WorldWideScience

Sample records for delivering health information

  1. Delivering health information services and technologies to urban community health centers: the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E R; McDaniels, C; Crespo, J; Lanier, D

    1997-10-01

    Health professionals cannot address public health issues effectively unless they have immediate access to current biomedical information. This paper reports on one mode of access, the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project, which was supported by the National Library of Medicine through outreach awards in 1995 and 1996. The three-year project is an effort to link the programs and services of the University of Illinois at Chicago Library of the Health Sciences and the Midwest AIDS Training and Education Center with the clinic services of community-based organizations in Chicago. The project was designed to provide electronic access to AIDS-related information for AIDS patients, the affected community, and their care givers. The project also provided Internet access and training and continued access to library resources. The successful initiative suggests a working model for outreach to health professionals in an urban setting.

  2. Will information and communication technology disrupt the health system and deliver on its promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Johanna I; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2010-10-04

    Investment in information and communication technology (ICT) in the health sector can bring important benefits. To date, the focus has been on automating clinical work practices such as ordering tests and prescriptions, which significantly improves efficiency and safety. Uptake of ICT has been slow and the results less favourable than anticipated for various reasons, including poor integration of systems into complex clinical work processes, limited training, and the intermittent nature of ICT funding. As a result, many health care organisations have been operating hybrid paper and computer systems that introduce new patient risks, staff frustration, and outcomes below expectation. The focus must shift from automation of clinical work to innovation; from evolutionary application of ICT to revolutionary uses. Health professionals must embrace ICT as a "disruptive technology" that will produce significant changes in their roles and responsibilities and lead to real health reform with new, innovative models of health care delivery. As other industries have shown, substitution and role changes are areas in which ICT can lead to the greatest gains.

  3. A Health Surveillance Software Framework to deliver information on preventive healthcare strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Alessandra Alaniz; Pollettini, Juliana Tarossi; Baranauskas, José Augusto; Chaves, Julia Carmona Almeida

    2016-08-01

    A software framework can reduce costs related to the development of an application because it allows developers to reuse both design and code. Recently, companies and research groups have announced that they have been employing health software frameworks. This paper presents the design, proof-of-concept implementations and experimentation of the Health Surveillance Software Framework (HSSF). The HSSF is a framework that tackles the demand for the recommendation of surveillance information aiming at supporting preventive healthcare strategies. Examples of such strategies are the automatic recommendation of surveillance levels to patients in need of healthcare and the automatic recommendation of scientific literature that elucidates epigenetic problems related to patients. HSSF was created from two systems we developed in our previous work on health surveillance systems: the Automatic-SL and CISS systems. The Automatic-SL system aims to assist healthcare professionals in making decisions and in identifying children with developmental problems. The CISS service associates genetic and epigenetic risk factors related to chronic diseases with patient's clinical records. Towards evaluating the HSSF framework, two new systems, CISS+ and CISS-SW, were created by means of abstractions and instantiations of the framework (design and code). We show that HSSF supported the development of the two new systems given that they both recommend scientific papers using medical records as queries even though they exploit different computational technologies. In an experiment using simulated patients' medical records, we show that CISS, CISS+, and CISS-SW systems recommended more closely related and somewhat related documents than Google, Google Scholar and PubMed. Considering recall and precision measures, CISS+ surpasses CISS-SW in terms of precision.

  4. Information Processing Versus Social Cognitive Mediators of Weight Loss in a Podcast-Delivered Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Linda K.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Campbell, Marci K.

    2014-01-01

    Podcasting is an emerging technology, and previous interventions have shown promising results using theory-based podcast for weight loss among overweight and obese individuals. This study investigated whether constructs of social cognitive theory and information processing theories (IPTs) mediate the effect of a podcast intervention on weight loss…

  5. Information Processing Versus Social Cognitive Mediators of Weight Loss in a Podcast-Delivered Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Linda K.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Campbell, Marci K.

    2014-01-01

    Podcasting is an emerging technology, and previous interventions have shown promising results using theory-based podcast for weight loss among overweight and obese individuals. This study investigated whether constructs of social cognitive theory and information processing theories (IPTs) mediate the effect of a podcast intervention on weight loss…

  6. Understanding reactions to an internet-delivered health-care intervention: accommodating user preferences for information provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardley Lucy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is recognised as good practice to use qualitative methods to elicit users' views of internet-delivered health-care interventions during their development. This paper seeks to illustrate the advantages of combining usability testing with 'theoretical modelling', i.e. analyses that relate the findings of qualitative studies during intervention development to social science theory, in order to gain deeper insights into the reasons and context for how people respond to the intervention. This paper illustrates how usability testing may be enriched by theoretical modelling by means of two qualitative studies of users' views of the delivery of information in an internet-delivered intervention to help users decide whether they needed to seek medical care for their cold or flu symptoms. Methods In Study 1, 21 participants recruited from a city in southern England were asked to 'think aloud' while viewing draft web-pages presented in paper format. In Study 2, views of our prototype website were elicited, again using think aloud methods, in a sample of 26 participants purposively sampled for diversity in education levels. Both data-sets were analysed by thematic analysis. Results Study 1 revealed that although the information provided by the draft web-pages had many of the intended empowering benefits, users often felt overwhelmed by the quantity of information. Relating these findings to theory and research on factors influencing preferences for information-seeking we hypothesised that to meet the needs of different users (especially those with lower literacy levels our website should be designed to provide only essential personalised advice, but with options to access further information. Study 2 showed that our website design did prove accessible to users with different literacy levels. However, some users seemed to want still greater control over how information was accessed. Conclusions Educational level need not be an

  7. Delivering health information via podcast or web: media effects on psychosocial and physiological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Kalyanaraman, Sri; Campbell, Marci K

    2013-01-01

    This study explored differences in psychosocial and physiological variables in response to being presented with information on weight loss through either reading text on a website or listening to the same information via podcast. Participants were randomized to receive a weight loss website (n = 20) or podcast (n = 20). Participants had skin conductance levels measured and completed questionnaire items assessing demographic characteristics, user control, novelty, and knowledge. Participants in the podcast group exhibited greater levels of physiological arousal and reported the intervention to be more novel than those in the Web group; however, the Web group reported greater user control. There was no difference in knowledge between the groups. This study presents the first step in examining the role that novelty and user control may play in two different weight-loss electronic media, as well as differences in knowledge acquisition. Future research should explore adding additional media features, such as video content, to the podcasts and websites in order to optimize fully the different mediums and to examine whether user control and novelty are potential mediators of weight loss outcomes.

  8. Electronic Health Records: Delivering the Right Information to the Right Health Care Providers at the Right Time

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In 1993 I wrote "Communication and information management consume as much as 40 percent of all inpatient costs, yet errors still occur at an unacceptable rate. The Institute of medicine has suggested that electronic medical records (EMRs) will help lower health care costs, maintain quality of care, and provide physicians with better information" (Tierney et al. 1993, 379). Nearly 20 years later I'm here to tell you how far we've come toward implementing EHRs nationwide, and what we've learned...

  9. DESIGNS MATTER: Delivering Information Sources for Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie A. Nolasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tourism has benefits not just for travelers, but also to the local economy. Since, Bicol Region has natural and cultural attractions; it is a potential travel destination in the country. Technology in delivering information sources played vital role for the success of the tourism industry in the Region. This allows travel enthusiasts to get more information about various tourist attractions. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of delivering information sources such as web advertisement and desktop publishing for tourist promotion in the Bicol Region. Specifically, it determined the status of tourism, and identified common forms of promotions for tourism development. The study adopted mixed method of research. This method was utilized to confirm and validate findings. Interviews and focus group discussions were used to gather data from the respondents of the selected Local Government Units, Department of Tourism, Travel Agencies and Hotel Agents in the Region. Based on the findings, of the total foreign visitors in the country, only 9.14% visited Bicol Region in 2014. That is why, domestic tourist showed high percentage against foreign visitors with 25.7%. Brochures with EZ maps as most commonly used desktop publishing materials and websites and social media for web advertisement. Thus, there is a need to reevaluate promotional activities by the DOT and other agencies. Adoption suggestive features for creative desktop publishing materials and web services should be considered to increase tourist visitors in the Region.

  10. Key informant perspectives on policy- and service-level challenges and opportunities for delivering integrated sexual and reproductive health and HIV care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Jennifer A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integration of sexual and reproductive health (SRH and HIV services is a policy priority, both globally and in South Africa. Recent studies examining SRH/HIV integration in South Africa have focused primarily on the SRH needs of HIV patients, and less on the policy and service-delivery environment in which these programs operate. To fill this gap we undertook a qualitative study to elicit the views of key informants on policy-and service-level challenges and opportunities for improving integrated SRH and HIV care in South Africa. This study comprised formative research for the development of an integrated service delivery model in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN Province. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 21 expert key informants from the South African Department of Health, and local and international NGOs and universities. Thematic codes were generated from a subset of the transcripts, and these were modified, refined and organized during coding and analysis. Results While there was consensus among key informants on the need for more integrated systems of SRH and HIV care in South Africa, a range of inter-related systems factors at policy and service-delivery levels were identified as challenges to delivering integrated care. At the policy level these included vertical programming, lack of policy guidance on integrated care, under-funding of SRH, program territorialism, and weak referral systems; at the service level, factors included high client load, staff shortages and insufficient training and skills in SRH, resistance to change, and inadequate monitoring systems related to integration. Informants had varying views on the best way to achieve integration: while some favored a one-stop shop approach, others preferred retaining sub-specialisms while strengthening referral systems. The introduction of task-shifting policies and decentralization of HIV treatment to primary care provide opportunities for

  11. Informing mental health policies and services in the EMR: cost-effective deployment of human resources to deliver integrated community-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivbijaro, G; Patel, V; Chisholm, D; Goldberg, D; Khoja, T A M; Edwards, T M; Enum, Y; Kolkiewic, L A

    2015-09-28

    For EMR countries to deliver the expectations of the Global Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 & the ongoing move towards universal health coverage, all health & social care providers need to innovate and transform their services to provide evidence-based health care that is accessible, cost-effective & with the best patient outcomes. For the primary and community workforce, this includes general medical practitioners, practice & community nurses, community social workers, housing officers, lay health workers, nongovernmental organizations & civil society, including community spiritual leaders/healers. This paper brings together the current best evidence to support transformation & discusses key approaches to achieve this, including skill mix and/or task shifting and integrated care. The important factors that need to be in place to support skill mix/task shifting and good integrated care are outlined with reference to EMR countries.

  12. Strengthening informal healthcare deliver: gender perspectives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashiri, M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available in rural areas in fighting disease, poverty, isolation and deprivation. It will profile the importance of transportation infrastructure and services as well as communication in facilitating informal healthcare service delivery. One strand of thought...

  13. Delivering Training for Highly Demanding Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Andrew Lawrence; Coulson-Thomas, Yvette May; Coulson-Thomas, Colin Joseph; Ashurst, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of research covering the training requirements of organisations implementing highly demanding information systems (HDISs). The aim of this paper is to help in the understanding of appropriate training requirements for such systems. Design/methodology/approach: This research investigates the training delivery within a…

  14. Delivering quality-evaluated healthcare information in the era of Web 2.0: design implications for Intute: Health and Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Robert

    2010-03-01

    The internet, though an invaluable and ubiquitous resource for health-related information, is perceived as being undermined by concerns about quality and reliability. Some recent developments, by permitting so-called user-generated content to be published on the internet, exacerbate these concerns. The impact of these developments, mostly characterized as Web 2.0, on the use of healthcare educational and information resources is explored in this article. There is a recognized need for an authoritative service that can address issues of quality. Intute: Health and Life Sciences is one such service, and its design in the context of meeting current Web 2.0 expectations and addressing concerns about quality is the focus of the article.

  15. Social Media–Delivered Sexual Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Sheana S.; Levine, Deborah; Black, Sandra R.; Schmiege, Sarah; Santelli, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Youth are using social media regularly and represent a group facing substantial risk for sexually transmitted infection (STI). Although there is evidence that the Internet can be used effectively in supporting healthy sexual behavior, this hasn't yet extended to social networking sites. Purpose To determine whether STI prevention messages delivered via Facebook are efficacious in preventing increases in sexual risk behavior at 2 and 6 months. Design Cluster RCT, October 2010–May 2011. Setting/participants Individuals (seeds) recruited in multiple settings (online, via newspaper ads and face-to-face) were asked to recruit three friends, who in turn recruited additional friends, extending three waves from the seed. Seeds and waves of friends were considered networks and exposed to either the intervention or control condition. Intervention Exposure to Just/Us, a Facebook page developed with youth input, or to control content on 18–24 News, a Facebook page with current events for 2 months. Main outcome measures Condom use at last sex and proportion of sex acts protected by condoms. Repeated measures of nested data were used to model main effects of exposure to Just/Us and time by treatment interaction. Results 1578 participants enrolled, with 14% Latino and 35% African-American; 75% of participants completed at least one study follow-up. Time by treatment effects were observed at 2 months for condom use (intervention 68% vs control 56%, p=0.04) and proportion of sex acts protected by condoms (intervention 63% vs control 57%, p=0.03) where intervention participation reduced the tendency for condom use to decrease over time. No effects were seen at 6 months. Conclusions Social networking sites may be venues for efficacious health education interventions. More work is needed to understand what elements of social media are compelling, how network membership influences effects, and whether linking social media to clinical and social services can be beneficial

  16. delivering equitable health care in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    role, laboratories are an important part of many disease control programmes; yet ... it was feasible to use this test in primary health care antenatal clinics as it is .... reached the market-place, sputum smear microscopy is set to remain a rate ...

  17. Delivering Better Health Services to Pakistan's Poor

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2010-01-01

    Pakistan is not on track to achieve most Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) related to health, nutrition and population. Given its current rate of progress, in 2015 Pakistan's infant mortality rate (IMR) will be 65 deaths per 1,000 live births and the under-five mortality rate (U5MR) will be 78, considerably above the MDG4 targets of 33 and 43 deaths per 1000 births respectively. Pakistan...

  18. Delivering Better Health Services to Pakistan's Poor

    OpenAIRE

    Belay, Tekabe; Couffinhal, Agnes; Haq, Inaam; Kazi, Shahnaz; Loevinsohn, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Pakistan is not on track to achieve most Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) related to health, nutrition and population. Given its current rate of progress, in 2015 Pakistan's infant mortality rate (IMR) will be 65 deaths per 1,000 live births and the under-five mortality rate (U5MR) will be 78, considerably above the MDG4 targets of 33 and 43 deaths per 1000 births respectively. Pakistan will not achieve the MDG related to nutrition. The review aims to develop a limited set of practical opt...

  19. A novel concept for integrating and delivering health information using a comprehensive digital dashboard: An analysis of healthcare professionals' intention to adopt a new system and the trend of its real usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehyuck; Jung, Se Young; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung; Baek, Hyun Young; Baek, Rong-Min; Kim, Seok

    2017-01-01

    To introduce a new concept of medical dashboard system called BESTBoard. Such a system was implemented in all wards in a tertiary academic hospital to explore the development process, core designs, functions, usability and feasibility. The task-force team made user interface designs for 6 months based on a need analysis. Hardware configuration and software development was carried out for 3 months. We conducted a survey of 383 physicians and nurses to determine the usability and feasibility of the system. In March 2012, the system was installed in all wards, including the intensive care units, emergency rooms, operation rooms, and even delivery rooms. Healthcare professionals had access to all information of EHRs optimized for a large 55-inch touchscreen. The satisfaction rate of BESTBoard users was high, with a mean of 3.3 points. Voluntary users tended to consider BESTBoard as a good system that is useful for team round visits, interdisciplinary team approach, and collecting the status of the hospital rooms. Elderly users didn't tend to think of BESTBoard as a useful tool for interdisciplinary team approach and collecting the status of the hospital rooms. Greater expectations regarding work performance affected the users' attitudes positively. A positive attitude toward using the system resulted in consistent real usage and health care professionals' satisfaction with the new dashboard system. A new concept of hospital dashboard system proved to be feasible and useful in delivering health information to healthcare professionals. A positive attitude and an expectation regarding work performance were important factors for intention to use the system. This finding can serve for developing new systems to present health information effectively. Further studies will be needed to evaluate the extent to which BESTBoard can have a positive impact on clinical care outcomes and work performance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Mouse embryonic retina delivers information controlling cortical neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Bonetti

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded, the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal. Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system.

  1. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  2. Predictors in Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy and behavioral stress management for severe health anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Erik; Andersson, Erik; Lekander, Mats; Ljótsson, Brjánn

    2015-01-01

    Severe health anxiety can be effectively treated with exposure-based Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT), but information about which factors that predict outcome is scarce. Using data from a recently conducted RCT comparing ICBT (n = 79) with Internet-delivered behavioral stress management (IBSM) (n = 79) the presented study investigated predictors of treatment outcome. Analyses were conducted using a two-step linear regression approach and the dependent variable was operationalized both as end state health anxiety at post-treatment and as baseline-to post-treatment improvement. A hypothesis driven approach was used where predictors expected to influence outcome were based on a previous predictor study by our research group. As hypothesized, the results showed that baseline health anxiety and treatment adherence predicted both end state health anxiety and improvement. In addition, anxiety sensitivity, treatment credibility, and working alliance were significant predictors of health anxiety improvement. Demographic variables, i.e. age, gender, marital status, computer skills, educational level, and having children, had no significant predictive value. We conclude that it is possible to predict a substantial proportion of the outcome variance in ICBT and IBSM for severe health anxiety. The findings of the present study can be of high clinical value as they provide information about factors of importance for outcome in the treatment of severe health anxiety.

  3. Avoiding health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Joshua B; Rintamaki, Lance S; Ramsey, Jason A; Brashers, Dale E

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated why and how individuals avoid health information to support the development of models of uncertainty and information management and offer insights for those dealing with the information and uncertainty inherent to health and illness. Participants from student (n = 507) and community (n = 418) samples reported that they avoided health information to (a) maintain hope or deniability, (b) resist overexposure, (c) accept limits of action, (d) manage flawed information, (e) maintain boundaries, and (f) continue with life/activities. They also reported strategies for avoiding information, including removing or ignoring stimuli (e.g., avoiding people who might provide health advice) and controlling conversations (e.g., withholding information, changing the subject). Results suggest a link between previous experience with serious illness and health information avoidance. Building on uncertainty management theory, this study demonstrated that health information avoidance is situational, relatively common, not necessarily unhealthy, and may be used to accomplish multiple communication goals.

  4. Delivering Career Information on a Toll-Free Hotline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Juanita K.; McDaniels, Carl

    1982-01-01

    Reviews some of the uses of the phone in crisis situations and describes a popular toll-free career information hotline in Virginia. Provides a profile of the mostly adult users along with a user evaluation of the service. (Author)

  5. Strengthening of primary health care: Key to deliver inclusive health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Yeravdekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inequity and poverty are the root causes of ill health. Access to quality health services on an affordable and equitable basis in many parts of the country remains an unfulfilled aspiration. Disparity in health care is interpreted as compromise in ′Right to Life.′ It is imperative to define ′essential health care,′ which should be made available to all citizens to facilitate inclusivity in health care. The suggested methods for this include optimal utilization of public resources and increasing public spending on health care. Capacity building through training, especially training of paramedical personnel, is proposed as an essential ingredient, to reduce cost, especially in tertiary care. Another aspect which is considered very important is improvement in delivery system of health care. Increasing the role of ′family physician′ in health care delivery system will improve preventive care and reduce cost of tertiary care. These observations underlie the relevance and role of Primary health care as a key to deliver inclusive health care. The advantages of a primary health care model for health service delivery are greater access to needed services; better quality of care; a greater focus on prevention; early management of health problems; and cumulative improvements in health and lower morbidity as a result of primary health care delivery.

  6. Health Information Systems (HIS): Concept and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2012-01-01

    A health information system (HIS) is the intersection of between healthcare's business process, and information systems to deliver better healthcare services. The nature of healthcare industry, which is highly influenced by economic, social, politic, and technological factors, has changed over time. This paper will address some important concepts of healthcare and related terminologies to provide a holistic view for HIS. Related technological milestones and major events are briefly summarized. The trends and rapid development of health information technologies are also discussed.

  7. Evaluating Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millions of consumers get health information from magazines, TV or the Internet. Some of the information is reliable and up to date; some is not. How can ... the site have an editorial board? Is the information reviewed before it is posted? Be skeptical. Things ...

  8. Health Care Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jane L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The first of eight articles discusses the current state of the sensitive but unclassified information controversy. A series of six articles then explores the use of integrated information systems in the area of health services. Current trends in document management are provided in the last article. (CLB)

  9. Information in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeda, Tadashi A.

    The report stresses the fact that while there is unity in the continuum of medicine, information in health care is markedly different from information in medical education and research. This difference is described as an anomaly in that it appears to deviate in excess of normal variation from needs common to research and education. In substance,…

  10. Out of pocket expenditure to deliver at public health facilities in India: a cross sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Anns; Chatterjee, Susmita; Srivastava, Aradhana; Bhattacharyya, Sanghita

    2016-08-24

    To expand access to safe deliveries, some developing countries have initiated demand-side financing schemes promoting institutional delivery. In the context of conditional cash incentive scheme and free maternity care in public health facilities in India, studies have highlighted high out of pocket expenditure (OOPE) of Indian families for delivery and maternity care. In this context the study assesses the components of OOPE that women incurred while accessing maternity care in public health facilities in Uttar Pradesh, India. It also assesses the determinants of OOPE and the level of maternal satisfaction while accessing care from these facilities. It is a cross-sectional analysis of 558 recently delivered women who have delivered at four public health facilities in Uttar Pradesh, India. All OOPE related information was collected through interviews using structured pre-tested questionnaires. Frequencies, Mann-Whitney test and categorical regression were used for data reduction. The analysis showed that the median OOPE was INR 700 (US$ 11.48) which varied between INR 680 (US$ 11.15) for normal delivery and INR 970 (US$ 15.9) for complicated cases. Tips for getting services (consisting of gifts and tips for services) with a median value of INR 320 (US$ 5.25) contributed to the major share in OOPE. Women from households with income more than INR 4000 (US$ 65.57) per month, general castes, primi-gravida, complicated delivery and those not accompanied by community health workers incurred higher OOPE. The significant predictors for high OOPE were caste (General Vs. OBC, SC/ST), type of delivery (Complicated Vs. Normal), and presence of ASHA (No Vs. Yes). OOPE while accessing care for delivery was one among the least satisfactory items and 76 % women expressed their dissatisfaction. Even though services at the public health facilities in India are supposed to be provided free of cost, it is actually not free, and the women in this study paid almost half of their mandated

  11. Feasibility and acceptability of delivering adolescent health interventions alongside HPV vaccination in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Jones, Deborah; Lees, Shelley; Mwanga, Joseph; Neke, Nyasule; Changalucha, John; Broutet, Nathalie; Maduhu, Ibrahim; Kapiga, Saidi; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Bloem, Paul; Ross, David A

    2016-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination offers an opportunity to strengthen provision of adolescent health interventions (AHI). We explored the feasibility of integrating other AHI with HPV vaccination in Tanzania. A desk review of 39 policy documents was preceded by a stakeholder meeting with 38 policy makers and partners. Eighteen key informant interviews (KIIs) with health and education policy makers and district officials were conducted to further explore perceptions of current programs, priorities and AHI that might be suitable for integration with HPV vaccination. Fourteen school health interventions (SHI) or AHI are currently being implemented by the Government of Tanzania. Most are delivered as vertical programmes. Coverage of current programs is not universal, and is limited by financial, human resource and logistic constraints. Limited community engagement, rumours, and lack of strategic advocacy has affected uptake of some interventions, e.g. tetanus toxoid (TT) immunization. Stakeholder and KI perceptions and opinions were limited by a lack of experience with integrated delivery and AHI that were outside an individual's area of expertise and experience. Deworming and educational sessions including reproductive health education were the most frequently mentioned interventions that respondents considered suitable for integrated delivery with HPV vaccine. Given programme constraints, limited experience with integrated delivery and concern about real or perceived side-effects being attributed to the vaccine, it will be very important to pilot-test integration of AHI/SHI with HPV vaccination. Selected interventions will need to be simple and quick to deliver since health workers are likely to face significant logistic and time constraints during vaccination visits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  12. Physician assessments of the value of therapeutic information delivered via e-mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Repchinsky, Carol; Jovaisas, Barbara; Marlow, Bernard; Marques Ricarte, Ivan L; Galvão, Maria Cristiane Barbosa; Shulha, Michael; de Gaspé Bonar, James; Moscovici, Jonathan L

    2014-05-01

    Although e-learning programs are popular and access to electronic knowledge resources has improved, raising awareness about updated therapeutic recommendations in practice continues to be a challenge. To raise awareness about and document the use of therapeutic recommendations. In 2010, family physicians evaluated e-Therapeutics (e-T) Highlights with a Web-based tool called the Information Assessment Method (IAM). The e-T Highlights consisted of information found in the primary care reference e-Therapeutics+. Each week, family physicians received an e-mail containing a link to 1 Highlight from a different chapter of e-Therapeutics+. Family physicians received continuing medical education credits for each Highlight they rated with the IAM. Of the 5346 participants, 85% of them were full-time or part-time practitioners. A total of 31 429 Highlights ratings were received in 2010 (median of 2 ratings per participant, range 1 to 49). Among participants who rated more than 2 Highlights, the median number of ratings was 7 (mean 11.9). The relevance of the information from individual Highlights varied widely; however, for 90% of the rated Highlights participants indicated total or partial relevance of the information for at least 1 patient. For 41% of rated Highlights, participants expected patient health benefits to result from implementing the recommendation, such as avoiding an unnecessary or inappropriate treatment, or a preventive intervention. This continuing medical education program stimulated family physicians to rate therapeutic recommendations that were delivered weekly via e-mail. The process of rating e-T Highlights with the IAM raised awareness about treatment recommendations and documented self-reported use of this information in practice. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  13. Government-Backed Salt Reduction Efforts Could Deliver Big Health Pay Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162976.html Government-Backed Salt Reduction Efforts Could Deliver Big Health Pay Day Researchers ... found that a government-supported national plan to reduce salt would be cost-effective in nearly every country ...

  14. Health Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Artz, David R

    2015-06-01

    This article provides surgical pathologists an overview of health information systems (HISs): what they are, what they do, and how such systems relate to the practice of surgical pathology. Much of this article is dedicated to the electronic medical record. Information, in how it is captured, transmitted, and conveyed, drives the effectiveness of such electronic medical record functionalities. So critical is information from pathology in integrated clinical care that surgical pathologists are becoming gatekeepers of not only tissue but also information. Better understanding of HISs can empower surgical pathologists to become stakeholders who have an impact on the future direction of quality integrated clinical care.

  15. Health Information Systems (HIS): Concept and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil; Anshari, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    A health information system (HIS) is the intersection of between healthcare's business process, and information systems to deliver better healthcare services. The nature of healthcare industry, which is highly influenced by economic, social, politic, and technological factors, has changed over time. This paper will address some important concepts of healthcare and related terminologies to provide a holistic view for HIS. Related technological milestones and major events are briefly summarized...

  16. When Educational Material Is Delivered: A Mixed Methods Content Validation Study of the Information Assessment Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Hani; Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland

    2017-03-14

    The Information Assessment Method (IAM) allows clinicians to report the cognitive impact, clinical relevance, intention to use, and expected patient health benefits associated with clinical information received by email. More than 15,000 Canadian physicians and pharmacists use the IAM in continuing education programs. In addition, information providers can use IAM ratings and feedback comments from clinicians to improve their products. Our general objective was to validate the IAM questionnaire for the delivery of educational material (ecological and logical content validity). Our specific objectives were to measure the relevance and evaluate the representativeness of IAM items for assessing information received by email. A 3-part mixed methods study was conducted (convergent design). In part 1 (quantitative longitudinal study), the relevance of IAM items was measured. Participants were 5596 physician members of the Canadian Medical Association who used the IAM. A total of 234,196 ratings were collected in 2012. The relevance of IAM items with respect to their main construct was calculated using descriptive statistics (relevance ratio R). In part 2 (qualitative descriptive study), the representativeness of IAM items was evaluated. A total of 15 family physicians completed semistructured face-to-face interviews. For each construct, we evaluated the representativeness of IAM items using a deductive-inductive thematic qualitative data analysis. In part 3 (mixing quantitative and qualitative parts), results from quantitative and qualitative analyses were reviewed, juxtaposed in a table, discussed with experts, and integrated. Thus, our final results are derived from the views of users (ecological content validation) and experts (logical content validation). Of the 23 IAM items, 21 were validated for content, while 2 were removed. In part 1 (quantitative results), 21 items were deemed relevant, while 2 items were deemed not relevant (R=4.86% [N=234,196] and R=3.04% [n

  17. When Educational Material Is Delivered: A Mixed Methods Content Validation Study of the Information Assessment Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background The Information Assessment Method (IAM) allows clinicians to report the cognitive impact, clinical relevance, intention to use, and expected patient health benefits associated with clinical information received by email. More than 15,000 Canadian physicians and pharmacists use the IAM in continuing education programs. In addition, information providers can use IAM ratings and feedback comments from clinicians to improve their products. Objective Our general objective was to validate the IAM questionnaire for the delivery of educational material (ecological and logical content validity). Our specific objectives were to measure the relevance and evaluate the representativeness of IAM items for assessing information received by email. Methods A 3-part mixed methods study was conducted (convergent design). In part 1 (quantitative longitudinal study), the relevance of IAM items was measured. Participants were 5596 physician members of the Canadian Medical Association who used the IAM. A total of 234,196 ratings were collected in 2012. The relevance of IAM items with respect to their main construct was calculated using descriptive statistics (relevance ratio R). In part 2 (qualitative descriptive study), the representativeness of IAM items was evaluated. A total of 15 family physicians completed semistructured face-to-face interviews. For each construct, we evaluated the representativeness of IAM items using a deductive-inductive thematic qualitative data analysis. In part 3 (mixing quantitative and qualitative parts), results from quantitative and qualitative analyses were reviewed, juxtaposed in a table, discussed with experts, and integrated. Thus, our final results are derived from the views of users (ecological content validation) and experts (logical content validation). Results Of the 23 IAM items, 21 were validated for content, while 2 were removed. In part 1 (quantitative results), 21 items were deemed relevant, while 2 items were deemed not relevant

  18. Online health information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Synnot, Anneliese J.; Hill, Sophie J.; Garner, Kerryn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: The Internet is increasingly prominent as a source of health information for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). But there has been little exploration of the needs, experiences and preferences of people with MS for integrating treatment information into decision making......, in the context of searching on the Internet. This was the aim of our study. Design: Sixty participants (51 people with MS; nine family members) took part in a focus group or online forum. They were asked to describe how they find and assess reliable treatment information (particularly online) and how...... this changes over time. Thematic analysis was underpinned by a coding frame. Results: Participants described that there was both too much information online and too little that applied to them. They spoke of wariness and scepticism but also empowerment. The availability of up-to-date and unbiased treatment...

  19. Health information technology: help or hindrance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchersid, Terry

    2014-07-01

    The practice of medicine in general and nephrology in particular grows increasingly complex with each passing year. In parallel with this trend, the purchasers of health care are slowly shifting the reimbursement paradigm from one based on rewarding transactions, or work performed, to one that rewards value delivered. Within this context, the health-care value equation is broadly defined as quality divided by costs. Health information technology has been widely recognized as 1 of the foundations for delivering better care at lower costs. As the largest purchaser of health care in the world, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has deployed a series of interrelated programs designed to spur the adoption and utilization of health information technology. This review examines our known collective experience in the practice of nephrology to date with several of these programs and attempts to answer the following question: Is health information technology helping or hindering the delivery of value to the nation's health-care system? Through this review, it was concluded overall that the effect of health information technology appears positive; however, it cannot be objectively determined because of the infancy of its utilization in the practice of medicine.

  20. Internet Use for Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Services Utilization > Internet use for Health Information Internet use for Health Information Narrative Due in part ... adults in the United States who use the Internet has increased substantially, from 47 percent in 2000 ...

  1. Using mHealth to Deliver Behavior Change Interventions Within Prenatal Care at Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriello, Leanne M; Van Marter, Deborah F; Umanzor, Cindy D; Castle, Patricia H; de Aguiar, Emma L

    2016-09-01

    To test an iPad-delivered multiple behavior tailored intervention (Healthy Pregnancy: Step by Step) for pregnant women that addresses smoking cessation, stress management, and fruit and vegetable consumption. A randomized 2 × 5 factorial repeated measures design was employed with randomization on the individual level stratified on behavior risk. Women completed three sessions during pregnancy and two postpartum at postdelivery months 1 and 4. Women were recruited from six locations of federally funded health centers across three states. Participants (N = 335) were English- and Spanish-speaking women at up to 18 weeks gestation. The treatment group received three interactive sessions focused on two priority health behavior risks. The sessions offered individually tailored and stage-matched change strategies based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. The usual care group received March of Dimes brochures. The primary outcome was the number of behavior risks. Stage of change and continuous measures for all behaviors also were assessed. Data were analyzed across all time points using generalized estimating equations examining repeated measures effects. Women in the treatment group reported significantly fewer risks than those in usual care at 1 month (.85 vs. 1.20, odds ratio [OR] = .70) and 4 months postpartum (.72 vs. .91, OR = .81). Healthy Pregnancy is an evidence-based and personalized program that assists pregnant women with reducing behavior risks and sustaining healthy lifestyle behaviors. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  2. NOAA's Regional Climate Services Program: Building Relationships with Partners and Customers to Deliver Trusted Climate Information at Usable Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecray, E. L.; Dissen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Federal agencies across multiple sectors from transportation to health, emergency management and agriculture, are now requiring their key stakeholders to identify and plan for climate-related impacts. Responding to the drumbeat for climate services at the regional and local scale, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) formed its Regional Climate Services (RCS) program to include Regional Climate Services Directors (RCSD), Regional Climate Centers, and state climatologists in a partnership. Since 2010, the RCS program has engaged customers across the country and amongst many of the nation's key economic sectors to compile information requirements, deliver climate-related products and services, and build partnerships among federal agencies and their regional climate entities. The talk will include a sketch from the Eastern Region that may shed light on the interaction of the multiple entities working at the regional scale. Additionally, we will show examples of our interagency work with the Department of Interior, the Department of Agriculture, and others in NOAA to deliver usable and trusted climate information and resources. These include webinars, print material, and face-to-face customer engagements to gather and respond to information requirements. NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Information's RCSDs work on-the-ground to learn from customers about their information needs and their use of existing tools and resources. As regional leads, the RCSDs work within NOAA and with our regional partners to ensure the customer receives a broad picture of the tools and information from across the nation.

  3. Variability in delivered dose and respirable delivered dose from nebulizers: are current regulatory testing guidelines sufficient to produce meaningful information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatley, Ross HM; Byrne, Sarah M

    2017-01-01

    Background To improve convenience to patients, there have been advances in the operation of nebulizers, resulting in fast treatment times and less drug lost to the environment. However, limited attention has been paid to the effects of these developments on the delivered dose (DD) and respirable delivered dose (RDD). Published pharmacopoeia and ISO testing guidelines for adult-use testing utilize a single breathing pattern, which may not be sufficient to enable effective comparisons between the devices. Materials and methods The DD of 5 mg of salbutamol sulfate into adult breathing patterns with inhalation:exhalation (I:E) ratios between 1:1 and 1:4 was determined. Droplet size was determined by laser diffraction and RDD calculated. Nine different nebulizer brands with different modes of operation (conventional, venturi, breath-enhanced, mesh, and breath-activated) were tested. Results Between the non-breath-activated nebulizers, a 2.5-fold difference in DD (~750–1,900 µg salbutamol) was found; with RDD, there was a more than fourfold difference (~210–980 µg). With increasing time spent on exhalation, there were progressive reductions in DD and RDD, with the RDD at an I:E ratio of 1:4 being as little as 40% of the dose with the 1:1 I:E ratio. The DD and RDD from the breath-activated mesh nebulizer were independent of the I:E ratio, and for the breath-activated jet nebulizer, there was less than 20% change in RDD between the I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:4. Conclusion Comparing nebulizers using the I:E ratio recommended in the guidelines does not predict relative performance between the devices at other ratios. There was significant variance in DD or RDD between different brands of non-breath-activated nebulizer. In future, consideration should be given to revision of the test protocols included in the guidelines, to reflect more accurately the potential therapeutic dose that is delivered to a realistic spectrum of breathing patterns. PMID:28203110

  4. The acceptability, feasibility and impact of a lay health counsellor delivered health promoting schools programme in India: a case study evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaraman Divya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in resource-limited settings have shown that there are constraints to the use of teachers, peers or health professionals to deliver school health promotion interventions. School health programmes delivered by trained lay health counsellors could offer a cost-effective alternative. This paper presents a case study of a multi-component school health promotion intervention in India that was delivered by lay school health counsellors, who possessed neither formal educational nor health provider qualifications. Methods The intervention was based on the WHO’s Health Promoting Schools framework, and included health screening camps; an anonymous letter box for student questions and complaints; classroom-based life skills training; and, individual psycho-social and academic counselling for students. The intervention was delivered by a lay school health counsellor who had attained a minimum of a high school education. The counsellor was trained over four weeks and received structured supervision from health professionals working for the implementing NGO. The evaluation design was a mixed methods case study. Quantitative process indicators were collected to assess the extent to which the programme was delivered as planned (feasibility, the uptake of services (acceptability, and the number of students who received corrective health treatment (evidence of impact. Semi-structured interviews were conducted over two years with 108 stakeholders, and were analysed to identify barriers and facilitators for the programme (feasibility, evaluate acceptability, and gather evidence of positive or negative effects of the programme. Results Feasibility was established by the high reported coverage of all the targeted activities by the school health counsellor. Acceptability was indicated by a growing number of submissions to the students’ anonymous letter-box; more students self-referring for counselling services over time; and, the

  5. Health Research Information Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Health Research Information Tracking System (HRIT) is an expansion of the Child Health Research database that collects and maintains categorization, description,...

