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Sample records for delta botswana electronic

  1. A Spatially Distributed Hydrological Model For The Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, P.; Kinzelbach, W.; Thabeng, G.

    2003-04-01

    The Okavango Delta is a large (˜30 000 km^2) inland delta situated in northern Botswana. It is subject to annual flooding due to the strong seasonality of the inflowing Okavango River and of local rainfall. The inflowing waters spread out over vast perennial and seasonal floodplains and partially infiltrate into the underlying sand aquifer. Ultimately, the water is consumed by evapotranspiration, there is no significant outflow from the Delta. The system's response to the annual flood in the Okavango River as well as local rainfall and evapotranspiration is modelled within a finite difference scheme based on MODFLOW. The wetland and the underlying sand aquifer are incorporated as two separate layers. In the superficial layer, either steady uniform channel flow (Darcy-Weisbach equation) or potential flow (Darcy flow) can be chosen on a cell-by-cell basis. The coarse spatial resolution does not capture the small-scale variation in the topographic elevation. Therefore, upscaling techniques are applied to incorporate the statistics of that variation into effective parameters for the hydraulic conductivity, the storage coefficient and the evapotranspiration. Modelled flooding patterns are compared with flooding patterns derived from NOAA-AVHRR and other remote sensing data (1 km resolution). Good correspondence between the two is achieved based on parameters chosen according to prior knowledge and field data. Global indicators like the average size of the Delta and the temporal variance of its size are closely reproduced. Ultimately, the remotely sensed flooding patterns will be used to calibrate the model. Apart from flooding patterns, model outputs include cell-by-cell flow terms. Water balances can be calculated for arbitrary sub-regions of the grid. Other monitoring data like water levels in rivers and boreholes as well as discharges at gauging points may be used for validation of the model. The Okavango Delta is one of the prime conservation areas in Africa and a

  2. Island forming processes in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. S.; Humphries, M. S.; Mahomed, I.; Le Roux, P.; Verhagen, B. Th.

    2012-12-01

    The Okavango Delta in Botswana is a large (40,000 km2) alluvial fan that is characterised by the presence of numerous tree-covered islands. Thought to originate from the mound-building activities of termites or through fluvial processes associated with development of scroll bars and inverted channels, islands have been shown to play an important role in the structure and functioning of the Delta through the creation of habitat diversity, focusing of nutrients, and disposal of toxic salts. This study investigates the processes responsible for the maintenance and growth of two such islands in the seasonal swamps. Transpiration by vegetation is shown to result in substantial increases in groundwater salinity beneath the islands, contributing to their growth through chemical precipitation. Detailed chemical analyses revealed that the precipitation of magnesian calcite and silica within the island soils contributes 30-40% of the total island volume. Isotopic analyses of carbonate samples show that vegetation plays an important role in providing carbon for carbonate precipitation. Variations in δ13C carbonate values appear to reflect the relative proportion of C3 to C4 plants on the island, with C4 species becoming more dominant toward island centres in response to increases in groundwater salinity. The study suggests that continued island growth is also related to the deposition of aerosols and the accumulation of dust preferentially on islands and possibly to ongoing termite activity. Tall trees that characterise the island margins trap dust carried from the floodplains, resulting particularly in the lateral growth of islands. Islands in the Okavango are considered to be the product of long-term aggradation processes, with the two islands studied estimated to be in the order of tens of thousands of years old.

  3. Indicators of desiccation-driven change in the distal Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringrose, S.; Vanderpost, C.; Matheson, W.; Wolski, P.; Huntsman-Mapila, P.; Murray-Hudson, M.; Jellema, A.

    2007-01-01

    This work seeks to determine whether riparian woody plant variables respond to drying and salinity regimes in the semi-arid distal Okavango Delta, northern Botswana. Structural and compositional variables were obtained from 47 field sites. Mapping using satellite imagery illustrated differences in t

  4. Regional review: the hydrology of the Okavango Delta, Botswana-processes, data and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milzow, C.; Kgotlhang, L.; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2009-01-01

    of the Delta has to be understood. This article reviews scientific work done for that purpose, focussing on the hydrological modelling of surface water and groundwater. Research providing input data to hydrological models is also presented. It relies heavily on all types of remote sensing. The history......The wetlands of the Okavango Delta accommodate a multitude of ecosystems with a large diversity in fauna and flora. They not only provide the traditional livelihood of the local communities but are also the basis of a tourism industry that generates substantial revenue for the whole of Botswana...

  5. Epidemic transmission of intestinal schistosomiasis in the seasonal part of the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, C.C.; Ellery, W.N.; Byskov, Jens;

    2008-01-01

    A well documented epidemic of human intestinal schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni occurred at Maun in the seasonal part of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, building from very few cases in the 1950s and early 1960s to a peak prevalence of >80% in the 1980s. A retrospective analysis was per...... with a lag period of 5-6 years between the rise and fall of discharge and the rise and fall of transmission. Since the hydrological events in the delta follow a cyclical pattern, another epidemic around 2020 appears likely....

  6. Interaction of density flow and geochemical processes on islands in the Okavanga Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Langer, T.; Prommer, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the interactions of density driven flow and geochemical reactions under evapo-concentration. A multi-species hydrodynamic flow and transport simulation model (SEAWAT) is coupled to a batch reaction model (PHREEQC) to analyze densitydriven flow on islands in the Okavango Delta......, Botswana. Evapo-concentration on the islands leads to steadily increasing concentrations until the onset of density-driven flow against the evaporation-induced upward gradient. Lag times to the onset of density-driven flow are strongly influenced by geochemical reactions. Mineral precipitation and carbon...

  7. Normal intestinal flora of wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, C J; Leslie, A J

    2008-06-01

    Bacterial and fungal cultures were performed from cloacal swabs collected from 29 wild Nile crocodiles, captured in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Sixteen species of bacteria and 6 fungal species were cultured. Individual crocodiles yielded 1-4 bacterial species, and 0-2 fungal species. The most commonly isolated bacteria were Microbacterium, Enterococcus faecalis, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Escherichia coli. No salmonellae were cultured. The most commonly occurring fungus was Cladosporium. Several of the bacterial and fungal species isolated have been implicated in cases of septicaemia in crocodilians. Knowledge of the normal intestinal flora will contribute towards the development of a crocodile-specific probiotic for use in farmed crocodiles.

  8. Normal intestinal flora of wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J. Lovely

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial and fungal cultures were performed from cloacal swabs collected from 29 wild Nile crocodiles, captured in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Sixteen species of bacteria and 6 fungal species were cultured. Individual crocodiles yielded 1-4 bacterial species, and 0-2 fungal species. The most commonly isolated bacteria were Microbacterium, Enterococcus faecalis, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Escherichia coli. No salmonellae were cultured. The most commonly occurring fungus was Cladosporium. Several of the bacterial and fungal species isolated have been implicated in cases of septicaemia in crocodilians. Knowledge of the normal intestinal flora will contribute towards the development of a crocodile-specific probiotic for use in farmed crocodiles.

  9. Relative Effects of Visualized and Verbal Presentation Methods in Communicating Environmental Information among Stakeholders: Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakadu, Olekae T.; Irani, Tracy; Telg, Ricky

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the relative effectiveness of 2 public instructional communication methods in improving selected predictors of knowledge-sharing behaviors among communities in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. A total of 120 subjects took part in a quasiexperimental study, with 2 experimental treatments: (a) visualized PowerPoint…

  10. Changes in resident attitudes towards tourism development and conservation in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaiwa, Joseph E; Stronza, Amanda L

    2011-08-01

    Negative attitudes of resident communities towards conservation are associated with resource decline in developing countries. In Botswana, Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) was adopted to address this challenge. CBNRM links rural development and conservation. However, the impact of CBNRM on changes of resident attitudes towards conservation and tourism is not adequately researched. This paper, therefore, assesses the impacts of CBNRM on resident attitudes towards tourism development and conservation in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. The study purposively sampled villages of Khwai, Mababe and Sankoyo. Household data using variables like: economic benefits from CBNRM; level of satisfaction with CBNRM; co-management of natural resources between resident communities and government agencies; and collective action was collected. This data was supplemented by secondary and ethnographic data. Using qualitative and quantitative analysis, results indicate changes in resident attitudes from being negative to positive towards tourism and conservation. These changes are triggered by economic benefits residents derived from CBNRM, co-management in resource management; and, collective action of communities in CBNRM development. Positive attitudes towards conservation and tourism are the first building blocks towards achieving conservation in nature-based tourism destinations. As a result, decision-makers should give priority to CBNRM and use it as a tool to achieve conservation and improved livelihoods in nature-based tourism destinations of developing countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Wildlife resource utilisation at Moremi Game Reserve and Khwai community area in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaiwa, Joseph E

    2005-10-01

    This paper uses the concept of sustainable development to examine the utilisation of wildlife resources at Moremi Game Reserve (MGR) and Khwai community area (NG 18/19) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Using both secondary and primary data sources, results show that the establishment of MGR in 1963 led to the displacement of Khwai residents from their land; affected Basarwa's hunting and gathering economy; marked the beginning of resource conflicts between Khwai residents and wildlife managers; and, led to the development of negative attitudes of Khwai residents towards wildlife conservation. Since the late 1980s, a predominantly foreign owned tourism industry developed in and around MGR, however, Khwai residents derive insignificant benefits from it and hence resource conflicts increased. In an attempt to address problems of resource conflicts and promote sustainable wildlife utilisation, the Botswana Government adopted the Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) programme, which started operating at Khwai village in 2000. The CBNRM programme promotes local participation in natural resource management and rural development through tourism. It is beginning to have benefits to Khwai residents such as income generation, employment opportunities and local participation in wildlife management. These benefits from CBNRM are thus having an impact in the development of positive attitudes of Khwai residents towards wildlife conservation and tourism development. This paper argues that if extended to MGR, CBNRM has the potential of minimising wildlife conflicts between Khwai residents and the wildlife-tourism sectors. This approach may in the process promote the sustainable wildlife use in and around MGR.

  12. Normal haematology and blood biochemistry of wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, C J; Pittman, J M; Leslie, A J

    2007-09-01

    Wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) of various size classes were captured in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Blood was collected from the post occipital sinus and used for the determination of a wide range of haematological and biochemical parameters. These values were compared between the sexes and between 3 size classes. The values were also compared with the limited data available from farmed Nile crocodiles, as well as from other wild Nile crocodiles. The Okavango crocodiles were comparatively anaemic, and had comparatively low total protein and blood glucose levels. There was a high prevalence of Hepatozoon pettiti infection, however, there was no significant difference in haematological values between the infected and uninfected crocodiles. The values reported here will be useful in diagnostic investigations in both zoo and farmed Nile crocodiles.

  13. Normal haematology and blood biochemistry of wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J. Lovely

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Wild Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus of various size classes were captured in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Blood was collected from the post occipital sinus and used for the determination of a wide range of haematological and biochemical parameters. These values were compared between the sexes and between 3 size classes. The values were also compared with the limited data available from farmed Nile crocodiles, as well as from other wild Nile crocodiles. The Okavango crocodiles were comparatively anaemic, and had comparatively low total protein and blood glucose levels. There was a high prevalence of Hepatozoon pettiti infection, however, there was no significant difference in haematological values between the infected and uninfected crocodiles. The values reported here will be useful in diagnostic investigations in both zoo and farmed Nile crocodiles.

  14. A regional coupled surface water/groundwater model of the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Peter; Gumbricht, Thomas; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2006-04-01

    In the endorheic Okavango River system in southern Africa a balance between human and environmental water demands has to be achieved. The runoff generated in the humid tropical highlands of Angola flows through arid Namibia and Botswana before forming a large inland delta and eventually being consumed by evapotranspiration. With an approximate size of about 30,000 km2, the Okavango Delta is the world's largest site protected under the convention on wetlands of international importance, signed in 1971 in Ramsar, Iran. The extended wetlands of the Okavango Delta, which sustain a rich ecology, spectacular wildlife, and a first-class tourism infrastructure, depend on the combined effect of the highly seasonal runoff in the Okavango River and variable local climate. The annual fluctuations in the inflow are transformed into vast areas of seasonally inundated floodplains. Water abstraction and reservoir building in the upstream countries are expected to reduce and/or redistribute the available flows for the Okavango Delta ecosystem. To study the impacts of upstream and local interventions, a large-scale (1 km2 grid), coupled surface water/groundwater model has been developed. It is composed of a surface water flow component based on the diffusive wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations, a groundwater component, and a relatively simple vadose zone component for calculating the net water exchange between land and atmosphere. The numerical scheme is based on the groundwater simulation software MODFLOW-96. Since the primary model output is the spatiotemporal distribution of flooded areas and since hydrologic data on the large and inaccessible floodplains and tributaries are sparse and unreliable, the model was not calibrated with point hydrographs but with a time series of flooding patterns derived from satellite imagery (NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer). Scenarios were designed to study major upstream and local interventions and their expected impacts

  15. Ethno-meteorology and scientific weather forecasting: Small farmers and scientists’ perspectives on climate variability in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Oluwatoyin Dare Kolawole; Piotr Wolski; Barbara Ngwenya; Gagoitseope Mmopelwa

    2014-01-01

    Recent trends in abrupt weather changes continue to pose a challenge to agricultural production most especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper specifically addresses the questions on how local farmers read and predict the weather; and how they can collaborate with weather scientists in devising adaptation strategies for climate variability (CV) in the Okavango Delta of Botswana. Recent trends in agriculture-related weather variables available from country’s climate services, as well as in f...

  16. HIV/AIDS, artisanal fishing and food security in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwenya, B. N.; Mosepele, K.

    Generally, rural households pursue all year round natural and non-natural resource-based livelihood systems to diversify these options in order to cope with risks emanating from a range of shocks and stressors. Artisanal fishing in the Delta is not only a major livelihood option but also a source of food security. This paper is based on analysis of primary data collected from a survey of 248 subsistence fishers’ households through simple random sampling in 22 villages in the Delta. The overall objectives of the survey were to assess the general prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the Ngamiland district of Botswana, to investigate potential effects of AIDS-related stressors, particularly chronic illness on artisanal fishing activities, and to assess implications towards food security. Results from this study indicate that HIV prevalence rates for pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in the Delta are approximately 30% and are related to factors such as marriage, education, and employment. Despite this relatively high prevalence percentage, most of the affected households do not have adequate access to HIV/AIDS support facilities. Support services are provided on the basis of population size and/or status of the settlement (i.e. urban, urban village, rural or remote). Therefore, since about 50% of the Delta’s population lives in settlements of less than 500 people, they receive health services indirectly through major population centres whose capacity to deliver timely HIV/AIDS services is limited. This disproportionate access to HIV/AIDS services disadvantages the majority of fishing communities in the Delta, and may affect their ability to fish. Moreover, about 53% of sampled households had cared for a continuously ill person/s (CIP’s) in the last 5 years, out of which approximately 29% felt that this seriously impacted fishing activities. These serious impacts included sale of family assets, depletion of savings, and switching or abandoning fishing activities

  17. Fluid Waters and Rigid Livelihoods in the Okavango Delta of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian King

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Current and future impacts of climate change include increasing variability in a number of biophysical processes, such as temperature, precipitation, and flooding. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC has suggested that Southern Africa is particularly vulnerable to the anticipated impacts from global climate change and that social and ecological systems in the region will be disrupted and likely transformed in future decades. This article engages with current research within geography and cognate disciplines on the possibilities for responsive livelihoods within socio-ecological systems experiencing biophysical change. The paper draws from an ongoing research project that is evaluating perceptions of environmental change, specifically of precipitation and flooding dynamics, in order to understand social responses. We report on the findings from qualitative interviewing conducted in 2010 and 2011 in the communities of Etsha 1, Etsha 6, and Etsha 13 within the Okavango Delta of Botswana. While flooding and precipitation patterns have been dynamic and spatially differentiated, some livelihood systems have proven rigid in their capacity to enable adaptive responses. We assert this demonstrates the need for detailed research on livelihood dynamics to support adjustments to biophysical variability within socio-ecological systems experiencing change.

  18. Using ground-based geophysics to constrain the interpretation of airborne TEM data recorded across the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, J. E.; Kalscheuer, T.; Doetsch, J.; Rabenstein, L.; Tshoso, G.; Meier, P.; Horstmeyer, H.; Kgotlhang, L.; Ploug, C.; Auken, E.; Kinzelbach, W. K.; Green, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Okavango Delta in northern Botswana is a near endorheic inland delta that has developed over the past ~2 MA in an active graben at the southwestern end of the East Africa Rift System. An annual flood from the north causes a slowly flowing surface water regime in the delta, but previous wetter climatic periods were responsible for intermittent lacustrine environments. The Okavango Delta is the largest permanent water body in the Kalahari Desert and, as such, represents an important resource for wildlife and humans alike. An airborne time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) survey, commissioned by the Botswana government, was undertaken in 2007 for the purpose of better understanding the hydrogeology of the delta. Initial processing and inversion of these data show within the main fan of the delta a resistive 20-50 m thick surface layer underlain by a 30-200 m thick conductive layer. In the upper fan, the conductive layer is underlain by a resistive unit beginning at about 150 m depth. This unit exhibits a dendritic pattern implying a fluvial origin. To help interpret this and other structures, geophysical field work was initiated in early 2011 at various locations in the delta. Seismic reflection and refraction, electrical resistive tomography (ERT), and ground TEM methods were employed. The seismic methods are useful for delineating the boundaries of the weathering and basement layers, whereas ERT provides an independent estimate of the resistivity structure, particularly at shallow depths. Ground TEM allows for a direct comparison with the airborne TEM soundings, helping to estimate the accuracy of the latter. Though still evolving, the current large-scale hydrogeological interpretation of the airborne data set includes a fresh water-saturated surface layer underlain by a saline aquifer and clay aquitard. In the upper fan of the delta, a fresh water aquifer appears to lie between the aquitard and the basement rock.

  19. Using helicopter TEM to delineate fresh water and salt water zones in the aquifer beneath the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, Joel E.; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang K. H.; Kgotlhang, Lesego

    2017-09-01

    The Okavango Delta is a vast wetland wilderness in the middle of the Kalahari Desert of Botswana. It is a largely closed hydrological system with most water leaving the delta by evapotranspiration. In spite of this, the channels and swamps of the delta remain surprisingly low in salinity. To help understand the hydrological processes at work, we reanalyzed a previous inversion of data collected from a helicopter transient electromagnetic (HTEM) survey of the entire delta and performed an inversion of a high resolution dataset recorded during the same survey. Our results show widespread infiltration of fresh water to as much as ∼200 m depth into the regional saline aquifer. Beneath the western delta, freshwater infiltration extends to only about 80 m depth. Hydrological modeling with SEAWAT confirms that this may be due to rebound of the regional saltwater-freshwater interface following the cessation of surface flooding over this part of the delta in the 1880s. Our resistivity models also provide evidence for active and inactive saltwater fingers to as much as ∼100 m beneath islands. These results demonstrate the great extent of freshwater infiltration across the delta and also show that all vegetated areas along the delta's channels and swamps are potential locations for transferring solutes from surface water to an aquifer at depth.

  20. Hydrological and sedimentological modeling of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, using remotely sensed input and calibration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milzow, C.; Kgotlhang, L.; Kinzelbach, W.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2006-12-01

    The Okavango Delta is a vast wetland situated in the mostly arid southern Africa. It is protected by the Ramsar convention but economic growth of the tributary countries (Angola, Namibia and Botswana) will make the waters of its feeding river, the Okavango, more and more attractive for agricultural water abstraction and production of electrical energy. An integrated hydrological model of the delta is build to study consequences of water abstraction and sediment retention in the river. The model is based on Modflow 2000 but several changes are made to the code. Flows in the delta are of three types: Groundwater flow, slow overland flow and fast flow through channels. These three components are reflected in the model by a standard aquifer layer, a wettable surface layer which also obeys the Darcy law, and stream flow routing using the SFR2 package. The stream-flow routing component of the model simulates realistic flow velocities which allow to incorporate sediment transport in the model. For this purpose a basic sediment transport package for Modflow 2000 has been written. We assume that the position of the channels stays approximately constant over few decades but that channel elevations may change due to aggradation and erosion. Changing slopes induce changes in the distribution of the water to the different arms and flood plains of the deltaic system. Flooding patterns of the delta differ each year. They are a function of inflow, meteorological data and to some extend of the wetting state in previous years in the short term (1-3 years). Vegetation growth, peat fires and sediment deposition lead to variations in the medium term (10 to 50 years). Topography changes with major changes of channel network geometry will only occur in the long term (100 to 1000 years). Tectonic events may, however, lead to sudden discontinuities in the flooding behavior. When analyzing management options and the sustainable use of the Delta's resources the interesting time scale is the

  1. Variation in Assemblages of Small Fishes and Microcrustaceans After Inundation of Rarely Flooded Wetlands of the Lower Okavango Delta, Botswana

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    Siziba, Nqobizitha; Chimbari, Moses J.; Masundire, Hillary; Mosepele, Ketlhatlogile; Ramberg, Lars

    2013-12-01

    Water extraction from floodplain river systems may alter patterns of inundation of adjacent wetlands and lead to loss of aquatic biodiversity. Water reaching the Okavango Delta (Delta), Botswana, may decrease due to excessive water extraction and climate change. However, due to poor understanding of the link between inundation of wetlands and biological responses, it is difficult to assess the impacts of these future water developments on aquatic biota. Large floods from 2009 to 2011 inundated both rarely and frequently flooded wetlands in the Delta, creating an opportunity to examine the ecological significance of flooding of wetlands with widely differing hydrological characteristics. We studied the assemblages of small fishes and microcrustaceans, together with their trophic relationships, in temporary wetlands of the lower Delta. Densities of microcrustaceans in temporary wetlands were generally lower than previously recorded in these habitats. Microcrustacean density varied with wetland types and hydrological phase of inundation. High densities of microcrustaceans were recorded in the 2009 to 2010 flooding season after inundation of rarely flooded sites. Large numbers of small fishes were observed during this study. Community structure of small fishes differed significantly across the studied wetlands, with poeciliids predominant in frequently flooded wetlands and juvenile cichlids most abundant in rarely flooded wetlands (analysis of similarity, P wetlands. This result matched our prediction that rarely flooded wetlands would be more productive; hence, they supported greater populations of microcrustaceans and cichlids, which are aggressive feeders. However, the predominance of microcrustaceans in the guts of small fishes (wetlands are highly accessible by fish. We predict that a decline in the amount of water reaching the Delta will negatively affect fish recruitment, particularly the cichlids that heavily exploited the rarely flooded wetlands. Cichlids are

  2. Variation in assemblages of small fishes and microcrustaceans after inundation of rarely flooded wetlands of the lower Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siziba, Nqobizitha; Chimbari, Moses J; Masundire, Hillary; Mosepele, Ketlhatlogile; Ramberg, Lars

    2013-12-01

    Water extraction from floodplain river systems may alter patterns of inundation of adjacent wetlands and lead to loss of aquatic biodiversity. Water reaching the Okavango Delta (Delta), Botswana, may decrease due to excessive water extraction and climate change. However, due to poor understanding of the link between inundation of wetlands and biological responses, it is difficult to assess the impacts of these future water developments on aquatic biota. Large floods from 2009 to 2011 inundated both rarely and frequently flooded wetlands in the Delta, creating an opportunity to examine the ecological significance of flooding of wetlands with widely differing hydrological characteristics. We studied the assemblages of small fishes and microcrustaceans, together with their trophic relationships, in temporary wetlands of the lower Delta. Densities of microcrustaceans in temporary wetlands were generally lower than previously recorded in these habitats. Microcrustacean density varied with wetland types and hydrological phase of inundation. High densities of microcrustaceans were recorded in the 2009 to 2010 flooding season after inundation of rarely flooded sites. Large numbers of small fishes were observed during this study. Community structure of small fishes differed significantly across the studied wetlands, with poeciliids predominant in frequently flooded wetlands and juvenile cichlids most abundant in rarely flooded wetlands (analysis of similarity, P fishes of fishes (fishes may also be an important regulatory mechanism of microcrustacean assemblages during large floods when inundated terrestrial patches of wetlands are highly accessible by fish. We predict that a decline in the amount of water reaching the Delta will negatively affect fish recruitment, particularly the cichlids that heavily exploited the rarely flooded wetlands. Cichlids are an important human food source, and their decline in fish catches will negatively affect livelihoods. Hence, priority in

  3. Lamproglena hepseti n. sp. (Copepoda: Lernaeidae), a gill parasite of the African pike Hepsetus odoe (Bloch) from the Okavango River and Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van As, Liesl L; van As, Jo G

    2007-05-01

    During surveys of the biodiversity of fish parasites in the Okavango River and Delta, Botswana, specimens of Lamproglena von Nordmann, 1832 were found associated with the African pike Hepsetus odoe (Bloch). This Lamproglena species distinctly differs from all known species based on morphological features, in particular the cephalothorax and the maxilliped; it is described as L. hepseti n. sp. and is specific to its host, the African pike.

  4. Indigenous knowledge and land use policy: Implications for livelihoods of flood recession farming communities in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motsumi, Sekgowa; Magole, Lapologang; Kgathi, Donald

    Flood recession farming commonly known as molapo farming in the Okavango Delta is an important land use and livelihood activity for poor and vulnerable communities living on its fringes. Molapo farming is mainly practised by subsistence farmers. The study on the system was conducted in the villages of Shorobe and Tubu in the Okavango Delta in Ngamiland District, Botswana. The objective of the study was to find out if indigenous knowledge (IK) still has a role in molapo farming and if current land use policy supports or stifle the practice and the attendant IK. Indigenous knowledge systems (IKSs) within molapo farming were studied using focused group discussions, Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) and open ended interviews. Policy content and process analysis was done through document perusal and stakeholder analysis. The study found that in Tubu more than 50% of molapo farms are owned by women making molapo farming an important livelihood activity for marginalised groups. The Ngamiland land use plan acknowledges the importance of stakeholder participation and IK in land management. However the use of IK is not evident in the plan and subsequent recommendations. Molapo farming is considered a potential threat to the ecological functioning of the Delta, through use of inputs such as fertilizers and pesticides. Consequently farmers have been discouraged from practicing molapo farming on floodplains. However according to the farmers, ploughing in floodplains minimizes cutting of trees and renders use of fertilizer unnecessary due to annual deposition of nutrients through flood waters. We conclude that although IK still plays an important role in molapo farming there exists no policy environment to use the knowledge and support the practice. We recommend that sustainable molapo farming requires the use of IK within an Integrated Land Use Planning process.

  5. A regional coupled surface water/groundwater model of the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Gumbricht, T.; Kinzelbach, W.

    2006-01-01

    consumed by evapotranspiration. With an approximate size of about 30,000 km(2), the Okavango Delta is the world's largest site protected under the convention on wetlands of international importance, signed in 1971 in Ramsar, Iran. The extended wetlands of the Okavango Delta, which sustain a rich ecology...

  6. A preliminary disease survey in the wild Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) population in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, A J; Lovely, C J; Pittman, J M

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a preliminary survey of diseases that might be present in the wild Nile crocodile population in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Blood samples were collected from crocodiles ranging in size from 34.0 cm to 463.0 cm total length. Samples were examined for blood parasites and underwent a haematological analysis. Before release the crocodiles were examined for various clinical abnormalities. Of the 144 crocodiles examined, none were visibly sick or displayed any signs of disease. No antibodies to Mycoplasma crocodyli were detected. Hepatozoon pettiti was present in 55.3% of blood smears examined, but there was no significant difference in any of the haematological values between the infected and uninfected crocodiles, and a high prevalence of Hepatozoon infection is not uncommon in other species. Only 7.6% of the examined crocodiles were infested with leeches. Further research is required for several of the crocodilian diseases, in particular to elucidate the role of wild crocodilians as reservoirs of infection.

  7. A preliminary disease survey in the wild Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus population in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Leslie

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to conduct a preliminary survey of diseases that might be present in the wild Nile crocodile population in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Blood samples were collected from crocodiles ranging in size from 34.0cmto 463.0cmtotal length. Samples were examined for blood parasites and underwent a haematological analysis. Before release the crocodiles were examined for various clinical abnormalities. Of the 144 crocodiles examined, none were visibly sick or displayed any signs of disease. No antibodies to Mycoplasma crocodyli were detected. Hepatozoon pettiti was present in 55.3 % of blood smears examined, but there was no significant difference in any of the haematological values between the infected and uninfected crocodiles, and a high prevalence of Hepatozoon infection is not uncommon in other species. Only 7.6 % of the examined crocodiles were infested with leeches. Further research is required for several of the crocodilian diseases, in particular to elucidate the role of wild crocodilians as reservoirs of infection.

  8. Integrated interpretation of helicopter and ground-based geophysical data recorded within the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podgorski, Joel E.; Green, Alan G.; Kalscheuer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ) data recorded across most of the delta, (ii) 2D models and images derived from ground-based electrical resistance tomographic, transient electromagnetic, and high resolution seismic reflection/refraction tomographic data acquired at four selected sites in western and north-central regions of the delta...... resistivities and very low to low P-wave velocities. Except for images of several buried abandoned river channels, it is non-reflective. The laterally extensive underlying unit of low resistivities, low P-wave velocity, and subhorizontal reflectors very likely contains saline-water-saturated sands and clays...... reflectivity. The interface between the POM unit and basement is a prominent seismic reflector....

  9. Looking for very low tectonic deformation in GNSS time series impacted by strong hydrological signal in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastier, Anne-Morwenn; Dauteuil, Olivier; Murray-Hudson, Michael; Makati, Kaelo; Moreau, Frédérique; Crave, Alain; Longuevergne, Laurent; Walpersdorf, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Located in northern Botswana, the Okavango Delta is a vast wetland, fed from the Angolan highlands and constrained by a half-graben in the Kalahari depression. Since the 70's, the Okavango graben is usually considered as the terminus of the East African Rift System. But a recent geodetic study showed there has been no extension on the tectonic structure over the past 5 years, and recent geophysical studies began to call this hypothesis into question. The deformation in the area could instead be related to far-field deformation accommodation due to the motion of the Kalahari craton relative to the rest of the Nubian plate and to the opening of the Rift Valley. Getting to the vertical deformation isn't trivial. The GNSS time series show a strong annual deformation of the ground surface (3 cm of amplitude). On the vertical component, this periodic signal is so strong that it hides the tectonic long-term deformation, while this information would give a crucial insight on the geodynamic process at play. This periodic signal is related to the seasonal loading of water due to the rainy season. This hypothesis is corroborated by the modeling of the surface deformation based on the GRACE satellites data, interpreted as the variation of groundwater amount. In the Okavango Delta, the peak of water level isn't paced with the local precipitations, but is driven by a flood pulse coming from the Angolan Highlands. The migration of this massive water body isn't visible at first order in GRACE data. Yet, local precipitations are supposed to undergo too much evapotranspiration to be significant in the hydrological balance. Thus this later water body isn't supposed to produce a mass anomaly in GRACE time series. This paradox could highlight a relationship not yet defined between groundwater and local rainfall. The wide spatial resolution of GRACE data (about 300 km) doesn't allow a modeling accurate enough to give access to the slow tectonic deformation, nor to determine the

  10. Abiotic and biotic factors influencing the mobility of arsenic in groundwater of a through-flow island in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenov, Natalie; Wolski, Piotr; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Murray-Hudson, Michael; Enriquez, Hersy; Damaraju, Sivaramakrishna; Galkaduwa, Madhubhashini B.; McKnight, Diane M.; Masamba, Wellington

    2014-10-01

    The Okavango Delta of Botswana is a large arid-zone wetland comprising 20,000 km2 of permanent and seasonal floodplains and over 100,000 islands. It has been shown that island groundwater can have very high dissolved arsenic (As) concentration, but the abiotic and biotic controls on As mobility are not well understood in this setting. At New Island, an island located in the seasonal swamp, dissolved As concentration increased from below detection limits in the surface water to 180 μg/L in groundwater, present as As(III) species. We investigated the relative importance of hydrologic, geochemical, and geomicrobial processes, as well as influences of recent extreme flooding events, in mobilizing and sequestering As in the shallow groundwater system under this island. Our results suggest that evapotranspiration and through-flow conditions control the location of the high arsenic zone. A combination of processes is hypothesized to control elevated As in the concentration zone of New Island: high evapotranspiration rates concentrate As and other solutes, more alkaline pH leads to desorption of arsenic or dissolution of arsenic sulfides, and formation of thioarsenic complexes acts to keep arsenic in solution. Evidence from X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) measurements further suggests that SRBs influence arsenic sequestration as orpiment (As2S3). Although dissolved organic matter (DOM) was not significantly correlated to dissolved As in the groundwater, our results suggest that DOM may serve as an electron donor for sulfate reduction or other microbial reactions that influence redox state and As mobility. These results have important implications for water management in the region and in other large wetland environments. The processes evaluated in this study are also relevant for arsenic removal in subsurface constructed wetland systems that may exhibit rapidly changing processes over small spatial scales.

  11. Soils, people and policy: land resource management conundrum in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatoyin Dare Kolawole

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The multi-faceted aspects of natural resource governance underscore the complex nature of the subject. The intricacies associated with the skewed power relations between those who allocate these resources (land, in this case and those who access and use them vis à vis environmental conservation make the subject a daunting one. Based on preliminary field observations and farmers’ opinions on soil health conditions in the Okavango Delta, the paper assesses the nutrient status of selected farmers’ fields and how the smallholders and government respond to this peculiar ecological environment. It specifically analyses small farmers’ perceptions on the political ecology of soil management in the area. We used a multi-stage sampling procedure to sample 228 smallholder farmers. The smallholders were interviewed using interview schedules. Key informant interviews were used to collect qualitative data from farmers as well. Thirty-three (33 composite soil samples were collected from 30 farmers’ plots in three farming communities (Makalamabedi, Nokaneng and Mohembo. Laboratory analysis shows that most soils in the wetland and its dryland surroundings are generally acidic, low in essential nutients as well as in cation-exchange-capacity (CEC. However, the results of a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA conducted shows significant differences in soil nutrient levels in different locations within the Delta. While farming remains an important livelihood of rural communities, policies on natural resource governance particularly along the river channels delimit local farmers’ ability to engage in meaningful soil fertility management. The low CEC of the soils is an indication that holistic cultural practices, which are beyond mere chemical fertilizations are critical and more desirable for improved soil health and sustainable rural livelihoods in the Delta.

  12. Integrated interpretation of helicopter and ground-based geophysical data recorded within the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podgorski, Joel E.; Green, Alan G.; Kalscheuer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    deposited in the huge Paleo Lake Makgadikgadi (PLM), which once covered a 90,000km2 area that encompassed the delta, Lake Ngami, the Mababe Depression, and the Makgadikgadi Basin. Examples of PLM sediments are intersected in many boreholes. Low permeability clay within the PLM unit seems to be a barrier...... to the downward flow of the saline water. Below the PLM unit, freshwater-saturated sand of the Paleo Okavango Megafan (POM) unit is distinguished by moderate to high resistivities, low P-wave velocity, and numerous subhorizontal reflectors. The POM unit is interpreted to be the remnants of a megafan based...

  13. Ethno-meteorology and scientific weather forecasting: Small farmers and scientists’ perspectives on climate variability in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatoyin Dare Kolawole

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent trends in abrupt weather changes continue to pose a challenge to agricultural production most especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper specifically addresses the questions on how local farmers read and predict the weather; and how they can collaborate with weather scientists in devising adaptation strategies for climate variability (CV in the Okavango Delta of Botswana. Recent trends in agriculture-related weather variables available from country’s climate services, as well as in freely available satellite rainfall products were analysed. The utility of a seasonal hydrological forecasting system for the study area in the context of supporting farmer’s information needs were assessed. Through a multi-stage sampling procedure, a total of 592 households heads in 8 rural communities in the Okavango Delta were selected and interviewed using open and close-ended interview schedules. Also, 19 scientists were purposively selected and interviewed using questionnaires. Key informant interviews, focus group and knowledge validation workshops were used to generate qualitative information from both farmers and scientists. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in summarising the data. Analysis of satellite rainfall products indicated that there was a consistent increase in total annual rainfall throughout the region in the last 10 years, accompanied by an increase in number of rain days, and reduction of duration of dry spells. However, there is a progressive increase in the region’s temperatures leading to increase in potential evaporation. Findings from social surveys show that farmers’ age, education level, number of years engaged in farming, sources of weather information, knowledge of weather forecasting and decision on farming practices either had a significant relationship or correlation with their perceptions about the nature of both local [ethno-meteorological] and scientific weather knowledge. Nonetheless, there was a

  14. Environmental hydro-refugia demonstrated by vegetation vigour in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, S. C.; Marston, C. G.; Hassani, H.; King, G. C. P.; Bennett, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    Climate shifts at decadal scales can have environmental consequences, and therefore, identifying areas that act as environmental refugia is valuable in understanding future climate variability. Here we illustrate how, given appropriate geohydrology, a rift basin and its catchment can buffer vegetation response to climate signals on decadal time-scales, therefore exerting strong local environmental control. We use time-series data derived from Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) residuals that record vegetation vigour, extracted from a decadal span of MODIS images, to demonstrate hydrogeological buffering. While this has been described previously it has never been demonstrated via remote sensing and results in relative stability in vegetation vigour inside the delta, compared to that outside. As such the Delta acts as a regional hydro-refugium. This provides insight, not only to the potential impact of future climate in the region, but also demonstrates why similar basins are attractive to fauna, including our ancestors, in regions like eastern Africa. Although vertebrate evolution operates on time scales longer than decades, the sensitivity of rift wetlands to climate change has been stressed by some authors, and this work demonstrates another example of the unique properties that such basins can afford, given the right hydrological conditions.

  15. Rural livelihoods and household adaptation to extreme flooding in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motsholapheko, M. R.; Kgathi, D. L.; Vanderpost, C.

    Adaptation to flooding is now widely adopted as an appropriate policy option since flood mitigation measures largely exceed the capability of most developing countries. In wetlands, such as the Okavango Delta, adaptation is more appropriate as these systems serve as natural flood control mechanisms. The Okavango Delta system is subject to annual variability in flooding with extreme floods resulting in adverse impacts on rural livelihoods. This study therefore seeks to improve the general understanding of rural household livelihood adaptation to extreme flooding in the Okavango Delta. Specific objectives are: (1) to assess household access to forms of capital necessary for enhanced capacity to adapt, (2) to assess the impacts of extreme flooding on household livelihoods, and (3) to identify and assess household livelihood responses to extreme flooding. The study uses the sustainable livelihood and the socio-ecological frameworks to analyse the livelihood patterns and resilience to extreme flooding. Results from a survey of 623 households in five villages, key informant interviews, focus group discussions and review of literature, indicate that access to natural capital was generally high, but low for financial, physical, human and social capital. Households mainly relied on farm-based livelihood activities, some non-farm activities, limited rural trade and public transfers. In 2004 and 2009, extreme flooding resulted in livelihood disruptions in the study areas. The main impacts included crop damage, household displacement, destruction of household property, livestock drowning and mud-trapping, the destruction of public infrastructure and disruption of services. The main household coping strategies were labour switching to other livelihood activities, temporary relocation to less affected areas, use of canoes for early harvesting or evacuation and government assistance, particularly for the most vulnerable households. Household adaptive strategies included

  16. Waste electrical and electronic equipment management in Botswana: Prospects and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmereki, Daniel; Li, Baizhan; Li'ao, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The management of waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) is a major challenge in developing and transition countries. The paper investigates recent strategies to manage this waste stream in an environmentally sound way. Obsolete electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) are a complex waste category containing both hazardous and valuable substances. Many countries and regions in the world are undertaking extensive scientific research to plan and develop effective collection and treatment systems for end-of-life EEE. In developing countries such as Botswana, effective strategies that cover all stages throughout the lifecycle of products, particularly at the end-of-life, still lag behind. Infrastructure, pre-processing, and end-processing facilities and innovative technologies for end-of-life management of e-waste are noticeably absent due to lack of investment and high costs of its management. The objective of the paper is to present the e-waste situation in Botswana, highlighting (a) measures taken in the form of legislative and policy regulations; (b) existing practices to manage e-waste; and (c) effective solutions for e-waste management in emerging economies. Studies from other countries on e-waste management issues provided insights on the "best" technical and logistical pre-processing and end-processing strategies to treat hazardous waste. The paper also highlights key societal factors that affect successful implementation of cost-effective collection and value recovery of end-of-life EEE. These include unavailability of national "e-waste policy," absence of formal take-back system, absence of financing and subsidies, inadequate source separation programmes, absence of technical and logistical integration of pre-processing and end-processing facilities, and limited infrastructure and access to technologies and investment. Effective strategies such as an "integrated approach" (mixed options), access to technologies, establishment of pre-processing and

  17. ‘n Vergelykende histomorfologiese assessering van die testis van twee Clarias spesies van die Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Mokae

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Die testis van twee Clarias species wat in die Okavango Delta voorkom, is histomorfologiesgeassesseer om die verskil in struktuur te beskryf, omdat die twee spesies se testiskleur verskilmet die Clarias ngamensis ‘n swart testis en die Clarias gariepinus ‘n roomkleurige testis.

  18. 11 Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fair political competition cannot exist between the unequal. .... and the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), Botswana seeks to negotiate a .... groups, especially by Bakalanga, from strategic positions in government and other key sectors of ..... they were either fixed or falsified to advantage some candidates.

  19. An assessment of spatial and temporal rainfall variability and its implications to Molapo farming in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikgola, Kobamelo; Mazvimavi, Dominic

    2013-04-01

    This paper assesses the variability of rainfall on the entire Okavango Delta. Due to the effects of climate change as a result of global warming there is a concern of possibility of decline of rainfall over Southren Africa. Rainfall is a very important component driving the hydrological cycle and therefore the understanding of rainfall spatial and temporal variation is crucial for agricultural production and general water resources management. Time series of individual months, continuous month- to month, total rainfall for the early part ofthe rainy season, October-November-December (OND), the mid to end of the rainy season, January-February-March JFM) andannual rainfall, for 16 stations spread on the entire Okavango Delta are analysed and assessed for correlations and any significant trends to proof any changes in rainfall. A homogeneity test was conducted using four different methods; the Standard Normal Homogeneity, the Buishand Range, the Pettit and the Von Neuman ratio to examine the possible existence of change or break-pointsin the rainfall time series.Spatial rainfall variability was investigated using the spatial correlation function.The Mann-Kendall trend test was used to investigate existence of trends. The results showed a fluctuation from one months to another in existence of trend; e,g October a more negative trend for all stations, then a more positive trend for November and so on and so forth. For a seasonal series half of the stations were showing a negative trend while the other half was positive. The annual series also followed the same order as seasonal. The trends were statistically non-significant.A linear regression and quantile regression were used for further investigation of trends. The spatial rainfall correlation amongst stations and the indication of trends has implications on distribution and yields of molapo farming in the Okavango Delta.

  20. Integrating Dendrochronology, Climate and Satellite Remote Sensing to Better Understand Savanna Landscape Dynamics in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Southworth

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the integration and potential uses of linkages between climate dynamics, savanna vegetation and landscape level processes within a highly vulnerable region, both in terms of climate variability and social systems. We explore the combined applications of two time-series methodologies: (1 climate signals detected in tree ring growth, from published literature, chronologies from the International Tree-Ring Data Bank, and minimal preliminary field data; and (2 new primary production (NPP data of vegetation cover over time derived from remotely sensed analyses. Both time-series are related to the regional patterns of precipitation, the principle driver of plant growth in the area. The approach is temporally and spatially multiscalar and examines the relationships between vegetation cover, type and amount, and precipitation shifts. We review literature linking dendrochronology, climate, and remotely sensed imagery, and, in addition, provide unique preliminary analyses from a dry study site located on the outer limit of the Okavango Delta. The work demonstrates integration across the different data sources, to provide a more holistic view of landscape level processes occurring in the last 30-50 years. These results corroborate the water-limited nature of the region and the dominance of precipitation in controlling vegetation growth. We present this integrative analysis of vegetation and climate change, as a prospective approach to facilitate the development of long-term climate/vegetation change records across multiple scales.

  1. Electronic properties of delta -doped GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Ghazali, A.; Serre, J.

    1992-07-01

    For temperature zero the authors study the effects of disorder on the electronic properties of the two-dimensional electron gas which exists in planar-doped ( delta -doped) GaAs. The density of states, the Fermi level, the single-particle relaxation time and the electron mobility are calculated as functions of the dopant concentration. The transition from a band tail to an impurity band and the nature of the metal-insulator transition are discussed. The authors compare the theoretical results on the mobility with some available experimental data.

  2. Self hardening property of Botswana fly ash | Sahu | Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self hardening property of Botswana fly ash. ... In the present investigation, an effort has been made to study the self hardening property of Botswana fly ash by ... This will encourage the use of fly ash economically as a construction material.

  3. Flooding dynamics in a large low-gradient alluvial fan, the Okavango Delta, Botswana, from analysis and interpretation of a 30-year hydrometric record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Wolski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Okavango Delta is a flood-pulsed wetland, which supports a large tourism industry and the subsistence of the local population through the provision of ecosystem services. In order to obtain insight into the influence of various environmental factors on flood propagation and distribution in this system, an analysis was undertaken of a 30-year record of hydrometric data (discharges and water levels from one of the Delta distributaries. The analysis revealed that water levels and discharges at any given channel site in this distributary are influenced by a complex interplay of flood wave and local rainfall inputs, modified by channel-floodplain interactions, in-channel sedimentation and technical interventions, both at the given site and upstream. Additionally, cyclical variation of channel vegetation due to intermittent nutrient loading, possibly sustained by nutrient recycling, may play a role. It is shown that short and long-term flood dynamics are mainly due to variation in floodplain flows. As a consequence, discharge data collected within the main channels of distributaries do not adequately represent flooding dynamics in the system. The paper contributes to the understanding of seasonal and long-term flood pulsing and their variation in low gradient systems of channels and floodplains.

  4. Botswana country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Peter [EECG Consultants, Gaborone (Botswana)

    1998-10-01

    The project analysed the baseline economic, energy development and greenhouse gas (GHG) scenarios, and abatement costing of plausible greenhouse gas mitigation options in the energy sector of Botswana. The analysis period for both the baseline and mitigation scenarios is up to 2030 with the short term stretching from 1994 to 2005 and the long term up to 2030. There is a relatively significant potential to reduce GHG emissions in the energy system of Botswana by applying a number of mitigation options. The potential in by applying a set of 21 mitigation options analysed in this study was found to be about 28.7% in 2005 and 26.1% in 2030. (EG)

  5. Environmental Security in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    take a generation to recover . For this reason the president of Botswana has made environmental security a national priority and is utilizing a...poachers in late June, 2010. CSL-4 The focus of these seminars has included conservation of ground water, collection of rainwater and overall water

  6. Lateral shifts of spin electron beams in antiparallel double {delta}-magnetic-barrier nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong Yonghong [Department of Electronic Engineering, Hunan University Science and Engineering, Hunan 425100 (China); Lu Maowang, E-mail: m_w_lu@126.com [Department of Electronic Engineering, Hunan University Science and Engineering, Hunan 425100 (China); Chen Saiyan; Zhang Guilian [Department of Electronic Engineering, Hunan University Science and Engineering, Hunan 425100 (China)

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the Goos-Haenchen (GH) effect of spin electron beams in a magnetic-barrier (MB) nanostructure consisting of antiparallel double {delta}-MBs, which can be experimentally realized by depositing two ferromagnetic (FM) stripes on top and bottom of the semiconductor heterostructure. GH shifts for spin electron beams across this type of MB nanostructures, is derived exactly, with the help of the stationary phase method. It is shown that GH shifts depend strongly on the spin directions for double {delta}-MBs with unidentical magnetic strengths, giving rise to a considerable spin polarization effect. It also is shown that spin polarization of GH shifts is closely relative to the separation and magnetic-strength difference of two {delta}-MBs. These interesting properties may provide an alternative scheme to spin-polarize electrons into the semiconductor, and the devices can serve as tunable spin beam splitters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spin Goos-Haenchen effect of electron beams through a kind of MB nanostructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GH shift depends greatly on electron-spins, which is used to spin polarize electrons in semiconductor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spin polarization in GH shift is tunable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A tunable spin beam splitter is achieved.

  7. AC Stark effect in ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ for the electron EDM search

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, A N

    2015-01-01

    A method and code for calculations of diatomic molecules in the external variable electromagnetic field have been developed. Code applied for calculation of systematics in the electron's electric dipole moment search experiment on ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ state related to geometric phases, including dependence on $\\Omega$-doublet, rotational level, and external static electric field. It is found that systematics decrease cubically with respect to the frequency of the rotating transverse component of the electric field. Calculation confirms that experiment on ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ state is very robust against systematic errors related to geometric phases.

  8. Tinea capitis in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakur R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rameshwari ThakurDepartment of Microbiology, Muzaffarnagar Medical College, Muzaffarnagar, IndiaBackground: Tinea capitis (TC is a common dermatophyte infection of the scalp that can also involve the eyebrows and eyelashes.Aim: This study aimed to find the causative fungus responsible for TC in Botswana and determine its association with the clinical types of TC.Methods: Samples for potassium hydroxide 10% mounts and fungal cultures were collected in a microbiology laboratory at the National Health Laboratory, Gaborone, Botswana. Dermasel agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar were inoculated with the samples. Lactophenol cotton blue mounts were prepared from the culture-positive samples to study the morphological characteristics.Results: Trichophyton violaceum was found to be the predominant causative organism of TC. Trichophyton tonsurans was isolated from one patient. Both are anthropophilic species.Conclusion: TC was found to be most common in those aged 1–15 years (81%. Of 17 patients in this age group, 16 were younger than 10 years old and one was 14 years old. T. violaceum was the most common dermatophyte species isolated.Keywords: Trichophyton violaceum, Trichophyton violaceum white variant, Trichophyton tonsurans, dermatophyte

  9. Behaviour of Youths in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Botswana. Gaborone ... poor intellectual and work performance and death (Kinney and Leaton, 1983;. Gossop, 1989 .... alcohol consumption than the number of times youth drink alcohol. ...... Kluwer Academic Publishers. Santelli ...

  10. Botswana country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-09-01

    This study was carried out in Botswana, Tanzania and Zambia as part of the project `Climate Change Mitigation in Southern Africa` funded by the Danish International Development Agency (Danida). The project was conducted parallel to the UNEP/GEF project `Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations` which involved 8 other developing countries and 2 regional projects in Latin America and the SADC region. The limitation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is a complex issue, intimately connected with economic development at local, national, regional and global levels. Key economic sectors such as energy, agriculture, industry and forestry all produce GHGs, and are likely to be affected directly and indirectly by any mitigation policy. The UNEP Greenhouse Gas Abatement Costing Studies, initiated in 1991, attempted to address these complex issues, developing a methodological framework and testing it through practical application in ten countries. (EHS) 28 refs.

  11. Urban agriculture in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloysius Clemence Mosha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Botswana, a middle-income country, is experiencing a sluggish economic growth and a rapid urbanisation which has brought in its wake high unemployment, poverty and food insecurity. This has led some people to engage in subsistence and commercial urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA to address these problems. However, in spite of its known advantages, uptake of UPA has been low for a number of reasons including: high GDP before the economic meltdown of recent years; a harsh climate; lack of water; poor access to land; and over-reliance on generous government handouts. Nevertheless, the extent of its practice and its contribution to food security – albeit modest – shows that it is a sector that needs to be encouraged and supported. Both central and local government can play a big role by providing land and infrastructure, and also by implementing an enabling policy and regulatory environment which promotes small- and medium-scale urban food production.

  12. Traditional midwives in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staugard, F

    1985-01-01

    Botswanan women tend to consciously opt for home deliveries, even in areas where modern maternity care facilities are easily accessible. Approximately 40% of deliveries in Botswana occur outside of institutions (55% in rural areas and 23% in urban areas) and are generally assisted by traditional midwives. To gain more information on this phenomenon, the 175 identified traditional midwives in 2 health regions of Botswana were interviewed. All midwives were female, the majority were over 50 years of age, and 80% were illiterate. 38% were married and 42% were widowed; 67% had 4 or more children. 59% practiced the traditional Tswana religion. 82% of the midwives interviewed indicated they had performed only 5-6 deliveries in the 1 year preceding the survey, suggesting a decline in their level of professional activity. Only 58% received a fee for their services; in most of these cases, the fee was minimal or in kind. Interestingly, 90% of traditional midwives expressed a positive attitude toward cooperation with the modern health care system. A more intensive interview with 59 of these traditional midwives indicated that 81% had no contact with their clients during the prenatal period. 95% showed a total lack of knowledge of the female reproductive system, yet all were able to identify signs of a high risk delivery and willing to refer these cases to a modern health facility. 76% were informed about family planning, although they indicated they refer clients to clinics for supplies, and all were supportive of breastfeeding for at least 1 year. As a group, Botswanan traditional midwives have specific conceptions regarding food taboos during pregnancy (e.g., avoidance of meat and eggs) that can place pregnant women at risk of protein deficiencies. Overall, these findings indicate that the traditional midwife in Tswana society cannot be regarded as a well-defined health worker, as is the case with traditional healers.

  13. Prospects for Measuring $\\Delta$G from Jets at HERA with Polarized Protons and Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Rädel, G; Feltesse, Joel; Kunne, Fabienne; Maul, M; Mirkes, E; Schäfer, A; Wu, C Y

    1996-01-01

    The measurement of the polarized gluon distribution function Delta G(x) from photon-gluon fusion processes in electron-proton deep inelastic scattering producing two jets has been investigated. The study is based on the MEPJET and PEPSI simulation programs. The size of the expected spin asymmetry and corresponding statistical uncertainties for a possible measurement with polarized beams of electrons and protons at HERA have been estimated. The results show that the asymmetry can reach a few percent, and is not washed out by hadronization and higher order processes.

  14. Prospects for measuring {Delta}G from jets at HERA with polarized protons and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeck, A. de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Feltesse, J. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee (DAPNIA); Kunne, F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee (DAPNIA); Maul, M. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Schaefer, A. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Wu, C.Y. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Mirkes, E. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Raedel, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments

    1996-09-01

    The measurement of the polarized gluon distribution function {Delta}G(x) from photon-gluon fusion processes in electron-proton deep inelastic scattering producing two jets has been investigated. The study is based on the MEPJET and PEPSI simulation programs. The size of the expected spin asymmetry and corresponding statistical uncertainties for a possible measurement with polarized beams of electrons and protons at HERA have been estimated. The results show that the asymmetry can reach a few percent, and is not washed out by hadronization and higher order processes. (orig.)

  15. Electron beam asymmetry measurements from exclusive pi0 electroproduction in the Delta(1232) resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Joo

    2003-05-01

    The polarized longitudinal-transverse structure function sigma_LT'in the p(e,e'p)pi^0 reaction has been measured for the first time in the Delta(1232) resonance region for invariant mass W = 1.1 - 1.3 GeV and at four-momentum transfer Q^2 = 0.40 and 0.65 GeV^2. Data were taken at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using longitudinally polarized electrons at an energy of 1.515 GeV. This newly measured sigma_LT' provides new and unique information on the interference between resonant and non-resonant amplitudes in the Delta(1232) resonance region. The comparison to recent phenomenological calculations shows sensitivity to the description of non-resonant amplitudes and higher resonances.

