become legacies that record prior storm impacts and locally influence subsequent storm-induced morphological changes. Wetland losses caused by hurricane impacts depend directly on impact duration, which is controlled by the diameter of hurricane-force winds, forward speed of the storm, and wetland distance over which the storm passes. Distinguishing between wetland losses caused by storm impacts and losses associated with long-term delta-plain processes is critical for accurate modeling and prediction of future conversion of land to open water. ?? Coastal Education & Research Foundation 2011.

  5. Phragmites sp. physiological changes in a constructed wetland treating an effluent contaminated with a diazo dye (DR81).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Renata Alexandra; Duarte, Joana Gouveia; Vergine, Pompilio; Antunes, Carlos D; Freire, Filipe; Martins-Dias, Susete

    2014-01-01

    The role of Phragmites sp. in phytoremediation of wastewaters containing azo dyes is still, in many ways, at its initial stage of investigation. This plant response to the long-term exposure to a highly conjugated di-azo dye (Direct Red 81, DR81) was assessed using a vertical flow constructed wetland, at pilot scale. A reed bed fed with water was used as control. Changes in photosynthetic pigment content in response to the plant contact with synthetic DR81 effluent highlight Phragmites plasticity. Phragmites leaf enzymatic system responded rapidly to the stress imposed; in general, within 1 day, the up-regulation of foliar reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzymes (especially superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and peroxidase) was noticed as plants entered in contact with synthetic DR81 effluent. This prompt activation decreased the endogenous levels of H₂O₂ and the malonyldialdehyde content beyond reference values. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity intensification was not enough to cope with stress imposed by DR81. GPX activity was pivotal for the detoxification pathways after a 24-h exposure. Carotenoid pool was depleted during this shock. After the imposed DR81 stress, plants were harvested. In the next vegetative cycle, Phragmites had already recovered from the chemical stress. Principal component analysis (PCA) highlights the role of GPX, GST, APX, and carotenoids along catalase (CAT) in the detoxification process.

  6. Integrated analysis of PALSAR/Radarsat-1 InSAR and ENVISAT altimeter data for mapping of absolute water level changes in Louisiana wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-W.; Lu, Zhiming; Lee, H.; Shum, C.K.; Swarzenski, C.M.; Doyle, T.W.; Baek, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has been used to detect relative water level changes in wetlands. We developed an innovative method to integrate InSAR and satellite radar altimetry for measuring absolute or geocentric water level changes and applied the methodology to remote areas of swamp forest in coastal Louisiana. Coherence analysis of InSAR pairs suggested that the HH polarization is preferred for this type of observation, and polarimetric analysis can help to identify double-bounce backscattering areas in the wetland. ENVISAT radar altimeter-measured 18-Hz (along-track sampling of 417 m) water level data processed with regional stackfile method have been used to provide vertical references for water bodies separated by levees. The high-resolution (~ 40 m) relative water changes measured from ALOS PALSAR L-band and Radarsat-1 C-band InSAR are then integrated with ENVISAT radar altimetry to obtain absolute water level. The resulting water level time series were validated with in situ gauge observations within the swamp forest. We anticipate that this new technique will allow retrospective reconstruction and concurrent monitoring of water conditions and flow dynamics in wetlands, especially those lacking gauge networks. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Virginia ESI: Wetlands (Wetland Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the coastal wetlands for Virginia, classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI)...

  8. Remote Sensing of River Delta Inundation: Exploiting the Potential of Coarse Spatial Resolution, Temporally-Dense MODIS Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Kuenzer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available River deltas belong to the most densely settled places on earth. Although they only account for 5% of the global land surface, over 550 million people live in deltas. These preferred livelihood locations, which feature flat terrain, fertile alluvial soils, access to fluvial and marine resources, a rich wetland biodiversity and other advantages are, however, threatened by numerous internal and external processes. Socio-economic development, urbanization, climate change induced sea level rise, as well as flood pulse changes due to upstream water diversion all lead to changes in these highly dynamic systems. A thorough understanding of a river delta’s general setting and intra-annual as well as long-term dynamic is therefore crucial for an informed management of natural resources. Here, remote sensing can play a key role in analyzing and monitoring these vast areas at a global scale. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the potential of intra-annual time series analyses at dense temporal, but coarse spatial resolution for inundation characterization in five river deltas located in four different countries. Based on 250 m MODIS reflectance data we analyze inundation dynamics in four densely populated Asian river deltas—namely the Yellow River Delta (China, the Mekong Delta (Vietnam, the Irrawaddy Delta (Myanmar, and the Ganges-Brahmaputra (Bangladesh, India—as well as one very contrasting delta: the nearly uninhabited polar Mackenzie Delta Region in northwestern Canada for the complete time span of one year (2013. A complex processing chain of water surface derivation on a daily basis allows the generation of intra-annual time series, which indicate inundation duration in each of the deltas. Our analyses depict distinct inundation patterns within each of the deltas, which can be attributed to processes such as overland flooding, irrigation agriculture, aquaculture, or snowmelt and thermokarst processes. Clear differences between mid

  9. 河南沿黄湿地景观格局及其动态%Impacts of human activity and natural change on the wetland landscape pattern along the Yellow River in Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁国付; 丁圣彦