  6. Behavioral health providers' perspectives of delivering behavioral health services in primary care: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beehler Gregory P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-located, collaborative care (CCC is one component of VA’s model of Integrated Primary Care that embeds behavioral health providers (BHPs into primary care clinics to treat commonly occurring mental health concerns among Veterans. Key features of the CCC model include time-limited, brief treatments (up to 6 encounters of 30 minutes each and emphasis on multi-dimensional functional assessment. Although CCC is a mandated model of care, the barriers and facilitators to implementing this approach as identified from the perspective of BHPs have not been previously identified. Methods This secondary data analysis used interview data captured as part of a quality improvement project in 2008. Fourteen BHPs (48% of providers in a regional VA network agreed to participate in a 30-minute, semi-structured phone interview. The interview included questions about their perceived role as a CCC provider, depiction of usual practice styles and behaviors, and perceptions of typical barriers and facilitators to providing behavioral healthcare to Veterans in CCC. Interviews were transcribed verbatim into a text database and analyzed using grounded theory. Results Six main categories emerged from the analysis: (a Working in the VA Context, (b Managing Access to Care on the Front Line, (c Assessing a Care Trajectory, (d Developing a Local Integrated Model, (e Working in Collaborative Teams, and (f Being a Behavioral Health Generalist. These categories pointed to system, clinic, and provider level factors that impacted BHP’s role and ability to implement CCC. Across categories, participants identified ways in which they provided Veteran-centered care within variable environments. Conclusions This study provided a contextualized account of the experiences of BHP’s in CCC. Results suggest that these providers play a multifaceted role in delivering clinical services to Veterans while also acting as an interdependent component of the larger VA

  7. Supportive supervision for volunteers to deliver reproductive health education: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Debra; Negin, Joel; Orach, Christopher Garimoi; Cumming, Robert

    2016-10-03

    Community Health Volunteers (CHVs) can be effective in improving pregnancy and newborn outcomes through community education. Inadequate supervision of CHVs, whether due to poor planning, irregular visits, or ineffective supervisory methods, is, however, recognized as a weakness in many programs. There has been little research on best practice supervisory or accompaniment models. From March 2014 to February 2015 a proof of concept study was conducted to compare training alone versus training and supportive supervision by paid CHWs (n = 4) on the effectiveness of CHVs (n = 82) to deliver education about pregnancy, newborn care, family planning and hygiene. The pair-matched cluster randomized trial was conducted in eight villages (four intervention and four control) in Budondo sub-county in Jinja, Uganda. Increases in desired behaviors were seen in both the intervention and control arms over the study period. Both arms showed high retention rates of CHVs (95 %). At 1 year follow-up there was a significantly higher prevalence of installed and functioning tippy taps for hand washing (p reproductive health care by addressing cultural norms and scientific misconceptions. Having a team of 2 CHWs to 40 CHVs enables close to community access to information, conversation and services. Supportive supervision involves creating a non-threatening, empowering environment in which both the CHV and the supervising CHW learn together and overcome obstacles that might otherwise demotivate the CHV. While the results seem promising for added value with supportive supervision for CHVs undertaking reproductive health activities, further research on a larger scale will be needed to substantiate the effect.

  8. Applications of health information exchange information to public health practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) can support several aspects of public health practice by increasing the availability, timeliness, and comprehensiveness individual-level patient information. The potential benefits to disease monitoring, disaster response, and other public health activities served...... qualitative interviews and template analyses, we identified public health efforts and activities that were improved by participation in HIE. We derived the codes for the template analysis through a literature review. HIE supported public health activities consistent with expectations in the literature...

  9. The ability of health promoters to deliver group diabetes education in South African primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S. Botes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes makes a significant contribution to the burden of disease in South Africa.This study assesses a group diabetes education programme using motivational interviewingin public sector health centres serving low socio-economic communities in Cape Town.The programme was delivered by mid-level health promotion officers (HPOs.Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore the experience of the HPOs and to observetheir fidelity to the educational programme.Methods: Three focus group interviews were held with the 14 HPOs who delivered theeducational programme in 17 health centres. Thirty-three sessions were observed directly andthe audio tapes were analysed using the motivational interviewing (MI integrity code.Results: The HPOs felt confident in their ability to deliver group education after receiving thetraining. They reported a significant shift in their communication style and skills. They feltthe new approach was feasible and better than before. The resource material was found to berelevant, understandable and useful. The HPOs struggled with poor patient attendance and alack of suitable space at the facilities. They delivered the majority of the content and achievedbeginning-level proficiency in the MI guiding style of communication and the use of openquestions. The HPOs did not demonstrate proficiency in active listening and continued to offersome unsolicited advice.Conclusion: The HPOs demonstrated their potential to deliver group diabetes education despiteissues that should be addressed in future training and the district health services. Thefindings will help with the interpretation of results from a randomised controlled trial evaluatingthe effectiveness of the education.

  10. DoD Information Technology Acquisition: Delivering Information Technology Capabilities Expeditiously

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    59  Figure 6.  Navy ERP (From GAO, 2013...Industries Alliance ERP Enterprise Resource Planning ESHO Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health EV Earned Value FD Full Deployment FDD Full...changes have had little impact because the timeline remains long compared to the commercial sector. Commercial technology evolution cycles for new

  11. Readiness of health facilities to deliver safe male circumcision services in Tanzania: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Felix Mosha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the readiness of health facilities to deliver safe male circumcision services is more important in sub-Saharan Africa because of the inadequacy state of health facilities in many ways. The World Health Organization recommends that only facilities equipped with available trained staff, capable to perform at least minor surgery, able to offer minimum MC package and appropriate equipment for resuscitation, and compliant with requirements for sterilization and infection control should be allowed to deliver safe circumcision services. A cross-sectional study using quantitative data collection technique was conducted to assess the readiness of the health facilities to deliver safe circumcision services in selected districts of Tanzania. All hospitals, health centres and 30% of all dispensaries in these districts were selected to participate in the study. Face-toface questionnaires were administered to the heads of the health facilities and to health practitioners. Overall, 49/69 (59% of the facilities visited provided circumcision services and only 46/203 (24% of the health practitioners performed circumcision procedures. These were mainly assistant medical officers and clinical officers. The vast majority – 190/203 (95% – of the health practitioners require additional training prior to providing circumcision services. Most facilities – 63/69 (91% – had all basic supplies (gloves, basin, chlorine and waste disposal necessary for infection prevention, 44/69 (65% provided condoms, HIV counselling and testing, and sexuallytransmitted infections services, while 62/69 (90% had the capability to perform at least minor surgery. However, only 25/69 (36% and 15/69 (22% of the facilities had functioning sterilization equipment and appropriate resuscitation equipment, respectively. There is readiness for roll out of circumcision services; however, more practitioners need to be trained on circumcision procedures, demand forecasting

  12. Implementation examined in a health center-delivered, educational intervention that improved infant growth in Trujillo, Peru: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Rebecca C; Gittelsohn, Joel; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary M; Penny, Mary E; Caulfield, Laura E; Narro, M Rocio; Steckler, Allan; Black, Robert E

    2007-06-01

    Process evaluation was used to examine the implementation of a randomized, controlled trial of an education intervention that improved infant growth in Trujillo, Peru. Health personnel delivered the multi-component intervention as part of usual care in the government health centers. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine process indicators, which included the extent of delivery (dose), fidelity to intervention protocol, barriers to implementation and context. Results demonstrated that most intervention components were delivered at a level of 50-90% of expectations. Fidelity to intervention protocol, where measured, was lower (28-70% of expectations). However, when compared with existing nutrition education, as represented by the control centers, significant improvements were demonstrated. This included both improved delivery of existing educational activities as well as delivery of new intervention components to strengthen overall nutrition education. Barriers to, and facilitators of, implementation were explored with health personnel and helped to explain results. This study demonstrates the importance of examining actual versus planned implementation in order to improve our understanding of how interventions succeed. The information gained from this study will inform future evaluation designs, and lead to the development and implementation of more effective intervention programs for child health.

  13. Rural Health Information Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issues that impact rural health in RHIhub’s Topic Guides. Recently updated: Social Determinants of Health for Rural People Browse all 50+ topics Community Health Gateway Find rural project examples in Rural Health Models and Innovations and proven strategies for strong rural programs with ...

  14. Randomized controlled trial comparing four strategies for delivering e-curriculum to health care professionals [ISRCTN88148532

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Ananda

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet education is increasingly provided to health professionals, but little is known about the most effective strategies for delivering the content. The purpose of this study is to compare four strategies for delivering an Internet-based (e- curriculum on clinicians' knowledge (K, confidence (CONF, and communication (COMM about herbs and other dietary supplements (HDS. Methods This national randomized 2 × 2 factorial trial included physicians, pharmacists, nurses, nutritionists and trainees in these fields. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four curriculum delivery strategies for 40 brief modules about HDS: a delivering four (4 modules weekly over ten (10 weeks by email (drip-push; b modules accessible on web site with 4 reminders weekly for 10 weeks (drip-pull; c 40 modules delivered within 4 days by email (bolus-push; and d 40 modules available on the Internet with one email informing participants of availability (bolus-pull. Results Of the 1,267 enrollees, 25% were male; the average age was 40 years. The completion rate was 62%, without significant differences between delivery groups. There were statistically significant improvements in K, CONF and COMM scores after the course (P Conclusion All delivery strategies tested similarly improved K, CONF, COMM scores about HDS. Educators can use the strategy that is most convenient without diminishing effectiveness. Additional curricula may be necessary to make substantial changes in clinicians' communication practices.

  15. DELIVERING TIMELY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION TO YOUR COMMUNITY: THE BOULDER AREA SUSTAINABILITY INFORMATION NETWORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Technology Transfer and Support Division of the EPA Office of Research and Development's (ORD's) National Risk Management Laboratory in conjunction with the Boulder Area Sustainability Information Network (BASIN) has developed a "how-to" handbook to allow other community orga...

  16. Information technology in health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintonen, T P; Konu, A I; Seedhouse, D

    2008-06-01

    eHealth, the use of information technology to improve or enable health and health care, has recently been high on the health care development agenda. Given the vivid interest in eHealth, little reference has been made to the use of these technologies in the promotion of health. The aim of this present study was to conduct a review on recent uses of information technology in health promotion through looking at research articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Fifteen relevant journals with issues published between 2003 and June 2005 yielded altogether 1352 articles, 56 of which contained content related to the use of information technology in the context of health promotion. As reflected by this rather small proportion, research on the role of information technology is only starting to emerge. Four broad thematic application areas within health promotion were identified: use of information technology as an intervention medium, use of information technology as a research focus, use of information technology as a research instrument and use of information technology for professional development. In line with this rather instrumental focus, the concepts 'ePromotion of Health' or 'Health ePromotion' would come close to describing the role of information technology in health promotion.

  17. Finding Reliable Health Information Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at NHGRI About About the Institute Budget and Financial Information Divisions Director's Page How to Contact Us Institute ... una búsqueda saludable en Internet Finding Reliable Health Information Online As Internet users quickly discover, an enormous amount of health information ...

  18. Improvements in recall and food choices using a graphical method to deliver information of select nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Nathan S; Ellison, Brenna D; Benjamin, Aaron S; Nakamura, Manabu T

    2016-01-01

    Consumers have difficulty using nutrition information. We hypothesized that graphically delivering information of select nutrients relative to a target would allow individuals to process information in time-constrained settings more effectively than numerical information. Objectives of the study were to determine the efficacy of the graphical method in (1) improving memory of nutrient information and (2) improving consumer purchasing behavior in a restaurant. Values of fiber and protein per calorie were 2-dimensionally plotted alongside a target box. First, a randomized cued recall experiment was conducted (n=63). Recall accuracy of nutrition information improved by up to 43% when shown graphically instead of numerically. Second, the impact of graphical nutrition signposting on diner choices was tested in a cafeteria. Saturated fat and sodium information was also presented using color coding. Nutrient content of meals (n=362) was compared between 3 signposting phases: graphical, nutrition facts panels (NFP), or no nutrition label. Graphical signposting improved nutrient content of purchases in the intended direction, whereas NFP had no effect compared with the baseline. Calories ordered from total meals, entrées, and sides were significantly less during graphical signposting than no-label and NFP periods. For total meal and entrées, protein per calorie purchased was significantly higher and saturated fat significantly lower during graphical signposting than the other phases. Graphical signposting remained a predictor of calories and protein per calorie purchased in regression modeling. These findings demonstrate that graphically presenting nutrition information makes that information more available for decision making and influences behavior change in a realistic setting.

  19. Health information seeking in the information society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abir; Bawden, David

    2012-09-01

    This article is the second student contribution to the Dissertations into Practice feature. It reports on a study that investigated the everyday health information-seeking practices of a small group of the 'general public' and the implications for information-seeking theory and health information provision. The first student article, about the implementation of radio frequency identification (RFID) in a hospital library, was very different, and the two articles illustrate the broad spectrum of possible subjects for the Dissertations into Practice feature. This study was conducted in summer 2011 by Abir Mukherjee for his MSc dissertation in the Library and Information Sciences programme at City University London. Further information and copies of the full dissertation may be obtained from Abir Mukherjee or David Bawden. AM.

  20. In the Wake of Hurricane Katrina: Delivering Crisis Mental Health Services to Host Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbley, Aretha Faye

    2007-01-01

    Throughout the country and especially in Texas, local communities opened their arms to hurricane Katrina evacuees. Like the federal government, emergency health and mental health entities were unprepared for the massive numbers of people needing assistance. Mental health professionals, though armed with a wealth of crisis intervention information,…

  1. Embracing Our "Otherness": A Mutually Transformative Journey in Delivering an Indigenous Heart Health Promotion Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodan-Bhalla, Natasha; Middagh, Diane; Jinkerson-Brass, Sharon; Ziabakhsh, Shabnam; Pederson, Ann; King, Charlene

    2016-04-19

    Theories on the importance of holistic and spiritual healing within nonconventional models of care are vast, yet there is little written about the practical, clinical-level interventions required to deliver such practices in collaborative cross-cultural settings. This article describes the learning experiences and transformative journeys of non-Indigenous nurse practitioners working with a Cultural Lead from an Indigenous community in British Columbia, Canada. The goal of theSeven Sisters Healthy Heart Projectwas to improve heart health promotion in an Indigenous community through a model of knowledge translation. The article describes the development of a bridge between two cultures in an attempt to deliver culturally responsive programming. Our journeys are represented in a phenomenological approach regarding relationships, pedagogy, and expertise. We were able to find ways to balance two worlds-the medical health services model and Indigenous holistic models of healing. The key to building the bridge was our willingness to be vulnerable, to trust in each other's way of teaching and learning, and allowing diverse viewpoints and knowledge sources to be present. Our work has vast implications for health promotion in Indigenous communities, as it closes the gap between theory and practice by demonstrating how Indigenous models can be integrated into mainstream health promotion practices.

  2. Internet-Delivered Health Interventions That Work: Systematic Review of Meta-Analyses and Evaluation of Website Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary Am; Lemmen, Kelsey; Kramer, Rachel; Mann, Jason; Chopra, Vineet

    2017-03-24

    Due to easy access and low cost, Internet-delivered therapies offer an attractive alternative to improving health. Although numerous websites contain health-related information, finding evidence-based programs (as demonstrated through randomized controlled trials, RCTs) can be challenging. We sought to bridge the divide between the knowledge gained from RCTs and communication of the results by conducting a global systematic review and analyzing the availability of evidence-based Internet health programs. The study aimed to (1) discover the range of health-related topics that are addressed through Internet-delivered interventions, (2) generate a list of current websites used in the trials which demonstrate a health benefit, and (3) identify gaps in the research that may have hindered dissemination. Our focus was on Internet-delivered self-guided health interventions that did not require real-time clinical support. A systematic review of meta-analyses was conducted using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines (PROSPERO Registration Number CRD42016041258). MEDLINE via Ovid, PsycINFO, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) were searched. Inclusion criteria included (1) meta-analyses of RCTs, (2) at least one Internet-delivered intervention that measured a health-related outcome, and (3) use of at least one self-guided intervention. We excluded group-based therapies. There were no language restrictions. Of the 363 records identified through the search, 71 meta-analyses met inclusion criteria. Within the 71 meta-analyses, there were 1733 studies that contained 268 unique RCTs which tested self-help interventions. On review of the 268 studies, 21.3% (57/268) had functional websites. These included evidence-based Web programs on substance abuse (alcohol, tobacco, cannabis), mental health (depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder

  3. Advantages of Information Systems in Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA MALLIAROU & SOFIA ZYGA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nursing Information System (NIS has been defined as “a part of a health care information system that deals with nursing aspects, particularly the maintenance of the nursing record”. Nursing Uses of Information Systems in order to assess patient acuity and condition, prepare a plan of care or critical pathway, specify interventions, document care, track outcomes and control quality in the given patient care. Patient care processes, Communication, research, education and ward management can be easily delivered using NIS. There is a specific procedure that should be followed when implementing NISs. The electronic databases CINAHL and Medline were used to identify studies for review. Studies were selected from a search that included the terms ‘nursing information systems’, ‘clinical information systems’, ‘hospital information systems’, ‘documentation’, ‘nursing records’, combined with ‘electronic’ and ‘computer’. Journal articles, research papers, and systematic reviews from 1980 to 2007 were included. In Greek Hospitals there have been made many trials and efforts in order to develop electronic nursing documentation with little results. There are many difficulties and some of them are different levels of nursing education, low nurse to patient ratios, not involvement of nurses in the phases of their implementation, resistance in change. Today’s nursing practice in Greece needs to follow others counties paradigm and phase its controversies and problems in order to follow the worldwide changes in delivering nursing care.

  4. The checkerboard area health system: delivering comprehensive care in a remote region of New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, R A; Bartlett, E E; Kozoll, R

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive health center is defined as the synergistic coupling of a medical and administrative structure designed to provide inpatient, outpatient, and public health services. While health centers have been widely established in other countries, only limited implementation has occurred in rural areas of the United States. The successful implementation of the health center concept in a sparsely populated area of northwestern New Mexico, which is predominately inhabited by Navajo Indians and Spanish Americans, is descriptively analyzed. The physical environment and the socioeconomic characteristics of the catchment area residents are related to dominant conditions in underdeveloped countries. The evolution of the delivery system with its network of satellite clinics staffed by mid-level primary care providers is documented. The funding and provision of a wide range of preventive and curative health services supported by communication, transportation, outreach, education, public health, and administration components are described. Several problems thought to impede the application of the health center concept to other regions in the United States are identified and discussed relative to this New Mexican experience. Innovative and persevering systems designers who are strongly committed to delivering a balance between preventive and curative services are considered to be absolutely necessary for successful implementation of the health center concept in the United States.

  5. 77 FR 55217 - Health Information Technology Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Information Technology Implementation... of the Public Health Service Act) Health Information Technology Implementation for Health Center... organizational challenges. In the effort to preserve the opportunity to advance information technology...

  6. 77 FR 2734 - Health Information Technology Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Information Technology Implementation...) (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) Health Information Technology Implementation for Health... operations. In the effort to preserve the opportunity to advance information technology resources of...

  7. Applications of health information exchange information to public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R

    2014-01-01

    Increased information availability, timeliness, and comprehensiveness through health information exchange (HIE) can support public health practice. The potential benefits to disease monitoring, disaster response, and other public health activities served as an important justification for the US' investments in HIE. After several years of HIE implementation and funding, we sought to determine if any of the anticipated benefits of exchange participation were accruing to state and local public health practitioners participating in five different exchanges. Using qualitative interviews and template analyses, we identified public health efforts and activities that were improved by participation in HIE. HIE supported public health activities consistent with expectations in the literature. However, no single department realized all the potential benefits of HIE identified. These findings suggest ways to improve HIE usage in public health.

  8. Readiness for Delivering Digital Health at Scale: Lessons From a Longitudinal Qualitative Evaluation of a National Digital Health Innovation Program in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Marilyn R; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Devlin, Alison M; O'Connor, Siobhan; O'Donnell, Catherine; Chetty, Ula; Agbakoba, Ruth; Bikker, Annemieke; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Watson, Nicholas; Wyke, Sally; Mair, Frances S

    2017-02-16

    Digital health has the potential to support care delivery for chronic illness. Despite positive evidence from localized implementations, new technologies have proven slow to become accepted, integrated, and routinized at scale. The aim of our study was to examine barriers and facilitators to implementation of digital health at scale through the evaluation of a £37m national digital health program: ‟Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale" (dallas) from 2012-2015. The study was a longitudinal qualitative, multi-stakeholder, implementation study. The methods included interviews (n=125) with key implementers, focus groups with consumers and patients (n=7), project meetings (n=12), field work or observation in the communities (n=16), health professional survey responses (n=48), and cross program documentary evidence on implementation (n=215). We used a sociological theory called normalization process theory (NPT) and a longitudinal (3 years) qualitative framework analysis approach. This work did not study a single intervention or population. Instead, we evaluated the processes (of designing and delivering digital health), and our outcomes were the identified barriers and facilitators to delivering and mainstreaming services and products within the mixed sector digital health ecosystem. We identified three main levels of issues influencing readiness for digital health: macro (market, infrastructure, policy), meso (organizational), and micro (professional or public). Factors hindering implementation included: lack of information technology (IT) infrastructure, uncertainty around information governance, lack of incentives to prioritize interoperability, lack of precedence on accountability within the commercial sector, and a market perceived as difficult to navigate. Factors enabling implementation were: clinical endorsement, champions who promoted digital health, and public and professional willingness. Although there is receptiveness to digital health

  9. Readiness for Delivering Digital Health at Scale: Lessons From a Longitudinal Qualitative Evaluation of a National Digital Health Innovation Program in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Marilyn R; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Devlin, Alison M; O'Connor, Siobhan; O'Donnell, Catherine; Chetty, Ula; Agbakoba, Ruth; Bikker, Annemieke; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Watson, Nicholas; Wyke, Sally

    2017-01-01

    Background Digital health has the potential to support care delivery for chronic illness. Despite positive evidence from localized implementations, new technologies have proven slow to become accepted, integrated, and routinized at scale. Objective The aim of our study was to examine barriers and facilitators to implementation of digital health at scale through the evaluation of a £37m national digital health program: ‟Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale” (dallas) from 2012-2015. Methods The study was a longitudinal qualitative, multi-stakeholder, implementation study. The methods included interviews (n=125) with key implementers, focus groups with consumers and patients (n=7), project meetings (n=12), field work or observation in the communities (n=16), health professional survey responses (n=48), and cross program documentary evidence on implementation (n=215). We used a sociological theory called normalization process theory (NPT) and a longitudinal (3 years) qualitative framework analysis approach. This work did not study a single intervention or population. Instead, we evaluated the processes (of designing and delivering digital health), and our outcomes were the identified barriers and facilitators to delivering and mainstreaming services and products within the mixed sector digital health ecosystem. Results We identified three main levels of issues influencing readiness for digital health: macro (market, infrastructure, policy), meso (organizational), and micro (professional or public). Factors hindering implementation included: lack of information technology (IT) infrastructure, uncertainty around information governance, lack of incentives to prioritize interoperability, lack of precedence on accountability within the commercial sector, and a market perceived as difficult to navigate. Factors enabling implementation were: clinical endorsement, champions who promoted digital health, and public and professional willingness. Conclusions

  10. Evaluation of a training programme to induct medical students in delivering public health talks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Mitesh, Shah; Koh, Yi Ling Eileen; Ang, Seng Bin; Chan, Hian Hui Vincent; How, Choon How; Tay, Ee Guan; Hwang, Siew Wai

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION It is uncommon for medical students to deliver public health talks as part of their medical education curriculum. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a novel training programme that required medical students to deliver public health talks during their family medicine (FM) clerkship in a Singapore primary care institution. METHODS The FM faculty staff guided teams of third-year medical students to select appropriate topics for health talks that were to be conducted at designated polyclinics. The talks were video-recorded and appraised for clarity, content and delivery. The appraisal was done by the student’s peers and assigned faculty staff. The audience was surveyed to determine their satisfaction level and understanding of the talks. The students also self-rated the effectiveness of this new teaching activity. RESULTS A total of 120 medical students completed a questionnaire to rate the effectiveness of the new teaching activity. 85.8% of the students felt confident about the delivery of their talks, 95.8% reported having learnt how to deliver talks and 92.5% perceived this new training modality as useful in their medical education. Based on the results of the audience survey, the speakers were perceived as knowledgeable (53.1%), confident (51.3%) and professional (39.0%). Assessment of 15 video-recorded talks showed satisfactory delivery of the talks by the students. CONCLUSION The majority of the students reported a favourable overall learning experience under this new training programme. This finding is supported by the positive feedback garnered from the audience, peers of the medical students and the faculty staff. PMID:26891745

  11. HealtH facility and HealtH worker readiness to deliver new national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-05-01

    May 1, 2008 ... six months, presence of al wall charts, health worker's exposure to ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 85 No. ... and development, Boston university school of public health, 85 East concord street, 5th floor, Boston, Ma 02118,.

  12. Delivering an effective elearning program for psychiatrists in Ireland – a framework for other health professionals (presentation)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawton, Aoife

    2010-11-18

    Up until September 2010 teaching was delivered in person by the College of Psychiatry in Ireland to its students. A move towards elearning was initiated and as part of this move, an online instruction module in “Health Information Literacy” based on the five steps of Evidence-Based-Medicine was developed. The Systems Librarian from the Health Service Executive wrote the content which was reviewed by a senior Psychiatrist in the college. The Librarian worked with the e-learning specialist at the College to develop the online e-tutorial. This consisted of seven lessons. Feedback to date has been positive. At the end of the module, participants received a certificate of achievement. The methodology used for this course could be expanded to other medical disciplines.

  13. Using e-health applications to deliver new mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Helen; Hickie, Ian B

    2010-06-07

    Traditional clinic-based service delivery systems remain inaccessible to many Australians with mental health problems. If we are to substantially reduce the burden of mental illness, we need to develop more accessible, empowering and sustainable models of mental health care. E-health technologies have specific efficiencies and advantages in the domains of health promotion, prevention, early intervention and prolonged treatment. It is timely to use the best features of these technologies to start to build a more responsive and efficient mental health care system.

  14. Pull vs. Push: How OmniEarth Delivers Better Earth Observation Information to Subscribers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, C.; Slagowski, S.; Dyrud, L.; Fentzke, J.; Hargis, B.; Steerman, M.

    2015-04-01

    Until very recently, the commercialization of Earth observation systems has largely occurred in two ways: either through the detuning of government satellites or the repurposing of NASA (or other science) data for commercial use. However, the convergence of cloud computing and low-cost satellites is enabling Earth observation companies to tailor observation data to specific markets. Now, underserved constituencies, such as agriculture and energy, can tap into Earth observation data that is provided at a cadence, resolution and cost that can have a real impact to their bottom line. To connect with these markets, OmniEarth fuses data from a variety of sources, synthesizes it into useful and valuable business information, and delivers it to customers via web or mobile interfaces. The "secret sauce" is no longer about having the highest resolution imagery, but rather it is about using that imagery - in conjunction with a number of other sources - to solve complex problems that require timely and contextual information about our dynamic and changing planet. OmniEarth improves subscribers' ability to visualize the world around them by enhancing their ability to see, analyze, and react to change in real time through a solutions-as-a-service platform.

  15. Handling Internet-Based Health Information: Improving Health Information Web Site Literacy Among Undergraduate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwen; Sun, Ran; Mulvehill, Alice M; Gilson, Courtney C; Huang, Linda L

    2017-02-01

    Patient care problems arise when health care consumers and professionals find health information on the Internet because that information is often inaccurate. To mitigate this problem, nurses can develop Web literacy and share that skill with health care consumers. This study evaluated a Web-literacy intervention for undergraduate nursing students to find reliable Web-based health information. A pre- and postsurvey queried undergraduate nursing students in an informatics course; the intervention comprised lecture, in-class practice, and assignments about health Web site evaluation tools. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon and ANOVA signed-rank tests. Pre-intervention, 75.9% of participants reported using Web sites to obtain health information. Postintervention, 87.9% displayed confidence in using an evaluation tool. Both the ability to critique health Web sites (p = .005) and confidence in finding reliable Internet-based health information (p = .058) increased. Web-literacy education guides nursing students to find, evaluate, and use reliable Web sites, which improves their ability to deliver safer patient care. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(2):110-114.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Applications of health information exchange information to public health practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    as an important justification for the US’ investments in HIE. After several years of HIE implementation and funding, we sought to determine if any of the anticipated benefits of exchange participation were accruing to state and local public health practitioners participating in five different exchanges. Using......Health information exchange (HIE) can support several aspects of public health practice by increasing the availability, timeliness, and comprehensiveness individual-level patient information. The potential benefits to disease monitoring, disaster response, and other public health activities served...... qualitative interviews and template analyses, we identified public health efforts and activities that were improved by participation in HIE. We derived the codes for the template analysis through a literature review. HIE supported public health activities consistent with expectations in the literature...

  17. Cost of Delivering Health Care Services in Public Sector Primary and Community Health Centres in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Verma, Ramesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Kumar, Dinesh; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Background With the commitment of the national government to provide universal healthcare at cheap and affordable prices in India, public healthcare services are being strengthened in India. However, there is dearth of cost data for provision of health services through public system like primary & community health centres. In this study, we aim to bridge this gap in evidence by assessing the total annual and per capita cost of delivering the package of health services at PHC and CHC level. Secondly, we determined the per capita cost of delivering specific health services like cost per antenatal care visit, per institutional delivery, per outpatient consultation, per bed-day hospitalization etc. Methods We undertook economic costing of fourteen public health facilities (seven PHCs and CHCs each) in three North-Indian states viz., Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Punjab. Bottom-up costing method was adopted for collection of data on all resources spent on delivery of health services in selected health facilities. Analysis was undertaken using a health system perspective. The joint costs like human resource, capital, and equipment were apportioned as per the time value spent on a particular service. Capital costs were discounted and annualized over the estimated life of the item. Mean annual costs and unit costs were estimated along with their 95% confidence intervals using bootstrap methodology. Results The overall annual cost of delivering services through public sector primary and community health facilities in three states of north India were INR 8.8 million (95% CI: 7,365,630–10,294,065) and INR 26.9 million (95% CI: 22,225,159.3–32,290,099.6), respectively. Human resources accounted for more than 50% of the overall costs at both the level of PHCs and CHCs. Per capita per year costs for provision of complete package of preventive, curative and promotive services at PHC and CHC were INR 170.8 (95% CI: 131.6–208.3) and INR162.1 (95% CI: 112–219

  18. Health Information Economy: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Kamal; Roudbari, Masoud; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2015-04-19

    Health Information Economy (HIE) is one of the broader, more complex, and challenging and yet important topics in the field of health science that requires the identification of its dimensions for planning and policy making. The aim of this study was to determine HIE concept dimensions. This paper presents a systematic methodology for analyzing the trends of HIE. For this purpose, the main keywords of this area were identified and searched in the databases and from among 4775 retrieved sources, 12 sources were studied in the field of HIE. Information Economy (IE) in the world has passed behind four paradigms that involve the information evaluation perspective, the information technology perspective, the asymmetric information perspective and information value perspective. In this research, the fourth perspective in the HIE was analyzed. The main findings of this research were categorized in three major groups, including the flow of information process in the field of health (production. collection, processing and dissemination), and information applications in the same field (education, research, health industry, policy, legislation, and decision-making) and the underlying fields. According to the findings, HIE has already developed a theoretical and conceptual gap that due to its importance in the next decade would be one of the research approaches to health science.

  19. Health Information in Bosnian (bosanski)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Home - bosanski (Bosnian) PDF U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants Drug Abuse Substance Abuse or Dependence - ... Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Postpartum Depression Emotional Changes After Giving Birth - bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF ...

  20. Health Information in German (Deutsch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → German (Deutsch) URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/german.html Health Information in German (Deutsch) To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  1. Health Information in Italian (Italiano)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → Italian (Italiano) URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/italian.html Health Information in Italian (Italiano) To use ...

  2. Online Technologies for Health Information and Education: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Harkiran K; Gill, Navkiranjit; Young, Sean D

    2013-04-01

    There is a growing body of research focused on the use of social media and Internet technologies for health education and information sharing. The authors reviewed literature on this topic, with a specific focus on the benefits and concerns associated with using online social technologies as health education and communication tools. Studies suggest that social media technologies have the potential to safely and effectively deliver health education, if privacy concerns are addressed. Utility of social media-based health education and communication will improve as technology developers and public health officials determine ways to improve information accuracy and address privacy concerns.

  3. Quality of health care: the responsibility of health care professionals in delivering high quality services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, A

    1998-11-01

    According to a recent definition, quality of care consists of the degree to which health services increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge; a definition that introduces both requirements of outcomes and the appropriateness of the process used. Clearly many different figures are interested in quality assessment initiatives in the health care field and these include patients, administrators and doctors each having different perspective. Doctors obviously pay greater attention to technical quality and results, giving greater emphasis to the health of the individual patient, tending to give priority to technical excellence and interaction between patient and doctor. Although the perspective of health care professionals is widely acknowledged to be important and useful, other perspectives on quality have been emphasised in recent years. The most important of these is the recognition that care must be responsive to the preferences and values of the consumers of health care services. In complete harmony with one's own professional commitment, the attention to the perspectives of patients must give physician the chance to identify methods of measuring and verifying quality which take account of the expectations of the many groups with an interest in improving the functioning of the health system. A global approach in the health field is needed the more specialization advances. The quality of medicine lies in its capacity to integrate what science says is appropriate and to be recommended, what can be reconciled with human rights and the self determination of the patient and what can be achieved by optimising available resources. In this complex context, the doctor could take on both the role of the person who decides on the use of resources and the one of social mediator.

  4. Delivering at home or in a health facility? health-seeking behaviour of women and the role of traditional birth attendants in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Constanze; Mwaipopo, Rosemarie

    2013-02-28

    Traditional birth attendants retain an important role in reproductive and maternal health in Tanzania. The Tanzanian Government promotes TBAs in order to provide maternal and neonatal health counselling and initiating timely referral, however, their role officially does not include delivery attendance. Yet, experience illustrates that most TBAs still often handle complicated deliveries. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to describe (1) women's health-seeking behaviour and experiences regarding their use of antenatal (ANC) and postnatal care (PNC); (2) their rationale behind the choice of place and delivery; and to learn (3) about the use of traditional practices and resources applied by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) and how they can be linked to the bio-medical health system. Qualitative and quantitative interviews were conducted with over 270 individuals in Masasi District, Mtwara Region and Ilala Municipality, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The results from the urban site show that significant achievements have been made in terms of promoting pregnancy- and delivery-related services through skilled health workers. Pregnant women have a high level of awareness and clearly prefer to deliver at a health facility. The scenario is different in the rural site (Masasi District), where an adequately trained health workforce and well-equipped health facilities are not yet a reality, resulting in home deliveries with the assistance of either a TBA or a relative. Instead of focusing on the traditional sector, it is argued that more attention should be paid towards (1) improving access to as well as strengthening the health system to guarantee delivery by skilled health personnel; and (2) bridging the gaps between communities and the formal health sector through community-based counselling and health education, which is provided by well-trained and supervised village health workers who inform villagers about promotive and preventive health services, including

  5. Engaging an Urban African American Community to Deliver Cognitive Health Education to Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Jennifer; Nolan, Timiya S; Vo, Jacqueline B; Gisiger-Camata, Silvia; Meneses, Karen

    2016-12-28

    Little is known about cognitive changes among African American (AA) breast cancer survivors (BCS). Here, we report our experience with engagement of leaders of urban AA churches in Birmingham, Alabama to deliver and evaluate Think Well: Healthy Living to Improve Cognitive Function, an educational cognitive health program for BCS. The Think Well team engaged leaders of urban AA churches using a 7-step process: 1) identify leaders, 2) develop connection with leaders, 3) assess AA community preferences, 4) tailor for cultural relevance, 5) plan seminars, 6) deliver seminars, and 7) evaluate cultural relevance and overall program quality. Program evaluation was via a 22-item survey and sociodemographic questionnaire. Data from AA participants were analyzed using SPSS. The engagement process resulted in sustained partnerships with three urban AA churches and delivery of three Think Well seminars to 172 participants. Of the 172 participants, 138 (80%) AA participants (40 BCS, 98 co-survivors) returned the program survey. Respondents reported Think Well to be culturally relevant (90%) and of high quality (94%). Think Well was developed and evaluated with the collaboration of urban AA church leaders. Engaging church leaders facilitated reach of AA BCS. Partnership facilitated a culturally relevant, high quality program for AA BCS and co-survivors.

  6. Using Information Processing Techniques to Forecast, Schedule, and Deliver Sustainable Energy to Electric Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulusani, Praneeth R.