  16. Electron beam asymmetry measurements from exclusive pi0 electroproduction in the Delta(1232) resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Joo

    2003-05-01

    The polarized longitudinal-transverse structure function sigma_LT'in the p(e,e'p)pi^0 reaction has been measured for the first time in the Delta(1232) resonance region for invariant mass W = 1.1 - 1.3 GeV and at four-momentum transfer Q^2 = 0.40 and 0.65 GeV^2. Data were taken at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using longitudinally polarized electrons at an energy of 1.515 GeV. This newly measured sigma_LT' provides new and unique information on the interference between resonant and non-resonant amplitudes in the Delta(1232) resonance region. The comparison to recent phenomenological calculations shows sensitivity to the description of non-resonant amplitudes and higher resonances.

  17. Electronic and physico-chemical properties of nanometric boron delta-doped diamond structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicot, G., E-mail: gauthier.chicot@neel.cnrs.fr; Fiori, A.; Tran Thi, T. N.; Bousquet, J.; Delahaye, J.; Grenet, T.; Eon, D.; Omnès, F.; Bustarret, E. [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut NEEL, 38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, 38042 Grenoble (France); Volpe, P. N.; Tranchant, N.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Arnault, J. C. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gerbedoen, J. C.; Soltani, A.; De Jaeger, J. C. [IEMN, UMR-CNRS 8520, Avenue Poincaré, Université de Lille 1, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Alegre, M. P.; Piñero, J. C.; Araújo, D. [Dpto Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Cádiz) (Spain); Jomard, F. [Groupe d' Étude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), UMR 8635 du CNRS, UVSQ, 45 Avenue des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); and others

    2014-08-28

    Heavily boron doped diamond epilayers with thicknesses ranging from 40 to less than 2 nm and buried between nominally undoped thicker layers have been grown in two different reactors. Two types of [100]-oriented single crystal diamond substrates were used after being characterized by X-ray white beam topography. The chemical composition and thickness of these so-called delta-doped structures have been studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Temperature-dependent Hall effect and four probe resistivity measurements have been performed on mesa-patterned Hall bars. The temperature dependence of the hole sheet carrier density and mobility has been investigated over a broad temperature range (6 K < T < 450 K). Depending on the sample, metallic or non-metallic behavior was observed. A hopping conduction mechanism with an anomalous hopping exponent was detected in the non-metallic samples. All metallic delta-doped layers exhibited the same mobility value, around 3.6 ± 0.8 cm{sup 2}/Vs, independently of the layer thickness and the substrate type. Comparison with previously published data and theoretical calculations showed that scattering by ionized impurities explained only partially this low common value. None of the delta-layers showed any sign of confinement-induced mobility enhancement, even for thicknesses lower than 2 nm.

  18. Electronic structure of delta-Pu and PuCoGa[sub 3] from photoemission and the mixed level model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, J. J. (John Joseph); Wills, J. M. (John M.); Durakiewicz, T. (Tomasz); Butterfield, M. T. (Martin T.); Guziewicz, E. (Elzbieta); Sarrao, John L.,; Arko, A. J. (Aloysius J.); Moore, D. P. (David P.); Morales, L. A. (Luis A.); Eriksson, O. (Olle)

    2004-01-01

    The electronic structure of {delta}-phase Pu metal and the Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa{sub 5} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy and a novel theoretical scheme. Excellent agreement between calculation and experiment defines a path forward for understanding electronic structure aspects of Pu-based materials. The photoemission results show two separate regions of 5f electron spectral intensity, one at the Fermi energy and another centered 1.2 eV below the Fermi level. A comparison is made between the photoemission data and five computational schemes for {delta}-Pu. The results for {delta}-Pu and PuCoGa{sub 5} indicate 5f electron behavior on the threshold between localized and itinerant and a broader framework for understanding the fundamental electronic properties of the Pu 5f levels in general within two configurations, one localized and one itinerant.

  19. A novel electronic configuration of the 5f states in {delta}-plutonium as revealed by the photo-electron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wills, J.M.; Eriksson, O. E-mail: olle.eriksson@fysik.uu.se; Delin, A.; Andersson, P.H.; Joyce, J.J.; Durakiewicz, T.; Butterfield, M.T.; Arko, A.J.; Moore, D.P.; Morales, L.A

    2004-04-01

    We present a theoretical model, the mixed-level model, aiming at describing metals with very complex, strongly correlated, electronic structures. As a demonstration, it is applied to the electronic structure of {delta}-Pu. The model reproduces the electronic-structure related properties of this complex metal; in particular, the theory is capable of reproducing the valence band photoemission spectrum of {delta}-Pu. We also report new experimental photoemission spectra at several photon energies. Taken together, our results provide strong evidence that the electronic structure of {delta}-Pu involves a 5f shell with four electrons in a localized multiplet hybridizing with valence states, and approximately one 5f electron forming a completely delocalized band state.

  20. Zeeman interaction in ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ for the electron EDM search

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, A N; Titov, A V; Hutzler, N R; Hess, P W; O'Leary, B R; Spaun, B; DeMille, D; Gabrielse, G; Doyle, J M

    2014-01-01

    The current limit on the electron's electric dipole moment, $|d_\\mathrm{e}|<8.7\\times 10^{-29} e {\\cdotp} {\\rm cm}$ (90% confidence), was set using the molecule thorium monoxide (ThO) in the $J=1$ rotational level of its $H ^3\\Delta_1$ electronic state [Science $\\bf 343$, 269 (2014)]. This state in ThO is very robust against systematic errors related to magnetic fields or geometric phases, due in part to its $\\Omega$-doublet structure. These systematics can be further suppressed by operating the experiment under conditions where the $g$-factor difference between the $\\Omega$-doublets is minimized. We consider the $g$-factors of the ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ state both experimentally and theoretically, including dependence on $\\Omega$-doublets, rotational level, and external electric field. The calculated and measured values are in good agreement. We find that the $g$-factor difference between $\\Omega$-doublets is smaller in $J=2$ than in $J=1$, and reaches zero at an experimentally accessible electric field. This ...

  1. Spin-polarized electron tunneling across a Si delta-doped GaMnAs/n-GaAs interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, S.E.; Sørensen, B.S.; Lindelof, P.E.;

    2003-01-01

    Spin-polarized electron coupling across a Si delta-doped GaMnAs/n-GaAs interface was investigated. The injection of spin-polarized electrons was detected as circular polarized emission from a GaInAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode. The angular momentum selection rules were simplified...

  2. Massively parallel full configuration interaction. Benchmark electronic structure calculations on the Intel Touchstone Delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, R.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stahlberg, E.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    We describe an implementation of the benchmark ab initio electronic structure full configuration interaction model on the Intel Touchstone Delta. Its performance is demonstrated with several calculations, the largest of which (95 million configurations, 418 million determinants) is the largest full-CI calculation yet completed. The feasibility of calculations with over one billion configurations is discussed. A sustained computation rate in excess of 4 GFLOP/s on 512 processors is achieved, with an average aggregate communication rate of 155 Mbytes/s. Data-compression techniques and a modified diagonalization method were required to minimize I/O. The object-oriented design has increased portability and provides the distinction between local and non-local data essential for use of a distributed-data model.

  3. Effect of the hydrostatic pressure on the electron mobility in delta-doped systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oubram, O; Mora-Ramos, M E; Gaggero-Sager, L M, E-mail: 1gaggero@uaem.m [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on the electron states and low-temperature mobility in n-type GaAs delta-doped single quantum wells is studied. Values of hydrostatic pressure consider are below the so-called GAMMA-X crossover, keeping all attention in the electronic properties at the Brillouin zone center. The effect of the pressure on the electron mobility is described via a relative quantity that is proportional to the ratio between P not = 0 and zero pressure results. Calculation is performed using an analytical description of the potential energy function profile, based on the Thomas-Fermi approach, taking explicitly into account the dependence upon P of the main input parameters: effective masses and dielectric constant. The relative mobility increases for higher values of P. The cases of zero and finite -although small- temperature are studied, showing that the influence of T is mainly to lower the values of the relative mobility in the entire range of P considered. Numerical results are reported for a two-dimensional density of ionized impurities equals to 7.5 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}.

  4. Electronic Structure of TIBa(sub 2)CaCu(sub 2)O(sub 7-delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Novikov, D. L.; Freeman, A. J.; Siegal, M. P.

    1996-01-01

    The core levels of TIBa(sub 2)CaCu(sub 2)O(sub 7-delta) epitaxial films have been measured with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The valence electronic structure has been determined using the full-potential linear muffin tin orbital band structure method and measured with XPS.

  5. Electronic structure of p type Delta doped systems; Estructura electronica de sistemas dopadas con Delta de tipo p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaggero S, L.M.; Perez A, R. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    We summarize of the results obtained for the electronic structure of quantum wells that consist in an atomic layer doped with impurities of p type. The calculations are made within the frame worth of the wrapper function approach to independent bands and with potentials of Hartree. We study the cases reported experimentally (Be in GaAs and B in Si). We present the levels of energy, the wave functions and the rate of the electronic population between the different subbands, as well as the dependence of these magnitudes with the density of impurities in the layer. The participation of the bans of heavy holes is analysed, light and split-off band in the total electronic population. The effect of the temperature is discussed and we give a possible qualitative explanation of the experimental optical properties. (Author)

  6. Guinea Fowl Production in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cassius Moreki

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Guinea fowl farming is still in its infancy in Botswana; hence the population of farmed guinea fowl is unknown, as well as, their contribution to human nutrition. Presently, production occurs mainly at subsistence level and females (women appear to dominate the industry. In Botswana, guinea fowl are raised mainly under the semi-intensive system. Guinea fowl meat is of high quality, being high in protein and low in fat content, thus it is highly prized compared to chicken meat. It appears that guinea fowl farming could be more suitable to the rural areas where commercial chicken production has failed because guinea fowl are tolerant to diseases than chickens. Some challenges to guinea fowl production include farmers’ inadequate management skills necessary to raise guinea fowl successfully, inadequate technical support and lack of financial support from government extension services. It appears that guinea fowl production could be an important supplier of high quality animal protein (meat and eggs, as well as, a job creator in the rural areas.

  7. POULTRY WASTE MANAGEMENT IN BOTSWANA: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Moreki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A literature review was conducted to identify methods that are used to dispose of poultry waste in Botswana. It appears that the predominant methods of poultry waste disposal in Botswana are direct disposal at the landfills, application as a fertilizer in gardens or farms, burning and compositing. The use of poultry manure and/or litter to raise fertility status of the soil appears to be appropriate given that soils in Botswana are generally poor in plant nutrients, especially phosphorus. Given the high feed costs in Botswana it is suggested that the use of poultry manure and/or litter as livestock feed should be considered in areas where foot and mouth disease (FMD is endemic such as Chobe and North West Districts, as meat from these districts does not enter the European Union market.

  8. Electronic structure of {alpha}- and {delta}-Pu from photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arko, A. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Joyce, J. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Morales, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wills, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lashley, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wastin, F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranic Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76175 Karlsruhe, (Germany); Rebizant, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranic Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76175 Karlsruhe, (Germany)

    2000-07-15

    We report photoemission results on {alpha}- and {delta}-Pu using a laser plasma light source (LPLS) as well as He light as the exciting radiation. The LPLS is a pseudocontinuum tunable light source with intensities rivaling some second-generation synchrotrons. Both phases of Pu display a narrow, temperature-independent, 5f-related feature at the Fermi energy, which is narrower in {delta}-Pu than in {alpha}-Pu, suggestive of possible heavy-fermion-like behavior. In both {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu the photon-energy dependence of this feature suggests some 6d admixture, albeit somewhat smaller in {delta}-Pu. In this respect it differs qualitatively from Ce and U heavy fermions. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. Electronic transport measurements in the electron-doped high-temperature superconductor Praseodymium(2-x) Cerium(x) Copper (II) oxide(4+-delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Paul Leonard

    2011-12-01

    This thesis is composed of four major parts centered around the electron-doped superconductor Pr2-xCexCuO4+/-delta: angular magnetoresistance studies of antiferromagnetism, doping effects of oxygenation, Tc enhancement by the creation of superlattices, and comparison of high-temperature resistivity with the pnictides. The first part focuses on transport measurements of the magnetism in Pr2-xCexCuO4+/-delta and La 2-xCexCuO4+/-delta. It was found that the thermal evolution of the angular dependence of magnetoresistance in Pr 2-xCexCuO4+/-delta can be used to determine the Neel temperature in that material. This angular magnetoresistance technique was also applied to La2-xCexCuO4+/-delta ; evidence for antiferromagnetism in this system was observed as well. This section additionally develops angular magnetoresistance as a useful probe in other cuprate projects here described. The second part investigates over-oxygenated and irradiated Pr2-x CexCuO4+/-delta, in under- and optimal dopings. Resistivity, Hall effect, and angular magnetoresistance measurements show oxygen both doping and disordering the system, in agreement with over-doped films. The evolution of both the Hall effect and angular magnetoresistance shows that over-oxygenation results in significant changes in the number of charge carriers, regardless of the increase in scattering incurred. Additionally, this study indicates that annealing primarily removes apical oxygen, rather than other proposed behaviors. The third part studies multi-layer films of Pr2-xCex CuO4+/-delta and La2-xCexCuO 4+/-delta. These superlattices exhibit a significant Tc enhancement over component layers' T cs. Interface effects are excluded as a source of this Tc increase based upon critical current measurments. The Tc enhancement is found to be due to charge redistribution. Based on Hall and angular magnetoresistance measurements, the result of this redistribution is slightly net-under-doped films. The fourth part uses Pr2-xCexCuO4

  10. Comment on "Theoretical study of thorium monoxide for the electron electric dipole moment search: Electronic properties of ${H}^3\\Delta_1$ in ThO"

    CERN Document Server

    Denis, Malika

    2016-01-01

    We present an updated EDM effective electric field of $E_{\\text{eff}} = 75.2\\left[\\frac{\\rm GV}{\\rm cm}\\right]$ and the electron-nucleon scalar-pseudoscalar interaction constant $W_S=107.8$ [kHz] for the ${^3\\Delta}_1$ science state of ThO. The criticisms made in reference [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 024301 (2015)] are addressed and largely found to be unsubstantiated within the framework of our approach.

  11. Performance evaluation of partial differential equation models in electronic speckle pattern interferometry and the delta-mollification phase map method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chen; Zhang, Fang; Li, Botao; Yan, Haiqing

    2006-10-01

    The ordinary differential equation (ODE) and partial differential equation (PDE) image- processing methods have been applied to reduce noise and enhance the contrast of electronic speckle pattern interferometry fringe patterns. We evaluate the performance of a few representative PDE denoising models quantitatively with two parameters called image fidelity and speckle index, and then we choose a good denoising model. Combining this denoising model with the ODE enhancement method, we make it possible to perform contrast enhancement and denoising simultaneously. Second, we introduce the delta-mollification method to smooth the unwrapped phase map. Finally, based on PDE image processing, delta mollification and some traditional techniques, an approach of phase extraction from a single fringe pattern is tested for computer-simulated and experimentally obtained fringe patterns. The method works well under a high noise level and limited visibility and can extract accurate phase values.

  12. Deep Impact Delta II Launch Vehicle Cracked Thick Film Coating on Electronic Packages Technical Consultation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenneth D.; Kichak, Robert A.; Piascik, Robert S.; Leidecker, Henning W.; Wilson, Timmy R.

    2009-01-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft was launched on a Boeing Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on January 12, 2005. Prior to the launch, the Director of the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OS&MA) requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) lead a team to render an independent opinion on the rationale for flight and the risk code assignments for the hazard of cracked Thick Film Assemblies (TFAs) in the E-packages of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Deep Impact Mission. The results of the evaluation are contained in this report.

  13. Bilayer splitting in the electronic structure of heavily overdoped Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, D L; Armitage, N P; Lu, D H; Damascelli, A; Hu, J P; Bogdanov, P; Lanzara, A; Ronning, F; Shen, K M; Eisaki, H; Kim, C; Shen, Z X; Shimoyama, J; Kishio, K

    2001-06-11

    The electronic structure of heavily overdoped Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) is investigated by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The long-sought bilayer band splitting in this two-plane system is observed in both normal and superconducting states, which qualitatively agrees with the bilayer Hubbard model calculations. The maximum bilayer energy splitting is about 88 meV for the normal state feature, while it is only about 20 meV for the superconducting peak.

  14. Multiplet effects in the electronic structure of {delta}-Pu, Am and their compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shick, A.; Kolorenc, J.; Drchal, V. [Institut of Physics, ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Kolorenc, J. [North Carolina State Univ., Dept. of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Havela, L. [Charles Univ. Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Gouder, T. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, European Commission, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    We propose a straightforward and efficient procedure to perform dynamical mean-field (DMFT) calculations on the top of the static mean-field LDA+U (local density approximation) approximation. Starting from self-consistent LDA+U ground state we included multiplet transitions using the Hubbard-I approximation, which yields a very good agreement with experimental photoelectron spectra of {delta}-Pu, Am, and their selected compounds. (authors)

  15. South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Pale green vegetation and red-brown deserts dominate this MODIS image of Namibia (left), Botswana (upper right), and the Republic of South Africa (bottom) acquired on June3, 2002. In central Namibia the mountainous terrain of Namaqualand is sandwiched between the Namib Desert on the Atlantic Coast and the Kalahari Desert to the interior, where white dots mark the location of small, impermanent lakes and ponds. Namaqualand is home to numerous rare succulent plants that can survive on the region.s scant rainfall as well as fog that blows in off the ocean. Namaqualand extends south of the Orange River, which runs along the border of Namibia and South Africa and into that country.s Northern Cape region. The Orange River extends almost all the way back through the country, and where it makes a sharp southward dip in this image (at lower right), it runs through the Asbestos Mountains, names for the naturally-occurring asbestos they contain. In southwestern South Africa, high plateaus, such as the Great Karoo become mountain ridges near the coast, and the city of Cape Town is visible as a grayish area of pixels on the north shores of the horseshoe-shaped False Bay at the Cape of Good Hope. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  16. DEVELOPMENT ELECTRONIC MAPS OF ECOLOGICAL STATUS OF WATER OBJECTS OF THE VOLGA RIVER DELTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. N. Isenalieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Aim. The aim of this work was the comprehensive study of the ecological state of water objects of the Volga River delta. Methods. The following methods were used: field (collection, observation, organoleptic, uniform chemical analysis techniques are based on colorimetric, settlement, photometric, spectrometric measurement methods. Results. On the basis of results of researches for 2010-2014 performed a comparative analysis of the dynamics of the content of hydro-chemical indicators of environmental quality in waters of the Volga River delta and the residential areas of the background. Applying an integrated approach to the study of biological indicators of water quality. Created digitized map of the quality of aquatic ecosystems of the Volga River delta. Displaying modern ecological condition of watercourses investigated, determined the degree of contamination, the overall trophic and saprobic. Main conclusions. The work has identified adverse environmental situation in water objects of the Astrakhan and the surrounding areas. Average annual concentrations of toxicological substances water objects in the background zone 10 times less than in the water objects of settlements. As a result of work on the basis of ArcGis 10.2.2 created information environment "Eco-monitor", which is a systematic set of information, and quantitatively characterizing the ecological status of water objects. Created on the basis of ArcGis 10.2.2 information environment monitoring system of waterways allows for a temporary and spatial analysis, to assess the quality of different streams in the control sections.

  17. Marketing Sports Facilities: Perspectives from Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohutsana, Basuti; Akpata, Dele

    2013-01-01

    The provision of sports facilities contributes immensely to the growth of sports and leisure activities in the countries where they are provided. In some countries, as was the case in Botswana, the government had to spend millions of dollars to provide new Integrated Sports Facilities (ISF's) as a panacea for the continued poor performance of its…

  18. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Uganda And Botswana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Ministry of Local Government of Uganda and the Botswana-China Friendship Association, a 28-member Delegation of the CPAFFC, local government officials and Entrepreneurs led by CPAFFC Vice President Feng Zuoku, paid a goodwill visit to the two countries from May 27 to June 3.

  19. Investigation of transient processes at the DELTA electron storage ring using a digital bunch-by-bunch feedback system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoener, Markus

    2015-07-01

    At the 1.5-GeV synchrotron radiation source DELTA, operated by the TU Dortmund University, intensive synchrotron radiation in the spectral range from hard X-rays to THz radiation is generated by the circular deflection of highly relativistic electron bunches. Interacting with the vacuum chamber wall, the electron bunches create electric fields, which can act back on subsequent bunches. With increasing beam current, the excitation is enhanced so that the electron beam is unstable, which means that the electron bunches oscillate longitudinally or transversely relative to their reference position. The oscillations reduce the quality of the synchrotron radiation and limit the maximum storable beam current. Within the scope of this thesis, the beam instabilities at the storage ring were systematically investigated. A digital bunch-by-bunch feedback system was installed and commissioned, which allows to detect and digitize the position of each electron bunch at each turn. Based on the input signal, a correction signal is calculated in order to suppress transverse and longitudinal oscillation of the bunches. In addition, it is possible to excite dedicated bunches. The systematic excitation of all coupled-bunch modes allowed for the first time to determine the damping rates of all 192 eigenmodes of the electron beam. The current dependence of the damping rates was investigated and an instability threshold was found. Besides the investigation of multibunch instabilities, single-bunch instabilities are discussed. In addition, the acquisition unit of the digital feedback system can be triggered on external events. This was used to investigate the injection process and beam losses. It was shown that the transverse feedback system increases the injection efficiency. Another aspect of this thesis is the improvement of the signal quality of ultrashort coherent synchrotron radiation pulses, which are generated by the short-pulse facility at DELTA. The short-pulse facility is based

  20. HIV/AIDS-Anxiety among Adolescent Students in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyewadume, Mary Adeola

    2008-01-01

    This research investigated the incidence of HIV/AIDS anxiety among students in Botswana. The sample comprised 240 randomly selected students from six schools in three districts in Botswana, with data collected via a questionnaire. Percentages and Chi-square were used to analyze the extent to which the students were anxious about HIV/AIDS and if…

  1. Magnetic state of f electrons in {delta}-phase of Pu-Ga alloys studied by Ga NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verkhovskii, S. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kovalevskaya Str. 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Piskunov, Yu. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kovalevskaya Str. 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: piskunov@imp.uran.ru; Mikhalev, K.; Buzlukov, A.; Arkhipov, V. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kovalevskaya Str. 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Zouev, Yu. [RFNC-VNII Technical Physics named after acad. E.I. Zababakhin, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Korolev, A. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kovalevskaya Str. 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Lekomtsev, S.; Svyatov, I. [RFNC-VNII Technical Physics named after acad. E.I. Zababakhin, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Pogudin, A.; Ogloblichev, V. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kovalevskaya Str. 18, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-11

    {sup 69}Ga nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) line shift ({sup 69}K) and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate ({sup 69}T{sub 1}{sup -1}) are measured for Pu{sub 0.95}Ga{sub 0.05} alloy, stabilized in {delta}-phase, in the temperature range 10 and 650 K at magnetic field of 9.4 T. The shift and {sup 69}T{sub 1}{sup -1} are determined correspondingly by the static and fluctuating-in-time parts of the local magnetic fields arisen at Ga due to transferred hyperfine coupling with the nearest f electron environment of more magnetic Pu. At T > 200 K, the temperature dependent part of the shift {sup 69}K(T) scales macroscopic magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T), following the Curie-Weiss law, and the product ({sup 69}T{sub 1}T) increases with temperature proportionally (T + 255){sup 1.5(1)}. Both of the NMR observations are typical of the incoherent spin fluctuation regime of f electrons in nonmagnetic 3D Kondo lattice. An estimate of the effective magnetic moment {mu}{sub eff,5f}(g{sub e} = 2) = 0.15(5){mu}{sub B} per Pu atom points out a strong suppression of the spin magnetism in the alloy.

  2. Reaction of protonated tyrosine with electronically excited singlet molecular oxygen (a1Delta(g)): an experimental and trajectory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yigang; Liu, Jianbo

    2009-10-22

    Reaction of protonated tyrosine with the lowest electronically excited singlet state of molecular oxygen, (1)O(2) (a(1)Delta(g)), is reported over the center-of-mass collision energy (E(col)) range from 0.1 to 3.0 eV, using an electrospray-ionization, guided-ion-beam scattering instrument, in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations and direct dynamics trajectory simulations. Only one product channel is observed, corresponding to generation of hydrogen peroxide via transfer of two hydrogen atoms from protonated tyrosine. Despite being exoergic, the reaction is in competition with physical quenching of (1)O(2) and is very inefficient. At low E(col), the reaction may be mediated by intermediate complexes and shows strong inhibition by collision energy. At high E(col), the reaction efficiency drops to approximately 1% and starts to have contribution from a direct mechanism. Quasi-classical trajectory simulations were performed to probe the mechanism at high collision energies. Analysis of trajectories shows that, at E(col) of 3.0 eV, a small fraction of hydrogen peroxide (25%) is produced via a direct, concerted mechanism where two hydrogen atoms are transferred simultaneously, but most hydrogen peroxide (75%) is formed by dissociation of hydroperoxide intermediates. According to ab initio calculations and trajectory simulations, collisions also lead to formation of various endoperoxides, and dissociation of endoperoxides may play a role in physical quenching of (1)O(2). The apparatus and experimental techniques are described in detail.

  3. Effect of two intermediate electron donors, NADPH and FADH(2), on Spirulina Delta (6)-desaturase co-expressed with two different immediate electron donors, cytochrome b (5) and ferredoxin, in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdrid, Pavinee; Subudhi, Sanjukta; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Hongsthong, Apiradee

    2007-12-01

    When the gene desD encoding Spirulina Delta(6)-desaturase was heterologously expressed in E. coli, the enzyme was expressed without the ability to function. However, when this enzyme was co-expressed with an immediate electron donor, i.e. the cytochrome b (5) domain from Mucor rouxii, the results showed the production of GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), the product of the reaction catalyzed by Delta(6)-desaturase. The results revealed that in E. coli cells, where cytochrome b (5) is absent and ferredoxin, a natural electron donor of Delta(6)-desaturase, is present at a very low level, the cytochrome b (5) domain can complement for the function of ferredoxin in the host cells. In the present study, the Spirulina-ferredoxin gene was cloned and co-expressed with the Delta(6)-desaturase in E. coli. In comparison to the co-expression of cytochrome b ( 5 ) with the Delta(6)-desaturase, the co-expression with ferredoxin did not cause any differences in the GLA level. Moreover, the cultures containing the Delta(6)-desaturase co-expressed with cytochrome b (5) and ferredoxin were exogenously supplied with the intermediate electron donors, NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form) and FADH(2) (flavin adenine dinucleotide, reduced form), respectively. The GLA level in these host cells increased drastically, by approximately 50%, compared to the cells without the intermediate electron donors. The data indicated that besides the level of immediate electron donors, the level of intermediate electron donors is also critical for GLA production. Therefore, if the pools of the immediate and intermediate electron donors in the cells are manipulated, the GLA production in the heterologous host will be affected.

  4. Theoretical study of thorium monoxide for the electron electric dipole moment search, II: Electronic properties of $H^3\\Delta_1$ in ThO

    CERN Document Server

    Skripnikov, L V

    2014-01-01

    Recently an improved limits on the electron electric dipole moment, \\eEDM, and dimensionless constant, $k_{T,P}$, characterizing the strength of the T,P-odd pseudoscalar$-$scalar electron$-$nucleus neutral current interaction in the $H^3\\Delta_1$ state of ThO molecule were obtained by ACME collaboration [Science 343, 269 (2014)]. The interpretation of the experiment in terms of fundamental quantities \\eEDM\\ and $k_{T,P}$ is based on the results of theoretical study of appropriate ThO characteristics, the effective electric field acting on electron, \\Eeff, and a parameter of the T,P-odd pseudoscalar$-$scalar interaction, $W_{T,P}$, given in [J.Chem.Phys.\\ 139, 221103 (2013)] by St.Petersburg group. To reduce the uncertainties of the given limits we report improved calculations of the molecular state$-$specific quantities \\Eeff, 81.5~GV/cm, and $W_{T,P}$, 112~kHz, with the uncertainty within 7\\% of the magnitudes. Thus, the values recommended to use for the upper limits of the quantities are 75.8~GV/cm and 104~...

  5. Lifetime improvement and beam stabilization by longitudinal phase modulation at the DELTA electron storage ring; Lebensdauerverbesserung und Strahlstabilisierung durch longitudinale Phasenmodulation am Elektronenspreicherring DELTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuersch, Jonathan

    2014-10-16

    In DELTA especially at high beam currents often the occurence of an instability of a longitudinal oscillation mode is observed. In the framework of the present thesis first with different procedure the cause of the longitudinal oscillation mode, which is especially strongly excited at high beam currents, is searched for. Thereby connections between the occurrence of this mode and parameters from the region of the storage-ring high-frequency system is observed. It is shown by comparison of different procedures, simulation calculations, and experimental pre-examinations, that especially by a phase modulation of the storage-ring high frequency an essential improvement of especially the longitudinal beam stability and the beam lifetime can be reached. For the durable and reliable improvement of these beam properties in the framework of the present thesis a system for the longitudinal phase modulation of the after-acceleration voltage in the cavity resonator of the DELTA storage ring is concipated, developed, constructed, taken in operation, and tested. Finally the results aimed hereby are presented and discussed.

  6. Electronic structure and the van Hove singularity scenario in high-T(sub c)H(g)Ba2CuO(4+delta) superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Bal K.; Agrawal, Savitri

    1995-01-01

    The electronic structure and the hole concentrations in the high Tc superconductor HgBa2CuO(4+delta) (delta = O, 1) has been investigated by employing a first principles full potential self-consistent LMTO method with the local density functional theory. The scalar relativistic effects have been considered. The hole concentrations of the Cu-d and O-p(x,y) orbitals are seen to be larger for the HgBaCuO5 system than those of the HgBaCuO4 solid. However, the van Hove singularity (vHs) induced Cu-d and O-p peak which is seen to lie comparatively away and above the Fermi level in the delta = 1 system shifts towards the Fermi level in the delta = 0 system. Thus, the superconducting behavior appears to originate from the occurrence of the vHs peak at the Fermi level. The Fermi surface nesting area in the delta = 0 compound is seen to be larger than in the delta = 1 compound. The calculation reveals that the increase in pressure on the crystal enhances the hole concentrations but without showing any optimum value, On the other hand, the vHs peak approaches to-wards the Fermi level with pressure and crosses the Fermi surface near V/Vo approximately equals 0.625 (V and Vo are the crystal volumes at high and normal pressures, respectively). Our calculated value of the bulk modulus equal to 0.626 Mbar predicts the occurrence of this crossover at about 24 GPa which is in complete agreement with the experimental value. At this pressure the compound has maximum nesting area and self-doped behavior.

  7. Electronic Raman scattering in heavily overdoped (Y,Ca)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limonov, M.; Masui, T.; Uchiyama, H.; Lee, S.; Tajima, S.; Yamanaka, A

    2003-10-15

    In order to get insight into the overdoped electronic state, Raman scattering in heavily overdoped detwinned (Y,Ca)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} crystals (T{sub c}=65 K) has been investigated. In the A{sub 1g} and B{sub 1g} polarizations, the electronic pair-breaking peak is located at nearly the same energy of about 220 cm{sup -1}, in contrast to the polarization dependent position of the peak in optimally doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} O{sub 7-{delta}} crystals. The result is in favor of d + s-pairing symmetry in this overdoped material. The spectra also show the strong superconductivity induced XY-anisotropy in intensity of the pair-breaking peak, which indicates the existence of quantum interference between CuO{sub 2} planes and CuO-chains in this compound.

  8. Low-temperature electronic transport measurements on a gated delta -doped GaAs sample: magnetoresistance, quantum Hall effect and conductivity fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Dötzer, R.; Friedland, K. J.; Hey, R.; Kostial, H; Miehling, H.; Schoepe, Wilfried

    1994-01-01

    We present magnetotransport measurements (up to 7 T) performed at very low temperatures (down to 20 mK) on a GaAs sample containing two parallel delta -doped layers whose carrier concentration can be varied by means of a gate electrode. With increasing negative gate voltage the resistance becomes more strongly temperature-dependent, indicating a more localized electron system. The magnetoresistance is found to be strongly anisotropic. When the field is parallel to the layers we find a large p...

  9. The Impact of Microfinance on Household Welfare in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    education level, household assets and being in paid employment in the ... Poverty is a development problem that Botswana also faces despite being classified as ... the relatively poor people due to high administration costs relative to potential ...

  10. An Analysis of the Stability of Monetary Aggragates in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    work for Botswana, given also the existing trade ties and the exchange rate ... (1) public announcement of medium term numerical targets for inflation; (2) an ... This objective is achieved by using interest rates and open market operations.

  11. Financing poverty programmes in Botswana under fiscal uncertainty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Financing poverty programmes in Botswana under fiscal uncertainty. ... Journal of Social Development in Africa ... on the government and while social programmes have been spared the budget axe, this cannot be guaranteed in the future.

  12. The Textile and Clothing Sector in Botswana: Challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Textile and Clothing Sector in Botswana: Challenges and Opportunities ... South Africa and Swaziland through the SACU Agreement and thus products ...... assistance and value chain support, SME training and offer export support. 6.

  13. The teaching of reading in Botswana Government Primary Shcools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teaching of reading in Botswana Government Primary Shcools. ... and provide students with research-based proven strategies, lack of reading specialists/coaches in the primary schools, the use of only basal series as the primary texts

  14. Implementation of a records management strategy at the Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation of a records management strategy at the Botswana Unified ... and also draws from the project management methodology that was used to guide ... that an approved records management policy covering the whole life cycle of ...

  15. Movement patterns of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in farmlands in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    L. K. Van der Weyde; Hubel, T. Y.; Horgan, J.; J. Shotton; McKenna, R.; Wilson, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Botswana has the second highest population of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with most living outside protected areas. As a result, many cheetahs are found in farming areas which occasionally results in human-wildlife conflict. This study aimed to look at movement patterns of cheetahs in farming environments to determine whether cheetahs have adapted their movements in these human-dominated landscapes. We fitted high-time resolution GPS collars to cheetahs in the Ghanzi farmlands of Botswana. GPS...

  16. Economic accounting of water: The Botswana experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlhogile, T.; Arntzen, J.; Pule, O. B.

    2017-08-01

    Water accounts aim to capture the value of water resources and their use within the economy. The accounts complement the National Accounts as the latter's main indicator (GDP) does not reflect changes in natural capital. Botswana developed water accounts for the period 2010/11-2014/15 using the UN's standard System of Environmental Economic Accounting for water (SEEA-water). The article focuses both on the construction of physical flow accounts as well as on the policy implications for development planning and water resource management through the use of policy indicators. It also shows long-term trends in water abstraction and water use efficiency linking the SEEA water accounts with results of earlier (non-SEEA) water accounting projects in Botswana. The water accounts results show that water abstraction and consumption have been largely stable since 2010/11 despite population (1.9% p.a.) and economic growth (around 5% p.a.) likely due to a combination of water sector reforms and drought conditions in south eastern Botswana; the latter led to the drying up of several dams and the imposition of severe water restrictions. While public attention focuses mostly on water service providers, self-providers (mines and the agricultural sector) account for more than 50% of total water abstracted from the environment of water, demonstrating the need to pay more attention to self-providers in IWRM implementation. Water consumption is highest for the agricultural sector (70.2 Mm3) followed by households and mines at 41.2 and 39 Mm3 respectively in 2014/15. In terms of water use efficiency, value added per m3 has increased in time, showing (some) decoupling of water consumption and economic growth. This positive trend needs to be enhanced in the pursuit of economic diversification, which should focus on growth of water-efficient economic sectors. Finally, per capita water consumption has decreased over time; while this may indicate that people conserve water, it may also point

  17. The Emerging Market for Information Professionals in Botswana, and the Skills Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojedokun, Ayoku A.; Moahi, Kgomotso H.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the status of the emerging market for information professionals in Botswana. The respondents were the Masters graduates from the University of Botswana Library and Information Studies (LIS) program from 1996 to 2003 who are currently employed, and four employing organizations--the University of Botswana (UBL), Botswana…

  18. Hairy Stalagmites, a new biogenic root speleothem from Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard C. Du Preez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ngamiland in northwestern Botswana hosts the Gcwihaba Caves which present unique subterranean environments and host speleothems never before recorded. Cave atmospheric conditions can be extreme with temperatures as high as 28°C and relative humidity nearing 99.9%. Within Dimapo and Diviner’s Caves peculiar root speleothems that we named ‘Hairy Stalagmites’ were found. These stalagmites are closely associated with the roots of Namaqua fig (Ficus cordata trees that enter the cave environment in search of water. Pieces of broken stalagmites were sampled from Dimapo Cave for further investigations. Stereo and electron microscopy revealed that the Hairy Stalagmites consist of multiple intertwined tubes created when thin films of CaCO3 are deposited around fine lateral roots. The importance of the roots is substantiated with evidence of calcified epidermal cells, apical meristems and epidermal imprints. The development of these stalagmites starts when roots accumulate on the cave floor in the vicinity of a water drip and a root nest is created to capture the water. From this point the roots grow upwards (positive hydrotropism allowing the development of the calcite structure, and as CO2 diffusion and evaporation occurs, CaCO3 is deposited. The environmental conditions necessary for the growth of Hairy Stalagmites, as well their developmental mechanism, are discussed and illustrated.

  19. Ultrafast electron relaxation in superconducting Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, L; Loukakos, P A; Lisowski, M; Bovensiepen, U; Eisaki, H; Wolf, M

    2007-11-09

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is employed to study the dynamics of photoexcited electrons in optimally doped Bi{2}Sr{2}CaCu{2}O{8+delta} (Bi-2212). Hot electrons thermalize in less than 50 fs and dissipate their energy on two distinct time scales (110 fs and 2 ps). These are attributed to the generation and subsequent decay of nonequilibrium phonons, respectively. We conclude that 20% of the total lattice modes dominate the coupling strength and estimate the second momentum of the Eliashberg coupling function lambdaOmega{0}{2}=360+/-30 meV{2}. For the typical phonon energy of copper-oxygen bonds (Omega{0} approximately 40-70 meV), this results in an average electron-phonon coupling lambda<0.25.

  20. STIRAP preparation of a coherent superposition of ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ states for an improved electron EDM measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Panda, C D; West, A D; Baron, J; Hess, P W; Hoffman, C; Kirilov, E; Overstreet, C B; West, E P; DeMille, D; Doyle, J M; Gabrielse, G

    2016-01-01

    Experimental searches for the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) probe new physics beyond the Standard Model. The current best EDM limit was set by the ACME Collaboration [Science \\textbf{343}, 269 (2014)], constraining time reversal symmetry ($T$) violating physics at the TeV energy scale. ACME used optical pumping to prepare a coherent superposition of ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ states that have aligned electron spins. Spin precession due to the molecule's internal electric field was measured to extract the EDM. We report here on an improved method for preparing this spin-aligned state of the electron by using STIRAP. We demonstrate a transfer efficiency of $75\\pm5\\%$, representing a significant gain in signal for a next generation EDM experiment. We discuss the particularities of implementing STIRAP in systems such as ours, where molecular ensembles with large phase-space distributions are transfered via weak molecular transitions with limited laser power and limited optical access.

  1. STM studies of the electronic structure of vortex cores in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan; Hudson; Gupta; Ng; Eisaki; Uchida; Davis

    2000-08-14

    We report on low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of the electronic structure of vortex cores in Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O (8+delta). At the vortex core center, an enhanced density of states is observed at energies near Omega = +/-7 meV. Spectroscopic imaging at these energies reveals an exponential decay of these "core states" with a decay length of 22+/-3 A. The fourfold symmetry sometimes predicted for d-wave vortices is not seen in spectroscopic vortex images. A locally nodeless order parameter induced by the magnetic field may be consistent with these measurements.

  2. Percolation and electronic properties of superconducting (YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta. ) sub 1 minus x Ag sub x ceramics and thick films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwir, B.; Pavuna, D.; Affronte, M.; Berger, H. (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland)); Tholence, J.L. (C.R.T.B.T., Grenoble (France))

    1989-09-01

    The authors present the percolation and electronic properties of (Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}){sub 1{minus}x}Ag{sub x} compounds in which silver fills the intergranular space without reducing {Tc}, which remains at 92 {plus minus} 1 K. Normal-state resistivity is decreased by up to two orders of magnitude when adding up to 50 wt.% Ag({Tc} = 87 K), and samples exhibit improved contact resistance, better mechanical properties, and resistance to water. They analyzed the percolation properties of these compounds and found that the critical indices t, s are in agreement with percolation theory, but p{sub c} is higher than expected, probably due to the effect of holes. The J{sub c} estimated from magnetization reaches 5 {center dot} 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} (at T = 4.2 K, H = 0) and shows enhancement of 15-50% by addition of {approximately} 10 wt.% Ag, which exists also in samples having a higher J{sub c} due to preparation conditions (temperature). They present preliminary results on the 2D percolation problem in (Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}){sub 1{minus}x}Ag{sub x} samples, obtained by preparing Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} thick films using the spin-on technique. Preliminary results show good adhesion but a reduced {Tc} of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} films compared with bulk samples.

  3. A case of rhinolithiasis in botswana: a mineralogical, microscopic and chemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Bernard W; van Hasselt, Piet; Wormald, Richard

    2002-12-01

    A case of rhinolithiasis in Southeast Botswana was treated and after removal in hospital, the rhinolith was subjected to macroscopic and microscopic examination, X-ray diffraction analysis, electron microscope analysis and partial botanical analysis. The rhinolith consists of a strongly elliptical core of calcium stearate (C36H70CaO4.H2O), surrounded by approximately 30 elongated concentric growth rings, consisting of sodium-containing whitlockite (Ca18Mg2(Na,H)(PO4)14). The different layers have various degrees of porosity and red staining, probably due to traces of amorphous iron oxide. The origin of the rhinolith started with a piece of plant material, lodged in the nose, which was replaced by calcium stearate, leaving some remnants of resistant epidermal plant tissue. During subsequent years, thin layers of whitlockite were deposited periodically around the core with the reddish brown bands representing deposition during the dry season when atmospheric dust rich in amorphous iron oxide is at its highest in Botswana.

  4. Observational $\\Delta\

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, Antonio García; Monteiro, Mário J P F G; Suárez, Juan Carlos; Reese, Daniel R; Pascual-Granado, Javier; Garrido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Delta Scuti ($\\delta$ Sct) stars are intermediate-mass pulsators, whose intrinsic oscillations have been studied for decades. However, modelling their pulsations remains a real theoretical challenge, thereby even hampering the precise determination of global stellar parameters. In this work, we used space photometry observations of eclipsing binaries with a $\\delta$ Sct component to obtain reliable physical parameters and oscillation frequencies. Using that information, we derived an observational scaling relation between the stellar mean density and a frequency pattern in the oscillation spectrum. This pattern is analogous to the solar-like large separation but in the low order regime. We also show that this relation is independent of the rotation rate. These findings open the possibility of accurately characterizing this type of pulsator and validate the frequency pattern as a new observable for $\\delta$ Sct stars.

  5. Electronic standing waves on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vershinin, M.; Misra, S.; Abe, Y.; Ono, S.; Ando, Y.; Yazdani, A

    2004-08-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements have shown that electronic states at the surface of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} single crystals form standing wave patterns at temperatures far below the superconducting transition. It has been shown that these patterns are consistent with those expected from the interference of well-defined quasi-particles around the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} Fermi surface. We have extended STM measurements of these standing wave patterns to higher temperatures and have found that four unit-cell periodicity patterns observed in the superconducting state persist well above T{sub C}, in the pseudogap state. In this regime, many different experimental studies of the cuprates have long claimed the absence of well-defined quasi-particles. If the pseudogap regime is indeed devoid of any coherent quasi-particles then our results suggest that other phenomena, such as stripe formation, must play a role in formation of these patterns.

  6. Electronic structure of {delta}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} with oxygen vacancy: ab initio calculations and comparison with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Maxim V.; Perevalov, Timofey V.; Aliev, Vladimir S.; Gritsenko, Vladimir A. [A. V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Kaichev, Vasily V. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Electronic structure of oxygen vacancies in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been studied theoretically by first-principles calculations and experimentally by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Calculations of {delta}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} were performed using density functional theory within gradient-corrected approximation with the +U approach. Results indicate that the oxygen vacancy causes a defect level in the energy gap at 1.2 eV above the top of the valence band. To produce oxygen vacancies, amorphous films of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} were bombarded with Ar{sup +} ions. XPS results indicate that the Ar-ion bombardment leads to the generation of the oxygen vacancies in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} that characterize the peak at 2 eV above the valence band. The calculated spectrum of crystalline {delta}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} demonstrates qualitative correspondence with the XPS spectrum of the amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film after Ar-ion bombardment.

  7. Site-specific electronic structure of Pr in $Pr_{1+x} Ba_{2-x} Cu _{3} O_{7-} \\delta$

    CERN Document Server

    Staub, U; O'Conner, A G; Kramer, M J; Knapp, M

    2001-01-01

    We report on resonant X-ray powder-diffraction measurements in the vicinity of the Pr L/sub 3/ absorption edge of Pr/sub 1+x/Ba/sub 2-x /Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7- delta /. The Pr site occupation has been accurately determined: 6+or-2% of the Pr is on the Ba site. From an analysis of the energy dependence of selected Bragg reflections, the site-specific oxidation state of Pr has been obtained. These results are discussed in the context of models describing the suppression of superconductivity by Pr, and they indicate that Pr on the R site is responsible for T/sub c/ suppression. (34 refs).

  8. "Doing Identity" in the Botswana Classroom: Negotiating Gendered Institutional Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on post-structural and post-colonial conceptions of gender, this paper explores multiple student masculinities and femininities in the classrooms of four junior secondary schools in Botswana. These gendered identities, it is argued, are negotiated within broader institutional constraints that have been socio-historically produced. Such…

  9. Botswana's Beef Global Commodity Chain: Explaining the Resistance to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    In an era of increasing global agricultural trade, many firms and farms seek to upgrade their agricultural commodity chains to become better integrated into global markets. Utilizing a global commodity chain (GCC) approach, this analysis unravels the challenges to and the potential consequences of upgrading Botswana's beef commodity chain.…

  10. Botswana English: Implications for English Language Teaching and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Modupe

    2011-01-01

    Concerted efforts to characterise Botswana English (BE), though still referred to as "a variety in development", have validated its existence. However, the teaching and assessment of English in the high schools do not seem to have responded to the development of this variety. This paper discusses the viability of using Standard British…

  11. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-07

    May 7, 2013 ... procedures in the two general referral government hospitals ... Out of 508 death records audited during 2008 by the first ... these situations and saving more persons' lives in Botswana. ... based on the literature review. The interview schedule's first section's closed-ended questions requested biographic.

  12. Reproductive Health and the Question of Abortion in Botswana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    abortion leads some women to seek clandestine procedures, or alternatively, to carry the fetus ... This article constitutes a review of the abortion issue in Botswana based on my ... not punitive laws, present the greatest barriers to women seeking to terminate an unwanted ... familial pressures, or because abortion on request.

  13. Health and Dietary Patterns of the Elderly in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruapula, Segametsi; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe associations among socioeconomic conditions and dietary patterns of Botswana elderly. Design: Secondary analysis from a cross-sectional nationwide survey. Participants: Subjects (N = 1086, 60-99 years old) were selected after multistage sampling. Main Outcome Measures: Dietary patterns were dependent variables; health and…

  14. A Critique of Botswana's Language Policy from a Translanguaging Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwasi, Mompoloki Mmangaka

    2017-01-01

    This paper critiques the language practices and language-in-education policy of Botswana from a translanguaging perspective. By so doing, it revisits our commonly held perceptions about multilingualism, bilingualism and language and its boundary. We commonly perceive languages as autonomous and as having boundaries and we perceive bilingualism or…

  15. Adult Literacy Education in Botswana: Planning between Reproduction and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruatona, Tonic

    2004-01-01

    This article explores how planning the Botswana National Literacy Programme aided the state in maintaining its power and control over the past two decades. Using critical educational theory as the theoretical framework, it demonstrates how the planning of literacy education promotes conventional views of literacy and perpetuates state hegemony. It…

  16. Radio Broadcasting for Adult Nonformal Environmental Education in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, Juma E.

    1995-01-01

    Radio broadcasting is used in Botswana to inform, teach, and persuade adults about issues in agriculture, health, wildlife, conservation, and other areas. However, open broadcasting is not an effective nonformal education tool. Active and guided group listening to radio enables discussion and feedback. (SK)

  17. Micro Language Planning and Cultural Renaissance in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Modupe M.

    2016-01-01

    Many African countries exhibit complex patterns of language use because of linguistic pluralism. The situation is often compounded by the presence of at least one foreign language that is either the official or second language. The language situation in Botswana depicts this complex pattern. Out of the 26 languages spoken in the country, including…

  18. Albinism in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools: A Double Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Gareth; Nkanotsang, Tiroyaone; Chizwe, Ose; Kowa, Lily

    2010-01-01

    Pupils with albinism potentially face a number of challenges in accessing quality education in schools in Botswana. Physical issues such as poor eyesight related to the condition and the problems of sensitive skin in such a dry and warm climate are both contributing factors to making learning problematic for some pupils. This study by Gareth Dart…

  19. Botswana's Beef Global Commodity Chain: Explaining the Resistance to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    In an era of increasing global agricultural trade, many firms and farms seek to upgrade their agricultural commodity chains to become better integrated into global markets. Utilizing a global commodity chain (GCC) approach, this analysis unravels the challenges to and the potential consequences of upgrading Botswana's beef commodity chain.…

  20. Learning with a Website for the Textile Industry in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbambo, Buhle; Cronje, Johannes C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a locally initiated investigation into the suitability of the Internet in helping to meet the information needs of women in small, medium, and micro enterprises (SMMEs) in the textile industry in Botswana. The background is the stated government policy to encourage the development of SMMEs and the Internet infrastructure. The…

  1. Delta Electroproduction in 12-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven McLauchlan

    2003-01-31

    The Delta-nucleus potential is a crucial element in the understanding of the nuclear system. Previous electroexcitation measurements in the delta region reported a Q2 dependence of the delta mass indicating that this potential is dependent on the momentum of the delta. Such a dependence is not observed for protons and neutrons in the nuclear medium. This thesis presents the experimental study of the electroexcitation of the delta resonance in 12C, performed using the high energy electron beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and the near 4(pie) acceptance detector CLAS that enables the detection of the full reaction final state. Inclusive, semi inclusive, and exclusive cross sections were measured with an incident electron beam energy of 1.162GeV over the Q2 range 0.175-0.475 (GeV/c)2. A Q2 dependence of the delta mass was only observed in the exclusive measurements indicating that the delta-nucleus potential is affected by the momentum of the delta.

  2. The Okavango: Whose Delta is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magole, Lapologang; Magole, Lefatshe Innocent

    The Okavango Delta is amongst the largest Ramsar sites ( http://www.ramsar.org/sitelist.pdf) in the world and an important wetland for community livelihoods, conservation and tourism in Botswana. Over the years, the utilization of the delta has shifted from communal use to state control, with an increased use for conservation and tourism. This increased use for conservation and tourism has manifested in the physical expansion of the conservation area - Moremi Game Reserve and the formation of Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) around the reserve, whose primary land use is wildlife utilization. The expansion of the conservation area has translated into several practical matters, including expansion of the area for non-hunting activities or photographic areas. The livelihoods of local communities of the Okavango delta who depended on fishing, hunter-gathering, livestock rearing, rain-fed agriculture and flood recession farming have been negatively affected by the expansion of conservation and tourism in the delta. The livelihoods alternatives in the form of Community Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) and tourism have not provided substitutes for the people as the communities are still reliant on the same old livelihood sources as in the past, albeit within smaller and restricted areas. This paper explores the ownership of the natural resources within the Okavango Delta. It asks and attempts to answer the following questions: Who owns and controls the use of the land? Who has access to other resources there in? Who makes the decisions on how the delta resources should be managed and used? Who benefits from the delta resources? We argue firstly that ownership of the delta as defined by legal parameters and demonstrated in natural resource management practice is vested on government. Secondly, government, after assuming ownership of the delta continues to sell its stake to the international community, at the expense of local ownership and access to resources. We

  3. Delta robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, J.L.; Van der Wijk, V.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a delta robot comprising a stationary base (2) and a movable platform (3) that is connected to the base with three chains of links (4,5,6), and comprising a balancing system incorporating at least one pantograph (7) for balancing the robot's center of mass, wherein the at le

  4. Delta robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, J.L.; Van der Wijk, V.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a delta robot comprising a stationary base (2) and a movable platform (3) that is connected to the base with three chains of links (4,5,6), and comprising a balancing system incorporating at least one pantograph (7) for balancing the robot's center of mass, wherein the at le

  5. Deformation characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.Y., E-mail: haiyanzhang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, S.H., E-mail: shzhang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Cheng, M. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Z.X. [Beijing Institute of Aeronautica1 Materials, Beijing 100095 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The hot working characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy during isothermal compression deformation at temperature of 950 deg. C and strain rate of 0.005 s{sup -1}, were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and quantitative X-ray diffraction technique. The results showed that the dissolution of plate-like {delta} phase and the precipitation of spherical {delta} phase particles coexisted during the deformation, and the content of {delta} phase decreased from 7.05 wt.% to 5.14 wt.%. As a result of deformation breakage and dissolution breakage, the plate-like {delta} phase was spheroidized and transferred to spherical {delta} phase particles. In the center with largest strain, the plate-like {delta} phase disappeared and spherical {delta} phase appeared in the interior of grains and grain boundaries.

  6. Behavioral Response to Plastic Bag Legislation in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of charges and standards in dealing with a common externality, plastic litter from shopping bags in Botswana. The country passed a plastic bag tax (effective 2007) to curb the plastic bag demand. Interestingly, the legislation did not force retailers to charge for plastic bags, which they did voluntarily at different prices. We assessed the environmental effectiveness and efficiency of the plastic bag legislation by analyzing consumers’ sensitivity to the impro...

  7. Diamonds and sustainable growth : The success story of Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Hilldén, Joakim; Mesterton, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies have confirmed a statistically significant negative relationship between natural resource abundance and economic growth. This has been labeled “The Resource Curse”. In this paper we try to explain why Botswana, a country heavily dependent on its diamond industry, has managed to generate sustainable growth. Economists have advanced several explanations for the negative impact of natural resources on long-term growth. This paper focuses on the following important problems: Firs...