    2004-01-01

    By using GIS and remote sensing techniques, the paper discusses how human activities have changed along the Yellow River in Henan province, China and how these altered activities have influenced the wetland landscape pattern change from 1987 to 2002. Results show that the total area of the wetland reduces dramatically compared to 1987, the total area of wetland reduces by 19.18%, the number of the patches in 2002 increases by 21.17%, the density increases by 50%, and the total perimeter increases by 1,290,491 m. Disturbed by human activities, landscape diversity index decreases from 1.1740 in 1987 to 0.9803 in 2002. During the last 20 years, the total area of the rice wetland increases, while the others decrease. Among those, the area of the bulrush wetland decreases most. In 1987, it takes 0.5% of the total area, but in 2002, it only takes 0.11%. The interpenetration of human influences on the wetland natural system has been long and close. The impacts of human activities on the spatial pattern of the wetland landscape along the Yellow River in Henan from 1987 to 2002 are great.

  10. Daily Changes of Spatial Patterns of Meteorological Elements over Pearl River Delta Based on GIS and MM5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xueding; XIA Beicheng; LIN Guangfa; LIN Wenshi

    2009-01-01

    The spatial distribution of meteorological elements is important for understanding the regional meteorology and climate changes. However, previous studies rarely focused on the daily changes of the spatial patterns of meteorological elements due to the limitation of remote sensing (RS) techniques and traditional meteorological methods. In this paper, the regional meteorological elements were simulated by the fifth-generation non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (MM5), and the spatial patterns of meteorological elements and their diurnal variations were analyzed in landscape level over the Pearl (Zhujiang) River Delta (PRD), China. The results showed that there were several centers of urban heat islands, cold islands, dry islands, wet islands, high wind over the PRD at noon. The diurnal changes of Moran I of meteorological elements were obvious and they reached the extremum at noon and 2-3 hours after the sunrise. The landscape indices of meteorological elements, such as area-weighted mean Fractal Dimension Index (FRAC_AM), Landscape Shape Index (LSI), Shannon's Diversity Index (SHDI) and Contagion Index (CONTAG), were more variable at about the sunrise, noon and sunset. The occurrence of wave crests and vales of landscape indices was affected by the surface net radiation, turbulence and local circumfluence. The spatial patterns of meteorological elements correlated well with the land surface, thermal exchanges and local circumfluence. A new approach combining GIS, RS and numerical simulatious technologies and the landscape ecology method was presented to analyze spatial patterns of meteorological elements, which may be useful for studying global and regional climate changes.

  11. How can climate change and engineered water conveyance affect sediment dynamics in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achete, Fernanda; Van der Wegen, Mick; Roelvink, Jan Adriaan; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Suspended sediment concentration is an important estuarine health indicator. Estuarine ecosystems rely on the maintenance of habitat conditions, which are changing due to direct human impact and climate change. This study aims to evaluate the impact of climate change relative to engineering measures on estuarine fine sediment dynamics and sediment budgets. We use the highly engineered San Francisco Bay-Delta system as a case study. We apply a process-based modeling approach (Delft3D-FM) to assess the changes in hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics resulting from climate change and engineering scenarios. The scenarios consider a direct human impact (shift in water pumping location), climate change (sea level rise and suspended sediment concentration decrease), and abrupt disasters (island flooding, possibly as the results of an earthquake). Levee failure has the largest impact on the hydrodynamics of the system. Reduction in sediment input from the watershed has the greatest impact on turbidity levels, which are key to primary production and define habitat conditions for endemic species. Sea level rise leads to more sediment suspension and a net sediment export if little room for accommodation is left in the system due to continuous engineering works. Mitigation measures like levee reinforcement are effective for addressing direct human impacts, but less effective for a persistent, widespread, and increasing threat like sea level rise. Progressive adaptive mitigation measures to the changes in sediment and flow dynamics resulting from sea level rise may be a more effective strategy. Our approach shows that a validated process-based model is a useful tool to address long-term (decades to centuries) changes in sediment dynamics in highly engineered estuarine systems. In addition, our modeling approach provides a useful basis for long-term, process-based studies addressing ecosystem dynamics and health.

  12. Determination of seasonal changes in wetlands using CHRIS/Proba Hyperspectral satellite images: A case study from Acigöl (Denizli), Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Muhittin; Budakoglu, Murat; Avci, Damla Uca; Ozelkan, Emre; Bulbul, Ali; Civas, Melda; Tasdelen, Suat

    2015-01-01

    The changes in wetlands that occur through natural processes, as well as through industrialization and agricultural activities, are decreasing and even annihilating the living spaces of endemic species. Acigöl (Denizli, Turkey), which is a suitable habitat for flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), is a lake that is affected by seasonal anomalies as a result of being shallow. Acigöl, which is fed by precipitation, groundwater and the springs that occur along tectonic faults, has no water output other than evaporation and industrial activities. In addition to natural factors, it is important to determine the changes in the wetlands of Acig6l, where industrial salt is produced, in order to reveal the micro-ecological equilibrium, the relationship between climate and natural life, and regulation of industrial activities. Remote sensing tools are frequently used in determination of changes in wetlands. Changes in coastlines, water level and area covered by water are parameters that can be examined by remote sensing while investigating wetlands. In this study, the water-covered area was examined using remote sensing. Within the scope of this study, CHRIS/Proba Mode 2 (water bandset) hyperspectral satellite images, acquired on 9/17/2011 for the season and on 6/18/2012 - 6/19/2012 forwet season, were used in orderto present the seasonal changes in Acigöl, during one hydrogeological period. The processes of noise reduction, cloud screening, atmospheric correction, geometric correction, and identification of wetlands have been implemented on the CHRIS/Proba images. In determining the water-covered areas, the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) was used. It was determined that W6 (560 nm) and W18 (1015 nm) and W2 (447 nm) and W18 (1015 nm) band combinations were most appropriate to be used in NDWI to demonstrate the water-land separation. Using Proba-NDWI image, it was established that an area of 27.4 km2 was covered with water during dry season, and 61.2 km2 was covered