    As the number of electric vehicles on the road increases, current power grid infrastructure will not be able to handle the additional load. Some approaches in the area of Smart Grid research attempt to mitigate this, but those approaches alone will not be sufficient. Those approaches and traditional solution of increased power production can result in an insufficient and imbalanced power grid. It can lead to transformer blowouts, blackouts and blown fuses, etc. The proposed solution will supplement the ``Smart Grid'' to create a more sustainable power grid. To solve or mitigate the magnitude of the problem, measures can be taken that depend on weather forecast models. For instance, wind and solar forecasts can be used to create first order Markov chain models that will help predict the availability of additional power at certain times. These models will be used in conjunction with the information processing layer and bidirectional signal processing components of electric vehicle charging systems, to schedule the amount of energy transferred per time interval at various times. The research was divided into three distinct components: (1) Renewable Energy Supply Forecast Model, (2) Energy Demand Forecast from PEVs, and (3) Renewable Energy Resource Estimation. For the first component, power data from a local wind turbine, and weather forecast data from NOAA were used to develop a wind energy forecast model, using a first order Markov chain model as the foundation. In the second component, additional macro energy demand from PEVs in the Greater Rochester Area was forecasted by simulating concurrent driving routes. In the third component, historical data from renewable energy sources was analyzed to estimate the renewable resources needed to offset the energy demand from PEVs. The results from these models and components can be used in the smart grid applications for scheduling and delivering energy. Several solutions are discussed to mitigate the problem of overloading

  7. What's in a message? Delivering sexual health promotion to young people in Australia via text messaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellard Margaret E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in communication technologies have dramatically changed how individuals access information and communicate. Recent studies have found that mobile phone text messages (SMS can be used successfully for short-term behaviour change. However there is no published information examining the acceptability, utility and efficacy of different characteristics of health promotion SMS. This paper presents the results of evaluation focus groups among participants who received twelve sexual health related SMS as part of a study examining the impact of text messaging for sexual health promotion to on young people in Victoria, Australia. Methods Eight gender-segregated focus groups were held with 21 males and 22 females in August 2008. Transcripts of audio recordings were analysed using thematic analysis. Data were coded under one or more themes. Results Text messages were viewed as an acceptable and 'personal' means of health promotion, with participants particularly valuing the informal language. There was a preference for messages that were positive, relevant and short and for messages to cover a variety of topics. Participants were more likely to remember and share messages that were funny, rhymed and/or tied into particular annual events. The message broadcasting, generally fortnightly on Friday afternoons, was viewed as appropriate. Participants said the messages provided new information, a reminder of existing information and reduced apprehension about testing for sexually transmitted infections. Conclusions Mobile phones, in particular SMS, offer health promoters an exciting opportunity to engage personally with a huge number of individuals for low cost. The key elements emerging from this evaluation, such as message style, language and broadcast schedule are directly relevant to future studies using SMS for health promotion, as well as for future health promotion interventions in other mediums that require short formats, such

  8. Development of a training program to support health care professionals to deliver the SPACE for COPD self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmore C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Claire Blackmore,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,2 Johanna EA Williams,2 Lindsay D Apps,2 Hannah ML Young,2 Claire LA Bourne,2 Sally J Singh2 1Kettering General Hospital National Health Service (NHS Trust, Kettering, Northamptonshire, 2Centre for Exercise and Rehabilitation Science, Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK Background: With the growing burden of COPD and associated morbidity and mortality, a need for self-management has been identified. The Self-management Programme of ­Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD manual was developed to support self-management in COPD patients. Currently, there is no literature available regarding health care professionals’ training needs when supporting patients with COPD on self-management.Aim: This study sought to identify these needs to inform, design and develop a training program for health care professionals being trained to deliver a self-management program in COPD.Methods: Fourteen health care professionals from both primary and secondary care COPD services participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to produce a framework and identify training needs and views on delivery of the SPACE for COPD self-management program. Components of training were web-based knowledge training, with pre- and posttraining knowledge questionnaires, and a 1-day program to introduce the self-management manual. Feedback was given after training to guide the development of the training program.Results: Health care professionals were able to identify areas where they required increased knowledge to support patients. This was overwhelming in aspects of COPD seen to be outside of their current clinical role. Skills in goal setting and behavioral change were not elicited as a training need, suggesting a lack of understanding of components of supporting self

  9. Health service planning and sustainable development: considering what, where and how care is delivered through a pro-environmental lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Sharon

    2017-03-02

    The aim of the present paper was to review the opportunities currently available to health service planners to advance sustainable development in their future-facing roles within health service organisation. Critical challenges and enablers to facilitate health services planners in adopting a pro-environmental lens are discussed.What is known about the topic? Despite its harmful effect on the environment, health has been slower than other industries to embrace the sustainable development agenda. The attitudes and knowledge base of health service planners with regard to environmental sustainability has not been widely studied. For health service planners, embracing pro-environmental considerations in sustainable model of care development is a powerful opportunity to review care paradigms and prepare for the implementation of meaningful, improved health and system efficiency.What does this paper add? This paper advances the case for health service planners to embrace a pro-environmental stance and guides health service leaders in the preparation and implementation of sustainable and improved health and system efficiency.What are the implications for practitioners? Health service planers are in an ideal position to champion the sustainable development agenda as they explore what care is delivered, how care is delivered and where care is delivered. External policy, health service leadership and carbon literacy are advanced as critical contextual factors to facilitate the key role that health service planners can play in building sustainable healthcare organisations.

  10. Impact evaluation of a health promotion-focused organisational development strategy on a health service's capacity to deliver comprehensive primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michelle; Taylor, Jane; O'Hara, Lily

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive primary health care approach is required to address complex health issues and reduce inequities. However, there has been limited uptake of this approach by health services nationally or internationally. Reorienting health services towards becoming more health promoting provides a mechanism to support the delivery of comprehensive primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a health promotion-focused organisational development strategy on the capacity of a primary health care service to deliver comprehensive primary health care. A questionnaire and semistructured individual interviews were used to collect quantitative and qualitative impact evaluation data, respectively, from 13 health service staff across three time points with regard to 37 indicators of organisational capacity. There were significant increases in mean scores for 31 indicators, with effect sizes ranging from moderate to nearly perfect. A range of key enablers and barriers to support the delivery of comprehensive primary health care was identified. In conclusion, an organisational development strategy to reorient health services towards becoming more health promoting may increase the capacity to deliver comprehensive primary health care.

  11. Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of the Effectiveness of Contraceptive Service Interventions for Young People, Delivered in Health Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Lindsay; Baxter, Susan K.; Payne, Nick; Guillaume, Louise R.; Squires, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review and narrative synthesis to determine the effectiveness of contraception service interventions for young people delivered in health care premises was undertaken. We searched 12 key health and medical databases, reference lists of included papers and systematic reviews and cited reference searches on included articles. All…

  12. Seeking Health Information and Support Online: Does It Differ as a Function of Engagement in Risky Health Behaviors? Evidence From the Health Information National Trends Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Shahab, Lion; Brown, Jamie; Gardner, Benjamin; Smith, Samuel George

    2014-01-01

    Background The Internet is an important tool to deliver health behavior interventions, yet little is known about Internet access and use of health-related information, or support, by the intended intervention recipients. Objective Our aim was to evaluate whether health-related Internet use differed as a function of common health-risk behaviors (excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, low fruit/vegetable intake, inactive/sedentary lifestyle, unprotected sun exposure, or obesity). Methods Socio...

  13. Bringing loyalty to e-Health: theory validation using three internet-delivered interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutzen, Rik; Cyr, Dianne; de Vries, Nanne K

    2011-09-24

    Internet-delivered interventions can effectively change health risk behaviors, but the actual use of these interventions by the target group once they access the website is often very low (high attrition, low adherence). Therefore, it is relevant and necessary to focus on factors related to use of an intervention once people arrive at the intervention website. We focused on user perceptions resulting in e-loyalty (ie, intention to visit an intervention again and to recommend it to others). A background theory for e-loyalty, however, is still lacking for Internet-delivered interventions. The objective of our study was to propose and validate a conceptual model regarding user perceptions and e-loyalty within the field of eHealth. We presented at random 3 primary prevention interventions aimed at the general public and, subsequently, participants completed validated measures regarding user perceptions and e-loyalty. Time on each intervention website was assessed by means of server registrations. Of the 592 people who were invited to participate, 397 initiated the study (response rate: 67%) and 351 (48% female, mean age 43 years, varying in educational level) finished the study (retention rate: 88%). Internal consistency of all measures was high (Cronbach alpha > .87). The findings demonstrate that the user perceptions regarding effectiveness (beta(range) .21-.41) and enjoyment (beta(range) .14-.24) both had a positive effect on e-loyalty, which was mediated by active trust (beta(range) .27-.60). User perceptions and e-loyalty had low correlations with time on the website (r(range) .04-.18). The consistent pattern of findings speaks in favor of their robustness and contributes to theory validation regarding e-loyalty. The importance of a theory-driven solution to a practice-based problem (ie, low actual use) needs to be stressed in view of the importance of the Internet in terms of intervention development. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether people

  14. Evaluation of a Pilot Nutrition Education Program Delivered by Hmong Community Health Workers (CHWs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Treiber

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many members of the Hmong population in the United States suffer from comparatively bad health. Moreover, disease prevention messaging that has traditionally been used through various media and healthcare outlets is not as successful with the Hmong as with the general population, due in part to cultural barriers. This paper explores whether community health workers (CHWs may be a potentially successful way to deliver lessons in disease prevention, especially messages on healthy eating, drinking, and exercising. In addition, it explores the potential impact of a CHW program on participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP. Following a literature review, a pilot project that used CHWs in the Hmong Community of Sacramento, California is described. It used KAP (Knowledge, Attitude, Practice measures in a pre-post test. Statistically significant improvement was achieved in knowledge and attitude, and practice, but not in SNAP participation. The program and CHWs were well received as measured by a satisfaction survey of the 131 participants. Overall the pilot project proved to be successful.

  15. How could health information be improved? Recommended actions from the Victorian Consultation on Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sophie J; Sofra, Tanya A

    2017-03-07

    Objective Health literacy is on the policy agenda. Accessible, high-quality health information is a major component of health literacy. Health information materials include print, electronic or other media-based information enabling people to understand health and make health-related decisions. The aim of the present study was to present the findings and recommended actions as they relate to health information of the Victorian Consultation on Health Literacy.Methods Notes and submissions from the 2014 Victorian Consultation workshops and submissions were analysed thematically and a report prepared with input from an advisory committee.Results Health information needs to improve and recommendations are grouped into two overarching themes. First, the quality of information needs to be increased and this can be done by developing a principle-based framework to inform updating guidance for information production, formulating standards to raise quality and improving the systems for delivering information to people. Second, there needs to be a focus on users of health information. Recommendation actions were for information that promoted active participation in health encounters, resources to encourage critical users of health information and increased availability of information tailored to population diversity.Conclusion A framework to improve health information would underpin the efforts to meet literacy needs in a more consistent way, improving standards and ultimately increasing the participation by consumers and carers in health decision making and self-management.What is known about the topic? Health information is a critical component of the concept of health literacy. Poorer health literacy is associated with poorer health outcomes across a range of measures. Improving access to and the use of quality sources of health information is an important strategy for meeting the health literacy needs of the population. In recent years, health services and governments

  16. Economic analysis of delivering primary health care services through community health workers in 3 North Indian states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Prinja

    Full Text Available We assessed overall annual and unit cost of delivering package of services and specific services at sub-centre level by CHWs and cost effectiveness of Government of India's policy of introducing a second auxiliary nurse midwife (ANM at the sub-centre compared to scenario of single ANM sub-centre.We undertook an economic costing of health services delivered by CHWs, from a health system perspective. Bottom-up costing method was used to collect data on resources spent in 50 randomly selected sub-centres selected from 4 districts. Mean unit cost along with its 95% confidence intervals were estimated using bootstrap method. Multiple linear regression model was used to standardize cost and assess its determinants.Annually it costs INR 1.03 million (USD 19,381, or INR 187 (USD 3.5 per capita per year, to provide a package of preventive, curative and promotive services through community health workers. Unit costs for antenatal care, postnatal care, DOTS treatment and immunization were INR 525 (USD 10 per full ANC care, INR 767 (USD 14 per PNC case registered, INR 974 (USD 18 per DOTS treatment completed and INR 97 (USD 1.8 per child immunized in routine immunization respectively. A 10% increase in human resource costs results in 6% rise in per capita cost. Similarly, 10% increment in the ANC case registered per provider through-put results in a decline in unit cost ranging from 2% in the event of current capacity utilization to 3% reduction in case of full capacity utilization. Incremental cost of introducing 2nd ANM at sub-centre level per unit percent increase ANC coverage was INR 23,058 (USD 432.Our estimates would be useful in undertaking full economic evaluations or equity analysis of CHW programs. Government of India's policy of hiring 2nd ANM at sub-centre level is very cost effective from Indian health system perspective.

  17. Raising awareness of research evidence among health professionals delivering dementia care: Are knowledge translation workshops useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, Belinda; Fleming, Richard; Young, Michael; Burns, Kim; Jones, Cindy; Forbes, Fallon

    2016-10-24

    Providing information about the latest research via educational sessions to health professionals caring for people with dementia may be insufficient to drive change. This project explored self-reported impacts on practice change of adding information about knowledge translation (KT) to a national dementia education program. Six national workshop days were held. Each provided the option of participating in a Principles of KT and innovation implementation seminar in addition to a clinical topic update (sexualities and dementia, or managing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia). Six months postworkshop, 321 participants were invited to complete a research utilization survey. Seventy-five responded. KT seminar participants were more likely to report instrumental outcomes (e.g. changed policies, procedures) than those who did not participate in the KT seminar. Including KT information in educational sessions for health professionals may increase the likelihood of practice change in the field of dementia care and warrants further research.

  18. USDA Climate Hubs - delivering usable information and tools to farmers, ranchers and forest land managers - Communication insights from the Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R.; Steele, R.

    2016-12-01

    The USDA Climate Hubs were established in 2014 to develop and deliver science-based, region-specific information and technologies, with USDA agencies and partners, to agricultural and natural resource managers to enable climate-informed decision-making. In the two and half years of existence, our regional leads have gained insights into communicating with the agricultural and forestry communities throughout the different regions of the country. Perspectives differ somewhat among regions and sectors. This talk will share those various insights.

  19. Participatory Design & Health Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Health Information Technology (HIT) continues to increase in importance as a component of healthcare provision, but designing HIT is complex. The creation of cooperative learning processes for future HIT users is not a simple task. The importance of engaging end users such as health professionals......, in collaboration with a wide range of people, a broad repertoire of methods and techniques to apply PD within multiple domains has been established. This book, Participatory Design & Health Information Technology, presents the contributions of researchers from 5 countries, who share their experience and insights......, patients and relatives in the design process is widely acknowledged, and Participatory Design (PD) is the primary discipline for directly involving people in the technological design process. Exploring the application of PD in HIT is crucial to all those involved in engaging end users in HIT design and...

  20. Health information literacy required for teachers in health guidance

    OpenAIRE

    古田, 真司

    2012-01-01

    In order to perform scientific health guidance in school, teachers need to have “health information literacy.”Teachers with health information literacy can collect and analyze health information, examine the information critically, and apply useful findings from the information to health guidance. The most important word for understanding health information literacy is “Evidence,” and the method of the study guarantees the scientific rationality of “Evidence” in the study. In classifying evid...

  1. Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial of Proactive Web-Based Versus Telephone-Based Information and Support: Can Electronic Platforms Deliver Effective Care for Lung Cancer Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Allison W; O'Brien, Lorna; Baker, Amanda L; Henskens, Frans A; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Bellamy, Douglas; Colburn, Glenda; Rose, Shiho; Cox, Martine E; Fradgley, Elizabeth A; Baird, Hannah; Barker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Community-based services such as telephone support lines can provide valuable informational, emotional, and practical support for cancer patients via telephone- or Web-based (live chat or email) platforms. However, very little rigorous research has examined the efficacy of such services in improving patient outcomes. Objective This study will determine whether: proactive telephone or Web-delivered support produces outcomes superior to printed information; and Web-delivered support produces outcomes comparable to telephone support. Methods A consecutive sample of 501 lung cancer outpatients will be recruited from 50 Australian health services to participate in a patient-randomized controlled trial (RCT). Eligible individuals must: be 18 years or older; have received a lung cancer diagnosis (including mesothelioma) within the previous 4 months; have an approximate life expectancy of at least 6 months; and have Internet access. Participants will be randomly allocated to receive: (1) an information booklet, (2) proactive telephone support, or (3) proactive Web support, chat, and/or email. The primary patient outcomes will be measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and Health Education and Impact Questionnaire (heiQ) at 3 and 6 months post recruitment. The acceptability of proactive recruitment strategies will also be assessed. Results It is hypothesized that participants receiving telephone or Web support will report reduced distress (GHQ-12 scores that are 0.3 standard deviations (SD) lower) and greater self-efficacy (heiQ scores that are 0.3 SDs higher) than participants receiving booklets. Individuals receiving Web support will report heiQ scores within 0.29 SDs of individuals receiving telephone support. Conclusions If proven effective, electronic approaches such as live-chat and email have the potential to increase the accessibility and continuity of supportive care delivered by community-based services. This evidence may also inform the

  2. Location-based health information services: a new paradigm in personalised information delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulos Maged

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brute health information delivery to various devices can be easily achieved these days, making health information instantly available whenever it is needed and nearly anywhere. However, brute health information delivery risks overloading users with unnecessary information that does not answer their actual needs, and might even act as noise, masking any other useful and relevant information delivered with it. Users' profiles and needs are definitely affected by where they are, and this should be taken into consideration when personalising and delivering information to users in different locations. The main goal of location-based health information services is to allow better presentation of the distribution of health and healthcare needs and Internet resources answering them across a geographical area, with the aim to provide users with better support for informed decision-making. Personalised information delivery requires the acquisition of high quality metadata about not only information resources, but also information service users, their geographical location and their devices. Throughout this review, experience from a related online health information service, HealthCyberMap http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org/, is referred to as a model that can be easily adapted to other similar services. HealthCyberMap is a Web-based directory service of medical/health Internet resources exploring new means to organise and present these resources based on consumer and provider locations, as well as the geographical coverage or scope of indexed resources. The paper also provides a concise review of location-based services, technologies for detecting user location (including IP geolocation, and their potential applications in health and healthcare.

  3. Why do women deliver at home? Multilevel modeling of Ethiopian National Demographic and Health Survey data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henock Yebyo

    Full Text Available Despite of the existing intensive efforts to improve maternal health in Ethiopia, the proportion of birth delivered at home remains high and is still the top priority among the national health threats.The study aimed to examine effects of individual women and community-level factors of women's decision on place of delivery in Ethiopia.Data were obtained from the nationally representative 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS which used a two-stage cluster sampling design with rural-urban and regions as strata. The EDHS collected data from a big sample size but our study focused on a sample of 7,908 women whose most recent birth was within five years preceding 2011 and 576 communities in which the women were living in. The data were analyzed using a two-level mixed-effects logistic regression to determine fixed-effects of individual- and community-level factors and random-intercept of between-cluster characteristics.In the current study, 6980 out of 7908 deliveries (88.3% took place at home. Lower educational levels (OR=2.74, 95%CI:1.84,4.70; p<0.0001, making no or only a limited number of ANC visits (OR=3.72,95%CI:2.85, 4.83; p<0.0001, non-exposure to media (OR=1.51, 95%CI 1.13, 2.01; p=0.004, higher parity (OR=2.68, 95%CI:1.96,3.68; p<0.0001, and perceived distance problem to reach health facilities (OR=1.29, 95%CI:1.03,1.62; p=0.022 were positively associated with home delivery. About 75% of the total variance in the odds of giving birth at home was accounted for the between-community differences of characteristics (ICC=0.75, p<0.0001. With regard to community-level characteristics, rural communities (OR=4.67, 95%CI:3.06,7.11; p<0.0001, pastoralist communities (OR=4.53, 95%CI:2.81,7.28; p<0.0001, communities with higher poverty levels (OR=1.49 95%CI:1.08,2.22; p=0.048, with lower levels of ANC utilization (OR=2.01, 95%CI:1.42,2.85; p<0.0001 and problem of distance to a health facility (OR=1.29, 95%CI:1.03,1.62; p=0.004 had a

  4. Using Lunar Impact Glasses to Inform the Amount of Organic Material Delivered to the Early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Pham; Zellner, Nicolle

    2017-01-01

    The delivery of organic material via comets and asteroids during the early history of Earth plays an important role in some theories about the origin of life on Earth. Given the close proximity of the Moon to the Earth, the Moon’s impact history can be used to estimate the amount of organic material delivered to the early Earth. Analysis of lunar impact glasses, derived from energetic impacts on the Moon, provide valuable data that can be used to interpret the Moon’s impact flux. Here we present the results of a study of the non-volatile lithophile element compositions of over 500 impact glass samples from the Apollo 14, 16, and 17 landing sites, along with associated ages of a subset of them. Our analyses show that many of the impact glasses possess compositions exotic to the local regolith in which they were found. Coupled with their ages, these glasses suggest material transport from distant regions of the Moon and may allow an estimate of the number of lunar (and terrestrial) impactors in a given time period. These results have important implications for constraining the Moon’s impact flux and also the amount of organic material delivered to the early Earth. Results of our preliminary study, which investigates the amounts of organic material delivered by comets and asteroids to the Moon (and Earth), will be presented.

  5. The role of health anxiety in online health information search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Susanne E; Hartmann, Tilo

    2011-10-01

    This article is one of the first to empirically explore the relationship between health anxiety and online health information search. Two studies investigate how health anxiety influences the use of the Internet for health information and how health anxious individuals respond to online health information. An exploratory survey study with 104 Dutch participants indicates that health anxiety is related to an increase in online health information search. Moreover, results suggest that health anxious individuals experience more negative consequences from online health information search. Findings from an experimental study (n=120) indicate that online health information results in greater worries among health anxious individuals compared to nonhealth anxious individuals only if the information stems from a trustworthy governmental Web site. Information from a less trustworthy online forum does not lead to greater worries among health anxious individuals. In sum, the Internet appears to play a pivotal role in the lives of health anxious individuals.

  6. Evaluation of a university general education health and wellness course delivered by lecture or online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Ronald; George, James D; LeCheminant, James D; Bailey, Bruce W; Vincent, William J

    2012-01-01

    To assess a single-semester university general education (GE) health and wellness course influence on physical activity (PA) and dietary habits among university students and to compare the course delivered through lecture or online for these outcomes. A 15-week intervention with pre-post one-group design, allowing for comparative assessments in dietary and PA habits across time by delivery method (classroom lecture vs. online). A large Western university. Participants (n = 1638, female; n = 1333, male) were 82% university freshman or sophomores. Participants were required to take a GE health and wellness course either by classroom lecture or online. The lecture and online curriculum content were similar. Participation in the study was entirely voluntary and was not connected to course grade. PA and dietary outcomes were determined from questions used in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey and were assessed pre- and post-intervention. Other validated questions were used to assess fitness. The general linear model was utilized to determine group x period interactions when comparing the classroom lecture vs. online course. Students improved overall level of PA by 12%, daily minutes of moderate-intensity PA by 8%, and fitness level by 2%. Students improved fruit/vegetable consumption by 4%, bran/whole grain cereal consumption by 8%, and brown rice/whole wheat bread consumption by 11%. All improvements were statistically significant (p lecture course yielded stronger improvements in several PA and dietary outcomes than the online course. A single-semester university wellness course may positively influence multiple PA and dietary behaviors; however, classroom lecture may be superior to online delivery.

  7. Abortion care services delivered from a community sexual and reproductive health setting: views of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Lucy; Cameron, Sharon T; Glasier, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Abortion services should provide high-quality contraceptive care. The community sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services may be well placed to deliver more abortion care in the UK. We wished to determine the views of health professionals working in SRH regarding their attitudes towards providing more abortion services and also the views of staff within one community SRH centre in Scotland where a service providing early medical abortion (EMA) was due to commence. An anonymous questionnaire distributed to attendees at a UK SRH scientific meeting collected data on demographics, current practice of and attitude to abortion, and views on delivery of abortion services. An internet questionnaire distributed by e-mail to staff at a community SRH clinic in Scotland sought demographics, views regarding the planned introduction of an EMA service and willingness to participate in it. 165 questionnaires were completed out of 200 distributed at the scientific meeting (an 82% response rate). 128 (78%) respondents felt that abortion services were suited to community clinics and 115 (70%) stated that they would be willing to participate in them. 62/90 (69%) staff from the SRH clinic responded to the internet questionnaire. 44 (71%) felt the plan to introduce abortion services was a natural extension to services already offered and the same number would be willing to be involved in such a service. There is clear support amongst health professionals in community SRH in the UK towards greater participation in the provision of abortion care services.

  8. Delivering innovation and choice in water supply in Kenya's informal settlements

    OpenAIRE

    O'Regan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Improved access to water and sanitation in the worlds slums were among the key targets in the Millennium Development Goals. In Kenya, water is generally accessed in slum areas by filling 20l jerrycans at standposts and water kiosks and carrying back to households, with residents paying up to nine times more than utility bulk water prices and spending large parts of their day collecting water. The aim of this research was to assess consumers’ response and reaction to a series of water deliv...

  9. The Church as a Bridge to Deliver Health Resources Via Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    Obesity; Diet, Food, and Nutrition; Church; Healthcare Disparities; Minority Health; Mobile Health; Telehealth; Community-based Participatory Research; Primary Health Care; Weight Loss Programs; Health Behavior

  10. Designing digital health information in a health literacy context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, C.S.

    2016-01-01

    Digital health information is widely available, but not everyone fully benefits due to limited health literacy. Until now, little was known about how health literacy influences information processing and how design features of digital health information can be used to create optimal health messages

  11. Designing digital health information in a health literacy context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, C.S.

    2016-01-01

    Digital health information is widely available, but not everyone fully benefits due to limited health literacy. Until now, little was known about how health literacy influences information processing and how design features of digital health information can be used to create optimal health messages

  12. 75 FR 76986 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information Technology; Request for Information Regarding the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) Report Entitled ``Realizing the Full Potential of Health Information Technology To...

  13. One stop shop versus collaborative integration: what is the best way of delivering sexual health services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R S; Coope, C M; Graham, A; Gerressu, M; Salisbury, C; Stephenson, J M

    2006-06-01

    To examine various models of integrated and/or one stop shop (OSS) sexual health services (including general practice, mainstream specialist services, and designated young people's services) and explore their relative strengths and weaknesses. Literature review and interviews with key informants involved in developing the National Strategy for Sexual Health and HIV (n = 11). The paper focuses on five broad perspectives (logistics, public health, users, staff, and cost). Contraceptive and genitourinary medicine issues are closely related. However, there is no agreement about what is meant by having "integrated" services, about which services should be integrated, or where integration should happen. There are concerns that OSSs will result in over-centralisation, to the disadvantage of stand alone and satellite services. OSS models are potentially more user focused, but the stigma that surrounds sexual health services may create an access barrier. From staff perspectives, the advantages are greater career opportunities and increased responsibility, while the disadvantages are concern that OSSs will result in loss of expertise and professional status. Cost effectiveness data are contradictory. Although there is a policy commitment to look at how integrated services can be better developed, more evidence is required on the impact and appropriateness of this approach.

  14. The role of health anxiety in online health information search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgartner, S.E.; Hartmann, T.

    2011-01-01

    This article is one of the first to empirically explore the relationship between health anxiety and online health information search. Two studies investigate how health anxiety influences the use of the Internet for health information and how health anxious individuals respond to online health infor

  15. Health literacy, information seeking, and trust in information in Haitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubetkin, Erica I; Zabor, Emily C; Isaac, Kathleen; Brennessel, Debra; Kemeny, M Margaret; Hay, Jennifer L

    2015-05-01

    To assess heath literacy, health information seeking, and trust in health-related information among Haitian immigrants seen in primary care. Health literacy was measured by the Brief Health Literacy Screen (BHLS); items on health information use were from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey. BHLS scores differed according to age, education, and survey language. Participants with lower levels of health literacy tended to be more likely to place "a lot" or "some" trust in family and friends and religious organizations and leaders as sources of information about health or medical topics. Constructing a culturally-tailored and appropriate intervention regarding health promotion requires understanding how the population accesses and conveys health information.

  16. The quality of care delivered to Parkinson's disease patients in the U.S. Pacific Northwest Veterans Health System

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common chronic neurological disorder of the elderly. Despite the fact that a comprehensive review of general health care in the United States showed that the quality of care delivered to patients usually falls below professional standards, there is limited data on the quality of care for patients with PD. Methods Using the administrative database, the Pacific Northwest Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Data Warehouse, a popula...

  17. Development of a Health System-Based Nurse-Delivered Aromatherapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswiak, Denise; Kinney, Mary Ellen; Johnson, Jill R; Kolste, Alison K; Griffin, Kristen H; Rivard, Rachael L; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2016-04-01

    Healthcare systems are increasingly looking to integrate aromatherapy (essential oils) as a safe, low-cost, and nonpharmacologic option for patient care to reduce pain, nausea, and anxiety and to improve sleep. This article describes the development and implementation of a healthcare system-wide program of nurse-delivered essential oil therapeutic interventions to inpatients throughout an acute care setting. In addition, we provide lessons learned for nursing administrators interested in developing similar nurse-delivered aromatherapy programs.

  18. A geodata warehouse: Using denormalisation techniques as a tool for delivering spatially enabled integrated geological information to geologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingdon, Andrew; Nayembil, Martin L.; Richardson, Anne E.; Smith, A. Graham

    2016-11-01

    New requirements to understand geological properties in three dimensions have led to the development of PropBase, a data structure and delivery tools to deliver this. At the BGS, relational database management systems (RDBMS) has facilitated effective data management using normalised subject-based database designs with business rules in a centralised, vocabulary controlled, architecture. These have delivered effective data storage in a secure environment. However, isolated subject-oriented designs prevented efficient cross-domain querying of datasets. Additionally, the tools provided often did not enable effective data discovery as they struggled to resolve the complex underlying normalised structures providing poor data access speeds. Users developed bespoke access tools to structures they did not fully understand sometimes delivering them incorrect results. Therefore, BGS has developed PropBase, a generic denormalised data structure within an RDBMS to store property data, to facilitate rapid and standardised data discovery and access, incorporating 2D and 3D physical and chemical property data, with associated metadata. This includes scripts to populate and synchronise the layer with its data sources through structured input and transcription standards. A core component of the architecture includes, an optimised query object, to deliver geoscience information from a structure equivalent to a data warehouse. This enables optimised query performance to deliver data in multiple standardised formats using a web discovery tool. Semantic interoperability is enforced through vocabularies combined from all data sources facilitating searching of related terms. PropBase holds 28.1 million spatially enabled property data points from 10 source databases incorporating over 50 property data types with a vocabulary set that includes 557 property terms. By enabling property data searches across multiple databases PropBase has facilitated new scientific research, previously

  19. A systematic review of intimate partner violence educational interventions delivered to allied health care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Simon; Coles, Jan; Williams, Angela; Williams, Brett

    2016-11-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide. Numerous health organisations have called for increased education for health care practitioners who encounter IPV patients and the first clinical guidelines for health services responding to IPV were recently published. This renewed focus has created a need to examine the current evidence for IPV education so that it may inform the next generation of educational interventions. This study was designed to examine the effects of IPV educational interventions on the knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviours of allied health care practitioners (AHCPs). We conducted a systematic search of multiple databases up to the end of May 2015. We selected studies that included IPV educational interventions for AHCPs and that measured knowledge, attitude, skill or behavioural outcomes. Studies were evaluated based on methodological quality, education context and outcome measurement. We found 2757 articles from which 18 were selected for inclusion. Study participants included nurses, dentists, social workers and paramedics. Educational interventions ranged widely in length, delivery format and topics covered. Findings indicate that improvements in some knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviours are associated with education, although the lack of high-quality studies indicates that conclusions should be treated with caution. Future studies should be conducted using rigorous methodology and validated instruments to measure evidence-based outcomes and should target a wider range of AHCPs. Recommendations are provided on education content and delivery, study methodology and outcome measurement based on insights gained from selected studies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  20. What does it cost to deliver information using position-based beaconless forwarding protocols?

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2012-04-01

    Beaconless position-based forwarding protocols have recently evolved as a promising solution for packet forwarding in wireless sensor networks. Quite a few variants of this class of forwarding protocols have been proposed over the years. One common observation is that they have all been evaluated from the perspective of a single node. Although useful, but a solid understanding of the end-to-end performance is still necessary. In this paper, we shed light on the end-to-end performance of beaconless position-based protocols along three distinct dimensions: energy, latency, and back-off probability. The latter is used as a direct indicator of the network\\'s transport capacity. Consequently, we are able to provide an elaborate response to the question: what does it really cost to deliver a packet in a wireless sensor network using position-based beaconless forwarding protocols? In responding to this question, we highlighted the different performance tradeoffs inherent to beaconless position-based protocols. Furthermore, some operational recommendations are also provided. © 2012 IEEE.

  1. A systematic review of the health, social and financial impacts of welfare rights advice delivered in healthcare settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howel Denise

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Socio-economic variations in health, including variations in health according to wealth and income, have been widely reported. A potential method of improving the health of the most deprived groups is to increase their income. State funded welfare programmes of financial benefits and benefits in kind are common in developed countries. However, there is evidence of widespread under claiming of welfare benefits by those eligible for them. One method of exploring the health effects of income supplementation is, therefore, to measure the health effects of welfare benefit maximisation programmes. We conducted a systematic review of the health, social and financial impacts of welfare rights advice delivered in healthcare settings. Methods Published and unpublished literature was accessed through searches of electronic databases, websites and an internet search engine; hand searches of journals; suggestions from experts; and reference lists of relevant publications. Data on the intervention delivered, evaluation performed, and outcome data on health, social and economic measures were abstracted and assessed by pairs of independent reviewers. Results are reported in narrative form. Results 55 studies were included in the review. Only seven studies included a comparison or control group. There was evidence that welfare rights advice delivered in healthcare settings results in financial benefits. There was little evidence that the advice resulted in measurable health or social benefits. This is primarily due to lack of good quality evidence, rather than evidence of an absence of effect. Conclusion There are good theoretical reasons why income supplementation should improve health, but currently little evidence of adequate robustness and quality to indicate that the impact goes beyond increasing income.

  2. Learning to cross boundaries: the integration of a health network to deliver seamless care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; de Bont, Antoinette A; Huijsman, Robbert

    2006-12-01

    We analysed the development of an integrated network from a learning perspective to see how care givers from different organisations were able to cross the professional and organisational boundaries that existed between them to make sure patients receive the right care, at the right moment, in the right place. We show how through a process of collective learning social contacts between health professionals increased and improved. These professionals learned to speak each other's language, learned how other professionals and organisations work and learned to look at the care process from a network perspective instead of only from a professional or organisational perspective. Through this learning process, they also experienced the limitations of standardizing knowledge in criteria, protocols and rules, and the value of direct contact for sharing information and knowledge, to ensure continuity in care.

  3. HEALTH WORKERS' USE OF ELECTRONIC INFORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    support

    Key Words: electronic information; children with communication disorders; health workers' ... Information regarding young children who experience barriers to the ... the position might be even less favourable. Effective health care depends on ...

  4. Delivering Mental Health Services to OEF/OIF Veterans: A VHA Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoracci, Gina M; Bahraini, Nazanin H; Matarazzo, Bridget B; Olson-Madden, Jennifer H; Brenner, Lisa A

    2014-09-01

    Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health (MH) professionals are providing care to increasing numbers of veterans who served in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). This study aimed to describe MH clinicians' views of OEF/OIF veteran needs and how providers meet those needs within a large system of care. Qualitative research methodology, specifically qualitative description, was used to explore VHA MH clinicians' experiences providing MH services to OEF/OIF veterans. Thirteen VA MH providers participated in semistructured interviews, which included questions regarding the following areas: psychiatric needs of OEF/OIF veterans; collaboration and referral; needs and resources; and the personal/professional impact of providing services to this cohort. Themes emerged which highlighted complex challenges faced by OEF/OIF veterans, barriers associated with matching the unique needs of these veterans with existing treatments, and the challenges and rewards associated with providing care to members of this population. Capturing provider perspectives within MH services suggest potential areas for innovation aimed at providing patient-centered care to this cohort of veterans. Results may also inform future work aimed at meeting the needs of both OEF/OIF veterans and MH providers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Can a health coaching intervention delivered during pregnancy help prevent excessive gestational weight gain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Briony; Skouteris, Helen; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; McPhie, Skye

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated: (1) the efficacy of a health coaching (HC) intervention designed to prevent excessive gestational weight gain (GWG); and (2) whether there were improved psychological, motivational, and behavioural outcomes for women in the HC intervention compared to a "usual care" control group. In this quasi-experimental study, 267 pregnant women ≤18 weeks gestation were recruited between August 2011 and June 2013 from two hospital antenatal clinics in Melbourne, Australia. Intervention women received four individual HC and two group HC/educational sessions informed by theories of behaviour change. Women completed questionnaires assessing psychological, motivational and behavioural outcomes at 16-18 (baseline) and 33 (post-intervention) weeks gestation. Weight measures were collected. Compared to usual care, the intervention did not limit GWG or prevent excessive GWG. However, HC women reported greater use of active coping skills post-intervention. Despite lack of success of the HC intervention, given the risks associated with excessive weight gain in pregnancy, health professionals should continue to recommend appropriate GWG.

  6. Blogging in support of health information outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Lara; Cogdill, Keith

    2010-07-01

    Social media technologies are transforming the way librarians are collaborating, creating, and disseminating information. This article discusses how librarians at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio created a blog to support their health information outreach activities. Launched in 2007, the Staying Well Connected blog was established with the goal of promoting access to biomedical and health information for consumers and health professionals in the South Texas region. Postings highlight relevant health news, conferences, funding opportunities, and outreach events.

  7. How might FIA deliver more information on status and trends of non-timber forest products?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen P. Prisley

    2015-01-01

    Data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis program (including the Timber Products Output portion) are critical for assessing the sustainability of US timber production. Private sector users of this information rely on it for strategic planning, and their strong support of the FIA program has helped to ensure funding and program viability. Non-timber forest products...

  8. Dewey Redux: Virtual Dewey Resources Deliver Trusted, Familiar 21st-Century Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamich, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Where do school librarians go to find out the latest on how the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) system is being used (and will be used) in the 21st-century virtual-knowledge world? The answer is two great websites containing: (1) the most current information on both Dewey and linked data at dewey.info>; (2) Dewey here-and-now…

  9. Online health information - what can you trust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000869.htm Online health information - what can you trust? To use ... schools, professional health organizations, and hospitals often provide online health content. Look for ".gov," ".edu," or ".org" ...