  8. Obstacles to labour companionship at Bamalete Lutheran hospital Ramotswa : Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Cur. Obstacles to labour companionship at Bamalete Lutheran Hospital (BLH) in Botswana are discussed. There is an underutilization of labour companionship in the BLH maternity ward despite several efforts that have been made to introduce labour companionship. Labour companionship is a rare exception in the BLH labour ward. Why is labour companionship underutilized at Bamalete Lutheran Hospital and what could be done to promote labour companions? An explorative, descriptive, qualitative, ...

  9. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of {sigma} plutonium alloys. Contribution to the study of the 5f electrons localization in the plutonium; Mesure de la susceptibilite magnetique d`alliages de plutonium en phase delta. Contribution a l`etude de la localisation des electrons 5f dans le plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot-Reymond, S

    1996-12-31

    Physical properties of actinide metals are essentially ruled by the 5f electrons localization. From a theoretically point of view, this localization is more important in the {delta}-phase than in the {alpha}-one. To compare their magnetic behaviour, low temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements have been performed and previous-resistivity data have been analysed. Experimental results and theoretical data can be conciliate by the existence of a Kondo effect in the {delta}-Pu phase. (author) 63 refs.

  10. What is $\\Delta m^2_{ee}$ ?

    CERN Document Server

    Parke, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The current short baseline reactor experiments, Daya Bay and RENO (Double Chooz) have measured (or are capable of measuring) an effective $\\Delta m^2$ associated with the atmospheric oscillation scale of 0.5 km/MeV in electron anti-neutrino disappearance. In this paper, I compare and contrast the different definitions of such an effective $\\Delta m^2$ and argue that the simple, L/E independent, definition given by $\\Delta m^2_{ee} \\equiv \\cos^2 \\theta_{12} \\Delta m^2_{31}+ \\sin^2 \\theta_{12} \\Delta m^2_{32}$, i.e. "the $\

  11. Understanding human resource management practices in Botswana's public health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna Stannie; Gauld, Robin; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2016-11-21

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the management of the public sector health workforce in Botswana. Using institutional frameworks it aims to document and analyse human resource management (HRM) practices, and make recommendations to improve employee and health system outcomes. Design/methodology/approach The paper draws from a large study that used a mixed methods approach to assess performance of Botswana's Ministry of Health (MOH). It uses data collected through document analysis and in-depth interviews of 54 key informants comprising policy makers, senior staff of the MOH and its stakeholder organizations. Findings Public health sector HRM in Botswana has experienced inadequate planning, poor deployment and underutilization of staff. Lack of comprehensive retention strategies and poor working conditions contributed to the failure to attract and retain skilled personnel. Relationships with both formal and informal environments affected HRM performance. Research limitations/implications While document review was a major source of data for this paper, the weaknesses in the human resource information system limited availability of data. Practical implications This paper presents an argument for the need for consideration of formal and informal environments in developing effective HRM strategies. Originality/value This research provides a rare system-wide approach to health HRM in a Sub-Saharan African country. It contributes to the literature and evidence needed to guide HRM policy decisions and practices.

  12. CURRENT STATUS, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES OF RABBIT PRODUCTION IN BOTSWANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. MOREKI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the current status of rabbit production, challenges facing the industry and opportunities available. Rabbit farming in Botswana is in its infancy and the rabbit population is estimated to be less than 1000. However, this value is a gross underestimate due to poor monitoring by government extension services. In Botswana, rabbits are mainly kept in the backyards, indicating that intensive systems have not yet been developed. Rabbits have small body size, short gestation period, high reproductive potential, rapid growth rate and ability to utilize forages. Compared to beef, chicken, mutton, chevon and chicken, rabbit meat has low cholesterol, high protein and low fat contents. Rabbit production can be integrated into small farming systems, with the rabbits being fed on crop residues, weeds, poultry droppings, and kitchen and garden wastes. The manure can be used to fertilize soils. The major challenges in rabbit production are inadequacy of breeding stock, inadequate rabbit feeds, poor management (feeding, housing and health care, lack of research support, lack of technical support from extension services, lack of access to credit and inadequate supply of equipment. The major opportunity available to the rearers is that the market is vast due to the small rabbit population in the country. The attributes of rabbits suggest that rabbit farming is likely to play an important role in nutrition, poverty alleviation and food security, especially in countries with higher unemployment levels and HIV/AIDS prevalence rates such as Botswana.

  13. Predicting Intentions to Seek Psychological Help Among Botswana University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho M. Pheko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study had two main objectives. The first was to investigate Botswana’s university students’ intentions to seek psychological help. The second was to investigate whether (a Attitude Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help (ATSPPH, (b Self-Stigma of Seeking Help (SSOSH, and (c Social Stigma of Receiving Psychological Help (SSRPH predicted the students’ intentions to seek psychological help. A total of N = 519 (283 females and 236 males students from the University of Botswana completed the survey. Results indicated that generally, the students had moderate intentions of seeking psychological help. Multiple regression analysis revealed that of the three predictors, only ATSPPH and SSRPH significantly predicted intentions to seek psychological help. The current study is important because while it has been established that university students are a high-risk population for mental health problems, there is close to nothing documented on university students in Botswana. Findings of the current study will undoubtedly increase knowledge relating to psychological help-seeking and its predictors in Botswana and may inform interventions that aim to encourage young people to seek psychological or counseling help.

  14. Foreign Direct Investment – The Case of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Lindelwa Makoni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out to analyse the occurrence of foreign direct investment (FDI in Botswana. Diamonds contribute more than 50% of Botswana’s gross domestic product (GDP, hence economic growth and development focus has been on the mining sector. The country’s other sectors of tourism, agriculture, financial services and manufacturing have not received as much support from the Government, private sector and even international investors. This article briefly examines FDI inflow trends and the country’s national economic-building policies which the Government has put in place to diversify its economy from the current export-oriented, diamond mining economy. A country-specific case study approach was adopted. The results yielded show that Botswana is overly dependent on export earnings from diamonds. This leaves the country vulnerable to external global economic shocks. Given that diamonds are a natural resource with a limited lifespan, the Government of Botswana needs to draw up investor-friendly policies to attract FDI inflows to expand its economic base. International capital inflows would complement domestic savings and further boost employment and trade opportunities in the country.

  15. Integrating policy, disintegrating practice: water resources management in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatuk, Larry A.; Rahm, Dianne

    Botswana is generally regarded as an African ‘success story’. Nearly four decades of unabated economic growth, multi-party democracy, conservative decision-making and low-levels of corruption have made Botswana the darling of the international donor community. One consequence of rapid and sustained economic development is that water resources use and demands have risen dramatically in a primarily arid/semi-arid environment. Policy makers recognize that supply is limited and that deliberate steps must be taken to manage demand. To this end, and in line with other members of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), Botswana devised a National Water Master Plan (NWMP) and undertook a series of institutional and legal reforms throughout the 1990s so as to make water resources use more equitable, efficient and sustainable. In other words, the stated goal is to work toward Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in both policy and practice. However, policy measures have had limited impact on de facto practice. This paper reflects our efforts to understand the disjuncture between policy and practice. The information presented here combines a review of primary and secondary literatures with key informant interviews. It is our view that a number of constraints-cultural, power political, managerial-combine to hinder efforts toward sustainable forms of water resources use. If IWRM is to be realized in the country, these constraints must be overcome. This, however, is no small task.

  16. Lifelong Learning and the Pursuit of a Vision for Sustainable Development in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruatona, Tonic

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses Botswana's commitment to lifelong learning policy and discusses how it can help the state achieve its vision for sustainable development. First, it argues that while Botswana is renowned for its economic success, it still fails to address positively such traditional challenges as poverty, unemployment and income inequality,…

  17. Pragmatizing Democratic Education in Botswana through Business Education: Countering the Scourge of the Diploma Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotia, Agreement Lathi; Sithole, Burman Musa

    2016-01-01

    Meaningful and emancipatory education which empowers citizens as democrats is the ideal education which can propel the socio-economic and political fibre of nay nation-state. After independence, Botswana aligned her education system with the envisioned development process. The sad thing about this ambitious approach in Botswana is that it sought…

  18. Aids Eestis nagu Botswanas / Mikk Jürisson ; interv. Svea Talving

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jürisson, Mikk, 1963-

    2004-01-01

    Kui Eesti ei taha jõuda olukorda, mis tekkis Botswanas, kus aidsiepideemia ravi ja tõkestamine haaras lõviosa riigi tuludest ning keskmine eluiga lühenes drastiliselt, tuleks haiguse levik võtta range tähelepanu alla ja uurida, mida tasuks õppida Botswana kogemusest

  19. Parental Involvement and Expectations of Children's Academic Achievement Goals in Botswana: Parent's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kgosidialwa, Keinyatse T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the school related activities that parents in Botswana engage in with their children. The study also examined how parents in Botswana perceive their involvement and expectations of their children's academic achievement goals. Sixteen parents (15 females and 1 male) who had children in standards five, six, or seven participated…

  20. Aids Eestis nagu Botswanas / Mikk Jürisson ; interv. Svea Talving

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jürisson, Mikk, 1963-

    2004-01-01

    Kui Eesti ei taha jõuda olukorda, mis tekkis Botswanas, kus aidsiepideemia ravi ja tõkestamine haaras lõviosa riigi tuludest ning keskmine eluiga lühenes drastiliselt, tuleks haiguse levik võtta range tähelepanu alla ja uurida, mida tasuks õppida Botswana kogemusest

  1. Using System Dynamics to model the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Botswana and Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howell, R.; Wesselink, O.; Pruyt, E.

    2013-01-01

    Uganda and Botswana present two interesting and contrasting cases in the AIDS epidemic. System dynamics models of the AIDS epidemic in Botswana and Uganda were created to examine the future development of the virus in both countries and evaluate existing and future policy measures. The effect of exi

  2. Identification of new isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis using rep-PCR products and delta-endotoxin electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.G. Lima

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PCR has been used to analyze the distribution of REP (Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic and ERIC (Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus sequences (rep-PCR found within the genome of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, with the purpose to analyze the genetic similarities among 56 subspecies samples and 95 field isolates. The PCR products were analyzed by EB-AGE (ethidium bromide-agarose electrophoresis and then submitted to banding comparisons, based on the Phyllip software algorithm. When the banding similarities were considered for comparison purposes among all the strains, the phylogenic tree patterns varied according to the rep-PCR primers considered, but, from a broader point of view, the ERIC sequences produced better results, which, together with electron microscopy analysis of the released parasporal bodies and colony morphology characteristics, allowed to detect two possible new subspecies of B. thuringiensis.

  3. Structural, electronic and flux dynamics of Gd(Ba2-xPrxCu3O7+& delta superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Mohammadizadeh and M Akhavan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available   The Gd(Ba2-xPrxCu3O single phase polycrystalline samples with 0.00 ≤ x ≤ 1.00 were investigated for structural, electronic and flux dynamic properties. An unusual hump on the resistivity vs. temperature curve of the samples has been observed for particular values of Pr doping. We have found that the Ba atom substitution at the rare earth site could lead to superconductivity in some parts of the grains at Tm~80-90K, which appears as a hump on the (T curve. For all the samples, the two-dimensional variable range hopping (VRH is a dominant conduction mechanism in the normal state. The Pr doping strongly localizes the carriers in the normal state, and finally causes the suppression of superconductivity. The effect of Pr substitution in 123 structure of HTSC at R or Ba site is to increase the pseudo gap temperature Ts, although, Pr at Ba site has a stronger effect on the increase of Ts and suppression of superconductivity. We have also extracted the two dimensionality aspects of HTSC through the similarities between superconductors, two-dimensional electron gas (2D-EG i.e., MOSFETs, and the ultra thin films of conventional superconductors. The magneto resistance of the samples have been studied within thermally activated flux creep and the Ambegaokar and Halperin phase slip models. The derived critical current density, Hc2(T, Hc2(0, and superconducting coherence length show that the Pr- doping, like weak links, decreases the vortex flux pinning energy. Our results imply that understanding the real suppression mechanism of superconductivity by Pr doping in HTSC is connected unavoidably to determination of the exact position of Pr in the structure.

  4. Accurate measurement of electron beam polarization using Compton effect at TJNAF for the experiments G{sup p}{sub E} and N-{delta}; Mesure precise de la polarisation du faisceau d'electrons a TJNAF par polarimetrie compton pour les experiences G{sup p}{sub E} et N-{delta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escoffier, St

    2001-10-01

    This work deals with electron beam polarization measurements using Compton effect at TJNAF, for experiments of the proton electromagnetic form factors measurement and for nucleon response functions determination in the pion electroproduction reaction near the {delta}(1232) region. The Compton polarimeter, whose principle is built on elastic electron-photon scattering, was designed and built around a high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity (finesse = 25000). The incident Nd:YAG laser power is amplified by an optical cavity which provides a luminosity such as the statistical uncertainty on the electron polarization measurement is at the level of 1% in one hour. Using Pound-Drever method, laser frequency is locked on one of interferometer resonance frequencies. Circularly photon polarization inside the optical cavity was measured to be 99.6+/-0.45%. The electron beam polarization is deduced from the measurements of the photon polarization, experimental asymmetry and analysing power of our detector. The analysing power is determined by a measurement of the response function of the photon detector, composed of 25 PbWO{sub 4} crystals, thanks to coincidence events detected with the electron detector made up of 4 plans of 48 silicon strips. Measurement uncertainties come meanly from detector's response function modelling, pile up effect and photon beam polarization. Total relative uncertainty on the electron beam polarization measurement is about 1.4% for 40 minutes data taking. Moreover, the Compton polarimeter allows to estimate the electron helicity difference between two polarization reversals. This effect was found compatible with zero at 0.3%. (author)

  5. Mineralogical and particulate morphological characterization of geophagic clayey soils from Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges-Ivo Ekosse

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on determining the minerals composition and particle morphology of geophagic clayey soils from Botswana in order to infer on how they could influence human health. Six representative geophagic clayey soils from Botswana were mineralogically characterized using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD, optical microscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. Results of identified mineral phases revealed quartz (SiO2 as the most dominant in all samples constituting close to 70 wt %; followed by goethite (FeO.OH having a mean concentration of 9 wt%, and kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH4 with a mean concentration of 8 wt%. Other minerals present were smectite ((Na,Ca(Al,Mg6(Si4O103(OH6-n(H2O, mica (AB2-3(Al,SiSi3O10(F,OH2, feldspar (Na/K(AlSi3O8 and hematite (Fe2O3. The quartz particles were generally coarse; and angular to very angular in morphology. Due to ions present in goethite, kaolinite, and smectite, these minerals impact positively on properties of geophagic clayey soils and could possibly influence human health when consumed. The quartz particles could negatively affect dental enamel as a result of mastication; and cause abrasion of the walls of the gastro-intestinal tract which may lead to rupturing. Although the studied clayey soils could have potential to provide medicinal benefits to the consumer, there is need for beneficiation exercise to be conducted to reduce the coarse angular particles contained in them. It is therefore necessary for constructive efforts to be directed at beneficiating geophagic materials which will render them safe for human consumption.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i3.6

  6. Investigations of the electron phase space dynamics in triggered whistler wave emissions using low noise \\delta f method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xin; Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of the electron phase space structures during excitation of a triggered emission is investigated using the nonlinear δ f method. Previous studies suggested that the dynamics of phase space structures due to nonlinear wave particle interactions is critical to the excitation of triggered emissions with frequency chirping. We introduce the use of the nonlinear δ f method to simulate triggered emissions. Compared with full-f particle-in-cell method, the nonlinear δ f method significantly reduces numerical noise, therefore making the phase space structures more identifiable. Specific to the simulation of triggered emissions, the nonlinear δ f method also does not show numerical distortion of the distribution function due to reflecting particle boundary conditions. Using the nonlinear δ f method, we show that during the main portion of the chirping element, the phase space structure roughly maintains a shape so that the resonant island moves a distance in phase space that is on the same order as its width during one phase space bounce period of deeply trapped particles, supporting that the interaction is non-adiabatic. We also demonstrate the disappearance of the phase space structure near the end of the chirping. Our work suggests that the nonlinear δ f method could be very useful for the study of excitation of triggered emissions and to understand the mechanism of frequency chirping.

  7. The geography of HIV/AIDS prevalence rates in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandala NB

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ngianga-Bakwin Kandala,1 Eugene K Campbell,2 Serai Dan Rakgoasi,2 Banyana C Madi-Segwagwe,3 Thabo T Fako41University of Warwick, Warwick Medical School, Division of Health Sciences; Populations, Evidence and Technologies Group, Warwick Evidence, Coventry, UK; 2Department of Population Studies, University of Botswana, 3SADC Secretariat, Directorate of Social and Human Development and Special Programmes, 4Vice Chancellor's Office, University of Botswana, Gaborone, BotswanaBackground: Botswana has the second-highest human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection rate in the world, with one in three adults infected. However, there is significant geographic variation at the district level and HIV prevalence is heterogeneous with the highest prevalence recorded in Selebi-Phikwe and North East. There is a lack of age-and location-adjusted prevalence maps that could be used for targeting HIV educational programs and efficient allocation of resources to higher risk groups.Methods: We used a nationally representative household survey to investigate and explain district level inequalities in HIV rates. A Bayesian geoadditive mixed model based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques was applied to map the geographic distribution of HIV prevalence in the 26 districts, accounting simultaneously for individual, household, and area factors using the 2008 Botswana HIV Impact Survey.Results: Overall, HIV prevalence was 17.6%, which was higher among females (20.4% than males (14.3%. HIV prevalence was higher in cities and towns (20.3% than in urban villages and rural areas (16.6% and 16.9%, respectively. We also observed an inverse U-shape association between age and prevalence of HIV, which had a different pattern in males and females. HIV prevalence was lowest among those aged 24 years or less and HIV affected over a third of those aged 25–35 years, before reaching a peak among the 36–49-year age group, after which the rate of HIV infection decreased by more

  8. Improved two-dimensional electron mobility in asymmetric barrier delta-doped GaAs/AlGaAs modulation-doped field-effect transistor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudhakar; Mohapatra, Meryleen; Nayak, Rasmita K.; Panda, Ajit K.; Sahu, Trinath

    2017-03-01

    We study the enhancement of electron mobility μ in barrier delta-doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum-well-based modulation-doped field-effect transistor (MODFET) structures. We asymmetrically vary the doping concentrations N d1 and N d2 in the barriers on the substrate and surface sides, respectively, to obtain a nonlinear enhancement of μ as a function of the well width w through multi-subband effects. We show that an increase in doping concentration increases the surface electron density N s, which in turn enhances μ. Interchanging N d1 and N d2 leads to no change in N s but rather, an enhancement of μ as a function of w for N d2 > N d1 owing to asymmetric variation of subband wave functions, thereby implying a higher channel conductivity in a surface-doped structure than in an inverted doped structure. By keeping (N d1 + N d2) unchanged, the conductivity of a single-channel MODFET, N d1 (N d2) ≠ 0 and N d2 (N d1) = 0, can be enhanced by considering a MODFET based on an asymmetrically doped (N d1 ≠ N d2 ≠ 0) quantum well structure. We show that the highest N s and μ product for these structures occurs almost before the onset of the occupation of the second subband. Our analysis of the effect of asymmetric doping profiles on channel conductivity can be utilized for the performance improvement of MODFET-like devices.

  9. Electronic structure of delta-doped La:SrTiO{sub 3} layers by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, A. M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Peter-Gruenberg-Institut PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Gray, A. X. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Conti, G.; Fadley, C. S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Jalan, B. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Kajdos, A. P.; Stemmer, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Gloskovskii, A. [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Ueda, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Kobayashi, K. [NIMS Beamline Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Drube, W. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-06-25

    We have employed hard x-ray photoemission (HAXPES) to study a delta-doped SrTiO{sub 3} layer that consisted of a 3-nm thickness of La-doped SrTiO{sub 3} with 6% La embedded in a SrTiO{sub 3} film. Results are compared to a thick, uniformily doped La:SrTiO{sub 3} layer. We find no indication of a band offset for the delta-doped layer, but evidence of the presence of Ti{sup 3+} in both the thick sample and the delta-layer, and indications of a density of states increase near the Fermi energy in the delta-doped layer. These results further demonstrate that HAXPES is a powerful tool for the non-destructive investigation of deeply buried doped layers.

  10. Interface structure and electronic properties of SrTiO{sub 3} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} crystals and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiess, S.

    2007-07-01

    Two new extensions of the X-ray standing wave (XSW) technique, made possible by the intense highly collimated X-ray beams from undulators at the ESRF, are described in this thesis. First, the XSW method was applied in a structural study to solve the nucleation mechanism of the high temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} on the (001) surface of SrTiO{sub 3}. Second, the valence electronic structures of SrTiO{sub 3} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were investigated. Finally, recent developments in the field of photoelectron spectroscopy in the hard X-ray region are described. The X-ray standing wave method is used in combination with fluorescence, Auger or photoelectron spectroscopy and lends very high spatial resolution power to these analytical techniques. Previously, the XSW method has been used for structure determination of surfaces and interfaces. The currently available X-ray intensities permit extensions to the XSW technique. Two recently established applications, described in this thesis, are XSW real space imaging and XSW valence electronic structure analysis. XSW real space imaging was employed to analyse the atomic structure of 0.5 and 1.0 layers of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} deposited on SrTiO{sub 3}(001). Three-dimensional images of the atomic distributions were reconstructed for each of the elements from experimentally determined Fourier components of the atomic distribution functions. The images confirmed the formation of a perovskite precursor phase prior to the formation of the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} phase during the growth of the first monolayer of the film. XSW valence electronic structure analysis applied to SrTiO{sub 3} identified the valence band contributions arising from the strontium, titanium, and oxygen sites of the crystal lattice. Relations between the site-specific valence electronic structure and the lattice structure were established. The experimental results agree very well with

  11. Hazardous and toxic waste management in Botswana: practices and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmereki, Daniel; Li, Baizhan; Meng, Liu

    2014-12-01

    Hazardous and toxic waste is a complex waste category because of its inherent chemical and physical characteristics. It demands for environmentally sound technologies and know-how as well as clean technologies that simultaneously manage and dispose it in an environmentally friendly way. Nevertheless, Botswana lacks a system covering all the critical steps from importation to final disposal or processing of hazardous and toxic waste owing to limited follow-up of the sources and types of hazardous and toxic waste, lack of modern and specialised treatment/disposal facilities, technical know-how, technically skilled manpower, funds and capabilities of local institutions to take lead in waste management. Therefore, because of a lack of an integrated system, there are challenges such as lack of cooperation among all the stakeholders about the safe management of hazardous and toxic waste. Furthermore, Botswana does not have a systematic regulatory framework regarding monitoring and hazardous and toxic waste management. In addition to the absence of a systematic regulatory framework, inadequate public awareness and dissemination of information about hazardous and toxic waste management, slower progress to phase-out persistent and bio-accumulative waste, and lack of reliable and accurate information on hazardous and toxic waste generation, sources and composition have caused critical challenges to effective hazardous and toxic waste management. It is, therefore, important to examine the status of hazardous and toxic waste as a waste stream in Botswana. By default; this mini-review article presents an overview of the current status of hazardous and toxic waste management and introduces the main challenges in hazardous and toxic waste management. Moreover, the article proposes the best applicable strategies to achieve effective hazardous and toxic waste management in the future. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Conservation implications of brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea population densities and distribution across landscapes in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan W. Winterbach

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea is endemic to southern Africa. The largest population of this near-threatened species occurs in Botswana, but limited data were available to assess distribution and density. Our objectives were to use a stratified approach to collate available data and to collect more data to assess brown hyaena distribution and density across land uses in Botswana. We conducted surveys using track counts, camera traps and questionnaires and collated our results and available data to estimate the brown hyaena population based on the stratification of Botswana for large carnivores. Brown hyaenas occur over 533 050 km² (92% of Botswana. Our density estimates ranged from 0 brown hyaenas/100 km² in strata of northern Botswana to 2.94 (2.16–3.71 brown hyaenas/100 km² in the southern stratum of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. We made assumptions regarding densities in strata that lacked data, using the best references available. We estimated the brown hyaena population in Botswana as 4642 (3133–5993 animals, with 6.8% of the population in the Northern Conservation Zone, 73.1% in the Southern Conservation Zone, 2.0% in the smaller conservation zones and 18.1% in the agricultural zones. The similar densities of brown hyaenas in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve and the Ghanzi farms highlight the potential of agricultural areas in Botswana to conserve this species. The conservation of brown hyaenas in the agricultural landscape of Botswana is critical for the long-term conservation of the species; these areas provide important links between populations in South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe.Conservation implications: Botswana contains the core of the brown hyaena population in southern Africa, and conflict mitigation on agricultural land is crucial to maintaining connectivity among the range countries.

  13. Terrestrial Water Storage from GRACE and Satellite Altimetry in the Okavango Delta (Botswana)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Krogh, Pernille Engelbredt; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    New technology can for the first time enable the accurate retrieval of the global and regional water budgets from space-borne and ground-based gravity surveys. Water is mankind’s most critical natural resource, but it is being heavily used throughout the globe. The aim of this paper is to outline...

  14. Occurrence and seasonality of internal parasite infection in elephants, Loxodonta africana, in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Lydia; Morgan, Eric R; Ofthile, Mphoeng; Evans, Kate

    2015-04-01

    It is known from studies in a wide range of wild and domestic animals, including elephants, that parasites can affect growth, reproduction and health. A total of 458 faecal samples from wild elephants were analysed using a combination of flotation and sedimentation methods. Coccidian oocysts (prevalence 51%), and nematode (77%) and trematode (24%) eggs were found. Species were not identified, though trematode egg morphology was consistent with that of the intestinal fluke Protofasciola robusta. The following factors were found to have a significant effect on parasite infection: month, year, sex, age, and group size and composition. There was some evidence of peak transmission of coccidia and nematodes during the rainy season, confirmed for coccidia in a parallel study of seven sympatric domesticated elephants over a three month period. Nematode eggs were more common in larger groups and nematode egg counts were significantly higher in elephants living in maternal groups (mean 1116 eggs per gram, standard deviation, sd 685) than in all-male groups (529, sd 468). Fluke egg prevalence increased with increasing elephant age. Preservation of samples in formalin progressively decreased the probability of detecting all types of parasite over a storage time of 1-15 months. Possible reasons for associations between other factors and infection levels are discussed.

  15. Occurrence and seasonality of internal parasite infection in elephants, Loxodonta africana, in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Baines

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known from studies in a wide range of wild and domestic animals, including elephants, that parasites can affect growth, reproduction and health. A total of 458 faecal samples from wild elephants were analysed using a combination of flotation and sedimentation methods. Coccidian oocysts (prevalence 51%, and nematode (77% and trematode (24% eggs were found. Species were not identified, though trematode egg morphology was consistent with that of the intestinal fluke Protofasciola robusta. The following factors were found to have a significant effect on parasite infection: month, year, sex, age, and group size and composition. There was some evidence of peak transmission of coccidia and nematodes during the rainy season, confirmed for coccidia in a parallel study of seven sympatric domesticated elephants over a three month period. Nematode eggs were more common in larger groups and nematode egg counts were significantly higher in elephants living in maternal groups (mean 1116 eggs per gram, standard deviation, sd 685 than in all-male groups (529, sd 468. Fluke egg prevalence increased with increasing elephant age. Preservation of samples in formalin progressively decreased the probability of detecting all types of parasite over a storage time of 1–15 months. Possible reasons for associations between other factors and infection levels are discussed.

  16. Status of waste tyres and management practice in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmereki, Daniel; Machola, Bontle; Mokokwe, Kentlafetse

    2017-02-22

    Waste tyres (WTs) are becoming a significant environmental, economical and technological challenge due to their high contents of combustible composition and potential for valuable materials and energy resources. Fewer studies in developing and even developed countries have been carried out to assess the challenges regarding waste tyres management, and suggested the best alternative solutions for managing this waste stream. While developed countries made progress in waste tyres management needs by implementing more efficient innovative recovery and recycling methods, and restrictive regulations regarding the management of used tyres, in many developing countries the management of waste tyres has not received adequate interest, and the processing, treatment and disposal of waste tyre is still nascent. In recent years, worldwide, several methods for managing used tyres, including other principal alternatives for managing end-of-life tyres defined in the 4Rs, reduction, re-use, recovery and recycling have been adopted and applied to minimize serious threats to both the natural environment environment and human. The paper attempted to establish stakeholders' action that has the responsibility in waste tyre management in Botswana. This study also analyzed important aspects on waste tyres management in Botswana. A synthesis of approaches was employed in the present investigation to determine the factors influencing effective performance of waste tyres management practice in Botswana. Data for the present study was obtained using relevant published literature, scientific journals, other third sector sources, academic sources, and research derived from governments and other agencies and field observations. Group discussions with the participants and semi-structured interviews with professionals were carried out. The outcomes of this investigation are a wide-range outline concerning the participants that are important in waste tyres management, and a set of aspects affecting

  17. Charged current weak electroproduction of $\\Delta$ resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, L; Vacas, M J V

    1998-01-01

    We study the weak production of $\\Delta$ (i.e. $e^{-} + p \\to \\Delta^{0}+ energy range corresponding to the Mainz and TJNAF electron accelerators. The differential cross sections $\\sigma(\\theta)$ are found to be of the order of $ 10^{-39}$ cm$^2$/sr, over a range of angles which increases with energy. The possibility of observing these reactions with the high luminosities available at these accelerators, and studying the weak N-$\\Delta$ transition form factors through these reactions is discussed. The production cross section of N$^*(1440)$ in the kinematic region of $\\Delta$ production is also estimated and found to be small.

  18. Movement patterns of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus in farmlands in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Van der Weyde

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botswana has the second highest population of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus with most living outside protected areas. As a result, many cheetahs are found in farming areas which occasionally results in human-wildlife conflict. This study aimed to look at movement patterns of cheetahs in farming environments to determine whether cheetahs have adapted their movements in these human-dominated landscapes. We fitted high-time resolution GPS collars to cheetahs in the Ghanzi farmlands of Botswana. GPS locations were used to calculate home range sizes as well as number and duration of visits to landscape features using a time-based local convex hull method. Cheetahs had medium-sized home ranges compared to previously studied cheetah in similar farming environments. Results showed that cheetahs actively visited scent marking trees and avoided visiting homesteads. A slight preference for visiting game farms over cattle farms was found, but there was no difference in duration of visits between farm types. We conclude that cheetahs selected for areas that are important for their dietary and social needs and prefer to avoid human-occupied areas. Improved knowledge of how cheetahs use farmlands can allow farmers to make informed decisions when developing management practices and can be an important tool for reducing human-wildlife conflict.

  19. Movement patterns of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in farmlands in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, T. Y.; Horgan, J.; Shotton, J.; McKenna, R.; Wilson, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Botswana has the second highest population of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with most living outside protected areas. As a result, many cheetahs are found in farming areas which occasionally results in human-wildlife conflict. This study aimed to look at movement patterns of cheetahs in farming environments to determine whether cheetahs have adapted their movements in these human-dominated landscapes. We fitted high-time resolution GPS collars to cheetahs in the Ghanzi farmlands of Botswana. GPS locations were used to calculate home range sizes as well as number and duration of visits to landscape features using a time-based local convex hull method. Cheetahs had medium-sized home ranges compared to previously studied cheetah in similar farming environments. Results showed that cheetahs actively visited scent marking trees and avoided visiting homesteads. A slight preference for visiting game farms over cattle farms was found, but there was no difference in duration of visits between farm types. We conclude that cheetahs selected for areas that are important for their dietary and social needs and prefer to avoid human-occupied areas. Improved knowledge of how cheetahs use farmlands can allow farmers to make informed decisions when developing management practices and can be an important tool for reducing human-wildlife conflict. PMID:27913453

  20. Movement patterns of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in farmlands in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Weyde, L K; Hubel, T Y; Horgan, J; Shotton, J; McKenna, R; Wilson, A M

    2017-01-15

    Botswana has the second highest population of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with most living outside protected areas. As a result, many cheetahs are found in farming areas which occasionally results in human-wildlife conflict. This study aimed to look at movement patterns of cheetahs in farming environments to determine whether cheetahs have adapted their movements in these human-dominated landscapes. We fitted high-time resolution GPS collars to cheetahs in the Ghanzi farmlands of Botswana. GPS locations were used to calculate home range sizes as well as number and duration of visits to landscape features using a time-based local convex hull method. Cheetahs had medium-sized home ranges compared to previously studied cheetah in similar farming environments. Results showed that cheetahs actively visited scent marking trees and avoided visiting homesteads. A slight preference for visiting game farms over cattle farms was found, but there was no difference in duration of visits between farm types. We conclude that cheetahs selected for areas that are important for their dietary and social needs and prefer to avoid human-occupied areas. Improved knowledge of how cheetahs use farmlands can allow farmers to make informed decisions when developing management practices and can be an important tool for reducing human-wildlife conflict.

  1. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  2. Determinants of educational systems of Bophuthatswana and Botswana / Jacob Herman Kgosi Malao

    OpenAIRE

    Malao, Jacob Herman Kgosi

    1985-01-01

    In the opening chapter the following matters are looked into: * PROBLEM OF RESEARCH The problem of research is: - to determine whether the influences of the Republic of South Africa on the Bophuthatswana system of education and that of England on Botswana are responsible for differences of the educational systems of Bophuthatswana and Botswana; - to determine whether there are other determinants of the systems in question; and - a comparison of the determinants of the education...

  3. Knowledge management a competitive edge for law firms in Botswana in the changing business environment

    OpenAIRE

    Madeleine Fombad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Law firms in Botswana offer a particularly interesting context to explore the effects of transition in the knowledge economy. Acquiring and leveraging knowledge effectively in law firms through knowledge management can result in competitive advantage; yet the adoption of this approach remains in its infancy. Objectives: This article investigates the factors that will motivate the adoption of knowledge management in law firms in Botswana, and creates an awareness of the potential ...

  4. The development of a strategic framework for the promotion of local cuisine in Botswana / Delly Chatibura

    OpenAIRE

    Chatibura, Delly

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study is the development a strategic framework for the promotion of local cuisine in Botswana. This goal was achieved in five key objectives. Firstly the study set to review extant literature on tourists‟ cuisine experiences in general and in Botswana. An understanding of tourists‟ cuisine experiences is significant in paving the way for increased promotion in cuisine tourism, an alternative form of tourism that has remained relatively neglected in the country‟s tourism ...

  5. The Delta 2 launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousley, Gilbert W., Sr.

    1991-12-01

    The utilization of the Delta 2 as the vehicle for launching Aristoteles into its near Sun synchronous orbit is addressed. Delta is NASA's most reliable launch vehicle and is well suited for placing the present Aristoteles spacecraft into a 400 m circular orbit. A summary of some of the Delta 2 flight parameters is presented. Diagrams of a typical Delta 2 two stage separation are included along with statistics on delta reliability and launch plans.

  6. New law on HIV testing in Botswana: The implications for healthcare professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rofiah O. Sarumi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botswana is one of the countries with the highest HIV prevalence rates in the world. Innovative HIV testing strategies are required to ensure that those infected or at risk of infection become aware of their HIV status and are able to access treatment, care and support. Despite this public health imperative, HIV testing strategies in Botswana will in future be based around the principles in the new Public Health Act (2013. The present article describes the HIV testing norms in the Act, and sets out the strengths and weaknesses of this approach and its implications for healthcare professionals in Botswana.Objectives: To compare international norms on HIV testing with the provisions governing such testing in the new Botswana Public Health Act and to assess the extent to which the new Act meets international human rights norms on HIV testing.Method: A ‘desktop’ review of international human rights norms and those in the Botswana Public Health Act.Conclusion: HIV testing norms in the new Public Health Act in Botswana violate individual rights and will place healthcare workers in a position where they will have to elect between acting lawfully or ethically. Law reform is required in order to ensure that HIV testing achieves the joint goals of public health and human rights.

  7. The promotion of mental health through cultural values, institutions, and practices: a reflection on some aspects of botswana culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabone, Motshedisi B

    2009-12-01

    Botswana has seen rapid socioeconomic development since the 1970s that has contributed to the erosion of the values, institutions, and practices that are believed to be supportive of mental health. In this paper, the author argues that the aspects of culture that are supportive of mental health have been diluted by the process of urbanization and the interactions of Batswana (the indigenous people of Botswana) with other cultural groups, particularly those from the western hemisphere. The paper further highlights some of the values, institutions, and practices native to Botswana and describes how they promote mental health. Lastly, recommendations for reviving the cultural values, institutions, and practices of Botswana are discussed.

  8. Negative quantum interference between the electronic Raman scattering processes of CuO chains and CuO2 planes of heavily overdoped (Y, Ca)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, T; Limonov, M; Uchiyama, H; Tajima, S; Yamanaka, A

    2005-11-11

    We found a strong X-Y anisotropy of the pair-breaking peak in the Raman scattering of heavily overdoped (Y, Ca)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) (T(c) = 65 K). The pair-breaking peak is radically suppressed in the YY-polarized spectrum. We ascribe this anomaly to the effect of quantum interference between the Raman processes of the CuO-chain and the CuO2-plane electronic excitations that might take place as a result of the increase in the transfer matrix due to overdoping.

  9. Distance Learning and Teacher Education in Botswana: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L Sikwibele

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study at Molepolole College of Education (MCE involving teachers and tutors in the Diploma in Primary Education (DPE program by distance mode, an in-service program aimed at upgrading academic and professional qualifications of primary school teachers in Botswana. The study sought to understand the level of access and the challenges faced by teachers and tutors. Data was collected through in-depth interviews, survey, and document analysis. Findings showed that teachers should be enrolled in the program at a younger age, and issues that lead to delays in completion must be addressed. The paper recommends that the Ministry of Education (MOE hire full-time tutors to support teachers at their bases, provide resources for practical subjects, organize workshops to familiarize tutors with appropriate strategies for adult learners, increase the duration of residential sessions, explore the use of alternative instructional technologies, and institute regular customer evaluations.

  10. Computer and Internet use Among Families: A Case of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Ishaan Srivastava

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available During the past 20 years, novel communication technologydevices have become familiar in African homes; among themare Personal Computers and the Internet. Social reviewers andother polemicists have debated whether these devices influencethe lives of families in a productive or a destructive way. Theauthors examined the literature about family use of Computersand the Internet.Though home Internet access in Botswana isconstantly increasing, there is diminutive information availableabout actual usage patterns in homes. The present study wascarried out across Botswana on 570 Batswana1 family unitswith children. It measured computer and Internet use of eachfamily member across 4 weeks. Data on actual computer andInternet usage were collected with the help of local leaders andteachers. They also played a key role in providing informationon a number of variables for several age groups separately,including children, adolescents, and adult men and women.Averages were revealed for the amount of time spent oncomputers and the Web, the percentage of each age grouponline, and the types of Web sites viewed. Overall, about 9% ofchildren ages 4 to 12, 40% of adolescents, 45% of adult womenand 70% of adult men access the Internet each week. Childrenspend an average of 9 hours/week on the computer, 38hours/week for adolescents. Adult women (non- working 2spend only about 2 hours per week, yet in general, women werefound to be spending long hours (25 hours on computerscorresponding with adult men who also spend 25 hours/week.The types of Web sites visited are accounted, including the topfive for each age group. In general, search engines and Webportals are the most commonly visited sites, regardless of agegroup. These data provide a baseline for comparisons acrosstime and cultures.

  11. Estimated HIV trends and program effects in Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stover

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study uses surveillance, survey and program data to estimate past trends and current levels of HIV in Botswana and the effects of treatment and prevention programs. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data from sentinel surveillance at antenatal clinics and a national population survey were used to estimate the trend of adult HIV prevalence from 1980 to 2007. Using the prevalence trend we estimated the number of new adult infections, the transmission from mothers to children, the need for treatment and the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART and adult and child deaths. Prevalence has declined slowly in urban areas since 2000 and has remained stable in rural areas. National prevalence is estimated at 26% (25-27% in 2007. About 330,000 (318,000-335,000 people are infected with HIV including 20,000 children. The number of new adult infections has been stable for several years at about 20,000 annually (12,000-26,000. The number of new child infections has declined from 4600 in 1999 to about 890 (810-980 today due to nearly complete coverage of an effective program to prevent mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT. The annual number of adult deaths has declined from a peak of over 15,500 in 2003 to under 7400 (5000-11,000 today due to coverage of ART that reaches over 80% in need. The need for ART will increase by 60% by 2016. CONCLUSIONS: Botswana's PMTCT and treatment programs have achieved significant results in preventing new child infections and deaths among adults and children. The number of new adult infections continues at a high level. More effective prevention efforts are urgently needed.

  12. Frontier and territorial dispute between Botswana and Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etinski Rodoljub M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Botswana and Namibia have accepted that their mutual frontier was determined by Anglo-German Treaty of1890. The Treaty defined a frontier of the sphere of influence of the UK and Germany saying that it follows, inter alia, the center of the main channel of the Chobe River around the Kasikili/Sedudu Island. The River bifurcates in two channels around the Island and after the Island the channels merge again in the same River. The Treaty did not determine which of the two channels was the main channel and it became cause of a dispute. The parties agreed that the International Court of Justice resolves the dispute about the frontier and the status of the Kasikili/Sedudu Island applying the 1890 Treaty and general rules and principles of international law. The Court decided that the main channel is the north channel, that the Island is a territory of Botswana and that the navigation on the both channels remains free and under equal national treatment for vessels of the both sides. The Court based its conclusion about main channel on the common meaning of the term as it defined in relevant literature. The support for the conclusion was found in a report of local authorities of the both sides and a report of a common expert group, established by the two parties. Namibia did not succeed to convince the Court that Namibia had acquired the Island by prescription on the basis of long presence of Namibian tribe Masubia on the island, since the Court did not accepted that the tribe pursued sovereign power.

  13. Delta Plaza kohvik = Delta Plaza cafe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Tallinnas Pärnu mnt 141 asuva kohviku Delta Plaza sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Tiiu Truus ja Marja Viltrop (Stuudio Truus OÜ). Tiiu Truusi tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Büroohoone Delta Plaza arhitektid Marika Lõoke ja Jüri Okas (AB J. Okas & M. Lõoke)

  14. Delta Plaza kohvik = Delta Plaza cafe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Tallinnas Pärnu mnt 141 asuva kohviku Delta Plaza sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Tiiu Truus ja Marja Viltrop (Stuudio Truus OÜ). Tiiu Truusi tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Büroohoone Delta Plaza arhitektid Marika Lõoke ja Jüri Okas (AB J. Okas & M. Lõoke)

  15. From Perception and Knowledge to Classroom Practice: Teaching Listening Comprehension to Setswana Speakers of English in Junior Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebina, Boikanyego; Arua, Arua E.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated whether teachers' knowledge and positive perception of listening contribute to its teaching in junior secondary schools in Botswana. Using an observation schedule, data were collected from four schools in the Gaborone, Botswana, area. The main finding of the study is that knowledge of listening does not translate into good…

  16. The Rise and Attenuation of the Basic Education Programme (BEP) in Botswana: A Global-Local Dialectic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabulawa, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Using a global-local dialectic approach, this paper traces the rise of the basic education programme in the 1980s and 1990s in Botswana and its subsequent attenuation in the 2000s. Amongst the local forces that led to the rise of BEP were Botswana's political project of nation-building; the country's dire human resources situation in the decades…

  17. Electronic structure of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub delta/ including strong correlation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Quintana, J.; Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Balle, S.; Salvador, R.

    1989-05-01

    The occupied and unoccupied valence-band density of states of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub delta/ is determined considering a coherent potential which includes the Coulomb intrasite d-d correlation. The p states tend to be all occupied and, as a consequence, the most localized d states with the XZ symmetry tend to be unoccupied giving rise to an upper Hubbard band. This picture is in good agreement with the direct and inverse photoemission spectroscopies.

  18. Crossover from coherent to incoherent electronic excitations in the normal state of Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, A; Rosenkranz, S; Fretwell, H M; Li, Z Z; Raffy, H; Randeria, M; Norman, M R; Campuzano, J C

    2003-05-23

    Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and resistivity measurements are used to explore the overdoped region of the high temperature superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta). We find evidence for a new crossover line in the phase diagram between a coherent metal phase, for lower temperatures and higher doping, and an incoherent metal phase, for higher temperatures and lower doping. The former is characterized by two well-defined spectral peaks in ARPES due to coherent bilayer splitting and superlinear behavior in the resistivity, whereas the latter is characterized by a single broad spectral feature in ARPES and a linear temperature dependence of the resistivity.

  19. Crustal Structure Across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Initial Results From the PRIDE-SEISORZ Active-Source Seismic Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, J. P.; Moffat, L.; Lizarralde, D.; Laletsang, K.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Modisi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa Rift System, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi. The SEISORZ active-source seismic component of PRIDE focused on the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana, with the main goal of imaging the crustal structure across the ORZ. This will allow us to estimate total crustal extension, determine the pattern and amount of thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrasts in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a fold belt. In November 2014 we conducted a crustal-scale, 450-km-long seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile consisting of 19 sources (shots in 30-m-deep boreholes) spaced ~25 km apart from each other, and 900 receivers (IRIS/PASSCAL "Texan" dataloggers and 4.5Hz geophones) with ~500 m spacing. From NW to SE, the profile crosses several tectonic domains: the Congo craton, the Damara metamorphic belt and the Ghanzi-Chobe fold belt where the axis of the ORZ is located, and continues into the Kalahari craton. The record sections display clear crustal refraction (Pg) and wide-angle Moho reflection (PmP) phases for all 17 of the good-quality shots, and a mantle refraction arrival (Pn), with the Pg-PmP-Pn triplication appearing at 175 km offset. There are distinct changes in the traveltime and amplitude of these phases along the transect, and on either side of the axis, that seem to correlate with sharp transitions across tectonic terrains. Initial modeling suggests: (1) the presence of a sedimentary half-graben structure at the rift axis beneath the Okavango delta, bounded to the SE by the Kunyere-Thamalakane fault system; (2) faster crustal Vp in the domains to the NW of the ORZ; and (3) thicker crust (45-50 km) at both ends of the profile within the Congo and Kalahari craton domains than at the ORZ and

  20. Prevalence of asthma among school children in Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiboneka, Andrew; Levin, Michael; Mosalakatane, Thembisile; Makone, Ishmael; Wobudeya, Eric; Makubate, Boikanyo; Hopp, Russell; Mazhani, Loeto; Kung, Shiang-Ju

    2016-09-01

    Asthma prevalence is high (>10%) in developed countries and although data is still missing for most of Africa, rates are increasing in developing regions as they become more westernized. We investigated the prevalence of asthma in school children in Gaborone, Botswana. This was a cross sectional descriptive study. ISAAC methodology was used. A representative proportionate size random sample of two age groups of children (13-14 year olds and 6-7 year olds) was consecutively enrolled from 10 schools. The schools were selected using a table of random numbers. A minimum sample size of 924 individuals (462 from each group) was adequate to achieve a precision of 3 % around our estimated prevalence of asthma of 10% with 95% confidence assuming a non-response rate of 20%. Data was collected using the validated International study of Asthma and Allergies in children (ISAAC) questionnaire. In accordance with the ISAAC criteria, Asthma was defined as wheezing in the previous 12 months. Data was captured in microsoft excel and analysed using SPSS version 23. The prevalence of asthma (wheezing in the previous 12 months) was 16.5% (194/1175). Among the 6-7 year olds, the prevalence of asthma (wheezing in the previous 12 months) was 15.9%, while among the 13-14 years olds it was 16.8 %. The prevalence school type was 22.3 % in private schools versus 14.5 % in public schools. More severe asthma was associated with older children, 13-14 years. The older children reported more limited speech due to wheezing (OR= 2.0, 95% CI =1.034, 3.9, p-value=0.043), ever had asthma (OR= 1.5, 95% CI=1.031, 2.3, p-value=0.034) and wheezing during exercise (OR=3.4, 95% CI= 2.5, 4.9, p-value= children 6-7 years. Children from private schools had more wheezing symptoms. They were more likely to have ever wheezed (OR=2.2, .95% CI=1.7,2.9, p-value asthma) (OR=1.7,95%CI=1.2,2.4, p-value = 0.001), ever had asthma (OR=2.4, 95% CI=1.7,3.5, p-valueasthma amongst school children in Gaborone, Botswana is high

  1. Stellar delta matter with delta-meson coupling constants constrained by QCD sum rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Antonio Ferreira da [Secretaria de Educacao, Cultura e Desportos do Estado de Roraima (SECD/RR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Oliveira, Jose Carlos Teixeira de [Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Rodrigues, Hilario [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Duarte, Sergio Barbosa [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chiapparini, Marcelo [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The considerable presence of delta-resonances (30% of baryonic population) in the dense phase of relativistic heavy ion collisions leads to a great interest in the study of the delta matter formation in the deep interior of compact stars. In the present work we determine the equation of state and the population of baryons and leptons and discuss the effects of the baryon-meson coupling constants to the formation of delta matter in the stellar medium. We use the non-linear Walecka model consisting of the octet of baryons of spin 1=2 (n, p, {Lambda}{sup 0}, {Sigma}{sup -}, {Sigma}{sup 0}, {Sigma}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -}, {Xi}{sup 0}) and baryonic resonances of spin 3=2, represented by the delta resonances ({Delta}{sup -}, ({Delta}{sup 0}, ({Delta}{sup +}, ({Delta}{sup ++}) and {Omega}{sup -}, in the baryonic sector. In the leptonic sector we consider the electrons and muons. The coupling constants between the hyperons {Lambda}, {Sigma}, and {Xi} and the mesons {omega} and {rho} are fixed by using SU(6) symmetry, while the hyperons-{sigma} coupling constants are constrained by the consistence of the hypernuclear potential in the nuclear matter with hypernuclear data. In addition, we use the finite density QCD sum rule to determine the possible values of delta-meson coupling constants. (author)

  2. Developmentally Appropriate Technology in Early Childhood (DATEC in Botswana: In-Service Teachers’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabita BOSE

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Developmentally Appropriate Technology in Early Childhood (DATEC aims to identify themost appropriate applications of Information and Communication Technology to support thedevelopment of children under eight years of age. Botswana has a unique spread ofpopulation density and deep-rooted socio-cultural values. There is a need to address thecompatibility of these aspects with the application of Information and CommunicationTechnology in the proposed Early Childhood Education programmes throughout Botswana.The researcher felt that the views of the in-service teachers, (who are now students of theBachelor of Education Programme in the University of Botswana and have specialized inEarly Childhood Education, would be a valuable input towards an appropriate EarlyChildhood Education curriculum. Hence, a study was proposed to assess the views of theteachers, regarding DATEC in Botswana. Forty (40 fourth year students (Level 400 ofBachelor of Education (Primary Programme of University of Botswana, who specialised inearly years and have a good exposure to Information and Communication Technologyconstituted the sample. Their views were obtained from a semi-structured questionnaire.Both quantitative and qualitative approaches were used for analysis of data. The findings ofthe study showed that the respondents strongly believed that an integration of Informationand Communication Technology with the Early Childhood Education curriculum isnecessary to enhance an overall development of young children. Computers with relevantresources were thought to be the best Information and Communication Technologyapplications in Early Childhood Education for a developmentally appropriate programmethat would provide educational concepts, problem solving skills and creativity. However,they emphasised the need to make the technology socio-culturally compatible to citizens ofBotswana (Batswana to facilitate developmentally appropriate education of young children.The study

  3. Economic valuation of selected direct and indirect use values of the Makgadikgadi wetland system, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlhogile, Tshepo; Arntzen, Jaap; Mabiza, Collin; Mano, Reneth

    Economic valuation of wetlands aims to investigate public preferences for changes in the state of the wetland and the natural resources it constitutes in monetary terms. It provides a means of quantifying the direct and indirect benefits that people derive from wetlands. In addition, it informs management planning and practice about resource options, optimal allocation and also provides information for conservation of the resource. The Makgadikgadi wetland is a unique system that mostly consists of dry pans during most of the year. This study aimed at estimating the value of groundwater recharge and community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) activities within the Makgadikgadi wetland and how these goods and services contribute to the local and national economy. The study used the Total Economic Valuation approach, which considers both the direct and indirect use values of the resource. In essence, the study concentrated on one direct use value (use of resources through CBNRM) and one indirect use value (groundwater recharge). With regard to CBNRM, three community-based organisations (CBOs) were selected for the study and static and dynamic cost-benefit models for these CBOs were developed. The groundwater recharge value was largely determined through desktop review and interviews with stakeholders. The results indicate a small positive contribution of CBOs towards the economy of Botswana and a high potential for communities to derive substantial benefits from the projects because currently benefits realised by communities are limited. CBOs involved in joint venture partnerships with tourism and hunting enterprises benefit more from utilising the wetland’s resources. Groundwater recharge often occurs in areas away from the physical location of the wetland and may not be easily attributable to the wetland. However, the study assessed the value taking into consideration the various sectors which rely on the groundwater resource. The groundwater recharge

  4. Morbidity and health care utilisation among elderly people in Mmankgodi village, Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Clausen, F.; SANDBERG, E.; Ingstad, B.; Hjortdahl, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the health status among the elderly in a village in Botswana and their pattern of health care utilisation.
DESIGN—A descriptive study where all persons 60 years and older were invited to participate, including a medical examination, laboratory testing and a questionnaire aiming at gathering sociodemographic data.
SETTING—Mmankgodi village of Botswana.
SUBJECTS—419 persons were identified as elderly in the village, out of which 337 were included.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The...

  5. Processing and Utilization of Sorghum and Maize in Botswana: Current Status and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Nthoiwa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study reviews the current sorghum and maize production, processing and utilization in Botswana. Most of the grains produced in Botswana are used for home consumption, while processing of commercial and export commodities are limited both in terms of quantity and extent of processing. The major processing activity by both small scale and large scale firms is grain milling into maize and sorghum flours. There is limited value-added commercial processing. This creates an opportunity for development and marketing of traditional and new value-added products. Opportunities for expanding and diversifying industrial or semi-industrial processing of maize and sorghum beyond grain milling are suggested.

  6. The characteristics and economic importance of Pterocarpus angolensis in D.C. Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbile, A U; Kwerepe, B C; Kelatlhilwe, M

    2007-02-15

    Pterocarpus angolensis grows throughout northern Botswana and may be found in all woodland types as well as in evergreen and deciduous forests. It is among the few indigenous trees that thrive in the deep Kalahari sands. P. angolensis produces a hard wood timber of attractive appearance. Due to its flexibility, resistance and lightweight, the communities in Botswana use the species for making door frames, window frames, canoes, canoe peddles, spear handles for use in game hunting, fishing and general construction. The community also use it as a carving and sculpting medium. Traditionally, all parts of the tree are used for medicinal purposes.