  13. A Review of Wetland Remote Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meng; Li, Jing; Sheng, Chunlei; Xu, Jiawei; Wu, Li

    2017-04-05

    Wetlands are some of the most important ecosystems on Earth. They play a key role in alleviating floods and filtering polluted water and also provide habitats for many plants and animals. Wetlands also interact with climate change. Over the past 50 years, wetlands have been polluted and declined dramatically as land cover has changed in some regions. Remote sensing has been the most useful tool to acquire spatial and temporal information about wetlands. In this paper, seven types of sensors were reviewed: aerial photos coarse-resolution, medium-resolution, high-resolution, hyperspectral imagery, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. This study also discusses the advantage of each sensor for wetland research. Wetland research themes reviewed in this paper include wetland classification, habitat or biodiversity, biomass estimation, plant leaf chemistry, water quality, mangrove forest, and sea level rise. This study also gives an overview of the methods used in wetland research such as supervised and unsupervised classification and decision tree and object-based classification. Finally, this paper provides some advice on future wetland remote sensing. To our knowledge, this paper is the most comprehensive and detailed review of wetland remote sensing and it will be a good reference for wetland researchers.

  14. A Review of Wetland Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meng; Li, Jing; Sheng, Chunlei; Xu, Jiawei; Wu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Wetlands are some of the most important ecosystems on Earth. They play a key role in alleviating floods and filtering polluted water and also provide habitats for many plants and animals. Wetlands also interact with climate change. Over the past 50 years, wetlands have been polluted and declined dramatically as land cover has changed in some regions. Remote sensing has been the most useful tool to acquire spatial and temporal information about wetlands. In this paper, seven types of sensors were reviewed: aerial photos coarse-resolution, medium-resolution, high-resolution, hyperspectral imagery, radar, and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. This study also discusses the advantage of each sensor for wetland research. Wetland research themes reviewed in this paper include wetland classification, habitat or biodiversity, biomass estimation, plant leaf chemistry, water quality, mangrove forest, and sea level rise. This study also gives an overview of the methods used in wetland research such as supervised and unsupervised classification and decision tree and object-based classification. Finally, this paper provides some advice on future wetland remote sensing. To our knowledge, this paper is the most comprehensive and detailed review of wetland remote sensing and it will be a good reference for wetland researchers. PMID:28379174

  15. Towards a Comprehensive Framework for Adaptive Delta Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchand, M.; Ludwig, F.

    2014-01-01

    Deltas are dynamic landforms at the boundary of land and sea, involving intricate mazes of rivers and small waterways, wetlands, estuaries and coastal barrier islands. They are home to over half a billion people. Deltas are also home to rich ecosystems, such as mangroves and marshes. They are

  16. Towards a Comprehensive Framework for Adaptive Delta Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchand, M.; Ludwig, F.

    2014-01-01

    Deltas are dynamic landforms at the boundary of land and sea, involving intricate mazes of rivers and small waterways, wetlands, estuaries and coastal barrier islands. They are home to over half a billion people. Deltas are also home to rich ecosystems, such as mangroves and marshes. They are econom

  17. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theroux, Susanna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hartman, Wyatt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; He, Shaomei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  18. Rice crop mapping and change prediction using multi-temporal satellite images in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. R.; Chen, C. F.; Nguyen, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The rice cropping systems in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) has been undergoing major changes to cope with developing agro-economics, increasing population and changing climate. Information on rice cropping practices and changes in cropping systems is critical for policymakers to devise successful strategies to ensure food security and rice grain exports for the country. The primary objective of this research is to map rice cropping systems and predict future dynamics of rice cropping systems using the MODIS time-series data of 2002, 2006, and 2010. First, a phenology-based classification approach was applied for the classification and assessment of rice cropping systems in study region. Second, the Cellular Automata-Markov (CA-Markov) models was used to simulate the rice-cropping system map of VMD for 2010. The comparisons between the classification maps and the ground reference data indicated satisfactory results with overall accuracies and Kappa coefficients, respectively, of 81.4% and 0.75 for 2002, 80.6% and 0.74 for 2006 and 85.5% and 0.81 for 2010. The simulated map of rice cropping system for 2010 was extrapolated by CA-Markov model based on the trend of rice cropping systems during 2002~2006. The comparison between predicted scenario and classification map for 2010 presents a reasonably closer agreement. In conclusion, the CA-Markov model performs a powerful tool for the dynamic modeling of changes in rice cropping systems, and the results obtained demonstrate that the approach produces satisfactory results in terms of accuracy, quantitative forecast and spatial pattern changes. Meanwhile, the projections of the future changes would provide useful inputs to the agricultural policy for effective management of the rice cropping practices in VMD.