  10. Health Care Information System (HCIS) Data File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data was derived from the Health Care Information System (HCIS), which contains Medicare Part A (Inpatient, Skilled Nursing Facility, Home Health Agency (Part A...

  11. Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Job Advertise a Job Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information Whether you're a high school student ... about this rewarding, challenging profession. What is a health sciences or medical librarian? What do they do? Health ...

  12. Health care services, information systems & sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovenga, Evelyn J S

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * many competing characteristics within national health systems * national primary information and knowledge flows between health care entities * the role of information technologies in assisting health organizations become sustainable enterprises * the business of maintaining healthy populations for any nation * desirable e-health strategy objectives.

  13. Challenges that Hinder Parturients to Deliver in Health Facilities: A Qualitative Analysis in Two Districts of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudirman Nasir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are many challenges women face to be able to give birth in health facilities in many parts of Indonesia. This study explores the roles and observations of close-to-community maternal health providers and other community members on potential barriers faced by women to deliver in health facilities in two districts within The Archipelago. Methods: Employing an explorative qualitative approach, 110 semi-structured interviews and 7 focus group discussions were conducted in 8 villages in Southwest Sumba, in the East Nusa Tenggara province, and in 8 villages in Cianjur, in the West Java province. The participants included village midwives, Posyandu kader (village health volunteers, traditional birth attendants (TBAs, mothers, men, village heads and district health officials. Results: The main findings were mostly similar in the two study areas. However, there were some key differences. Preference for TBA care, traditional beliefs, a lack of responsiveness of health providers to local traditions, distance, cost of travel and indirect costs of accompanying family members were all barriers to patients attending health facilities for the birth of their child. TBAs were the preferred health providers in most cases due to their close proximity at the time of childbirth and their adherence to traditional practices during pregnancy and delivery. Conclusions: Improving collaborations between midwives and TBAs, and responsiveness to traditional practices within health facilities and effective health promotion campaigns about the benefits of giving birth in health facilities may increase the use of health facilities in both study areas.

  14. The EUSTACE project: delivering global, daily information on surface air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018, https://www.eustaceproject.eu) we are developing an understanding of the relationships between traditional (land and marine) surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. Here we discuss the science needed to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types. Information contained in the satellite retrievals is used to create globally-complete fields in the past, using statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. As the data volumes involved are considerable, such work needs to include development of new "Big Data" analysis methods. We will present recent progress along this road in the EUSTACE project: 1. providing new, consistent, multi-component estimates of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; 2. identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; 3. estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; 4. using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras. Information will also be given on how interested users can become involved.

  15. The EUSTACE project: delivering global, daily information on surface air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice, C. P.; Rayner, N. A.; Auchmann, R.; Bessembinder, J.; Bronnimann, S.; Brugnara, Y.; Conway, E. A.; Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Herring, K.; Kennedy, J.; Lindgren, F.; Madsen, K. S.; Merchant, C. J.; van der Schrier, G.; Stephens, A.; Tonboe, R. T.; Waterfall, A. M.; Mitchelson, J.; Woolway, I.

    2015-12-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional (land and marine) surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. These relationships can be derived either empirically or with the help of a physical model.Here we discuss the science needed to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types. Information contained in the satellite retrievals would be used to create globally-complete fields in the past, using statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. As the data volumes involved are considerable, such work needs to include development of new "Big Data" analysis methods.We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018), i.e.: • providing new, consistent, multi-component estimates of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; • identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; • estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; • using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras.Information will also be given on how interested users can become

  16. Cancer articles in weekly magazines: useful media to deliver cancer information to the public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Masayoshi; Takita, Morihito; Kishi, Yukiko; Kodama, Yuko; Matsumura, Tomoko; Murashige, Naoko; Homma, Yukio; Kami, Masahiro

    2013-04-01

    Japanese weekly magazines, which have a circulation of over 2 700 000, play important roles in communicating with the public. They offer a wide range of information, entertainment, gossip, politics and economics, and often include articles on cancer. However, cancer articles in magazines have not been systematically analyzed. We investigated cancer-related articles and advertisements in six major Japanese weekly magazines to demonstrate trends in public interest regarding cancer. The total number of articles assessed from July 2009 to December 2010 was 36 914, of which 696 (1.9%) were cancer articles. The total number of advertisements was 21 718, of which 340 (1.6%) were related to cancer. The number of cancer articles demonstrated an upward trend during the study period. Articles focused on lung (n = 145) and urogenital cancer (n = 122). The most common content comprised therapies and diagnosis (n = 340) and case reports on individual patients (n = 160). After a famous Japanese comedian revealed his prostate cancer diagnosis, the number of articles on prostate cancer increased from 2.0 to 6.6 per month. Immunotherapy including some dubious folk therapies was the most frequently reported cancer therapy in articles and advertisements (30.4%). A small group of oncologists were repeatedly referred to in comment sources; 35.6% of comments were presented by only five doctors. Cancer articles in weekly magazines are common paper media for providing cancer information to the public. However, the information provided might place emphasis on unestablished treatments or biased opinions.

  17. Framing of health information messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Oxman, Andrew D; Herrin, Jeph; Vist, Gunn E; Terrenato, Irene; Sperati, Francesca; Costiniuk, Cecilia; Blank, Diana; Schünemann, Holger

    2011-12-07

    The same information about the evidence on health effects can be framed either in positive words or in negative words. Some research suggests that positive versus negative framing can lead to different decisions, a phenomenon described as the framing effect. Attribute framing is the positive versus negative description of a specific attribute of a single item or a state, for example, "the chance of survival with cancer is 2/3" versus "the chance of mortality with cancer is 1/3". Goal framing is the description of the consequences of performing or not performing an act as a gain versus a loss, for example, "if you undergo a screening test for cancer, your survival will be prolonged" versus "if you don't undergo screening test for cancer, your survival will be shortened". To evaluate the effects of attribute (positive versus negative) framing and of goal (gain versus loss) framing of the same health information, on understanding, perception of effectiveness, persuasiveness, and behavior of health professionals, policy makers, and consumers. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, issue 3 2007), MEDLINE (Ovid) (1966 to October 2007), EMBASE (Ovid) (1980 to October 2007), PsycINFO (Ovid) (1887 to October 2007). There were no language restrictions. We reviewed the reference lists of related systematic reviews, included studies and of excluded but closely related studies. We also contacted experts in the field. We included randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials, and cross-over studies with health professionals, policy makers, and consumers evaluating one of the two types of framing. Two review authors extracted data in duplicate and independently. We graded the quality of evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach. We standardized the outcome effects using standardized mean difference (SMD). We stratified the analysis by the type of framing (attribute, goal) and conducted pre

  18. Readiness for delivering digital health at scale: lessons from a longitudinal qualitative evaluation of a national digital health innovation program in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Lennon, Marilyn R.; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Devlin, Alison M.; O'Connor, Siobhan; O'Donnell, Catherine; Chetty, Ula; Agbakoba, Ruth; Bikker, Annemieke; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Watson, Nicholas; Wyke, Sally; Frances S Mair

    2017-01-01

    Background: Digital health has the potential to support care delivery for chronic illness. Despite positive evidence from localized implementations, new technologies have proven slow to become accepted, integrated, and routinized at scale.\\ud Objective: The aim of our study was to examine barriers and facilitators to implementation of digital health at scale through the evaluation of a £37m national digital health program: ‟Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale” (dallas) from 2012-20...

  19. Delivering digital health and well-being at scale: lessons learned during the implementation of the dallas program in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Alison M; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Agbakoba, Ruth; O'Connor, Siobhan; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Wyke, Sally; Watson, Nicholas; Browne, Susan; Mair, Frances S

    2016-01-01

    To identify implementation lessons from the United Kingdom Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale (dallas) program-a large-scale, national technology program that aims to deliver a broad range of digital services and products to the public to promote health and well-being. Prospective, longitudinal qualitative research study investigating implementation processes. Qualitative data collected includes semi-structured e-Health Implementation Toolkit-led interviews at baseline/mid-point (n = 38), quarterly evaluation, quarterly technical and barrier and solutions reports, observational logs, quarterly evaluation alignment interviews with project leads, observational data collected during meetings, and ethnographic data from dallas events (n > 200 distinct pieces of qualitative data). Data analysis was guided by Normalization Process Theory, a sociological theory that aids conceptualization of implementation issues in complex healthcare settings. Five key challenges were identified: 1) The challenge of establishing and maintaining large heterogeneous, multi-agency partnerships to deliver new models of healthcare; 2) The need for resilience in the face of barriers and set-backs including the backdrop of continually changing external environments; 3) The inherent tension between embracing innovative co-design and achieving delivery at pace and at scale; 4) The effects of branding and marketing issues in consumer healthcare settings; and 5) The challenge of interoperability and information governance, when commercial proprietary models are dominant. The magnitude and ambition of the dallas program provides a unique opportunity to investigate the macro level implementation challenges faced when designing and delivering digital health and wellness services at scale. Flexibility, adaptability, and resilience are key implementation facilitators when shifting to new digitally enabled models of care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  20. Facilitating consumer access to health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, Anne; Schnarr, Karin; Alessi, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The lead paper from Zelmer and Hagens details the substantive evolution occurring in health information technologies that has the potential to transform the relationship between consumers, health practitioners and health systems. In this commentary, the authors suggest that Canada is experiencing a shift in consumer behaviour toward a desire to actively manage one's health and wellness that is being facilitated through the advent of health applications on mobile and online technologies platforms. The result is that Canadians are now able to create personalized health solutions based on their individual health values and goals. However, before Canadians are able to derive a personal health benefit from these rapid changes in information technology, they require and are increasingly demanding greater real-time access to their own health information to better inform decision-making, as well as interoperability between their personal health tracking systems and those of their health practitioner team.

  1. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radis, Molly E.; Updegrove, Stephen C.; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A.

    2016-01-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result,…

  2. Visualization to support identification, exploitation, and fusion of data and information delivered from heterogeneous sources in ISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamboti, Kavyashree; Van de Camp, Florian; Kuwertz, Achim; Haferkorn, Daniel; Eck, Ralf; Grasemann, Gunther

    2016-05-01

    In ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance), heterogeneous sources deliver data and information having spatial and temporal attributes. Real time and non-real time data created for various purposes, present in different formats has to be exploited and fused. The Coalition Shared Data (CSD) concept makes the interoperable sharing of ISR data and information possible. The concept itself and a technical approach for it were developed within the multinational projects CAESAR, MAJIIC and MAJIIC 2 and tested in coalition exercises. The interfaces of software systems providing access to CSD data must allow the user to intuitively use the system and form a substantial part with regard to user acceptance. We describe different systems and approaches we designed and developed to access CSD data that can locate and present the data to the user based on his specific demands. Visualization forms an important part of these systems which share the common challenge of representing data and information with spatial and temporal attributes. The visualization of data and information has to be designed in a manner that supports efficient access, discovery and optionally additional processing (such as filtering and sorting). Given the large amount of data and information that may be available, visualization taking into account their quality and inherent uncertainty is an additional challenge. This publication provides an overview of the systems and approaches we developed to present CSD data and identifies challenges common to these systems. To tackle these challenges, we present new research results regarding visualization of data and information with temporal and spatial attributes.

  3. The Health Information Literacy Research Project*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz-Rossi, Sabrina; Funk, Carla J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This research studied hospital administrators' and hospital-based health care providers' (collectively, the target group) perceived value of consumer health information resources and of librarians' roles in promoting health information literacy in their institutions. Methods: A web-based needs survey was developed and administered to hospital administrators and health care providers. Multiple health information literacy curricula were developed. One was pilot-tested by nine hospital libraries in the United States and Canada. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate the curriculum and its impact on the target group. Results: A majority of survey respondents believed that providing consumer health information resources was critically important to fulfilling their institutions' missions and that their hospitals could improve health information literacy by increasing awareness of its impact on patient care and by training staff to become more knowledgeable about health literacy barriers. The study showed that a librarian-taught health information literacy curriculum did raise awareness about the issue among the target group and increased both the use of National Library of Medicine consumer health resources and referrals to librarians for health information literacy support. Conclusions: It is hoped that many hospital administrators and health care providers will take the health information literacy curricula and recognize that librarians can educate about the topic and that providers will use related consumer health services and resources. PMID:19851494

  4. The health information literacy research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Jean P; Kurtz-Rossi, Sabrina; Funk, Carla J

    2009-10-01

    This research studied hospital administrators' and hospital-based health care providers' (collectively, the target group) perceived value of consumer health information resources and of librarians' roles in promoting health information literacy in their institutions. A web-based needs survey was developed and administered to hospital administrators and health care providers. Multiple health information literacy curricula were developed. One was pilot-tested by nine hospital libraries in the United States and Canada. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate the curriculum and its impact on the target group. A majority of survey respondents believed that providing consumer health information resources was critically important to fulfilling their institutions' missions and that their hospitals could improve health information literacy by increasing awareness of its impact on patient care and by training staff to become more knowledgeable about health literacy barriers. The study showed that a librarian-taught health information literacy curriculum did raise awareness about the issue among the target group and increased both the use of National Library of Medicine consumer health resources and referrals to librarians for health information literacy support. It is hoped that many hospital administrators and health care providers will take the health information literacy curricula and recognize that librarians can educate about the topic and that providers will use related consumer health services and resources.

  5. A phase II clinical trial of a dental health education program delivered by aboriginal health workers to prevent early childhood caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is a widespread problem in Australian Aboriginal communities causing severe pain and sepsis. In addition dental services are difficult to access for many Aboriginal children and trying to obtain care can be stressful for the parents. The control of dental caries has been identified as a key indictor in the reduction of Indigenous disadvantage. Thus, there is a need for new approaches to prevent ECC, which reflect the cultural norms of Aboriginal communities. Methods/Design This is a Phase II single arm trial designed to gather information on the effectiveness of a dental health education program for Aboriginal children aged 6 months, followed over 2 years. The program will deliver advice from Aboriginal Health Workers on tooth brushing, diet and the use of fluoride toothpaste to Aboriginal families. Six waves of data collection will be conducted to enable estimates of change in parental knowledge and their views on the acceptability of the program. The Aboriginal Health Workers will also be interviewed to record their views on the acceptability and program feasibility. Clinical data on the child participants will be recorded when they are 30 months old and compared with a reference population of similar children when the study began. Latent variable modeling will be used to interpret the intervention effects on disease outcome. Discussion The research project will identify barriers to the implementation of a family centered Aboriginal oral health strategy, as well as the development of evidence to assist in the planning of a Phase III cluster randomized study. Trial registration ACTRN12612000712808 PMID:22909327

  6. A phase II clinical trial of a dental health education program delivered by aboriginal health workers to prevent early childhood caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinkhorn Fiona

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early Childhood Caries (ECC is a widespread problem in Australian Aboriginal communities causing severe pain and sepsis. In addition dental services are difficult to access for many Aboriginal children and trying to obtain care can be stressful for the parents. The control of dental caries has been identified as a key indictor in the reduction of Indigenous disadvantage. Thus, there is a need for new approaches to prevent ECC, which reflect the cultural norms of Aboriginal communities. Methods/Design This is a Phase II single arm trial designed to gather information on the effectiveness of a dental health education program for Aboriginal children aged 6 months, followed over 2 years. The program will deliver advice from Aboriginal Health Workers on tooth brushing, diet and the use of fluoride toothpaste to Aboriginal families. Six waves of data collection will be conducted to enable estimates of change in parental knowledge and their views on the acceptability of the program. The Aboriginal Health Workers will also be interviewed to record their views on the acceptability and program feasibility. Clinical data on the child participants will be recorded when they are 30 months old and compared with a reference population of similar children when the study began. Latent variable modeling will be used to interpret the intervention effects on disease outcome. Discussion The research project will identify barriers to the implementation of a family centered Aboriginal oral health strategy, as well as the development of evidence to assist in the planning of a Phase III cluster randomized study. Trial registration ACTRN12612000712808

  7. Exploration of Deaf People's Health Information Sources and Techniques for Information Delivery in Cape Town: A Qualitative Study for the Design and Development of a Mobile Health App.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chininthorn, Prangnat; Glaser, Meryl; Tucker, William David; Diehl, Jan Carel

    2016-11-11

    Many cultural and linguistic Deaf people in South Africa face disparity when accessing health information because of social and language barriers. The number of certified South African Sign Language interpreters (SASLIs) is also insufficient to meet the demand of the Deaf population in the country. Our research team, in collaboration with the Deaf communities in Cape Town, devised a mobile health app called SignSupport to bridge the communication gaps in health care contexts. We consequently plan to extend our work with a Health Knowledge Transfer System (HKTS) to provide Deaf people with accessible, understandable, and accurate health information. We conducted an explorative study to prepare the groundwork for the design and development of the system. To investigate the current modes of health information distributed to Deaf people in Cape Town, identify the health information sources Deaf people prefer and their reasons, and define effective techniques for delivering understandable information to generate the groundwork for the mobile health app development with and for Deaf people. A qualitative methodology using semistructured interviews with sensitizing tools was used in a community-based codesign setting. A total of 23 Deaf people and 10 health professionals participated in this study. Inductive and deductive coding was used for the analysis. Deaf people currently have access to 4 modes of health information distribution through: Deaf and other relevant organizations, hearing health professionals, personal interactions, and the mass media. Their preferred and accessible sources are those delivering information in signed language and with communication techniques that match Deaf people's communication needs. Accessible and accurate health information can be delivered to Deaf people by 3 effective techniques: using signed language including its dialects, through health drama with its combined techniques, and accompanying the information with pictures in

  8. National Pregnancy and Health Survey: Drug Use Among Women Delivering Live Births (NPHS-1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The primary objective of the National Pregnancy and Health Survey (NPHS) was to produce national annual estimates of the percentages and numbers of mothers of live...

  9. Mental health care as delivered by Dutch general practitioners between 2004 and 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, Peter F. M.; van Dijk, Christel E.; Nuijen, Jasper; Verheij, Robert A.; Schellevis, Francois G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. In the field of mental health care, a major role for general practice is advocated. However, not much is known about the treatment and referral of mental health problems in general practice. This study aims at the volume and nature of treatment of mental health problems in general practic

  10. Using online health communities to deliver patient-centered care to people with chronic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M. van der; Faber, M.J.; Aarts, J.W.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our health care system faces major threats as the number of people with multiple chronic conditions rises dramatically. OBJECTIVE: To study the use of Online Health Communities (OHCs) as a tool to facilitate high-quality and affordable health care for future generations. METHODS: OHCs ar

  11. Mental health care as delivered by Dutch general practitioners between 2004 and 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, Peter F. M.; van Dijk, Christel E.; Nuijen, Jasper; Verheij, Robert A.; Schellevis, Francois G.

    Objective. In the field of mental health care, a major role for general practice is advocated. However, not much is known about the treatment and referral of mental health problems in general practice. This study aims at the volume and nature of treatment of mental health problems in general

  12. Multiple micronutrients in powder delivered through primary health care reduce iron and vitamin A deficiencies in young Amazonian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristieli Sm; Sampaio, Patrícia; Muniz, Pascoal T; Cardoso, Marly A

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of home fortification with multiple micronutrient powder (MNP) on anaemia and micronutrient status of young Amazonian children. A pragmatic controlled trial was performed. A control group (CG) of children aged 11-14 months was recruited in the routine of primary health-care centres for assessing anaemia and micronutrient status. At the same time, an intervention group (IG) of infants aged 6-8 months was recruited in the same health centres to receive MNP daily in complementary feeding for 2 months. The IG children were assessed 4-6 months after enrolment (n 112) when they had reached the age of the CG participants (n 128) for comparisons. Primary health centres in Rio Branco city, Brazilian Amazon. A total of 240 children ageddeficiency (VAD; serum retinol complementary feeding delivered through primary health care was effective in reducing iron and vitamin A deficiencies among young Amazonian children.

  13. Towards safe information technology in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHealth information technology is widely accepted to increase patient safety and reduce medical errors. The widespread implementation makes evident that health information technology has become of a complex sociotechnical system that is health care. Design and implementation may result in

  14. Towards safe information technology in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHealth information technology is widely accepted to increase patient safety and reduce medical errors. The widespread implementation makes evident that health information technology has become of a complex sociotechnical system that is health care. Design and implementation may result in

  15. Communicating health information to disadvantaged populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacom, Amanda M; Newman, Sandra J

    2010-01-01

    Interest in the communication of health information among disadvantaged populations has increased in recent years with the shift from a model of patient-provider communication to one of a more empowered healthcare consumer; with the use of new communication technologies that increase the number of channels through which health information may be accessed; and with the steadily increasing number of people without health insurance. Three separate research literatures contribute to our current understanding of this issue. In the medicine and public health literature, disparities in health access and outcomes among socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial groups are now well documented. In the information sciences literature, scholars note that on a continuum of health information behaviors, ranging from information avoidance and nonseeking to active seeking, nonseeking behaviors are associated with disadvantaged populations. In the communication literature, enthusiasm over the technology-driven growth of online health information seeking is tempered by evidence supporting the knowledge gap hypothesis, which indicates that as potential access to health information increases, systematic gaps in health knowledge also increase as groups with higher socioeconomic status acquire this information at a faster rate than those with lower socioeconomic status. A number of diverse strategies show promise in reducing information and health disparities, including those that focus on technology, such as programs to increase computer and Internet access, skills, and comprehension; those that focus on interpersonal communication, such as the community health worker model; and those that focus on mass media channels, such as entertainment education.

  16. A Mobile Phone App Intervention Targeting Fruit and Vegetable Consumption : The Efficacy of Textual and Auditory Tailored Health Information Tested in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbert, Sarah Pietertje; Dijkstra, Arie; Oenema, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mobile phone apps are increasingly used to deliver health interventions, which provide the opportunity to present health information via different communication modes. However, scientific evidence regarding the effects of such health apps is scarce. Objective: In a randomized controlled

  17. Scaling Health Information Systems in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw; Neilsen, Petter

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the issues of scaling health information system in the context of developing countries by taking a case study from Ethiopia. Concepts of information infrastructure have been used as an analytical lens to better understand scaling of Health Information systems. More...

  18. Applications of health information exchange information to public health practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    qualitative interviews and template analyses, we identified public health efforts and activities that were improved by participation in HIE. We derived the codes for the template analysis through a literature review. HIE supported public health activities consistent with expectations in the literature...

  19. Types of social media (Web 2.0) used by Australian allied health professionals to deliver early twenty-first-century practice promotion and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Types of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major allied health professions (AHPs, n = 935) were examined. Australian AHPs are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies for personal use but are failing to implement such technologies throughout their health professions to deliver health care. Australian AHPs are willing to undertake online educational courses designed to up skill them about how Web 2.0 may be used for practice promotion and health care delivery in the early twenty-first century. Participants in this study indicated that educational courses that were offered online would be the preferred mode of delivery.

  20. Family Caregivers and Consumer Health Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Darer, Jonathan D; Larsen, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Health information technology has been embraced as a strategy to facilitate patients' access to their health information and engagement in care. However, not all patients are able to access, or are capable of using, a computer or mobile device. Although family caregivers assist individuals with some of the most challenging and costly health needs, their role in health information technology is largely undefined and poorly understood. This perspective discusses challenges and opportunities of engaging family caregivers through the use of consumer-oriented health information technology. We compile existing evidence to make the case that involving family caregivers in health information technology as desired by patients is technically feasible and consistent with the principles of patient-centered and family-centered care. We discuss how more explicit and purposeful engagement of family caregivers in health information technology could advance clinical quality and patient safety by increasing the transparency, accuracy, and comprehensiveness of patient health information across settings of care. Finally, we describe how clarifying and executing patients' desires to involve family members or friends through health information technology would provide family caregivers greater legitimacy, convenience, and timeliness in health system interactions, and facilitate stronger partnerships between patients, family caregivers, and health care professionals.

  1. Integrating Compliance, Communication, and Culture: Delivering Health Care to an Aging Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Nieli

    2008-01-01

    Older adults often get lost in the process of assessment, diagnosis and service brokering. If our concern as care providers is to enable older persons to remain independent or in the community for as long as possible, we must tap into their personal values, cultural identity and health beliefs in order to foster enhanced health care communication.…

  2. Characterizing Health Information for Different Target Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yueping; Hou, Zhen; Hou, Li; Li, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of audiences in health care: health professionals and health consumers, each have different information needs. Health monographs targeting different audiences are created by leveraging readers' background knowledge. The NCI's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries provide parallel cancer information and education resources with different target audiences. In this paper, we used targeted audience-specific cancer information PDQs to measure characteristic differences on the element level between audiences. In addition, we compared vocabulary coverage. Results show a significant difference between the professional and patient version of cancer monographs in both content organization and vocabulary. This study provides a new view to assess targeted audience-specific health information, and helps editors to improve the quality and readability of health information.

  3. Electronic Health Information Legal Epidemiology Protocol 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Authors: Cason Schmit, JD, Gregory Sunshine, JD, Dawn Pepin, JD, MPH, Tara Ramanathan, JD, MPH, Akshara Menon, JD, MPH, Matthew Penn, JD, MLIS The Health Information...

  4. Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) is a biennial, cross-sectional survey of a nationally-representative sample of American adults that is used to...

  5. Health & Nutrition Information for Pregnant & Breastfeeding Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults Moms/ Moms-to-Be Print Share Health & Nutrition Information When you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you ... Story Last Updated: Feb 9, 2017 RESOURCES FOR NUTRITION AND HEALTH MYPLATE What Is MyPlate? Fruits Vegetables ...

  6. Implementing health information exchange for public health reporting: a comparison of decision and risk management of three regional health information organizations in New York state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew B; Wilson, Rosalind V; Kaushal, Rainu; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2014-02-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) is a significant component of healthcare transformation strategies at both the state and national levels. HIE is expected to improve care coordination, and advance public health, but implementation is massively complex and involves significant risk. In New York, three regional health information organizations (RHIOs) implemented an HIE use case for public health reporting by demonstrating capability to deliver accurate responses to electronic queries via a set of services called the Universal Public Health Node. We investigated process and outcomes of the implementation with a comparative case study. Qualitative analysis was structured around a decision and risk matrix. Although each RHIO had a unique operational model, two common factors influenced risk management and implementation success: leadership capable of agile decision-making and commitment to a strong organizational vision. While all three RHIOs achieved certification for the public health reporting, only one has elected to deploy a production version.

  7. Welcome to health information science and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanchun

    2013-01-01

    Health Information Science and Systems is an exciting, new, multidisciplinary journal that aims to use technologies in computer science to assist in disease diagnoses, treatment, prediction and monitoring through the modeling, design, development, visualization, integration and management of health related information. These computer-science technologies include such as information systems, web technologies, data mining, image processing, user interaction and interface, sensors and wireless networking and are applicable to a wide range of health related information including medical data, biomedical data, bioinformatics data, public health data.

  8. Medical Records and Health Information Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Projected Employment, 2024 Change, 2014-24 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Medical records and health information ...

  9. The development of a lay health worker delivered collaborative community based intervention for people with schizophrenia in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Madhumitha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care for schizophrenia in low and middle income countries is predominantly facility based and led by specialists, with limited use of non-pharmacological treatments. Although community based psychosocial interventions are emphasised, there is little evidence about their acceptability and feasibility. Furthermore, the shortage of skilled manpower is a major barrier to improving access to these interventions. Our study aimed to develop a lay health worker delivered community based intervention in three sites in India. This paper describes how the intervention was developed systematically, following the MRC framework for the development of complex interventions. Methods We reviewed the lierature on the burden of schizophrenia and the treatment gap in low and middle income countries and the evidence for community based treatments, and identified intervention components. We then evaluated the acceptability and feasibility of this package of care through formative case studies with individuals with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers and piloted its delivery with 30 families. Results Based on the reviews, our intervention comprised five components (psycho-education; adherence management; rehabilitation; referral to community agencies; and health promotion to be delivered by trained lay health workers supervised by specialists. The intervention underwent a number of changes as a result of formative and pilot work. While all the components were acceptable and most were feasible, experiences of stigma and discrimination were inadequately addressed; some participants feared that delivery of care at home would lead to illness disclosure; some participants and providers did not understand how the intervention related to usual care; some families were unwilling to participate; and there were delivery problems, for example, in meeting the targeted number of sessions. Participants found delivery by health workers acceptable, and

  10. Examination of costs for a lay health educator-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program in senior centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowski, Rebecca A; Pope, Rebecca A; Love, Sharhonda; Lensing, Shelly; Felix, Holly C; Prewitt, T Elaine; West, Delia

    2013-10-01

    Older adults in the U.S. have high rates of obesity. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of lifestyle interventions among older adults, lifestyle interventions are not widely implemented in community settings. Program delivery by lay health educators (LHEs) might support greater dissemination because of lower delivery cost and greater accessibility. We examined the costs of a LHE-delivered translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) evidence-based lifestyle intervention for older adults in Arkansas senior centers. This examination of costs used data from a cluster randomized control trial (conducted 2008-2010) in which 7 senior centers (116 participants) were randomized to implement a LHE-delivered 12-session translation of the DPP lifestyle intervention. We compiled direct lifestyle intervention implementation costs, including training, recruitment, materials, and ongoing intervention implementation support. Weight loss data (at 4-month follow-up) were collected from participants. Participant weight loss averaged 3.7kg at 4-months. The total estimated cost to implement the lifestyle intervention is $2731 per senior center, or $165 per participant. The implementation cost per kilogram lost is $45. A LHE-delivered DPP translation in senior centers is effective in achieving weight loss at low cost and offers promise for the dissemination of this evidence-based intervention. © 2013.

  11. Cloud based intelligent system for delivering health care as a service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Pankaj Deep; Chana, Inderveer

    2014-01-01

    The promising potential of cloud computing and its convergence with technologies such as mobile computing, wireless networks, sensor technologies allows for creation and delivery of newer type of cloud services. In this paper, we advocate the use of cloud computing for the creation and management of cloud based health care services. As a representative case study, we design a Cloud Based Intelligent Health Care Service (CBIHCS) that performs real time monitoring of user health data for diagnosis of chronic illness such as diabetes. Advance body sensor components are utilized to gather user specific health data and store in cloud based storage repositories for subsequent analysis and classification. In addition, infrastructure level mechanisms are proposed to provide dynamic resource elasticity for CBIHCS. Experimental results demonstrate that classification accuracy of 92.59% is achieved with our prototype system and the predicted patterns of CPU usage offer better opportunities for adaptive resource elasticity.

  12. Relationship between health literacy, health information access, health behavior, and health status in Japanese people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suka, Machi; Odajima, Takeshi; Okamoto, Masako; Sumitani, Masahiko; Igarashi, Ataru; Ishikawa, Hirono; Kusama, Makiko; Yamamoto, Michiko; Nakayama, Takeo; Sugimori, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between health literacy (HL), health information access, health behavior, and health status in Japanese people. A questionnaire survey was conducted at six healthcare facilities in Japan. Eligible respondents aged 20-64 years (n=1218) were included. Path analysis with structural equation modeling was performed to test the hypothesis model linking HL to health information access, health behavior, and health status. The acceptable fitting model indicated that the pathways linking HL to health status consisted of two indirect paths; one intermediated by health information access and another intermediated by health behavior. Those with higher HL as measured by the 14-item Health Literacy Scale (HLS-14) were significantly more likely to get sufficient health information from multiple sources, less likely to have risky habits of smoking, regular drinking, and lack of exercise, and in turn, more likely to report good self-rated health. HL was significantly associated with health information access and health behavior in Japanese people. HL may play a key role in health promotion, even in highly educated countries like Japan. In order to enhance the effects of health promotion interventions, health professionals should aim at raising HL levels of their target population groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Delivering Flexible Education and Training to Health Professionals: Caring for Older Adults in Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Brian A; Gulley, Kelly H; Rossi, Carlo; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    The National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (NCDMPH), in collaboration with over 20 subject matter experts, created a competency-based curriculum titled Caring for Older Adults in Disasters: A Curriculum for Health Professionals. Educators and trainers of health professionals are the target audience for this curriculum. The curriculum was designed to provide breadth of content yet flexibility for trainers to tailor lessons, or select particular lessons, for the needs of their learners and organizations. The curriculum covers conditions present in the older adult population that may affect their disaster preparedness, response, and recovery; issues related to specific types of disasters; considerations for the care of older adults throughout the disaster cycle; topics related to specific settings in which older adults receive care; and ethical and legal considerations. An excerpt of the final capstone lesson is included. These capstone activities can be used in conjunction with the curriculum or as part of stand-alone preparedness training. This article describes the development process, elements of each lesson, the content covered, and options for use of the curriculum in education and training for health professionals. The curriculum is freely available online at the NCDMPH website at http://ncdmph.usuhs.edu (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:633-637).

  14. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radis, Molly E; Updegrove, Stephen C; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A

    2016-04-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result, nurses' time is poorly utilized and students may suffer adverse outcomes including delayed school entry. In response to this pressing public health issue, a school medical advisor and director of school nurses in a local health department successfully negotiated access for school nurses to three health record systems: a state immunization tracking system, an electronic lead surveillance program, and an electronic health record system. This negotiation process is presented within a framework of the Theory of Diffusion of Innovation and provides a strategy for other school nurses seeking access to student health information.

  15. The Consumer Health Information System Adoption Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkman, Helen; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2015-01-01

    Derived from overlapping concepts in consumer health, a consumer health information system refers to any of the broad range of applications, tools, and educational resources developed to empower consumers with knowledge, techniques, and strategies, to manage their own health. As consumer health information systems become increasingly popular, it is important to explore the factors that impact their adoption and success. Accumulating evidence indicates a relationship between usability and consumers' eHealth Literacy skills and the demands consumer HISs place on their skills. Here, we present a new model called the Consumer Health Information System Adoption Model, which depicts both consumer eHealth literacy skills and system demands on eHealth literacy as moderators with the potential to affect the strength of relationship between usefulness and usability (predictors of usage) and adoption, value, and successful use (actual usage outcomes). Strategies for aligning these two moderating factors are described.

  16. [Good practice guidelines for health information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based health information is distinguished by the provision of an unbiased and trustworthy description of the current state of medical knowledge. It enables people to learn more about health and disease, and to make health-related decisions - on their own or together with others - reflecting their attitudes and lifestyle. To adequately serve this purpose, health information must be evidence-based. A working group from the German Network for Evidence-based Medicine (Deutsches Netzwerk Evidenzbasierte Medizin) has developed a first draft of good practice guidelines for health information (Gute Praxis Gesundheitsinformation) with the aim of providing support for authors and publishers of evidence-based health information. The group included researchers, patient representatives, journalists and developers of health information. The criteria for evidence-based health information were developed and agreed upon within this author group, and then made available for public comment. All submitted comments were documented and assessed regarding the need to revise or amend the draft. Changes were subsequently implemented following approval by the author group. Gute Praxis Gesundheitsinformation calls for a transparent methodological approach in the development of health information. To achieve this, evidence-based information must be based on (a) a systematic literature search, (b) a justified selection of evidence, (c) unbiased reporting of relevant results, (d) appropriate factual and linguistic communication of uncertainties, (e) either avoidance of any direct recommendations or a strict division between the reporting of results and the derivation of recommendations, (f) the consideration of current evidence on the communication of figures, risks and probabilities, and (g) transparent information about the authors and publishers of the health information, including their funding sources. Gute Praxis Gesundheitsinformation lists a total of 16 aspects to be addressed

  17. American Health Information Management Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Government Corporate & Government Training Signature Partners Sponsorship Exhibitors Advertise With AHIMA Copyright & Permissions RSS LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Copyright © 2017 by The American Health ...

  18. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detmer Don E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential to correct these shortcomings. Better health and a better health system are within our reach. Discussion A national health information infrastructure for the United States should address the needs of personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and research. It should also address relevant global dimensions (e.g., standards for sharing data and knowledge across national boundaries. The public and private sectors will need to collaborate to build a robust national health information infrastructure, essentially a 'paperless' health care system, for the United States. The federal government should assume leadership for assuring a national health information infrastructure as recommended by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. Progress is needed in the areas of funding, incentives, standards, and continued refinement of a privacy (i.e., confidentiality and security framework to facilitate personal identification for health purposes. Particular attention should be paid to NHII leadership and change management challenges. Summary A national health information infrastructure is a necessary step for improved health in the U.S. It will require a concerted, collaborative effort by both public and private sectors. If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin

  19. Building the Case for Delivering Health Promotion Services within the Vocational Rehabilitation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, Catherine; Seekins, Tom; Ravesloot, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Research studies report a negative relationship between employment and secondary conditions. Access to health promotion programs to manage secondary conditions, however, is limited for people with disabilities due to employment, financial, and insurance barriers. Vocational rehabilitation (VR) is one possible delivery point to overcome these…

  20. Students Delivering Health Care to a Vulnerable Appalachian Population through Interprofessional Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle L.; Hayes, Patricia A.; McConnell, Peggy; Henry, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Interprofessional student service-learning experiences are integrated into the preventive care of older adult residents of public housing in Appalachia. Receiving a Health Resources and Services Administration grant provided the College of Nursing at East Tennessee State University the opportunity to expand interprofessional clinical experiences…

  1. Bayer HealthCare Delivers a Dose of Reality for Cloud Payoff Mantras in Multinationals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Till J.; Benlian, Alexander; Piper, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cloud services provide high cost advantages” is one of several often-quoted assertions (called mantras in this article) about payoffs from cloud computing. These mantras, however, have their origins in the experiences of small and mid-size companies, but, as the case of Bayer HealthCare’s cloud...

  2. Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…

  3. Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…

  4. Finding Good Health Information on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Finding Good Health Information on the Internet Past Issues / Fall 2016 Table of Contents Stephanie ... for free. “We provide MedlinePlus.gov , and our Spanish sister site MedlinePlus en Español , so that you ...