  7. Inclusive Education for Learners With Disabilities in Botswana Primary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Mukhopadhyay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the findings of a qualitative case study, this article describes the experiences of key stakeholders about the inclusion of learners with disabilities in regular schools in the South Central Region of Botswana. Multiple stakeholders, such as school-heads, general education teachers, learners with disabilities, and their peers, from six elementary schools participated in this research. The data collection methods included focus group discussions, school and classroom observations, and document analysis. Findings indicate that most of the teachers preferred to include learners with mild disabling conditions compared with learners with severe to profound disabling conditions. School-heads raised concerns such as inadequate training in special education, lack of resources, and high student–teacher ratio as barriers to successful implementation of inclusive education. In contrast to this, the students’ peers expressed high levels of acceptance of learners with disabilities. This reflects Botswana’s history of diversity and culture incorporating regional ethnic differences. It is a real strength to build on in the movement toward fully inclusive education.

  8. Use of mobile learning by resident physicians in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Aileen Y; Ghose, Sankalpo; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Anolik, Rachel B; Kyer, Andrea; Mazhani, Loeto; Seymour, Anne K; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2012-01-01

    With the growth of mobile health in recent years, learning through the use of mobile devices (mobile learning [mLearning]) has gained recognition as a potential method for increasing healthcare providers' access to medical information and resources in resource-limited settings. In partnership with the University of Botswana School of Medicine (SOM), we have been exploring the role of smartphone-based mLearning with resident (physicians in specialty training) education. The SOM, which admitted its first class of medical students and residents in 2009, is committed to providing high-level on-site educational resources for resident physicians, even when practicing in remote locations. Seven residents were trained to use an Android-based myTouch 3G smartphone equipped with data-enabled subscriber identity module (SIM) cards and built-in camera. Phones contained locally loaded point-of-care and drug information applications, a telemedicine application that allows for the submission of cases to local mentors, and e-mail/Web access. Surveys were administered at 4 weeks and 8 weeks following distribution of phones. We found that smartphones loaded with point-of-care tools are effectively utilized by resident physicians in resource-limited settings, both for accessing point-of-care medical information at the bedside and engaging in self-directed learning at home.

  9. Coal prospects in Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Namibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-01

    Increasing demand for coal in Asia is stimulating interest in the potentially large coal resources in Southern African countries such as Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Namibia. These countries have been slow to utilise their coal as local demand has been limited and the means to export coal has been inadequate. The governments in these regions are now recognising coal as a strategically important commodity, capable of earning foreign revenue but also adding value to the economy by generating much needed electricity. This report looks in turn at the role of coal in the energy economies of each of these countries. As in most emerging economies, the provision of a reliable and cost-effective supply of electricity to industries and people is essential for economic growth and the welfare of communities. Demand for Africa's mineral commodities such as diamonds and copper is driving a massive need for electricity and coal will play a major role. Not only does the mining industry need power, but with these growing industries come communities and commerce which are also in need of energy.

  10. PREVALENCE OF POULTRY DISEASES AND PARASITES IN BOTSWANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. MOREKI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviewed literature on the prevalence of diseases and parasites of poultry in Botswana over a five year period i.e., from 2006 to 2010. Coccidiosis was the most prevalent disease in poultry species except for ostriches which were mainly affected by colisepticaemia. The highest prevalence of diseases and parasites was recorded in 2007 with fowl pox, coccidiosis, salmonellosis and helminthiasis being the main contributors. Fowl pox was prevalent in family chickens which are reared under free range. Poultry diseases were mainly prevalent in Gaborone, Mochudi, Francistown and Molepolole districts with 225, 168, 148 and 135 cases, respectively. Newcastle disease was sporadic throughout the study period. In the present study, the common parasites of poultry were mites, fleas, lice, ticks and helminths, and helminths were the most prevalent followed by mites. Of all species, chickens were affected most by parasites followed by guinea fowl. These results suggest inadequacies in health management, indicating that strict biosecurity measures should be put in place in order to reduce mortalities. There is also a need for extension service to train farmers on health management.

  11. Gap distributions and spatial variation of electronic states in superconducting and pseudogap states of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}CuO{sub 8+{delta}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, K.K.; Pasupathy, A.; Pushp, A. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ono, S.; Ando, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Yazdani, A. [Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: yazdani@princeton.edu

    2007-09-01

    High-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to study the tunneling density of states in lightly underdoped samples of the high-T{sub c} superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}CuO{sub 8+{delta}} in both the superconducting and pseudogap states. We demonstrate that the tunneling gaps observed in these two states have identical spatial distributions and correlation lengths. This observation suggests that the two gaps, and hence the two phenomena, cannot have a competing origin. In addition, we present measurements that show that in contrast to the superconducting state, in which low energy quasi-particles are homogenous in real space, the states near the Fermi level are spatially inhomogeneous in the pseudogap state. The variation of the low-energy electronic states is spatially correlated with local changes in the pseudogap.

  12. Studies on ascaridid, oxyurid and enoplid nematodes (Nematoda) from fishes of the Okavango River, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Frantisek; Van As, Liesl L

    2015-07-22

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, eight species (five adult and three larval) of nematodes belonging to the Ascaridida, Oxyurida and Enoplida were collected from fishes of the Okavango River, Botswana, namely Falcaustra similis Moravec et Van As, 2004, Atractidae gen. sp. (only female) (both Cosmocercoidea), Cucullanus sp. (only female) (Seuratoidea), Cithariniella longicaudata sp. n., Synodontisia annulata sp. n. (both Oxyuroidea), Contracaecum sp. third-stage larvae, third-stage larvae of Galeiceps sp. (both Ascaridoidea) and Eustrongylides sp. fourth-stage larvae (Dioctophymatoidea). The new species Citharinella longicaudata (type host Schilbe intermedius Rüppel) is mainly characterised by the shape and size of cephalic papillae and the spicule 108 µm long, and Synodontisia annulata (type host S. intermedius) by the shape of cephalic papillae, body length of gravid females (4.88-5.33 mm) and a short spicule (66 µm long). The female specimen of Cucullanus sp. from Tilapia sparmanni Smith markedly differs from congeners parasitising inland fishes in Africa by the elongate pseudobuccal capsule and by the excretory pore far posterior to the oesophago-intestinal junction; apparently, it belongs to an undescribed species. Galeiceps larvae parasitising fishes are described for the first time. Cithariniella gonzalezi Van Waerebeke, Chabaud, Bain et Georges, 1988 is considered a junior synonym of C. khalili Petter, Vassiliadès et Troncy, 1972, and the previous records of Cithariniella citharini Khalil, 1964 from Synodontis spp. in Egypt concern, in fact, Cithariniella khalili Petter, Vassiliadès et Troncy, 1972. The specimens of Cithariniella reported by Koubková et al. (2010) from Paradistichodus dimidiatus (Pellegrin) in Senegal and misidentified as C. gonzalesi Van Waerebeke, Chabaud, Bain et Georges, 1988 are considered to represent a new species, C. koubkovae sp. n.; this is established by reference to the description and drawings

  13. BAQMAP. Air Quality Monitoring and Surveillance Program for Botswana. Mission 1 Report 4-22 November 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkestad, T.; Dreiem, R.; Hermansen, O.; Knudsen, S.

    1996-12-31

    This report is concerned with the start of a joint project between the authorities in Botswana and Norway on the development of an air pollution monitoring and surveillance program for Botswana. NILU will provide assistance in the fields of (1) Siting and establishment of an air pollution monitoring network, (2) Laboratory techniques, methods and routines, (3) Quality control and quality assurance procedures, (4) Emission data bases, (5) Statistical data analysis and reporting, (6) Atmospheric dispersion model estimates for air quality planning and assessment analysis. This is the report of the Norwegian team after their first visit to Botswana. 1 ref., 13 figs., 35 tabs.

  14. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    'electronic signature' means data attached to, incorporated in, or logically ... See Cwele v S 2012 4 All SA 497 (SCA); Mohlabeng v Minister of Safety and Security ... ZAKZPHC 51 (2 September 2010); Delta Finance, a Division of Wesbank, ...

  15. Computational assessment of the electronic structures of cyclohexa-1,2,4-triene, 1-oxacyclohexa-2,3,5-triene (3delta(2)-pyran), their benzo derivatives, and cyclohexa-1,2-diene. An experimental approach to 3delta(2)-pyran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Bernd; Schöneboom, Jan C; Münster, Arno F; Groetsch, Stefan; Christl, Manfred

    2002-01-16

    The six-membered cyclic allenes given in the title have been studied theoretically by means of an MR-CI approach. For all compounds, the allene structures were found to be the ground states in the gas phase. In the cases of cyclohexa-1,2-diene (1), the isobenzene 2, and the isonaphthalene 7, the most stable structures having a planar allene moiety are the diradicals 1b, 2b, and 7b, representing the transition states for the racemization of 1a, 2a, and 7a and being less stable than the latter by 14.1, 8.9, and 11.2 kcal/mol, respectively. At variance with this order, the 3delta(2)-pyran 4 and the chromene 5 have the zwitterions 4c and 5c as the most stable planar structures, which lie only 1.0 and 5.4 kcal/mol above 4a and 5a, respectively. According to the simulation of the solvent effect, 4c even becomes the ground state of 4 in THF solution. The frontier orbitals of the respective states of 2 and 4 suggest different rates and sites for the reaction with nucleophiles. For the first time, the pyran 4 has been generated and trapped. As a precursor for 4, 3-bromo-4H-pyran (9) was chosen, the synthesis of which was achieved on two routes from 4H-pyran. The treatment of 9 with potassium tert-butoxide (KOt-Bu)/18-crown-6 gave 4-tert-butoxy-4H-pyran as the only discernible product, whether styrene or furan was present, indicating the interception of 4 by KOt-Bu. Finally, the disagreement between the experiment and the theory concerning the heat of formation and the electronic nature of the isobenzene 2 is resolved by demonstrating that the experimental data can provide only an upper limit of the DeltaH(f) degrees value.

  16. An Assessment of Academic Stress among Undergraduate Students: The Case of University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agolla, Joseph E.; Ongori, Henry

    2009-01-01

    This research finding is based on the responses obtained from the undergraduate students at a higher learning institution (University) in Botswana. This paper investigated the stressors, symptoms and effects that are likely to be experienced by the undergraduate students in higher institutions (Universities). Stressors related to time, academic…

  17. Advancing Grassroots Climate Change Awareness in Botswana: BCA Campus Greenhouse Gas Baseline Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisani, Nnyaladzi; Ndiane, Abijah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on the results of a case study in Botswana, aimed at raising awareness on climate issues. Higher-education institutions play a leading role in sustainability efforts, as their research role often lays the groundwork for social transformation. Design/methodology/approach: The Clean Air-Cool Planet (CACP) campus…

  18. Botswana and Swaziland: report links violations of women's rights to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Kate

    2007-12-01

    In May 2007, Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) released a report investigating the links between discriminatory views against women in Botswana and Swaziland and sexual risk-taking and, in turn, extremely high HIV prevalence in those countries. The report also examines the role of women's lack of political and economic power in those countries, and the connection to HIV infection.

  19. Utilization characteristics and importance of woody biomass resources on the rural-urban fringe in botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkambwe, Musisi; Sekhwela, Mogodisheng B M

    2006-02-01

    This article examines the utilization characteristics and importance of woody biomass resources in the rural-urban fringe zones of Botswana. In the literature for Africa, attention has been given to the availability and utilization of biomass in either urban or rural environments, but the rural-urban fringe has been neglected. Within southern Africa, this neglect is not justified; the rural-urban fringe, not getting the full benefits available in urban environments in Botswana, has developed problems in woody biomass availability and utilization that require close attention. In this article, socioeconomic data on the importance of woody biomass in the Batlokwa Tribal Territory, on the rural-urban fringe of Gaborone, Botswana, were collected together with ecologic data that reveal the utilization characteristics and potential for regrowth of woody biomass. The analysis of these results show that local woody biomass is very important in the daily lives of communities in the rural-urban fringe zones and that there is a high level of harvesting. However, there is no effort in planning land use in the tribal territory to either conserve this resource or provide alternatives to its utilization. The future of woody biomass resources in Botswana's rural-urban fringe is uncertain. The investigators recommend that a comprehensive policy for the development of the rural-urban fringe consider the importance of this resource. The neglect of this resource will have far-reaching implications on the livelihoods of residents as well as the environment in this zone.

  20. The Relationship between Followership Style and Job Performance in Botswana Private Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetunji, Christianah O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the followership style and job performance in Botswana private universities. Attempt was made to determine if there is a significant relationship between followership styles in relation to job performance. A total of 102 randomly selected lecturers from the two private universities completed followership and job performance…

  1. An Assessment of Academic Stress among Undergraduate Students: The Case of University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agolla, Joseph E.; Ongori, Henry

    2009-01-01

    This research finding is based on the responses obtained from the undergraduate students at a higher learning institution (University) in Botswana. This paper investigated the stressors, symptoms and effects that are likely to be experienced by the undergraduate students in higher institutions (Universities). Stressors related to time, academic…

  2. Mentor Development in Higher Education in Botswana: How Important Is Reflective Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, H.; Nyanjom, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Mentor development in higher education in Vocational Education and Training (VET) in Botswana is explored in this article. Changes in education policy require mentors to engage in individual as well as organisational change and transformation. Most studies focus on mentee development and the resulting organisational change but there is very little…

  3. Factors That Influence the Diffusion Process of Mobile Devices in Higher Education in Botswana and Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asino, Tutaleni I.

    2015-01-01

    This comparative study uses the Diffusion of Innovation (DoI) theoretical framework to explore factors that influence diffusion of mobile devices in higher education in Botswana and Namibia. The five attributes (Relative Avantage, Compatability, Complexity, Trialability, and Observability) of the persuasion stage, which have been found in previous…

  4. Using Student Notebooks to Measure Opportunity to Learn in Botswana and South African Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Cheryl; Major, Thenjiwe

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how a detailed notebook analysis was used to assess and compare the opportunity to learn of a sample of grade 6 students from 126 classes in South East Botswana and North West Province, South Africa. Students' mathematics notebooks provided the main data source for estimating how much time is spent on the subject during the…

  5. Evolution of Botswana planning education in light of local and international requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavrić Branko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Planning problems have been with us ever since human beings realized that their wellbeing is very closely linked to the quality of their settlements and the environment. Over the last century this has led to the worldwide emergence of built environment education in general, and planning in particular. In many African universities planning education is a rapidly growing phenomenon reaching its maturity in terms of structure and number of programs. This development has been most significant in those countries that underwent rapid urbanization and environmental changes similar to those occurring in Botswana. The first Urban and Regional Planning Programme at the University of Botswana was established in 1993 as part of the Department of Environmental Science at the Faculty of Science. The continued growth and expansion of the planning profession world-wide as well as in Botswana, and its interdisciplinary ties with allied built-environment disciplines, have reached the point at which the University of Botswana is ready to continue with a new internationally recognized planning school. There is a belief that a combined (spatial and specialist accredited planning programme should support local and regional interests, focusing on the Southern African Region, while acknowledging global standards and innovation in teaching, research, and technology.

  6. Mary's room : a case study on becoming a consumer in Francistown, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Fardon, R.; Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Dijk, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter presents an extended case study of the personal experiences of a young Kalanga woman in Francistown, Botswana, as she moves from village girlhood to incipient urban consumerism. After describing the urban setting of Francistown and the expansion of the town's residential space under the

  7. Botswana Primary Schools Teachers' Perception of Inclusion of Learners with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sourav

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the perception of primary teachers towards inclusive education in the South Central regions of Botswana. The research employed a descriptive survey design that used both qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Two hundred and seventy-three primary teachers were drawn from a sample size of 2950…

  8. Governmentality in Environmental Education Policy Discourses: A Qualitative Study of Teachers in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketlhoilwe, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    International environmental education policy discourses have influenced policy construction in Botswana and how teachers conduct themselves and teaching in environmental learning. The researcher uses Foucault's notion of governmentality to understand the effects of power/knowledge relations in policy. The analysis is taken further through a…

  9. The effect of praziquantel against Schistosoma mansoni-infections in Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, H; Byskov, Jens

    1989-01-01

    Chemotherapy of all infected individuals, using praziquantel 40 mg/kg in a single dose, was the initial component of the recently introduced control programme against Schistosoma mansoni-infections in Ngamiland, Botswana. To evaluate the effect of praziquantel in Ngamiland, 81 children were...

  10. El Negro, el Niño, witchcraft and the absence of rain in Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gewald, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    In October 2000, the remains of 'El Negro', a Tswana man who had died 170 years before and who, as a stuffed specimen, had been on display in Europe for over 160 years, were flown from Spain to Botswana and given a State funeral in the capital Gaborone. In early 2001, as it became clear that the rai

  11. The Nature, Extent and Causes of Abuse of Children with Disabilities in Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumba, Almon; Abosi, Okey C.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that the exact number of children with disabilities in Botswana is unknown. A study on child abuse sought to determine: the forms of child abuse perpetrated on children with disabilities; the extent of child abuse; and the causes of child abuse of children with disabilities. A questionnaire on child abuse was adapted and used to…

  12. Coping Behaviour of Disabled Persons and Their Families: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from Norway and Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingstad, Benedicte

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented for analyzing the influence of culture on the coping behavior of families with disabled children, using examples from families in Norway and Botswana. The model considers culture's impact on the process of coping through emotional patterning, expectations of life and future, life experiences, and actual opportunities. (JDD)

  13. Welfare Effects of Higher Energy and Food Prices in Botswana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emerging market economies those contributing to higher food prices include global warming and the shift to ... Botswana has allowed energy and food prices to be transmitted to domestic markets in the form of higher ..... Responding to global food price volatility and its impact on food security ... Poverty and Equity. Group.

  14. Benefits to Host Organizations from Participating in Internship Programs in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgaya, Klodwig; Mbekomize, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe internship programs have gained the attention of many tertiary institutions. Many researchers have found the internship programs to be beneficial to the students, tertiary institutions and host organizations. The Faculty of Business at the University of Botswana runs an internship program which attaches students to various…

  15. In-School HIV & AIDS Counselling Services in Botswana: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefhedi, Sheila; Montsi, Mercy; Mpofu, Elias

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study describes the provision of HIV & AIDS counselling services in Botswana junior secondary schools as perceived by teachers. A total of 45 teachers (age range = 20-55; teaching experience range = 0-21 years) from three schools participated. The participants completed a questionnaire on the types of HIV & AIDS-related…

  16. HIV/AIDS in Botswana: President Festus G. Mogae's narrative of secular conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robin E; Williams, Elizabeth A; Holyoak, Isaac C; Shorter, Shavonne

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, Botswana has been identified as a model for countries fighting against annihilation from HIV/AIDS. The country had the highest rate of HIV infections in the world in 2000, but by the end of Festus G. Mogae's presidential term in 2008 Botswana's situation had improved significantly, as residents were increasingly likely to get tested, obtain treatment, and discontinue practices of discrimination against the infected. This study seeks to contribute to a growing body of literature focusing on the communicative elements that played a role in Botswana's successes. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to explore Mogae's national speeches about HIV/AIDS to consider how his rhetoric may have encouraged Botswana's residents to alter their health-related beliefs and behaviors. We find that Mogae used a narrative of secular conversion (i.e., discourse with a pseudoreligious structure that positions problems as rooted in existing values and offers a new guiding principle as an antidote), and we identify such narratives as persuasive health communication tools. The analysis offers public health advocates, scholars, and opinion leaders a framework for persuasively communicating about diseases such as HIV/AIDS without drawing exclusively from a biomedical framework.

  17. Molecular, Spatial, and Field Epidemiology Suggesting TB Transmission in Community, Not Hospital, Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surie, Diya; Fane, Othusitse; Finlay, Alyssa; Ogopotse, Matsiri; Tobias, James L; Click, Eleanor S; Modongo, Chawangwa; Zetola, Nicola M; Moonan, Patrick K; Oeltmann, John E

    2017-03-01

    During 2012-2015, 10 of 24 patients infected with matching genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis received care at the same hospital in Gaborone, Botswana. Nosocomial transmission was initially suspected, but we discovered plausible sites of community transmission for 20 (95%) of 21 interviewed patients. Active case-finding at these sites could halt ongoing transmission.

  18. Dialogue--Missing in Action Competence: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Approach in a Botswana School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silo, Nthalivi

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth case study on children's participation in environmental management activities in a primary school in Botswana was undertaken, drawing on cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) and the action competence model. This research revealed that due to a lack of dialogue between teachers and children, teachers tended to view children's…

  19. Library Automation in Sub Saharan Africa: Case Study of the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutula, Stephen Mudogo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to present experiences and the lessons learned from the University of Botswana (UB) library automation project. The implications of the project for similar libraries planning automation in sub Saharan Africa and beyond are adduced. Design/methodology/approach: The article is a case study of library automation at the…

  20. Classroom Assessment Practices: A Survey of Botswana Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koloi-Keaikitse, Setlhomo

    2012-01-01

    The Classroom Assessment Practices and Skills (CAPS) questionnaire was administered to a sample of 691 primary and secondary school teachers in Botswana, Southern Africa to survey their thoughts about classroom assessment and identify classroom assessment practices teachers perceive to be skilled and those that they used most. The study examined…

  1. Sign Language as Medium of Instruction in Botswana Primary Schools: Voices from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpuang, Kerileng D.; Mukhopadhyay, Sourav; Malatsi, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive phenomenological study investigates teachers' experiences of using sign language for learners who are deaf in the primary schools in Botswana. Eight in-service teachers who have had more than ten years of teaching deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) learners were purposively selected for this study. Data were collected using multiple…

  2. Learners' and Teachers' Conceptual Knowledge of Science Processes: The Case of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emereole, Hezekiah Ukegbu

    2009-01-01

    The conceptual knowledge of science processes possessed by University of Botswana science students and senior secondary school science teachers was sought through a three-part questionnaire. One part requested demographic data of subjects, the second part asked them to select their level of familiarity with the processes, and the third part probed…

  3. Conquering the digital divide: Botswana and South Korea digital divide status and interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonofo C. Sedimo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botswana is putting in place initiatives towards establishing itself as a knowledgebased economy. Transformation from a resource-based to a knowledge-based economy is partly hinged on innovation, research and development capability, knowledge channels, and the funding of research and development activities.Objectives: Bridging the digital divide and narrowing the intra-national divide brings about global information and communication technology (ICT usage that translates into changing work patterns and eventually transformed economies. This article outlines the different interventions implemented in Botswana to bridge the divide. The South Korean experience in bridging the divide is discussed so as to serve as lessons on how to effectively bridge the divide to Botswana’s initiatives.Method: Using a mix of exploratory and empirical study, this article presents the findings on the status of ICT uptake in Botswana and investigates the level of the digital divide in the country.Results: The results of the study show that the digital divide is much more evident in Botswana than in South Korea. South Korea has put in place robust strategic initiatives towards reducing the digital divide and this has largely transcended into its transformation into a full-fledged knowledge society.Conclusion: This article is timely as it unearths the different pointers that may be utilised in policy formation and what interventions need to be taken at both the individual and national level to bridge the digital divide.

  4. The Use of Digital Library Skills in the Emergent Information Market in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojedokun, Ayoku A.; Moahi, Kgomotso H.

    2007-01-01

    This study probed the use of digital library skills by MLIS graduates, and their perception of employment preparation for the emergent information market in Botswana. The study used a survey approach. The study was carried out in 2004. A total of 32 MLIS graduates (1996-2003) of the Department of Library and Information Studies in employment were…

  5. English Articles and Modals in the Writing of Some Botswana Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Modupe M.

    2007-01-01

    What syntactic patterns emerge in students' use of articles and modals? What are the reasons for these patterns? What implications do the findings of the study have for English language instruction in Botswana? Exactly 1556 essays comprising class assignments, written seminar presentations, test papers and examination scripts from 514 randomly…

  6. Portfolio Assessment of Teaching Practice: Views From Business Education In-Service Student Teachers in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithole, Burman Musa

    2011-01-01

    Portfolio assessment of teaching practice was first introduced into the University of Botswana's Faculty of Education in May 2010. This study sought to investigate the impact of this innovative new professional development/assessment system on the professional growth and development of in-service teachers. The findings of the study suggest that…

  7. A Review of the Literature on Reading in Botswana Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commeyras, M.; Ketsitlile, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In this review the authors considered all the documents pertaining to the teaching of reading in Botswana primary schools from independence to the present. The purpose was to get the big picture with regard to the status of reading education. The results are reported in four categories: (1) Reading in the Classroom; (2) Reading and Policy; (3)…

  8. Peer Coaching as Part of a Professional Development Program for Science Teachers in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Annette; van den Berg, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a study into the potentials of peer coaching as part of a professional development program, consisting of an in-service course and exemplary curriculum materials, in supporting the implementation of learner-centred teaching in senior secondary science and mathematics education in Botswana. Teachers in the study…

  9. Soil carbon inventories and d 13C along a moisture gradient in Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bird, M.I.; Veenendaal, E.M.; Lloyd, J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of soil organic carbon (SOC) inventories and d 13C values for 625 soil cores collected from well-drained, coarse-textured soils in eight areas along a 1000 km moisture gradient from Southern Botswana, north into southern Zambia. The spatial distribution of trees and grass in the d

  10. Governmentality in Environmental Education Policy Discourses: A Qualitative Study of Teachers in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketlhoilwe, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    International environmental education policy discourses have influenced policy construction in Botswana and how teachers conduct themselves and teaching in environmental learning. The researcher uses Foucault's notion of governmentality to understand the effects of power/knowledge relations in policy. The analysis is taken further through a…

  11. Training Needs Assessment in the Botswana Public Service: A Case Study of Five State Sector Ministries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balisi, Shadreck

    2014-01-01

    Using qualitative methods, this study analysed the process of training needs assessment in the Botswana public service, with special focus on five state sector ministries. It is evident from the research findings that there is little and an unsystematic approach to the needs assessment prior to training. The research further revealed that the…

  12. Patterns of Language Use and Language Preference of Some Children and Their Parents in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arua, Arua E.; Magocha, Keoneng

    2002-01-01

    Examines language use and language preference of children aged 6 to 15 and their parents at the University of Botswana. Results indicate that the majority of the children speak Setswana and English, despite the fact that they come from different language groups. Language preferences of children differ from that of parents. Shows the growth of…

  13. Why We Drop out of School: Voices of San School Dropouts in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokibelo, Eureka B.

    2014-01-01

    Among San communities in Botswana, the rate of student disengagement from both primary and junior secondary school is an ongoing concern for educators. San learners leave school at all levels of primary and junior secondary education. Students who leave school have tended not to provide reasons as to why they are dropping out. This study…

  14. Perceptions of door-to-door HIV counselling and testing in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Karen Kroeger a knk2@cdc.gov, Allan W Taylor MD MPH a , Heather M Marlow b , Dr Douglas T Fleming c , Vanessa Beyleveld d , Mary Grace Alwano e e , Mabel Tebogo Kejelepula f , Kentsenao Busang Chilume g , Dr Dawn K Smith a , Dr Thierry Roels h & Dr Peter Kilmarx i

    related to HIV/STD prevention among vulnerable populations in Africa, Asia, and the US. Allan W Taylor, MD, MPH ... The prevalence of HIV-1 infection in Botswana, a country of ..... HBCT as a method of delivering HIV counselling and testing,.

  15. Communication Strategies in Primary Schools in Botswana: Interventions Using Cooks, Teacher Aides and Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokibelo, Eureka B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the micro planning activities that schools engage in to address learners' needs to make education work in rural primary schools of Botswana. The national language plan prescribes the use of English and Setswana only as languages of instruction at the primary school level. However, this plan is not practical in some regions…

  16. Mary's room : a case study on becoming a consumer in Francistown, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Fardon, R.; Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Dijk, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter presents an extended case study of the personal experiences of a young Kalanga woman in Francistown, Botswana, as she moves from village girlhood to incipient urban consumerism. After describing the urban setting of Francistown and the expansion of the town's residential space under the

  17. Contextualised Inclusive Education: A Retrospective Look at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalagae, Macdelyn Khufsafalo; Lukusa, Jean-Pierre Kabeya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to intrinsically explore how inclusive education (UNESCO, 1994) can be contextualized and applied within the cultural perspective of "Botho." The impending issue restraining reform of inclusion policies in Botswana and other Sub-Saharan countries is failure to tailor these policies to local context (ILO,…

  18. An Investigation on Students Academic Performance for Junior Secondary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    MolokoMphale, Luke; Mhlauli, Mavis B.

    2014-01-01

    The major purpose of the study was to investigate factors which contribute to the decline in students' academic performance in junior secondary schools in Botswana since 2010. The study was mainly quantitative and used the positivist inquiry paradigm. The study employed critical theory for its theoretical framework. Questionnaires were used to…

  19. Long term trends in economic inequality : Lessons from colonial Botswana 1921–1974

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, Jutta; Hillbom, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This article contributes to the growing literature on colonial legacies influencing long-term development. It focuses on Botswana, a case where the post-independence diamond-led economy has been considered an economic success story, despite its high levels of inequality. Here it is argued that this

  20. Long term trends in economic inequality : Lessons from colonial Botswana 1921–1974

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, Jutta; Hillbom, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This article contributes to the growing literature on colonial legacies influencing long-term development. It focuses on Botswana, a case where the post-independence diamond-led economy has been considered an economic success story, despite its high levels of inequality. Here it is argued that this

  1. Effective Utilization of ICT in English Language Learning--The Case of University of Botswana Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umunnakwe, Ngozi; Sello, Queen

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the effective utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by first year undergraduates of the University of Botswana (UB) in their reading and writing skills. The first year students are not first language (L1) learners of English. They have not utilized computers for learning reading and writing in their…

  2. Botswana School Child Parents: Their Personal and Community Relationships Contexts for Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntinda, Kayi; Mpofu, Elias; Bender, Benza; Moagi, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The study determined personal-socio-contextual influences that predicted the perceived quality of relationships with Batswana early teenage mothers. The participants were 86 Botswana high school students (mean age 18.97, SD = 1.76) with motherhood. They completed a numerical measure of adjustment to teenage motherhood in the context of family,…

  3. Agriculture on the Brink: Climate Change, Labor and Smallholder Farming in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Moseley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Botswana is a semi-arid, middle-income African country that imports 90 percent of its food. Despite its relative prosperity, Botswana also suffers from one of the highest measures of income inequality in the world, persistent poverty, and relatively high levels of food insecurity. The objective of this paper is to explore how political economy, climate change and livelihood dynamics are synergistically impacting household food security. The major finding is that the marginalization of smallholder farming in Botswana has as much or more to do with domestic, regional and international political economy as it does with climate change. As such, international efforts to support climate change adaptation in Botswana will have a limited effect on smallholder farming livelihoods and rural food security unless such efforts take account of political economic constraints. Effective support must be based on a grounded understanding of the real drivers of marginalization and food insecurity. One initiative that merits further exploration is the government’s backyard gardening initiative, which could be viewed as a pro-poor climate adaptation strategy. The findings of this paper are based on semi-structured interviews with policymakers and surveys with urban, peri-urban and rural households undertaken in 2012 and 2015.

  4. Delta hedging strategies comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Giovanni, Domenico; Ortobelli, S.; Rachev, S.T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we implement dynamic delta hedging strategies based on several option pricing models. We analyze different subordinated option pricing models and we examine delta hedging costs using ex-post daily prices of S&P 500. Furthermore, we compare the performance of each subordinated model ...

  5. Validation of AIDS-related mortality in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taffa Negussie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality data are used to conduct disease surveillance, describe health status and inform planning processes for health service provision and resource allocation. In many countries, HIV- and AIDS-related deaths are believed to be under-reported in government statistics. Methods To estimate the extent of under-reporting of HIV- and AIDS-related deaths in Botswana, we conducted a retrospective study of a sample of deaths reported in the government vital registration database from eight hospitals, where more than 40% of deaths in the country in 2005 occurred. We used the consensus of three physicians conducting independent reviews of medical records as the gold standard comparison. We examined the sensitivity, specificity and other validity statistics. Results Of the 5276 deaths registered in the eight hospitals, 29% were HIV- and AIDS-related. The percentage of HIV- and AIDS-related deaths confirmed by physician consensus (positive predictive value was 95.4%; however, the percentage of non-HIV- and non-AIDS-related deaths confirmed (negative predictive value was only 69.1%. The sensitivity and specificity of the vital registration system was 55.7% and 97.3%, respectively. After correcting for misclassification, the percentage of HIV- and AIDS--related deaths was estimated to be in the range of 48.8% to 54.4%, depending on the definition. Conclusion Improvements in hospitals and within government offices are necessary to strengthen the vital registration system. These should include such strategies as training physicians and coders in accurate reporting and recording of death statistics, implementing continuous quality assurance methods, and working with the government to underscore the importance of using mortality statistics in future evidence-based planning.

  6. Corporate entrepreneurship orientation and the pursuit of innovating opportunities in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodi Botha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and objectives: A causal relationship between the independent variable (introduction of innovation and the dependent variable (Corporate Entrepreneurship orientation is explored by addressing the question: Do companies in Botswana have a corporate entrepreneurship (CE orientation that leads them to pursue innovating opportunities? The primary objective is to investigate how CE orientation in companies in Botswana is linked to individual employees' pursuit of innovation within corporate boundaries. Secondary objectives are to identify the prerequisites and factors of CE orientation, individual employees' perceptions and the importance of innovation factors in established companies. Problem investigated: To determine whether existing firms in Botswana represent the concept of an entrepreneurial company within the sphere of corporate entrepreneurship by pursuing innovating opportunities. The intention is to identify the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of individuals as potential corporate entrepreneurs, their ability to be innovative and how such innovation is brought to fruition. Design and methodology: To obtain quantifiable measures of the link between CE orientation and innovation, a quantitative approach is used: a formalised, cross-sectional research design. The sample consists of 100 individuals at supervisory levels and above in large corporate companies, from eight different provinces in Botswana. A research instrument is used and convenience sampling employed. Factor analysis is performed on the questionnaire to determine its validity and reliability. A Pearson correlation coefficient test is conducted on the three factors identified in factor analysis. The chi-square test and T-test (Mann-Whitney U test are used to illustrate the statistically significant differences between the different variables and factors. Findings and implications: This paper proves the inextricable link between CE orientation and the pursuit of innovation

  7. Information needs of Botswana health care workers and perceptions of wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elizabeth; Masupe, Tiny; Joseph, Joseph; Ho-Foster, Ari; Chavez, Afton; Jammalamadugu, Swetha; Marek, Andrew; Arumala, Ruth; Ketshogileng, Dineo; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Kovarik, Carrie

    2016-11-01

    Since the UN Human Rights Council's recognition on the subject in 2011, the right to access the Internet and information is now considered one of the most basic human rights of global citizens [1,2]. Despite this, an information gap between developed and resource-limited countries remains, and there is scant research on actual information needs of workers themselves. The Republic of Botswana represents a fertile ground to address existing gaps in research, policy, and practice, due to its demonstrated gap in access to information and specialists among rural health care workers (HCWs), burgeoning mHealth capacity, and a timely offer from Orange Telecommunications to access Wikipedia for free on mobile platforms for Botswana subscribers. In this study, we sought to identify clinical information needs of HCWs of Botswana and their perception of Wikipedia as a clinical tool. Twenty-eight facilitated focus groups, consisting of 113 HCWs of various cadres based at district hospitals, clinics, and health posts around Botswana, were employed. Transcription and thematic analysis were performed for those groups. Access to the Internet is limited at most facilities. Most HCWs placed high importance upon using Botswana Ministry of Health (MoH) resources for obtaining credible clinical information. However, the clinical applicability of these materials was limited due to discrepancies amongst sources, potentially outdated information, and poor optimization for time-sensitive circumstances. As a result, HCWs faced challenges, such as loss of patient trust and compromises in patient care. Potential solutions posed by HCWs to address these issues included: multifaceted improvements in Internet infrastructure, access to up-to-date information, transfer of knowledge from MoH to HCW, and improving content and applicability of currently available information. Topics of clinical information needs were broad and encompassed: HIV, TB (Tuberculosis), OB/GYN (Obstetrics and Gynecology

  8. Horizontal Symmetries $\\Delta(150)$ and $\\Delta(600)$

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, C S

    2013-01-01

    Using group theory of mixing to examine all finite subgroups of SU(3) with an order less than 512, we found recently that only the group $\\Delta(150)$ can give rise to a correct reactor angle $\\th_{13}$ of neutrino mixing without any free parameter. It predicts $\\sin^22\\th_{13}=0.11$ and a sub-maximal atmospheric angle with $\\sin^22\\th_{23}=0.94$, in good agreement with experiment. The solar angle $\\th_{12}$, the CP phase $\\d$, and the neutrino masses $m_i$ are left as free parameters. In this article we provide more details of this case, discuss possible gain and loss by introducing right-handed symmetries, and/or valons to construct dynamical models. A simple model is discussed where the solar angle agrees with experiment, and all its mixing parameters can be obtained from the group $\\Delta(600)$ by symmetry alone. The promotion of $\\Delta(150)$ to $\\Delta(600)$ is on the one hand analogous to the promotion of $S_3$ to $S_4$ in the presence of tribimaximal mixing, and on the other hand similar to the extens...

  9. SCALING UP A MOBILE TELEMEDICINE SOLUTION IN BOTSWANA: KEYS TO SUSTAINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagiso eNdlovu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective health care delivery is significantly compromised in an environment where resources, both human and technical, are limited. Botswana’s health care system is one of the many in the African continent with few specialised medical doctors, thereby posing a barrier to patients’ access to health care services. In addition, the traditional landline and non-robust Information Technology (IT network infrastructure characterised by slow bandwidth still dominates the health care system in Botswana. Upgrading of the landline IT infrastructure to meet today’s health care demands is a tedious, long and expensive process. Despite these challenges, there still lies hope in health care delivery utilising wireless telecommunication services. Botswana has recently experienced a tremendous growth in the mobile telecommunication industry coupled with an increase in the number of individually owned mobile devices. This growth inspired the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP to collaborate with local partners to explore using mobile devices as tools to improve access to specialised health care delivery. Pilot studies were conducted across four medical specialties, including radiology, oral medicine, dermatology and cervical cancer screening. Findings from the studies became vital evidence in support of the first scale-up project of a mobile telemedicine solution in Botswana, also known as Kgonafalo. Some technical and social challenges were encountered during the initial studies, such as malfunctioning of mobile devices, accidental damage of devices and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. These challenges brought about lessons learnt, including a strong need for unwavering senior management support, establishment of solid local public-private partnerships, and efficient project sustainability plans. Sustainability milestones included the development and signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU between the Botswana government and

  10. Application of PRECEDE-PROCEED model to tackle problems identified with diarrhoea burden among under-5s in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Tosin; Mchunu, Gugu

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhoea has been identified as the second leading cause of mortality among under-5s and also claims more life than HIV, measles and malaria combined together in the same category of population. This article is a combination of literature review and personal experience of lessons learnt from past diarrhoea outbreaks in Botswana that caused significant rate of mortality among under-5s. The paper used literature review to identify contributory factors to diarrhoea burden among under-5s in Botswana and applied a community health nursing framework (PRECEDE-PROCEED) to tackle the problems identified. The study revealed that Botswana mothers are lacking in knowledge related to exclusive breastfeeding, prevention and treatment of diarrhoea disease. The paper recommends that health-care workers in Botswana be sensitized on current diarrhoea management to tailor their health education methods appropriately. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Addressing the Growing Cancer Burden in the Wake of the AIDS Epidemic in Botswana: The BOTSOGO Collaborative Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bvochora-Nsingo, Memory [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Gierga, David P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Alphonse Kayembe, Mukendi K. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, National Health Laboratory, Gaborone (Botswana); Department of Pathology, University of Botswana School of Medicine, Gaborone (Botswana); Mmalane, Mompati [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Russell, Anthony H.; Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brown, Carolyn [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Musimar, Zola [Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Abramson, Jeremy S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bruce, Kathy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Karumekayi, Talkmore [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Clayman, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hodgeman, Ryan [Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute, Gaborone (Botswana); Kasese, Joseph [Bokamoso Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Makufa, Remigio [Gaborone Private Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Bigger, Elizabeth [Princess Marina Hospital, Gaborone (Botswana); Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Suneja, Gita [Department of Radiation Oncology and Leonard David Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Busse, Paul M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    Botswana has experienced a dramatic increase in HIV-related malignancies over the past decade. The BOTSOGO collaboration sought to establish a sustainable partnership with the Botswana oncology community to improve cancer care. This collaboration is anchored by regular tumor boards and on-site visits that have resulted in the introduction of new approaches to treatment and perceived improvements in care, providing a model for partnership between academic oncology centers and high-burden countries with limited resources.

  12. On the width of N-Delta and Delta-Delta states

    CERN Document Server

    Niskanen, J A

    2016-01-01

    It is seen by a coupled-channel calculation that in the two-baryon N-Delta or Delta-Delta system the width of the state is greatly diminished due to the relative kinetic energy of the two baryons, since the internal energy of the particles, available for pionic decay, is smaller. A similar state dependent effect arises from the centrifugal barrier in N-Delta or Delta-Delta systems with non-zero orbital angular momentum. The double-Delta width can become even smaller than the free width of a single Delta. This has some bearing to the interpretation of the d'(2380) resonance recently discovered at COSY.

  13. Regional review: the hydrology of the Okavango Delta, Botswana—processes, data and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milzow, Christian; Kgotlhang, Lesego; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Meier, Philipp; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    The wetlands of the Okavango Delta accommodate a multitude of ecosystems with a large diversity in fauna and flora. They not only provide the traditional livelihood of the local communities but are also the basis of a tourism industry that generates substantial revenue for the whole of Botswana. For the global community, the wetlands retain a tremendous pool of biodiversity. As the upstream states Angola and Namibia are developing, however, changes in the use of the water of the Okavango River and in the ecological status of the wetlands are to be expected. To predict these impacts, the hydrology of the Delta has to be understood. This article reviews scientific work done for that purpose, focussing on the hydrological modelling of surface water and groundwater. Research providing input data to hydrological models is also presented. It relies heavily on all types of remote sensing. The history of hydrologic models of the Delta is retraced from the early box models to state-of-the-art distributed hydrological models. The knowledge gained from hydrological models and its relevance for the management of the Delta are discussed.

  14. Profile of acute poisoning in three health districts of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kasule

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study sought to characterise acute poisoning cases seen in three health districts of Botswana.Method: A retrospective review of patients’ records was conducted and included patients treated from January 2004 to December 2005. Data on the demographic status of the patients, information about the poisonous agent(s involved, and the circumstances and outcomes of the poisoning incidents were recorded on a pre-tested data collection form.Results: A total of 590 cases of acute poisoning were included in the analysis. The most affected age category was that of children aged less than six years, who constituted 33.4% of the cases. Most incidents were recorded in the urban district of Gaborone. Seventy-eight percent (78% of the incidents were accidental, with the remainder being intentional. The poisonous agents involved were pharmaceuticals (26.6%, natural toxins (25.6%, household products (14.6%, foods (14.4%, alcohol (6.9%, traditional medicines (4.7%, unspecified agents (3.2%, and agrochemicals (2.7%. The most common route of poison exposure was by oral (82.2%, followed by dermal contact (16.5%, while the inhalation of gases occurred in 1.2% of cases. An incidence rate of 4.7/1000, a case fatality rate of 3.8/100, and 1.5% of deaths were recorded over the two-year period.Conclusion: In conclusion, it can be stated that acute poisoning involved mainly young children and resulted in an incidence rate of 4.7/1000, a case fatality rate of 3.8/100, and 1.5% of deaths over the two-year period. There were differences based on age category, gender and residence of the victims, the types of toxic agents involved, as well as the circumstances and the outcomes of the poisoning incidents. Given the fact that pharmaceuticals, natural toxins, household products and foods were the agents most commonly involved, targeted interventions should take these differences into account in addressing the problem of acute poisoning.

  15. geomorphology_delta

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Surficial geology of the Delta area of California by Brian Atwater of the U.S. Geological Survey. Source maps are from the USGS publication MF-1401. This digital...

  16. Delta-Reliability

    OpenAIRE

    Eugster, P.; Guerraoui, R.; Kouznetsov, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new, non-binary measure of the reliability of broadcast algorithms, called Delta-Reliability. This measure quantifies the reliability of practical broadcast algorithms that, on the one hand, were devised with some form of reliability in mind, but, on the other hand, are not considered reliable according to the ``traditional'' notion of broadcast reliability [HT94]. Our specification of Delta-Reliability suggests a further step towards bridging the gap between theory and...

  17. Selectively delta-doped Al(x)Ga(1-x)As/GaAs heterostructures with high two-dimensional electron-gas concentrations (n2DEG) of not less than 1.5 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm for field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, E. F.; Cunningham, J. E.; Tsang, W. T.; Timp, G. L.

    1987-10-01

    Selectively delta-doped heterostructures in the Al(x)Ga(1-x)As/GaAs material system, combining the delta-doping and selectively doped heterostructure concepts, are considered. From Shubnikov-de Haas measurements, two-dimensional electron-gas concentrations of 1.1 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm at 300 mK and at a spacer thickness of 25 A are found, and it is suggested that such high values are due to size quantization in Al(x)Ga(1-x)As and the localization of donor impurities within one atomic monolayer. Selectively delta-doped heterostructure transistors are fabricated, showing a transconductance of about 360 mS/mm at a gate length of 1.2 microns and a temperature of 300 K.

  18. Scaling up a Mobile Telemedicine Solution in Botswana: Keys to Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlovu, Kagiso; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Park, Elizabeth; Dikai, Zambo; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2014-01-01

    Effective health care delivery is significantly compromised in an environment where resources, both human and technical, are limited. Botswana's health care system is one of the many in the African continent with few specialized medical doctors, thereby posing a barrier to patients' access to health care services. In addition, the traditional landline and non-robust Information Technology (IT) network infrastructure characterized by slow bandwidth still dominates the health care system in Botswana. Upgrading of the landline IT infrastructure to meet today's health care demands is a tedious, long, and expensive process. Despite these challenges, there still lies hope in health care delivery utilizing wireless telecommunication services. Botswana has recently experienced tremendous growth in the mobile telecommunication industry coupled with an increase in the number of individually owned mobile devices. This growth inspired the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP) to collaborate with local partners to explore using mobile devices as tools to improve access to specialized health care delivery. Pilot studies were conducted across four medical specialties, including radiology, oral medicine, dermatology, and cervical cancer screening. Findings from the studies became vital evidence in support of the first scale-up project of a mobile telemedicine solution in Botswana, also known as "Kgonafalo." Some technical and social challenges were encountered during the initial studies, such as malfunctioning of mobile devices, accidental damage of devices, and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. These challenges brought about lessons learnt, including a strong need for unwavering senior management support, establishment of solid local public-private partnerships, and efficient project sustainability plans. Sustainability milestones included the development and signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Botswana government and a private

  19. An innovative educational approach to professional development of medical laboratory scientists in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magowe MK

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mabel KM Magowe,1 Jenny H Ledikwe,2,3 Ishmael Kasvosve,1 Robert Martin,2 Kabo Thankane,3 Bazghina-werq Semo2,31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana; 2Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 3Botswana International Training and Education Center for Health, Gaborone, BotswanaPurpose: To address the shortage of laboratory scientists in Botswana, an innovative, one-year academic bridging program was initiated at the University of Botswana, to advance diploma-holding laboratory technicians towards becoming laboratory scientists holding Bachelor’s degrees. An evaluation was conducted, which described the outcomes of the program and the lessons learned from this novel approach to meeting human resource needs.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, mixed-methods evaluation. Qualitative interviews were conducted with graduates of the Bachelor of Science (BSc Medical Laboratory Sciences (MLS bridging program, along with the graduates’ current supervisors, and key informants who were involved in program development or implementation. The quantitative data collected included a written questionnaire, completed by program graduates, with a retrospective pre-test/post-test survey of graduates’ confidence, in terms of key laboratory competencies.Results: The BSc MLS bridging program produced thirty-three laboratory scientists over 3 years. There was a significant increase in confidence among graduates, for specified competencies, after the program (P<0.05. Graduates reported acquiring new skills and, often, accepting new responsibilities at their former workplace, particularly in relationship to leadership and management. Five graduates enrolled in advanced degree programs. Most graduates assumed increased responsibility. However, only two graduates were promoted after completing the training program. The lessons learned include: the importance of stakeholder involvement, the need for

  20. Electricity Consumption and Economic Growth: Trivariate investigation in Botswana with Capital Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiru Adebola Solarin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between electricity consumption and real gross domestic product in Botswana (the world’s largest producer of diamonds. The study includes capital formation in a trivariate system for the period covering 1980-2008. Zivot and Andrews (1992 unit roots test; bound test for cointegration, and Granger causality test are employed. Unidirectional causality is found from electricity consumption to real gross domestic product is in line with study of Altinay and Karagol (2005 among others. The long run estimate reinforce the Granger causality tests by indicating that electricity consumption is positively associated with real gross domestic product in the long run. Further findings suggest unidirectional causality from capital formation to real gross domestic product. The implication is that Botswana- being a highly energy dependent country- will have the performance of its capital formation on the economy partly determined by adequate electricity.

  1. Continuing Discontinuities: Local and State Perspectives on Cattle Production and Water Management in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    From 1885 when the modern state of Botswana was founded until the discovery of significant mineral deposits in 1967, one year after independence, the livestock industry, particularly cattle production, played a significant role in the country’s economy. Today there are concerns about how the livestock industry, because of its importance to many rural households, and its potential to diversify the mineral-dominated economy, can be revived. In recognition of the country’s semi-arid climate, the...

  2. Clinical use of blood and blood components in post-abortion care in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsima, B M; Melese, T; Mogobe, K D; Chabaesele, K; Rankgoane, G; Nassali, M; Habte, D

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the pattern and gaps in blood product utilisation in post-abortion care is crucial for evidence-based planning and priority setting. To describe the current use of blood and blood components in post-abortion care in Botswana. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study across four hospitals in Botswana using routine patients' records. We included all patients admitted for an abortion between January and August 2014. Descriptive statistics are used to report the results. Whole blood and red cell concentrates were used in 59/619 (9·5%) of patients. Plasma and platelet use was 1·3 and 0·7%, respectively. The mean admission haemoglobin level was 10·07 g dL(-1) (SD 2·69) and differed significantly between referral and district hospitals. The mean number of blood units transfused per patient was 2·23 (standard deviation (SD) 1·23), with 15/55 (27·3%) receiving a single unit. A total of 43/288 (14·9%) of the patients had haemoglobin levels below 7 g dL(-1) but did not receive any transfusion. There was a moderate positive correlation between admission haemoglobin level and time to transfusion (Spearman's rho = 0·37, P = 0·01). The number of blood units given increased with decreasing admission haemoglobin level. The strength of this association was moderate (Spearman's rho = -0·48, P blood and blood components in post-abortion care in Botswana despite an apparent clinical need in some instances. The reason for this shortfall, as well as its impact on morbidity and mortality, needs to be explored and be a focus of health systems research in Botswana. © 2016 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Blood Transfusion Society.

  3. Developmentally Appropriate Technology in Early Childhood (DATEC) in Botswana: In-Service Teachers’ Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    BOSE, Kabita

    2009-01-01

    Developmentally Appropriate Technology in Early Childhood (DATEC) aims to identify themost appropriate applications of Information and Communication Technology to support thedevelopment of children under eight years of age. Botswana has a unique spread ofpopulation density and deep-rooted socio-cultural values. There is a need to address thecompatibility of these aspects with the application of Information and CommunicationTechnology in the proposed Early Childhood Education programmes throug...

  4. A cross-sectional study of HPV vaccine acceptability in Gaborone, Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Taylor DiAngi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women in Botswana and elsewhere in Sub-Saharan Africa. We sought to examine whether HPV vaccine is acceptable among parents in Botswana, which recently licensed the vaccine to prevent cervical cancer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2009, around the time the vaccine was first licensed, with adults recruited in general medicine and HIV clinics in Gaborone, the capital of Botswana. Although only 9% (32/376 of respondents had heard of HPV vaccine prior to the survey, 88% (329/376 said they definitely will have their adolescent daughters receive HPV vaccine. Most respondents would get the vaccine for their daughters at a public or community clinic (42% or a gynecology or obstetrician's office (39%, and 74% would get it for a daughter if it were available at her school. Respondents were more likely to say that they definitely will get HPV vaccine for their daughters if they had less education (OR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.07-0.58 or lived more than 30 kilometers from the capital, Gaborone (OR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.06-4.93. Other correlates of acceptability were expecting to be involved in the decision to get HPV vaccine, thinking the vaccine would be hard to obtain, and perceiving greater severity of HPV-related diseases. CONCLUSIONS: HPV vaccination of adolescent girls would be highly acceptable if the vaccine became widely available to the daughters of healthcare seeking parents in Gaborone, Botswana. Potential HPV vaccination campaigns should provide more information about HPV and the vaccine as well as work to minimize barriers.