  19. The Changing Nature of Transitions in the Evolution of a Floodplain Wetland Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Flood plain ecosystems are mosaics of physical units and the sediments contained within these often display a high degree of spatial and temporal complexity. This paper reconstructs the environmental history of a large floodplain ecosystem in North-west New South Wales. Sediment cores, up to 14 m in depth, extracted from the Narran floodplain ecosystem have undergone detailed stratigraphic, geochemical and textural analyses. When combined with a series of dates obtained from various depths in the cores a complex environmental history is revealed. The Narran floodplain ecosystem is between 40,000 to 85,000 years old that has undergone three major changes in state. From a relatively simple initial state, divergent evolution processes resulted in an ecosystem that experienced periodic and major changes in water and sediment inputs. Finally, a change in flow and sediment regimes approximately 25,000 years ago resulted in the formation of the current floodplain ecosystem. Three major thresholds have thus been recorded, the character of which differs markedly. This study highlights how various numerical methods, in association with standard sedimentological techniques, can assist in unravelling the environmental complexity, identification of thresholds, their character as well as the divergent and convergent trajectories of change in floodplain ecosystems.

  20. How stable is the Mississippi Delta?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Törnqvist, T.E.; Bick, S.J.; van der Borg, K.; de Jong, A.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Large deltas are commonly believed to exhibit rapid rates of tectonic subsidence, largely due to sediment loading of the lithosphere. As a result, deltaic plains are prone to accelerated relative sea-level rise, coastal erosion, and wetland loss. Hurricane Katrina's devastation testifies to the seve

  1. A Decision Tree Analysis to Support Potential Climate Change Adaptations of Striped Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus Sauvage) Farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.A.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Leemans, H.B.J.; Bosma, R.H.; Silva, De S.

    2016-01-01

    This study uses the decision tree framework to analyse possible climate change impact adaptation options for pangasius (Pangasianodon hypopthalmus Sauvage) farming in the Mekong Delta. Here we present the risks for impacts and the farmers' autonomous and planned public adaptation by using primary an

  2. A Decision Tree Analysis to Support Potential Climate Change Adaptations of Striped Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus Sauvage) Farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.A.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Leemans, H.B.J.; Bosma, R.H.; Silva, De S.

    2016-01-01

    This study uses the decision tree framework to analyse possible climate change impact adaptation options for pangasius (Pangasianodon hypopthalmus Sauvage) farming in the Mekong Delta. Here we present the risks for impacts and the farmers' autonomous and planned public adaptation by using primary

  3. Developing Remote Sensing Products for Monitoring and Modeling Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Vulnerability to Climate Change and Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; Miller, M. E.; Battaglia, M.; Banda, E.; Endres, S.; Currie, W. S.; Elgersma, K. J.; French, N. H. F.; Goldberg, D. E.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Spread of invasive plant species in the coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes is degrading wetland habitat, decreasing biodiversity, and decreasing ecosystem services. An understanding of the mechanisms of invasion is crucial to gaining control of this growing threat. To better understand the effects of land use and climatic drivers on the vulnerability of coastal zones to invasion, as well as to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of invasion, research is being conducted that integrates field studies, process-based ecosystem and hydrological models, and remote sensing. Spatial data from remote sensing is needed to parameterize the hydrological model and to test the outputs of the linked models. We will present several new remote sensing products that are providing important physiological, biochemical, and landscape information to parameterize and verify models. This includes a novel hybrid radar-optical technique to delineate stands of invasives, as well as natural wetland cover types; using radar to map seasonally inundated areas not hydrologically connected; and developing new algorithms to estimate leaf area index (LAI) using Landsat. A coastal map delineating wetland types including monocultures of the invaders (Typha spp. and Phragmites austrailis) was created using satellite radar (ALOS PALSAR, 20 m resolution) and optical data (Landsat 5, 30 m resolution) fusion from multiple dates in a Random Forests classifier. These maps provide verification of the integrated model showing areas at high risk of invasion. For parameterizing the hydrological model, maps of seasonal wetness are being developed using spring (wet) imagery and differencing that with summer (dry) imagery to detect the seasonally wet areas. Finally, development of LAI remote sensing high resolution algorithms for uplands and wetlands is underway. LAI algorithms for wetlands have not been previously developed due to the difficulty of a water background. These products are being used to

  4. Ecological, biogeochemical and salinity changes in coastal lakes and wetlands over the last 200 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lucy; Holmes, Jonathan; Horne, David

    2016-04-01

    Shallow lakes provide extensive ecosystem services and are ecologically important aquatic resources supporting a diverse flora and fauna. In marginal-marine areas, where such lakes are subjected to the multiple pressures of coastal erosion, sea level rise, increasing sea surface temperature and increasing frequency and intensity of storm surges, environments are complex and unstable. They are characterised by physico-chemical variations due to climatic (precipitation/evaporation cycles) and dynamic factors (tides, currents, freshwater drainage and sea level changes). Combined with human activity in the catchment these processes can alter the salinity, habitat and ecology of coastal fresh- to brackish water ecosystems. In this study the chemical and biological stability of coastal lakes forming the Upper Thurne catchment in the NE of the Norfolk Broads, East Anglia, UK are seriously threatened by long-term changes in salinity resulting from storm surges, complex hydrogeology and anthropogenic activity in the catchment. Future management decisions depend on a sound understanding of the potential ecological impacts, but such understanding is limited by short-term observations and measurements. This research uses palaeolimnological approaches, which can be validated and calibrated with historical records, to reconstruct changes in the aquatic environment on a longer time scale than can be achieved by observations alone. Here, salinity is quantitatively reconstructed using the trace-element geochemistry (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) of low Mg-calcite shells of Ostracoda (microscopic bivalved crustaceans) and macrophyte and macroinvertebrate macrofossil remains are used as a proxy to assess ecological change in response to variations in salinity. δ13C values of Cladocera (which are potentially outcompeted by the mysid Neomysis integer with increasing salinity and eutrophication) can be used to reconstruct carbon cycling and energy pathways in lake food webs, which alongside