  5. Improving Exposure to Internet-Delivered Health Behaviour Change Interventions: An exploration of determinants and dissemination strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Brouwer (Wendy)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe Internet has become the key medium to obtain health information for many people. This makes the Internet an attractive and increasingly used medium for the delivery of health behaviour change programs aiming to contribute to the primary prevention of chronic diseases. Although in the

  6. Integrating child health information systems in public health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, Debra; McPhillips-Tangum, Carol; Wild, Ellen L; Mann, Marie Y

    2009-01-01

    Public health agencies at state and local levels are integrating information systems to improve health outcomes for children. An assessment was conducted to describe the extent to which public health agencies are currently integrating child health information systems (CHIS). Using online technology information was collected, to assess completed and planned activities related to integration of CHIS, maturity of these systems, and factors that influence decisions by public health agencies to pursue integration activities. Of the 39 public health agencies that participated, 18 (46%) reported already integrating some or all of their CHIS, and 13 (33%) reported to be planning to integrate during the next 3 years. Information systems most commonly integrated include Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI), immunization, vital records, and Newborn Dried Bloodspot Screening (NDBS). Given the high priority that has been placed on using technology to improve health status in the United States, the emphasis on expanding the capability for the electronic exchange of health information, and federal support for electronic health records by 2014, public health agencies should be encouraged and supported in their efforts to develop, implement, and maintain integrated CHIS to facilitate the electronic exchange of health information with the clinical healthcare sector.

  7. Benefits and tensions in delivering public health in community pharmacies - a qualitative study of healthy living pharmacy staff champions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Richard J; Tsoneva, Jo

    2017-10-01

    Healthy Living Pharmacies (HLP) were introduced in the United Kingdom (UK) in a further attempt to deliver public health benefits in community pharmacy settings. Central to the initiative are staff trained as Healthy Living Champions (HLC) and this study sought to explore HLC perceptions of positive and negative aspect of their work and the wider scheme. A qualitative study was undertaken with a purposive sample of HLCs working in pathfinder HCPs in the Sheffield area in 2014. Participants were recruited by email to either a focus group (n = 7) held at a training event or later semi-structured one-to-one interviews in pharmacies (n = 6). Four stages of interpretative phenomenological analysis were used to code and identify themes. Four main themes emerged relating to the positive workforce development impact HLPs had upon HLCs themselves and on perceived customer and patient engagement and benefits. Tensions were identified with existing commercial business demands and negative views overall of the pharmacy setting with a perceived lack of not only integration with other services but also awareness among the public and health care staff. HLCs felt empowered and more confident in initiating conversation about health issues with patients, but identified barriers relating to workload, a lack of time to perform their role, isolation, tensions with non-HLC staff and logistical barriers such as poor Internet access. Delivering public health activities through the HLC role in UK pharmacies is associated with several perceived benefits for different stakeholders, but may be threatened by well recognised barriers in UK pharmacies related to the commercial setting. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Training Older Adults to Access Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertera, Elizabeth M.; Bertera, Robert L.; Morgan, Russell; Wuertz, Ellen; Attey, Alfred M. O.

    2007-01-01

    Many older adults do not use health information available on the Internet. Older adults residing in affordable housing were taught to use the NIHSeniorHealth.gov Web site. Participants were predominantly African American women with limited education and income (N = 42). Outcomes included changes in computer and health Web site navigation skills.…

  9. Bayer HealthCare Delivers a Dose of Reality for Cloud Payoff Mantras in Multinationals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Till J.; Benlian, Alexander; Piper, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cloud services provide high cost advantages” is one of several often-quoted assertions (called mantras in this article) about payoffs from cloud computing. These mantras, however, have their origins in the experiences of small and mid-size companies, but, as the case of Bayer HealthCare’s cloud-b......-based CRM rollout program shows, may not always be true for large multinational companies. To ensure payoffs from the cloud, multinationals must adopt strategies for coping with the inhibitors identified in this article.......Cloud services provide high cost advantages” is one of several often-quoted assertions (called mantras in this article) about payoffs from cloud computing. These mantras, however, have their origins in the experiences of small and mid-size companies, but, as the case of Bayer HealthCare’s cloud...

  10. Preparing Air Force Nurses to Deliver Health Care in a Unique Operational Environment: Detainee Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    challenging. Weiskopf described the inmate nursing care experience,‘It’s not like a hospital, because the whole purpose is the offender is there...facility’s primary mission focuses on custody of the detainee, not care of the detainee. Nursing care in prison systems has already been identified as...for custody; the offender is not there incarcerated to improve their health.ʹ 1 It is difficult for nurses to transition from an environment in

  11. Occupational health scenario of Indian informal sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Anjali; Vyas, Heer; Nag, Pranab

    2016-08-05

    Workers in the Indian informal sector are engaged with different occupations. These occupations involve varied work related hazards. These occupational hazards are a consequent risk to health. The study aimed to determine occupational health scenario in the Indian Informal sector. One thousand eleven hundred twenty two workers from five different occupations namely weaving (handloom and power loom), construction, transportation, tobacco processing and fish processing were assessed by interviewer administered health questionnaire. Workers suffered from musculo-skeletal complaints, respiratory health hazards, eye problems and skin related complaints. There was a high prevalence of self-reported occupational health problems in the selected sectors. The study finds that workers have occupational exposures to multiple hazards. The absence of protective guards aggrevate their health condition. The study attempts to draws an immediate attention on the existing health scenario of the Indian Informal sector.

  12. Using mobile technology to deliver a cognitive behaviour therapy-informed intervention in early psychosis (Actissist): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Sandra; Barrowclough, Christine; Ainsworth, John; Morris, Rohan; Berry, Katherine; Machin, Matthew; Emsley, Richard; Lewis, Shon; Edge, Dawn; Buchan, Iain; Haddock, Gillian

    2015-09-10

    Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is recommended for the treatment of psychosis; however, only a small proportion of service users have access to this intervention. Smartphone technology using software applications (apps) could increase access to psychological approaches for psychosis. This paper reports the protocol development for a clinical trial of smartphone-based CBT. We present a study protocol that describes a single-blind randomised controlled trial comparing a cognitive behaviour therapy-informed software application (Actissist) plus Treatment As Usual (TAU) with a symptom monitoring software application (ClinTouch) plus TAU in early psychosis. The study consists of a 12-week intervention period. We aim to recruit and randomly assign 36 participants registered with early intervention services (EIS) across the North West of England, UK in a 2:1 ratio to each arm of the trial. Our primary objective is to determine whether in people with early psychosis the Actissist app is feasible to deliver and acceptable to use. Secondary aims are to determine whether Actissist impacts on predictors of first episode psychosis (FEP) relapse and enhances user empowerment, functioning and quality of life. Assessments will take place at baseline, 12 weeks (post-treatment) and 22-weeks (10 weeks post-treatment) by assessors blind to treatment condition. The trial will report on the feasibility and acceptability of Actissist and compare outcomes between the randomised arms. The study also incorporates semi-structured interviews about the experience of participating in the Actissist trial that will be qualitatively analysed to inform future developments of the Actissist protocol and app. To our knowledge, this is the first controlled trial to test the feasibility, acceptability, uptake, attrition and potential efficacy of a CBT-informed smartphone app for early psychosis. Mobile applications designed to deliver a psychologically-informed intervention offer new possibilities to

  13. Issues in consumer mental health information.

    OpenAIRE

    Angier, J J

    1984-01-01

    Consumer health information as applied to mental health includes areas such as the diagnosis, management, and treatment of mental illness, as well as self-help, emotional wellness, and the relationship between life events, stress, and disease. This paper presents issues specific to the provision of mental health information to the layperson, e.g., confidentiality, literacy, competence, the social stigma of mental illness, the state of the art in psychiatry, popular psychology, and treatment f...

  14. ‘Get Healthy, Stay Healthy’: protocol for evaluation of a lifestyle intervention delivered by text-message following the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Behavioural lifestyle interventions can be effective at promoting initial weight loss and supporting physical activity and dietary behaviour change, however maintaining improvements in these outcomes is often more difficult to achieve. Extending intervention contact to reinforce learnt behavioural skills has been shown to improve maintenance of behaviour change and weight loss. This trial aims to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of a text message-delivered extended contact intervention to enhance or maintain change in physical activity, dietary behaviour and weight loss among participants who have completed a six month Government-funded, population-based telephone coaching lifestyle program: the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service (GHS). Methods/Design GHS completers will be randomised to the 6-month extended contact intervention (Get Healthy, Stay Healthy, GHSH) or a no contact control group (standard practice following GHS completion). GHSH participants determine the timing and frequency of the text messages (3–13 per fortnight) and content is tailored to their behavioural and weight goals and support preferences. Two telephone tailoring calls are made (baseline, 12-weeks) to facilitate message tailoring. Primary outcomes, anthropometric (body weight and waist circumference via self-report) and behavioural (moderate-vigorous physical activity via self-report and accelerometer, fruit and vegetable intake via self-report), will be assessed at baseline (at GHS completion), 6-months (end of extended contact intervention) and 12-months (6-months post intervention contact). Secondary aims include evaluation of: the feasibility of program delivery; the acceptability for participants; theoretically-guided, potential mediators and moderators of behaviour change; dose-responsiveness; and, costs of program delivery. Discussion Findings from this trial will inform the delivery of the GHS in relation to the maintenance of behaviour

  15. 'Get Healthy, Stay Healthy': protocol for evaluation of a lifestyle intervention delivered by text-message following the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeldsoe, Brianna; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Bauman, Adrian; Goode, Ana; Maher, Genevieve; Eakin, Elizabeth

    2014-02-04

    Behavioural lifestyle interventions can be effective at promoting initial weight loss and supporting physical activity and dietary behaviour change, however maintaining improvements in these outcomes is often more difficult to achieve. Extending intervention contact to reinforce learnt behavioural skills has been shown to improve maintenance of behaviour change and weight loss. This trial aims to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of a text message-delivered extended contact intervention to enhance or maintain change in physical activity, dietary behaviour and weight loss among participants who have completed a six month Government-funded, population-based telephone coaching lifestyle program: the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service (GHS). GHS completers will be randomised to the 6-month extended contact intervention (Get Healthy, Stay Healthy, GHSH) or a no contact control group (standard practice following GHS completion). GHSH participants determine the timing and frequency of the text messages (3-13 per fortnight) and content is tailored to their behavioural and weight goals and support preferences. Two telephone tailoring calls are made (baseline, 12-weeks) to facilitate message tailoring. Primary outcomes, anthropometric (body weight and waist circumference via self-report) and behavioural (moderate-vigorous physical activity via self-report and accelerometer, fruit and vegetable intake via self-report), will be assessed at baseline (at GHS completion), 6-months (end of extended contact intervention) and 12-months (6-months post intervention contact). Secondary aims include evaluation of: the feasibility of program delivery; the acceptability for participants; theoretically-guided, potential mediators and moderators of behaviour change; dose-responsiveness; and, costs of program delivery. Findings from this trial will inform the delivery of the GHS in relation to the maintenance of behaviour change and weight loss, and will

  16. [Health information in the daily local press].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzueta Zamalloa, L; Najarro Ajuria, G; Mendíbil Crespo, I; Galán Morales, F; Garay Narvarte, F J

    1998-04-15

    To know how much health-related information is published in the daily local press, type of information; pathologies; practical help offered, and sources. Crossover descriptive study. Community. Health articles (events and publicity excluded) published in the newspapers of Bizkaia: Deia, Egin, Egunkaria, El Correo and El Mundo; sample included all issues from one fortnight of June and one fortnight of September of 1996. 501 articles, which occupied 1.57% of the impressed surface, were published. 90% of the issues had health articles. 19.8% appeared in once-weekly health sections. Subjects considered as health culture were 49.9% scientific and technical information and 9.8% health habits and vaccinations. When compared with the rest of the newspaper, health sections gave more explicit advice (p = 0.04) and diferred in sources of information (p < 0.01). Health articles are almost daily published. The most frequent type was the spread of scientific and technical information. Current information topics are dominant. A few articles give explicit advice or referred to health habits. Acknowledgement of the sources could be improved. It would be desirable to investigate the quality of contents.

  17. Delivering digital health and well-being at scale: lessons learned during the implementation of the dallas program in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, Alison M.; McGee-Lennon, Marily; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Agbakoba, Ruth; O'Connor, Siobhan; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Wyke, Sally; Watson, Nicholas; Browne, Susan; Frances S Mair

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify implementation lessons from the United Kingdom Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale (dallas) program—a large-scale, national technology program that aims to deliver a broad range of digital services and products to the public to promote health and well-being.\\ud \\ud Materials and Methods: Prospective, longitudinal qualitative research study investigating implementation processes. Qualitative data collected includes semi-structured e-Health Implementation Toolk...

  18. The NADI program and the JOICFP integrated project: partners in delivering primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshat, H; Othman, R; Kuan Lin Chee; Abdullah, M

    1985-10-01

    The NADI program (pulse in Malay) was initially launched as a pilot project in 1980 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It utilized an integrated approach involving both the government and the private sectors. By sharing resources and expertise, and by working together, the government and the people can achieve national development faster and with better results. The agencies work through a multi-level supportive structure, at the head of which is the steering committee. The NADI teams at the field level are the focal points of services from the various agencies. Members of NADI teams also work with urban poor families as well as health groups, parents-teachers associations, and other similar groups. The policy and planning functions are carried out by the steering committee, the 5 area action committees and the community action committees, while the implementation function is carried out by the area program managers and NADI teams. The chairman of each area action committee is the head of the branch office of city hall. Using intestinal parasite control as the entry point, the NADI Integrated Family Development Program has greatly helped in expanding inter-agency cooperation and exchange of experiences by a coordinated, effective and efficient resource-mobilization. The program was later expanded to other parts of the country including the industrial and estate sectors. Services provided by NADI include: comprehensive health services to promote maternal and child health; adequate water supply, proper waste disposal, construction of latrines and providing electricity; and initiating community and family development such as community education, preschool education, vocational training, family counseling and building special facilities for recreational and educational purposes.

  19. Health on the web: randomised controlled trial of online screening and brief alcohol intervention delivered in a workplace setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarnie Khadjesari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alcohol misuse in England costs around £7.3 billion (US$12.2 billion annually from lost productivity and absenteeism. Delivering brief alcohol interventions to employees as part of a health check may be acceptable, particularly with online delivery which can provide privacy for this stigmatised behaviour. Research to support this approach is limited and methodologically weak. The aim was to determine the effectiveness of online screening and personalised feedback on alcohol consumption, delivered in a workplace as part of a health check. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This two-group online individually randomised controlled trial recruited employees from a UK-based private sector organisation (approx. 100,000 employees. 3,375 employees completed the online health check in the three week recruitment period. Of these, 1,330 (39% scored five or more on the AUDIT-C (indicating alcohol misuse and were randomised to receive personalised feedback on their alcohol intake, alongside feedback on other health behaviours (n = 659, or to receive feedback on all health behaviours except alcohol intake (n = 671. Participants were mostly male (75%, with a median age of 48 years and half were in managerial positions (55%. Median Body Mass Index was 26, 12% were smokers, median time undertaking moderate/vigorous physical activity a week was 173 minutes and median fruit and vegetable consumption was three portions a day. Eighty percent (n = 1,066 of participants completed follow-up questionnaires at three months. An intention to treat analysis found no difference between experimental groups for past week drinking (primary outcome (5.6% increase associated with the intervention (95% CI -4.7% to 16.9%; p = .30, AUDIT (measure of alcohol-related harm and health utility (EQ-5D. CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence to support the use of personalised feedback within an online health check for reducing alcohol consumption among employees in this

  20. [Health information on nutrition in newspaper articles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinada, Kayoko; Ariake, Motoko; Abe, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review health information on nutrition in Japanese newspaper articles. The Nikkei Database was used to select articles published in five major newspapers: Asahi, Sankei, Nikkei, Mainichi and Yomiuri. All these dailies have nationwide circulation. The search period was for 7 years, from January 1993 to December 1999. The keywords "diet," "health," and "nutrition" were used. Consequently, 182 articles were selected and analyzed by determining content and coverage. The articles were published to be targeted for the general population: 123 (67.6%), schoolchildren: 21 (11.5%), and elderly: 18 (9.9%). The main source of the newspaper articles on diet was health professionals, such as nutritionists and medical doctors. As diet related health problems, the lifestyle-related diseases, obesity, hypertension, and mental health were introduced in the newspapers. Few articles commented on the relationship between oral health and diet, and dental professionals were not much involved in providing health information on diet. The newspaper is a major source for the general public to obtain health information. It is clear that oral diseases and functional disorder influence daily eating habits. It was suggested that dental professionals should provide such information to the general public, using many occasions, such as conducting health guidance at dental clinics, health education at health centers or schools, and also through mass media.

  1. Using mobile health technology to deliver decision support for self-monitoring after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Sereika, Susan M; DeVito Dabbs, Annette; Handler, Steven M; Schlenk, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Lung transplant recipients (LTR) experience problems recognizing and reporting critical condition changes during their daily health self-monitoring. Pocket PATH(®), a mobile health application, was designed to provide automatic feedback messages to LTR to guide decisions for detecting and reporting critical values of health indicators. To examine the degree to which LTR followed decision support messages to report recorded critical values, and to explore predictors of appropriately following technology decision support by reporting critical values during the first year after transplantation. A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted to analyze existing data from 96 LTR who used the Pocket PATH for daily health self-monitoring. When a critical value is entered, the device automatically generated a feedback message to guide LTR about when and what to report to their transplant coordinators. Their socio-demographics and clinical characteristics were obtained before discharge. Their use of Pocket PATH for health self-monitoring during 12 months was categorized as low (≤25% of days), moderate (>25% to ≤75% of days), and high (>75% of days) use. Following technology decision support was defined by the total number of critical feedback messages appropriately handled divided by the total number of critical feedback messages generated. This variable was dichotomized by whether or not all (100%) feedback messages were appropriately followed. Binary logistic regression was used to explore predictors of appropriately following decision support. Of the 96 participants, 53 had at least 1 critical feedback message generated during 12 months. Of these 53 participants, the average message response rate was 90% and 33 (62%) followed 100% decision support. LTR who moderately used Pocket PATH (n=23) were less likely to follow technology decision support than the high (odds ratio [OR]=0.11, p=0.02) and low (OR=0.04, p=0.02) use groups. The odds of following decision

  2. Health information technology: strategic initiatives, real progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodner, Robert M; Cohn, Simon P; Friedman, Charles P

    2008-01-01

    We fully agree with Carol Diamond and Clay Shirky that deployment of health information technology (IT) is necessary but not sufficient for transforming U.S. health care. However, the recent work to advance health IT is far from an exercise in "magical thinking." It has been strategic thinking. To illustrate this, we highlight recent initiatives and progress under four focus areas: adoption, governance, privacy and security, and interoperability. In addition, solutions exist for health IT to advance rapidly without adversely affecting future policy choices. A broad national consensus is emerging in support of advancing health IT to enable the transformation of health and care.

  3. [Information systems in health and health indicators: an integrating perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela-Soler, Jaume; Elvira-Martínez, David; Labordena-Barceló, María Jesús; Loyola-Elizondo, Enrique

    2010-02-01

    Health Information Systems (HIS) are the core support to decision-making in health organizations. Within HIS, health indicators (HI) reflect, numerically, events measured in the health-illness continuum. The integrated health information system is intended to standardize, integrate and organize all the information available in health information systems through an accessible and secure repository, and to conveniently distribute information for decision-making. To standardize information it is necessary to define standards and semantic information to enable us to identify concepts and relate them uniquely to each other. The definition of a catalog of entities (DEA) with concepts, attributes and domains will enable the configuration of the information system, so there will be a catalog of entities (concepts of information and domains). Based on operational systems, analytical systems enabling management and strategy in the management of organizations will be built. The maximum level of analysis is the Balanced Score Card (BSC), which is established as the strategic tool for managers. It is necessary for the organization an integrated information system to plan, manage, evaluate and therefore provide managers with a decision tool for strategic and tactical decision-making in short and medium term. 2010 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. The ethical dimensions of delivering culturally congruent nursing and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoucha, R; Husted, G L

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the ethical parameters of giving culturally congruent care to individual patients by health care professionals. Leininger's Cultural Care Diversity and Universality theory (Leininger, 1995) is used to demonstrate the importance of culture in a person's life and Husted's and Husted's (1995) bioethical theory is used to create a mind-set of ethical interaction and to direct the analysis of a bioethical dilemma involving cultural differences between persons of the same culture, a depressed Mexican-American woman and her husband. The differences between transculturalism and multiculturalism are explored. We defend the position that a patient's culture is only a useful tool in caring for a patient if the individual person is made the primary focus of care.

  5. Promoting consumption of fruit and vegetables for better health. Have campaigns delivered on the goals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekhy, Reetica; McConchie, Robyn

    2014-08-01

    Daily intake of fruits and vegetables worldwide remains well below the recommended WHO levels, despite the established health benefits associated with fruit and vegetable consumption. A diversity of policy interventions designed to increase consumption have been conducted in the developed economies around the globe for over a decade, involving significant monetary outlays. The impact of these initiatives remains at best, modest to low, in effecting a significant increase in daily consumption on a sustained basis. Several factors have been identified in both promoting and impeding the increase in fruit and vegetable consumption, including the effects of consumer behaviour. This paper reviews several of the major promotional campaigns from around the world and provides analysis of their level of success, with a view to developing novel approaches for formulating more effective marketing and promotional interventions that will prompt significant change.

  6. [Consumer health-care information technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyaev, A

    2013-06-01

    Consumer health-care information technology is intended to improve patients' opportunities to gather information about their own health. Ideally, this will be achieved through an improved involvement of existing data bases and an improved communication of information to patients and to care providers, if desired by patients. Additionally, further interconnection of existing and new systems and pervasive system design may be used. All consumer health-care information technology services are optional and leave patients in control of their medical data at all times. This article reflects the current status of consumer health-care information technology research and suggests further research areas that should be addressed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Early diagnosis and Early Start Denver Model intervention in autism spectrum disorders delivered in an Italian Public Health System service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devescovi R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Raffaella Devescovi,1 Lorenzo Monasta,2 Alice Mancini,3 Maura Bin,1 Valerio Vellante,1 Marco Carrozzi,1 Costanza Colombi4 1Division of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, 2Clinical Epidemiology and Public Health Research Unit, Institute for Maternal and Child Health – IRCCS “Burlo Garofolo”, Trieste, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Background: Early diagnosis combined with an early intervention program, such as the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM, can positively influence the early natural history of autism spectrum disorders. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an early ESDM-inspired intervention, in a small group of toddlers, delivered at low intensity by the Italian Public Health System.Methods: Twenty-one toddlers at risk for autism spectrum disorders, aged 20–36 months, received 3 hours/wk of one-to-one ESDM-inspired intervention by trained therapists, combined with parents’ and teachers’ active engagement in ecological implementation of treatment. The mean duration of treatment was 15 months. Cognitive and communication skills, as well as severity of autism symptoms, were assessed by using standardized measures at pre-intervention (Time 0 [T0]; mean age =27 months and post-intervention (Time 1 [T1]; mean age =42 months.Results: Children made statistically significant improvements in the language and cognitive domains, as demonstrated by a series of nonparametric Wilcoxon tests for paired data. Regarding severity of autism symptoms, younger age at diagnosis was positively associated with greater improvement at post-assessment.Conclusion: Our results are consistent with the literature that underlines the importance of early diagnosis and early intervention, since prompt diagnosis can reduce the severity of autism symptoms and improve cognitive and language skills in younger children

  8. Mass Drug Administration and beyond: how can we strengthen health systems to deliver complex interventions to eliminate neglected tropical diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Achieving the 2020 goals for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) requires scale-up of Mass Drug Administration (MDA) which will require long-term commitment of national and global financing partners, strengthening national capacity and, at the community level, systems to monitor and evaluate activities and impact. For some settings and diseases, MDA is not appropriate and alternative interventions are required. Operational research is necessary to identify how existing MDA networks can deliver this more complex range of interventions equitably. The final stages of the different global programmes to eliminate NTDs require eliminating foci of transmission which are likely to persist in complex and remote rural settings. Operational research is required to identify how current tools and practices might be adapted to locate and eliminate these hard-to-reach foci. Chronic disabilities caused by NTDs will persist after transmission of pathogens ceases. Development and delivery of sustainable services to reduce the NTD-related disability is an urgent public health priority. LSTM and its partners are world leaders in developing and delivering interventions to control vector-borne NTDs and malaria, particularly in hard-to-reach settings in Africa. Our experience, partnerships and research capacity allows us to serve as a hub for developing, supporting, monitoring and evaluating global programmes to eliminate NTDs.

  9. Delivering post-abortion care through a community-based reproductive health volunteer programme in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmat, Syed Khurram; Shaikh, Babar T; Mustafa, Ghulam; Hameed, Waqas; Bilgrami, Mohsina

    2012-11-01

    This qualitative study was conducted in May-June 2010 with women using post-abortion care (PAC) services provided by the Marie Stopes Society in Pakistan during the six month period preceding the study, more than 70% of whom had been referred to the clinics by reproductive health volunteers (RHVs). The aim of the study was to establish the socio-demographic profile of clients, determine their preferred method of treatment, explore their perceptions of the barriers to accessing post-abortion services and to understand the challenges faced by RHVs. The sample women were selected from six randomly selected districts of Sindh and Punjab. Eight focus group discussions were conducted with PAC clients and fifteen in-depth interviews with RHVs. In addition, a quantitative exit interview questionnaire was administered to 76 clients. Medical, rather than surgical, treatment for incomplete and unsafe abortions was preferred because it was perceived to 'cause less pain', was 'easy to employ' and 'having fewer complications'. Household economics influence women's decision-making on seeking post-abortion care. Other restraining factors include objection by husbands and in-laws, restrictions on female mobility, the views of religious clerics and a lack of transport. The involvement of all stakeholders could secure social approval and acceptance of the provision of safe post-abortion care services in Pakistan, and improve the quality of family planning services to the women who want to space their pregnancies.

  10. Correlates of consumer trust in online health information: findings from the health information national trends survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yinjiao

    2011-01-01

    The past few decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in consumers seeking health information online. However, the quality of such information remains questionable, and the trustworthiness of online health information has become a hot topic, whereas little attention has been paid to how consumers evaluate online health information credibility. This study builds on theoretical perspectives of trust such as personal-capital-based, social-capital-based, and transfer-based, and it examines various correlates of consumer trust in online health information. The author analyzed the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey data (N = 7,674). Results showed that consumer trust in online health information did not correlate with personal capital such as income, education, and health status. Social capital indicated by visiting social networking Web sites was not associated with trust in online health information either. Nevertheless, trust in online health information transferred from traditional mass media and government health agencies to the Internet, and it varied by such information features as easiness to locate and to understand. Age appeared to be a key factor in understanding the correlates of trust in online health information. Theoretical and empirical implications of the results are discussed.

  11. Health care in the information society: evolution or revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimson, Jane; Grimson, William

    2002-11-20

    This brief article is a commentary on the Haux et al. paper on Health Care in the Information Society: a prognosis for the year 2013. The commentary concentrates in particular on the underlying assumptions, which are at the core of the Haux et al. vision for healthcare in 2013. They assume that while there will be a shift towards increased patient-centred, community-based shared care, the underlying healthcare system will remain essentially the same. This commentary suggests that this is a conservative view and indeed questions its validity. Radical financial pressures to control costs as well as demands for equity fueled by more knowledgeable and better informed patients have the potential to bring about fundamental changes, with consequences for the way in which healthcare is delivered and in turn in how information and communications technologies are utilised.

  12. [Information security in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ködmön, József; Csajbók, Zoltán Ernő

    2015-07-05

    Doctors, nurses and other medical professionals are spending more and more time in front of the computer, using applications developed for general practitioners, specialized care, or perhaps an integrated hospital system. The data they handle during healing and patient care are mostly sensitive data and, therefore, their management is strictly regulated. Finding our way in the jungle of laws, regulations and policies is not simple. Notwithstanding, our lack of information does not waive our responsibility. This study summarizes the most important points of international recommendations, standards and legal regulations of the field, as well as giving practical advices for managing medical and patient data securely and in compliance with the current legal regulations.

  13. [A study on health information literacy among urban and suburban residents in six provinces in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xueqiong; Li, Yinghua; Li, Li; Huang, Xianggang

    2014-07-01

    To understand the status and its influencing factors of health information literacy among urban and suburban residents in China, and to explore the method for improving the health information literacy. From March to May in 2013, residents aged 18-60 years in six provinces in China were investigated with Questionnaire of Health Literacy of Diabetes Mellitus of the Public in China about self-reported health information literacy. The results of the survey were standardized by the 6th national census data. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore influencing factors of health information literacy. A total of 4 416 residents were surveyed, and 4 282 (97.0%) valid questionnaires were collected. After weight adjustments, 30.1% of the residents aged 18-60 years had adequate health information literacy in China, and the 95%CI of the rate was 28.5% - 31.6%. Totally, 70.8% of the residents ever actively searched for health information, 43.7% of the residents could easily retrieve the health information, 49.1% of the residents could easily understand the health information, 41.8% of the residents could confidently differentiate the quality of the health information and 51.1% of the residents ever searched health information on the internet. The results of multi-logistic regression showed that the rural residents, the males, those with lower levels of education, those with poor health had a lower health information literacy. The most trusted health information source was from doctors, and the trust rate reached 97.0%, followed by family members, friends or colleagues. The residents trusted the interpersonal communication more than the mass media and the new media. The level of health information literacy of the residents was generally low in China. To improve the health information literacy, high-quality health information services should be delivered to the residents, and the health education on the internet provided by the medical professionals should also be explored.

  14. Mental health surveillance and information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gater, R; Chisholm, D; Dowrick, C

    2015-09-28

    Routine information systems for mental health in many Eastern Mediterranean Region countries are rudimentary or absent, making it difficult to understand the needs of local populations and to plan accordingly. Key components for mental health surveillance and information systems are: national commitment and leadership to ensure that relevant high quality information is collected and reported; a minimum data set of key mental health indicators; intersectoral collaboration with appropriate data sharing; routine data collection supplemented with periodic surveys; quality control and confidentiality; and technology and skills to support data collection, sharing and dissemination. Priority strategic interventions include: (1) periodically assessing and reporting the mental health resources and capacities available using standardized methodologies; (2) routine collection of information and reporting on service availability, coverage and continuity, for priority mental disorders disaggregated by age, sex and diagnosis; and (3) mandatory recording and reporting of suicides at the national level (using relevant ICD codes).

  15. Health Information in Somali (Af-Soomaali )

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Plan - Af-Soomaali (Somali) MP4 Healthy Roads Media Mass Casualty Patient Self-Assessment Form - Af-Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information ... MP4 Healthy Roads Media Pets and Disaster - English Pets and Disaster - Af- ...

  16. Health Information in Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/indonesian.html Health Information in Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  17. 78 FR 17418 - Rural Health Information Technology Network Development Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... award under the Rural Health Information Technology Network Development Grant (RHITND) to Grace... relinquishing its fiduciary responsibilities for the Rural Health Information Technology Network Development... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Rural Health Information Technology...

  18. Ontology-driven health information systems architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blobel, Bernd; Oemig, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Following an architecture vision such as the Generic Component Model (GCM) architecture framework, health information systems for supporting personalized care have to be based on a component-oriented architecture. Representing concepts and their interrelations, the GCM perspectives system architecture, domains, and development process can be described by the domains' ontologies. The paper introduces ontology principles, ontology references to the GCM as well as some practical aspects of ontology-driven approaches to semantically interoperable and sustainable health information systems.

  19. Using information to deliver safer care: a mixed-methods study exploring general practitioners’ information needs in North West London primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Mastellos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The National Health Service in England has given increasing priority to improving inter-professional communication, enabling better management of patients with chronic conditions and reducing medical errors through effective use of information. Despite considerable efforts to reduce patient harm through better information usage, medical errors continue to occur, posing a serious threat to patient safety.Objectives This study explores the range, quality and sophistication of existing information systems in primary care with the aim to capture what information practitioners need to provide a safe service and identify barriers to its effective use in care pathways.Method Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with general practitioners from surgeries in North West London and a survey evaluating their experience with information systems in care pathways.Results Important information is still missing, specifically discharge summaries detailing medication changes and changes in the diagnosis and management of patients, blood results ordered by hospital specialists and findings from clinical investigations. Participants identified numerous barriers, including the communication gap between primary and secondary care, the variable quality and consistency of clinical correspondence and the inadequate technological integration.Conclusion Despite attempts to improve integration and information flow in care pathways, existing systems provide practitioners with only partial access to information, hindering their ability to take informed decisions. This study offers a framework for understanding what tools should be in place to enable effective use of information in primary care. 

  20. Using information to deliver safer care: a mixed-methods study exploring general practitioners' information needs in North West London primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, Nikolaos; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Aylin, Paul

    2014-12-08

    The National Health Service in England has given increasing priority to improving inter-professional communication, enabling better management of patients with chronic conditions and reducing medical errors through effective use of information. Despite considerable efforts to reduce patient harm through better information usage, medical errors continue to occur, posing a serious threat to patient safety. This study explores the range, quality and sophistication of existing information systems in primary care with the aim to capture what information practitioners need to provide a safe service and identify barriers to its effective use in care pathways. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with general practitioners from surgeries in North West London and a survey evaluating their experience with information systems in care pathways. Important information is still missing, specifically discharge summaries detailing medication changes and changes in the diagnosis and management of patients, blood results ordered by hospital specialists and findings from clinical investigations. Participants identified numerous barriers, including the communication gap between primary and secondary care, the variable quality and consistency of clinical correspondence and the inadequate technological integration. Despite attempts to improve integration and information flow in care pathways, existing systems provide practitioners with only partial access to information, hindering their ability to take informed decisions. This study offers a framework for understanding what tools should be in place to enable effective use of information in primary care.

  1. Building consumer trust into health information exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Carol; Ricciardi, Lygeia

    2006-01-01

    For nationwide health information exchange to succeed, consumers must trust that their data are being managed responsibly. Regional and other networks that create the nationwide exchange should make consumer trust a priority that is factored into every decision they make. Connecting for Health's Common Framework offers a starting point.

  2. Redesigning Health Information Systems in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw; Kimaro, Honest; Aanestad, Margunn

    2008-01-01

    Despite widespread aims to strengthen the Health Information System (HIS) as a tool for decentralised health care, there is a strong tendency in most developing countries that the HIS continues to reflect the central level's needs and requirements. The traditional design approach with little...

  3. Philip Morris's health information web site appears responsible but undermines public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth A; Malone, Ruth E

    2008-01-01

    Many people may search for information about tobacco use, the largest cause of preventable mortality in the United States, on the Internet. In 1999, Philip Morris U.S.A. (PM), the country's biggest cigarette manufacturer, posted a Web site and launched a campaign to encourage people to obtain information about tobacco and health issues there. The company asserted that its goal was to deliver the messages of the public health community about tobacco. However, internal tobacco company documents reveal that the site was a public relations effort intended to help the company avoid punishment and regulation. Examination of the language on the Web site reveals many contradictions and omissions that may undermine public health messages. Among these are vague and confusing information about addiction, tar, and nicotine, a lack of motivators to quit smoking, and silence about tobacco-related mortality. By appearing to join with public health organizations in disseminating "responsible" messages about tobacco, PM may improve its image, thus facilitating its ability to continue to sell its lethal products. Public health nurses should be prepared to examine health information on the Internet for subtle biases, to counter PM's specific language about smoking to patients, and to challenge PM's larger corporate goals.

  4. Strengthening Rehabilitation in Health Systems Worldwide by Integrating Information on Functioning in National Health Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Gerold; Bickenbach, Jerome; Melvin, John

    2016-12-15

    A complete understanding of the experience of health requires information relevant not merely to the health indicators of mortality and morbidity but also to functioning-that is, information about what it means to live in a health state, "the lived experience of health." Not only is functioning information relevant to healthcare and the overall objectives of person-centered healthcare but to the successful operation of all components of health systems.In light of population aging and major epidemiological trends, the health strategy of rehabilitation, whose aim has always been to optimize functioning and minimize disability, will become a key health strategy. The increasing prominence of the rehabilitative strategy within the health system drives the argument for the integration of functioning information as an essential component in national health information systems.Rehabilitation professionals and researchers have long recognized in WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health the best prospect for an internationally recognized, sufficiently complete and powerful information reference for the documentation of functioning information. This paper opens the discussion of the promise of integrating the ICF as an essential component in national health systems to secure access to functioning information for rehabilitation, across health systems and countries.

  5. Design principles in the development of (public) health information infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neame, Roderick

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author outlines the key issues in the development of a regional health information infrastructure suitable for public health data collections. A set of 10 basic design and development principles as used and validated in the development of the successful New Zealand National Health Information Infrastructure in 1993 are put forward as a basis for future developments. The article emphasises the importance of securing clinical input into any health data that is collected, and suggests strategies whereby this may be achieved, including creating an information economy alongside the care economy. It is suggested that the role of government in such developments is to demonstrate leadership, to work with the sector to develop data, messaging and security standards, to establish key online indexes, to develop data warehouses and to create financial incentives for adoption of the infrastructure and the services it delivers to users. However experience suggests that government should refrain from getting involved in local care services data infrastructure, technology and management issues.

  6. The secret to a health benefits self-service model: a more informed consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, T R

    2001-01-01

    Sageo is the first full-service e-business to deliver health, dental, vision and welfare benefits via the Internet. The author describes the health care system's problems that have led to the need for participant-driven, self-service systems; describes Sageo's genesis and inaugural online enrollment; and explains how services like those offered by Sageo allow employers to "match, pace and lead" to a more informed health care consumer.

  7. Issues in consumer mental health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angier, J J

    1984-07-01

    Consumer health information as applied to mental health includes areas such as the diagnosis, management, and treatment of mental illness, as well as self-help, emotional wellness, and the relationship between life events, stress, and disease. This paper presents issues specific to the provision of mental health information to the layperson, e.g., confidentiality, literacy, competence, the social stigma of mental illness, the state of the art in psychiatry, popular psychology, and treatment fads. The development of a community education pamphlet illustrates how one organization addressed these issues.