  5. Buffalo, bush meat, and the zoonotic threat of brucellosis in Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Anne Alexander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of global importance infecting humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. Little is known about the epidemiology and persistence of brucellosis in wildlife in Southern Africa, particularly in Botswana. METHODS: Archived wildlife samples from Botswana (1995-2000 were screened with the Rose Bengal Test (RBT and fluorescence polarization assay (FPA and included the African buffalo (247, bushbuck (1, eland (5, elephant (25, gemsbok (1, giraffe (9, hartebeest (12, impala (171, kudu (27, red lechwe (10, reedbuck (1, rhino (2, springbok (5, steenbok (2, warthog (24, waterbuck (1, wildebeest (33, honey badger (1, lion (43, and zebra (21. Human case data were extracted from government annual health reports (1974-2006. FINDINGS: Only buffalo (6%, 95% CI 3.04%-8.96% and giraffe (11%, 95% CI 0-38.43% were confirmed seropositive on both tests. Seropositive buffalo were widely distributed across the buffalo range where cattle density was low. Human infections were reported in low numbers with most infections (46% occurring in children (<14 years old and no cases were reported among people working in the agricultural sector. CONCLUSIONS: Low seroprevalence of brucellosis in Botswana buffalo in a previous study in 1974 and again in this survey suggests an endemic status of the disease in this species. Buffalo, a preferred source of bush meat, is utilized both legally and illegally in Botswana. Household meat processing practices can provide widespread pathogen exposure risk to family members and the community, identifying an important source of zoonotic pathogen transmission potential. Although brucellosis may be controlled in livestock populations, public health officials need to be alert to the possibility of human infections arising from the use of bush meat. This study illustrates the need for a unified approach in infectious disease research that includes consideration of both domestic and wildlife sources of

  6. La chambre de Mary : ou comment devenir consommatrice à Francistown, Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Zabus, C.; Lame, D de

    1999-01-01

    Cet article est fondé sur un travail de terrain ethnographique réalisé sur une durée de cinq années d'observation participante entrecoupée de pauses dans la ville de Francistown au Botswana à partir de 1988. Il s'agit d'une étude de cas longitudinale, où est suivie une jeune femme qui a migré d'un

  7. Rural exposure during medical education and student preference for future practice location - a case of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya Arscott-Mills

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botswana’s medical school graduated its first class in 2014. Given the importance of attracting doctors to rural areas the school incorporated rural exposure throughout its curriculum. Aim: This study explored the impact of rural training on students’ attitudes towards rural practice.Setting: The University of Botswana family medicine rural training sites, Maun and Mahalapye.Methods: The study used a mixed-methods design. After rural family medicine rotations, third- and fifth-year students were invited to complete a questionnaire and semi-structured interview. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.Results: The thirty-six participants’ age averaged 23 years and 48.6% were male. Thirtythree desired urban practice in a public institution or university. Rural training did not influence preferred future practice location. Most desired specialty training outside Botswana but planned to practice in Botswana. Professional stagnation, isolation, poorly functioning health facilities, dysfunctional referral systems, and perceived lack of learning opportunities were barriers to rural practice. Lack of recreation and poor infrastructure were personal barriers. Many appreciated the diversity of practice and supportive staff seen in rural practice. Several considered monetary compensation as an enticement for rural practice. Only those with a rural background perceived proximity to family as an incentive to rural practice.Conclusion: The majority of those interviewed plan to practice in urban Botswana, however, they did identify factors that, if addressed, may increase rural practice in the future. Establishing systems to facilitate professional development, strengthening specialists support, and deploying doctors near their home towns are strategies that may improve retention of doctors in rural areas.Keyords: rural health, student perceptions

  8. Rural exposure during medical education and student preference for future practice location - a case of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya Arscott-Mills

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botswana’s medical school graduated its first class in 2014. Given the importance of attracting doctors to rural areas the school incorporated rural exposure throughout its curriculum. Aim: This study explored the impact of rural training on students’ attitudes towards rural practice.Setting: The University of Botswana family medicine rural training sites, Maun and Mahalapye.Methods: The study used a mixed-methods design. After rural family medicine rotations, third- and fifth-year students were invited to complete a questionnaire and semi-structured interview. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.Results: The thirty-six participants’ age averaged 23 years and 48.6% were male. Thirtythree desired urban practice in a public institution or university. Rural training did not influence preferred future practice location. Most desired specialty training outside Botswana but planned to practice in Botswana. Professional stagnation, isolation, poorly functioning health facilities, dysfunctional referral systems, and perceived lack of learning opportunities were barriers to rural practice. Lack of recreation and poor infrastructure were personal barriers. Many appreciated the diversity of practice and supportive staff seen in rural practice. Several considered monetary compensation as an enticement for rural practice. Only those with a rural background perceived proximity to family as an incentive to rural practice.Conclusion: The majority of those interviewed plan to practice in urban Botswana, however, they did identify factors that, if addressed, may increase rural practice in the future. Establishing systems to facilitate professional development, strengthening specialists support, and deploying doctors near their home towns are strategies that may improve retention of doctors in rural areas.Keyords: rural health, student perceptions

  9. Satellite remote sensing of rangelands in Botswana. II - NOAA AVHRR and herbaceous vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, S. D.; Tucker, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The relation between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the herbaceous vegetation in Tamasane, Shakwe, and Masama in eastern Botswana is studied using 1983-1984 AVHRR data. The procedures for Landsat MSS interpolation of ground measurements and the data processing of the AVHRR data are described. The temporal sequence AVHRR global-area coverage (GAC) composite NDVI is examined. The AVHRR GAC composite NDVI and biomass and Landsat MSS interpolations of field measurements are analyzed and compared.

  10. The Release of a Captive-Raised Female African Elephant (Loxodonta africana in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Harris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wild female elephants live in close-knit matrilineal groups and housing captive elephants in artificial social groupings can cause significant welfare issues for individuals not accepted by other group members. We document the release of a captive-raised female elephant used in the safari industry because of welfare and management problems. She was fitted with a satellite collar, and spatial and behavioural data were collected over a 17-month period to quantify her interactions with the wild population. She was then monitored infrequently for a further five-and-a-half years. We observed few signs of aggression towards her from the wild elephants with which she socialized. She used an area of comparable size to wild female elephants, and this continued to increase as she explored new areas. Although she did not fully integrate into a wild herd, she had three calves of her own, and formed a social unit with another female and her calf that were later released from the same captive herd. We recommend that release to the wild be considered as a management option for other captive female elephants.

  11. Relative availability of natural prey versus livestock predicts landscape suitability for cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbach, Hanlie E K; Winterbach, Christiaan W; Boast, Lorraine K; Klein, Rebecca; Somers, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Prey availability and human-carnivore conflict are strong determinants that govern the spatial distribution and abundance of large carnivore species and determine the suitability of areas for their conservation. For wide-ranging large carnivores such as cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), additional conservation areas beyond protected area boundaries are crucial to effectively conserve them both inside and outside protected areas. Although cheetahs prefer preying on wild prey, they also cause conflict with people by predating on especially small livestock. We investigated whether the distribution of cheetahs' preferred prey and small livestock biomass could be used to explore the potential suitability of agricultural areas in Botswana for the long-term persistence of its cheetah population. We found it gave a good point of departure for identifying priority areas for land management, the threat to connectivity between cheetah populations, and areas where the reduction and mitigation of human-cheetah conflict is critical. Our analysis showed the existence of a wide prey base for cheetahs across large parts of Botswana's agricultural areas, which provide additional large areas with high conservation potential. Twenty percent of wild prey biomass appears to be the critical point to distinguish between high and low probable levels of human-cheetah conflict. We identified focal areas in the agricultural zones where restoring wild prey numbers in concurrence with effective human-cheetah conflict mitigation efforts are the most immediate conservation strategies needed to maintain Botswana's still large and contiguous cheetah population.

  12. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 1: Integrated approach and field campaign results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Vugts, H. F.; Ramothwa, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. Results of the first part of the program (Botswana 1) which ran from 1 Jan. 1988 - 31 Dec. 1990 are summarized. Botswana 1 consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components in general are described and activities performed during the surface energy modeling component including the extensive field campaign are summarized. The results of the passive microwave component are summarized. The key of the field campaign was a multilevel approach, whereby measurements by various similar sensors were made at several altitudes and resolution. Data collection was performed at two adjacent sites of contrasting surface character. The following measurements were made: micrometeorological measurements, surface temperatures, soil temperatures, soil moisture, vegetation (leaf area index and biomass), satellite data, aircraft data, atmospheric soundings, stomatal resistance, and surface emissivity.

  13. Small Business Critical Success/Failure Factors In Developing Economies: Some Evidences From Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelealem T. Temtime

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the discovery of diamond has propelled Botswana from one of the poorest countries in 1966 to its current economic status as a middle-income country, the country still faces the problems of economic diversification, employment creation, income generation and distribution and poverty alleviation. Governmental and non- Governmental organizations have put many efforts on the development of small and medium Enterprises (SMEs to diversify the economy away from mining, to create jobs, generate income and alleviate poverty. However, the pace of development of SMEs, after 30 years, is very slow. The small business failure rate is currently estimated to be over 80%. There is a general consensus among policy makers, politicians and researchers in Botswana that this trend should not be allowed to continue indefinitely. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Perceived Critical Success/Failure factors (PCSFs affecting the development of SMEs by collecting primary data from 203 SMEs in 3 cities in the republic of Botswana through a questionnaire. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were employed to present the empirical data. The findings showed that ten PCSFs (human resources development; organizational development, managerial background; managerial leadership and competitive strategy affect the performance of SMEs. The PCSFs are strongly related among themselves, indicating the need for a holistic and systematic approach in addressing them. Important relationships were also found between the PCSFs and firm-specific demographic variables such as ownership status, experience and operation period. Recommendations and implications for the policy and research are also forwarded.

  14. Safe male circumcision in Botswana: tension between traditional practices and biomedical marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katisi, Masego; Daniel, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    Botswana has been running Safe Male Circumcision (SMC) since 2009 and has not yet met its target. Donors like the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Africa Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnership (funded by the Gates Foundation) in collaboration with Botswana's Ministry of Health have invested much to encourage HIV-negative men to circumcise. Demand creation strategies make use of media and celebrities. The objective of this paper is to explore responses to SMC in relation to circumcision as part of traditional initiation practices. More specifically, we present the views of two communities in Botswana on SMC consultation processes, implementation procedures and campaign strategies. The methods used include participant observation, in-depth interviews with key stakeholders (donors, implementers and Ministry officials), community leaders and men in the community. We observe that consultation with traditional leaders was done in a seemingly superficial, non-participatory manner. While SMC implementers reported pressure to deliver numbers to the World Health Organization, traditional leaders promoted circumcision through their routine traditional initiation ceremonies at breaks of two-year intervals. There were conflicting views on public SMC demand creation campaigns in relation to the traditional secrecy of circumcision. In conclusion, initial cooperation of local chiefs and elders turned into resistance.

  15. Poverty Alleviation through Pro-Poor Tourism: The Role of Botswana Forest Reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haretsebe Manwa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Both government and international donor agencies now promote the use of tourism to alleviate poverty. The Botswana government has embraced tourism as a meaningful and sustainable economic activity and diversification opportunity, which now ranks second after mining in its contribution to the country’s gross domestic product. The study reported in this paper investigates perceptions of stakeholders on the opportunities that would be created for the poor by opening up Botswana’s forest reserves for ecotourism. Data was collected through mixed methods involving in-depth interviews with government departments, traditional leaders, quasi-government organisations and the Hospitality and Tourism Association of Botswana. Focus group discussions were also held with village development committees, Chobe Enclave Conservation Trust (CECT and Kasane, Lesoma and Pandematenga Trust (KALEPA members, and a consultative national workshop of stakeholders was also held. The findings indicate that opening up forest reserves for ecotourism has the potential to alleviate poverty among the disadvantaged groups living adjacent to forest reserves through direct (employment, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs, secondary (linkages/partnerships and dynamic effects (sustainable livelihoods. The study concludes by cautioning that whilst pro-poor tourism may yield short- and medium-term benefits, in keeping with sustainability objectives, participants in the programme need to be mindful of forestry encroachment and come up with strategies to ensure the sustainability of the Botswana forest reserves.

  16. Comparative assessment of water infiltration of soils under different tillage systems in eastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroke, T. S.; Dikinya, O.; Patrick, C.

    Water infiltration is an important component of water balance for improving crop production potential in dryland soil tillage systems in Botswana, particularly in the eastern region. Hardsetting soils common in arable lands of Botswana, often require some kind of tillage such as mouldboard ploughing, chiselling and ripping to improve waterharvesting and crop growth conditions. The objective of this study was to compare ponded cumulative infiltration, steady state infiltration rate and sorptivity of soils cultivated using deep ripping, single and double mouldboard ploughing. This study was conducted on Chromic Luvisols (sandy loam), Haplic Luvisols (sandy clay loam), Ferric Luvisols (clay loam), and Ferric Arenosols (sand). Infiltration was measured using double ring infiltrometer method for 4 h. Although infiltration was smaller on traffic line of deep ripping system at all sites, it was only significantly ( P 0.05) different under deep ripped. Cumulative and steady state infiltration rate was greater under sandy than loamy soils, smaller under double ploughing compared with single ploughed and deep ripped soils. Sorptivity was not significantly ( P > 0.05) different among tillage systems but was greater under sandy than sandy loam soils. Information on tillage and infiltration can improve implementation of waterharvesting technologies and crop production in Botswana.

  17. Triggering the decision to undergo medical male circumcision: a qualitative study of adult men in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Kathleen E; Semo, Bazghina-Werq; Ntsuape, Conrad; Ramabu, Nankie M; Otlhomile, Boyce; Plank, Rebeca M; Barnhart, Scott; Ledikwe, Jenny H

    2016-08-01

    In 2007, the World Health Organization endorsed voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) as part of comprehensive HIV-prevention strategies. A major challenge facing VMMC programs in sub-Saharan Africa remains demand creation; there is urgent need for data on key elements needed to trigger the decision among eligible men to seek VMMC. Using qualitative methods, we sought to better understand the circumcision decision-making process in Botswana related to VMMC. From July to November 2013, we conducted 27 focus group discussions in four purposively selected communities in Botswana with men (stratified by circumcision status and age), women (stratified by age) and community leaders. All discussions were facilitated by a trained same-sex interviewer, audio recorded, transcribed and translated to English, and analyzed for key themes using an inductive content analytic approach. Improved hygiene was frequently cited as a major benefit of circumcision and many participants believed that cleanliness was directly responsible for the protective effect of VMMC on HIV infection. While protection against HIV was frequently noted as a benefit of VMMC, the data indicate that increased sexual pleasure and perceived attractiveness, not fear of HIV infection, was an underlying reason why men sought VMMC. Data from this qualitative study suggest that more immediate benefits of VMMC, such as improved hygiene and sexual pleasure, play a larger role in the circumcision decision compared with protection from potential HIV infection. These findings have immediate implications for targeted demand creation and mobilization activities for increasing uptake of VMMC among adult men in Botswana.

  18. Stakeholders' Perceptions on Shortage of Healthcare Workers in Primary Healthcare in Botswana: Focus Group Discussions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oathokwa Nkomazana

    Full Text Available An adequate health workforce force is central to universal health coverage and positive public health outcomes. However many African countries have critical shortages of healthcare workers, which are worse in primary healthcare. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of healthcare workers, policy makers and the community on the shortage of healthcare workers in Botswana.Fifteen focus group discussions were conducted with three groups of policy makers, six groups of healthcare workers and six groups of community members in rural, urban and remote rural health districts of Botswana. All the participants were 18 years and older. Recruitment was purposive and the framework method was used to inductively analyse the data.There was a perceived shortage of healthcare workers in primary healthcare, which was believed to result from an increased need for health services, inequitable distribution of healthcare workers, migration and too few such workers being trained. Migration was mainly the result of unfavourable personal and family factors, weak and ineffective healthcare and human resources management, low salaries and inadequate incentives for rural and remote area service.Botswana has a perceived shortage of healthcare workers, which is worse in primary healthcare and rural areas, as a result of multiple complex factors. To address the scarcity the country should train adequate numbers of healthcare workers and distribute them equitably to sufficiently resourced healthcare facilities. They should be competently managed and adequately remunerated and the living conditions and rural infrastructure should also be improved.

  19. Safe male circumcision in Botswana: Tension between traditional practices and biomedical marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katisi, Masego; Daniel, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    Botswana has been running Safe Male Circumcision (SMC) since 2009 and has not yet met its target. Donors like the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Africa Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnership (funded by the Gates Foundation) in collaboration with Botswana's Ministry of Health have invested much to encourage HIV-negative men to circumcise. Demand creation strategies make use of media and celebrities. The objective of this paper is to explore responses to SMC in relation to circumcision as part of traditional initiation practices. More specifically, we present the views of two communities in Botswana on SMC consultation processes, implementation procedures and campaign strategies. The methods used include participant observation, in-depth interviews with key stakeholders (donors, implementers and Ministry officials), community leaders and men in the community. We observe that consultation with traditional leaders was done in a seemingly superficial, non-participatory manner. While SMC implementers reported pressure to deliver numbers to the World Health Organization, traditional leaders promoted circumcision through their routine traditional initiation ceremonies at breaks of two-year intervals. There were conflicting views on public SMC demand creation campaigns in relation to the traditional secrecy of circumcision. In conclusion, initial cooperation of local chiefs and elders turned into resistance. PMID:25866013

  20. The Madikwe Forum: a comprehensive partnership for supporting governance of Botswana's HIV and AIDS response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Gavin; Reardon, Candice; Gunthorp, Jonathan; Moeti, Themba; Chingombe, Innocent; Busang, Lesego; Musuka, Godfrey

    2012-03-01

    There is a need for actors within the philanthropic sector to pursue collaborative partnerships with developing nations which could result in sustainable country-led responses to HIV and AIDS. There is also a need to evaluate the structures governing these partnerships in order to determine their effectiveness in strengthening national responses to HIV and AIDS. This article presents findings from a qualitative study of a governance structure of the African Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnerships (ACHAP), namely the Madikwe Forum. The investigation sought to critically reflect on the role and effectiveness of the Madikwe Forum in Botswana's response to HIV and AIDS and to consider the value of such a forum for other developing nations and partnership arrangements. The findings indicate that the Madikwe Forum has enabled considerable progress in the implementation of ACHAP-supported initiatives in Botswana. The constructive working relationship and close alignment between ACHAP and the Botswana government's objectives and priority areas were viewed as critical to this success. However, problems exist regarding the operation of the forum as well as a lack of focus on monitoring and evaluation, which requires the forum's urgent attention.

  1. "My Eyes Went Wide Open"--An Evaluation of the Special Needs Education Awareness Course at Molepolole College of Education, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Gareth

    2006-01-01

    This article is an evaluation of the special needs education awareness course run at Molepolole College of Education, Botswana. The course directly reflects the Government of Botswana's policy on special education and seeks to provide students with a wide range of skills and knowledge to help them identify and support pupils with a variety of…

  2. Using IRT Approach to Detect Gender Biased Items in Public Examinations: A Case Study from the Botswana Junior Certificate Examination in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoyin, O. O.

    2010-01-01

    This is a quantitative study, which attempted to detect gender bias test items from the Botswana Junior Certificate Examination in mathematics. To detect gender bias test items, a randomly selected sample of 4000 students responses to mathematics paper 1 of the Botswana Junior Certificate examination were selected from 36,000 students who sat for…

  3. {\\delta}M Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Talebian-Ashkezari, Alireza; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of the "non-perturbative" metric perturbations in a Bianchi background in the long-wavelength limit. By applying the gradient expansion to the equations of motion we exhibit a generalized "Separate Universe" approach to the cosmological perturbation theory. Having found this consistent separate universe picture, we introduce the "{\\delta}M formalism" for calculating the evolution of the tensor perturbations in anisotropic inflation models in almost similar way as the so-called {\\delta}N formula for the super-horizon dynamics of the curvature perturbations. Likewise its ancestor, {\\delta}N formalism, this new method can substantially reduce the amount of calculations related to the evolution of the tensor modes.

  4. Influence of illumination on the quantum mobility of a two-dimensional electron gas in Si delta-doped GaAs/In sub 0 sub . sub 1 sub 5 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 sub 5 As quantum wells

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalheiro, A; Quivy, A A; Takahashi, E K; Martini, S; Silva, M J D; Meneses, E A; Leite, J R

    2003-01-01

    A series of GaAs/InGaAs quantum wells with a silicon delta-doped layer in the top barrier was investigated by Shubnikov-de Haas measurements as a function of the illumination time of the samples. During the illumination process strong modifications of the electronic density and the quantum mobility of each occupied subband were observed. Based on self-consistent calculations, the dominant mechanism which caused the changes in the subband quantum mobilities with illumination was elucidated.

  5. DISSEMINATION OF AND USE OF HIV/AIDS INFORMATION BY STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauretta Wamunza

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Presents part of the findings of a study that was carried out at the University of Botswana to determine in general how HIV/AIDS information is disseminated to and used by undergraduate students. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches were used. A survey design was used to study a population of 9000 plus undergraduate students. Questionnaires and interviews were used to collect data. SPSS was used to analyse quantitative data while qualitative data was analysed using thematic categorization.Key findings revealed that the HIV/AIDS information disseminated to students include information on behaviour change; information on HIV/AIDS prevention; transmission and treatment. The means of disseminating information to students include the use of multiple channels such as the university Health and Wellness Centre, Lectures, peer groups, seminars/workshops, students meetings, the University Clinic and the library. The study found that the most common media used to disseminate information to students include video, print, CDs and verbal means. Finally, factors that affect access to and use of HIV/AIDS information by students include: religious orientations, substance abuse, low income levels, multiple relationships, age and gender.There is need for the University of Botswana to review its overall approach of disseminating HIV/AIDS information to students in order to make it more effective. Moreover, strong liaison among agencies involved in the fight against the spread of HIV/AIDS at the University is needed. Furthermore, a more rigorous research into issues of students’ attitudes and values in relation to HIV/AIDS is needed. Similarly, more efforts are needed to create awareness and educate students on the dangers associated with substance abuse, multiple partners and practicing unprotected sex. The need to encourage testing for HIV/AIDS among students is needed so that appropriate interventions can be put in place.The world over, HIV/AIDS has

  6. The Niger Delta Crisis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2013-09-28

    Sep 28, 2013 ... lions de barils par jour à environ 1 million au plus fort de la crise du Delta ... (JTF) between 13 May 2009 and 4 October 2009 (the deadline for embrac- ..... He had just ended his welcome address as the occasion's chairman.

  7. The magnetic and electronic properties of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (strain delta H) methyl coenzyme M reductase and its nickel tetrapyrrole cofactor F430. A low temperature magnetic circular dichroism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C L; Scott, R A; Johnson, M K

    1989-07-15

    Variable temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy has been used to characterize the magnetic and electronic properties of the Ni(II) tetrapyrrole, F430, which is the cofactor of the S-methyl coenzyme M methylreductase enzyme from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (strain delta H). 4-Coordinate forms are found to be diamagnetic (S = 0 ground state), whereas 6-coordinate forms are paramagnetic (S = 1 ground state). MCD studies, together with parallel low temperature UV-visible absorption and resonance Raman investigations, show that the equilibrium distribution of 4-coordinate square-planar and 6-coordinate bis-aquo forms of the native isomer of F430 in aqueous solution is affected by both temperature and the presence of glycerol. In the presence of 50% glycerol, the 12,13-diepimer of F430 is shown to be partially 6-coordinate in frozen solution at low temperature. Low temperature MCD magnetization data allow the determination of the axial zero-field splitting (D) of the S = 1 ground state of bis-ligand complexes of F430. The value of D is sensitive to the nature of the Ni(II) axial ligands: bis-aquo F430, D = +9 +/- 1 cm-1; bis-imidazole F430, D = -8 +/- 2 cm-1. Measurement of D = +10 +/- 1 cm-1 for F430 in the methylreductase holoenzyme argues strongly against histidine imidazole coordination to Ni(II) in the enzyme. The possible existence of alcoholic or phenolic oxygen-containing ligands (serine, threonine, tyrosine, water) to Ni(II) in the enzyme-bound cofactor is discussed.

  8. Performance evaluation of photonic Sigma Delta ADCS

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yean Wee

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The integration of photonic and electronic components to realize a photonic sigma delta ADC is considered in this thesis. The integration process was broken up into steps. First, the performance of a pair of dual-port Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZI) modulating a train of narrow high-speed laser pulses from a mode-locked laser was investigated. Various parameters like the half-wave voltage (V) and insertion loss were verified. Nex...

  9. DELTAS: A new Global Delta Sustainability Initiative (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deltas are economic and environmental hotspots, food baskets for many nations, home to a large part of the world population, and hosts of exceptional biodiversity and rich ecosystems. Deltas, being at the land-water interface, are international, regional, and local transport hubs, thus providing the basis for intense economic activities. Yet, deltas are deteriorating at an alarming rate as 'victims' of human actions (e.g. water and sediment reduction due to upstream basin development), climatic impacts (e.g. sea level rise and flooding from rivers and intense tropical storms), and local exploration (e.g. sand or aggregates, groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction). Although many efforts exist on individual deltas around the world, a comprehensive global delta sustainability initiative that promotes awareness, science integration, data and knowledge sharing, and development of decision support tools for an effective dialogue between scientists, managers and policy makers is lacking. Recently, the international scientific community proposed to establish the International Year of Deltas (IYD) to serve as the beginning of such a Global Delta Sustainability Initiative. The IYD was proposed as a year to: (1) increase awareness and attention to the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide; (2) promote and enhance international and regional cooperation at the scientific, policy, and stakeholder level; and (3) serve as a launching pad for a 10-year committed effort to understand deltas as complex socio-ecological systems and ensure preparedness in protecting and restoring them in a rapidly changing environment. In this talk, the vision for such an international coordinated effort on delta sustainability will be presented as developed by a large number of international experts and recently funded through the Belmont Forum International Opportunities Fund. Participating countries include: U.S., France, Germany, U.K., India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Brazil, Bangladesh

  10. Landscape suitability in Botswana for the conservation of its six large African carnivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanlie E K Winterbach

    Full Text Available Wide-ranging large carnivores often range beyond the boundaries of protected areas into human-dominated areas. Mapping out potentially suitable habitats on a country-wide scale and identifying areas with potentially high levels of threats to large carnivore survival is necessary to develop national conservation action plans. We used a novel approach to map and identify these areas in Botswana for its large carnivore guild consisting of lion (Panthera leo, leopard (Panthera pardus, spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta, brown hyaena (Hyaena brunnea, cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus and African wild dog (Lycaon pictus. The habitat suitability for large carnivores depends primarily on prey availability, interspecific competition, and conflict with humans. Prey availability is most likely the strongest natural determinant. We used the distribution of biomass of typical wild ungulate species occurring in Botswana which is preyed upon by the six large carnivores to evaluate the potential suitability of the different management zones in the country to sustain large carnivore populations. In areas where a high biomass of large prey species occurred, we assumed interspecific competition between dominant and subordinated competitors to be high. This reduced the suitability of these areas for conservation of subordinate competitors, and vice versa. We used the percentage of prey biomass of the total prey and livestock biomass to identify areas with potentially high levels of conflict in agricultural areas. High to medium biomass of large prey was mostly confined to conservation zones, while small prey biomass was more evenly spread across large parts of the country. This necessitates different conservation strategies for carnivores with a preference for large prey, and those that can persist in the agricultural areas. To ensure connectivity between populations inside Botswana and also with its neighbours, a number of critical areas for priority management actions exist

  11. The peasantariat and politics: migration, wage labor, and agriculture in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, J

    1984-01-01

    This article examines Botswana's wage labor migration in terms of 2 reigning theories: 1) as a dichotomy between traditional and modern society, with workers viewing agriculture as an alternative to more desirable wage employment; or 2) as a subordination of colonial society to capitalist society, with workers drawn from the resulting underdeveloped and impoverished areas and divorced from their agricultural potential. Approximately 90% of Botswanan households have a wage worker; less than 1/4 of households rely on the agricultural economy alone. 80% of the population works in agriculture in some way, but agriculture contributes only 35% of total rural income. Over 50% of households are below the poverty level, and most must rely on a variety of income sources for subsistence. 68% of rural households (Botswana is 84% rural) have absent wage earners while 45% have 1 or more wage earners present. Absent wage earners work mainly in unskilled and semi-skilled jobs in Botswanan towns (44%) and villages (22%), and lands and cattlepost locations (5%) in South African mines (19%), and other jobs in South Africa (8%). Individuals with low socioeconomic status tend to migrate to South Africa; those with higher status move to Botswanan towns. Working for wages has become customary for most Botswanans. This article undermines conventional development theories by showing the close interweaving of the modern and traditional societies, and arguing that traditional retention of communal land rights and cattle ownership served the capitalistic system by becoming the basis for wage earning; previous income source (agriculture) did not disappear, but their use was altered. South African mining returns to the Botswanan government since 1965 largely benefited a growing petty-bourgeois class and marginally improved the life styles of the peasant labor class. Botswana's development depends on the relationship between the peripherial laboring class and the dominating petty-bourgeois and

  12. An evaluation of the self-help housing scheme in Botswana, case of Gaborone city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikgopoleng Horatio

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Botswana like other developing countries faces a problem of acute shortage of housing, particularly for low-income urban families. The current housing problems are the outcomes of the economic, demographic and social changes which the country has experienced since independence in 1966. In particular the urbanization process which surfaced in the early 1980’s. The government has sought to cope with the problem of low-income urban housing by establishing a Self-Help Housing (SHHA program in the main urban centers. The evaluation findings reveal that, on the whole, the impact of the SHHA approach on the improvement of low-income urban housing has been unsuccessful. The major problems of the scheme are lack of serviced land and inadequate finances for plot development. This has been exacerbated by the high urban development standards which are out of the reach of low-income urban families. The evaluation study also reveals that, there are some indications of non low-income urban households living in SHHA areas. The available evidence reveals that the number of those people in SHHA areas is not as big as has been speculated by most people in the country. However this paper calls for more investigation in this issue and a need for more tight measures to control this illicit practice. The major conclusions are that housing policies in Botswana are not supportive of the general housing conditions in low-income urban areas. Therefore there is a need for urban planners and policy makers of Botswana to take more positive action towards the improvement of low-income urban areas. This would require pragmatic policies geared towards the improvement of those areas. .

  13. Climate Change is Likely to Worsen the Public Health Threat of Diarrheal Disease in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Vance

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diarrheal disease is an important health challenge, accounting for the majority of childhood deaths globally. Climate change is expected to increase the global burden of diarrheal disease but little is known regarding climate drivers, particularly in Africa. Using health data from Botswana spanning a 30-year period (1974–2003, we evaluated monthly reports of diarrheal disease among patients presenting to Botswana health facilities and compared this to climatic variables. Diarrheal case incidence presents with a bimodal cyclical pattern with peaks in March (ANOVA p < 0.001 and October (ANOVA p < 0.001 in the wet and dry season, respectively. There is a strong positive autocorrelation (p < 0.001 in the number of reported diarrhea cases at the one-month lag level. Climatic variables (rainfall, minimum temperature, and vapor pressure predicted seasonal diarrheal with a one-month lag in variables (p < 0.001. Diarrheal case incidence was highest in the dry season after accounting for other variables, exhibiting on average a 20% increase over the yearly mean (p < 0.001. Our analysis suggests that forecasted climate change increases in temperature and decreases in precipitation may increase dry season diarrheal disease incidence with hot, dry conditions starting earlier and lasting longer. Diarrheal disease incidence in the wet season is likely to decline. Our results identify significant health-climate interactions, highlighting the need for an escalated public health focus on controlling diarrheal disease in Botswana. Study findings have application to other arid countries in Africa where diarrheal disease is a persistent public health problem.

  14. The cost and impact of male circumcision on HIV/AIDS in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bollinger Lori A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a major issue facing Botswana, with overall adult HIV prevalence estimated to be 25.7 percent in 2007. This paper estimates the cost and impact of the draft Ministry of Health male circumcision strategy using the UNAIDS/WHO Decision-Makers' Programme Planning Tool (DMPPT. Demographic data and HIV prevalence estimates from the recent National AIDS Coordinating Agency estimations are used as input to the DMPPT to estimate the impact of scaling-up male circumcision on the HIV/AIDS epidemic. These data are supplemented by programmatic information from the draft Botswana National Strategy for Safe Male Circumcision, including information on unit cost and program goals. Alternative scenarios were developed in consultation with stakeholders. Results suggest that scaling-up adult and neonatal circumcision to reach 80% coverage by 2012 would result in averting almost 70,000 new HIV infections through 2025, at a total net cost of US$47 million across that same period. This results in an average cost per HIV infection averted of US$689. Changing the target year to 2015 and the scale-up pattern to a linear pattern results in a more evenly-distributed number of MCs required, and averts approximately 60,000 new HIV infections through 2025. Other scenarios explored include the effect of risk compensation and the impact of increasing coverage of general prevention interventions. Scaling-up safe male circumcision has the potential to reduce the impact of HIV/AIDS in Botswana significantly; program design elements such as feasible patterns of scale-up and inclusion of counselling are important in evaluating the overall success of the program.

  15. Evaluation of a well-established task-shifting initiative: the lay counselor cadre in Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny H Ledikwe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence supports the implementation of task shifting to address health worker shortages that are common in resource-limited settings. However, there is need to learn from established programs to identify ways to achieve the strongest, most sustainable impact. This study examined the Botswana lay counselor cadre, a task shifting initiative, to explore effectiveness and contribution to the health workforce. METHODS: This evaluation used multiple methods, including a desk review, a national lay counselor survey (n = 385; response = 94%, in-depth interviews (n = 79, lay counselors focus group discussions (n = 7, lay counselors observations (n = 25, and client exit interviews (n = 47. RESULTS: Interview and focus group data indicate that lay counselors contribute to essentially all HIV-related programs in Botswana and they conduct the majority of HIV tests and related counseling at public health facilities throughout the country. Interviews showed that the lay counselor cadre is making the workload of more skilled health workers more manageable and increasing HIV acceptance in communities. The average score on a work-related knowledge test was 74.5%. However for 3 questions, less than half answered correctly. During observations, lay counselors demonstrated average competence for most skills assessed and clients (97.9% were satisfied with services received. From the survey, lay counselors generally reported being comfortable with their duties; however, some reported clinical duties that extended beyond their training and mandate. Multiple factors affecting the performance of the lay counselors were identified, including insufficient resources, such as private counseling space and HIV test kits; and technical, administrative, and supervisory support. CONCLUSION: Lay counselors are fulfilling an important role in Botswana's healthcare system, serving as the entry point into HIV care, support, and treatment services

  16. Electronic structure of the gold/Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8 and gold/EuBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta. interfaces as studied by photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessau, D.S.; Shen, Z.; Wells, B.O.; Spicer, W.E. (Stanford Electronics Laboratories, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (USA)); List, R.S.; Arko, A.J.; Bartlett, R.J.; Fisk, Z.; Cheong, S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA)); Mitzi, D.B.; Kapitulnik, A. (Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (USA)); Schirber, J.E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Sandia, New Mexico 87185 (USA))

    1990-07-16

    High-resolution photoemission has been used to probe the electronic structure of the gold/Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} and gold/EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} interface formed by a low-temperature (20 K) gold evaporation on cleaved high quality single crystals. We find that the metallicity of the EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} substrate in the near surface region ({similar to}5 A) is essentially destroyed by the gold deposition, while the near surface region of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} remains metallic. This has potentially wide ranging consequences for the applicability of the different types of superconductors in real devices.

  17. The reorganization of mine labor recruitment in Southern Africa: evidence from Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J

    1990-01-01

    "The past decade has been one of unprecedented change in the pattern and organization of mine labor recruitment in Southern Africa. Using detailed data on recruitment patterns in Botswana, this article supports the view that recent changes have initiated a self-sustaining trend whereby certain flows of foreign labor into South Africa will decline unabated into the foreseeable future. This results from a shift in general recruiting policy from one of encouraging external migrant labor flows--by expanding recruitment networks and employing a variable and transient workforce--to one of retrenchment and labor stabilization biased in favor of internalized labor supplies."

  18. Farmer–African wild dog (Lycaon pictus relations in the eastern Kalahari region of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valli-Laurente Fraser-Celin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus are the most endangered large carnivores in southern Africa. Direct and indirect persecution by farmers causes significant conservation challenges. Farmer– wild dog conflict in Botswana commonly occurs as a result of cattle and stocked game depredation by wild dogs, affecting farmer livelihood and causing economic and emotional distress. Although wild dogs predate livestock at lower levels than other carnivores, they continue to be killed both indiscriminately and in retaliation for incidents of depredation. Investigating farmer–wild dog conflict is a necessary step towards establishing appropriate conflict mitigation strategies. Eighty livestock and game farmers were interviewed in order to examine farmers’ value of, perceptions of and experiences with wild dogs as well as their insights on wild dog impacts and conservation in the eastern Kalahari region of Botswana. Interviews were semi-structured and used open-ended questions to capture complexities surrounding farmer–wild dog relations. This research contributes baseline data on wild dogs in understudied tribal land and commercial livestock and game farms in eastern Kalahari. It confirms the presence of wild dogs, livestock and stocked game depredation by wild dogs and negative perspectives amongst farmers towards wild dogs and their conservation. Mean losses were 0.85 livestock per subsistence farmer, 1.25 livestock per commercial livestock farmer, while game farmers lost 95.88 game animals per farmer during January 2012 through June 2013. Proportionally, more subsistence farmers than commercial livestock farmers and game farmers held negative perspectives of wild dogs (χ ² = 9.63, df = 2, p < 0.05. Farmer type, education level, socioeconomic status and land tenure, as well as positive wild dog characteristics should be considered when planning and operationalising conflict mitigation strategies. As such, conservation approaches should focus on

  19. Access to water in gazetted and ungazetted rural settlements in Ngamiland, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazvimavi, Dominic; Mmopelwa, Gagoitseope

    Lack of access to safe or improved water supply in developing countries is a major global concern, since water is a basic need for sustenance. Programmes aimed at improving access to safe water have been implemented in several sub-Saharan countries. In Botswana, only gazetted settlements have access to water and other basic services provided by the government. This paper examined the level of access to safe water, effort required, and problems encountered in collecting water by households in ungazetted settlements. The paper also investigated whether households in these settlements were willing to pay for improving access to water. The study has been undertaken on settlements located along the Boteti River in the North West District of Botswana. The majority of households in ungazetted settlements satisfy their domestic water requirements through abstracting untreated water from river flows and hand-dug wells when the river is not flowing. Men dominate in collecting water in ungazetted settlements, with the most dominant mode of transporting water being the use of donkey carts. The dominance of men in water collection and use of donkey carts is due to water sources being too distant from homesteads. This has resulted in low water consumption levels, with the per capita water consumption being less than 20 l/capita/day for most households. Such low levels of water consumption adversely affect attainment of desirable personal hygiene and food preparation. The opportunity cost of time for water collection has been estimated at 1.80 Botswana Pula (P) and the price of water is estimated to be P18/m 3 (1.00 P = 0.1755 USD on 18 November 2005). This is higher than the price paid by households residing in rural settlements obtaining water from government or district council water supply schemes. The majority of the households were willing to make a once-off contribution towards improving access to potable water with the mean willingness to pay (WTP) being P161 per

  20. Comparative profitability of onions harvested as green and dry (mature) in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    S.P. Baliyan

    2013-01-01

    This study was an attempt to calculate and compare the profitability of onions harvested as green and dry (mature) in Botswana. Half of the planted onions were harvested and sold as green and half were harvested and sold as dry onions. The cost of production of green onions was 32.78% higher than the cost of production of dry onions. The irrigation and marketing expenses contributed the highest difference in the cost of production of green and dry onions. The major cost item contributing to t...

  1. Knowledge sharing behaviour and demographic variables amongst secondary school teachers in and around Gaborone, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac C. Mogotsi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between knowledge sharing behaviour and the demographic variables gender, age, organisational tenure and professional tenure. Following a correlational survey approach, the study sourced its data from senior secondary school teachers in and around Gaborone, Botswana. Knowledge sharing behaviour was measured using an instrument sourced from the extant literature. No statistically significant relationship was detected between knowledge sharing behaviour and gender, age, or professional tenure. Only organisational tenure weakly negatively correlated with knowledge sharing behaviour. Thus, according to these findings, demographic variables do not appear to be important determinants of knowledge sharing behaviour.

  2. Innovative corporate social responsibility in Botswana. The Debswana mining company study case

    OpenAIRE

    José Ramón Torres Solís; Keonethebe Moroka

    2011-01-01

    En este trabajo se presentan una serie de consideraciones sobre la forma en que una importante compañía africana hace frente a su responsabilidad social, en lo que podría ser una innovación en la industria minera dedicada a la explotación del diamante. De esta manera se realiza un caso de estudio referido a la compañía Debswana que opera en Botswana, uno de los países africanos más destacados en la producción diamantífera mundial. Se discuten y critican algunas acciones implementadas por esa ...

  3. The Bolivian, Botswana, and Bilybara Highs and Southern Hemisphere drought/floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reason, C. J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Semipermanent anticyclones in the midlevel troposphere over the subtropical landmasses are a prominent component of Southern Hemisphere climate. Typically, they occur over Bolivia, Botswana/Namibia, and northwestern Australia from austral spring to about April and are strongest in late summer. Here a mode of variability is studied that modulates the strength of these midlevel anticyclones and which is not strongly tied to El Niño-Southern Oscillation. This mode leads to variations in January-March rainfall over large parts of South America, southern Africa, and Australia on both interannual and near-decadal scales.

  4. Gastric nematodes of Nile crocodiles, Crocodylus niloticus Laurenti, 1768, in the Okavango River, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junker

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The ascaridoid nematodes Dujardinascaris madagascariensis Chabaud & Caballero, 1966, Dujardinascaris dujardini (Travassos, 1920, Gedoelstascaris vandenbrandeni (Baylis, 1929 Sprent, 1978 and Multicaecum agile (Wedl, 1861 Baylis, 1923 were recovered from the stomach contents of Crocodylus niloticus Laurenti, 1768 from the Okavango River, Botswana, together with Eustrongylides sp., a dioctophymatoid nematode usually parasitizing piscivorous birds. Dujardinascaris madagascariensis was present in most of the infected hosts, while the remaining species were mostly represented in single collections in one to three hosts. All four ascaridoid nematodes represent new geographic records.

  5. Hot deformation behavior of delta-processed superalloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y., E-mail: wangyanhit@yahoo.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Shao, W.Z.; Zhen, L.; Zhang, B.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The peak stress for hot deformation can be described by the Z parameter. {yields} The grain size of DRX was inversely proportional to the Z parameter. {yields} The dissolution of {delta} phases was greatly accelerated under hot deformation. {yields}The {delta} phase stimulated nucleation can serve as the main DRX mechanism. - Abstract: Flow stress behavior and microstructures during hot compression of delta-processed superalloy 718 at temperatures from 950 to 1100 deg. C with strain rates of 10{sup -3} to 1 s{sup -1} were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The relationship between the peak stress and the deformation conditions can be expressed by a hyperbolic-sine type equation. The activation energy for the delta-processed superalloy 718 is determined to be 467 kJ/mol. The change of the dominant deformation mechanisms leads to the decrease of stress exponent and the increase of activation energy with increasing temperature. The dynamically recrystallized grain size is inversely proportional to the Zener-Hollomon (Z) parameter. It is found that the dissolution rate of {delta} phases under hot deformation conditions is much faster than that under static conditions. Dislocation, vacancy and curvature play important roles in the dissolution of {delta} phases. The main nucleation mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) for the delta-processed superalloy 718 include the bulging of original grain boundaries and the {delta} phase stimulated DRX nucleation, which is closely related to the dissolution behavior of {delta} phases under certain deformation conditions.

  6. Delta Electroproduction in 12-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLauchlan, Steven [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    The Δ-nucleus potential is a crucial element in the understanding of the nuclear system. Previous electroexcitation measurements in the delta region reported a Q2 dependence of the Δ mass indicating that this potential is dependent on the momentum of the Δ. Such a dependence is not observed for protons and neutrons in the nuclear medium. This thesis presents the experimental study of the electroexcitation of the Δ resonance in 12C, performed using the high energy electron beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and the near 4π acceptance detector CLAS that enables the detection of the full reaction final state. Inclusive, semi inclusive, and exclusive cross sections were measured with an incident electron beam energy of 1.162GeV over the Q2 range 0.175-0.475 (GeV/c)2. A Q2 dependence of the Δ mass was only observed in the exclusive measurements indicating that the Δ-nucleus potential is affected by the momentum of the Δ.

  7. Timelike gamma* N -> Delta form factors and Delta Dalitz decay

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G

    2012-01-01

    We extend a covariant model, tested before in the spacelike region for the physical and lattice QCD regimes, to a calculation of the gamma* N -> Delta reaction in the timelike region, where the square of the transfered momentum, q^2, is positive (q^2>0). We estimate the Dalitz decay Delta -> Ne+e- and the Delta distribution mass distribution function. The results presented here can be used to simulate the NN -> NNe+e- reactions at moderate beam kinetic energies.

  8. Exploration of Experiences and Perceptions of Three Botswana Basic Education Stakeholders on Employment and Unemployment of Graduates of Basic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidimane, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study used a phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of three groups of stakeholders of the Botswana basic education program related to the employment and unemployment of graduates of basic education. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 participants from three groups of stakeholders, graduates of basic…

  9. Insights into Attempts at Using Action Research in a Collaborative Work in a Policy Review Exercise in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koosimile, Anthony Tsatsing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I embrace the thinking that writing on one's experiences in the use of qualitative educational research strategies and principles could potentially contribute to furthering knowledge in the field. In adopting an action research framework to guide collaborative work in a policy review exercise in Botswana, I found that collaborative…

  10. Constraints to Senior Management's Capacity to Implement the Performance Management System in Senior Secondary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulawa, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The performance management system in different forms has been in existence in many countries for some years. In 1999 Botswana like other countries decided to implement a performance management system (PMS) across the entire public service including schools. At its introduction, the government explained the purpose for which this reform was being…

  11. Assessment of coalbed gas resources of the Kalahari Basin Province of Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Zambia, Africa, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Finn, Thomas M.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2017-02-24

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated undiscovered, technically recoverable mean resources of 4.5 trillion cubic feet of coalbed gas in the Kalahari Basin Province of Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, Africa.

  12. "Children of the fence" : the maintenance of extra-marital children under law and practice in Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molokomme, Athaliah

    1991-01-01

    This study is concerned with the laws regulating compensation for extramarital pregnancy and maintenance of extramarital children in Botswana. More specifically, it aims to comprehend the reasons for the increase in extramarital reproduction and its seeming tolerance by the society; to make an in-de

  13. Training of Evaluators in the Third World: Implementation of the Action Training Model (ATM) in Kenya and Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, H. S.

    The Action Training Model (ATM) was developed for the delivery of evaluation training to development workers in Kenya and Botswana and implemented under the aegis of the German Foundation for International Development. Training of evaluators is a challenge in any context, but in the Third World environment, evaluation training offers special…

  14. General Education Courses at the University of Botswana: Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action in Measuring Course Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Deepti; Garg, Ajay K.

    2007-01-01

    This study applied the Theory of Reasoned Action and the Technology Acceptance Model to measure outcomes of general education courses (GECs) under the University of Botswana Computer and Information Skills (CIS) program. An exploratory model was validated for responses from 298 students. The results suggest that resources currently committed to…

  15. Metacognitive awareness of reading strategies of University of Botswana English as Second Language students of different academic reading proficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Magogwe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored metacognitive awareness level of University of Botswana students in the Faculty of Social Sciences. It also considered the more recent research focusing on the role of metacognitive awareness in reading and how it relates to proficiency. The following questions are addressed: (1 What are the self-reported reading proficiencies of the University of Botswana students? (2 Are the University of Botswana students aware of their metacognitive reading strategies? (3 What kind of metacognitive reading strategies are frequently used? (4 Is there a difference in metacognitive awareness of reading strategies used by high- and low-proficiency students respectively? The Survey of Reading Strategies Questionnaire (SORS developed by Mokhtari and Sheorey (2002, and the semi-structured interview technique were used to collect data for this study. The findings indicate that University of Botswana English as Second Language (ESL students reported high reading proficiency and high use of metacognitive strategies, but there was no vast difference in terms of proficiency. Students who reported their proficiency as high had an edge over low-proficiency ones mainly because their management and monitoring of reading was guided more by the goals they have set themselves than by the tests and assignments they were supposed to write.

  16. Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

  17. Integrating Information and Communication Technology in English Language Teaching: A Case Study of Selected Junior Secondary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuraga, Mbizo; Moremi, Mbiganyi

    2017-01-01

    The paper discusses how Information and Communication Technology (ICT) could be integrated in the teaching of English Language in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools. It does so by exploring opportunities and challenges faced by teachers of English Language and the students they teach. Fifty five (55) teachers in eleven (11) Junior Secondary Schools…

  18. Implementation of m-health applications in Botswana: telemedicine and education on mobile devices in a low resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Mibenge, Chikoti; Antwi, Cynthia; Chandra, Amit; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2013-02-01

    Although Botswana has recently been categorised as an upper middle income country, it is burdened by a scarcity of resources, both human and technological. There are barriers to patients' access to specialized care and healthcare providers' access to medical knowledge. Over the past three years, the Botswana-University of Pennsylvania Partnership (BUP) has piloted four mobile telemedicine projects in the specialties of women's health (cervical cancer screening utilizing visual inspection with acetic acid), radiology, oral medicine and dermatology. Mobile telemedicine has been used in 11 locations in Botswana, training a total of 24 clinicians and successfully contributing to the management of 643 cases. In addition to mobile telemedicine, BUP has initiated an m-learning programme with the University of Botswana School of Medicine. While successfully providing patients and providers with improved access to healthcare resources, the m-health projects have faced numerous technical and social challenges. These include malfunctioning mobile devices, unreliable IT infrastructure, accidental damage to mobile devices, and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. BUP has worked with its local partners to develop solutions to these problems. To ensure sustainability, m-health programmes must have strategic goals that are aligned with those of the national health and education system, and the initiatives must be owned and led by local stakeholders. Whenever possible, open source technology and local IT expertise and infrastructure should be employed.

  19. Exploration of Experiences and Perceptions of Three Botswana Basic Education Stakeholders on Employment and Unemployment of Graduates of Basic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidimane, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study used a phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of three groups of stakeholders of the Botswana basic education program related to the employment and unemployment of graduates of basic education. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 participants from three groups of stakeholders, graduates of basic…

  20. Instructional Leadership for Quality Learning: An Assessment of the Impact of the Primary School Management Development Project in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansiri, Nkobi Owen

    2008-01-01

    A descriptive study using questionnaires was conducted in 2004 to assess the effectiveness of instructional leadership displayed by primary school management teams following the implementation of the Primary School Management Project in Botswana. Leadership skills, Coordination of instructional activities, management of curriculum and quality of…

  1. Perceived Influencers of the Decline on Performance of Students in Botswana General Certificate of Secondary Education's Agriculture Examination Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Clyde; Hulela, Keba; Tselaesele, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate factors perceived to contribute to the decline of students' performance in the Botswana's General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE) agriculture results. Ninety-one agriculture examiners were randomly sampled out of 100 teachers who were invited to mark the 2012 end of year examination scripts. A…

  2. Crossing the Chasm--Introducing Flexible Learning into the Botswana Technical Education Programme: From Policy to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Alison Mead

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a longitudinal, ethnomethodological case study of the development towards flexible delivery of the Botswana Technical Education Programme (BTEP), offered by Francistown College of Technical & Vocational Education (FCTVE). Data collection methods included documentary analysis, naturalistic participant observation, and…

  3. The Impact of Lack of Resources on Declining Students' Enrolments in Design and Technology in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaotlhobogwe, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Lack of resources has resulted in declining students' enrolment in design and technology in Botswana junior secondary schools by up to 6% per year over 10 years, despite positive encouragement by the government. Based on the PATT (pupils' attitude towards technology) theoretical framework this study indicated how a lack of resources in Botswana…

  4. The Relationship between Language Learning Strategies, Proficiency, Age and Self-Efficacy Beliefs: A Study of Language Learners in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magogwe, Joel Mokuedi; Oliver, Rhonda

    2007-01-01

    This research seeks to extend our current knowledge by exploring the relationship between preferred language strategies, age, proficiency, and self-efficacy beliefs. Responding to the call for more replication of strategy research and for research in different cultural contexts, this research was undertaken in Botswana between 2002 and 2005. The…

  5. A Comparative Study of Entrepreneurship Curriculum Development and Review at the University of Zimbabwe and Botho University, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyanyiwa, Takaruza; Svotwa, Douglas; Rudhumbu, Norman; Mutsau, Morgen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to make comparative study of the development and review process of the entrepreneurship curriculum at the University of Zimbabwe (UZ) Faculty of Commerce and Botho University, (BU) Faculty of Business and Accounting in Gaborone, Botswana. The study focused on the processes and influences of curriculum development…

  6. The Status of Education for Sustainable Development in the Faculty of Education, Views from Faculty Members: University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabatshwane, T. Tsayang; Bose, Kabita

    2013-01-01

    The paper is based on a study which sought the understanding and appreciation of, and activities on issues of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) amongst the staff of the Faculty of Education, University of Botswana (UB). A survey design was adopted with a questionnaire for collecting data from academic staff members while Heads of…

  7. The Consequences of Parental Separation and Divorce for the Economic, Social and Emotional Circumstances of Children in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maundeni, Tapologo

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes children's and mothers' accounts of the economic consequences of divorce for children in Botswana. Notes that most mothers and children reported economic hardship following divorce, although a few reported improvement or no change in economic circumstances. Traces the implications for the social and psychological well-being of children.…

  8. Seen But Not Heard? Focusing on the Needs of Children of Divorced Parents in Gaborone and Surrounding Areas, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maundeni, Tapologo

    2002-01-01

    Examined extent to which children's expressed needs for information were met by their mothers in study of parental separation and divorce in Botswana. Found that most children were dissatisfied with informational support received from their mothers. Mothers' ability to meet children's communication needs were influenced by their perceptions of…

  9. Delta II commercial space transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, J. F.

    1988-07-01

    Delta II is an upgraded variant of the Delta family of launch vehicles that has been in use by NASA since 1960. Among the design improvements incorporated by Delta II is a cryogenic-propellant second stage, a 2.89-m diameter satellite-protecting nose fairing, graphite/epoxy solid rocket motor cases, and 12:1 main engine expansion nozzle. The manufacturer/operator offers Delta II customers a dedicated, single satellite launch capability fully tailored to the given spacecraft's unique mission requirements.

  10. Wildlife Abundance and Diversity as Indicators of Tourism Potential in Northern Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbach, Christiaan W; Whitesell, Carolyn; Somers, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife tourism can provide economic incentives for conservation. Due to the abundance of wildlife and the presence of charismatic species some areas are better suited to wildlife tourism. Our first objective was to develop criteria based on wildlife abundance and diversity to evaluate tourism potential in the Northern Conservation Zone of Botswana. Secondly we wanted to quantify and compare tourism experiences in areas with high and low tourism potential. We used aerial survey data to estimate wildlife biomass and diversity to determine tourism potential, while data from ground surveys quantified the tourist experience. Areas used for High Paying Low Volume tourism had significantly higher mean wildlife biomass and wildlife diversity than the areas avoided for this type of tourism. Only 22% of the Northern Conservation Zone has intermediate to high tourism potential. The areas with high tourism potential, as determined from the aerial survey data, provided tourists with significantly better wildlife sightings (ground surveys) than the low tourism potential areas. Even Low Paying tourism may not be economically viable in concessions that lack areas with intermediate to high tourism potential. The largest part of the Northern Conservation Zone has low tourism potential, but low tourism potential is not equal to low conservation value. Alternative conservation strategies should be developed to complement the economic incentive provided by wildlife-based tourism in Botswana.

  11. Improving the quality of care for patients with hypertension in Moshupa District, Botswana: Quality improvement cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Kande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no prevalence studies on hypertension in Botswana, this condition is thought to be common and the quality of care to be poor.Aim: The aim of this project was to assess and improve the quality of primary care forhypertension.Setting: Moshupa clinic and catchment area, Botswana.Methods: Quality improvement cycle.Results: Two hundred participants were included in the audit. Sixty-eight per cent were women with a mean age of 55 years. In the baseline audit none of the target standards were met. During the re-audit six months later, six out of nine structural target standards, five out of 11 process target standards and one out of two outcome target standards were achieved. Statistically-significant improvement in performance (p < 0.05 was shown in 10 criteria although the target standard was not always met. In the re-audit, the target of achieving blood pressure control (< 140/90 in 70% of patients was achieved.Conclusion: The quality of care for hypertension was suboptimal in our setting. Simple interventions were designed and implemented to improve the quality of care. These interventions led to significant improvement in structural and process criteria. A corresponding significant improvement in the control of blood pressure was also seen.