  5. Geospatial-temporal analysis of land-use changes in the Yellow River Delta during the last 40 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE; Qinghua; LIU; Gaohuan; TIAN; Guoliang; CHEN; Shenlian

    2004-01-01

    Comprehensive study on land-use change of spatial pattern and temporal process is the key component in land use/land cover changes (LUCC) study nowadays. According to the theories and methods of Geo-information Tupu (Carto-methodology in Geo-information, CMGI)for geospatial and temporal analysis and integration models of spatial pattern and temporal processes in GIS, the paper puts forward Tupu methodology of land-use change and names the basic synthetic unit of spatial-temporal information Tupu unit. Tupu unit is the synthetic unit for composed of relatively homogeneous geographic unit and temporal unit. Based on the spatial features of 4 stages of land-use change in 1956, 1984, 1991, and 1996, a series of Tupu on land-use change in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) are created and studied in the paper, which includes 3 temporal units of spatial-temporal Tupu, process Tupu of land-use changes during the last 40 years, and reconstructions of a series of "arisen" Tupu, "arisen" process Tupu and pattern Tupu on land-use changes in the last 40 years by remapping tables of a reclassifying system.There are 3 methods of Tupu analysis on land-use change that are used to disclose change processes of land-use spatial conversion in YRD, such as spatial query and statistics, order of Tupu units by area and land-use conversion matrixes. In order to reveal the spatial pattern of land-use change processes, we analyze spatial-temporal changes of each Tupu above in various temporal units and spatial difference of pattern Tupu in the last 40 years by dynamic Tupu units.Tupu analysis on regional land-use is a promising trial on the comprehensive research of "spatial pattern of dynamic process" and "temporal process of spatial pattern" in LUCC research. The geo-information Tupu methodology would be a powerful and efficient tool on integrated studies of spatial pattern and temporal process in geoscience.

  6. Depositional architecture and evolution of inner shelf to shelf edge delta systems since the Late Oliocene and their respone to the tectonic and sea level change, Pear River Mouth Basin, northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changsong; Zhang, Zhongtao; liu, Jingyan; Jiang, Jing

    2016-04-01

    The Pear River Mouth Basin is located in the northern continent margin of the South China Sea. Since the Late Oligocene, the long-term active fluvial systems (Paleo-Zhujiang) from the western basin margin bebouched into the northern continental margin of the South China Sea and formed widespread deltaic deposits in various depositional geomorphologies and tectonic settings. Based of integral analysys of abundant seismic, well logging and drilling core data, Depositional architecture and evolution of these delta systems and their respone to the tectonic and sea level change are documented in the study. There are two basic types of the delta systems which have been recognized: inner shelf delta deposited in shallow water enviroments and the outer shelf or shelf-edge delta systems occurred in deep water settings. The paleowater depths of these delta systems are around 30 to 80m (inner shelf delta) and 400-1000m (shelf-edge delta) estimated from the thickness (decompaction) of the delta front sequences. The study shows that the inner shelf delta systems are characterized by relatively thin delta forests (20-40m), numereous stacked distributary channel fills, relative coarse river mouth bar deposits and thin distal delta front or distal bar and prodelta deposits. In contrast, the outer shelf or shelf edge delta systems are characteristic of thick (300-800m) and steep (4-60) of deltaic clinoforms, which commonly display in 3D seismic profiles as "S" shape reflection. Large scale soft-sediment deformation structures, slump or debris flow deposits consisting mainly of soft-sediment deformed beds, blocks of sandstones and siltstones or mudstones widely developed in the delta front deposits. The shelf edge delta systems are typically associated with sandy turbidite fan deposits along the prodelta slopes, which may shift basinwards as the progradation of the delta systems. The delta systems underwent several regional cycles of evolution from inner shelf deltas to shelf edge

  7. Interdisciplinary assessment of sea-level rise and climate change impacts on the lower Nile delta, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sušnik, Janez; Vamvakeridou-Lyroudia, Lydia S; Baumert, Niklas; Kloos, Julia; Renaud, Fabrice G; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Mabrouk, Badr; Savić, Dragan A; Kapelan, Zoran; Ludwig, Ralf; Fischer, Georg; Roson, Roberto; Zografos, Christos