  8. Information systems in neonatology and health planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lallo, Domenico; Di Napoli, Anteo

    2011-10-01

    Improving the well-being of infants and children is an important public health goal. To reach this objective public health authorities need in-depth knowledge of perinatal statistics as well as the organization of perinatal care. These data must be based on the use of reliable information describing both individual and organizational factors and short and long term outcomes. Several perinatal information sources are available in Italy for analyses aimed at producing evidence for health planning purposes: the National birth registry, Infant mortality registry and Neonatal networks. We describe their structure and summarize some evidence derived from the experiences conducted in the Lazio region.

  9. Data liquidity in health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Paul K

    2011-01-01

    In 2001, the Institute of Medicine report Crossing the Quality Chasm and the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics report Information for Health were released, and they provided the context for the development of information systems used to support health-supporting processes. Both had as their goals, implicit or explicit, to ensure the right data are provided to the right person at the right time, which is one definition of "data liquidity." This concept has had some traction in recent years as a shorthand way to express a system property for health information technology, but there is not a well-defined characterization of what properties of a system or of its components give it better or worse data liquidity. This article looks at some recent work that help to identify those properties and perhaps can help to ground the concept with metrics that are assessable.

  10. Delivering evidence-based smoking cessation treatment in primary care practice: experience of Ontario family health teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Sophia; Gharib, Marie; Hambleton, Josh; Reid, Robert D; Assi, Roxane; Pipe, Andrew L

    2014-07-01

    To report on the delivery of evidence-based smoking cessation treatments (EBSCTs) within a sample of 40 Ontario family health teams (FHTs). In each FHT, consecutive patients were screened for smoking status and eligible patients completed a questionnaire immediately following their clinic visits (index visits). Multilevel analysis was used to examine FHT-level, provider-level, and patient-level predictors of EBSCT delivery. Forty FHTs in Ontario. Across the 40 participating FHTs, 24,033 patients were screened and 2501 eligible patients contributed data. Provider performance in the delivery of EBSCTs during the preceding 12 months and during the index visits was assessed. The rate of provider delivery of EBSCT for the previous 12 months was 74.0% for the advise strategy. At the index visit, rates of EBSCT strategy delivery were 56.8% for ask; 46.9% for advise; 38.7% for assist; 11.6% for prescribing pharmacotherapy; and 11.3% for arrange follow-up. Significant intra-FHT and intraprovider variability in the rates of EBSCT delivery was identified. Family health teams with a physician champion (odds ratio [OR] 2.0; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.6; P < .01) and providers who highly ranked the importance of smoking cessation (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.7; P < .01) were more likely to deliver EBSCTs. Patient readiness to quit (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.3 to 1.9; P < .001), presence of smoking-related illness (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.1; P < .01), and presenting for an annual health examination (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.6 to 2.5; P < .001) were associated with the delivery of EBSCTs. Rates of smoking cessation advice were higher than previously reported for Canadian physicians; however, rates of assistance with quitting were lower. Future quality improvement initiatives should specifically target increasing the rates of screening and advising among low-performing FHTs and providers within FHTs, with a particular emphasis on doing so at all clinic appointments; and improving the rate at which assistance with

  11. Open Access to essential health care information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Manoj

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Open Access publishing is a valuable resource for the synthesis and distribution of essential health care information. This article discusses the potential benefits of Open Access, specifically in terms of Low and Middle Income (LAMI countries in which there is currently a lack of informed health care providers – mainly a consequence of poor availability to information. We propose that without copyright restrictions, Open Access facilitates distribution of the most relevant research and health care information. Furthermore, we suggest that the technology and infrastructure that has been put in place for Open Access could be used to publish download-able manuals, guides or basic handbooks created by healthcare providers in LAMI countries.

  12. Scaling Health Information Systems in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw; Neilsen, Petter

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the issues of scaling health information system in the context of developing countries by taking a case study from Ethiopia. Concepts of information infrastructure have been used as an analytical lens to better understand scaling of Health Information systems. More...... specifically, we question the fruitfulness of focusing on not being installed base hostile and suggest focusing on how to be installed base “friendly” by underscoring how the installed base can also be draw upon and shaped by human agents. The paper conceptualizes health information infrastructure (HII...... to the installed base. The relative strength between the proponents of a HIS and the installed base will vary and thus require different approaches. While the II may develop and evolve as it is out of control from time to time, this study shows that there is also room for II building activities at certain points...

  13. Pokémon Go: Ubiquitous Computing Delivering Better Health or Co-Incidental Health Benefits from Technology Use? A Participatory Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kwang Chien; Wong, Ming Chao; Turner, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Stimulating sustained behavioural change through information and technology has been an aim of much health informatics research. Traditional approaches use technology to mediate communications between health professionals and patients. More recent lifestyle technologies engage the patient directly with information and advice - but what of the phenomena that is Pokémon Go - does it point to another way of achieving health benefits through fun? This paper aims to explore some of the conceptual questions for health informatics stimulated by the phenomenal popularity of Pokémon Go. The paper is grounded analysis of data generated through a preliminary participatory observational study in Australia.

  14. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES TO DELIVER FINANCIAL SERVICES FOR THE LOW-INCOME POPULATION: CORRESPONDENT BANKING AT BANCO LEMON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Akira Yokomizo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian banks have developed innovative initiatives to deliver financial services for the lowincome population through correspondent banking (CB. Banco Lemon is such an interesting case to be studied because it has implemented a business model based exclusively on CB outlets and its focus was on low-income clients. This paper describes Banco Lemon’s adoption process of the CB technology to deliver financial services for the low-income population, promoting a historical description of the bank’s activities, since its creation and up to the year 2009. Eventually, this paper concludes that bill payment initiatives were successful while credit initiatives led to unexpressive outcomes.

  15. Global public health and the information superhighway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPorte, R E

    1994-06-25

    Applications of networking to health care have focused on the potential of networking to transmit data and to reduce the cost of health care. In the early 198Os networks began forming among academic institutions; one of them was Bitnet. During the 1980s Internet evolved, which joined diverse networks, including those of governments and industry. The first step is to connect public health organizations such as ministries of health, the World Health Organization, the Pan-American Health Organization, and the United Nations. Computer-based telecommunication will vastly increase effective transmission of information. Networking public health workers in local health departments, academia, governments, industry, and private agencies, will bring great benefits. One is global disease telemonitoring: with new epidemiological techniques such as capture-recapture, accurate estimates of incidences of important communicable and non-communicable diseases can now be obtained. Currently all countries in the Americas except Haiti are connected through Internet. No systematic integration of telecommunication and public health systems across countries has occurred yet. On-line vital statistics could be usable almost instantaneously to facilitate monitoring and forecasting of population growth and the health needs of mothers and children. Linking global disease telemonitoring (morbidity data for non-communicable diseases) with environmental data systems would considerably improve understanding of the environmental determinants of disease. Internet is already linked to the National Library of Medicine through Bitnis. Computer based distance education is rapidly improving through E-mail searches. Reading materials, video, pictures, and sound could be transmitted across huge distances for low costs. Hundreds of schools are already networked together. On-line electronic journals and books have the potential for instantaneous dissemination of free information through gopher servers. Global

  16. Web information retrieval for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S L; See-To, Eric W K; Tse, Y K

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a Web Information Retrieval System (WebIRS), which is designed to assist the healthcare professionals to obtain up-to-date medical knowledge and information via the World Wide Web (WWW). The system leverages the document classification and text summarization techniques to deliver the highly correlated medical information to the physicians. The system architecture of the proposed WebIRS is first discussed, and then a case study on an application of the proposed system in a Hong Kong medical organization is presented to illustrate the adoption process and a questionnaire is administrated to collect feedback on the operation and performance of WebIRS in comparison with conventional information retrieval in the WWW. A prototype system has been constructed and implemented on a trial basis in a medical organization. It has proven to be of benefit to healthcare professionals through its automatic functions in classification and summarizing the medical information that the physicians needed and interested. The results of the case study show that with the use of the proposed WebIRS, significant reduction of searching time and effort, with retrieval of highly relevant materials can be attained.

  17. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  18. Where Do Agricultural Producers Get Safety and Health Information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Sophia; Cheyney, Marsha; Ramirez, Marizen; Gerr, Fred

    2015-01-01

    There is little empirical guidance regarding communication sources and channels used and trusted by agricultural producers. The goal of this study was to characterize frequency of use and levels of trust in agricultural safety and health information sources and channels accessed by agricultural producers. A sample of 195 agricultural producers was surveyed at county fairs in Iowa. Information was collected about the frequency of use and level of trust in 14 information sources and channels. Associations between age, gender, and education level and use and trust of each information source or channel were estimated using logistic regression. The sample consisted of 72% men with a mean age of 50.1 (SD = 15.6) years. Newspaper and magazine articles were the most commonly used agricultural safety and health information source or channel; 77% (n = 140) of respondents reporting using them at least monthly. Among those reporting monthly or more frequent use, 75% reported trusting mostly or completely, compared with 58% using and 49% trusting the Internet. High levels of use and trust of newspaper and magazine articles did not vary significantly by age, gender, or education level. Age in the highest tertile (57-83 years) was marginally associated with lower odds of using, as well as using and trusting, all the information sources and channels studied except for medical clinics (use only: odds ratio [OR], 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-15.64; use and trust: OR, 5.90, 95% CI, 0.91-38.42). These findings suggest that traditional media may be more effective than digital media for delivering agricultural safety and health information to agricultural producers. Medical clinics may be an untapped venue for communicating with older agricultural producers.

  19. Information support for the ambulant health worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Ronald C; Merriam, Nathaniel; Doarn, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Health workers are trained to work in information-rich environments. Nineteen medical students evaluated 2700 patients in four villages in Kenya where there was no power or phone. A model of information support included personal digital assistants (PDA), electronic medical records (EMR), satellite telecommunications, medical software, and solar power. The students promptly found the advantages of PDA over paper. By using software for decision support and interacting with the EMR data for medical expertise, very few live telemedicine consults were needed. The cost of this information support was only US 0.28 dollars per patient visit. We conclude information resources can be provided in remote environments at reasonable cost.

  20. 76 FR 4350 - Health Information Technology Extension Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Information Technology Extension Program ACTION: Public Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces changes to the Health Information Technology Extension Program, which assists providers seeking to adopt and become meaningful users of health information technology, as authorized under...

  1. A health plan prescription for health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingrich, Newt; Hasan, Malik

    2010-12-01

    The economic stimulus law of 2009 included incentive payments to encourage providers and hospitals to adopt and "meaningfully use" electronic health records. One resource was excluded from these regulations: patient data from the patient's health insurer, although health insurance companies tie together multiple sectors of the healthcare industry in a single patient-centered data form known as the claims history. They also have considerable experience with information technology (IT). As a result, they are uniquely positioned to move adoption of health IT systems forward. Health plan technologies should be included in the meaningful-use requirements. The result will be additional functionality, which in the end will improve quality, lower costs, and improve individual health.

  2. Redesigning Health Information Systems in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw; Kimaro, Honest; Aanestad, Margunn

    2008-01-01

    Despite widespread aims to strengthen the Health Information System (HIS) as a tool for decentralised health care, there is a strong tendency in most developing countries that the HIS continues to reflect the central level's needs and requirements. The traditional design approach with little...... or no end user involvement results in a centralised HIS with an extensive, somewhat inappropriate, but also inflexible set of standards. Consequently, the HIS is not very useful for the wished-for decentralisation of health services, and there is an urgent need to redesign the existing HIS in order to make...

  3. Information Selection and Delivery Algorithm for Delivering Advertisements Suitable for the Pedestrians Present at a Particular Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi MATSUOKA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider a service that shows an advertisement suitable for the preferences of the pedestrians present at the site where the display is installed. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of this service by a simulation that reflects the reality well, we propose evaluation functions that take account of the line of sight of moving pedestrians. The evaluation functions incorporate two independent variables: Category and Producer. Based on this evaluation functions, we also propose an algorithm of multicasting an advertisement to different sites in order to deliver advertisements efficiently over a network while ensuring a high advertisement relevance rate. The evaluation results show that the proposed algorithm always scores a higher advertisement relevance rate than conventional advertising media. It is also shown that the proposed algorithm can reduce the delivery time by about 37%, and the volume of data delivered from the server by about 39% compared with unicast delivery.

  4. Health information exchange: national and international approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Joshua R

    2012-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE), the process of electronically moving patient-level information between different organizations, is viewed as a solution to the fragmentation of data in health care. This review provides a description of the current state of HIE in seven nations, as well was three international HIE efforts, with a particular focus on the relation of exchange efforts to national health care systems, common challenges, and the implications of cross-border information sharing. National and international efforts highlighted in English language informatics journals, professional associations, and government reports are described. Fully functioning HIE is not yet a common phenomenon worldwide. However, multiple nations see the potential benefits of HIE and that has led to national and international efforts of varying scope, scale, and purview. National efforts continue to work to overcome the challenges of interoperability, record linking, insufficient infrastructures, governance, and interorganizational relationships, but have created architectural strategies, oversight agencies, and incentives to foster exchange. The three international HIE efforts reviewed represent very different approaches to the same problem of ensuring the availability of health information across borders. The potential of HIE to address many cost and quality issues will ensure HIE remains on many national agendas. In many instances, health care executives and leaders have opportunities to work within national programs to help shape local exchange governance and decide technology partners. Furthermore, HIE raises policy questions concerning the role of centralized planning, national identifiers, standards, and types of information exchanged, each of which are vital issues to individual health organizations and worthy of their attention.

  5. Delivering primary care in prison: the need to improve health information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudy Anaraki

    2003-12-01

    Conclusions To provide 'equivalence of care' for prisoners, primary care trusts need to implement full electronic clinical records in prisons and ensure staff have access to resources on the internet.

  6. A security architecture for health information networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailar, Rajashekar; Muralidhar, Vinod

    2007-10-11

    Health information network security needs to balance exacting security controls with practicality, and ease of implementation in today's healthcare enterprise. Recent work on 'nationwide health information network' architectures has sought to share highly confidential data over insecure networks such as the Internet. Using basic patterns of health network data flow and trust models to support secure communication between network nodes, we abstract network security requirements to a core set to enable secure inter-network data sharing. We propose a minimum set of security controls that can be implemented without needing major new technologies, but yet realize network security and privacy goals of confidentiality, integrity and availability. This framework combines a set of technology mechanisms with environmental controls, and is shown to be sufficient to counter commonly encountered network security threats adequately.

  7. Enabling the NSW health workforce to provide evidence-based smoking-cessation advice through competency-based training delivered via video conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Elayne N; Hawkshaw, Barbara N; Naylor, Carlie-Jane; Soewido, Dias; Sanders, John M

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco-related disease is estimated to cost the NSW health system more than $476 million in direct health care costs annually. Population-based smoking-cessation interventions, including brief intervention by health professionals, are effective and cost effective. As the prevalence of smoking in the general community declines, more highly dependent 'treatment-resistant' smokers may present a challenge to the health system. International guidelines recommend that health systems invest in training for health professionals in best practice smoking cessation. As part of the NSW Tobacco Action Plan 2005-2009, NSW Department of Health developed national competency standards in smoking cessation, designed learning and assessment materials and delivered training to more than 300 health professionals via video conference. Building the capacity of the NSW Health workforce to address smoking cessation as part of their routine practice is essential for addressing future challenges in tobacco control.

  8. Health information technology impact on productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Managers work to achieve the greatest output for the least input effort, better balancing all factors of delivery to achieve the most with the smallest resource effort. Documentation of actual health information technology (HIT) cost savings has been elusive. Information technology and linear programming help to control hospital costs without harming service quality or staff morale. This study presents production function results from a study of hospital output during the period 2008-2011. The results suggest that productivity varies widely among the 58 hospitals as a function of staffing patterns, methods of organization, and the degree of reliance on information support systems. Financial incentives help to enhance productivity. Incentive pay for staff based on actual productivity gains is associated with improved productivity. HIT can enhance the marginal value product of nurses and staff, so that they concentrate their workday around patient care activities. The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) was associated with a 1.6 percent improvement in productivity.

  9. Standards for health information technology to ensure adolescent privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, Margaret J; Del Beccaro, Mark A

    2012-11-01

    Privacy and security of health information is a basic expectation of patients. Despite the existence of federal and state laws safeguarding the privacy of health information, health information systems currently lack the capability to allow for protection of this information for minors. This policy statement reviews the challenges to privacy for adolescents posed by commercial health information technology systems and recommends basic principles for ideal electronic health record systems. This policy statement has been endorsed by the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.

  10. Identifying Health Consumers' eHealth Literacy to Decrease Disparities in Accessing eHealth Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejin; Cormier, Eileen; Gordon, Glenna; Baeg, Jung Hoon

    2016-02-01

    The increasing amount of health information available on the Internet highlights the importance of eHealth literacy skills for health consumers. Low eHealth literacy results in disparities in health consumers' ability to access and use eHealth information. The purpose of this study was to assess the perceived eHealth literacy of a general health consumer population so that healthcare professionals can effectively address skills gaps in health consumers' ability to access and use high-quality online health information. Participants were recruited from three public library branches in a Northeast Florida community. The eHealth Literacy Scale was used. The majority of participants (n = 108) reported they knew how and where to find health information and how to use it to make health decisions; knowledge of what health resources were available and confidence in the ability to distinguish high- from low-quality information were considerably less. The findings suggest the need for eHealth education and support to health consumers from healthcare professionals, in particular, how to access and evaluate the quality of health information.

  11. Development and Evaluation of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Delivered by Psychologists and Non-Psychologists in an NHS Community Adult Mental Health Service: a Preliminary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Thomas; Bell, Lorraine; Bolderston, Helen; Clarke, Sue

    2017-05-11

    Previous studies have demonstrated that acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is effective for depression and may be useful for complex transdiagnostic clients. To conduct a preliminary evaluation of whether ACT is feasible and effective when delivered by psychologists and non-psychologists for complex clients in a National Health Service (NHS) community mental health service for adults. Staff were trained in ACT and conducted one-to-one therapy with clients. Measures on general mental health, depression, fusion and values were given pre-therapy, post-therapy and at 3-month follow-up. Standardized measures showed significant improvements post-therapy for global mental health, depression, cognitive fusion and values post-treatment. These were partially maintained at follow-up and remained after an intent-to-treat analysis. There were no differences in outcomes between psychologists and non-psychologists. ACT may be delivered effectively with limited training for complex cases in secondary care, though further research is needed.

  12. Health information systems in Africa: descriptive analysis of data sources, information products and health statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbondji, Peter Ebongue; Kebede, Derege; Soumbey-Alley, Edoh William; Zielinski, Chris; Kouvividila, Wenceslas; Lusamba-Dikassa, Paul-Samson

    2014-05-01

    To identify key data sources of health information and describe their availability in countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) African Region. An analytical review on the availability and quality of health information data sources in countries; from experience, observations, literature and contributions from countries. Forty-six Member States of the WHO African Region. No participants. The state of data sources, including censuses, surveys, vital registration and health care facility-based sources. In almost all countries of the Region, there is a heavy reliance on household surveys for most indicators, with more than 121 household surveys having been conducted in the Region since 2000. Few countries have civil registration systems that permit adequate and regular tracking of mortality and causes of death. Demographic surveillance sites function in several countries, but the data generated are not integrated into the national health information system because of concerns about representativeness. Health management information systems generate considerable data, but the information is rarely used because of concerns about bias, quality and timeliness. To date, 43 countries in the Region have initiated Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response. A multitude of data sources are used to track progress towards health-related goals in the Region, with heavy reliance on household surveys for most indicators. Countries need to develop comprehensive national plans for health information that address the full range of data needs and data sources and that include provision for building national capacities for data generation, analysis, dissemination and use. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  13. Thoughts of suicide among HIV-infected rural persons enrolled in a telephone-delivered mental health intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Timothy G; Miller, Jeffrey; Kochman, Arlene; Kalichman, Seth C; Carlson, Bruce; Silverthorn, Monica

    2002-01-01

    This study characterized rates and predictors of suicidal thoughts among HIV-infected persons living in rural communities of eight U.S. states. Self-administered surveys were completed by 201 HIV-infected persons living in communities of 50,000 or fewer that were located at least 20 miles from a city of 100,000 or more. All participants were clients of rural AIDS service organizations and had recently enrolled into a randomized clinical trial of a telephone-delivered, coping improvement-group intervention designed specifically for HIV-infected rural persons. At baseline, participants reported on thoughts of suicide, psychological symptomatology, life-stressor burden, ways of coping, coping self-efficacy, social support, and barriers to health care and social services. Thirty-eight percent of HIV-infected rural persons had engaged in thoughts of suicide during the past week. A logistic regression analysis revealed that participants who endorsed thoughts of suicide also reported more depressive symptoms (odds ratio [OR] = 2.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32-3.63, p < .002), less coping self-efficacy (OR = 0.70; 95% CI = 0.56-0.88, p < .002), more frequently worried about transmitting their HIV infection to others (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.14-2.40, p < .008), and experienced more stress associated with AIDS-related stigma (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.07-2.35, p < .03). As AIDS prevalence rates increase in rural areas, interventions that successfully identify and treat geographically isolated HIV-infected persons who experience more frequent or serious thoughts of suicide are urgently needed.

  14. What sources do adolescents turn to for information about their health concerns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baheiraei, Azam; Khoori, Elham; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Ybarra, Michele L

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents are developmentally normatively interested in information about sexuality and other health-related issues. In the absence of available health programming, identifying the sources of information that youth are currently accessing will help adolescent health researchers understand where youth 'are,' thereby informing where and how future interventions can be targeted. This is particularly important in resource-limited settings, such as Iran, where funding for public health programming is scant. This study aimed to examine primary and preferred sources of adolescents' health information queries and identify health topics in which they are most interested. In 2011, a random sample of 915 adolescents, aged 14-18 years, completed anonymous, self-administered questionnaires. Mothers (51.11%) and same-sex friends (40.11%) were both the primary as well as the preferred source of health information for adolescents. More than one in three adolescents identified media information sources, including books (39.6%) and the Internet (37.9%), as their primary and preferred sources. The most common topic adolescents sought information about was sexuality issues. Younger adolescents preferred receiving information from parents, whereas older adolescents preferred friends as sources for information [X2=9.3, p=0.009]. No age differences were noted in using media sources (p>0.05). These findings indicate future interventions should integrate some if not all of these sources [both people (mothers, same-sex friends) and media (books, the Internet)] to deliver evidenced-based health information.

  15. The quality of care delivered to Parkinson's disease patients in the U.S. Pacific Northwest Veterans Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Eric

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common chronic neurological disorder of the elderly. Despite the fact that a comprehensive review of general health care in the United States showed that the quality of care delivered to patients usually falls below professional standards, there is limited data on the quality of care for patients with PD. Methods Using the administrative database, the Pacific Northwest Veterans Health Administration (VHA Data Warehouse, a population of PD patients with encounters from 10/1/98-12/31/04 were identified. A random sample of 350 patient charts underwent further review for diagnostic evaluation. All patients whose records revealed a physician diagnosis of definite or possible Idiopathic Parkinson's (IPD disease (n = 150 were included in a medical chart review to evaluate adherence to five evidence-based quality of care indicators. Results For those care indicators with good inter-rater reliability, 16.6% of care received by PD patients was adherent for annual depression screening, 23.4% of care was adherent for annual fall screening and, 67.3% of care was adherent for management of urinary incontinence. Patients receiving specialty care were more likely to be adherent with fall screening than those not receiving specialty care OR = 2.3, 95%CI = 1.2–4.2, but less likely to be adherent with management of urinary incontinence, OR = 0.3, 95%CI = 0.1–0.8. Patients receiving care outside the VA system were more likely to be adherent with depression screening OR = 2.4, 95%CI = >1.0–5.5 and fall screening OR = 2.2, 95%CI = 1.1–4.4. Conclusion We found very low rates of adherence for annual screening for depression and falls for PD patients but reasonable adherence rates for management of urinary incontinence. Interestingly, receiving concurrent specialty care did not necessarily result in higher adherence for all care indicators suggesting some coordination and role responsibility

  16. [Information system in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanović, Ranko; Stanić, Arsen; Varga, Sinisa

    2005-01-01

    The Croatian Ministry of Health started a health care system computerization project aimed at strengthening the collaboration among health care institutions, expert groups and individual health care providers. A tender for informatic system for Primary Health Care (PHC) general practice, pediatrics and gynecology, a vital prerequisite for project realization, has now been closed. Some important reasons for undertaking the project include rationalization of drug utilization, savings through a reduced use of specialists, consultants and hospitalization, then achievement of better cooperation, work distribution, result linking, data quality improvement (by standardization), and ensuring proper information-based decision making. Keeping non-standardized and thus difficult to process data takes too much time of the PHC team time. Since, however, a vast amount of data are collected on only a few indicators, some important information may remain uncovered. Although decisions made by health authorities should rely on evidence and processed information, the authorities spend most of the time working with raw data from which their decisions ultimately derive. The Informatic Technology (IT) in PHC is expected to enable a different approach. PHC teams should be relieved from the tedious task of data gathering and the authorities enabled to work with the information rather than data. The Informatics Communication Technology (ICT) system consists of three parts: hardware (5000 personal computers for work over the Internet), operative system with basic software (editor, etc.), and PHC software for PHC teams. At the national level (National Public Health Informatics System), a software platform will be built for data collection, analysis and distribution. This data collection will be based on the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC-2) standard to ensure the utilization of medical records and quality assessment. The system permits bi-directional data exchange between

  17. Information model design health service childhood cancer for parents and caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Syazwani; Muda, Zurina

    2015-05-01

    Most Malaysians do not realize that they are suffer from a chronic disease until the disease is confirmed to be at a critical stage. This is because lack of awareness among Malaysians about a chronic disease especially in a childhood cancer. Based on report of the National Cancer Council (MAKNA),11 million adults and children suffered with cancer and 6 million of them die in a worldwide. Lack of public exposure to this disease leads to health problems to their children. Information model design health service childhood cancer for p arents and caregivers using an android application medium can be used by a doctor to deliver an information of cancer to the parents and caregivers. The development of this information model design health service childhood cancer for parents and caregivers are using an integration of health promotion theory, spiral model and lean model to form a new model that can be used as a model design content of health service. The method using in this study are by an interview technique and questionnaires along the study was conducted. Hopefully the production of this information model design health service childhood cancer for parents and caregivers using an android apps as a medium can help parents, caregivers and public to know more about information of childhood cancer and at the same time can gain an awareness among them and this app also can be used as a medium for doctors to deliver an information to the parents and caregivers.

  18. Wawared Peru: reducing health inequities and improving maternal health by improving information systems in health

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, there are no high quality data to support decision-making and governance due to inadequateinformation collection and transmission processes. Our project WawaRed-Peru: “Reducing health inequities andimproving maternal health by improving health information systems” aims to improve maternal health processes andindicators through the implementation of interoperability standards for maternal health information systems in order fordecision makers to have timely, high quali...

  19. National Library of Medicine Guide to Finding Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Might I Get Services at a Health Sciences Library? What Other Federal Sites Have Health Information? How Do I Evaluate Information that I Find? ... research studies. Information in Other Languages includes health information on ... college, university, health sciences, or another library. A library near you may: ...

  20. Mechanisms of Communicating Health Information Through Facebook: Implications for Consumer Health Information Technology Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menefee, Hannah K; Thompson, Morgan J; Guterbock, Thomas M; Williams, Ishan C; Valdez, Rupa S

    2016-08-11

    Consumer health information technology (IT) solutions are designed to support patient health management and have the ability to facilitate patients' health information communication with their social networks. However, there is a need for consumer health IT solutions to align with patients' health management preferences for increased adoption of the technology. It may be possible to gain an understanding of patients' needs for consumer health IT supporting their health information communication with social networks by explicating how they have adopted and adapted social networking sites, such as Facebook, for this purpose. Our aim was to characterize patients' use of all communication mechanisms within Facebook for health information communication to provide insight into how consumer health IT solutions may be better designed to meet patients' communication needs and preferences. This study analyzed data about Facebook communication mechanisms use from a larger, three-phase, sequential, mixed-methods study. We report here on the results of the study's first phase: qualitative interviews (N=25). Participants were over 18, used Facebook, were residents or citizens of the United States, spoke English, and had a diagnosis consistent with type 2 diabetes. Participants were recruited through Facebook groups and pages. Participant interviews were conducted via Skype or telephone between July and September 2014. Data analysis was grounded in qualitative content analysis and the initial coding framework was informed by the findings of a previous study. Participants' rationales for the use or disuse of a particular Facebook mechanism to communicate health information reflected six broad themes: (1) characteristics and circumstances of the person, (2) characteristics and circumstances of the relationship, (3) structure and composition of the social network, (4) content of the information, (5) communication purpose, and (6) attributes of the technology. The results of this

  1. 77 FR 39986 - Information Collection; Health Screening Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Health Screening Questionnaire AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... a currently approved information collection, Health Screening Questionnaire. DATES: Comments must be...: Title: Health Screening Questionnaire. OMB Number: 0596-0164. Expiration Date of Approval: January...

  2. 78 FR 42945 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy AGENCY: Government Accountability Office... Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee (Health...

  3. 77 FR 27774 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy AGENCY: Government Accountability Office... Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee (Health...

  4. Towards a digitized and integrated health information system in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences ... Sudan's health information system is still paper-based and characterized by fragmentation and verticality. ... Results: All states ministries of health had health information units but this was believed ...

  5. Health Information Provided by Retail Health Food Outlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn Calder

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative health practices have become increasingly popular in recent years. Many patients visit specific complementary practitioners, while others attempt to educate themselves, trusting advice from employees at local health food stores or the Internet. Thirty-two retail health food stores were surveyed on the nature of the information provided by their staff. A research assistant visited the stores and presented as the mother of a child in whom Crohn’s disease had been diagnosed. Seventy-two per cent (23 of 32 of store employees offered advice, such as to take nutritional and herbal supplements. Of the 23 stores where recommendations were made, 15 (65% based their recommendation on a source of information. Fourteen of the 15 stores using information sources used the same reference book. This had a significant impact on the recommendations; the use of nutritional supplements was favoured. In conclusion, retail health food stores are not as inconsistent as hypothesized, although there are many variances in the types of supplements recommended for the same chronic disease.

  6. The state of information and communication technology and health informatics in ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achampong, Emmanuel Kusi

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become a major tool in delivery of health services and has had an innovative impact on quality of life. ICT is affecting the way healthcare is delivered to clients. In this paper, we discuss the state of ICT and health informatics in Ghana. We also discuss the state of various relevant infrastructures for the successful implementation of ehealth projects. We analyse the past and present state of health informatics in Ghana, in comparison to other African countries. We also review the challenges facing successful implementation of health informatics projects in Ghana and suggest possible solutions.

  7. Delivering the WISE (Whole Systems Informing Self-Management Engagement training package in primary care: learning from formative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protheroe Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The WISE (Whole System Informing Self-management Engagement approach encompasses creating, finding, and implementing appropriate self-care support for people with long-term conditions. A training package for primary care to introduce the approach was developed and underwent formative evaluation. This entailed exploring the acceptability of the WISE approach and its effectiveness in changing communication within consultations. The study aimed to refine the patient, practitioner, and patient level components of the WISE approach and translate the principles of WISE into an operational intervention deliverable through National Health Service training methods. Methods Normalisation Process Theory provided a framework for development of the intervention. Practices were recruited from an inner city Primary Care Trust in NW England. All practice staff were expected to attend two afternoon training sessions. The training sessions were observed by members of the training team. Post-training audio recordings of consultations from each general practitioner and nurse in the practices were transcribed and read to provide a narrative overview of the incorporation of WISE skills and tools into consultations. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff post-training. Results Two practices out of 14 deemed eligible agreed to take part. Each practice attended two sessions, although a third session on consultation skills training was needed for one practice. Fifty-four post-training consultations were recorded from 15 clinicians. Two members of staff were interviewed at each practice. Significant elements of the training form and methods of delivery fitted contemporary practice. There were logistical problems in getting a whole practice to attend both sessions, and administrative staff founds some sections irrelevant. Clinicians reported problems incorporating some of the tools developed for WISE, and this was confirmed in

  8. Seeking health information online: does Wikipedia matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Michaël R; Vickers, Tim J

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the significance of the English Wikipedia as a source of online health information. DESIGN The authors measured Wikipedia's ranking on general Internet search engines by entering keywords from MedlinePlus, NHS Direct Online, and the National Organization of Rare Diseases as queries into search engine optimization software. We assessed whether article quality influenced this ranking. The authors tested whether traffic to Wikipedia coincided with epidemiological trends and news of emerging health concerns, and how it compares to MedlinePlus. MEASUREMENTS Cumulative incidence and average position of Wikipedia compared to other Web sites among the first 20 results on general Internet search engines (Google, Google UK, Yahoo, and MSN, and page view statistics for selected Wikipedia articles and MedlinePlus pages. RESULTS Wikipedia ranked among the first ten results in 71-85% of search engines and keywords tested. Wikipedia surpassed MedlinePlus and NHS Direct Online (except for queries from the latter on Google UK), and ranked higher with quality articles. Wikipedia ranked highest for rare diseases, although its incidence in several categories decreased. Page views increased parallel to the occurrence of 20 seasonal disorders and news of three emerging health concerns. Wikipedia articles were viewed more often than MedlinePlus Topic (p = 0.001) but for MedlinePlus Encyclopedia pages, the trend was not significant (p = 0.07-0.10). CONCLUSIONS Based on its search engine ranking and page view statistics, the English Wikipedia is a prominent source of online health information compared to the other online health information providers studied.

  9. Health information exchange, system size and information silos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Amalia R; Tucker, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    There are many technology platforms that bring benefits only when users share data. In healthcare, this is a key policy issue, because of the potential cost savings and quality improvements from 'big data' in the form of sharing electronic patient data across medical providers. Indeed, one criterion used for federal subsidies for healthcare information technology is whether the software has the capability to share data. We find empirically that larger hospital systems are more likely to exchange electronic patient information internally, but are less likely to exchange patient information externally with other hospitals. This pattern is driven by instances where there may be a commercial cost to sharing data with other hospitals. Our results suggest that the common strategy of using 'marquee' large users to kick-start a platform technology has an important drawback of potentially creating information silos. This suggests that federal subsidies for health data technologies based on 'meaningful use' criteria, that are based simply on the capability to share data rather than actual sharing of data, may be misplaced.

  10. Exploration of Deaf People’s Health Information Sources and Techniques for Information Delivery in Cape Town: A Qualitative Study for the Design and Development of a Mobile Health App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Meryl; Tucker, William David; Diehl, Jan Carel

    2016-01-01

    Background Many cultural and linguistic Deaf people in South Africa face disparity when accessing health information because of social and language barriers. The number of certified South African Sign Language interpreters (SASLIs) is also insufficient to meet the demand of the Deaf population in the country. Our research team, in collaboration with the Deaf communities in Cape Town, devised a mobile health app called SignSupport to bridge the communication gaps in health care contexts. We consequently plan to extend our work with a Health Knowledge Transfer System (HKTS) to provide Deaf people with accessible, understandable, and accurate health information. We conducted an explorative study to prepare the groundwork for the design and development of the system. Objectives To investigate the current modes of health information distributed to Deaf people in Cape Town, identify the health information sources Deaf people prefer and their reasons, and define effective techniques for delivering understandable information to generate the groundwork for the mobile health app development with and for Deaf people. Methods A qualitative methodology using semistructured interviews with sensitizing tools was used in a community-based codesign setting. A total of 23 Deaf people and 10 health professionals participated in this study. Inductive and deductive coding was used for the analysis. Results Deaf people currently have access to 4 modes of health information distribution through: Deaf and other relevant organizations, hearing health professionals, personal interactions, and the mass media. Their preferred and accessible sources are those delivering information in signed language and with communication techniques that match Deaf people’s communication needs. Accessible and accurate health information can be delivered to Deaf people by 3 effective techniques: using signed language including its dialects, through health drama with its combined techniques, and accompanying

  11. Investigating the feasibility and acceptability of health psychology-informed obesity training for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Anna; Hart, Jo; Mann, Karen; Perry, Mark; Duthie, Harriet; Rezvani, Leila; Peters, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Health psychologists have succeeded in identifying theory-congruent behaviour change techniques (BCTs) to prevent and reduce lifestyle-related illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, cancers and diabetes. Obesity management discussions between doctors and patients can be challenging and are often avoided. Despite a clear training need, it is unknown how best to tailor BCT research findings to inform obesity-management training for future healthcare professionals. The primary objective of this descriptive study was to gather information on the feasibility and acceptability of delivering and evaluating health psychology-informed obesity training to UK medical students. Medical students (n = 41) attended an obesity management session delivered by GP tutors. Sessions were audio-recorded to enable fidelity checks. Acceptability of training was explored qualitatively. Tutors consistently delivered training according to the intervention protocol; and students and tutors found the training highly acceptable. This psychology-informed training can be delivered successfully by GP tutors and further research is warranted to explore its efficacy.