  12. Appropriating social citizenship: women's labour, poverty, and entrepreneurship in the manual workers union of Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbner, Pnina

    2010-01-01

    Interrogating critiques of the 'African labour aristocracy' thesis, the article proposes that public service industrial-class manual workers in Botswana form, if not a labour 'aristocracy' in the sense first defined by Saul and Arrighi, then a marginal worker 'elite'. They are privileged in having a regular salary above minimum pay, augmented by periodic lump-sum gratuity payments. This sets them apart from the other low-paid workers in the private sector, casual workers in the informal economy and a vast army of unemployed job seekers. In the absence of a national unemployment benefit scheme in Botswana, the article explores some of the strategies deployed by women members of the Manual Workers Union in their attempts to contend with the spectre of future unemployment and impoverishment. In gender terms, the article highlights the independence, autonomy and decision-making capacity of women trade unionist leaders, who straddle the worlds of workers' rights and citizens' rights, and manoeuvre their way through the maze of rules and regulations they encounter in both.

  13. Community Support and Adolescent Girls' Vulnerability to HIV/AIDS: Evidence From Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Carol; Schwandt, Hilary M

    2015-01-01

    Girls are vulnerable to HIV in part because the social systems in which they live have failed to support and protect them. The goal of this research was to develop a viable supportive community index and test its association with intermediate variables associated with HIV risk across 16 communities in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique. This cross-sectional survey with separate samples randomly drawn in each country (2010) yielded a total sample of 1,418 adolescent girls (aged 11-18). Multilevel, multivariate logistic regression, while controlling for vulnerability, age, religion, and residence, found that an increase in supportive community index is positively associated with the odds of indicating improved community support for girls and with the confidence to refuse unwanted sex with a boyfriend across the three countries, as well as with self-efficacy to insist on condom use in Botswana and Mozambique. Program implementers and decision makers alike can use the supportive community index to identify and measure structural factors associated with girls' vulnerability to HIV/AIDS; this will potentially contribute to judicious decision making regarding resource allocation to enhance community-level, protective factors for adolescent girls.

  14. Perceptions and attitudes towards food choice in adolescents in Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corbett; Shaibu, Sheila; Maruapula, Segametsi; Malete, Leapetswe; Compher, Charlene

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the factors that influence adolescent and adult perceptions and attitudes related to adolescent diet in Botswana. A series of 15 focus groups [12 adolescent focus groups (6 male and 6 female) & 3 parent focus groups] of approximately six to eleven members each were conducted in Gaborone, the capital city of Botswana in 2009-2010. Adolescents and parents of adolescents suggest that the main drivers of adolescent food choices have much to do with where the adolescent is in terms of time of day as well as with whom the adolescent is with. Outside of the home adolescents suggest that the real or perceived influence of companions place social standing on the ability to purchase and consume non-traditional foods, and that traditional foods leave adolescents open to ridicule. Additionally parents of adolescents suggest that while they prefer for their children to consume healthy foods, they frequently purchase unhealthy food items for their children based on the child's taste preferences as well as social influence to prove you can buy "nice things" for one's family. Adolescents and parents of adolescents suggest that increasing the availability and decreasing the costs of healthy food options are preferred possible interventions to increase healthful eating among adolescents. However, the adolescents also suggest that these healthy food options should not crowd out or completely replace unhealthy options, thus preserving the adolescents' freedom to choose. This could pose a major challenge in any school-based adolescent obesity prevention program.

  15. Continuing Discontinuities: Local and State Perspectives on Cattle Production and Water Management in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Manzungu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available From 1885 when the modern state of Botswana was founded until the discovery of significant mineral deposits in 1967, one year after independence, the livestock industry, particularly cattle production, played a significant role in the country’s economy. Today there are concerns about how the livestock industry, because of its importance to many rural households, and its potential to diversify the mineral-dominated economy, can be revived. In recognition of the country’s semi-arid climate, the government has promoted a policy of developing water sources for livestock watering. The state has acknowledged the policy has largely been ineffective, but continues to implement it. This paper attempts to explain this paradox by examining state and local perspectives in the management of water and related resources in the Botswana part of the Limpopo river basin. The discontinuities between the local inhabitants and state practitioners are analyzed within the wider physical social, political, and economic landscape. We ascribe the continued implementation of an ineffective policy to modernisation claims.

  16. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Setlhare

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definitionand scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation andinefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators canhelp inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made duringa visit to family physicians (FPs in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice offamily medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different andsometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly andenmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effectiveinformation technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staffattended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to morecomplicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed toundergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients andhealthcare workers (HCW may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting shouldbe formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective informationtechnology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure isnecessary to achieve good health indicators.Keywords: task shifting, Family Medicine, Family Physician, Denmark, health expenditure, egalitarian

  17. Family medicine in Denmark: Are there lessons for Botswana and Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlhare, Vincent

    2016-03-30

    Family medicine is a new specialty in Botswana and many African countries and its definitionand scope are still evolving. In this region, healthcare is constrained by resource limitation andinefficiencies in resource utilisation. Experiences in countries with good health indicators canhelp inform discussions on the future of family medicine in Africa. Observations made duringa visit to family physicians (FPs) in Denmark showed that the training of FPs, the practice offamily medicine and the role of support staff in a family practice were often different andsometimes unimaginable by African standards. Danish family practices were friendly andenmeshed in an egalitarian and efficient health system, which is supported by an effectiveinformation technology network. There was a lot of task shifting and nurses and clerical staffattended to simple or uncomplicated aspects of patient care whilst FPs attended to morecomplicated patient problems. Higher taxation and higher health expenditure seemed toundergird the effective health system. An egalitarian relationship amongst patients andhealthcare workers (HCW) may help improve patient care in Botswana. Task shifting shouldbe formalised, and all sectors of primary healthcare should have fast and effective informationtechnology systems. HCW training and roles should be revised. Higher health expenditure isnecessary to achieve good health indicators.

  18. Wildlife Abundance and Diversity as Indicators of Tourism Potential in Northern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbach, Christiaan W.; Whitesell, Carolyn; Somers, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife tourism can provide economic incentives for conservation. Due to the abundance of wildlife and the presence of charismatic species some areas are better suited to wildlife tourism. Our first objective was to develop criteria based on wildlife abundance and diversity to evaluate tourism potential in the Northern Conservation Zone of Botswana. Secondly we wanted to quantify and compare tourism experiences in areas with high and low tourism potential. We used aerial survey data to estimate wildlife biomass and diversity to determine tourism potential, while data from ground surveys quantified the tourist experience. Areas used for High Paying Low Volume tourism had significantly higher mean wildlife biomass and wildlife diversity than the areas avoided for this type of tourism. Only 22% of the Northern Conservation Zone has intermediate to high tourism potential. The areas with high tourism potential, as determined from the aerial survey data, provided tourists with significantly better wildlife sightings (ground surveys) than the low tourism potential areas. Even Low Paying tourism may not be economically viable in concessions that lack areas with intermediate to high tourism potential. The largest part of the Northern Conservation Zone has low tourism potential, but low tourism potential is not equal to low conservation value. Alternative conservation strategies should be developed to complement the economic incentive provided by wildlife-based tourism in Botswana. PMID:26308859

  19. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON DAIRY PRODUCTION IN BOTSWANA AND ITS SUITABLE MITIGATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. MOREKI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effects of climate change on dairy production in Botswana and mitigation strategies are suggested. Dairy farming has not experienced growth over time rendering the country heavily dependent on milk imports. National dairy herd is estimated to be approximately 5000 and per capita consumption of milk about 32.5 litres per person per year. Currently, Botswana is experiencing average high temperatures and low rainfall, frequent droughts and scarcity of both ground and surface water, which all contribute to low livestock and crop productivity. Changes in rainfall patterns, frequent droughts, high incidences of animal diseases (e.g., mastitis and FMD and parasites, and high environmental temperatures cause significant decrease in livestock productivity. For dairy animals, there is a decline in milk yield and reduced animal weight gain due mainly to high temperatures and inadequate feeds. Mitigation strategies comprise using smaller dairy breeds such as Jersey and Brown Swiss and local Tswana breed, growing fodder crops and utilization of crop residues and constructing cow sheds. Thus, the effects of climate change on dairy cattle production are real and require immediate attention if they are to be minimized or managed properly to attain higher milk production.

  20. Gender-specific patterns of multiple concurrent sexual partnerships: a national cross sectional survey in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho-Foster, Ari; Laetsang, Ditiro; Masisi, Mokgweetsi; Anderson, Marina; Tlhoiwe, Derrick; Cockcroft, Anne; Andersson, Neil

    2010-08-01

    A priority of AIDS prevention in Botswana is to reduce multiple concurrent sexual partnerships. We analysed data from interviews with people aged 16-60 years in a 2007 national stratified random cluster sample of communities across Botswana. Among 768 male and 1784 female respondents, 10% reported multiple sexual partners in the month prior to the survey (MP1); 19% of men and 6% of women. In a multivariate analysis, men were more likely to report MP1 if they had not completed primary education (adjusted Odds Ratio (ORa) 2.13, 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for clustering (CIca) 1.19-3.85), if they were single (ORa 2.29, 95% CIca 1.28-4.11), if they had experienced intimate partner violence in the last year (ORa 2.59, 95% CIca 1.51-4.45) and if they reported acquiescence to high risk sex (ORa 8.32, 95% CIca 3.38-20.46). Women who said they earned more or the same as their partner were also more likely to report MP1 (ORa 1.76, 95% CIca 1.21-2.56). The higher rate of MP1 among men with different forms of choice-disability shows an important potential multiplication of male risk factors. Women with higher income were more likely to have more partners, questioning the idea that multiple concurrent partners is mainly a question of male disposable income.

  1. An advocacy project for multicultural education: The case of the Shiyeyi language in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyati-Saleshando, Lydia

    2011-12-01

    Multicultural education respects cultural differences and affirms pluralism which students, their communities and teachers bring to the learning process. It is founded on the belief that a school curriculum which promotes the ideals of freedom, justice, equality, equity and human dignity is most likely to result in high academic achievement and quality education. In Botswana, English is the official language and medium of instruction and Setswana is the national lingua franca which is used for formal occasions in the villages and other informal settings. Any other languages spoken by unrecognised tribes are banned from use in schools or the media, including minority languages taught before independence in 1966, This paper describes the Shiyeyi Language Project, initiated by the Wayeyi tribe, which advocates for a multicultural model of education where children learn in their mother tongue and about their local culture at an early stage, then add the national language, and eventually an international language as medium of instruction. The project operates within an unfriendly political and legal context, but has achieved some results. Continued efforts, especially as supported by similar language projects, have the potential to change the situation in Botswana.

  2. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation.

  3. An epidemiologic review of enteropathogens in Gaborone, Botswana: shifting patterns of resistance in an HIV endemic region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack S Rowe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of diarrheal disease in Botswana, an HIV endemic region, is largely unknown. Our primary objective was to characterize the prevalent bacterial and parasitic enteropathogens in Gaborone, Botswana. Secondary objectives included determining corresponding antimicrobial resistance patterns and the value of stool white and red blood cells for predicting bacterial and parasitic enteropathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective cross-sectional study examined laboratory records of stool specimens analyzed by the Botswana National Health Laboratory in Gaborone, Botswana from February 2003 through July 2008. In 4485 specimens the median subject age was 23 [interquartile range 1.6-34] years. Overall, 14.4% (644 of 4485 of samples yielded a pathogen. Bacteria alone were isolated in 8.2% (367 of 4485, parasites alone in 5.6% (253 of 4485 and both in 0.5% (24 of 4485 of samples. The most common bacterial pathogens were Shigella spp. and Salmonella spp., isolated from 4.0% (180 of 4485 and 3.9% (175 of 4485 of specimens, respectively. Escherichia coli (22 of 4485 and Campylobacter spp. (22 of 4485 each accounted for 0.5% of pathogens. Comparing antimicrobial resistance among Shigella spp. and Salmonella spp. between two periods, February 2003 to February 2004 and July 2006 to July 2008, revealed an increase in ampicillin resistance among Shigella spp. from 43% to 83% (p<0.001. Among Salmonella spp., resistance to chloramphenicol decreased from 56% to 6% (p<0.001. The absence of stool white and red blood cells correlated with a high specificity and negative predictive value. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Most gastroenteritis stools were culture and microscopy negative suggesting that viral pathogens were the majority etiologic agents in this Botswana cohort. Shigella spp. and Salmonella spp. were the most common bacteria; Isospora spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. were the most common parasites. Resistance to commonly used

  4. Phenotypic expressions of CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, GT; Carrington, M; Beeler, JA; Dean, M; Aledort, LM; Blatt, PM; Cohen, AR; DiMichele, D; Eyster, ME; Kessler, CM; Konkle, B; Leissinger, C; Luban, N; O'Brien, SJ; Goedert, JJ; O'Brien, TR

    1999-01-01

    Objective: As blockade of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has been proposed as therapy for HIV-1, we examined whether the CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygous genotype has phenotypic expressions other than those related to HIV-1. Design: Study subjects were white homosexual men or men with hemophilia

  5. Phenotypic expressions of CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, GT; Carrington, M; Beeler, JA; Dean, M; Aledort, LM; Blatt, PM; Cohen, AR; DiMichele, D; Eyster, ME; Kessler, CM; Konkle, B; Leissinger, C; Luban, N; O'Brien, SJ; Goedert, JJ; O'Brien, TR

    1999-01-01

    Objective: As blockade of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has been proposed as therapy for HIV-1, we examined whether the CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygous genotype has phenotypic expressions other than those related to HIV-1. Design: Study subjects were white homosexual men or men with hemophilia wh

  6. Peat compaction in deltas : implications for Holocene delta evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselen, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838101

    2010-01-01

    Many deltas contain substantial amounts of peat, which is the most compressible soil type. Therefore, peat compaction potentially leads to high amounts of subsidence in deltas. The main objective of this research was to quantify subsidence due to peat compaction in Holocene fluvial-deltaic settings

  7. Phenotypic expressions of CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, GT; Carrington, M; Beeler, JA; Dean, M; Aledort, LM; Blatt, PM; Cohen, AR; DiMichele, D; Eyster, ME; Kessler, CM; Konkle, B; Leissinger, C; Luban, N; O'Brien, SJ; Goedert, JJ; O'Brien, TR

    1999-01-01

    Objective: As blockade of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has been proposed as therapy for HIV-1, we examined whether the CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygous genotype has phenotypic expressions other than those related to HIV-1. Design: Study subjects were white homosexual men or men with hemophilia wh

  8. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsima BM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Billy M Tsima,1 Vincent Setlhare,1 Oathokwa Nkomazana2 1Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana Background: Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers.Methods: The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list.Results: Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed.Conclusion: The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better

  9. $\\Delta$-N Electromagnetic Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Loan, M

    1999-01-01

    The EM ratio for a free Delta electromagnetic transition is discussed within the frame work of nonrelativistic approach. Such an approach gives a good account of data for a free Delta but is less important for an intrinsically relativistic nuclear many body problem.

  10. Mida pakub Delta? / Teele Kurm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurm, Teele

    2011-01-01

    Politsei- ja Piirivalveamet võtab kasutusele ühise Siseministeeriumi infotehnoloogia- ja arenduskeskuse ning Webmedia AS koostööna loodud dokumendihaldussüsteemi Delta. Kust sai Delta oma nime? Projekti "Dokumendihaldussüsteemi juurutamine Siseministeeriumi haldusalas" eesmärgid

  11. Mida pakub Delta? / Teele Kurm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurm, Teele

    2011-01-01

    Politsei- ja Piirivalveamet võtab kasutusele ühise Siseministeeriumi infotehnoloogia- ja arenduskeskuse ning Webmedia AS koostööna loodud dokumendihaldussüsteemi Delta. Kust sai Delta oma nime? Projekti "Dokumendihaldussüsteemi juurutamine Siseministeeriumi haldusalas" eesmärgid

  12. Mackenzie River Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada, with its headstreams the Peace and Finley, is the longest river in North America at 4241 km, and drains an area of 1,805,000 square km. The large marshy delta provides habitat for migrating Snow Geese, Tundra Swans, Brant, and other waterfowl. The estuary is a calving area for Beluga whales. The Mackenzie (previously the Disappointment River) was named after Alexander Mackenzie who travelled the river while trying to reach the Pacific in 1789. The image was acquired on August 4, 2005, covers an area of 55.8 x 55.8 km, and is located at 68.6 degrees north latitude, 134.7 degrees west longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  13. DELTA 3D PRINTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ȘOVĂILĂ Florin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a very used process in industry, the generic name being “rapid prototyping”. The essential advantage of a 3D printer is that it allows the designers to produce a prototype in a very short time, which is tested and quickly remodeled, considerably reducing the required time to get from the prototype phase to the final product. At the same time, through this technique we can achieve components with very precise forms, complex pieces that, through classical methods, could have been accomplished only in a large amount of time. In this paper, there are presented the stages of a 3D model execution, also the physical achievement after of a Delta 3D printer after the model.

  14. Neurocognitive impairment among HIV-positive individuals in Botswana: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawler Kathy

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of neurocognitive impairment among HIV-positive individuals in Botswana, using the International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS. We also compared performance on the IHDS with performance on tests of verbal learning/memory and processing speed, and investigated the association between performance on the IHDS and such variables as depression, age, level of education and CD4 count. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 120 HIV-positive individuals randomly selected from an outpatient HIV clinic in Gaborone, Botswana. Patients provided a detailed clinical history and underwent neuropsychological testing; measures of depression, daily activities and subjective cognitive complaints were recorded. Results Despite the fact that 97.5% of subjects were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, 38% met criteria for dementia on the IHDS, and 24% were diagnosed with major depressive disorder. There was a significant association between neurocognitive impairment as measured by the IHDS and performance on the other two cognitive measures of verbal learning/memory and processing speed. Level of education significantly affected performance on all three cognitive measures, and age affected processing speed and performance on the IHDS. Depression and current CD4 count did not affect performance on any of the cognitive measures. Conclusions The prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-positive individuals in Botswana is higher than expected, especially since almost all of the subjects in this study were prescribed HAART. This suggests the need to reconsider the timing of introduction of antiretroviral therapy in developing countries where HAART is generally not administered until the CD4 cell count has dropped to 200/mm3 or below. The contribution of other factors should also be considered, such as poor central nervous system penetration of some

  15. A population-based study on alcohol and high-risk sexual behaviors in Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri D Weiser

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In Botswana, an estimated 24% of adults ages 15-49 years are infected with HIV. While alcohol use is strongly associated with HIV infection in Africa, few population-based studies have characterized the association of alcohol use with specific high-risk sexual behaviors.We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of 1,268 adults from five districts in Botswana using a stratified two-stage probability sample design. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess correlates of heavy alcohol consumption (>14 drinks/week for women, and >21 drinks/week for men as a dependent variable. We also assessed gender-specific associations between alcohol use as a primary independent variable (categorized as none, moderate, problem and heavy drinking and several risky sex outcomes including: (a having unprotected sex with a nonmonogamous partner; (b having multiple sexual partners; and (c paying for or selling sex in exchange for money or other resources. Criteria for heavy drinking were met by 31% of men and 17% of women. Adjusted correlates of heavy alcohol use included male gender, intergenerational relationships (age gap > or =10 y, higher education, and living with a sexual partner. Among men, heavy alcohol use was associated with higher odds of all risky sex outcomes examined, including unprotected sex (AOR = 3.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.65 to 7.32, multiple partners (AOR = 3.08; 95% CI, 1.95 to 4.87, and paying for sex (AOR = 3.65; 95% CI, 2.58 to 12.37. Similarly, among women, heavy alcohol consumption was associated with higher odds of unprotected sex (AOR = 3.28; 95% CI, 1.71 to 6.28, multiple partners (AOR = 3.05; 95% CI, 1.83 to 5.07, and selling sex (AOR = 8.50; 95% CI, 3.41 to 21.18. A dose-response relationship was seen between alcohol use and risky sexual behaviors, with moderate drinkers at lower risk than both problem and heavy drinkers.Alcohol use is associated with multiple risks for HIV transmission among both men

  16. Delta self-consistent field method to obtain potential energy surfaces of excited molecules on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Olsen, Thomas; Engelund, Mads;

    2008-01-01

    We present a modification of the Delta self-consistent field (Delta SCF) method of calculating energies of excited states in order to make it applicable to resonance calculations of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces, where the molecular orbitals are highly hybridized. The Delta SCF approximation...... is a density-functional method closely resembling standard density-functional theory (DFT), the only difference being that in Delta SCF one or more electrons are placed in higher lying Kohn-Sham orbitals instead of placing all electrons in the lowest possible orbitals as one does when calculating the ground......-state energy within standard DFT. We extend the Delta SCF method by allowing excited electrons to occupy orbitals which are linear combinations of Kohn-Sham orbitals. With this extra freedom it is possible to place charge locally on adsorbed molecules in the calculations, such that resonance energies can...

  17. Naturally acquired anthrax antibodies in a cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Kyle M; Houser, Annmarie; Arntzen, Lorraine; Turnbull, Peter C B

    2008-07-01

    An outbreak of anthrax in the Jwana Game Reserve in Jwaneng, Botswana, was first observed when three cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) died of the disease in November 2004. In the aftermath of this event, banked serum samples collected from 23 wild-caught cheetahs were examined, by the inhibition enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), for antibodies to the protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis. Of the 23 cheetahs, 16 regularly accessed the reserve. Antibodies to PA were detected in one cheetah collected in May 2004, indicating the disease was occurring well before it was first noticed. This appears to be the first demonstration of naturally acquired anthrax antibodies in cheetahs. The finding of one antibody-positive animal amongst at least 16 potentially exposed individuals is consistent with existing reports that it is uncommon for cheetahs to develop natural immunity to anthrax.

  18. Devil's claw (Harpagophytum procumbens in a Brahman's preputial sheath : a case report from Botswana : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F.W. Isa

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Failure of penile protrusion during attempted service of a cow on heat was investigated in a 3-year-old Brahman bull at Kwakwadi cattle-post in the Kgalahadi sandveld, Kweneng District, Botswana. The investigation revealed that penile protrusion was obstructed by a devil's claw (grapple thorn, a dry fruit of the plant Harpagophytum procumbens, which had lodged in the cavum preputiale. The thorn, which was removed almost completely manually with minimal tissue dissection, had also caused minor lacerations and puncture wounds on the lamina interna pars parietalis. The wounds healed well following treatment with antiseptics and antibiotics and subsequently the bull regained full penile protrusion and served the cows well. This report describes the first case of lodgement of a devil's claw fruit in, and its extraction from, the cavum preputiale of a Brahman.

  19. Pastoralists' Perception and Ecological Knowledge on Savanna Ecosystem Dynamics in Semi-arid Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaotswe Kgosikoma

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated vegetation dynamics in relation to livestock grazing as perceived by pastoral farmers in different regions of Botswana. A structured questionnaire was used to collect farmers' understanding of vegetation changes and causes within three different grazing lands. The pastoral farmers' description of dominant vegetation differed significantly both at the local and district level, which suggests that rangelands consist of patches dominated by different grasses and woody vegetation. Most pastoralists indicated that grass composition has undergone changes, and unpalatable grasses such as Aristida congesta and Megaloprotachne albescens are increasing. The different factors perceived by pastoral farmers to cause changes in vegetation composition included rainfall, overgrazing, and fire. Bush encroachment is considered to be more common in communal grazing land than in ranches. According to pastoral farmers, the ranching system is less degrading to the environment and more sustainable for livestock production than is communal grazing.

  20. Assessment of Risk Factors Associated with Malaria Transmission in Tubu Village, Northern Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Chirebvu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated potential risk factors associated with malaria transmission in Tubu village, Okavango subdistrict, a malaria endemic area in northern Botswana. Data was derived from a census questionnaire survey, participatory rural appraisal workshop, field observations, and mosquito surveys. History of malaria episodes was associated with several factors: household income (P0.05 and number of nets possessed (P>0.05. Eave size was not associated with mosquito bites (P>0.05, frequency of mosquito bites (P>0.05, and time of mosquito bites (P>0.05. Possession of nets was very high (94.7%. Close proximity of a health facility and low vegetation cover were added advantages. Some of the identified risk factors are important for developing effective control and elimination strategies involving the community, with limited resources.

  1. Sexual abuse and violence among adolescent girls in Botswana: a mental health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seloilwe, Esther Salang; Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria

    2009-07-01

    The presence of sexual abuse among societies in Botswana is a phenomenon whose occurrence is usually denied albeit the police report on it and legal frameworks have been established to combat it. Several factors influence the concealment of sexual abuse among adolescent girls, which includes cultural factors and social status of the perpetrators. This paper espouses the concept of sexual abuse among adolescent girls, the existence of the problem, its magnitude, the factors that increase vulnerability to violence and abuse, and how these factors intersect with HIV and AIDS. Two case studies using a discovery method were used to explore the phenomenon under the study. The findings of the study indicated that sexual abuse and violence have profound mental health consequences including guilt, anxiety, depression and anger. Future research is suggested to explore this problem on a wider scale and develop interventions that can assist victims and perpetrators to cope with the situation.

  2. The role of nursing education in preventing medication errors in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wananani B. Tshiamo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors take stock of the extent to which nursing curricula address the prevention of medication errors, highlighting strengths and pinpointing weaknesses yet to be addressed. The exercise involved review of curricula at various levels of nursing education as well as nursing regulatory documents. Findings from the review were corroborated with published work on the subject. Recommendations for strengthening basic nursing curricula at both diploma and undergraduate levels’ coverage of medications errors are proposed. Also recommended are measures to improve the system in the practice arena as well as research to establish the magnitude of medication errors and their related risk factors in Botswana. The exercise is envisaged to improve patients’ safety and reduce the risk of litigation for nurses.

  3. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 2: Large scale moisture and passive microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. The research program consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components are explained in general and activities performed within the passive microwave research component are summarized. The microwave theory is discussed taking into account: soil dielectric constant, emissivity, soil roughness effects, vegetation effects, optical depth, single scattering albedo, and wavelength effects. The study site is described. The soil moisture data and its processing are considered. The relation between observed large scale soil moisture and normalized brightness temperatures is discussed. Vegetation characteristics and inverse modeling of soil emissivity is considered.

  4. Botlhoko, botlhoko! How people talk about their musculoskeletal complaints in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    . Abductive qualitative analysis was used as the interpretive methodology. RESULTS: Whereas initial responses about MSK troubles yielded the exclamation botlhoko, botlhoko! combined with animated non-verbal gestures and facial expressions indicating widespread body pains, in-depth interviews revealed......BACKGROUND: Conflicting interpretations about the structure and function of the body contribute to discordance in communication between healthcare professionals and lay people. Understanding musculoskeletal (MSK) complaints presents additional complexities when discussed in more than one language......: Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months in the Botswana Central District included participant observations and interviews with 34 community members with MSK complaints. Audio-recorded interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with an interpreter, transcribed verbatim, and contextually translated into English...

  5. WORLD DELTAS AND THEIR EVOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    In August 1998, an international symposium on the world deltas was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. This symposium attracted discussion about more than 25 deltas from around the world with emphasis placed on those that are most densely populated and impacted by humans. Keynote papers printed details about the physical, biological, engineering and socioeconomic aspects of six deltas including the Mississippi, Nile, Ganges-Brahmaputra, Rhine-Meuse, Changjiang and Po. The main purpose of this symposium was to inform scientists, engineers and decision-makers about information that is currently available and to provide them a basis for working in such environments.

  6. Dynamical Casimir effect with $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Jeferson Danilo L; Alves, Danilo T

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the spectrum and the total rate of created particles for a real massless scalar field in $1+1$ dimensions, in the presence of a partially transparent moving mirror simulated by a Dirac $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ point interaction. We show that, strikingly, a partially reflecting mirror can produce a larger number of particles in comparison with a perfectly reflecting one. In the limit of a perfect mirror, our formulas recover those found in the literature for the Robin boundary condition.

  7. Immune activation markers in peripartum women in Botswana: association with feeding strategy and maternal morbidity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S Russell

    Full Text Available Hormone levels shift the immune state in HIV-uninfected pregnant and breastfeeding women away from Th1 responses and toward regulation to permit fetal tolerance. Limited data exist on inflammation during pregnancy or postpartum in HIV-infected women, though certain inflammatory markers are associated with adverse health outcomes among HIV-infected persons. We measured hsCRP, D-dimer, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α at 34 weeks gestation and six months postpartum in HIV-infected women from the Botswana Mashi PMTCT trial who were randomized to breastfeeding or formula-feeding. Differences in inflammatory markers between gestation and postpartum periods, and by randomized feeding method, were estimated using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for baseline plasma HIV-1 viral load, CD4 count, calendar time, and antiretroviral treatment status. Additionally, we studied the association between marker concentrations at six months postpartum and major adverse clinical events over the following 4.5 years, using case-cohort sampling and adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. In 86 breastfeeding and 75 formula-feeding women, hsCRP and D-dimer decreased significantly between 34 weeks gestation and six months postpartum, while IFN-γ increased. There was no significant association between inflammatory marker change and randomized feeding method after adjusting for multiple comparisons and removing outliers. In univariate analysis, TNF-α, D-dimer, and IFN-γ concentrations at six months postpartum were significant predictors of subsequent clinical events, and TNF-α remained significant in multivariate analysis (HR = 4.16, p = 0.001. In young HIV-infected women in Botswana inflammatory marker concentrations did not differ significantly between women who breast- vs. formula-fed. However, postpartum TNF-α level was predictive of subsequent adverse clinical event.

  8. A retrospective longitudinal study of animal and human rabies in Botswana 1989-2006

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    K.T. Moagabo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A longitudinal study of animal and human rabies covering 18 years from 1989 to 2006 was retrospectively conducted in order to highlight the epidemiological features and trends of the disease in Botswana. Over the 18-year period, a total of 4 306 brain specimens collected from various species of animals including human beings with clinical signs consistent with rabies were submitted to the National Veterinary Laboratory in Gaborone for confirmatory diagnosis. Of the samples submitted, 2 419 cases were found to be positive for lyssavirus antigen; this presents an overall prevalence rate of 56.18 ± 1.48 %. About 85.7 % (2 074/2 419 of the cases were from domestic animals, 14.2 % (343/2 419 cases were from wild animals and two cases (0.1 % were from human beings. During the first half of the study (1989-1997 the prevalence rate of the disease was estimated at 62.79 ± 1.85 % (1 645/2 620 positive whereas during the second half (1998-2006 it was estimated at 45.91 ± 2.38 % (774/1 686 positive and the difference between the two estimates was statistically, highly significant (Δ % = 16.88, SE 95 diff % = 3.015, SD = 5.599; P < 0.001. Ruminant rabies accounted for 79.99 % (50.92 % bovine, 28.40 % caprine and 0.67 % ovine whereas canine (domestic dog and feline (domestic cat accounted for 16.01 and 0.87 %, respectively. Equine rabies accounted for 3.13 % with 1.35 and 1.78 %, respectively, for horses and donkeys. Jackal rabies accounted for more than 60 % of the total cases in wild animals. These findings are discussed in relation to the previous epidemiological situation of the disease (1979-1988, its socio-economic impact, monitoring and control in Botswana.

  9. People living with AIDS/HIV in Botswana: a needs assessment

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    A. Zuyderduin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A deficit in information and knowledge regarding people living with AIDS in Botswana, hampering health care planning and satisfactory health care delivery to these people, necessitated the needs assessment reported on in this paper. Not only did self-imposed alienation and societal levels of stigma surrounding HIV and AIDS force many people living with AIDS/HIV (PLWAH into silence and denial of their HIV+ve diagnosis, thereby creating knowledge and information deficits. These same factors also pose challenges for conducting a needs assessment among these persons. Consequently, a 73 item questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 39 male and 77 female PLWAH in Botswana. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Human Needs served as a general theoretical point of departure for the needs analysis and the 73 items represented needs at all levels of this hierarchy. Analysis of the data indicates that 65% of the respondents lived in urban areas. The majority of individuals (42% were tested for HIV because they became ill, while 28% did so voluntarily. Other reasons for testing were: child becoming ill, partner becoming ill, being pregnant and having been raped. Only 7% indicated that their HIV status had been disclosed to other persons. With regards to love and belongingness 70% of the respondents indicated that they were not in an intimate relationship, nearly one third experienced multiple deaths within their families due to AIDS, 61% had access to a support group, and 48% had not informed their parents about their HIV+ve status. Stigmatisation weighed down self-esteem. Despite the deficiencies in the fulfilment of safety, belonging

  10. Food insufficiency is associated with high-risk sexual behavior among women in Botswana and Swaziland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri D Weiser

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both food insufficiency and HIV infection are major public health problems in sub-Saharan Africa, yet the impact of food insufficiency on HIV risk behavior has not been systematically investigated. We tested the hypothesis that food insufficiency is associated with HIV transmission behavior. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied the association between food insufficiency (not having enough food to eat over the previous 12 months and inconsistent condom use, sex exchange, and other measures of risky sex in a cross-sectional population-based study of 1,255 adults in Botswana and 796 adults in Swaziland using a stratified two-stage probability design. Associations were examined using multivariable logistic regression analyses, clustered by country and stratified by gender. Food insufficiency was reported by 32% of women and 22% of men over the previous 12 months. Among 1,050 women in both countries, after controlling for respondent characteristics including income and education, HIV knowledge, and alcohol use, food insufficiency was associated with inconsistent condom use with a nonprimary partner (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.36, sex exchange (AOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.74-1.93, intergenerational sexual relationships (AOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.03-2.08, and lack of control in sexual relationships (AOR 1.68, 95% CI 1.24-2.28. Associations between food insufficiency and risky sex were much attenuated among men. CONCLUSIONS: Food insufficiency is an important risk factor for increased sexual risk-taking among women in Botswana and Swaziland. Targeted food assistance and income generation programs in conjunction with efforts to enhance women's legal and social rights may play an important role in decreasing HIV transmission risk for women.

  11. Herders’ ecological knowledge and carnivore predation on livestock investigations in Makgadikgadi and Nxai national parks, Botswana

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    Lucas P. Rutina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Botswana is one of the countries in Southern Africa that pay compensation for human properties damaged by wildlife. Before compensation is paid, a thorough investigation on determining wildlife species that have caused the damage is mandatory. Because of insufficient resources by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks, the initial investigation is carried out by herders. Three basic indicators are used to determine carnivore predation; sighting the carnivore at the kill, tracks of the predator and examining the carcasses. In this study, we tested herders’ knowledge on the above three indicators. The study was conducted in a communal area around Makgadikgadi and Nxai national parks, Botswana, where the main activities practiced by the local communities is pastoral farming. In general, there was a significant association between reported and perceived incidents of predation for all carnivores at all distances from protected areas. Herders were able to identify the large carnivores visually. But they had difficulties in identifying carnivore tracks and kill characteristics. The results demonstrate the importance of involvement of local communities in human–wildlife conflict management. However, more education regarding identification of carnivore tracks and kill behaviour is needed for herders in the study area.Conservation implications: Based on the results of this study, this calls for a change in the management of human–wildlife conflict (HWC and administration of the compensation scheme. Decentralising HWC to local communities using existing government structures that exist at local level will not only supplement the inadequate resources by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP to effectively mitigate the problem, but also empower local communities’ participation in wildlife management.

  12. Botlhoko, botlhoko! How people talk about their musculoskeletal complaints in rural Botswana: a focused ethnography

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    Maria Hondras

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conflicting interpretations about the structure and function of the body contribute to discordance in communication between healthcare professionals and lay people. Understanding musculoskeletal (MSK complaints presents additional complexities when discussed in more than one language or in cross-cultural settings. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs, few healthcare professionals have specialist MSK training and not all practitioners speak the primary language of patients. Objective: Our goal was to understand how people in rural Botswana perceive and express MSK complaints. Design: Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months in the Botswana Central District included participant observations and interviews with 34 community members with MSK complaints. Audio-recorded interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with an interpreter, transcribed verbatim, and contextually translated into English. Abductive qualitative analysis was used as the interpretive methodology. Results: Whereas initial responses about MSK troubles yielded the exclamation botlhoko, botlhoko! combined with animated non-verbal gestures and facial expressions indicating widespread body pains, in-depth interviews revealed the complexities of pain expression among respondents. MSK pains were described as ‘bursting, exploding, aching, numbness, hot, pricking, stabbing, swollen, and pain in the heart’. Language subtleties manifested during interviews, where ‘meat’ or ‘flesh’ implied soft tissue pains; waist pains were voiced yet portrayed as low back or sacroiliac pain; and ‘veins’ variously referred to structural and functional types of pain. Psychological and social stressors accompanied many accounts of MSK troubles. Conclusions: Respondents offered diverse MSK symptom descriptions consistent with biopsychosocial illness models, yet few communicated complaints using the biomedical language of healthcare providers. Although research interview and

  13. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission in HIV audit in Xhosa clinic, Mahalapye, Botswana

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    Stephane Tshitenge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Mahalapye district health management team (DHMT conducts regular audits to evaluate the standard of services delivered to patients, one of which is the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT programme. Xhosa clinic is one of the facilities in Mahalapye which provides a PMTCT programme.Aim: This audit aimed to identify gaps between the current PMTCT clinical practice in Xhosa clinic and the Botswana PMTCT national guidelines.Setting: This audit took place in Xhosa clinic in the urban village of Mahalapye, in the Central District of Botswana.Methods: This was a retrospective audit using PMTCT Xhosa clinic records of pregnant mothers and HIV-exposed babies seen from January 2013 to June 2013.Results: One hundred and thirty-three pregnant women registered for antenatal care. Twenty-five (19% knew their HIV-positive status as they had been tested before their pregnancy or had tested HIV positive at their first antenatal clinic visit. More than two-thirds of the 115 pregnant women (69% were seen at a gestational age of between 14 and 28 weeks. About two-thirds of the pregnant women (67% took antiretroviral drugs. Of the 44 HIV-exposed infants, 39 (89% were HIV DNA PCR negative at 6 weeks. Thirty-two (73% children were given cotrimoxazole prophylaxis between 6 and 8 weeks.Conclusion: The PMTCT programme service delivery was still suboptimal and could potentially increase the mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Daily monitoring mechanism to track those eligible could help to close the gap.

  14. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission in HIV audit in Xhosa clinic, Mahalapye, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Tshitenge

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Mahalapye district health management team (DHMT conducts regular audits to evaluate the standard of services delivered to patients, one of which is the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT programme. Xhosa clinic is one of the facilities in Mahalapye which provides a PMTCT programme. Aim: This audit aimed to identify gaps between the current PMTCT clinical practice in Xhosa clinic and the Botswana PMTCT national guidelines. Setting: This audit took place in Xhosa clinic in the urban village of Mahalapye, in the Central District of Botswana. Methods: This was a retrospective audit using PMTCT Xhosa clinic records of pregnant mothers and HIV-exposed babies seen from January 2013 to June 2013. Results: One hundred and thirty-three pregnant women registered for antenatal care. Twenty-five (19% knew their HIV-positive status as they had been tested before their pregnancy or had tested HIV positive at their first antenatal clinic visit. More than two-thirds of the 115 pregnant women (69% were seen at a gestational age of between 14 and 28 weeks. About two-thirds of the pregnant women (67% took antiretroviral drugs. Of the 44 HIV-exposed infants, 39 (89% were HIV DNA PCR negative at 6 weeks. Thirty-two (73% children were given cotrimoxazole prophylaxis between 6 and 8 weeks. Conclusion: The PMTCT programme service delivery was still suboptimal and could potentially increase the mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Daily monitoring mechanism to track those eligible could help to close the gap.

  15. Early mortality and AIDS progression despite high initial antiretroviral therapy adherence and virologic suppression in Botswana.

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    Katherine T Steele

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adverse outcomes occurring early after antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation are common in sub-Saharan Africa, despite reports of high levels of ART adherence in this setting. We sought to determine the relationship between very early ART adherence and early adverse outcomes in HIV-infected adults in Botswana. METHODS: This prospective cohort study of 402 ART-naïve, HIV-infected adults initiating ART at a public HIV clinic in Gaborone, Botswana evaluated the relationship between suboptimal early ART adherence and HIV treatment outcomes in the initial months after ART initiation. Early adherence during the interval between initial ART dispensation and first ART refill was calculated using pill counts. In the primary analysis patients not returning to refill and those with adherence <0.95 were considered to have suboptimal early adherence. The primary outcome was death or loss to follow-up during the first 6 months of ART; a secondary composite outcome included the primary outcome plus incident opportunistic illness (OIs and virologic failure. We also calculated the percent of early adverse outcomes theoretically attributable to suboptimal early adherence using the population attributable risk percent (PAR%. RESULTS: Suboptimal early adherence was independently associated with loss to follow-up and death (adjusted OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.8 and with the secondary composite outcome including incident OIs and virologic failure (adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4-4.7. However, of those with early adverse outcomes, less than one-third had suboptimal adherence and approximately two-thirds achieved virologic suppression. The PAR% relating suboptimal early adherence and primary and secondary outcomes were 14.7% and 17.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Suboptimal early adherence was associated with poor outcomes, but most early adverse outcomes occurred in patients with optimal early adherence. Clinical care and research efforts should focus on

  16. The use of rites of passage in strengthening the psychosocial wellbeing of orphaned children in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamuku, Masego; Daniel, Marguerite

    2012-10-01

    Children who have been bereaved in the context of AIDS may experience many challenges to their psychosocial wellbeing. Programmes to help orphaned children are usually anchored in child rights. As the individual focus of rights-based approaches is inept in African collectivist culture, NGOs tend to make use of group approaches in psychosocial support programmes. One orphan-strengthening programme in Botswana, called the Ark for Children, uses rites of passage and rites of affirmation as part of a therapeutic retreat. This study explored how rites of passage and rites of affirmation contribute to psychosocial strengthening of orphaned children in Botswana. Ten orphaned children were involved in five rounds of data collection during a 16-day therapeutic retreat; and eight social workers answered questions on the effectiveness of the therapy. A supplementary document analysis was also completed, which included retreat reports since 2001 and correspondence from community-based support workers and graduates of the programme. Participants reported that the rites used during the retreat helped them to commit to therapeutic transformation. During a retreat, all the participants witness and support each individual going through each rite - a process reported to foster and strengthen group formation. It was documented that the symbols used as part of the themed rites of affirmation are used by participants for years afterwards as reminders of their transformation and commitment to the group. We conclude that rites of passage can provide a powerful tool to help children commit to therapeutic transformation, build the supportive group, and enable the community to recognise and affirm that the children return as changed individuals and members of the group.

  17. Transverse response functions in the $\\Delta$-resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Rost, E; Shepard, J R

    1992-01-01

    We calculate transverse response functions for quasi-elastic electron scattering at high momentum transfers in a relativistic Hartree approximation in configuration space. We treat the excitation of the $\\Delta$ resonance using its free mass and width. Good agreement with experiment is found in the dip region.

  18. BAQMAP Air Quality Monitoring and Surveillance Program for Botswana. Mission 2 Report 27 January - 18 February 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkestad, T.

    1997-12-31

    This report is concerned with Mission 2 of a joint project between the authorities in Botswana and Norway on the development of an air pollution monitoring and surveillance program for Botswana. Mission 2 was undertaken as part of the annual meeting on 4 February 1997. Discussions and decision on the air quality program was performed after the annual meeting. Passive samplers for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} were installed in Selebi-Phikwe and Francistown. The samplers measured air pollution from the BCL smelter and traffic, respectively, during the first two weeks of February 1997. The samplers have been analysed and the results are given in this report, which also includes a status report. 13 tabs.

  19. PARAMETRIC DESIGN OF DELTA ROBOT

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    Mert Gürgen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a sophisticated determination and presentation of a workspace volume for a delta robot, with consideration of its kinematic behavior. With the help of theoretical equations, optimization is performed with the aid of the stiffness and dexterity analysis. Theoretical substructure is coded in Matlab and three-dimensional (3D data for delta robot are developed in computer-aided design (CAD environment. In later stages of the project, both 3D and theoretical data are linked together and thus, with the changing design parameter of the robot itself, the Solidworks CAD output adapts and regenerates output with a new set of parameters. To achieve an optimum workspace volume with predefined parameters, a different set of robot parameters are iterated through design optimization in Matlab, and the delta robot design is finalized and illustrated in the 3D CAD environment, Solidworks. This study provides a technical solution to accomplish a generic delta robot with optimized workspace volume.

  20. GPS-corrected and GIS-based remapping of the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park and the adjacent area in Botswana

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    J. du P. Bothma

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available GPS-equipment was used to map the interior roads, major pans and the location of all windmills and solar-equipped boreholes in the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park and the adjacent areas of Botswana. The final map was generated with GIS-equipment, and supplies managers and planners with the first error-free map of the area. The major errors of previous maps are indicated.

  1. Effects of single-parenthood on school-going adolescents in Gaborone District of Botswana / Portia Gobona Morebodi.

    OpenAIRE

    Morebodi, Portia Gobona

    2005-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the effects of single parenthood on school going adolescents on a group of male and female children schooling in Gaborone District of Botswana. The research questions focused on investigating the effects of. single parenthood on the social interactions of school-going adolescents, effects on their performance in class, the attitude of the community on such adolescents and whether single parenthood affected boys and girls differently. T...

  2. Multimode delta-E effect magnetic field sensors with adapted electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel, Sebastian; Fichtner, Simon; Kirchhof, Christine; Quandt, Eckhard; Faupel, Franz, E-mail: ff@tf.uni-kiel.de [Faculty of Engineering, Institute for Materials Science, Kiel University, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Reermann, Jens; Schmidt, Gerhard [Faculty of Engineering, Institute for Electrical Engineering, Kiel University, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Wagner, Bernhard [Fraunhofer Institute for Silicon Technology ISIT, Fraunhoferstraße 1, 25524 Itzehoe (Germany)

    2016-05-30

    We present an analytical and experimental study on low-noise piezoelectric thin film resonators that utilize the delta-E effect of a magnetostrictive layer to measure magnetic fields at low frequencies. Calculations from a physical model of the electromechanical resonator enable electrode designs to efficiently operate in the first and second transversal bending modes. As predicted by our calculations, the adapted electrode design improves the sensitivity by a factor of 6 and reduces the dynamic range of the sensor output by 16 dB, which significantly eases the requirements on readout electronics. Magnetic measurements show a bandwidth of 100 Hz at a noise level of about 100 pTHz{sup −0.5}.

  3. Multimode delta-E effect magnetic field sensors with adapted electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Sebastian; Reermann, Jens; Fichtner, Simon; Kirchhof, Christine; Quandt, Eckhard; Wagner, Bernhard; Schmidt, Gerhard; Faupel, Franz

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical and experimental study on low-noise piezoelectric thin film resonators that utilize the delta-E effect of a magnetostrictive layer to measure magnetic fields at low frequencies. Calculations from a physical model of the electromechanical resonator enable electrode designs to efficiently operate in the first and second transversal bending modes. As predicted by our calculations, the adapted electrode design improves the sensitivity by a factor of 6 and reduces the dynamic range of the sensor output by 16 dB, which significantly eases the requirements on readout electronics. Magnetic measurements show a bandwidth of 100 Hz at a noise level of about 100 pTHz-0.5.

  4. Electromagnetic excitation of the delta resonance in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, J.S.; Dodge, W.R.; Lightbody J.W. Jr.; Maruyama, X.K.; Adler, J.h.; Hansen, K.; Schro-dash-barder, B.; Bernstein, A.M.; Blomqvist, K.I.; Cottman, B.H.; and others

    1987-03-01

    Inclusive cross sections for the proton and nuclear targets of A = 4, 9, 12, and 16 were measured for 537 and 730 MeV electrons scattered at 37.1 deg. Systematic features of the continuum scattering data are compared with other electron scattering data and with photoabsorption measurements. A model calculation based on the isobar-hole formalism is compared with the data in the delta resonance region.

  5. Review; Ønulf Gulbrandsen, The State and the Social: State Formation in Botswana and Its Precolonial and Colonial Genealogies (2012 Buchbesprechung: Ønulf Gulbrandsen, The State and the Social: State Formation in Botswana and Its Precolonial and Colonial Genealogies (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhart Kößler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the monograph:Ønulf Gulbrandsen, The State and the Social: State Formation in Botswana and Its Precolonial and Colonial Genealogies, New York and Oxford: Berghahn, 2012, ISBN 9780857452979, 343 pagesBesprechung der Monographie:Ønulf Gulbrandsen, The State and the Social: State Formation in Botswana and Its Precolonial and Colonial Genealogies, New York and Oxford: Berghahn, 2012, ISBN 9780857452979, 343 Seiten

  6. Delta-Sigma Modulated Photodetection Method to Reduce Laser Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This delta-sigma technique may be thought of as a form of analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The proposed network offers a means of processing electronic signals...

  7. Immunofluorescence detection of new antigen-antibody system (delta/anti-delta) associated to hepatitis B virus in liver and in serum of HBsAg carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetto, M; Canese, M G; Aricò, S; Crivelli, O; Trepo, C; Bonino, F; Verme, G

    1977-01-01

    A new antigen-antibody system associated with the hepatitis B virus and immunologically distinct from the HB surface, core, and e systems is reported. The new antigen, termed delta, was detected by direct immunofluorescence only in the liver cell nuclei of patients with HBsAg positive chronic liver disease. At present, the intrahepatic expression of HBcAg and delta antigen appears to be mutually exclusive. No ultrastructural aspect corresponding to the delta antigen could be identified under the electron microscope. delta antibody was found in the serum of chronic HBsAg carriers, with a higher prevalence in patients with liver damage. The nuclear fluorescence patterns of HBcAg and delta antigen were similar; it is only possible to discriminate between the two antigens by using the respective specific antisera. Images Figure PMID:75123

  8. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyet, Jessica; Naylor, Claire E; Savva, Christos G; Gibert, Maryse; Popoff, Michel R; Basak, Ajit K

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF) revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB) cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

  9. Student Difficulties with the Dirac Delta Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R

    2014-01-01

    The Dirac delta function is a standard mathematical tool used in multiple topical areas in the undergraduate physics curriculum. While Dirac delta functions are usually introduced in order to simplify a problem mathematically, students often struggle to manipulate and interpret them. To better understand student difficulties with the delta function at the upper-division level, we examined responses to traditional exam questions and conducted think-aloud interviews. Our analysis was guided by an analytical framework that focuses on how students activate, construct, execute, and reflect on the Dirac delta function in physics. Here, we focus on student difficulties using the delta function to express charge distributions in the context of junior-level electrostatics. Challenges included: invoking the delta function spontaneously, constructing two- and three-dimensional delta functions, integrating novel delta function expressions, and recognizing that the delta function can have units.

  10. Association of respiratory viruses with outcomes of severe childhood pneumonia in Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Kelly

    Full Text Available The highest incidence of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI is in low- and middle-income countries. Few studies examined whether detection of respiratory viruses predicts ALRI outcomes in these settings.We conducted prospective cohort and case-control studies of children 1-23 months of age in Botswana. Cases met clinical criteria for pneumonia and were recruited within six hours of presentation to a referral hospital. Controls were children without pneumonia matched to cases by primary care clinic and date of enrollment. Nasopharyngeal specimens were tested for respiratory viruses using polymerase chain reaction. We compared detection rates of specific viruses in matched case-control pairs. We examined the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and other respiratory viruses on pneumonia outcomes.Between April 2012 and August 2014, we enrolled 310 cases, of which 133 had matched controls. Median ages of cases and controls were 6.1 and 6.4 months, respectively. One or more viruses were detected from 75% of cases and 34% of controls. RSV and human metapneumovirus were more frequent among cases than controls, but only enterovirus/rhinovirus was detected from asymptomatic controls. Compared with non-RSV viruses, RSV was associated with an increased risk of treatment failure at 48 hours [risk ratio (RR: 1.85; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.20, 2.84], more days of respiratory support [mean difference (MD: 1.26 days; 95% CI: 0.30, 2.22 days], and longer duration of hospitalization [MD: 1.35 days; 95% CI: 0.20, 2.50 days], but lower in-hospital mortality [RR: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.80] in children with pneumonia.Respiratory viruses were detected from most children hospitalized with ALRI in Botswana, but only RSV and human metapneumovirus were more frequent than among children without ALRI. Detection of RSV from children with ALRI predicted a protracted illness course but lower mortality compared with non-RSV viruses.

  11. {Delta}I = 3/2 and {Delta}S = 2 Hyperon decays in chiral perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, X.G. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Valencia, G. [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy

    1997-05-01

    We study the| {Delta}I| = 3/2 and |{Delta}S| = 2 amplitudes for hyperon decays of the form B {yields} B`{pi} at lowest order in chiral perturbation theory. At this order, the {Delta}I = 3/2 amplitudes depend on only one constant. We extract the value of this constant from experiment and find a reasonable description of these processes within experimental errors. The same constant determines the {Delta}S = 2 transitions which, in the standard model, are too small to be observed. We find that new physics with parity odd {Delta}S = 2 interactions can produce observable rates in hyperon decays while evading the bounds from K{sup 0} - K-bar{sup 0} mixing. (authors) 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Acceptability of infant male circumcision as part of HIV prevention and male reproductive health efforts in Gaborone, Botswana, and surrounding areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Rebeca M; Makhema, Joseph; Kebaabetswe, Poloko; Hussein, Fatima; Lesetedi, Chiapo; Halperin, Daniel; Bassil, Barbara; Shapiro, Roger; Lockman, Shahin

    2010-10-01

    Adult male circumcision reduces a man's risk for heterosexual HIV acquisition. Infant circumcision is safer, easier and less costly but not widespread in southern Africa. Questionnaires were administered to sixty mothers of newborn boys in Botswana: 92% responded they would circumcise if the procedure were available in a clinical setting, primarily to prevent future HIV infection, and 85% stated the infant's father must participate in the decision. Neonatal male circumcision appears to be acceptable in Botswana and deserves urgent attention in resource-limited regions with high HIV prevalence, with the aim to expand services in safe, culturally acceptable and sustainable ways.

  13. Relative availability of natural prey versus livestock predicts landscape suitability for cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanlie E.K. Winterbach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prey availability and human-carnivore conflict are strong determinants that govern the spatial distribution and abundance of large carnivore species and determine the suitability of areas for their conservation. For wide-ranging large carnivores such as cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus, additional conservation areas beyond protected area boundaries are crucial to effectively conserve them both inside and outside protected areas. Although cheetahs prefer preying on wild prey, they also cause conflict with people by predating on especially small livestock. We investigated whether the distribution of cheetahs’ preferred prey and small livestock biomass could be used to explore the potential suitability of agricultural areas in Botswana for the long-term persistence of its cheetah population. We found it gave a good point of departure for identifying priority areas for land management, the threat to connectivity between cheetah populations, and areas where the reduction and mitigation of human-cheetah conflict is critical. Our analysis showed the existence of a wide prey base for cheetahs across large parts of Botswana’s agricultural areas, which provide additional large areas with high conservation potential. Twenty percent of wild prey biomass appears to be the critical point to distinguish between high and low probable levels of human-cheetah conflict. We identified focal areas in the agricultural zones where restoring wild prey numbers in concurrence with effective human-cheetah conflict mitigation efforts are the most immediate conservation strategies needed to maintain Botswana’s still large and contiguous cheetah population.