    2015-01-15

    CLImate-induced changes on WAter and SECurity (CLIWASEC) was a cluster of three complementary EC-FP7 projects assessing climate-change impacts throughout the Mediterranean on: hydrological cycles (CLIMB - CLimate-Induced changes on the hydrology of Mediterranean Basins); water security (WASSERMed - Water Availability and Security in Southern EuRope and the Mediterranean) and human security connected with possible hydro-climatic conflicts (CLICO - CLImate change hydro-COnflicts and human security). The Nile delta case study was common between the projects. CLIWASEC created an integrated forum for modelling and monitoring to understand potential impacts across sectors. This paper summarises key results from an integrated assessment of potential challenges to water-related security issues, focusing on expected sea-level rise impacts by the middle of the century. We use this common focus to illustrate the added value of project clustering. CLIWASEC pursued multidisciplinary research by adopting a single research objective: sea-level rise related water security threats, resulting in a more holistic view of problems and potential solutions. In fragmenting research, policy-makers can fail to understand how multiple issues can materialize from one driver. By combining efforts, an integrated assessment of water security threats in the lower Nile is formulated, offering policy-makers a clearer picture of inter-related issues to society and environment. The main issues identified by each project (land subsidence, saline intrusion - CLIMB; water supply overexploitation, land loss - WASSERMed; employment and housing security - CLICO), are in fact related. Water overexploitation is exacerbating land subsidence and saline intrusion, impacting on employment and placing additional pressure on remaining agricultural land and the underdeveloped housing market. All these have wider implications for regional development. This richer understanding could be critical in making better

  8. Factors affecting coastal wetland loss and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, D.R.; Phillips, S.W.

    2007-01-01

    Opening paragraph: Tidal and nontidal wetlands in the Chesapeake Bay watershed provide vital hydrologic, water-quality, and ecological functions. Situated at the interface of land and water, these valuable habitats are vulnerable to alteration and loss by human activities including direct conversion to non-wetland habitat by dredge-and-fill activities from land development, and to the effects of excessive nutrients, altered hydrology and runoff, contaminants, prescribed fire management, and invasive species. Processes such as sea-level rise and climate change also impact wetlands. Although local, State, and Federal regulations provide for protection of wetland resources, the conversion and loss of wetland habitats continue in the Bay watershed. Given the critical values of wetlands, the Chesapeake 2000 Agreement has a goal to achieve a net gain in wetlands by restoring 25,000 acres of tidal and nontidal wetlands by 2010. The USGS has synthesized findings on three topics: (1) sea-level rise and wetland loss, (2) wetland restoration, and (3) factors affecting wetland diversity.

  9. Exploring pathways for sustainable water management in River deltas in a changing environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, M.; Middelkoop, H.; Offermans, A.; Beek, E. van; Deursen, W.P.A. van

    2012-01-01

    Exploring adaptation pathways into an uncertain future can support decisionmaking in achieving sustainable water management in a changing environment. Our objective is to develop and test a method to identify such pathways by including dynamics from natural variability and the interaction between th

  10. Policy, Systems, and Environmental Change in the Mississippi Delta: Considerations for Evaluation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler, Michelle C.; Honeycutt, Sally; Davis, Melvin; Dauria, Emily; Berg, Carla; Dove, Cassandra; Gamble, Abigail; Hawkins, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Community-level policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change strategies may offer an economical and sustainable approach to chronic disease prevention. The rapidly growing number of untested but promising PSE strategies currently underway offers an exciting opportunity to establish practice-based evidence for this approach. This article…

  11. Community-weighted mean traits but not functional diversity determine the changes in soil properties during wetland drying on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Epstein, Howard E.; Wen, Zhongming; Zhao, Jie; Jin, Jingwei; Jing, Guanghua; Cheng, Jimin; Du, Guozhen

    2017-02-01

    Climate change and human activities have caused a shift in vegetation composition and soil biogeochemical cycles of alpine wetlands on the Tibetan Plateau. The primary goal of this study was to test for associations between community-weighted mean (CWM) traits, functional diversity, and soil properties during wetland drying. We collected soil samples and investigated the aboveground vegetation in swamp, swamp meadow, and typical meadow environments. Four CWM trait values (specific leaf area is SLA, leaf dry matter content is LDMC, leaf area is LA, and mature plant height is MPH) for 42 common species were measured across the three habitats; three components of functional diversity (functional richness, functional evenness, and functional divergence) were also quantified at these sites. Our results showed that the drying of the wetland dramatically altered plant community and soil properties. There was a significant correlation between CWM of traits and soil properties, but not a significant correlation between functional diversity and soil properties. Our results further showed that CWM-LA, CWM-SLA, and CWM-LDMC had positive correlations with soil readily available nutrients (available nitrogen, AN; available phosphorus, AP), but negative correlations with total soil nutrients (soil organic carbon is SOC, total nitrogen is TN, and total phosphorus is TP). Our study demonstrated that simple, quantitative plant functional traits, but not functional diversity, are directly related to soil C and N properties, and they likely play an important role in plant-soil interactions. Our results also suggest that functional identity of species may be more important than functional diversity in influencing ecosystem processes during wetland drying.