  12. Promoting Healthy Behaviors among Egyptian Mothers: A Quasi-Experimental Study of a Health Communication Package Delivered by Community Organizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brasington

    Full Text Available Decisions made at the household level, for example, to seek antenatal care or breastfeed, can have a direct impact on the health of mothers and newborns. The SMART Community-based Initiatives program in Egypt worked with community development associations to encourage better household decision-making by training community health workers to disseminate information and encourage healthy practices during home visits, group sessions, and community activities with pregnant women, mothers of young children, and their families. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the program, with household surveys conducted before and after the intervention in intervention and comparison areas. Survey questions asked about women's knowledge and behaviors related to maternal and newborn care and child nutrition and, at the endline, exposure to SMART activities. Exposure to program activities was high in intervention areas of Upper Egypt: 91% of respondents reported receiving home visits and 84% attended group sessions. In Lower Egypt, these figures were 58% and 48%, respectively. Knowledge of danger signs related to pregnancy, delivery, and newborn illness increased significantly more in intervention than comparison areas in both regions (with one exception in Lower Egypt, after controlling for child's age and woman's education; this pattern also occurred for two of five behaviors (antenatal care visits and consumption of iron-folate tablets. Findings suggest that there may have been a significant dose-response relationship between exposure to SMART activities and certain knowledge and behavioral indicators, especially in Upper Egypt. The findings demonstrate the ability of civil society organizations with minimal health programming experience to increase knowledge and promote healthy behaviors among pregnant women and new mothers. The SMART approach offers a promising strategy to fill gaps in health education and counseling and strengthen community

  13. Promoting Healthy Behaviors among Egyptian Mothers: A Quasi-Experimental Study of a Health Communication Package Delivered by Community Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasington, Angela; Abdelmegeid, Ali; Dwivedi, Vikas; Kols, Adrienne; Kim, Young-Mi; Khadka, Neena; Rawlins, Barbara; Gibson, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Decisions made at the household level, for example, to seek antenatal care or breastfeed, can have a direct impact on the health of mothers and newborns. The SMART Community-based Initiatives program in Egypt worked with community development associations to encourage better household decision-making by training community health workers to disseminate information and encourage healthy practices during home visits, group sessions, and community activities with pregnant women, mothers of young children, and their families. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the program, with household surveys conducted before and after the intervention in intervention and comparison areas. Survey questions asked about women's knowledge and behaviors related to maternal and newborn care and child nutrition and, at the endline, exposure to SMART activities. Exposure to program activities was high in intervention areas of Upper Egypt: 91% of respondents reported receiving home visits and 84% attended group sessions. In Lower Egypt, these figures were 58% and 48%, respectively. Knowledge of danger signs related to pregnancy, delivery, and newborn illness increased significantly more in intervention than comparison areas in both regions (with one exception in Lower Egypt), after controlling for child's age and woman's education; this pattern also occurred for two of five behaviors (antenatal care visits and consumption of iron-folate tablets). Findings suggest that there may have been a significant dose-response relationship between exposure to SMART activities and certain knowledge and behavioral indicators, especially in Upper Egypt. The findings demonstrate the ability of civil society organizations with minimal health programming experience to increase knowledge and promote healthy behaviors among pregnant women and new mothers. The SMART approach offers a promising strategy to fill gaps in health education and counseling and strengthen community support for behavior

  14. Use of the Internet for Health Information: United States, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Technical Information Service NCHS Use of the Internet for Health Information: United States, 2009 Recommend on ... more likely than men to have used the Internet for health information. Women were more likely than ...

  15. How to Keep Your Health Information Private and Secure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health information technology and keeping your health information private and secure, visit our website at http: / / www. healthit. gov. For information and resources on HIPAA privacy and security issues, visit the Office for Civil Rights website ...

  16. Health Information in Tagalog (Tagalog): MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physical Fitness Starting an Exercise Program Pagsisimula ng Programa ng Ehersisyo - Tagalog (Tagalog) Bilingual PDF Health Information ... Information Translations Starting an Exercise Program Pagsisimula ng Programa ng Ehersisyo - Tagalog (Tagalog) Bilingual PDF Health Information ...

  17. Internet health information in the patient-provider dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Traci

    2008-10-01

    A patient discussing Internet health information with a health care provider (referred to as "patient-provider communication about Internet health information") can contribute positively to health outcomes. Although research has found that once Internet access is achieved, there are no ethnic differences in Internet health information seeking, it is unclear if there are ethnic differences in patient-provider communication about Internet health information. To help fill this gap in the literature, the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey 2005 was analyzed with Stata 9. Two sets of logistic regression analyses were conducted, one for a subsample of Internet users (n = 3,244) and one for a subsample of Internet users who are first-generation immigrants (n = 563). The dependent variable was patient-provider communication about Internet health information, which assessed whether survey participants had discussed online health information with a health care provider. The predictor variables included trust of health care provider, trust of online health information, Internet use, health care coverage, frequency of visits to health care provider, health status, and demographics. Among all Internet users, Whites had higher levels of patient-provider communication about Internet health information than Blacks and Asians. Similarly, among Internet users who are immigrants, Whites had higher levels of patient-provider communication about Internet health information than Blacks and Asians. While the digital divide is narrowing in terms of Internet access, racial differences in patient-provider communication about Internet health information may undermine the potential benefits of the information age.

  18. CORBA security services for health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blobel, B; Holena, M

    1998-01-01

    The structure of healthcare systems in developed countries is changing to 'shared care', enforced by economic constraints and caused by a change in the basic conditions of care. That development results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and, as far as their domains are concerned, heterogeneous systems are based on middleware approaches, such as CORBA. Regarding the sensitivity of personal and medical data, such open, distributed, and heterogeneous health information systems require a high level of data protection and data security, both with respect to patient information and with respect to users. This paper, relying on experience gained through our activities in CORBAmed, describes the possibilities the CORBA middleware provides to achieve application and communication security. On the background of the overall CORBA architecture, it outlines the different security services previewed in the adopted CORBA specifications which are discussed in the context of the security requirements of healthcare information systems. Security services required in the healthcare domain but not available at the moment are mentioned. A solution is proposed, which on the one hand allows to make use of the available CORBA security services and additional ones, on the other hand remains open to other middleware approaches, such as DHE or HL7.

  19. The gap in human resources to deliver the guaranteed package of prevention and health promotion services at urban and rural primary care facilities in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde-Rabanal, Jacqueline Elizabeth; Nigenda, Gustavo; Bärnighausen, Till; Velasco-Mondragón, Héctor Eduardo; Darney, Blair Grant

    2017-08-03

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the gap between the available and the ideal supply of human resources (physicians, nurses, and health promoters) to deliver the guaranteed package of prevention and health promotion services at urban and rural primary care facilities in Mexico. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study using a convenience sample. We selected 20 primary health facilities in urban and rural areas in 10 states of Mexico. We calculated the available and the ideal supply of human resources in these facilities using estimates of time available, used, and required to deliver health prevention and promotion services. We performed descriptive statistics and bivariate hypothesis testing using Wilcoxon and Friedman tests. Finally, we conducted a sensitivity analysis to test whether the non-normal distribution of our time variables biased estimation of available and ideal supply of human resources. The comparison between available and ideal supply for urban and rural primary health care facilities reveals a low supply of physicians. On average, primary health care facilities are lacking five physicians when they were estimated with time used and nine if they were estimated with time required (P facilities. There is a shortage of health promoters in urban primary health facilities (P facilities.

  20. Non-Spatial and Geospatial Semantic Query of Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S.; Anton, F.; Mioc, D.; Boley, H.

    2012-08-01

    With the growing amount of health information and frequent outbreaks of diseases, the retrieval of health information is given more concern. Machine understanding of spatial information can improve the interpretation of health data semantics. Most of the current research focused on the non-spatial semantics of health data, using ontologies and rules. Utilizing the spatial component of health data can assist in the understanding of health phenomena. This research proposes a semantic health information query architecture that allows the incorporation of both non-spatial semantics and geospatial semantics in health information integration and retrieval.

  1. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... information—(1) General. Any encryption algorithm identified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as an approved security function in Annex A of the Federal Information Processing Standards... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for health information technology...

  2. 77 FR 70444 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... draft recommendations for meaningful use Stage 3. DATES: To be assured consideration, electronic... inspection, including any personally identifiable or confidential business information that is included in a...; passport number; financial account number; credit or debit card number; any personal health information; or...

  3. Health Information Technology Adoption in California Community Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Katherine K.; Rudin, Robert S.; Wilson, Machelle D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives National and state initiatives to spur adoption of electronic health record (EHR) use and health information exchange (HIE) among providers in rural and underserved communities have been in place for 15 years. Our goal was to systematically assess the impact of these initiatives by quantifying the level of adoption and key factors associated with adoption among community health centers (CHCs) in California. Study Design Cross-sectional statewide survey. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of all California primary care CHCs from August to September 2013. Multiple logistic regressions were fit to test for associations between various practice characteristics and adoption of EHRs, Meaningful Use (MU)–certified EHRs, and HIE. For the multivariable model, we included those variables which were significant at the P = .10 level in the univariate tests. Results We received responses from 194 CHCs (73.5% response rate). Adoption of any EHRs (80.3%) and MU–certified EHRs (94.6% of those with an EHR) was very high. Adoption of HIE is substantial (48.7%) and took place within a few years (mean = 2.61 years; SD = 2.01). More than half (54.7%) of CHCs are able to receive data into the EHR, indicating some level of interoperability. Patient engagement capacity is moderate, with 21.6% offering a personal health record, and 55.2% electronic visit summaries. Rural location and belonging to a multi-site clinic organization both increase the odds of adoption of EHRs, HIE, and electronic visit summary, with odds ratios ranging from 0.63 to 3.28 (all P values <.05). Conclusions Greater adoption of health information technology (IT) in rural areas may be the result of both federal and state investments. As CHCs lack access to capital for investments, continued support of technology infrastructure may be needed for them to further leverage health IT to improve healthcare. PMID:26760431

  4. Factors associated with mobile health information seeking among Singaporean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Leanne; Chiuan Yen, Ching; Xue, Lishan; Choo Tai, Bee; Chuan Chan, Hock; Been-Lirn Duh, Henry; Choolani, Mahesh

    2017-01-01

    This study examined effects of age and social psychological factors on women's willingness to be mobile health information seekers. A national survey of 1,878 Singaporean women was conducted to obtain information on women's mobile phone usage, experiences of health information seeking, and appraisals of using mobile phones to seek health information. Results showed that young, middle-aged, and older women exhibited distinct mobile phone usage behaviors, health information-seeking patterns, and assessments of mobile health information seeking. Factors that accounted for their mobile information-seeking intention also varied. Data reported in this study provide insights into mobile health interventions in the future.

  5. Impact of Thailand universal coverage scheme on the country's health information systems and health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsanayotin, Boonchai

    2013-01-01

    Thailand achieved universal healthcare coverage with the implementation of the Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) in 2001. This study employed qualitative method to explore the impact of the UCS on the country's health information systems (HIS) and health information technology (HIT) development. The results show that health insurance beneficiary registration system helps improve providers' service workflow and country vital statistics. Implementation of casemix financing tool, Thai Diagnosis-Related Groups, has stimulated health providers' HIS and HIT capacity building, data and medical record quality and the adoption of national administrative data standards. The system called "Disease Management Information Systems" aiming at reimbursement for select diseases increased the fragmentation of HIS and increase burden on data management to providers. The financial incentive of outpatient data quality improvement project enhance providers' HIS and HIT investment and also induce data fraudulence tendency. Implementation of UCS has largely brought favorable impact on the country HIS and HIT development. However, the unfavorable effects are also evident.

  6. INFORMATION FROM THE CERN HEALTH INSURANCE SCHEME

    CERN Multimedia

    Tel : 7-3635

    2002-01-01

    Please note that, from 1 July 2002, the tariff agreement between CERN and the Hôpital de la Tour will no longer be in force. As a result the members of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme will no longer obtain a 5% discount for quick payment of bills. More information on the termination of the agreement and the implications for our Health Insurance Scheme will be provided in the next issue of the CHIS Bull', due for publication in the first half of July. It will be sent to your home address, so, if you have moved recently, please check that your divisional secretariat has your current address. Tel.: 73635 The Organization's Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) has launched its own Web pages, located on the Website of the Social & Statutory Conditions Group of HR Division (HR-SOC). The address is short and easy-to-remember www.cern.ch/chis The pages currently available concentrate on providing basic information. Over the coming months it is planned to fill out the details and introduce new topics. Please give us ...

  7. [Accessible health information: a question of age?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, E F

    2012-04-01

    Aging and digitalisation are important trends which have their impact on information accessibility. Accessible information about products and services is of crucial importance to ensure that all citizens can participate fully as active members of society. Senior citizens who have difficulties using new media run the risk of exclusion in today's information society. Not all senior citizens, however, encounter problems with new media. Not by a long shot. There is much to be said for 'aged heterogeneity', the concept that individual differences increase as people age. In two explorative qualitative case studies related to accessible health information--an important issue for senior citizens--that were conducted in the Netherlands, variables such as gender, education level and frequency of internet use were therefore included in the research design. In this paper, the most important results of these case studies will be discussed. Attention will be also paid to complementary theories (socialisation, life stages) which could explain differences in information search behaviour when using old or new media.

  8. [Information on health: production, consumption and biopower].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cléber Domingos Cunha

    2013-10-01

    This article seeks to elicit misgivings regarding the value attributed to medical truth found in the biomedical literature. The issue of the protection of sexual practices was taken by way of example and the works of thinkers like Nietzsche, Baudrillard, Bourdieu, and especially Michel Foucault, were consulted. This was done in order to consider that the elaboration and use of health information can be interpreted as a practice constituting a policy that dynamically inspires both experts and non-experts on medical truth, constituting a morality that is based on the production and consumption of this truth. It is a policy that Foucault called biopolitics, able to establish ways of living where the exercise of thought does not seem to be so "rewarding," where practices of command and obedience are mediated by health information. In this perspective, physicians and non-physicians have been seduced by the desire to attain the truth, such that the commitment of everyone is seen to concentrate on the production and use of statements that they believe can prolong life and save from getting sick. These are discourses cultivated in the market of a media-dominated society in which individuals controlled by information produce subjectivities that are anchored in the medical-capital truth binomial.

  9. 42 CFR 438.242 - Health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health information systems. 438.242 Section 438.242... Measurement and Improvement Standards § 438.242 Health information systems. (a) General rule. The State must ensure, through its contracts, that each MCO and PIHP maintains a health information system that collects...

  10. Can a community health worker and a trained traditional birth attendant work as a team to deliver child health interventions in rural Zambia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Hamer, Davidson H; Semrau, Katherine; Waltensperger, Karen Z; Snetro-Plewman, Gail; Kambikambi, Chilobe; Sakala, Amon; Filumba, Stephen; Sichamba, Bias; Marsh, David R

    2014-10-27

    Teaming is an accepted approach in health care settings but rarely practiced at the community level in developing countries. Save the Children trained and deployed teams of volunteer community health workers (CHWs) and trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to provide essential newborn and curative care for children aged 0-59 months in rural Zambia. This paper assessed whether CHWs and trained TBAs can work as teams to deliver interventions and ensure a continuum of care for all children under-five, including newborns. We trained CHW-TBA teams in teaming concepts and assessed their level of teaming prospectively every six months for two years. The overall score was a function of both teamwork and taskwork. We also assessed personal, community and service factors likely to influence the level of teaming. We created forty-seven teams of predominantly younger, male CHWs and older, female trained TBAs. After two years of deployment, twenty-one teams scored "high", twelve scored "low," and fourteen were inactive. Teamwork was high for mutual trust, team cohesion, comprehension of team goals and objectives, and communication, but not for decision making/planning. Taskwork was high for joint behavior change communication and outreach services with local health workers, but not for intra-team referral. Teams with members residing within one hour's walking distance were more likely to score high. It is feasible for a CHW and a trained TBA to work as a team. This may be an approach to provide a continuum of care for children under-five including newborns.

  11. 20 CFR 402.65 - Health care information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Health care information. 402.65 Section 402.65 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC § 402.65 Health care information. We have some information about health care programs under titles...

  12. Collaboration between Government and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs in Delivering Curative Health Services in North Darfur State, Sudan- a National Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah I A Yagub

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available North Darfur State has been affected by conflict since 2003 and the government has not been able to provide adequate curative health services to the people. The government has come to rely on Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs to provide curative health services. This study was conducted to examine the existing collaboration between government and NGOs in curative health service delivery in North Darfur State, and to identify the challenges that affect their collaboration.Documentary data were collected from government offices and medical organizations. Primary data were obtained through interviews with government and NGOs representatives. The interviews were conducted with (1 expatriates working for international NGOs (N=15 and (2, health professionals and administrators working in the health sector (N= 45.The collaboration between the government and NGOs has been very weak because of security issues and lack of trust. The NGOs collaborate by providing human and financial resources, material and equipment, and communication facilities. The NGOs supply 70% of curative health services, and contribute 52.9% of the health budget in North Darfur State. The NGOs have employed 1 390 health personnel, established 44 health centres and manage and support 83 health facilities across the State.The NGOs have played a positive role in collaborating with the government in North Darfur State in delivering curative health services, while government's role has been negative. The problem that faces the government in future is how health facilities will be run should a peaceful settlement be reached and NGOs leave the region.

  13. Pilot Implementation of Health Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2009-01-01

    Pilot implementation is a powerful and widely used approach in identifying design flaws and implementation issues before the full-scale deployment of new health information systems. However, pilot implementations often fail in the sense that they say little about the usability and usefulness...... information system. Based on the findings from this study, we identify three main challenges: (1) defining an appropriate scope for pilot implementation, (2) managing the implementation process, and (3) ensuring commitment to the pilot. Finally, recommendations for future research and implications...... of the proposed system designs. This calls for studies that seek to uncover and analyze the reasons for failure, so that guidelines for conducting such pilots can be developed. In this paper, we present a qualitative field study of an ambitious, but unsuccessful pilot implementation of a Danish healthcare...

  14. Pilot Implementation of Health Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2009-01-01

    Pilot implementation is a powerful and widely used approach in identifying design flaws and implementation issues before the full-scale deployment of new health information systems. However, pilot implementations often fail in the sense that they say little about the usability and usefulness...... of the proposed system designs. This calls for studies that seek to uncover and analyze the reasons for failure, so that guidelines for conducting such pilots can be developed. In this paper, we present a qualitative field study of an ambitious, but unsuccessful pilot implementation of a Danish healthcare...... information system. Based on the findings from this study, we identify three main challenges: (1) defining an appropriate scope for pilot implementation, (2) managing the implementation process, and (3) ensuring commitment to the pilot. Finally, recommendations for future research and implications...

  15. [Health Information Technology -where are we heading?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Nachman; Levy, Ilan

    2013-05-01

    The current issue of "Harefuah" dedicates a special corner to Health Information Technology (HIT), with a collection of five review papers discussing different areas of the field, focusing on its benefits to the quality of healthcare. In the first paper Topaz and Ash describe the United States MeaningfuL Use project, and list the lessons that the Israeli health system should learn from it. Zelingher and Ash analyze the decision of the Israeli Ministry of Health to move from the old coding system of ICD-9-CM to a combination of SNOMED-CT as a clinical terminology system and ICD-10-CM as the classification coding system. The authors conclude that achieving a standardized, homogenous and thorough coding of problems, diagnoses and procedures will enable interoperability in the Israeli health system. Shalom et al present us to the world of computerized clinical guidelines. They review the different projects that aim to bring tools and methods to transform the paper based guidelines to computer programs that support the everyday decisions that physicians take regarding their patients. The authors focus on their experience in developing methodology, tools and a library of computerized guidelines, and describe their evaluation in several projects. Shahar et al dive deeper to describe the challenge of representing time in cLinicaL guidelines and creating tools to discover new knowledge based on represented known knowledge. These two papers demonstrate the meaningful use of medicaL data. In the last article, Siegal addresses some legal concerns evolving from the HIT revolution, pointing to the emerging concepts in Israeli jurisprudence, which regards medical IT as an important contribution to patient empowerment, aspects of medical risk management and management of national health system resources. In the judgment of the Israeli court, a medical organization will possibly have to take the responsibiLity of not implementing a proven HIT system. This paper concludes with

  16. From Both Sides, Now: Librarians Team up with Computer Scientist to Deliver Virtual Computer-Information Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Martha Fallahay

    2011-01-01

    Two members of the library faculty at Seton Hall University teamed up with a respected professor of mathematics and computer science, in order to create an online course that introduces information literacy both from the perspectives of the computer scientist and from the instruction librarian. This collaboration is unique in that it addresses the…

  17. Information support for health information management in regional Sri Lanka: health managers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Kaduruwane Indika; Chan, Taizan; Yaralagadda, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Good management, supported by accurate, timely and reliable health information, is vital for increasing the effectiveness of Health Information Systems (HIS). When it comes to managing the under-resourced health systems of developing countries, information-based decision making is particularly important. This paper reports findings of a self-report survey that investigated perceptions of local health managers (HMs) of their own regional HIS in Sri Lanka. Data were collected through a validated, pre-tested postal questionnaire, and distributed among a selected group of HMs to elicit their perceptions of the current HIS in relation to information generation, acquisition and use, required reforms to the information system and application of information and communication technology (ICT). Results based on descriptive statistics indicated that the regional HIS was poorly organised and in need of reform; that management support for the system was unsatisfactory in terms of relevance, accuracy, timeliness and accessibility; that political pressure and community and donor requests took precedence over vital health information when management decisions were made; and use of ICT was unsatisfactory. HIS strengths included user-friendly paper formats, a centralised planning system and an efficient disease notification system; weaknesses were lack of comprehensiveness, inaccuracy, and lack of a feedback system. Responses of participants indicated that HIS would be improved by adopting an internationally accepted framework and introducing ICT applications. Perceived barriers to such improvements were high initial cost of educating staff to improve computer literacy, introduction of ICTs, and HIS restructure. We concluded that the regional HIS of Central Province, Sri Lanka had failed to provide much-needed information support to HMs. These findings are consistent with similar research in other developing countries and reinforce the need for further research to verify causes of

  18. From black box to toolbox: Outlining device functionality, engagement activities, and the pervasive information architecture of mHealth interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaher, Brian G.; Brendryen, Håvar; Seeley, John R.; Tyler, Milagra S.; Woolley, Tim

    2015-01-01

    mHealth interventions that deliver content via mobile phones represent a burgeoning area of health behavior change. The current paper examines two themes that can inform the underlying design of mHealth interventions: (1) mobile device functionality, which represents the technological toolbox available to intervention developers; and (2) the pervasive information architecture of mHealth interventions, which determines how intervention content can be delivered concurrently using mobile phones, personal computers, and other devices. We posit that developers of mHealth interventions will be better able to achieve the promise of this burgeoning arena by leveraging the toolbox and functionality of mobile devices in order to engage participants and encourage meaningful behavior change within the context of a carefully designed pervasive information architecture. PMID:25750862

  19. From black box to toolbox: Outlining device functionality, engagement activities, and the pervasive information architecture of mHealth interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G. Danaher

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available mHealth interventions that deliver content via mobile phones represent a burgeoning area of health behavior change. The current paper examines two themes that can inform the underlying design of mHealth interventions: (1 mobile device functionality, which represents the technological toolbox available to intervention developers; and (2 the pervasive information architecture of mHealth interventions, which determines how intervention content can be delivered concurrently using mobile phones, personal computers, and other devices. We posit that developers of mHealth interventions will be able to better achieve the promise of this burgeoning arena by leveraging the toolbox and functionality of mobile devices in order to engage participants and encourage meaningful behavior change within the context of a carefully designed pervasive information architecture.

  20. Effects of Health Literacy and Social Capital on Health Information Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Chan; Lim, Ji Young; Park, Keeho

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether social capital (bonding and bridging social capital) attenuate the effect of low functional health literacy on health information resources, efficacy, and behaviors. In-person interviews were conducted with 1,000 residents in Seoul, Korea, in 2011. The authors found that respondents' functional health literacy had positive effects on the scope of health information sources and health information self-efficacy but not health information-seeking intention. Respondents' social capital had positive effects on the scope of health information sources, health information efficacy, and health information-seeking intention. The authors found (a) a significant moderation effect of bridging social capital on the relation between health literacy and health information self-efficacy and (b) a moderation effect of bonding social capital on the relation between health literacy and health information-seeking intention.

  1. Costs and benefits of health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekelle, Paul G; Morton, Sally C; Keeler, Emmett B

    2006-04-01

    An evidence report was prepared to assess the evidence base regarding benefits and costs of health information technology (HIT) systems, that is, the value of discrete HIT functions and systems in various healthcare settings, particularly those providing pediatric care. PubMed, the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register, and the Cochrane Database of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) were electronically searched for articles published since 1995. Several reports prepared by private industry were also reviewed. Of 855 studies screened, 256 were included in the final analyses. These included systematic reviews, meta-analyses, studies that tested a hypothesis, and predictive analyses. Each article was reviewed independently by two reviewers; disagreement was resolved by consensus. Of the 256 studies, 156 concerned decision support, 84 assessed the electronic medical record, and 30 were about computerized physician order entry (categories are not mutually exclusive). One hundred twenty four of the studies assessed the effect of the HIT system in the outpatient or ambulatory setting; 82 assessed its use in the hospital or inpatient setting. Ninety-seven studies used a randomized design. There were 11 other controlled clinical trials, 33 studies using a pre-post design, and 20 studies using a time series. Another 17 were case studies with a concurrent control. Of the 211 hypothesis-testing studies, 82 contained at least some cost data. We identified no study or collection of studies, outside of those from a handful of HIT leaders, that would allow a reader to make a determination about the generalizable knowledge of the study's reported benefit. Beside these studies from HIT leaders, no other research assessed HIT systems that had comprehensive functionality and included data on costs, relevant information on organizational context and process change, and data on implementation. A small body of literature supports a role for HIT in improving the quality of pediatric

  2. [New information technologies and health consumerism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Castiel, Luis David; Bagrichevsky, Marcos; Griep, Rosane Harter

    2010-08-01

    Concepts related to consumption have shifted to include social processes not previously covered by traditional categories. The current review analyzes the application of classical concepts of consumerism to practices recently identified in the health field, like the phenomenon of cyberchondria. The theoretical challenge relates to the difficulty in extrapolating from the economic perspectives of consumerism to self-care issues in the context of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Drawing on recent anthropological categories, the study seeks to understand the phenomenon of self-care commodification under the imperative of self-accountability for health. New consumer identities are described in light of the unprecedented issues concerning technical improvements currently altering the nature of self-care. The study concludes that health is consumed as vitality, broken down into commercial artifacts in the context of a new bioeconomy - no longer linked to the idea of emulation and possession, but to forms of self-perception and self-care in the face of multiple risks and new definitions of the human being.

  3. Perceptions of health information management educational and practice experiences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bates, Mari; Black, Clarence; Blair, Franchesica; Davis, Laquanda; Ingram, Steven; Lane, DaQuandra; McElderry, Alicia; Peagler, Bianca; Pickett, Jamie; Plettenberg, Cheryl; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2014-01-01

    ... information infrastructure. Therefore, studies to evaluate variance in outcome assessment methods and perceived adequacy of educational curricula used by health information management (HIM) programs are vital...

  4. Discussing life expectancy with surgical patients: Do patients want to know and how should this information be delivered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacDonagh Ruaraidh P

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicted patient life expectancy (LE and survival probability (SP, based on a patient's medical history, are important components of surgical decision-making and informed consent. The objective of this study was to assess patients' interpretation of and desire to know information relating to LE, in addition to establishing the most effective format for discussion. Methods A cross sectional survey of 120 patients (mean age = 68.7 years, range 50–90 years, recruited from general urological and surgical outpatient clinics in one District General and one Teaching hospital in Southwest England (UK was conducted. Patients were included irrespective of their current diagnosis or associated comorbidity. Hypothetical patient case scenarios were used to assess patients' desire to know LE and SP, in addition to their preferred presentation format. Results 58% of patients expressed a desire to know their LE and SP, if it were possible to calculate, with 36% not wishing to know either. Patients preferred a combination of numerical and pictorial formats in discussing LE and SP, with numerical, verbal and pictorial formats alone least preferred. 71% patients ranked the survival curve as either their first or second most preferred graph, with 76% rating facial figures their least preferred. No statistically significant difference was noted between sexes or educational backgrounds. Conclusion A proportion of patients seem unwilling to discuss their LE and SP. This may relate to their current diagnosis, level of associated comorbidity or degree of understanding. However it is feasible that by providing this information in a range of presentation formats, greater engagement in the shared decision-making process can be encouraged.

  5. From the Director: Surfing the Web for Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... authoritative health information from across the World Wide Web. Searching for Reliable Results Most Internet users first visit a search engine — like Google or Yahoo! — when seeking health information. ...

  6. 78 FR 7784 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Nomination Letters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Nomination Letters AGENCY: Government... Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy...

  7. Health Information in Korean (한국어)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations MRI Scans MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) - 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations MRSA MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) - 한국어 (Korean) ...

  8. Health Information in French (français)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations MRI Scans MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations MRSA MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) - français (French) ...

  9. A segmentation analysis of consumer uses of health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risker, D C

    1995-01-01

    Public and private health data organizations are receiving increased pressure to produce consumer-level health information. In addition, the proposed health care reforms imply that health care networks will have to market their health plans. However, little attention has been given to what format the information should have and what the consumers' information needs are. This article discusses the health services marketing literature published to date on the subject, compares it to general marketing literature, and suggests some general guidelines for the effective publication and distribution of health information.

  10. A path analysis on correlates of consumer trust in online health information: evidence from the health information national trends survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yinjiao

    2010-01-01

    Many people look for health information online, and the Internet is the third most trusted health information source. What implications does this trust have on consumer health? Not much research has been done in this area. This study explored various health-related correlates of consumer trust in online health information, including Internet use for health, self-efficacy belief in managing one's own health, negative emotions, and subjective health status. The 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey data were analyzed. Results showed that controlling for demographics, trust in online health information was directly related to both Internet use for health and the self-efficacy belief, and was indirectly associated with negative emotions; the latter two factors in turn were associated with self-rated health.

  11. Cognitive factors of using health apps: systematic analysis of relationships among health consciousness, health information orientation, eHealth literacy, and health app use efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cho, Jaehee; Park, Dongjin; Lee, H Erin

    2014-01-01

    .... This study aimed to examine the effects of four cognitive factors-health consciousness, health information orientation, eHealth literacy, and health-app use efficacy-on the extent of health-app use...

  12. Seek and ye shall find: consumer search for objective health care cost and quality information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, Brian; Abraham, Jean M

    2011-01-01

    Significant investments have been made in developing and disseminating health care provider cost and quality information on the Internet with the expectation that stronger consumer engagement will lead consumers to seek providers who deliver high-quality, low-cost care. However, prior research shows that the awareness and use of such information is low. This study investigates how the information search process may contribute to explaining this result. The analysis reveals that the Web sites most likely to be found by consumers are owned by private companies and provide information based on anecdotal patient experiences. Web sites less likely to be found have government or community-based ownership, are based on administrative data, and contain a mixture of quality, cost, and patient experience information. Searches for information on hospitals reveal more cost and quality information based on administrative data, whereas searches that focus on clinics or physicians are more likely to produce information based on patient narratives.

  13. Information security risk management for computerized health information systems in hospitals: a case study of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zarei J; Sadoughi F

    2016-01-01

    Javad Zarei,1 Farahnaz Sadoughi2 1Health Information Management, Health Management and Economics Research Center, School of Health Management and Information Science, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran, 2Health Information Management Department, School of Health Management and Information Science, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran Background: In recent years, hospitals in Iran – similar to those in other...

  14. Using climate information in the health sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Ghebreyesus

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Many infectious and chronic diseases are either directly or indirectly sensitive to the climate. Managing this climate sensitivity more effectively requires new working relationships between the health sector and the providers of climate data and information. In Africa, where communities are particularly vulnerable, Ministries of Health and National Meteorological Services need to collaborate to reduce the burden of climate related ill health. The Ministry of Health and the National Meteorological Agency of Ethiopia have made significant progress towards the development of a climate-informed early warning and response system for diseases such as malaria and other climate-sensitive diseases. An important enabling mechanism is a Climate and Health Working Group, which is a multi-sectoral partnership created to spearhead the use of climate information for health interventions. While this is a work in progress, the key ingredients necessary to sustain such a joint venture are described to encourage similar activities in other countries faced with a growing climate-sensitive disease burden, to facilitate networking and to increase the return from the investment.De nombreuses infections et maladies chroniques sont sensibles, directement ou indirectement, au climat. Une gestion plus efficace de cette sensibilité au climat passe par l’instauration d’une coopération entre le secteur de la santé et les fournisseurs de données et d’informations sur le climat. En Afrique, où les communautés sont particulièrement vulnérables, le ministère de la Santé et les Services de météorologie nationale doivent collaborer pour réduire le fardeau des maladies liées au climat.Le ministère de la Santé et l’Agence de météorologie nationale d’Ethiopie ont fait des progrès considérables dans le développement d’un système d’alerte et de réponse précoces basé sur les informations climatiques pour des maladies comme le paludisme et d

  15. Clinical and Management Requirements for Computerized Mental Health Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Levinton, Paula H.; Dunning, Tessa F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Information requirements of mental health providers are sufficiently different from those of other health care managers to warrant a different approach to the development of management information systems (MIS). Advances in computer technology and increased demands for fiscal accountability have led to developing integrated mental health information systems (MHIS) that support clinical and management requirements.

  16. Non-Spatial and Geospatial Semantic Query of Health Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, S.; Anton, François; Mioc, Darka

    2012-01-01

    With the growing amount of health information and frequent outbreaks of diseases, the retrieval of health information is given more concern. Machine understanding of spatial information can improve the interpretation of health data semantics. Most of the current research focused on the non-spatia...

  17. 45 CFR 164.526 - Amendment of protected health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... RELATED REQUIREMENTS SECURITY AND PRIVACY Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.526 Amendment of protected health information. (a) Standard: Right to amend. (1) Right to amend. An... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amendment of protected health information. 164.526...

  18. Speaking up: Teens Voice Their Health Information Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Kathryn A.; Parker, Randy Spreen; Lampert, Joan; Sulo, Suela

    2012-01-01

    School nurses provide an important role in the continuity of health care especially for adolescents who are at high risk for significant health concerns. The purpose of this study was to assess adolescents' health information needs and identify their preferences for accessing health information. Using an inductive qualitative research design, 11…

  19. Avoiding Disclosure of Individually Identifiable Health Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio I. Prada

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving data and information dissemination without harming anyone is a central task of any entity in charge of collecting data. In this article, the authors examine the literature on data and statistical confidentiality. Rather than comparing the theoretical properties of specific methods, they emphasize the main themes that emerge from the ongoing discussion among scientists regarding how best to achieve the appropriate balance between data protection, data utility, and data dissemination. They cover the literature on de-identification and reidentification methods with emphasis on health care data. The authors also discuss the benefits and limitations for the most common access methods. Although there is abundant theoretical and empirical research, their review reveals lack of consensus on fundamental questions for empirical practice: How to assess disclosure risk, how to choose among disclosure methods, how to assess reidentification risk, and how to measure utility loss.

  20. HIV/AIDS Community Health Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Christopher L; Kaukinen, Catherine E

    2003-01-01

    Given changes in the faces of AIDS over the last decade, it is crucial that disparities in health and access to healthcare are addressed. An Internet-based GIS was developed using ESRI's Arc Internet Map Server (Arc IMS) to provide users with a suite of tools to interact with geographic data and conduct spatial analyses related to the characteristics that promote or impede the provision of HIV-related services. Internet Mapping allows those engaged in local decision-making to: (1) geographically visualize information via the Internet; (2) Assess the relationship between the distribution of HIV services and spatially referenced socio-economic data; and (3) generate "what if" scenarios" that may direct the allocation of healthcare resources.

  1. Functional safety of health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Liam; Fallon, Enda F; van der Putten, Wil J; Kirrane, Frank

    2012-03-01

    In an effort to improve patient safety and reduce adverse events, there has been a rapid growth in the utilisation of health information technology (HIT). However, little work has examined the safety of the HIT systems themselves, the methods used in their development or the potential errors they may introduce into existing systems. This article introduces the conventional safety-related systems development standard IEC 61508 to the medical domain. It is proposed that the techniques used in conventional safety-related systems development should be utilised by regulation bodies, healthcare organisations and HIT developers to provide an assurance of safety for HIT systems. In adopting the IEC 61508 methodology for HIT development and integration, inherent problems in the new systems can be identified and corrected during their development. Also, IEC 61508 should be used to develop a healthcare-specific standard to allow stakeholders to provide an assurance of a system's safety.

  2. Functional safety of health information technology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chadwick, Liam

    2012-03-01

    In an effort to improve patient safety and reduce adverse events, there has been a rapid growth in the utilisation of health information technology (HIT). However, little work has examined the safety of the HIT systems themselves, the methods used in their development or the potential errors they may introduce into existing systems. This article introduces the conventional safety-related systems development standard IEC 61508 to the medical domain. It is proposed that the techniques used in conventional safety-related systems development should be utilised by regulation bodies, healthcare organisations and HIT developers to provide an assurance of safety for HIT systems. In adopting the IEC 61508 methodology for HIT development and integration, inherent problems in the new systems can be identified and corrected during their development. Also, IEC 61508 should be used to develop a healthcare-specific standard to allow stakeholders to provide an assurance of a system\\'s safety.

  3. Principles and core functions of integrated child health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Alan R; Atkinson, Delton; Diehn, Tonya Norvell; Eichwald, John; Heberer, Jennifer; Hoyle, Therese; King, Pam; Kossack, Robert E; Williams, Donna C; Zimmerman, Amy

    2004-11-01

    Infants undergo a series of preventive and therapeutic health interventions and activities. Typically, each activity includes collection and submission of data to a dedicated information system. Subsequently, health care providers, families, and health programs must query each information system to determine the child's status in a given area. Efforts are underway to integrate information in these separate information systems. This requires specifying the core functions that integrated information systems must perform.

  4. National healthcare systems and the need for health information governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovenga, Evelyn J S

    2013-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of health data, information and knowledge governance needs and associated generic principles so that information systems are able to automate such data collections from point-of-care operational systems. Also covered are health information systems' dimensions and known barriers to the delivery of quality health services, including environmental, technology and governance influences of any population's health status within the context of national health systems. This is where health information managers and health informaticians need to resolve the many challenges associated with eHealth implementations where data are assets, efficient information flow is essential, the ability to acquire new knowledge desirable, and where the use of data and information needs to be viewed from a governance perspective to ensure reliable and quality information is obtained to enhance decision making.