  14. From landform to process: Morphology and formation of lake-bed barchan dunes, Makgadikgadi, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrough, Sallie L.; Thomas, David S. G.; Bailey, Richard M.; Davies, Lauren

    2012-08-01

    A suite of crescentic landforms is visible from remotely sensed imagery within the Ntwetwe panPan in the Makgadikgadi basin, Botswana. We investigate the most distinct of these landforms using morphometric measurements, sedimentary data and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) signal analysis. Comparative analysis with previously published barchan morphological data sets suggest the Ntwetwe features fall within the spectrum of morphometric parameters found in a range of barchan dunefields from around the world. There is currently insufficient comparative morphometric data from sub-aqueous dunefields to be able to distinguish the particular formative environment of the dune. OSL signal analyses however, support the hypothesis of Grove (1969) [Grove, A.T., 1969. Landforms and climatic change in the Kalahari and Ngamiland. Geographical Journal, 135: 191-212] that the last deposition of the sediments within the Ntwetwe forms was most likely aeolian in origin. Luminescence signal analysis is employed to investigate potential transport and bleaching environments of the sediments forming the features, but results in this case do not shed further light on the formative conditions of these enigmatic landforms.

  15. Participation of Females in Physics Programs at the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maabong, Kelebogile

    2005-10-01

    The number of females enrolling in medical and health-related fields is substantially higher than in engineering and technology. Females tend to express a preference for careers with a strong element of social services. The level of interest and achievement in science and technology between females and males is quite different. Much of the research argues that stereotyping influences the attitudes and beliefs of young children, and these attitudes and beliefs are reinforced at home and school to create a marked effect on participation of females and their subject choices in science and technology education. These attitudes affect the level of self-confidence and enjoyment that females develop about science, especially physics. Girls tend to view physics in a negative way, claiming that it is difficult, time consuming, and masculine. They may believe that they can only understand a concept if they can put it into a broader world view, whereas males are pleased if there is internal coherence within the concept learned, and appear to enjoy physics more than biology and chemistry, viewing it as valuable in itself. The University of Botswana is facing this low participation and lower performance of females in physics programs compared with males.

  16. Redesigning a Ministry of Health's organizational structure: exploring implementation challenges through Botswana's experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin D C; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    The Botswana's Ministry of Health redesigned and adopted a new organizational structure in 2005, which was poorly implemented. This article explores factors that influenced the implementation of this organizational structure. This article draws from data collected through in-depth interviews with 54 purposively selected key informants comprising policy makers, senior managers and staff of the Ministry of Health (N = 40) and senior officers from various stakeholder organizations (N = 14). Participants generally felt that the review of the Ministry of Health organizational structure was important. The previous structure was considered obsolete with fragmented functions that limited the overall performance of the health system. The new organizational structure was viewed to be aligned to current national priorities with potential to positively influence performance. Some key weaknesses identified included lack of consultation and information sharing with workers during the restructuring process, which affected the understanding of their new roles, failure to mobilize key resources to support implementation of the new structure and inadequate monitoring of the implementation process. Redesigning an organizational structure is a major change. There is a need for effective and sustained leadership to plan, direct, coordinate, monitor and evaluate the implementation phase of the reform. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Alcohol Consumption and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Persons Attending Alcohol Consumption Venues in Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Tsering Pema; Kumoji, E 'Kuor; Ketlogetswe, Ditsotlhe; Anderson, Marina; Brahmbhatt, Heena

    2016-02-01

    Alcohol use is a known key risk factor associated with risky sexual behavior that contributes to HIV transmission. This cross-sectional study used time location sampling to investigate alcohol use and risky sexual behaviors that occurred after ingesting alcohol among 609 patrons of alcohol venues in Gaborone, Botswana. Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores were categorized as low (1-7), medium (8-15), and high (16+) for analysis. Logistic regression models stratified by gender assessed the association between alcohol use and condom use at last sex after drinking alcohol. Among females, the odds of condom use during last sex after drinking alcohol were significantly lower for high compared to low AUDIT scores (AOR = 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.54). Among males, factors significantly associated with condom use at last sex after alcohol use were low levels of education (primary level compared to university and above AOR = 0.13; 95% CI 0.03-0.55) and beliefs that alcohol use did not increase risky sexual behaviors (AOR = 0.26; 95% CI 0.11-0.62). HIV prevention interventions should target females and emphasize sexual risks associated with alcohol use.

  18. Detection and quantification of biogenic amines in fermented food products sold in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwamba, Clement; Matsheka, Maitshwarelo Ignatius; Mpuchane, Sisai; Gashe, Berhanu Abegaz

    2010-09-01

    The incidence and concentrations associated with four important biogenic amines in leading commercial fermented beverages consumed in Botswana were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. In 87 sorghum brew and 84 sour milk (madila, amasi) samples tested, putrescine was the most prevalent biogenic amine (63 and 61%, respectively), while histamine was the least prevalent (24 and 8%, respectively). Cadaverine was the most frequently detected biogenic amine in 79 of the commercial sour maize beverage (mageu/mahewu) samples tested (found in 70% of the samples), while tyramine was the least detected (occurring in 3% of the samples). In sorghum brew and sour milk, tyramine was found to be the most concentrated (mean concentration of 2.08 mg/100 ml and 3.2 mg/100 ml, respectively), and histamine was found to be the least concentrated (mean concentration of 0.94 mg/100 ml and 0.31 mg/100 ml, respectively). Overall, the biogenic amine concentrations of all three fermented products were within acceptable limits. However, one sorghum brew sample had a histamine content of 5.8 mg/ 100 ml, which was above the 5.0 mg/100 g allowable limit suggested by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  19. Counselling and Pentecostal modalities of social engineering of relationships in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Rijk

    2013-01-01

    In African societies where HIV and AIDS are widespread, counselling is being used in an attempt to control people's sexual relationships and has become an important industry. Counselling is centrally placed in many AIDS-related policies in Botswana and is sponsored by both the government and religious organisations. Within the broad spectrum of Christianity, Pentecostal churches are very active. They emphasise the refashioning of relationships by mediating moral imperatives and by engaging with psychological knowledge on personal behaviour and on techniques of counselling in a changing context of sexuality. This paper explores the significance of religious counselling in terms of the disciplining effects concerning personal behaviour and the ways in which this form of communication is generating a wider interest in this society. This is particularly attractive to members of the educated classes who are engaging with Pentecostal counselling as a way of refashioning their domain of intimate relations. Yet, it does not only provide informed ideas on intimate relations--being often one of the proclaimed objectives of counselling - it also produces a communication about intimate matters that is intended to inform a critique of socio-cultural conventions. This is a counter-cultural dynamic of counselling, which has been little noticed in the academic study of counselling practices in Africa.

  20. Personal views about womanhood amongst women living with HIV in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaan, Michelle Marian; Taylor, Myra; Gungqisa, Nontombi; Marlink, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The social construction of womanhood in Africa can be said to have two central defining elements: being a wife and being a mother. The interplay between HIV and these elements is not well understood outside of prevention efforts. We conducted a qualitative study of womanhood in Botswana; specifically the sexual and reproductive lives of women living with HIV. Twelve focus-group discussions were held with 61 women, with a median age of 35, taking anti-retroviral therapy. Major themes describing womanhood, before and after HIV diagnosis, were identified using grounded theory strategies. Findings illustrate that womanhood is synonymous with motherhood and that women are expected to have sex in order to please a partner. HIV was said to create a barrier to fulfilling these expectations as it caused anxiety over disclosing one's HIV status and/or infecting the partner. The sense of pride and dignity that traditionally accompanied pregnancy was said to be lost and a common refrain was concern about passing HIV to an unborn child, having pregnancy complications or advancing HIV infection. Fear, shame and stigma play a large role in these negative perceptions. Interventions to address stigma, societal views of women and the integration of holistic family planning into HIV care are needed.

  1. Predictors of early breastfeeding cessation among HIV-infected women in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwu, Anthony; Moyo, Sikhulile; Powis, Kathleen; Asmelash, Aida; Lockman, Shahin; Moffat, Claire; Leidner, Jean; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Shapiro, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Infants born to HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) can be breastfed through at least 6 months with very low risk of HIV acquisition. We aimed to identify demographic and cultural factors that may influence mothers' willingness to breastfeed for the recommended duration. We evaluated factors associated with early cessation of breastfeeding (i.e. before 5 months post-partum) in a randomized clinical trial evaluating different ART regimens used for prevention of mother-to-child transmission during breastfeeding in Botswana. Univariate and multivariable Cox regressions were used to describe predictors of early exclusive BF cessation. Among 677 women who started breastfeeding, the median time to breastfeeding cessation was 178 days (IQR 150-181) and 25.1% weaned early. In multivariable analysis, urban location (aHR = 1.86 95%CI 1.27-2.73; P = 0.002), salaried employment or being a student (aHR = 2.78 95% CI 1.63-4.75; P < 0.001) and infant hospitalisation before weaning (aHR = 2.04 95% CI 1.21-3.45; P = 0.008) were independently and significantly associated with early BF cessation. Improved support for breastfeeding among employed mothers, especially in urban settings, may allow HIV-infected women who are receiving ART prophylaxis to breastfeed longer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR with functional equipment and adequate resources.The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to recommend more effective CPR strategies for Botswana’s hospitals. Interviews, comprising two quantitative sections with closed ended questions and one qualitative section with semi-structured questions, were conducted with 22 unit managers. The quantitative data indicated that all unit managers had at least eight years’ nursing experience, and could identify CPR shortcomings in their hospitals. Only one interviewee had never performed CPR. The qualitative data analysis revealed that the hospital units sometimes had too few staff members and did not have fully equipped emergency trolleys and/or equipment. No CPR teams and no CPR policies and guidelines existed. Nurses and doctors reportedly lacked CPR knowledge and skills. No debriefing services were provided after CPR encounters. The participating hospitals should address the following challenges that might affect CPR outcomes: shortages of staff, overpopulation of hospital units, shortcomings of the emergency trolleys and CPR equipment, absence of CPR policies and guidelines, absence of CPR teams, limited CPR competencies of doctors and nurses and the lack of debriefing sessions after CPR attempts.

  3. Coupled flow and salinity transport modelling in semi-arid environments: The Shashe River Valley, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Peter; Held, Rudolf J.; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Linn, Flenner; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Numerical groundwater modelling is used as the base for sound aquifer system analysis and water resources assessment. In many cases, particularly in semi-arid and arid regions, groundwater flow is intricately linked to salinity transport. A case in point is the Shashe River Valley in Botswana. A freshwater aquifer located around an ephemeral stream is depleted by the combined effect of transpiration and pumping. Quantitative system analysis reveals that the amount of water taken by transpiration is far more than the quantities pumped for water supply. Furthermore, the salinity distribution in and around Shashe River Valley as well as its temporal dynamics can be satisfactorily reproduced if the transpiration is modelled as a function of groundwater salinity. The location and dynamics of the saltwater-freshwater interface are highly sensitive to the parameterization of evaporative and transpirative salt enrichment. An existing numerical code for coupled flow/transport simulations (SEAWAT) was adapted to this situation. Model results were checked against a large set of field data including water levels, water chemistry, isotope data and ground and airborne geophysical data. The resulting groundwater model was able to reproduce the long-term development of the freshwater lens located in Shashe River Valley as well as the decline in piezometric heads observed over the last decade. Furthermore, the old age of the saline water surrounding the central freshwater lens could be explained.

  4. Reading competency of first-year undergraduate students at University of Botswana: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beauty B. Ntereke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to read and interpret textbooks and other assigned material is a critical component of success at university level. Therefore, the aims of this study are twofold: to evaluate the reading levels of first-year students when they first enter the university to determine how adequately prepared they are for university reading. It is also to find out if there will be any significant improvement after going through the academic literacy course offered to first-year students. The participants were 51 first-year undergraduate humanities students enrolled in the Communication and Academic Literacy course at the University of Botswana. The data were collected through a reading test adopted from Zulu which was administered at the beginning of the first semester. The same test was administered at the end of the semester after the students had gone through the academic literacy course to see if there was any difference in performance. The findings of this study indicate that there is a mixed and wide variation of students reading competency levels when students first enter the university and that a significant number of first-year entrants are inadequately prepared for university reading.

  5. Use of oxytocin during Caesarean section at Princess Marina Hospital, Botswana: An audit of clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy M. Tsima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxytocin is widely used for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage. In the setting of Caesarean section (CS, the dosage and mode of administrating oxytocin differs according to different guidelines. Inappropriate oxytocin doses have been identified as contributory to some cases of maternal deaths. The main aim of this study was to audit the current standard of clinical practice with regard to the use of oxytocin during CS at a referral hospital in Botswana.Methods: A clinical audit of pregnant women having CS and given oxytocin at the time of the operation was conducted over a period of three months. Data included indications for CS, oxytocin dose regimen, prescribing clinician’s designation, type of anaesthesia for the CS and estimated blood loss.Results: A total of 139 case records were included. The commonest dose was 20 IU infusion (31.7%. The potentially dangerous regimen of 10 IU intravenous bolus of oxytocin was used in 12.9% of CS. Further doses were utilized in 57 patients (41%. The top three indications for CS were fetal distress (36 patients, 24.5%, dystocia (32 patients, 21.8% and a previous CS (25 patients, 17.0%. Estimated blood loss ranged from 50 mL – 2000 mL.Conclusion: The use of oxytocin during CS in the local setting does not follow recommended practice. This has potentially harmful consequences. Education and guidance through evidence based national guidelines could help alleviate the problem.

  6. Factors influencing health care workers’ implementation of tuberculosis contact tracing in Kweneng, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlale, Lebapotswe; Frasso, Rosemary; Kgosiesele, Onalenna; Selemogo, Mpho; Mothei, Quirk; Habte, Dereje; Steenhoff, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction TB contact tracing rates remain low in high burden settings and reasons for this are not well known. We describe factors that influence health care workers' (HCW) implementation of TB contact tracing (CT) in a high TB burden district of Botswana. Methods Data were collected using questionnaires and in-depth interviews in 31 of the 52 health facilities in Kweneng East Health District. Responses were summarized using summary statistics and comparisons between HCW groups were done using parametric or non-parametric tests as per normality of the data distribution. Results One hundred and four HCWs completed questionnaires. Factors that influenced HCW TB contact tracing were their knowledge, attitudes and practices as well as personal factors including decreased motivation and lack of commitment. Patient factors included living further away from the clinic, unknown residential address and high rates of migration and mobility. Administrative factors included staff shortages, lack of transport, poor reporting of TB cases and poor medical infrastructure e.g. suboptimal laboratory services. A national HCW strike and a restructuring of the health system emerged as additional factors during in-depth interviews of TB coordinators. Conclusion Multiple factors lead to poor TB contact tracing in this district. Interventions to increase TB contact tracing will be informed by these findings. PMID:27800084

  7. Development and application of modern agricultural biotechnology in Botswana: the potentials, opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlang, Utlwang; Tsurupe, Gorata; Segwagwe, Amogelang; Obopile, Motshwari

    2014-07-03

    In Botswana, approximately 40% of the population live in rural areas and derive most of their livelihood from agriculture by keeping livestock and practising arable farming. Due to the nature of their farming practises livestock and crops are exposed to diseases and environmental stresses. These challenges offer opportunities for application of biotechnology to develop adaptable materials to the country's environment. On the other hand, the perceived risk of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has dimmed the promise of the technology for its application in agriculture. This calls for a holistic approach to the application of biotechnology to address issues of biosafety of GMOs. We have therefore assessed the potentials, challenges and opportunities to apply biotechnology with specific emphasis on agriculture, taking cognisance of requirement for its research, development and application in research and teaching institutions. In order to achieve this, resource availability, infrastructure, human and laboratory requirements were analyzed. The analysis revealed that the country has the capacity to carry out research in biotechnology in the development and production of genetically modified crops for food and fodder crops. These will include gene discovery, genetic transformation and development of systems to comply with the world regulatory framework on biosafety. In view of the challenges facing the country in agriculture, first generation biotech crops could be released for production. Novel GM products for development may include disease diagnosis kits, animal disease vaccines, and nutrient use efficiency, drought, and pest and disease resistant food and fodder crops.

  8. Body Image Dissatisfaction Is Increased in Male and Overweight/Obese Adolescents in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Malete

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to examine linkages between obesity, physical activity, and body image dissatisfaction, with consideration of socioeconomic status (SES and urbanization in adolescents in Botswana. Materials and Methods. A nationally representative, cross-sectional survey in 707 secondary school students included measured height and weight to determine overweight (OW or obesity (OB using World Health Organization standards; physical activity (PA using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire; and body image satisfaction using the Body Ideals Questionnaire. SES was described by private school versus public school attendance. Results and Discussion. OW/OB students felt farther from ideal and greater dissatisfaction with their weight and body proportions than optimal weight students. Boys felt greater difference from ideal and more dissatisfaction with muscle tone, chest size, and strength than girls. Lower SES students and those from rural villages had more minutes of PA than higher SES or urban students. In this rapidly developing African country, these trends reflect the nutrition transition and offer opportunity to motivate OW/OB students and boys for PA as a health promotion obesity prevention behavior. Conclusions. As urbanization and improved SES are desirable and likely to continue, the public health system will be challenged to prevent obesity while preserving a healthy body image.

  9. Reactive versus anticipative adaptive management of Deltas: The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Rhine-Meuse Delta compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg, T.J.; Zandvoort, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper Californian Adaptive Management (AM) and Dutch Adaptive Delta Management (ADM) are compared. The concepts are introduced in a policy context to deal with prevailing types of uncertainty in water management in the Californian Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Dutch Rhine-Meuse Delta

  10. Facts About Delta Pi Epsilon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delta Pi Epsilon Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The article discusses the purpose and structure of Delta Pi Epsilon and the general qualifications for membership. Service projects and publications, research awards, timely facts, the year of each chapter's origination, national presidents, and executive secretaries for the last 40 years are listed. (BP)

  11. Hydrological and Climatic Significance of Martian Deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Achille, G.; Vaz, D. A.

    2017-10-01

    We a) review the geomorphology, sedimentology, and mineralogy of the martian deltas record and b) present the results of a quantitative study of the hydrology and sedimentology of martian deltas using modified version of terrestrial model Sedflux.

  12. Yellow River Delta Faces a Historic Opportunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhen

    2010-01-01

    @@ China's State Council has endorsed the Development Plan of an Efficient Eco-Economic Zone at Yellow River Delta. The plan is meant to create a more ecologically sustainable economic zone along the river delta.

  13. Yellow River Delta Faces a Historic Opportunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhen

    2011-01-01

    @@ China's State Council has endorsed the Development Plan of an Efficient Eco-Economic Zone at Yellow River Delta.The plan is meant to create a more ecologically sustainable economic zone along the river delta.

  14. On the modelling of river delta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleynse, N.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents approaches to the modelling of river delta formation. In particular, it provides results of numerical stratigraphic-morphodynamic modelling of river delta formation under various environmental forcings.

  15. Adaptive delta management: Roots and branches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, J.S.; Haasnoot, M.; Hermans, L.M.; Kwakkel, J.H.; Rutten, M.M.; Thissen, W.A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Deltas are generally recognized as vulnerable to climate change and therefore a salient topic in adaptation science. Deltas are also highly dynamic systems viewed from physical (erosion, sedimentation, subsidence), social (demographic), economic (trade), infrastructures (transport, energy, metropoli

  16. Delta Vegetation and Land Use [ds292

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vegetation and land use are mapped for the approximately 725,000 acres constituting the Legal Delta portion of the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Delta area....

  17. Formation of aligned CrN nanoclusters in Cr-delta-doped GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y K; Kimura, S; Emura, S; Hasegawa, S; Asahi, H [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: zhou21@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-11

    Cr-delta-doped GaN layers were grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on GaN template substrates. Cr flux was supplied without nitrogen flow during Cr-delta-doping. Cr incorporation into a narrow thin layer region was confirmed with the depth profile measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Structural properties and Cr atom alignments were studied with transmission electron microscopy. It was found that Cr-delta-doped GaN layers were coherently grown with Cr or CrGa nanoclusters in the delta-doped region for low temperature growth (350, 500 deg. C). It was also found that aligned CrN nanoclusters (approximately 5 nm vertical thickness) with NaCl-type structure were formed in the delta-doped region for the growth at 700 deg. C.

  18. Reexamination of the Electronic Structure of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8 +{delta}} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 1}O{sub 6+{delta}} : Electronlike Portions of the Fermi Surface and Depletion of Spectral Weight near {bar M}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Y.; Gromko, A.D.; Dessau, D.S. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Aiura, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Oka, K. [Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL), 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.I. [Department of Superconductivity, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 (Japan); Nakamura, K.; Ando, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 2-11-1 Iwato-Kita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    We present a reexamination of the electronic structure and Fermi surface (FS) topology of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) as obtained from angle-resolved photoemission experiments. By applying a stricter set of FS crossing criteria as well as by varying the incident photon energy outside the usual range, we have found very different behavior from that previously observed. In particular, we have found a FS that is centered around the {Gamma} point and contains electronlike portions, and we observe a depletion of spectral weight around {bar M} . The flat bands observed at other photon energies may indicate the presence of two electronic components in the cuprates. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  19. National guidelines not always followed when diagnosing smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with HIV in Botswana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taurayi A Tafuma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis (SNPTB is challenging, especially in patients with HIV. The Botswana National Tuberculosis Program (BNTP guidelines give guidance in diagnosing and treating SNPTB. Patients with chronic cough should be screened for TB by 3 sputum smear investigations. If negative, a chest x-ray (CXR should be performed. If negative for TB, antimicrobial treatment for other infections should be started. We investigated the clinicians' use of the guidelines in clinical practice. METHODS: Data regarding the medical history (coughing period, requested and conducted investigations concerning tuberculosis diagnosis (sputum smear or culture or CXR or alternative diagnoses (sputum microscopy or blood or sputum culture for diagnosis of other organisms, in SNPTB HIV-positive patients (outpatients and admitted patients from 2006-2009 in a district hospital in Botswana were extracted from all available hospital medical records. Additionally, a survey was done in all doctors diagnosing SNPTB in this hospital using a self-administered questionnaire with questions regarding the application of the BNTP guidelines in practice. Descriptive analyses of collected data were performed to test the compliance to the guidelines. RESULTS: Data from medical records showed that in 47.0% (132/281 of patients, TB treatment was started without microbiological results from sputum smears. Other methods to rule out or confirm PTB were used in 2.1% (6/281; and 99.6% (280/281 of SNPTB patients had received a CXR. The survey in 7 clinicians found that all always used CXR, and all clinicians requested three sputum results only sometimes. Six out of 7 clinicians started antibiotics before starting TB treatment. Reasons clinicians gave for difficulties in following the guidelines included inability of patients to produce sputum; and laboratory delays in releasing sputum results. CONCLUSION: Between 2006 and 2009 a high proportion of SNPTB

  20. High-risk behaviors among adult men and women in Botswana: Implications for HIV/AIDS prevention efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keetile, Mpho

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The government of Botswana has been spending a lot of money in the prevention, treatment, care and support for HIV/AIDS patient for decades. This paper uses data from the third Botswana AIDS Impact Survey (BAIS III) to explore high-risk behaviors of adults and how they affect government efforts to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. The objective of this paper is to fill in the gap on the assessment of high-risk behaviors associated with HIV/AIDS and their implications on HIV/AIDS prevention efforts. A nationally representative sample of 10,159 men and women aged 20–64 years who had successfully completed the BAIS III individual questionnaire were used in the study. Both descriptive and binary logistic regression analyses were used for analysis. Crude odds ratios were obtained from gross effects model while adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were obtained from the net effects model. Statistically significant association was observed between multiple current partners and alcohol consumption (AOR = 1.5), drug abuse (AOR = 1.7), transactional sex (AOR = 2.6) and intergenerational sex (AOR = 1.07). Furthermore, statistically significant association was seen for inconsistent condom use and having tested for HIV (AOR = 1.5). These results show a worrying tendency that despite government's efforts to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS, adults in Botswana continue to indulge in high-risk behaviors. Therefore, any programs and policies on HIV/AIDS should first target these high-risk behaviors. PMID:25293869

  1. Subtype distribution of human papillomavirus in HIV-infected women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia stages 2 and 3 in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; McGrath, Cindy M; Barnhart, Kurt T; Friedman, Harvey M; Zetola, Nicola M

    2011-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines containing types 16 and 18 are likely to be effective in preventing cervical cancer associated with these HPV types. No information currently exists in Botswana concerning the HPV types causing precancerous or cancerous lesions. Our goal was to determine the prevalence of HPV types associated with precancerous cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) stages 2 and 3 in HIV-infected women in Gaborone, Botswana. HIV-infected women referred to our clinic with high-grade intraepithelial lesion on the Pap smear were enrolled in the study. HPV typing was only performed if the histopathology results showed CIN stage 2 or 3 disease using linear array genotyping (CE-IVD, Roche Diagnostics). One hundred HIV-infected women were identified with CIN stages 2 or 3 between August 11, 2009 and September 29, 2010. Eighty-two of 100 women enrolled had coinfection by multiple HPV subtypes (range, 2 to 12). Of the remaining 18 women, 14 were infected with a single high-risk subtype and 4 had no HPV detected. Overall, 92 (92%) women were infected with at least 1 high-risk HPV subtype, and 56 were coinfected with more than 1 high-risk HPV type (range, 2 to 5). Fifty-one (51%) women had HPV subtypes 16, 18, or both. HPV 16 and 18 are the most common types in HIV-infected women with CIN 2 or 3 in Gaborone, Botswana, suggesting that the implementation of HPV vaccination programs could have a significant impact on the reduction of cervical cancer incidence. However, given the relative lack of knowledge on the natural history of cervical cancer in HIV-infected women and the significant prevalence of infection and coinfection with other high-risk HPV types in our sample, the true impact and cost-effectiveness of such vaccination programs need to be evaluated.

  2. Tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship (TAPS) exposure, anti-TAPS policies, and students' smoking behavior in Botswana and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Lorna McLeod; Hsia, Jason; Malarcher, Ann

    2016-10-01

    We examined the change over time in tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship exposure and the concurrent changes in cigarette smoking behavior among students age 13 to 15years in two African countries with different anti-tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship policies. In South Africa, anti-tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship policies became more comprehensive over time and were more strictly enforced, whereas the partial anti-tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship policies adopted in Botswana were weakly enforced. We analyzed two rounds of Global Youth Tobacco Survey data from South Africa (1999, n=2342; 2011, n=3713) and in Botswana (2001, n=1073; 2008, n=1605). We assessed several indicators of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship exposure along with prevalence of current cigarette smoking and smoking susceptibility for each data round. Logistic regression was used to examine changes over time in tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship exposure and smoking behavior in both countries. Between 1999 and 2011, South African students' exposure to tobacco advertising and sponsorship decreased significantly by 16% (p value, advertising, promotion and sponsorship exposure did not change significantly between 2001 and 2008. South African students' prevalence of cigarette smoking decreased over time (OR, 0.68) as did susceptibility to smoking (OR, 0.75), but declines did not remain significant after adjusting for parents' and friends' smoking. In Botswana, students' prevalence of cigarette smoking increased significantly over time (OR, 1.84), as did susceptibility to smoking (OR, 2.71). Enforcement of strong anti-tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship policies is a vital component of effective tobacco control programs in Africa. Such regulations, if effectively implemented, can reduce tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship exposure among adolescents and may influence cigarette smoking behavior. Copyright

  3. High-risk behaviors among adult men and women in Botswana: implications for HIV/AIDS prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keetile, Mpho

    2014-01-01

    The government of Botswana has been spending a lot of money in the prevention, treatment, care and support for HIV/AIDS patient for decades. This paper uses data from the third Botswana AIDS Impact Survey (BAIS III) to explore high-risk behaviors of adults and how they affect government efforts to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. The objective of this paper is to fill in the gap on the assessment of high-risk behaviors associated with HIV/AIDS and their implications on HIV/AIDS prevention efforts. A nationally representative sample of 10,159 men and women aged 20-64 years who had successfully completed the BAIS III individual questionnaire were used in the study. Both descriptive and binary logistic regression analyses were used for analysis. Crude odds ratios were obtained from gross effects model while adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were obtained from the net effects model. Statistically significant association was observed between multiple current partners and alcohol consumption (AOR = 1.5), drug abuse (AOR = 1.7), transactional sex (AOR = 2.6) and intergenerational sex (AOR = 1.07). Furthermore, statistically significant association was seen for inconsistent condom use and having tested for HIV (AOR = 1.5). These results show a worrying tendency that despite government's efforts to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS, adults in Botswana continue to indulge in high-risk behaviors. Therefore, any programs and policies on HIV/AIDS should first target these high-risk behaviors.

  4. 福特-后福特二元生产系统下的企业创新行为——以珠江三角洲电子产业为例%Firm Innovation Behavior Under the Fordism-post Fordism Dual Production System: A Case Study of Electronics Industry in the Zhujiang River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符文颖

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of knowledge economy,innovation has become the key element in growth and development.Ample literature in regional innovation system suggests that firm network under the support of knowledge-related institution underlies the success of clusters.In the innovation studies,firm-level innovation strategies and behaviors are among the most important aspects in investigating the regional innovation prospect.Unlike the mechanic comparison between regional innovation systems among places,this article begs the question of what constitutes the innovation drives for the clustering firms in the Zhujiang River Delta,China,where the Fordist production sector relocated by multi-national corporations is intricately intertwined with post-Fordist mode of flexible production among small and medium sized supplier firms.Based on a random-sampled electronics firm questionnaire survey in the Zhujiang River Delta,this article begins by analyzing the Fordist-post Fordist way of production system in terms of production network,labor market,financial system,innovation system and business mode in the Zhujiang River Delta,concluding a close-oriented Fordist character in labor market,financial system and innovation system with relatively flexible way of production and business relations under the support of social capital.The study further investigates the innovation mechanism within this context of production system by building a probit model.In the model,the effect of firm scale,R&D investment,CEO background,staff turnover rate and urbanization economies on firm innovation have been examined.Moreover,the model succeeds in differentiating the effect of these factors between four types of innovation,i.e.product innovation,process innovation,organizational innovation and market innovation.The results show that while the production relations among the firms has become more vertically fragmented and flexible,innovation activities still keep the Fordist "in-house" characteristic

  5. Comprehensive studies for the crystal structures and electronic properties of the superconducting system Fe1 + δSe1 - xTex with \\delta \\simeq 0.037 and x \\simeq 0.55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Masashige; Kawasaki, Yasuna; Tsubokawa, Masashi; Koyano, Tamotsu

    2010-12-01

    Structural aspects and electronic properties for the Fe1 + δSe1 - xTex system with 0.04 125Te. The crystal structures with an excess Fe site are refined precisely with obvious constraints. For the superconducting composition, the transport properties are explained in terms of the two-band model, where an electron carrier band gives a linear-in-T resistivity and another hole band leads to nearly temperature-independent behaviour. The magnetic susceptibility and the Knight shift are explained with the idea that the electron correlation is enhanced with increasing x and it is reduced with annealing. The spin-lattice relaxation rates for the normal state that show the apparent Korringa relation may also be understood in this framework. These evidences suggest that the superconductivity may emerge in a regime where the correlation is relatively weak in this system.

  6. Limited junctional diversity of V delta 5-J delta 1 rearrangement in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J S; Michałowska-Wender, G; Januszkiewicz, D; Wender, M

    1997-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) delta gene repertoire, as assessed by V delta-J delta rearrangements, has been analyzed in nine multiple sclerosis (MS) cases and in 30 healthy individuals by seminested PCR technique. Among the V delta-J delta junctional diversities studied, the most striking result has been observed in V delta 5-J delta 1 rearrangement. The detection of repeated V delta 5-J delta 1 nucleotide sequences in all analyzed clones from seven out of nine patients studied proved the monoclonal nature of gamma delta T-cells with V delta 5-J delta 1 rearrangement. The clonal nature of this rearrangement proved by PAGE and sequencing analysis may suggest an antigen-driven expansion of gamma delta T cells and argues for a significant role of gamma delta T-cells with V delta 5-J delta 1 rearrangement in MS pathogenesis. However, it cannot be excluded that clonal expansion of these lymphocytes may represent secondary change to central nervous system damage.

  7. Reflections on Development Strategy of Pearl River Delta: In Comparison with Yangtze River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>1. A comparison between Pearl River Delta and Yangtze River Delta 1.1 Basic conditions 1.1.1 Location, area and scope Located in the southeast of Guangdong Province, the Pearl River Delta (PRD) as an economic zone is a compound delta

  8. What's on the Surface? Physics and Chemistry of Delta-Doped Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Outline of presentation: 1. Detector surfaces and the problem of stability 2. Delta-doped detectors 3. Physics of Delta-doped Silicon 4. Chemistry of the Si-SiO2 Interface 5. Physics and Chemistry of Delta-doped Surfaces a. Compensation b. Inversion c. Quantum exclusion. Conclusions: 1. Quantum confinement of electrons and holes dominates the behavior of delta-doped surfaces. 2. Stability of delta-doped detectors: Delta-layer creates an approx 1 eV tunnel barrier between bulk and surface. 3. At high surface charge densities, Tamm-Shockley states form at the surface. 4. Surface passivation by quantum exclusion: Near-surface delta-layer suppresses T-S trapping of minority carriers. 5. The Si-SiO2 interface compensates the surface 6. For delta-layers at intermediate depth, surface inversion layer forms 7. Density of Si-SiO2 interface charge can be extremely high (>10(exp 14)/sq cm)

  9. [delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Ishida, N; Akagi, R

    1995-06-01

    delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD: E. C. 4.2.1.24), the second enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, condenses two moles of delta-aminolevulinic acid to form porphobilinogen. ALAD deficiency is well known to develop signs and symptoms of typical hepatic porphyria, and classified into three categories as follows: (i) ALAD porphyria, a genetic defect of the enzyme, (ii) tyrosinemia type I, a genetic defect of fumarylacetoacetase in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, producing succinylacetone (a potent inhibitor of ALAD), and (iii) ALAD inhibition by environmental hazards, such as lead, trichloroethylene, and styrene. In the present article, we will describe molecular and biochemical mechanisms to cause the enzyme defect to discuss the significance of ALAD defect on human health.

  10. Implementation of the Performance Management System (PMS) in Senior Secondary Schools in Botswana: An Investigation of Senior Management Team's Expected Benefits of the PMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulawa, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Different forms of the performance management system have been implemented in many countries for some years. As in other countries, in 1999 the government of Botswana took a decision to implement a performance management system (PMS) across the entire public service including schools. The government explained the purpose for which this reform was…

  11. A Report of the Responses of Botswana Junior Secondary School Teachers on the Three Subscales of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibapile, Waitshega Tefo Smitta

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to present the findings of the study on teacher efficacy and classroom management. To collect data a survey was administered to 1006 Botswana participants. Out of 1006 participants only 6 did not complete the survey. Pearson-product moment correlation was computed to analyze the data using Statistical Package of Social…

  12. The impact of alcohol and road traffic policies on crash rates in Botswana, 2004-2011: a time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebego, Miriam; Naumann, Rebecca B; Rudd, Rose A; Voetsch, Karen; Dellinger, Ann M; Ndlovu, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    In Botswana, increased development and motorization have brought increased road traffic-related death rates. Between 1981 and 2001, the road traffic-related death rate in Botswana more than tripled. The country has taken several steps over the last several years to address the growing burden of road traffic crashes and particularly to address the burden of alcohol-related crashes. This study examines the impact of the implementation of alcohol and road safety-related policies on crash rates, including overall crash rates, fatal crash rates, and single-vehicle nighttime fatal (SVNF) crash rates, in Botswana from 2004 to 2011. The overall crash rate declined significantly in June 2009 and June 2010, such that the overall crash rate from June 2010 to December 2011 was 22% lower than the overall crash rate from January 2004 to May 2009. Additionally, there were significant declines in average fatal crash and SVNF crash rates in early 2010. Botswana's recent crash rate reductions occurred during a time when aggressive policies and other activities (e.g., education, enforcement) were implemented to reduce alcohol consumption and improve road safety. While it is unclear which of the policies or activities contributed to these declines and to what extent, these reductions are likely the result of several, combined efforts.

  13. Periodicity in Delta-modulated feedback control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua XIA; Guanrong CHEN; Rudong GAI; Alan S. I. ZINOBER

    2008-01-01

    The Delta-modulated feedback control of a linear system introduces nonlinearity into the system through switchings between two input values. It has been found that Delta-modulation gives rise to periodic orbits. The existence of periodic points of all orders of Sigma-Delta modulation with "leaky" integration is completely characterized by some interesting groups of polynomials with "sign" coefficients. The results are naturally generalized to Sigma-Delta modulations with multiple delays, Delta-modulations in the "downlink", unbalanced Delta-modulations and systems with two-level quantized feedback. Further extensions relate to the existence of periodic points arising from Delta-modulated feedback control of a stable linear system in an arbitrary direction, for which some necessary and sufficient conditions are given.

  14. Entendiendo Delta desde las Humanidades

    OpenAIRE

    José Calvo Tello

    2016-01-01

    Stylometry is one of the research areas in greater development within Digital Humanities. However, few studies have worked until recently with texts in Spanish and even less so from Spanish-speaking countries. The aim of this paper is to present in Spanish, and without prior statistical knowledge from the reader, one of the main methods used in stylometry, the measure of textual distance Burrows’ Delta. This paper explains this measure using a very small corpus of proverbs and then checks the...

  15. Postflight analysis for Delta Program Mission no. 113: COS-B Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    On 8 August 1975, the COS-B spacecraft was launched successfully from the Western Test Range (Delta Program Mission No. 113). The launch vehicle was a three stage Extended Long Tank Delta DSV-3P-11B vehicle. Postflight analyses performed in connection with flight are presented. Vehicle trajectory, stage performance, vehicle reliability and the propulsion, guidance, flight control, electronics, mechanical and structural systems are evaluated.

  16. An evaluation of the integrated poverty alleviation and housing scheme in Botswana, case of Ramotswa village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikgopoleng Horatio Gaogakwe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the effectiveness of the Integrated Poverty Alleviation and Housing Scheme (IPAHS in Ramotswa; an urban village located 32 km south-east of the capital city of Botswana, Gaborone. This study emanates from the fact that low income urban and rural residents with no formal employment were left out of the Self Help Housing Scheme (SHHA. The SHHA was mandated to facilitate the acquisition of subsidised land and loan to purchase building materials. One of the major conditions to qualify for SHHA is that applicants should have formal employment.; the IPAHS was specifically introduced to facilitate economic empowerment to poor households who do not qualify under the SHHA scheme. The IPAHS scheme is a twothronged approach mandated to equip the residents with skills to build/improve houses for themselves and create employment for themselves through molding of bricks for sale in an effort to alleviate poverty. This paper is based on documentary and field research. The field research has a participatory component involving discussion and open ended interviews with relevant government departments. It also involves the administration of structured questionnaire survey to 30 beneficiaries of the scheme. Results show that despite high uptake of the scheme within the country, there are several challenges such as insufficient income to build or improve their houses, signs of poverty in living environments of beneficiaries, uncoordinated roles of various institutions which are major stakeholders in the implementation of the scheme. The scheme requires pragmatic policies geared to meet the needs and aspirations of the poor. There is a need for policy interventions through Government commitment to principles such as the right to housing by every citizen, coordination of roles played by different stakeholders to support the sustainability of the scheme.

  17. Innovative corporate social responsibility in Botswana. The Debswana mining company study case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Torres Solís

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presentan una serie de consideraciones sobre la forma en que una importante compañía africana hace frente a su responsabilidad social, en lo que podría ser una innovación en la industria minera dedicada a la explotación del diamante. De esta manera se realiza un caso de estudio referido a la compañía Debswana que opera en Botswana, uno de los países africanos más destacados en la producción diamantífera mundial. Se discuten y critican algunas acciones implementadas por esa compañía en materia de responsabilidad social y se concluye con algunos señalamientos y opiniones al respecto. Podemos señalar que los resultados del estudio de este caso muestran como altamente positivas las interacciones de esta compañía minera con la sociedad en la que se desenvuelve sin que deje de puntualizarse la existencia de algunos inconvenientes serios que deben ser superados en conjunción con las políticas públicas del gobierno de ese país. Es importante señalar que lo que se intenta hacer en este trabajo es mostrar algunos hechos que consideramos importantes en la responsabilidad social de una organización en particular, buscando construir un caso de estudio que pudiera ser relevante para las disciplinas administrativas en cuya literatura han sido escasamente tratados.

  18. The geological setting and style of copper mineralization at the Bushman group of deposits, northeastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. M.; Blaine, J. L.; Doig, R.; Byron, C. L.

    1994-02-01

    The Bushman group of CuPbZn deposits occur within the north-northeasterly trending Bushman shear zone in northeastern Botswana. The deposits are hosted by a sliver of sheared and altered, carbonate rocks and chloritic and graphitic schists that resemble and are presumed correlative with metasedimentary rocks of the Matsitama schist belt to the east. This sliver is surrounded by sheared and altered granitic gneisses. Within the sliver, the mineralized zones are a chalcopyrite and pyrite bearing quartz-calcite±alkali feldspar vein breccias near the sheared contact between the carbonate rocks and the chloritic and graphitic schists. Elsewhere within the granitic gneisses, those zones are marked by barren quartz breccias surrounded by a zone dominated by red, turbid orthoclase in turn surrounded by a zone dominated by green epidote. Initially hydrothermal alteration propylitized the host rocks and then porphyroblasts of orthoclase, albite and quartz grew with the introduction of calcite. Away from the mineralized zones, four generations of veins occur, the first two directly traceable to CuPbZn mineralization and the third carrying galena and sphalerite. Isotopic data suggest that the protolith of the granitic gneisses was emplaced sometime between about 2.57 Ga and 2.3 Ga ago. After this protolith was deformed and metamorphosed, CuPbZn mineralization occurred about 1926 Ma ago from fluids at a temperature of about 360°C. The Pb isotopic compositions of the sulfide minerals indicate that the fluids giving rise to the CuPbZn mineralization were possibly the same as those giving rise to Pb and Zn mineralization. In both instances, however, the Pb came from several sources. More recently, shear zones parallel to the Bushman shear zone may have controlled in part the emplacement of kimberlite pipes.

  19. Comparative profitability of onions harvested as green and dry (mature in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P. Baliyan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to calculate and compare the profitability of onions harvested as green and dry (mature in Botswana. Half of the planted onions were harvested and sold as green and half were harvested and sold as dry onions. The cost of production of green onions was 32.78% higher than the cost of production of dry onions. The irrigation and marketing expenses contributed the highest difference in the cost of production of green and dry onions. The major cost item contributing to the cost of green onions production was marketing cost (32.86% followed by irrigation cost (23.77% and harvesting cost (18.53% whereas the highest cost of production for dry onions was contributed by irrigation (38.58% followed by marketing (19.45% and planting (11.96%. The marketing cost for green onions was almost double (35.6% as compare to the dry onions (18.2%. The total return from green onions was 50.90% higher than the returns from dry onions. Gross margin of onions harvested as green was 63% higher than the gross margin from dry onions, which indicated that the production of green onions is more profitable as compare to production of dry onions. The farmers preferred onion harvested as green because it generates regular and higher returns than onions harvested as mature. Government should support farmers through some policies such as Minimum Support Price (MSP for dry onions, distribution of Mini Ferti–Seed Kit (Seeds of improved varieties and fertilizer package, construction of storages and formation of cooperatives.

  20. Ethno-veterinary practices amongst livestock farmers in Ngamiland District, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabalebatse, Moabiemang; Ngwenya, Barbara N; Teketay, Demel; Kolawole, Oluwatoyin Dare

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a study to determine ethno-veterinary knowledge used to treat and prevent livestock diseases in Toteng Village in Ngamiland District, northwestern Botswana. Primary data were collected through simple random sampling of 45 households in Toteng. Respondents were either livestock owners or cattle herders. Respondents were interviewed using a structured questionnaire which had both open and closed-ended questions. Cattle ownership or herdership in Toteng is an inter-generational occupation with people ranging from 15 to 94 years old. Cattle were acquired either through inheritance, buying, mafisa (reciprocal exchange) system or government scheme. Women in the study area were more involved in livestock farming activities. Eleven livestock diseases were reported to be prevalent in the study area. The top six diseases were tlhako le molomo -foot and mouth disease (FMD), matlho -eye infections, letshololo-diarrhea, madi -pasteurollosis, mokokomalo -aphosphorisis and pholoso-contagious abortion. At least nine medicinal plant species having ethno-veterinary applications were recorded in the study area. Single plants are mostly used rather than a combination of plants. A number of social strategies were mentioned such as 'go fetola mafudiso' - to change grazing areas, and 'go thaa lesaka' - to ritualistically 'protect a kraal' or livestock against evil spells and predators (lions). Although the intervention of conventional veterinary medicine is pervasive in Toteng, and many livestock owners are resorting to it, there is evidence, however, of generalized ethno-veterinary knowledge used to treat and prevent livestock diseases. Local farmers and their herders in Ngamiland are not only knowledgeable and experienced in treating a range of livestock diseases, but also in performing other veterinary tasks such as assisting in births, treating fractures and range management strategies to mitigate particular threats from their local environment. The efficacy of ethno

  1. Incipient continental rifting: Insights from the Okavango Rift Zone, northwestern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinabo, Baraka Damas

    In this dissertation aeromagnetic, gravity, and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Digital Elevation Model (SRTM DEM) data from the Okavango Rift Zone in northwest Botswana are used to map the distribution of rift and basement structures. The distribution of these structures provide useful insights into the early stages of continental rifting. The objectives of this study are (1) assessing the role of pre-existing structures on rift basin development, (2) characterizing the geometry of the nascent rift basins, (3) documenting fault growth and propagation patterns, and (4) investigating the border fault development. Potential field data especially aeromagnetic data are used to map out structures in the sediment covered basement, whereas SRTM DEM data express the surface morphology of the structures. The azimuth of rift faults parallel the orientation of the fold axes and the prominent foliation directions of the basement rocks. This indicates that pre-existing structures in the basement influenced the development of the rift structures. NE dipping faults consistently exhibit greater displacements than SE dipping faults, suggesting a developing half-graben geometry. Individual faults grow by along axis linkage of small segments that develop from soft linkage (under lapping to overlapping segments) to hard linkage (hooking, fused segments). Major rifts faults are also linking through transfer zones by the process of "fault piracy" to establish an immature border fault system. The relationships between scam heights and vertical throws reveal that the young and active faults are located outside the rift while the faults with no recent activities are in the middle suggesting that the rift is also growing in width. This study demonstrates the utility of potential field data and SRTM DEM to provide a 3-D view of incipient continental rifting processes such as fault growth and propagation.

  2. The constraints of antiretroviral uptake in rural areas: the case of Thamaga and surrounding villages, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bene, Matlhogonolo; Darkoh, Michael B K

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the constraints of antiretroviral (ARV) uptake in the villages of Thamaga, Kumakwane, Mankgodi and Gakgatla which are in the Kweneng District of Botswana. The social interactionist approach and theories of health behaviour provided the theoretical basis of the study. Data were obtained by using interviewer-administered questionnaires which were applied to a sample of 145 respondents and 61 people living with HIV/AIDS in the four villages. The results of the study showed that people aged 30-39 years represented the highest proportion of the persons on ARV treatment in the villages. Some of the people living with HIV believed that ARV therapy could better their lives during the initial stages of introduction, but with time, they lost hope and gave up the treatment. Culturally, parents and children in the villages do not discuss sexual matters at home and it was found in the study that there was little communication between parents and children on AIDS and ARV issues. Some churches in the area discouraged the use of ARV. There were also traditional doctors who made their patients mix traditional herbs treatment with ARV treatment. Distance, travel costs, cultural beliefs, stigma and discrimination among others were found to be important socio-economic factors inhibiting ARV uptake. Even though there were constraints on ARV uptake in the villages, efforts were being made by Government and non-governmental organizations to overcome them. The Ministry of Health provided information and education to the public using its strategy known as Information, Education and Communication. Nurses, doctors and chiefs taught people at kgotlas (traditional courts) in the villages about the dangers of the epidemic. Free HIV testing, ARVs and condoms were provided to the villagers. The outlook for ARV uptake looks generally promising for the future. However, if HIV/AIDS is to be contained, sexual behaviour of people in the villages needs to change.

  3. Analysis of temperature data over semi-arid Botswana: trends and break points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mphale, Kgakgamatso; Adedoyin, Akintayo; Nkoni, Godiraone; Ramaphane, Galebonwe; Wiston, Modise; Chimidza, Oyapo

    2017-06-01

    Climate change is a global challenge which impacts negatively on sustainable rural livelihoods, public health and economic development, more especially for communities in Southern Africa. Assessment of indices that signify climate change can inform formulation of relevant adaptation strategies and policies for the communities. Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is acknowledged as an expedient measure of the scourge as it is sensitive to variations in radiative energy balance. In this study, a long-term (1961-2010) daily temperature data obtained from nine (9) synoptic stations in Botswana were analyzed for monotonic trends and epochal changes in annual maximum (T max), minimum (T min) temperatures and DTR time series. Most of the considered stations were along the Kalahari Transect, a region which is at high risk of extensive environmental change due to climate change. Mann-Kendall trend and Lepage tests were applied for trend and change point analysis, respectively. The statistical analysis shows that stations in the southern part of the country experienced significant negative trends in annual DTR at the rate of -0.09 to -0.30 °C per decade due to steeper warming rates in annual T min than annual T max trends. On the contrary, stations in the northern part of the country experienced positive trends in annual DTR brought about by either a decreasing annual T min trend which outstripped annual T max or annual T max which outpaced annual T min. The increasing trends in DTR varied from 0.25 to 0.67 °C per decade. For most of the stations, the most significant annual DTR trends change point was in 1982 which coincided with the reversal of atmospheric circulation patterns.

  4. University of Botswana Undergraduates Uses of the Internet: Implications on Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeyinka Tella

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The recognized potential of technology to improve education has led to several initiatives to foster effective use and integration in the curriculum. The Internet as a new invented technology holds the greatest promise humanity has known for learning and universal access to quality education. It allows students to broaden their academic experience, access important information and communicate to others within academic community. In the light of these therefore, this study examined undergraduate’s uses of the Internet and its implications on their academic performance at the University of Botswana, Gaborone. Three hundred and six undergraduate students from thirteen systematically selected departments formed the study sample. A modified Internet Use scale was used to gather data for the study. The data collected was analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-square and Friedman test. The results indicate that: majority of the respondents (66% access the Internet 1-5 hours per week, 33.3% of respondents access the Internet 6-20 hours per week and 0.7% of respondents access the Internet between 21-25 hours per week. Moreover, most respondents use the Internet for the purpose of obtaining course related information. The results also reveal that Internet contributes significantly to academic performance of the respondents. To enhance and optimise the use of the Internet so that learning can take place at any time and anywhere, providing more access to computers and the Internet on campus constitutes the major recommendations. Future areas of research could include determining variations in Internet use by students from different disciplines, determining the nature and relationships between Internet use and academic performance.

  5. Understanding the organisational culture of district health services: Mahalapye and Ngamiland health districts of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oathokwa Nkomazana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botswana has a shortage of health care workers, especially in primary healthcare. Retention and high performance of employees are closely linked to job satisfaction and motivation, which are both highest where employees’ personal values and goals are realised.Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate employees’ personal values, and the current and desired organisational culture of the district health services as experienced by the primary health care workers.Setting: The study was conducted in the Ngamiland and Mahalapye health districts.Method: This was a cross sectional survey. The participants were asked to select 10 values that best described their personal, current organisational and desired organisational values from a predetermined list.Results: Sixty and 67 health care workers completed the survey in Mahalapye and Ngamiland districts, respectively. The top 10 prevalent organisational values experienced in both districts were: teamwork, patient satisfaction, blame, confusion, job insecurity, not sharing information and manipulation. When all the current values were assessed, 32% (Mahalapye and 36% (Ngamiland selected by health care workers were potentially limiting organisational effectiveness. The organisational values desired by health care workers in both districts were: transparency, professional growth, staff recognition, shared decision-making, accountability, productivity, leadership development and teamwork.Conclusions: The experience of the primary health care workers in the two health districts were overwhelmingly negative, which is likely to contribute to low levels of motivation, job satisfaction, productivity and high attrition rates. There is therefore urgent need for organisational transformation with a focus on staff experience and leadership development.

  6. ‘We are the forgotten ones’: Occupational stress among university secretaries in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse E. Plattner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Secretaries play an essential role in any work organisation, but their contributions and support in the daily management activities are not always recognised.Research purpose: There is little research on occupational stress among secretaries. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate work-related stressors in the secretarial profession and their association with psychosomatic complaints.Motivations for study: Considering the lack of research on secretaries, it was the objective of this study to investigate occupational stressors in the secretarial profession and their association with psycho-physiological wellbeing.Research design, approach and method: Sixty-four secretaries at the University of Botswana participated in the study (response rate: 43.8%. Data were gathered through a self-administered questionnaire. Correlational analyses were performed using Spearman’s rho.Main findings: Seventeen potential stressors were identified, referring to lack of job clarity, performing work outside one’s job description, reduced competencies, supervisors who perform secretarial work, sharing resources such as an office or a telephone, lack of recognition and limited opportunities for promotion. Most stressors correlated significantly with one or more psychosomatic complaints.Practical/managerial implications: Additional research would be necessary to compare various work contexts and organisation-specific work environments and to investigate their relevance to occupational stress and health among secretaries.Contribution/value-add: The results of the study could be of use for human resource managers, as well as for supervisors of secretaries, in order to minimise potential stressors that could negatively affect the health of secretaries.

  7. Fifth-year medical students’ perspectives on rural training in Botswana: A qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kebaabetswe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Botswana includes rural community exposure for students throughout their 5 years of training. In addition to community exposure during the first 2 years, students complete 16 weeks of family medicine and 8 weeks of public health medicine. However, as a new faculty, students’ experiences and perceptions regarding rural clinical training are not yet known. Objective. To describe the experiences and perceptions of the 5th-year medical students during their rural training and solicit their recommendations for improvement. Methods. This qualitative study used face-to-face interviews with 5th-year undergraduate medical students (N=36 at the end of their family medicine rotation in Mahalapye and Maun villages. We used a phenomenological paradigm to underpin the study. Voice-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas TI version 7 software (USA. Results. Three main themes were identified: (i experiences and perceptions of the rural training environment; (ii perceptions of the staff at rural sites; and (iii perceptions of clinical benefits and relevance during rural training. While the majority of students perceived rural training as beneficial and valuable, a few felt that learning was compromised by limited resources and processes, such as medical equipment, internet connectivity and inadequate supervision. Conclusion. While the majority of students perceived rural training as beneficial, students identified limitations in both resources and supervision that need to be improved. Understanding students’ rural training experiences and perceptions can help the Faculty of Medicine, stakeholders and site facilitators to guide future rural training implementation.