  12. Markov chains-cellular automata modeling and multicriteria analysis of land cover change in the Lower Nhecolândia subregion of the Brazilian Pantanal wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacani, Vitor Matheus; Sakamoto, Arnaldo Yoso; Quénol, Hervé; Vannier, Clémence; Corgne, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of land use/land cover change in the Lower Nhecolândia wetland are marked by deforestation for pasture expansion, resulting in a real threat to the ecological stability. The aim of our work was to analyze the spatial distribution of land cover changes in the Lower Nhecolândia from 1985 to 2013 and to predict changes in trends for 2040. The mapping of land cover changes was developed using Landsat satellite images of 1985, 1999, 2007, and 2013, based on geographic object-based image analysis approach. This study uses integrated Markov chains and cellular automata modeling and multicriteria evaluation techniques to produce transition probability maps and describe the trajectory analysis methodology to construct a continuity of spatial and temporal changes for the wetland. The results of the multitemporal change detection classification show that, from 1985 to 2013, the forest woodland decreased by 6.89% and the grassland class increased by 18.29%. On the other hand, all water bodies showed a reducing trend, while the bare soil class increased compared to 1985, but did not present a regular trend of increase or decrease. From the present day, the trend for the future is a reduction of almost 6.4% by 2040. We found that deforestation actions will be concentrated in the areas with the highest concentration of saline lakes, constituting a serious threat to the natural functioning of this environmental system.

  13. Effects of prescribed burning on marsh-elevation change and the risk of wetland loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen L.; Grace, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Marsh-elevation change is the net effect of biophysical processes controlling inputs versus losses of soil volume. In many marshes, accumulation of organic matter is an important contributor to soil volume and vertical land building. In this study, we examined how prescribed burning, a common marsh-management practice, may affect elevation dynamics in the McFaddin National Wildlife Refuge, Texas by altering organic-matter accumulation. Experimental plots were established in a brackish marsh dominated by Spartina patens, a grass found throughout the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic marshes. Experimental plots were subjected to burning and nutrient-addition treatments and monitored for 3.5 years (April 2005 – November 2008). Half of the plots were burned once in 2006; half of the plots were fertilized seasonally with nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Before and after the burns, seasonal measurements were made of soil physicochemistry, vegetation structure, standing and fallen plant biomass, aboveground and belowground production, decomposition, and accretion and elevation change (measured with Surface Elevation Tables (SET)). Movements in different soil strata (surface, root zone, subroot zone) were evaluated to identify which processes were contributing to elevation change. Because several hurricanes occurred during the study period, we also assessed how these storms affected elevation change rates. The main findings of this study were as follows: 1. The main drivers of elevation change were accretion on the marsh surface and subsurface movement below the root zone, but the relative influence of these processes varied temporally. Prior to Hurricanes Gustav and Ike (September 2008), the main driver was subsurface movement; after the hurricane, both accretion and subsurface movement were important. 2. Prior to Hurricanes Gustav and Ike, rates of elevation gain and accretion above a marker horizon were higher in burned plots compared to nonburned plots, whereas

  14. A Critical Analysis of Climate Change Factors and its Projected Future Values in Delta State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emaziye, P. O., R. N. Okoh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the critical analysis of climate change factors (temperature and rainfall and its projected future values in the state. The main objective was to determine the trends of climate change factors (temperature and rainfall. And the specific objective was to determine the projected future trends of climate change factors in the state. Multistage sampling procedure was used in the random selection of states, local government, communities and rural households for the research study. Annual mean time series data of temperature and rainfall were collected from Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NIMET. Data were also obtained from structure questionnaire survey. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, trend analysis and growth model. The study reveals that there were increasing trends of temperature values and decreasing rainfall values in the state. But their projected future values witnessed an increasing trend. The increasing trends in temperature values may lead to a situation were crops will be smothered by excessive heat thereby reducing food production in the state. The study therefore recommends that meteorological station units should be established in the rural farming households in the state where accessibility is extremely difficult. This will make available meteorological data (information to the reach of the poor rural farming household for the attainment of food production.

  15. Environmental change in a Mediterranean salt marsh wetland: ecological drivers of halophytes diversity along flooding frequency gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia María Rodríguez-González

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Coastal wetlands are among most threatened ecosystems, owing to the intense human activity concentrated in shoreline areas together with the expected sea level rise resultant from climate change. Salt marshes are wetlands which are inundated twice daily by the sea, thus tightly dependent on frequency and duration of submergence. Identifying the factors that determine the diversity, distribution and abundance of halophyte species in salt marshes will help retaining their conservation status and adopt anticipate management measures, and this will ultimately contribute to preserve marshland biodiversity and ecological services. Reserva Natural de Castro Marim e Vila Real de Santo António (RNSCMVRSA is a natural reserve located in South Eastern Portugal, comprising the tidal area of Guadiana River mouth. In spite of their great ecological value, salt marsh ecosystems in this region have suffered intense anthropic disturbance, namely hydrologic alterations and vegetation removal to gain soils for agriculture and salt intensive production. The present study aimed at characterizing the halophyte diversity in the RNSCMVRSA salt marshes and determining their major ecological correlates. The end-point is to implement, afterward, a sustainable cultivation of autochthonous halophyte plants, with economic value, in the abandoned saltpans and degraded rangelands. This project will contribute to the conservation of halophyte diversity, promote environmental requalification, and provide an economic alternative for local populations, enabling the reduction of unregulated harvest of halophyte plant populations. Field sampling strategy included a preliminary survey of local vegetation diversity and floristic inventories of halophyte communities in plots established across the existing environmental heterogeneity in order to span the whole variation gradients of the species presence and abundance. The abiotic characterization of halophyte communities included a

  16. Coupling environmental, social and economic models to understand land-use change dynamics in the Mekong Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis eDrogoul

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Vietnamese Mekong Delta has undergone in recent years a considerable transformation in agricultural land-use, fueled by a boom of the exportation, an increase of population, a focus on intensive crops, but also environmental factors like sea level rise or the progression of soil salinity. These transformations have been, however, largely misestimated by the ten-year agricultural plans designed at the provincial levels, on the predictions of which, though, most of the large-scale investments (irrigation infrastructures, protection against flooding or salinity intrusion, and so on are normally planned. This situation raises the question of how to explain the divergence between the predictions used as a basis for these plans and the actual situation. Answering it could, as a matter of fact, offer some insights on the dynamics at play and hopefully allow designing them more accurately.The dynamics of land-use change at a scale of a region results from the interactions between heterogeneous actors and factors at different scales, among them institutional policies, individual farming choices, land-cover and environmental changes, economic conditions, social dynamics, just to name a few. Understanding its evolution, for example, in this case, to better support agricultural planning, therefore requires the use of models that can represent the individual contributions of each actor or factor, and of course their interactions.We address this question through the design of an integrated hybrid model of land-use change in a specific and carefully chosen case study, which relies on the central hypothesis that the main force driving land-use change is actually the individual choices made by farmers at their local level. Farmers are the actors who decide (or not to switch from one culture to another and the shifts observed at more global levels (village, district, province, region are considered, in this model, as a consequence of the aggregation of these

  17. Coastal Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Area Cooperative Educational Services, New Haven, CT. Environmental Education Center.

    This material includes student guide sheets, reference materials, and tape script for the audio-tutorial unit on Inland Wetlands. A set of 35mm slides and an audio tape are used with the materials. The material is designed for use with Connecticut schools, but it can be adapted to other localities. The unit materials emphasize the structure,…

  18. Urban wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Salm, N.; Bellmann, C.; Hoeijmakers, S.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0533 Innovation & Sustainability. This is a manual meant for designers who are interested in water purifications within the boundaries of a project, presenting constructed wetlands. It is a guide to quickly provide you with project relevant

  19. Effects of growth and change of food on the {delta}{sup 15}N in marine fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasamatsu, Fujio [Marine Ecology Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Sato, Rie; Park, Kwang Lai

    1998-06-01

    Information is limited concerning variation of the {delta}{sup 15}N with growth in marine organisms and consequently the effect of growth of marine biota on the {delta}{sup 15}N is not yet well understood. The {delta}{sup 15}N in 26 species of marine fishes taken from Japanese coastal waters together with 4664 stomach contents of these fishes were examined to investigate the effects of food habits and growth on the {delta}{sup 15}N. The mean {delta}{sup 15}N for two species that fed mainly on large-size fishes and six species that fed mainly on small-size fishes were 14.5{+-}1.0per mille and 12.8{+-}0.7per mille, respectively. For five species that fed mainly on decapod crustaceans, two species that fed mainly on zooplankton, and three species that fed mainly on benthos (mainly Polychaeta), the {delta}{sup 15}N were 13.0{+-}0.7, 9.7{+-}0.9, and 12.2{+-}1.2per mille, respectively. The mean {delta}{sup 15}N in the species whose prey were mainly fish or decapod crustaceans was about 3-5per mille higher than the species whose prey was mainly zooplankton. Within the four species that shift their food habits with growth to higher trophic level, the {delta}{sup 15}N significantly increased with growth in one species (Pacific cod), while not significant increase in the {delta}{sup 15}N with growth in the remaining species. (author)

  20. The Effect of Climate Change on Wetlands and Waterfowl in Western Canada: Incorporating Cropping Decisions into a Bioeconomic Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withey, P.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2013-01-01

    We extend an earlier bioeconomic model of optimal duck harvest and wetland retention in the Prairie Pothole Region of Western Canada to include cropping decisions. Instead of a single state equation, the model has two state equations representing the population dynamics of ducks and the amount of

  1. Wetland Microbial Community Response to Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been proposed as a potential long-term carbon storage solution, with a goal of engineering geochemical dynamics to accelerate peat accretion and encourage greenhouse gas (GHG) sequestration. However, wetland microbial community composition and metabolic rates are poorly understood and their predicted response to wetland restoration is a veritable unknown. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors that shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater tidal marshes to hypersaline ponds in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun metagenomics, coupled with greenhouse gas measurements, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range in salinity and restoration status. Seawater delivers sulfate to wetland ecosystems, encouraging sulfate reduction and discouraging methane production. As expected, we observed the highest rates of methane production in the freshwater wetlands. Recently restored wetlands had significantly higher rates of methane production compared to their historic counterparts that could be attributed to variations in trace metal and organic carbon content in younger wetlands. In contrast, our sequencing results revealed an almost immediate return of the indigenous microbial communities following seasonal flooding and full tidal restoration in saline and hypersaline wetlands and managed ponds. Notably, we found elevated methane production rates in hypersaline ponds, the result of methylotrophic methane production confirmed by sequence data and lab incubations. Our study links belowground microbial communities and their aboveground greenhouse gas production and highlights the inherent complexity in predicting wetland microbial response in the face of both natural and unnatural disturbances.

  2. USGS research on Florida's isolated freshwater wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Arturo E.; Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.; Metz, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has studied wetland hydrology and its effects on wetland health and ecology in Florida since the 1990s. USGS wetland studies in Florida and other parts of the Nation provide resource managers w