  8. Ground survey of red lechwe in the Linyanti swamps and Chobe floodplains, northern Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phemelo Gadimang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A ground survey of red lechwe was carried out in the Linyanti swamps and the Chobe floodplains of northern Botswana in the dry and wet seasons of 2012 and 2013, respectively. We documented numbers, sex ratio and age structure of red lechwe within the linear strips of 25 km × 300 m along the Linyanti swamps and the Chobe floodplains. Results indicated a significant difference in the numbers of red lechwe between sites and seasons. About 66 and 755 red lechwe were estimated for Chobe in the dry and wet season, respectively, with 343 and 261 of them estimated for Linyanti in the dry and wet season, respectively. In Chobe, the red lechwe densities varied widely between seasons (9 red lechwe/km2 – 101 red lechwe/km2 compared with Linyanti, where the densities did not vary much between seasons (35 red lechwe/km2 – 46 red lechwe/km2 . The lower densities of red lechwe in Chobe in the dry season when compared with the wet season suggest a possible seasonal shift in the distribution of red lechwe to the nearby Zambezi floodplains in Namibia.Conservation implications: The higher number of red lechwe in the Chobe floodplains in the wet season indicates the potential of the floodplains as a habitat for this species in that season. The dry season shift in the distribution of red lechwe in Chobe presents an opportunity for local communities in Namibia to engage in tourism, whereas the return of the red lechwe to the floodplains in the wet season ensures protection of the animals as well as boosts the tourism potential of the Chobe National Park.

  9. Maximizing the benefit of health workforce secondment in Botswana: an approach for strengthening health systems in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grignon JS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jessica S Grignon,1,2 Jenny H Ledikwe,1,2 Ditsapelo Makati,2 Robert Nyangah,2 Baraedi W Sento,2 Bazghina-werq Semo1,2 1Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2International Training and Education Center for Health, Gaborone, Botswana Abstract: To address health systems challenges in limited-resource settings, global health initiatives, particularly the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, have seconded health workers to the public sector. Implementation considerations for secondment as a health workforce development strategy are not well documented. The purpose of this article is to present outcomes, best practices, and lessons learned from a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief-funded secondment program in Botswana. Outcomes are documented across four World Health Organization health systems' building blocks. Best practices include documentation of joint stakeholder expectations, collaborative recruitment, and early identification of counterparts. Lessons learned include inadequate ownership, a two-tier employment system, and ill-defined position duration. These findings can inform program and policy development to maximize the benefit of health workforce secondment. Secondment requires substantial investment, and emphasis should be placed on high-level technical positions responsible for building systems, developing health workers, and strengthening government to translate policy into programs. Keywords: human resources, health policy, health worker, HIV/AIDS, PEPFAR

  10. Perceptions of key participants about Botswana adolescents' risks of unplanned pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV: Qualitative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magowe, Mabel K M; Seloilwe, Esther; Dithole, Kefalotse; St Lawrence, Janet

    2017-07-13

    The qualitative research findings are reported on the perceptions of key participants in Botswana about adolescent sexuality problems and the feasibility (with suggestions) of an adolescent prevention intervention. Twenty adult key participants who were selected through purposive sampling from schools and youth centers responded to open-ended questions during face-to-face individual in-depth interviews that were conducted between December, 2011 and January, 2012 in Gaborone, Botswana. The data were analyzed by using an inductive content analysis. Five major themes and 12 subthemes emerged from the interviews. The key participants discussed situations that exposed adolescents to HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy. They also discussed unsafe sexual practices, the consequences of unprotected sex, poor parent-adolescent communication on sexuality, and the need for a sexuality education program. Policy changes are needed to improve collaboration between adolescents, parents, teachers, and youth officers in order to address adolescent sexuality problems. Further research is needed to explore the ways in which to improve sexuality communication between these groups. The results of the study provide valuable information on the sexuality risks that expose adolescents to HIV, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections and the strategies for the prevention of these risks, thus informing targeted interventions for risk reduction for adolescents. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  11. Tswanarising global gayness: the 'unAfrican' argument, Western gay media imagery, local responses and gay culture in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a strategic intervention in the debate over the value of globalised gay identity for emerging sexual minority communities in the South. Focusing on self-identifying gay men in Botswana using semi-structured interviews, it explores their views of what characterises 'modern gay culture' and relates these to international media clichés of a glamorous, stylish, hedonistic gayness. I argue that identifying with what is so visibly a Western image of gayness exposes sexual minority communities to the most dangerous of the justifications for homophobia in Africa, the argument that sexual dissidence is a neo-colonial conspiracy to subvert 'African values'. The 'unAfrican' argument has to be taken very seriously, not only because it taps into the intense, conflicted emotions at the heart of the post-colonial condition, but also because it contains an undeniable germ of truth. This poses a dilemma, since global gay discourses, including the media clichés, are an important source of inspiration for African sexual minorities. A communication activism strategy is proposed to undermine the unAfrican argument by cultivating and asserting the 'tswanarisation' of gay culture in Botswana that is already taking place. A similar strategy may also be effective in other African societies.

  12. Validity of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score for Detecting Undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes among General Medical Outpatients in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshikuka, Jose-Gaby; Nkomazna, Oathokwa; Amone-P'Olak, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    This was a cross-sectional study designed to assess the validity of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score for detecting undiagnosed type 2 diabetes among general medical outpatients in Botswana. Participants aged ≥20 years without previously diagnosed diabetes were screened by (1) an 8-item Finnish diabetes risk assessment questionnaire and (2) Haemoglobin A1c test. Data from 291 participants were analyzed (74.2% were females). The mean age of the participants was 50.1 (SD = ±11) years, and the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 42 (14.4%) with no significant differences between the gender (20% versus 12.5%, P = 0.26). The area under curve for detecting undiagnosed diabetes was 0.63 (95% CI 0.55–0.72) for the total population, 0.65 (95% CI: 0.56–0.75) for women, and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.52–0.83) for men. The optimal cut-off point for detecting undiagnosed diabetes was 17 (sensitivity = 48% and specificity = 73%) for the total population, 17 (sensitivity = 56% and specificity = 66%) for females, and 13 (sensitivity = 53% and specificity = 77%) for males. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 20% and 89.5%, respectively. The findings indicate that the Finnish questionnaire was only modestly effective in predicting undiagnosed diabetes among outpatients in Botswana.

  13. Impact of Family Chickens on the Livelihoods of People Living with HIV and AIDS in Four Villages of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenaleone Gabanakgosi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of family chickens on the livelihoods of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA was investigated in Khudumelapye, Mogobane, Mokubilo and Serowe villages of Botswana. The objectives of this study were to determine the consumption and marketing of family chickens and to evaluate the contribution of family chickens towards household income and nutrition of PLWHA in four villages of Botswana. Data were collected from 100 respondents (25 from each village using a structured questionnaire and through direct observation. The results showed that 79% of the respondents slaughtered chickens for family consumption and 21% to honour guests. Sixty-one percent of respondents consumed eggs while the remainder used eggs for breeding purposes. Seventy-four percent of the respondents sold some chickens to meet immediate family needs. Eighty-two percent of chickens were sold for cash followed by barter (10%. A total of 874 chickens were sold from the surveyed villages earning the sum of P18, 030.00 (2253.75USD. The average price of a chicken was P57.50 (7.19USD. These results suggest that family chickens were mainly used for consumption and were also sold to meet family needs, thus contributing to improved household income and nutrition of PLWHA. In order to increase the benefits of rearing family chickens, the rearers should be trained in general poultry management. In addition, the rearers should be encouraged to form associations which will assist in marketing chickens

  14. Effects of HIV-related stigma among an early sample of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, W R; Weiser, S D; Bangsberg, D R; Thior, I; Makhema, J M; Dickinson, D B; Mompati, K F; Marlink, R G

    2006-11-01

    Botswana, with its estimated HIV prevalence of 37%, instituted a policy of universal access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 2002. Initial enrolment lagged behind expectations, with a shortfall in voluntary testing that observers have attributed to HIV-related stigma - although there are no published data on stigma among HIV-positive individuals in Botswana. We interviewed 112 patients receiving ART in 2000, finding evidence of pervasive stigma in patterns of disclosure, social sequelae, and delays in HIV testing. Ninety-four percent of patients reported keeping their HIV status secret from their community, while 69% withheld this information even from their family. Twenty-seven percent of patients said that they feared loss of employment as a result of their HIV status. Forty percent of patients reported that they delayed getting tested for HIV; of these, 51% cited fear of a positive test result as the primary reason for delay in seeking treatment, which was often due to HIV-related stigma. These findings suggest that success of large-scale national ART programmes will require initiatives targeting stigma and its social, economic and political correlates.

  15. Hospitalization and mortality among primarily nonbreastfed children during a large outbreak of diarrhea and malnutrition in Botswana, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creek, Tracy L; Kim, Andrea; Lu, Lydia; Bowen, Anna; Masunge, Japhter; Arvelo, Wences; Smit, Molly; Mach, Ondrej; Legwaila, Keitumetse; Motswere, Catherine; Zaks, Laurel; Finkbeiner, Thomas; Povinelli, Laura; Maruping, Maruping; Ngwaru, Gibson; Tebele, Goitebetswe; Bopp, Cheryl; Puhr, Nancy; Johnston, Stephanie P; Dasilva, Alexandre J; Bern, Caryn; Beard, R S; Davis, Margarett K

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, a pediatric diarrhea outbreak occurred in Botswana, coinciding with heavy rains. Surveillance recorded a 3 times increase in cases and a 25 fold increase in deaths between January and March. Botswana has high HIV prevalence among pregnant women (33.4% in 2005), and an estimated 35% of all infants under the age of 6 months are not breastfed. We followed all children <5 years old with diarrhea in the country's second largest referral hospital at the peak of the outbreak by chart review, interviewed mothers, and conducted laboratory testing for HIV and enteric pathogens. Of 153 hospitalized children with diarrhea, 97% were <2 years old; 88% of these were not breastfeeding. HIV was diagnosed in 18% of children and 64% of mothers. Cryptosporidium and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli were common; many children had multiple pathogens. Severe acute malnutrition (kwashiorkor or marasmus) developed in 38 (25%) patients, and 33 (22%) died. Kwashiorkor increased risk for death (relative risk 2.0; P = 0.05); only one breastfeeding child died. Many children who died had been undersupplied with formula. Most of the severe morbidity and mortality in this outbreak occurred in children who were HIV negative and not breastfed. Feeding and nutritional factors were the most important determinants of severe illness and death. Breastfeeding is critical to infant survival in the developing world, and support for breastfeeding among HIV-negative women, and HIV-positive women who cannot formula feed safely, may prevent further high-mortality outbreaks.

  16. Challenges, Approaches and Experiences from Asian Deltas and the Rhine-Meuse Delta : Regional Training Workshop on Delta Planning and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wosten, J.H.M.; Douven, W.; Long Phi, H.; Fida Abdullah Khan, M.

    2013-01-01

    River delta's, like the Mekong Delta (Vietnam), Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (Bangladesh), Ayeyarwady Delta (Myanmar), Nile (Egypt) and Ciliwung Delta (Indonesia) are developing rapidly and are characterised by large-scale urbanisation and industrialization processes. They are facing serious planning ch

  17. 区域吸收能力的多维度衡量--基于珠江三角洲电子产业的微观考察%Multi-dimension Measurements of Regional Absorptive Capacity:A Micro-scale Investigation on Electronics Industry in the Pearl River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符文颖

    2014-01-01

    吸收能力是外部学习和创新溢出发生的重要前提。本文将区域吸收能力在企业微观层面作为一个多维度变量,分解为人力资本、研究开发(R&D)活动和产品技术3个维度,探讨吸收能力中的构成要素对于企业在创新过程中特定学习行为特征的影响。对珠江三角洲电子产业的实证分析结果显示,利用社会临近性和组织临近性进行外部学习的企业主要集中在电子行业高技术产品的生产领域,并且首席执行官(CEO)能力是企业利用与母公司和国外客户的组织临近性进行学习的重要因素。%This paper takes regional absorptive capacity as a multi-level variable in the micro firm level,and sets out to explore how specific components of absorptive capacity support the use of different proximities in order to sus-tain trustful and effective interactive learning activities. Firm absorptive capacity is divided it into three compo-nents,i. e. human capital,R&D activities and product technology. The empirical analysis of the electronics firms in the Pearl River Delta further reveals the impact of each elements of firm absorptive capacity on the interactive learning behavior in the innovation process. The result shows that current practice and past experience in high-tech fields have been identified for the electronics firms in the Pearl River Delta as the important elements in shaping the absorptive capacity to enable the effective communication with external partners. Meanwhile,higher level of human capital such as highly educated managerial staff and overseas background CEO is able to facilitate the interactive learning embedded within organizational proximity with foreign firms.

  18. Migration in Deltas: An Integrated Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Robert J.; Hutton, Craig W.; Lazar, Attila; Adger, W. Neil; Allan, Andrew; Arto, Inaki; Vincent, Katharine; Rahman, Munsur; Salehin, Mashfiqus; Sugata, Hazra; Ghosh, Tuhin; Codjoe, Sam; Appeaning-Addo, Kwasi

    2017-04-01

    Deltas and low-lying coastal regions have long been perceived as vulnerable to global sea-level rise, with the potential for mass displacement of exposed populations. The assumption of mass displacement of populations in deltas requires a comprehensive reassessment in the light of present and future migration in deltas, including the potential role of adaptation to influence these decisions. At present, deltas are subject to multiple drivers of environmental change and often have high population densities as they are accessible and productive ecosystems. Climate change, catchment management, subsidence and land cover change drive environmental change across all deltas. Populations in deltas are also highly mobile, with significant urbanization trends and the growth of large cities and mega-cities within or adjacent to deltas across Asia and Africa. Such migration is driven primarily by economic opportunity, yet environmental change in general, and climate change in particular, are likely to play an increasing direct and indirect role in future migration trends. The policy challenges centre on the role of migration within regional adaptation strategies to climate change; the protection of vulnerable populations; and the future of urban settlements within deltas. This paper reviews current knowledge on migration and adaptation to environmental change to discern specific issues pertinent to delta regions. It develops a new integrated methodology to assess present and future migration in deltas using the Volta delta in Ghana, Mahanadi delta in India and Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta across India and Bangladesh. The integrated method focuses on: biophysical changes and spatial distribution of vulnerability; demographic changes and migration decision-making using multiple methods and data; macro-economic trends and scenarios in the deltas; and the policies and governance structures that constrain and enable adaptation. The analysis is facilitated by a range of

  19. Casimir force between $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ mirrors transparent at high frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Braga, Alessandra N; Alves, Danilo T

    2016-01-01

    We investigate, in the context of a real massless scalar field in $1+1$ dimensions, models of partially reflecting mirrors simulated by Dirac $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ point interactions. In the literature, these models do not exhibit full transparency at high frequencies. In order to provide a more realistic feature for these models, we propose a modified $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ point interaction that enables to achieve full transparency in the limit of high frequencies. Taking this modified $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ model into account, we investigate the Casimir force, comparing our results with those found in the literature.

  20. CASSCF/CI calculations for first row transition metal hydrides - The TiH(4-phi), VH(5-delta), CrH(6-sigma-plus), MnH(7-sigma-plus), FeH(4,6-delta) and NiH(2-delta) states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, S. P.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations are performed for the predicted ground states of TiH(4-phi), VH(5-delta), CrH(6-sigma-plus), MnH(7-sigma-plus), Fett(4,6-delta) and NiH(2-delta). For FeH both the 6-delta and 4-delta states are studied, since both are likely candidates for the ground state. The ground state symmetries are predicted based on a combination of atomic coupling arguments and coupling of 4s(2)3d(n) and 4s(1)3d(n+1) terms in the molecular system. Electron correlation is included by a CASSCF/CI (SD) treatment. The CASSCF includes near-degeneracy effects, while correlation of the 3d electrons in included at the CI level.

  1. Evolving deltas: Conceptualising coevolution with engineered interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Amy; Nicholls, Robert; Lazar, Attila

    2017-04-01

    Mid to low latitude deltas have been populated for thousands of years due to their fertile soil and coastal location. This has led to an alteration in the land cover of deltas to primary agriculture and dense rural settlements and more recently, major cities and megacities have developed on or adjacent to many deltas. Deltas may be prosperous in terms of their outputs and services; however, they are also susceptible to many hazards due to their location and low-lying nature. Hazards include storm surges, fluvial flooding and erosion of both coastal and riverine areas, as well as subsidence, relative sea-level rise and pollution. This can have severe impacts on the delta, its population and its services. Therefore engineered interventions have been used for some time to protect the population and the valuable land from the consequences of hazards. Coevolution can be described as a feedback loop between nature and humans: each has an effect on how the other behaves and hence this inter-dependence interaction continues. Therefore the natural evolution of the delta interacts with engineered interventions, such as promoting accelerated subsidence over time, necessitating further adaptation. The deltaic landscape and associated livelihoods are thus the result of this co-evolution process between natural delta processes and engineered interventions. This presentation will identify and discuss various drivers and consequences of large scale engineered interventions, comparing and contrasting the management approaches taken in five populated deltas (Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna, Yangtze, Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt, Mekong and Nile). The type of engineered intervention and management approaches had a direct effect on the coevolution of deltas, with each of the deltas being at different stages in terms of extent of coevolution. A qualitative timeline of the typical steps of coevolution between the human system and the delta system of the studied deltas was produced. The major

  2. Delta hepatitis agent: structural and antigenic properties of the delta-associated particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, F; Hoyer, B; Shih, J W; Rizzetto, M; Purcell, R H; Gerin, J L

    1984-01-01

    Delta agent (delta) was serially passaged to a second and third hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier chimpanzee, using as inoculum the peak delta antigen (delta Ag) serum of an animal previously infected with human serum. The characteristics of serially transmitted delta Ag were similar to those described in first-passage animals. It was consistently detected before the development of anti-delta, in association with a 35- to 37-nm subpopulation of HBsAg particles and a unique low-molecular-weight (5.5 X 10(5)) RNA. RNase susceptibility of the delta-associated RNA and release of delta Ag activity upon treatment of delta-associated particles with detergent revealed that this particle is organized into a virion-like form with the RNA and delta Ag as internal components within a coat of HBsAg. Surface determinants of the delta-associated particle other than HBsAg were not detected by radioimmunoprecipitation experiments, using sera of humans and chimpanzees convalescent from delta hepatitis. The HBsAg-associated particle is the "candidate agent" of delta hepatitis. Images PMID:6698598

  3. The Niger Delta Amnesty Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A. Okonofua

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The armed conflict between militias and government forces in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region has spanned for more than two decades, defying all solutions. A disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR program was established in August 2015 in effort to end the violence and has remained in place. It is a radically different approach from past approaches that displayed zero tolerance to all political challenges to oil production or the allocation of oil profits. The approach appeared to be immediately successful in that it forced a ceasefire, engaged militants in planned programs to rehabilitate and reintegrate them into civilian society, and opened up the oil wells (many of which had been shut due to the crisis with the effect of increasing government revenue, which depends 85% on oil exports. Yet, few studies have attempted to understand the dynamics within the country that are responsible for the design and implementation of this broad policy shift or to understand whether and how the current initiative is able to end the conflict and institute peace beyond the short term. This study, therefore, is important because it provides a critical perspective that anticipates and explains emerging issues with the Niger Delta Amnesty Program, which have implications for DDR adaptation and implementation all over the world. Ultimately, the research demonstrates how the DDR program both transforms the Niger Delta conflict and becomes embroiled in intense contestations not only about the mechanism for transforming the targeted population but also whether and how the program incorporates women who are being deprioritized by the program.

  4. Analysis and Synthesis of Delta Operator Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hongjiu; Shi, Peng; Zhao, Ling

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to analysis and design on delta operator systems. When sampling is fast, a dynamical system will become difficult to control, which can be seen in wide real world applications. Delta operator approach is very effective to deal with fast sampling systems. Moreover, it is easy to observe and analyze the control effect with different sampling periods in delta operator systems. The framework of this book has been carefully constructed for delta operator systems to handle sliding mode control, time delays, filter design, finite frequency and networked control. These problems indeed are especially important and significant in automation and control systems design. Through the clear framework of the book, readers can easily go through the learning process on delta operator systems via a precise and comfortable learning sequence. Following this enjoyable trail, readers will come out knowing how to use delta operator approach to deal with control problems under fast sampling case. This book should...

  5. Delta Clipper - Design for supportability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanic, Ray R.; Conrad, Charles; Spaulding, Ed; Gisburne, Don

    1993-07-01

    The 'Delta Clipper' Single Stage Rocket Technology (SSRT) currently under development in the DC-X program will implement reliability-centered maintenance and support, involving on-equipment/off-equipment two-level maintenance, a logistics and spares pipeline, and a minimization of 'blue suit' skill-level personnel. Attention is given to the range of SSRT features that are to be validated via the DC-X test program; these prominently involve LRUs replaceability and accessibility, standardization and interchangeability, and 'aircraft-like' automated data collection.

  6. Climate change and the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, Michael; Anderson, Jamie; Anderson, Michael L.; Brown, Larry R.; Cayan, Daniel; Maurer, Edwin P.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change amounts to a rapidly approaching, “new” stressor in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta system. In response to California’s extreme natural hydroclimatic variability, complex water-management systems have been developed, even as the Delta’s natural ecosystems have been largely devastated. Climate change is projected to challenge these management and ecological systems in different ways that are characterized by different levels of uncertainty. For example, there is high certainty that climate will warm by about 2°C more (than late-20th-century averages) by mid-century and about 4°C by end of century, if greenhouse-gas emissions continue their current rates of acceleration. Future precipitation changes are much less certain, with as many climate models projecting wetter conditions as drier. However, the same projections agree that precipitation will be more intense when storms do arrive, even as more dry days will separate storms. Warmer temperatures will likely enhance evaporative demands and raise water temperatures. Consequently, climate change is projected to yield both more extreme flood risks and greater drought risks. Sea level rise (SLR) during the 20th century was about 22cm, and is projected to increase by at least 3-fold this century. SLR together with land subsidence threatens the Delta with greater vulnerabilities to inundation and salinity intrusion. Effects on the Delta ecosystem that are traceable to warming include SLR, reduced snowpack, earlier snowmelt and larger storm-driven streamflows, warmer and longer summers, warmer summer water temperatures, and water-quality changes. These changes and their uncertainties will challenge the operations of water projects and uses throughout the Delta’s watershed and delivery areas. Although the effects of climate change on Delta ecosystems may be profound, the end results are difficult to predict, except that native species will fare worse than invaders. Successful

  7. From Natural to Design River Deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    Productive and biologically diverse, deltaic lowlands attracted humans since prehistory and may have spurred the emergence of the first urban civilizations. Deltas continued to be an important nexus for economic development across the world and are currently home for over half a billion people. But recently, under the double whammy of sea level rise and inland sediment capture behind dams, they have become the most threatened coastal landscape. Here I will address several deceptively simple questions to sketch some unexpected answers using example deltas from across the world from the Arctic to the Tropics, from the Danube to the Indus, Mississippi to Godavari and Krishna, Mackenzie to Yukon. What is a river delta? What is natural and what is not in a river delta? Are the geological and human histories of a delta important for its current management? Is maintaining a delta the same to building a new one? Can we design better deltas than Nature? These answers help us see clearly that survival of deltas in the next century depends on human intervention and is neither assured nor simple to address or universally applicable. Empirical observations on the hydrology, geology, biology and biochemistry of deltas are significantly lagging behind modeling capabilities endangering the applicability of numerical-based reconstruction solutions and need to be ramped up significantly and rapidly across the world.

  8. Delta Semantics Defined By Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kyng, Morten; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    This report is identical to an earlier version of May 1978 except that Chapter 5 has been revised. A new paper: "A Petri Net Definition of a System Description Language", DAIMI, April 1979, 20 pages, extends the Petri net model to include a data state representing the program variables. Delta...... and the possibility of using predicates to specify state changes. In this paper a formal semantics for Delta is defined and analysed using Petri nets. Petri nets was chosen because the ideas behind Petri nets and Delta concide on several points. A number of proposals for changes in Delta, which resulted from...

  9. SNC 80 and related delta opioid agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, S N; Coop, A

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of the selective delta (delta) opioid agonists SNC 80 and BW373U86, which possess a diarylmethylpiperazine structure unique among opioids, was a major advance in the field of delta-opioid ligands. Much research has been performed to uncover the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of this class of ligands and also to compare the diarylmethylpiperazines with the traditional morphinan-based delta opioids. This review focuses on the development of the SAR of this unique series of ligands, and discusses questions which remain unanswered.

  10. Time of mineralization of permanent teeth in children and adolescents in Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavrić, Jelena; Vodanović, Marin; Marušić, Ana; Galić, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The mineralization sequence of permanent dentition can be used to assess the stage of development and age of individuals. The most commonly used methods are based on the assessment of developmental stages of target groups of teeth on one side of the lower jaw. When compared with the rest of the world, fewer studies have been done on dental age in Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in the region of Southern Africa. The aim of this study was to determine the chronology of mineralization of permanent teeth by the evaluation of developmental stages according to the Demirjian's method from 1973 and to evaluate dental age by using sex-specific self-weighted scores for dental stages and 50th percentile conversion tables of total maturity scores of seven mandibular teeth. We used a sample of panoramic radiographs (OPTs) of black African children and adolescents from the city of Gaborone, Botswana, with the aim of forming an appropriate sample to evaluate the development of the teeth in this socio-geographic environment. The final sample consisted of 1760 OPTs (807 males and 953 females) of individuals aged 6-23 years. The developmental stages of the all permanent teeth in the left side of the maxilla and the mandible were evaluated. Comparing the maxilla and the mandible, we found similar development within different stages for most of the teeth. In comparison to the average age at each stage of development, including the third molars between males and females, it is evident that females are slightly faster in developing permanent teeth, but without statistical significance for most of the developmental stages. Applying 50th percentile conversion tables for calculating the dental age for the first seven mandibular teeth, 616 OPTs of the children (299 males and 317 females), aged 6.08-16.80 years, were evaluated and their dental age was calculated. Mean dental age was overestimated in comparison to chronological age by 1.25±1.11 years and 0.72±1.02 years for males and

  11. $\\Delta$ decay in nuclear medium

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, B K; Kundu, Bijoy

    1996-01-01

    Proton-nucleus collisions, where the beam proton gets excited to the delta resonance and then decays to p\\pi ^+, either inside or outside the nuclear medium, are studied. Cross-sections for various kinematics for the (p,p' \\pi ^+) reaction between 500 MeV and 1 GeV beam energy are calculated to see the effects of the nuclear medium on the propagation and decay of the resonance. The cross-sections studied include proton energy spectra in coincidence with the pion, four momentum transfer distributions, and the invariant p\\pi^+ mass distributions. We find that the effect of the nuclear medium on these cross-sections mainly reduces their magnitudes. Comparing these cross-sections with those considering the decay of the delta outside the nucleus only, we further find that at 500 MeV the two sets of cross-sections have large differences, while by 1 GeV the differences between them become much smaller.

  12. Leptospira interrogans at the human-wildlife interface in northern Botswana: a newly identified public health threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbins, S E; Sanderson, C E; Alexander, K A

    2014-03-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world. In northern Botswana, humans live in close proximity to a diversity of wildlife and peridomestic rodents and may be exposed to a variety of zoonotic pathogens. Little is known regarding the occurrence and epidemiology of L. interrogans in Africa despite the recognized global importance of this zoonotic disease and the threat it poses to public health. In Botswana, banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) live in close proximity to humans across protected and unprotected landscapes and may be a useful sentinel species for assessing the occurrence of zoonotic organisms, such as L. interrogans. We utilized PCR to screen banded mongoose kidneys for leptospiral DNA and identified 41.5% prevalence of renal carriage of L. interrogans (exact binomial 95% CI 27.7-56.7%, n = 41). Renal carriage was also detected in one Selous' mongoose (Paracynictis selousi). This is the first published confirmation of carriage of L. interrogans in either species. This is also the first report of L. interrogans occurrence in northern Botswana and the only report of this organism in a wildlife host in the country. Pathogenic Leptospira are usually transmitted indirectly to humans through soil or water contaminated with infected urine. Other avenues, such as direct contact between humans and wildlife, as well as consumption of mongooses and other wildlife as bushmeat, may pose additional exposure risk and must be considered in public health management of this newly identified zoonotic disease threat. There is a critical need to characterize host species involvement and pathogen transmission dynamics, including human-wildlife interactions that may increase human exposure potential and infection risk. We recommend that public health strategy be modified to include sensitization of medical practitioners to the presence of L. interrogans in the region, the potential for human infection, and implementation of clinical screening. This study

  13. Extension of the Archaean Madibe-Kraaipan granite-greenstone terrane in southeast Botswana: Constraints from gravity and magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramotoroko, Calistus D.; Ranganai, Rubeni T.; Nyabeze, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The main goal of this study is to use suitably processed potential field data between longitude 24°E to 26°E and latitude 25°S to 26.5°S to gain a better geological and structural understanding of the extension of the Madibe-Kraaipan granite-greenstone terrane in southeast Botswana. Specifically, 150 new gravity measurements at 2-4 km intervals are reduced and later merged with existing gravity data in Botswana and South Africa for an integrated crustal interpretation with regional aeromagnetic data. Gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies of the region present partly coincident medium to high amplitude regions alternating with low zones. Analysis of the data revealed the existence of relatively narrow Nsbnd S trending rocks of dense and high magnetic intensity extending to the village of Mmathethe, corresponding to the northern extent of the Kraaipan greenstone belt. Much of the north-central area forms a broad magnetic low and gravity high implying Kraaipan metavolcanic rocks are more extensively developed in this area than previously recognized, under a blanket of Kalahari sediments that are ∼55 m thick as indicated by borehole data. The whole area lies within an ENE-trending Pre-Transvaal dyke swarm visible on the regional aeromagnetic data and much clearer on (proprietary) high resolution aeromagnetic data. The derivative and analytic signal techniques applied for both gravity and magnetic data spatially map the greenstone belt and multiple granite plutons very well. Depth estimates obtained by the 3D Euler method in combination with two-dimensional power spectrum technique locate the high magnetic intensity horizon at around 4.0 km. The depths were further confirmed by gravity model results along two profiles across the granite-greenstone terrane in Botswana and South Africa in a W-E direction. The models show generally steep-sided bodies of comparable width with a maximum depth extent of 4.7 km for the greenstones and 4.4 km for the younger plutons. The

  14. Routine HIV testing in Botswana: a population-based study on attitudes, practices, and human rights concerns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri D Weiser

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The Botswana government recently implemented a policy of routine or "opt-out" HIV testing in response to the high prevalence of HIV infection, estimated at 37% of adults.We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study of 1,268 adults from five districts in Botswana to assess knowledge of and attitudes toward routine testing, correlates of HIV testing, and barriers and facilitators to testing, 11 months after the introduction of this policy. Most participants (81% reported being extremely or very much in favor of routine testing. The majority believed that this policy would decrease barriers to testing (89%, HIV-related stigma (60%, and violence toward women (55%, and would increase access to antiretroviral treatment (93%. At the same time, 43% of participants believed that routine testing would lead people to avoid going to the doctor for fear of testing, and 14% believed that this policy could increase gender-based violence related to testing. The prevalence of self-reported HIV testing was 48%. Adjusted correlates of testing included female gender (AOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-1.9, higher education (AOR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5-2.7, more frequent healthcare visits (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3-2.7, perceived access to HIV testing (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.5, and inconsistent condom use (AOR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1. Individuals with stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV and AIDS were less likely to have been tested for HIV/AIDS (AOR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.5-0.9 or to have heard of routine testing (AOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.45-0.76. While experiences with voluntary and routine testing overall were positive, 68% felt that they could not refuse the HIV test. Key barriers to testing included fear of learning one's status (49%, lack of perceived HIV risk (43%, and fear of having to change sexual practices with a positive HIV test (33%.Routine testing appears to be widely supported and may reduce barriers to testing in Botswana. As routine testing is

  15. Comparative assessment of the vulnerability and resilience of deltas : extended version with 14 deltas : synthesis report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucx, T.; Driel, van W.F.; Boer, de H.; Graas, S.; Langenberg, V.; Marchand, M.; Guchte, van de C.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, deltas host dense populations and are important centres of agricultural and industrial production, and economic activity. Many deltas are areas of great ecological importance as well, featuring wetlands of high and unique biodiversity. Deltas are vulnerable to changes by natural forces an

  16. $\\Delta I=4$ and $\\Delta I=8$ bifurcations in rotational bands of diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Lalazissis, G A; Drenska, S B; Minkov, N; Raychev, P P; Roussev, R P; Bonatsos, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the recently observed $\\Delta I=4$ bifurcation seen in superdeformed nuclear bands is also occurring in rotational bands of diatomic molecules. In addition, signs of a $\\Delta I=8$ bifurcation, of the same order of magnitude as the $\\Delta I=4$ one, are observed both in superdeformed nuclear bands and rotational bands of diatomic molecules.

  17. Determination of Si {delta}-doping concentration in GaN by electroreflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drabinska, A.; Korona, K.P.; Bozek, R.; Babinski, A.; Baranowski, J.M.; Pacuski, W.; Stepniewski, R.; Tomaszewicz, T. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2002-12-01

    Electroreflectance bias-wavelength mapping is used for the first time for characterization of {delta}-doped GaN layer. Electric field above and below the {delta}-doping plane, found from the Fourier transform applied to Franz-Keldysh oscillations, was used to find the {delta}-dopant concentration in investigated structure. The bias dependence of electric field allowed determining also the position of the {delta}-doping plane. In addition, capacitance-voltage profiling on the structure has been performed. The width of depleted region and concentration profiles are in good agreement with values deduced by the electroreflectance mapping. Numerical modeling of potential and electric field in the structure shows that the fields measured by the electroreflectance mapping are generated by redistribution of electric charges: ionized donors and electrons. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Hole states in diamond p-delta-doped field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Orozco, J C; Rodriguez-Vargas, I [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina con Paseo la Bufa S/N, CP 98060 Zacatecas, ZAC. (Mexico); Mora-Ramos, M E, E-mail: jcmover@correo.unam.m [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, CP 62209 Cuernavaca, MOR. (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    The p-delta-doping in diamond allows to create high density two-dimensional hole gases. This technique has already been applied in the design and fabrication of diamond-based field effect transistors. Consequently, the knowledge of the electronic structure is of significant importance to understand the transport properties of diamond p-delta-doped systems. In this work the hole subbands of diamond p-type delta-doped quantum wells are studied within the framework of a local-density Thomas-Fermi-based approach for the band bending profile. The calculation incorporates an independent three-hole-band scheme and considers the effects of the contact potential, the delta-channel to contact distance, and the ionized impurity density.

  19. INFLUENCE OF THE DELTA-DELTA-MESON COUPLING ON NUCLEON AND DELTA PROPERTIES IN NUCLEAR-MATTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEJONG, F; MALFLIET, R

    1994-01-01

    We introduce a scalar and a vector DELTADELTA-meson vertex in the relativistic Dirac-Brueckner model for nuclear matter and investigate the consequences. We find small effects on the effective nucleon properties. The effects in the DELTA sector are more profound, although the DELTA is still effectiv

  20. Precision Measurement of the Electron/Muon Gyromagnetic Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Awobode, A M

    2010-01-01

    Clear, persuasive arguments are brought forward to motivate the need for highly precise measurements of the electron/muon orbital g, i.e. gL. First, we briefly review results obtained using an extended Dirac equation, which conclusively showed that, as a consequence of quantum relativistic corrections arising from the time-dependence of the rest-energy, the electron gyromagnetic factors are corrected. It is next demonstrated, using the data of Kusch & Foley on the measurement of deltaS minus 2 deltaL together with the modern precise measurements of the electron deltaS where deltaS identically equal to gS minus 2, that deltaL may be a small, non-zero quantity, where we have assumed Russel-Saunders LS coupling and proposed, along with Kusch and Foley, that gS = 2 plus deltaS and gS = 1 plus deltaL. Therefore, there is probable evidence from experimental data that gS is not exactly equal to 1; the expectation that quantum effects will significantly modify the classical value of the orbital g is therefore rea...

  1. Maximizing the benefit of health workforce secondment in Botswana: an approach for strengthening health systems in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignon, Jessica S; Ledikwe, Jenny H; Makati, Ditsapelo; Nyangah, Robert; Sento, Baraedi W; Semo, Bazghina-Werq

    2014-01-01

    To address health systems challenges in limited-resource settings, global health initiatives, particularly the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, have seconded health workers to the public sector. Implementation considerations for secondment as a health workforce development strategy are not well documented. The purpose of this article is to present outcomes, best practices, and lessons learned from a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief-funded secondment program in Botswana. Outcomes are documented across four World Health Organization health systems' building blocks. Best practices include documentation of joint stakeholder expectations, collaborative recruitment, and early identification of counterparts. Lessons learned include inadequate ownership, a two-tier employment system, and ill-defined position duration. These findings can inform program and policy development to maximize the benefit of health workforce secondment. Secondment requires substantial investment, and emphasis should be placed on high-level technical positions responsible for building systems, developing health workers, and strengthening government to translate policy into programs.

  2. Christian theology of life, death and healing in an era of antiretroviraltherapy: reflections on the responses of some Botswana churches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togarasei, Lovemore

    2010-12-01

    This article discusses Christian understandings of life, death and healing in the context of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. The discussion is a response to the reactions of some Botswana Pentecostal and African Independent Churches to the availability of ARV therapy, as reflected in several media reports of churches discouraging church members' use of ARV drugs. The article argues that this negative attitude to ARVs is a result of the Christian churches' understandings of life, death and healing through traditional Bible-based interpretations. Based on this, some churches view the ability of ARVs to prolong life as challenging God who is the source of life and healing. The article argues that this attitude grows from an initial Christian understanding of HIV and AIDS as a form of God's punishment on humanity for its sins. The article thus argues for the development of 'a Christian theology of ARVs' that sees ARVs as a manifestation and not a contradiction of God's healing powers.

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation of an adolescent HIV prevention program: social validation of social contexts and behavior among Botswana adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Lawrence, Janet S; Seloilwe, Esther; Magowe, Mabel; Dithole, Kefalotse; Kgosikwena, Billy; Kokoro, Elija; Lesaane, Dipuo

    2013-08-01

    An evidence-based HIV prevention intervention was adapted for Botswana youth with qualitative interviews, input from an adolescent panel, and social validation. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 boys and girls ages 13-19. An adolescent panel then drafted scenarios reflecting social situations described in the interviews that posed risk for HIV. A social validation sample (N = 65) then indicated the prevalence and difficulty of each situation. Youth described informational needs, pressures to use alcohol and drugs, peer pressure for unprotected sex, and intergenerational sex initiations as risk-priming situations. From 17% to 57% of the social validation sample had personally experienced the situations drafted by the adolescent panel. There were no differences in the ratings of boys versus girls, but youth over age 16 more often reported that they had experienced these risky situations. The results were embedded into the intervention. Major changes to the intervention resulted from this three-phase process.

  4. Electron scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, J.

    1984-11-01

    Because of the elementary structure of the electron, it is considered a precise probe of the constituent nature of hadronic matter. Use of the electron as a probe of subnucleonic degrees of freedom in nuclei is discussed in this presentation. Experimentally determined charge distributions for a wide variety of nuclei are presented and compared with shell model calculations which include single particle modes, core polarization, corrections due to delta-hole components, and corrections due to inclusion of meson exchange currents. (AIP)

  5. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  6. Structure and replication of hepatitis delta virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... Unidade de Biologia Molecular, Centro de Malária e outras Doenças Tropicais, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, ... molecules of both delta antigens (Ryu et al., 1993). This ..... Glenn JS, Watson JA, Havel CM, White JO (1992). ... HDV RNA encoding the large delta antigen cannot replicate. J. Gen.

  7. Generalised CP and $\\Delta (96)$ Family Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Gui-Jun

    2014-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of the $\\Delta (96)$ family symmetry combined with the generalised CP symmetry $H_{\\rm{CP}}$. We investigate the lepton mixing parameters which can be obtained from the original symmetry $\\Delta (96)\\rtimes H_{\\rm{CP}}$ breaking to different remnant symmetries in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors, namely $G_{\

  8. Delta Blues Scholarship and Imperialist Nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, William P.

    When Delta blues are considered to be "folk music," the genre is inextricably tied to the neocolonial, sharecropping system of cotton production characteristic of the Mississippi Delta region between the Civil War and World War II. "Imperialist nostalgia," then, arises in accounts which pay primary and positive tribute to blues…

  9. The delta opioid receptor tool box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Pradhan, Amynah A

    2016-12-03

    In recent years, the delta opioid receptor has attracted increasing interest as a target for the treatment of chronic pain and emotional disorders. Due to their therapeutic potential, numerous tools have been developed to study the delta opioid receptor from both a molecular and a functional perspective. This review summarizes the most commonly available tools, with an emphasis on their use and limitations. Here, we describe (1) the cell-based assays used to study the delta opioid receptor. (2) The features of several delta opioid receptor ligands, including peptide and non-peptide drugs. (3) The existing approaches to detect delta opioid receptors in fixed tissue, and debates that surround these techniques. (4) Behavioral assays used to study the in vivo effects of delta opioid receptor agonists; including locomotor stimulation and convulsions that are induced by some ligands, but not others. (5) The characterization of genetically modified mice used specifically to study the delta opioid receptor. Overall, this review aims to provide a guideline for the use of these tools with the final goal of increasing our understanding of delta opioid receptor physiology.

  10. An analysis of factors contributing to household water security problems and threats in different settlement categories of Ngamiland, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujinga, Krasposy; Vanderpost, Cornelis; Mmopelwa, Gagoitseope; Wolski, Piotr

    Globally, water security is negatively affected by factors that include climatic and hydrological conditions, population growth, rural-urban migration, increased per-capita water use, pollution and over-abstraction of groundwater. While Botswana has made strides in providing safe and clean water to its population since independence in 1966, over the years, a combination of factors have contributed to water security problems in different settlement categories of the country (i.e., primary, secondary, tertiary and ungazetted settlements) in general and in the district of Ngamiland in particular. To study water security problems differentiated by settlement category, this study employed quantitative data collection methods (i.e. household structured questionnaires) and qualitative data collection methods (i.e. key informant interviews, observation, focus group discussions and informal interviews), complemented by a review of relevant literature. Water security in all settlements is affected by status of the settlement, i.e. gazetted or ungazetted, climatic and hydrological factors and water governance challenges. In large villages such as Maun, factors threatening water security include population growth, urbanization, management challenges, old water supply and distribution infrastructure, increased demand for individual connections and changing lifestyles. Small gazetted and ungazetted settlements encounter problems related to limited sources of water supply as well as salinity of groundwater resources. In order to enhance water security in different settlement categories, Botswana has to develop a comprehensive water resources management strategy underpinned by integrated water resources management principles aimed at addressing factors contributing to water security problems. The strategy has to be settlement category specific. Large villages have to address factors related to demographic changes, urbanization, management challenges, water supply infrastructure

  11. Value Chain Analysis of Botswana Poultry Industry: The Case of Gaborone, Kgatleng, Kweneng and South East Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charity Masole

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The poultry industry in Botswana has experienced tremendous growth over time and remains the most celebrated example of import substitution, which has resulted in the achievement of national food self-sufficiency. This study evaluated and characterized the structure of poultry value chain in Botswana. Specifically, it identified the actors, linkages, challenges faced by the players; and also assessed the relative importance of specific flows of poultry products. A structured questionnaire was administered to 40 poultry farmers, 10 input dealers, 10 retail stores and 5 Ministry of Agriculture extension staff using a purposive sampling technique. The results showed market access for small-scale farmers was undermined by the increasing complexity of value chain and increased vertical coordination of resources. Therefore, the reality of economies of scale and the need to establish strong marketing links with existing supermarkets by smallholder farmers for a more competitive poultry industry is inevitable. The poultry market structure is dominated by a few large-scale farmers. On a Likert scale of 1 to 4, these farmers scored an average of 3.62 in comparison to 2.60 scored by small-scale farmers, when their working relationship levels with other players were explored. These results implied that large-scale farmers have stronger linkages. The study also found out that poultry industry still faces some challenges that impede its growth and one such challenge is high feed prices. Therefore, policies aimed at supporting the industry players must be developed with a view to ensuring sustainable development of the subsector and enhancing the benefit derived by the player.

  12. Knowledge of HIV/AIDS, attitudes towards sexual risk behaviour and perceived behavioural control among college students in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Faimau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the knowledge of HIV/AIDS, attitudes towards risky sexual behaviour and perceived behavioural control among students in Botswana. Data were collected from 445 students randomly selected from the University of Botswana and Boitekanelo College. Hundred and seventy three males and 272 females participated in the study. The study established that although more than 90% of students correctly identified routes of HIV transmission, misconceptions regarding HIV/AIDS still exist. This includes the belief that people can be infected with HIV because of witchcraft and that only people who have sex with gay or homosexual partners can be infected with HIV. Majority of students were aware of various sexual risks. However, the percentage of students who indicated that “it is difficult to ask my partner to use a condom” was still relatively high (13.5% based on the assumption that students are supposed to know the consequences of sexual risky behaviour. It was also found that male students were 3.48 times more likely to negotiate sex than their female counterparts (OR = 3.48, 95% CI: 1.09 − 11.13 and students who were 18 years and below were more likely to negotiate sex than students above 18 years of age (OR = 2.78, 95% CI: 1.42 − 18.32. Christians are four times less likely to negotiate sex compared to non-Christians (OR = 0.219, 95% CI: 0.095 − 0.506. More than 80% of students were comfortable discussing HIV or sex and sexuality with their friends, boyfriends/girlfriends or partners but uncomfortable discussing the same issues with their parents.

  13. Translating a National Laboratory Strategic Plan into action through SLMTA in a district hospital laboratory in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keoratile Ntshambiwa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Ministry of Health (MOH of Botswana adopted Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA, a structured quality improvement programme, as a key tool for the implementation of quality management systems in its public health laboratories. Coupled with focused mentorship, this programme aimed to help MOH achieve the goals of the National Laboratory Strategic Plan to provide quality and timely clinical diagnosis.Objectives: This article describes the impact of implementing SLMTA in Sekgoma Memorial Hospital Laboratory (SMHL in Serowe, Botswana.Methods: SLMTA implementation in SMHL included trainings, improvement projects, site visits and focused mentorship. To measure progress, audits using the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA checklist were conducted at baseline and exit of the programme, with scores corresponding to a zero- to five-star scale.Turnaround times and customer satisfaction were tracked.Results: The laboratory scored 53% (zero stars at the baseline audit and 80% (three stars at exit. Nearly three years later, the laboratory scored 85% (four stars in an official audit conducted by the African Society for Laboratory Medicine. Turnaround times became shorter after SLMTA implementation, with reductions ranging 19% to 52%; overall patient satisfaction increased from 56% to 73%; and clinician satisfaction increased from 41% to 72%. Improvements in inventory management led to decreases in discarded reagents, reducinglosses from US $18 000 in 2011 to $40 in 2013.Conclusion: The SLMTA programme contributed to enhanced performance of the laboratory,which in turn yielded potential positive impacts for patient care at the hospital.

  14. Understanding Household Connectivity and Resilience in Marginal Rural Communities through Social Network Analysis in the Village of Habu, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grenville D. Barnes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptability is emerging as a key issue not only in the climate change debate but in the general area of sustainable development. In this context, we examine the link between household resilience and connectivity in a rural community in Botswana. We see resilience and vulnerability as the positive and negative dimensions of adaptability. Poor, marginal rural communities confronted with the vagaries of climate change, will need to become more resilient if they are to survive and thrive. We define resilience as the capacity of a social–ecological system to cope with shocks such as droughts or economic crises without changing its fundamental identity. We make use of three different indices of household resilience: livelihood diversity, wealth, and a comprehensive resilience index based on a combination of human, financial, physical, social, and natural capital. Then, we measure the social connectivity of households through a whole network approach in social network analysis, using two measures of network centrality (degree centrality and betweenness. We hypothesize that households with greater social connectivity have greater resilience, and analyze a community in rural Botswana to uncover how different households make use of social networks to deal with shocks such as human illness and death, crop damage, and livestock disease. We surveyed the entire community of Habu using a structured questionnaire that focused on livelihood strategies and social networks. We found that gender, age of household head, and household size were positively correlated with social connectivity. Our analysis indicates that those households that are more socially networked are likely to have a wider range of livelihood strategies, greater levels of other forms of social capital, and greater overall capital. Therefore, they are more resilient.

  15. Depression and HIV in Botswana: a population-based study on gender-specific socioeconomic and behavioral correlates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Gupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a leading contributor to the burden of disease worldwide, a critical barrier to HIV prevention and a common serious HIV co-morbidity. However, depression screening and treatment are limited in sub-Saharan Africa, and there are few population-level studies examining the prevalence and gender-specific factors associated with depression. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional population-based study of 18-49 year-old adults from five districts in Botswana with the highest prevalence of HIV-infection. We examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms, using a Hopkins Symptom Checklist for Depression (HSCL-D score of ≥ 1.75 to define depression, and correlates of depression using multivariate logistic regression stratified by sex. RESULTS: Of 1,268 participants surveyed, 25.3% of women and 31.4% of men had depression. Among women, lower education (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.07, 95% confidence interval [1.30-3.32], higher income (1.77 [1.09-2.86], and lack of control in sexual decision-making (2.35 [1.46-3.81] were positively associated with depression. Among men, being single (1.95 [1.02-3.74], living in a rural area (1.63 [1.02-2.65], having frequent visits to a health provider (3.29 [1.88-5.74], anticipated HIV stigma (fearing discrimination if HIV status was revealed (2.04 [1.27-3.29], and intergenerational sex (2.28 [1.17-4.41] were independently associated with depression. DISCUSSION: Depression is highly prevalent in Botswana, and its correlates are gender-specific. Our findings suggest multiple targets for screening and prevention of depression and highlight the need to integrate mental health counseling and treatment into primary health care to decrease morbidity and improve HIV management efforts.

  16. Prevalence and Characteristics of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV Coinfection among HIV-Positive Women in South Africa and Botswana.

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    Philippa C Matthews

    Full Text Available There is progressive concern about the evolving burden of morbidity and mortality caused by coinfection with HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus (HBV in sub-Saharan Africa, but the epidemiology and impact of this problem are not well defined. We therefore set out to assimilate more information about the nature of HBV/HIV coinfection in this region by undertaking a retrospective observational study of southern African adult women. We used samples from previously recruited HIV-1 positive women attending antenatal clinics in three settings in South Africa and Botswana (n = 950 and added a small cohort of HIV-negative antenatal South African women for comparison (n = 72. We tested for HBsAg and followed up HBsAg-positive samples by testing for HBeAg, HBV DNA, HBV genotype, presence of drug-resistance associated mutations (RAMs and HDV. We identified HBsAg in 72 individuals (7% of the whole cohort, of whom 27% were HBeAg-positive, and the majority HBV genotypes A1 and A2. We did not detect any HDV coinfection. HBV prevalence was significantly different between geographically distinct cohorts, but did not differ according to HIV status. Among adults from South Africa, HBV/HIV coinfected patients had lower CD4+ T cell counts compared to those with HIV-monoinfection (p = 0.02, but this finding was not replicated in the cohort from Botswana. Overall, these data provide a snapshot of the coinfection problem at the heart of the HIV/HBV co-epidemic, and are important to inform public health policy, resource allocation, education, surveillance and clinical care.

  17. Entendiendo Delta desde las Humanidades

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    José Calvo Tello

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stylometry is one of the research areas in greater development within Digital Humanities. However, few studies have worked until recently with texts in Spanish and even less so from Spanish-speaking countries. The aim of this paper is to present in Spanish, and without prior statistical knowledge from the reader, one of the main methods used in stylometry, the measure of textual distance Burrows’ Delta. This paper explains this measure using a very small corpus of proverbs and then checks the results in a corpus of Spanish novels. Both data and Python scripts are available to the community through GitHub, commented step by step so that you can play and visualize each step.

  18. Jiaxing: Delicacy of the Yangtze River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUXINYI; WANGNAN

    2004-01-01

    THE yangtze River Delta,where the Yangtzc River crosses China's east coast,has one of the country's most dynamic economies.In 1976Jcan Gottmann.a french geographer,called shanghai and its neighboring Yangtze River Delta the world's "sixth largest megalopolis." The Yangtze River Delta has 15 cities. Its territory accounts for one percent of China's total, 5.8 percent of hthe population, and 19.5 percent of the national GDP.In terms of both aggregate economy and growth speed, the Delta currently leads China and could likely be the "enginc" of the world's future economic growth. Located at the juncition of Shanghai Jiangsu and Zhejiang, Jiaxing City holds a central economic belt. It is within 100 kilometers of Shanghai, Hangzhou and Suzhou. In 200 and 2003, Jiaxing's GDP growth rate was first in Zhejiang Province and second among the 1.5 Delta cities.

  19. Making a difference in adult-child relationships: evidence from an adult-child communication intervention in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Hilary M; Underwood, Carol

    2013-12-01

    Girls are vulnerable to HIV in part because the social systems in which they live have failed to protect them. This study evaluates a program aimed at strengthening adult-child relationships to reduce girls' vulnerability to HIV in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique. In addition to an extensive process evaluation, a cross-sectional post-intervention survey was conducted in the three countries. The total sample size was 1418 adolescent girls (ages 11-18). Bivariate and multilevel, multivariate analyses were conducted to assess the association between adult program exposure and adult-child relationship improvement. In Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique, girls whose mothers and fathers participated in the program, as compared to those whose parents did not participate in the program, were significantly more likely to report that their relationships with their parents had improved. Research has shown the important role that adults can play in the mitigation of youth risk taking behavior.

  20. Evaluating the impact of a mobile oral telemedicine system on medical management and clinical outcomes of patients with complicated oral lesions in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfalul, Martha; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Antwi, Cynthia; Ndlovu, Siphiwo; Motsepe, Didintle; Phuthego, Motsholathebe; Tau, Boitumelo; Mohutsiwa-Dibe, Neo; Kovarik, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Mobile telemedicine, which involves the use of cellular phone telecommunications to facilitate exchange of information between parties in different locations to assist in the management of patients, has become increasingly popular, particularly in resource-limited settings. In Botswana, small studies of mobile telemedicine programs suggest access to these services positively affect patients, but these programs' impact is difficult to capture given limitations of baseline and comparative data. Our observational study uses each patient receiving mobile oral telemedicine services in Botswana as his/her own control to assess the impact of these services on his/her diagnosis and management plan. At month 5 of 12 total, preliminary analysis of eligible cases (n = 27) reveals management plan discordance between clinicians submitting cases and the specialist was 68.0% (17/25), suggesting that telemedicine can result in significant changes in management of patients.