  5. Enabling medication management through health information technology (Health IT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbon, K Ann; Lokker, Cynthia; Handler, Steve M; Dolovich, Lisa R; Holbrook, Anne M; O'Reilly, Daria; Tamblyn, Robyn; J Hemens, Brian; Basu, Runki; Troyan, Sue; Roshanov, Pavel S; Archer, Norman P; Raina, Parminder

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the report was to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) on all phases of the medication management process (prescribing and ordering, order communication, dispensing, administration and monitoring as well as education and reconciliation), to identify the gaps in the literature and to make recommendations for future research. We searched peer-reviewed electronic databases, grey literature, and performed hand searches. Databases searched included MEDLINE®, Embase, CINAHL (Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Compendex, Inspec (which includes IEEE Xplore), Library and Information Science Abstracts, E-Prints in Library and Information Science, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and Business Source Complete. Grey literature searching involved Internet searching, reviewing relevant Web sites, and searching electronic databases of grey literatures. AHRQ also provided all references in their e-Prescribing, bar coding, and CPOE knowledge libraries. Paired reviewers looked at citations to identify studies on a range of health IT used to assist in the medication management process (MMIT) during multiple levels of screening (titles and abstracts, full text and final review for assignment of questions and data abstrction). Randomized controlled trials and cohort, case-control, and case series studies were independently assessed for quality. All data were abstracted by one reviewer and examined by one of two different reviewers with content and methods expertise. 40,582 articles were retrieved. After duplicates were removed, 32,785 articles were screened at the title and abstract phase. 4,578 full text articles were assessed and 789 articles were included in the final report. Of these, 361 met only content criteria and were listed without further abstraction. The final report included data from 428 articles across the seven key

  6. Delivering the goods, showing our stuff: the case for a constructivist paradigm for health promotion research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonte, R; Robertson, A

    1996-11-01

    This article argues that there has been a tendency to empower the "conventional" positivist paradigm in health promotion research, often at the expense of confounding or ignoring much of health promotion practice. This article argues further that a "constructivist" research paradigm not only has the potential to resolve some of the tensions between research and practice in health promotion but also is inclusive of knowledge generated by the conventional paradigm. The usefulness of a constructivist paradigm is demonstrated through the use of four practice-based case examples drawn from actual community-based health promotion efforts. The congruence of a constructivist paradigm with the health promotion principles of empowerment and community participation are discussed. Finally, this article argues for the acceptance of the legitimacy of knowledge generated from the constructivist paradigm and concludes that this paradigm is more suited to the goals of current health promotion.

  7. A feasibility open trial of internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy (iCBT among consumers of a non-governmental mental health organisation with anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Kirkpatrick

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. To date the efficacy and acceptability of internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatments (iCBT has been examined in clinical trials and specialist facilities. The present study reports the acceptability, feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an established iCBT treatment course (the Wellbeing Course administered by a not-for-profit non-governmental organisation, the Mental Health Association (MHA of New South Wales, to consumers with symptoms of anxiety.Methods. Ten individuals who contacted the MHA’s telephone support line or visited the MHA’s website and reported at least mild symptoms of anxiety (GAD-7 total scores ≥5 were admitted to the study. Participants were provided access to the Wellbeing Course, which comprises five online lessons and homework assignments, and brief weekly support from an MHA staff member via telephone and email. The MHA staff member was an experienced mental health professional and received minimal training in administering the intervention.Results. All 10 participants completed the course within the 8 weeks. Post-treatment and two month follow-up questionnaires were completed by all participants. Mean within-group effect sizes (Cohen’s d for the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 Item (GAD-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 Item (PHQ-9 were large (i.e., > .80 and consistent with previous controlled research. The Course was also rated as highly acceptable with all 10 participants reporting it was worth their time and they would recommend it to a friend.Conclusions. These results provide support for the potential clinical utility of iCBT interventions and the acceptability and feasibility of employing non-governmental mental health organisations to deliver these treatments. However, further research is needed to examine the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering iCBT via such organisations.

  8. Early diagnosis and Early Start Denver Model intervention in autism spectrum disorders delivered in an Italian Public Health System service

    OpenAIRE

    Devescovi R; Monasta L; Mancini A.; Bin M; Vellante V; Carrozzi M; Colombi C

    2016-01-01

    Raffaella Devescovi,1 Lorenzo Monasta,2 Alice Mancini,3 Maura Bin,1 Valerio Vellante,1 Marco Carrozzi,1 Costanza Colombi4 1Division of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, 2Clinical Epidemiology and Public Health Research Unit, Institute for Maternal and Child Health – IRCCS “Burlo Garofolo”, Trieste, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA ...

  9. The changing role of the health care chief information officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G M

    2000-09-01

    Information is the lifeblood of the health care organization. In the past, chief information officers were responsible for nothing else but assuring a constant flow of information. Today, they are being asked to do a great deal more. From E-business to E-health strategy, the chief information officer is the focal point of an organization's ability to leverage new technology.

  10. Product improvement with dietary fibre : State-of-the-art expertise in delivering health-beneficial dietary fiber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankestijn, J.

    2013-01-01

    Addition of fibres to foods is an effective way to improve health benefits of food products. Dietary fibres (DF ) are indispensable in gastro-intestinal comfort and general well being. TNO can help you in formulating dietary fibres or prebiotics by establishing the gut-health effect, assessing the

  11. Product improvement with dietary fibre : State-of-the-art expertise in delivering health-beneficial dietary fiber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankestijn, J.

    2013-01-01

    Addition of fibres to foods is an effective way to improve health benefits of food products. Dietary fibres (DF ) are indispensable in gastro-intestinal comfort and general well being. TNO can help you in formulating dietary fibres or prebiotics by establishing the gut-health effect, assessing the e

  12. Relationship Between Parental and Adolescent eHealth Literacy and Online Health Information Seeking in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fong-Ching; Chiu, Chiung-Hui; Chen, Ping-Hung; Miao, Nae-Fang; Lee, Ching-Mei; Chiang, Jeng-Tung; Pan, Ying-Chun

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between parental and adolescent eHealth literacy and its impact on online health information seeking. Data were obtained from 1,869 junior high school students and 1,365 parents in Taiwan in 2013. Multivariate analysis results showed that higher levels of parental Internet skill and eHealth literacy were associated with an increase in parental online health information seeking. Parental eHealth literacy, parental active use Internet mediation, adolescent Internet literacy, and health information literacy were all related to adolescent eHealth literacy. Similarly, adolescent Internet/health information literacy, eHealth literacy, and parental active use Internet mediation, and parental online health information seeking were associated with an increase in adolescent online health information seeking. The incorporation of eHealth literacy courses into parenting programs and school education curricula is crucial to promote the eHealth literacy of parents and adolescents.

  13. Questioning reliability assessments of health information on social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmer, Nicole K.

    2017-01-01

    This narrative review examines assessments of the reliability of online health information retrieved through social media to ascertain whether health information accessed or disseminated through social media should be evaluated differently than other online health information. Several medical, library and information science, and interdisciplinary databases were searched using terms relating to social media, reliability, and health information. While social media’s increasing role in health information consumption is recognized, studies are dominated by investigations of traditional (i.e., non-social media) sites. To more richly assess constructions of reliability when using social media for health information, future research must focus on health consumers’ unique contexts, virtual relationships, and degrees of trust within their social networks. PMID:28096748

  14. Questioning reliability assessments of health information on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmer, Nicole K

    2017-01-01

    This narrative review examines assessments of the reliability of online health information retrieved through social media to ascertain whether health information accessed or disseminated through social media should be evaluated differently than other online health information. Several medical, library and information science, and interdisciplinary databases were searched using terms relating to social media, reliability, and health information. While social media's increasing role in health information consumption is recognized, studies are dominated by investigations of traditional (i.e., non-social media) sites. To more richly assess constructions of reliability when using social media for health information, future research must focus on health consumers' unique contexts, virtual relationships, and degrees of trust within their social networks.

  15. Promoting Information Literacy by Promoting Health Literacy in the Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisam Dastani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the information society, the production, distribution and use of information are freely and widely available for all issues of life. Proper and appropriate use of reliable information is especially important in health care. The present study introduces the concepts and benefits of health literacy and information literacy and its role in improving health literacy. This study was a review based on the concepts of information society, information literacy and information education to present importance of promoting information literacy on health literacy in the information society. The information society is presented by providing a platform of information technology and computer systems to attempt to exchange and develop information among people in the community. Currently, electronic and web-based health information in the mass form is available. Information as a fundamental base of the information society is a phenomenon that our decisions are affected in relation to various issues such as safety and health issues. It is important to avoid the mass of invalid, incorrect and inappropriate information which is available on the internet. This requires information literacy skills such as identifying, accessing and evaluating information. In general, it can be said that the promotion of health literacy in communities requires learning different skills in the form of information literacy.Data obtained from this study can be used in developing the long term health programs to prevention of non-communicable diseases in our country

  16. Injustice in Access to Health Information: The Difference between Health Professionals and Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Ashrafi-rizi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of information is undeniable in promoting public health (1-3. “Access to health information for all” was the slogan of the World Health Organization in 2004 (4. The proving of this slogan requires access to health information by beneficiaries (health professionals and patients. Access to health information by specialists as partly been achieved, but access to health information for patients and their families is considered low (5-7, which could have adverse effects. Health professionals have quick and easy access to information through libraries and medical information centers, participation in seminars, exchange of scientific information with other professionals, as well as identifying ways to effectively access to health information, but patients and their families do not have access to such facilities and capabilities. Therefore, patients and their families are faced with a phenomenon known as “inequity in access to health information” and the continuation of the injustice leads to health information poverty. Thus, the main question now is what we should do? It seems that the government needs to develop a national policy in the field of health information and it is the most important step. In the next step, the government should expand the concept production via using potentials of different organizations like public media (TV and Radio, health ministry and press and increase the access of patients to health information in the easy language (level of health information between health professionals and patients is different.

  17. Effectiveness of Web-Delivered Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Relation to Mental Health and Well-Being: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Menna; Glendenning, Alexander; Hoon, Alice E; John, Ann

    2016-08-24

    The need for effective interventions to improve mental health and emotional well-being at a population level are gaining prominence both in the United Kingdom and globally. Advances in technology and widespread adoption of Internet capable devices have facilitated rapid development of Web-delivered psychological therapies. Interventions designed to manage a range of affective disorders by applying diverse therapeutic approaches are widely available. The main aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence base of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in a Web-based delivery format. A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis was conducted. Two electronic databases were searched for Web-delivered interventions utilizing ACT for the management of affective disorders or well-being. Only Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) were included. The search strategy identified 59 articles. Of these, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria specified. The range of conditions and outcome measures that were identified limited the ability to draw firm conclusions about the efficacy of Web-delivered ACT-based intervention for anxiety or well-being. ACT in a Web-based delivery format was found to be effective in the management of depression. Rates of adherence to study protocols and completion were high overall suggesting that this therapeutic approach is highly acceptable for patients and the general public.

  18. Real Talk: Developing a Computer-Delivered Sexual Health Program for Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Charles; Lomonaco, Carmela

    2016-12-01

    HIV disproportionately affects Black men who have sex with men (MSM), yet there are few evidence-based programs that respond to the diverse realities of Black MSM communities. This article examines the development of Real Talk, a new harm reduction-based, sexual health intervention for Black MSM. We first analyze the key themes from our formative research: (1) stigma, discrimination, and intersectionalities in the lives of Black MSM, (2) the importance of safe spaces and community provided by health promotion programs, and (3) moving beyond condoms in sexual health messaging. We then describe our agile design product development process and present an overview of the intervention's components and how they respond to the issues identified in the formative research. In conclusion, we discuss dissemination opportunities and challenges in an age of decreased prevention funding, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and the increased use of e-health promotion modalities.

  19. Public health genomics Relevance of genomics for individual health information management, health policy development and effective health services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brand

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare delivery systems are facing fundamental challenges. New ways of organising theses systems based on the different needs of stakeholders’ are required to meet these challenges. While medicine is currently undergoing remarkable developments from its morphological and phenotype orientation to a molecular and genotype orientation, promoting the importance of prognosis and prediction, the discussion about the relevance of genome-based information and technologies for the health care system as a whole and especially for public health is still in its infancy. The following article discusses the relevance of genome-based information and technologies for individual health information management, health policy development and effective health services.

  20. Sources of health information among rural women in Western Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Leigh Ann; Wu, Qishan; Yang, Nancy; Bush, Heather M; Crofford, Leslie J

    2015-01-01

    To identify sources of general and mental health information for rural women to inform the development of public health nursing interventions that consider preferences for obtaining information. One thousand women (mean age = 57 years; 96.9% White) living in primarily nonmetropolitan areas of Western Kentucky participated via a random-digit-dial survey. Data were collected on demographics, sources of health information, depression, and stigma. Most participants preferred anonymous versus interpersonal sources for both general (68.1%) and mental health (69.4%) information. All participants reported at least one source of general health information, but 20.8% indicated not seeking or not knowing where to seek mental health information. The Internet was the most preferred anonymous source. Few women cited health professionals as the primary information source for general (11.4%) or mental (9.9%) health. Public stigma was associated with preferring anonymous sources and not seeking information. Public health nurses should understand the high utilization of anonymous sources, particularly for mental health information, and focus efforts on helping individuals to navigate resources to ensure they obtain accurate information about symptoms, effective treatments, and obtaining care. Reducing stigma should remain a central focus of prevention and education in rural areas. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Application of a model for delivering occupational safety and health to smaller businesses: Case studies from the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas R; Sinclair, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Smaller firms are the majority in every industry in the US, and they endure a greater burden of occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities than larger firms. Smaller firms often lack the necessary resources for effective occupational safety and health activities, and many require external assistance with safety and health programming. Based on previous work by researchers in Europe and New Zealand, NIOSH researchers developed for occupational safety and health intervention in small businesses. This model was evaluated with several intermediary organizations. Four case studies which describe efforts to reach small businesses with occupational safety and health assistance include the following: trenching safety training for construction, basic compliance and hazard recognition for general industry, expanded safety and health training for restaurants, and fall prevention and respirator training for boat repair contractors. Successful efforts included participation by the initiator among the intermediaries' planning activities, alignment of small business needs with intermediary offerings, continued monitoring of intermediary activities by the initiator, and strong leadership for occupational safety and health among intermediaries. Common challenges were a lack of resources among intermediaries, lack of opportunities for in-person meetings between intermediaries and the initiator, and balancing the exchanges in the initiator-intermediary-small business relationships. The model offers some encouragement that initiator organizations can contribute to sustainable OSH assistance for small firms, but they must depend on intermediaries who have compatible interests in smaller businesses and they must work to understand the small business social system.

  2. The impact of health information technology on collaborative chronic care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchibroda, Janet M

    2008-03-01

    Chronic disease is a growing problem in the United States. More than 125 million Americans had at least 1 chronic care condition in 2000, and this number is expected to grow to 157 million by the year 2020.1 Some of the challenges associated with current chronic care management approaches can be addressed through the use of health information technology (IT) and health information exchange. To review the current challenges of chronic care management and explore how health IT and health information exchange efforts at the national, state, and local levels can be leveraged to address some of these challenges. Efforts to effectively manage chronic care have been hampered by a number of factors, including a fragmented health care system and the need for more coordination across the health care setting; the lack of interoperable clinical information systems, which would help provide readily available, comprehensive information about the patient to those who deliver care, those who manage care, and those who receive care, and finally, the current predominantly fee-for-service reimbursement system that rewards volume and fragmentation, and does not effectively align incentives with the goals of chronic care management. The introduction of health IT, including electronic health records and health information exchange, holds great promise for addressing many of the barriers to effective chronic care management, by providing important clinical information about the patient when it is needed, and where it is needed, in a timely, secure fashion. Having information from the care delivery process readily available through health IT and health information exchange at the national, state, and local levels supports key components of the chronic care management process, including those related to measurement, clinical decision support, collaboration and coordination, and consumer activation. Those engaged in chronic care management should seek to leverage health IT and health

  3. Celebrity Health Announcements and Online Health Information Seeking: An Analysis of Angelina Jolie's Preventative Health Decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Marleah

    2016-01-01

    On May 14, 2013, Angelina Jolie disclosed she carries BRCA1, which means she has an 87% risk of developing breast cancer during her lifetime. Jolie decided to undergo a preventative bilateral mastectomy (PBM), reducing her risk to 5%. The purpose of this study was to analyze the type of information individuals are exposed to when using the Internet to search health information regarding Jolie's decision. Qualitative content analysis revealed four main themes--information about genetics, information about a PBM, information about health care, and information about Jolie's gender identity. Broadly, the identified websites mention Jolie's high risk for developing cancer due to the genetic mutation BRCA1, describe a PBM occasionally noting reasons why she had this surgery and providing alternatives to the surgery, discuss issues related to health care services, costs, and insurances about Jolie's health decision, and portray Jolie as a sexual icon, a partner to Brad Pitt, a mother of six children, and an inspirational humanitarian. The websites also depict Jolie's health decision in positive, negative, and/or both ways. Discussion centers on how this actress' health decision impacts the public.

  4. Understanding health information needs and gaps in the health care system in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia-Kundu, Nandita; Sullivan, Tara M; Safi, Basil; Trivedi, Geetali; Velu, Sanjanthi

    2012-01-01

    Health information and the channels that facilitate the flow and exchange of this information to and among health care providers are key elements of a strong health system that offers high-quality services,yet few studies have examined how health care workers define, obtain, and apply information in the course of their daily work. To better understand health information needs and barriers across all of levels of the health care system, the authors conducted a needs assessment in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. Data collection consisted of 46 key informant interviews and 9 focus group discussions. Results of the needs assessment pointed to the following themes: (a) perceptions or definitions of health information related to daily tasks performed at different levels of the health system; (b) information flow in the public health structure; (c) need for practical information; and (d) criteria for usability of information. This needs assessment found that health information needs vary across the health system in Uttar Pradesh. Information needs are dynamic and encompass programmatic and service delivery information. Providing actionable information across all levels is a key means to strengthen the health system and improve the quality of services. An adequate assessment of health information needs, including opportunities, barriers, and gaps, is a prerequisite to designing effective communication of actionable information.

  5. The Digital Health Divide: Evaluating Online Health Information Access and Use among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amanda K.; Bernhardt, Jay M.; Dodd, Virginia; Vollrath, Morgan W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Innovations in health information technology (HIT) provide opportunities to reduce health care spending, improve quality of care, and improve health outcomes for older adults. However, concerns relating to older adults' limited access and use of HIT, including use of the Internet for health information, fuel the digital health divide…

  6. The Digital Health Divide: Evaluating Online Health Information Access and Use among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amanda K.; Bernhardt, Jay M.; Dodd, Virginia; Vollrath, Morgan W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Innovations in health information technology (HIT) provide opportunities to reduce health care spending, improve quality of care, and improve health outcomes for older adults. However, concerns relating to older adults' limited access and use of HIT, including use of the Internet for health information, fuel the digital health divide…

  7. Education review: diversity and opportunity in health management systems and health information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begler, K H

    1995-05-01

    Innovative methods for managing health care information are critical to solving the problems posed by our nation's health care system. The Department of Health Information Sciences at the John G. Rangos, Sr. School of Health Sciences at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh has created baccalaureate and master's degree programs in health management systems that respond to a need for the redesign and management of the cultural and technologic infrastructure necessary to create more efficient, highly effective, and better informed health care organizations.

  8. A comprehensive review of the barriers and promoters health workers experience in delivering prevention of vertical transmission of HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Roseanne C; McMahon, Devon E; Young, Sera L

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant biomedical and policy advances, 199,000 infants and young children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) became infected with HIV in 2013, indicating challenges to implementation of these advances. To understand the nature of these challenges, we sought to (1) characterize the barriers and facilitators that health workers encountered delivering prevention of vertical transmission of HIV (PVT) services in SSA and (2) evaluate the use of theory to guide PVT service delivery. The PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched using keywords barriers, facilitators, HIV, prevention of vertical transmission of HIV, health workers, and their synonyms to identify relevant studies. Barriers and facilitators were coded at ecological levels according to the Determinants of Performance framework. Factors in this framework were then classified as affecting motivation, opportunity, or ability, per the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability (MOA) framework in order to evaluate domains of health worker performance within each ecological level. We found that the most frequently reported challenges occurred within the health facility level and spanned all three MOA domains. Barriers reported in 30% or more of studies from most proximal to distal included those affecting health worker motivation (stress, burnout, depression), patient opportunity (stigma), work opportunity (poor referral systems), health facility opportunity (overburdened workload, lack of supplies), and health facility ability (inadequate PVT training, inconsistent breastfeeding messages). Facilitators were reported in lower frequencies than barriers and tended to be resolutions to challenges (e.g., quality supervision, consistent supplies) or responses to an intervention (e.g., record systems and infrastructure improvements). The majority of studies did not use theory to guide study design or implementation. Interventions addressing health workers' multiple ecological levels of interactions, particularly the health

  9. Internet Use for Health Information among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; Miner, Kathleen R.; Adame, Daniel D.; Butler, Susan; McCormick, Laura; Mendell, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Use of the Internet to retrieve health information is increasingly common. The authors surveyed 743 undergraduate students at 2 academic institutions to examine their Internet use, health-seeking behaviors, and attitudes related to the use of the Internet to obtain health information. Fifty-three percent of the respondents indicated that they…

  10. 76 FR 57615 - National Health Information Technology Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... entrepreneurs. As we challenge ourselves to push forward into a new century of health technology, we will... September 15, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8711--National Health Information Technology Week... September 12, 2011 National Health Information Technology Week, 2011 By the President of the United...

  11. Treatment acceptability and preferences for managing severe health anxiety: Perceptions of internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy among primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Joelle N; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D

    2017-12-01

    While cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is an established treatment for health anxiety, there are barriers to service access. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) has demonstrated effectiveness and has the potential to improve access to treatment. Nevertheless, it is unknown how patients perceive ICBT relative to other interventions for health anxiety and what factors predict ICBT acceptability. This study investigated these questions. Primary care patients (N = 116) who reported elevated levels of health anxiety were presented three treatment vignettes that each described a different protocol for health anxiety (i.e., medication, CBT, ICBT). Acceptability and credibility of the treatments were assessed following the presentation of each vignette. Participants then ranked the three treatments and provided a rational for their preferences. The treatments were similarly rated as moderately acceptable. Relative to medication and ICBT, CBT was perceived as the most credible treatment for health anxiety. The highest preference ranks were for CBT and medication. Regression analyses indicated that lower computer anxiety, past medication use, and lower ratings of negative cognitions about difficulty coping with an illness significantly predicted greater ICBT acceptability. Health anxiety was not assessed with a diagnostic interview. Primary care patients were recruited through a Qualtrics panel. Patients did not have direct experience with treatment but learned about treatment options through vignettes. Medication and CBT are preferred over ICBT. If ICBT is to increase treatment access, methods of improving perceptions of this treatment option are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identifying inequities in maternal and child health through risk stratification to inform health systems strengthening in Northern Togo

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Katharine J.; Braganza, Sandra; Fiori, Kevin; Gbeleou, Christophe; Kpakpo, Vivien; Lopez, Andrew; Schechter, Jennifer; Singham Goodwin, Alicia; Jones, Heidi E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective In Togo, substantial progress in maternal and child health is needed to reach global development goals. To better inform clinic and community-based health services, this study identifies factors associated with maternal and child health care utilization in the Kara region of Northern Togo. Methods We conducted a population-representative household survey of four health clinic catchment areas of 1,075 women of reproductive age in 2015. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model individual and structural factors associated with utilization of four maternal and child health services. Key outcomes were: facility-based delivery, maternal postnatal health check by a health professional within the first six weeks of birth, childhood vaccination, and receipt of malaria medication for febrile children under age five within 72 hours of symptom onset. Results 83 percent of women who gave birth in the last 2 years delivered at a health facility. In adjusted models, the strongest predictor of facility delivery in the rural catchment areas was proximity to a health center, with women living under three kilometers having 3.7 (95% CI 1.7, 7.9) times the odds of a facility birth. Only 11 percent of women received a health check by a health provider at any time in the postnatal period. Postnatal health checks were less likely for women in the poorest households and for women who resided in rural areas. Children of polygamous mothers had half the odds of receiving malaria medication for fever within 72 hours of symptom onset, while children with increased household wealth status had increased odds of childhood vaccination and receiving treatment for malaria. Conclusion Our analysis highlights the importance of risk stratification analysis to inform the delivery and scope of maternal and child health programs needed to reach those with the least access to care. PMID:28301539

  13. Sharing Health Information and Influencing Behavioral Intentions: The Role of Health Literacy, Information Overload, and the Internet in the Diffusion of Healthy Heart Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Brittani; Stephens, Keri K; Pastorek, Angie E; Mackert, Michael; Donovan, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    Low health literacy remains an extremely common and problematic issue, given that individuals with lower health literacy are more likely to experience health challenges and negative health outcomes. In this study, we use the first three stages of the innovation-decision process found in the theory of diffusion of innovations (Rogers, 2003). We incorporate health literacy into a model explaining how perceived health knowledge, information sharing, attitudes, and behavior are related. Results show that health information sharing explains 33% of the variance in behavioral intentions, indicating that the communicative practice of sharing information can positively impact health outcomes. Further, individuals with high health literacy tend to share less information about heart health than those with lower health literacy. Findings also reveal that perceived heart-health knowledge operates differently than health literacy to predict health outcomes.

  14. Adding home health care to the discussion on health information technology policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiano, Nicole; Brown, Ellen L; Hristidis, Vagelis; Page, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    The potential for health information technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health care has resulted in several U.S. policy initiatives aimed at integrating health information technology into health care systems. However, home health care agencies have been excluded from incentive programs established through policies, raising concerns on the extent to which health information technology may be used to improve the quality of care for older adults with chronic illness and disabilities. This analysis examines the potential issues stemming from this exclusion and explores potential opportunities of integrating home health care into larger initiatives aimed at establishing health information technology systems for meaningful use.

  15. 75 FR 76393 - Notice of Request for a New Information Collection (Public Health Information System)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Collection (Public Health Information System) AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... Information System. DATES: Comments on this notice must be received on or before February 7, 2011. ADDRESSES...: Public Health Information System (PHIS). Type of Request: New information collection. Abstract: FSIS has...

  16. Health Information Needs and Reliability of Sources Among Nondegree Health Sciences Students: A Prerequisite for Designing eHealth Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruna, Hussein; Tshuma, Ndumiso; Hu, Xiao

    Understanding health information needs and health-seeking behavior is a prerequisite for developing an electronic health information literacy (EHIL) or eHealth literacy program for nondegree health sciences students. At present, interest in researching health information needs and reliable sources paradigms has gained momentum in many countries. However, most studies focus on health professionals and students in higher education institutions. The present study was aimed at providing new insight and filling the existing gap by examining health information needs and reliability of sources among nondegree health sciences students in Tanzania. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 conveniently selected health training institutions, where 403 health sciences students were participated. Thirty health sciences students were both purposely and conveniently chosen from each health-training institution. The selected students were pursuing nursing and midwifery, clinical medicine, dentistry, environmental health sciences, pharmacy, and medical laboratory sciences courses. Involved students were either in their first year, second year, or third year of study. Health sciences students' health information needs focus on their educational requirements, clinical practice, and personal information. They use print, human, and electronic health information. They lack eHealth research skills in navigating health information resources and have insufficient facilities for accessing eHealth information, a lack of specialists in health information, high costs for subscription electronic information, and unawareness of the availability of free Internet and other online health-related databases. This study found that nondegree health sciences students have limited skills in EHIL. Thus, designing and incorporating EHIL skills programs into the curriculum of nondegree health sciences students is vital. EHIL is a requirement common to all health settings, learning environments, and

  17. Understanding Health and Health-Related Behavior of Users of Internet Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimble, Matt

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about how actual use of Internet health-related information is associated with health or health-related behavior. Using a nationally representative sample of 34,525 from 2012, this study examined the demographics of users of Internet health-related information (users), reports estimates of association with several health and behavioral outcomes adjusting for demographic factors, and analyzed the sample by education level, race, gender, and age. Analysis of a large nationally representative sample shows evidence that users of health-related information (users) on the Internet are younger, more educated, more likely to be insured, more likely to be female, and less likely to be African American. After adjusting for demographic differences, users are more likely to have been diagnosed with hypertension, cancer, stroke, and high cholesterol, but no evidence of current hypertension, weight-related issues, or being in fair or poor health. Users are less likely to smoke and among smokers are more likely to attempt quitting. Users are more likely to exercise, get a flu shot, pap smear, mammogram, HIV test, colon cancer screening, blood pressure check, and cholesterol check, but likely to be heavy drinkers. With few exceptions, results appear robust across gender, age groups, level of education, and ethnicity. Use is generally positively associated with prior diagnosis for several conditions and behaviors related to improved health, but I find no relationship with existing health status. The association between use of health-related Internet information and health-related behavior seems robust across levels of education, age, gender, and race.

  18. Using web 2.0 for health information

    CERN Document Server

    Younger, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Since it was first formally described in 2004, what is known as Web 2.0 has affected every library and information sector. Web 2.0 has tremendous potential to transform health information delivery. This book offers a cohesive overview of how Web 2.0 is changing health and medical information work.

  19. Information retrieval pathways for health information exchange in multiple care settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine which health information exchange (HIE) technologies and information retrieval pathways healthcare professionals relied on to meet their information needs in the context of laboratory test results, radiological images and reports, and medication histories. Study Design...

  20. Delivering Education about Sexual Violence: Reflections on the Experience of Teaching a Sensitive Topic in the Social and Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriver, Stacey; Kennedy, Kieran M.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual violence is a serious and prevalent violation that is experienced by as many as one in three people worldwide. Professionals working in areas of health, social work, law, policy-development and other fields engage with survivors of sexual violence. Their knowledge of this issue is an important determinant in how they react towards survivors…

  1. Response Across the Health-Literacy Spectrum of Kidney Transplant Recipients to a Sun-Protection Education Program Delivered on Tablet Computers: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, June K; Friedewald, John J; Desai, Amishi; Gordon, Elisa J

    2015-08-18

    Sun protection can reduce skin cancer development in kidney transplant recipients, who have a greater risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma than the general population. A culturally sensitive sun-protection program (SunProtect) was created in English and Spanish with the option of choosing audio narration provided by the tablet computer (Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1). The intervention, which showed skin cancer on patients with various skin tones, explained the following scenarios: skin cancer risk, the ability of sun protection to reduce this risk, as well as offered sun-protection choices. The length of the intervention was limited to the time usually spent waiting during a visit to the nephrologist. The development of this culturally sensitive, electronic, interactive sun-protection educational program, SunProtect, was guided by the "transtheoretical model," which focuses on decision making influenced by perceptions of personal risk or vulnerability to a health threat, importance (severity) of the disease, and benefit of sun-protection behavior. Transportation theory, which holds that narratives can have uniquely persuasive effects in overcoming preconceived beliefs and cognitive biases because people transported into a narrative world will alter their beliefs based on information, claims, or events depicted, guided the use of testimonials. Participant tablet use was self-directed. Self-reported responses to surveys were entered into the database through the tablet. Usability was tested through interviews. A randomized controlled pilot trial with 170 kidney transplant recipients was conducted, where the educational program (SunProtect) was delivered through a touch-screen tablet to 84 participants. The study involved 62 non-Hispanic white, 60 non-Hispanic black, and 48 Hispanic/Latino kidney transplant recipients. The demographic survey data showed no significant mean differences between the intervention and control groups in age, sex, income, or time since

  2. Enhancing access to health information in Africa: a librarian's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathoni, Nasra

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, tremendous progress has been made toward providing health information in Africa, in part because of technological advancements. Nevertheless, ensuring that information is accessible, comprehensible, and usable remains problematic, and there remain needs in many settings to address issues such as computer skills, literacy, and the infrastructure to access information. To determine how librarians might play a more strategic role in meeting information needs of health professionals in Africa, the author reviewed key components of information systems pertinent to knowledge management for the health sector, including access to global online resources, capacity to use computer technology for information retrieval, information literacy, and the potential for professional networks to play a role in improving access to and use of information. The author concluded that, in regions that lack adequate information systems, librarians could apply their knowledge and skills to facilitate access and use by information seekers. Ensuring access to and use of health information can also be achieved by engaging organizations and associations working to enhance access to health information, such as the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa. These groups can provide assistance through training, dissemination, information repackaging, and other approaches known to improve information literacy.

  3. Public health ethics: informing better public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stacy M; Kerridge, Ian; Sainsbury, Peter; Letts, Julie K

    2012-01-01

    Public health ethics has emerged and grown as an independent discipline over the last decade. It involves using ethical theory and empirical analyses to determine and justify the right thing to do in public health. In this paper, we distinguish public health ethics from clinical ethics, research ethics, public health law and politics. We then discuss issues in public health ethics including: how to weigh up the benefits, harms and costs of intervening; how to ensure that public health interventions produce fair outcomes; the potential for public health to undermine or promote the rights of citizens; and the significance of being transparent and inclusive in public health interventions. We conclude that the explicit and systematic consideration of ethical issues will, and should, become central to every public health worker's daily practice.

  4. The potential of educational comics as a health information medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicol, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    To investigate ways in which educational comics might provide support in dealing with feelings and attitudes towards health conditions, as well as improving understanding of factual information and to identify potential weakness of comics as a medium for health information. Semi-structured interviewees with eleven university students who either had a mental or physical health condition themselves or had a family member with a health condition. The result highlighted the potential value of comics as a format for health information. In addition to conveying factual information, comics offer opportunities for self-awareness, reassurance, empathy, companionship and a means to explore the impact of illness on family relationships. However, there are notable barriers to the greater use of comics to provide health information, namely, a lack of awareness of, and easy access to, educational comics, along with the perception that comics are exclusively light-hearted and for children. Currently, the full potential of comics in health settings is not being realised. Health information professionals may be in a position to address this issue through identifying, cataloguing, indexing and promoting comics as a legitimate format for health information. © 2016 The Author. Health Information and Libraries Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Health Libraries Group.

  5. How health information is received by diabetic patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Zare-Farashbandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge of correct information-seeking behavior by the patients can provide health specialists and health information specialists with valuable information in improving health care. This study aimed to investigate the passive receipt and active seeking of health information by diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: A survey method was used in this research on 6426 diabetic patients of whom 362 patients were selected by a no percentage stratified random sampling. The Longo information-seeking behavior questionnaire was used to collect data and they were analyzed by SPSS 20 software. Results: The most common information source by diabetic patients was practitioners (3.12. The minimum usage among the information sources were from charity organizations and emergency phone lines with a usage of close to zero. The amount of health information gained passively from each source has the lowest average of 4.18 and usage of this information in making health decision has the highest average score of 5.83. Analysis of the data related to active seeking of information showed that knowledge of available medical information from each source has the lowest average score of 3.95 and ability in using the acquired information for making medical decisions has the highest average score of 5.28. The paired t-test showed that differences between passive information receipt (41.68 and active information seeking (39.20 considered as statistically significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Because diabetic patients are more passive information receivers than active information seekers, the health information must be distributed by passive means to these patients. In addition, information-seeking behavior during different time periods should be investigated; to identify more effective distribution of health information.

  6. Pathway to Support the Sustainable National Health Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahavechaphan, Naiyana; Phengsuwan, Jedsada; U-Ruekolan, Suriya; Aroonrua, Kamron; Ponhan, Jukrapong; Harnsamut, Nattapon; Vannarat, Sornthep

    Heath information across geographically distributed healthcare centers has been recognized as an essential resource that drives an efficient national health-care plan. There is thus a need for the National Health Information System (NHIS) that provides the transparent and secure access to health information from different healthcare centers both on demand and in a time efficient manner. As healthiness is the ultimate goal of people and nation, we believe that the NHIS should be sustainable by taking the healthcare center and information consumer perspectives into account. Several issues in particular must be resolved altogether: (i) the diversity of health information structures among healthcare centers; (ii) the availability of health information sharing from healthcare centers; (iii) the efficient information access to various healthcare centers; and (iv) the privacy and privilege of heath information. To achieve the sustainable NHIS, this paper details our work which is divided into 3 main phases. Essentially, the first phase focuses on the application of metadata standard to enable the interoperability and usability of health information across healthcare centers. The second phase moves forward to make information sharing possible and to provide an efficient information access to a large number of healthcare centers. Finally, in the third phase, the privacy and privilege of health information is promoted with respect to access rights of information consumers.

  7. An integrated and sustainable EU health information system: national public health institutes' needs and possible benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Petronille; Van Oyen, Herman

    2017-01-01

    Although sound data and health information are at the basis of evidence-based policy-making and research, still no single, integrated and sustainable EU-wide public health monitoring system or health information system exists. BRIDGE Health is working towards an EU health information and data generation network covering major EU health policy areas. A stakeholder consultation with national public health institutes was organised to identify the needs to strengthen the current EU health information system and to identify its possible benefits. Five key issues for improvement were identified: (1) coherence, coordination and sustainability; (2) data harmonization, collection, processing and reporting; (3) comparison and benchmarking; (4) knowledge sharing and capacity building; and (5) transferability of health information into evidence-based policy making. The vision of an improved EU health information system was formulated and the possible benefits in relation to six target groups. Through this consultation, BRIDGE Health has identified the continuous need to strengthen the EU health information system. A better system is about sustainability, better coordination, governance and collaboration among national health information systems and stakeholders to jointly improve, harmonise, standardise and analyse health information. More and better sharing of this comparable health data allows for more and better comparative health research, international benchmarking, national and EU-wide public health monitoring. This should be developed with the view to provide the tools to fight both common and individual challenges faced by the Members States and their politicians.

  8. Serving the Needs of the Latina Community for Health Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Yaros

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Latinos remain the largest US population with limited health literacy (Andrulis D.P. & Brach, 2007. Concerned with how local media can meet the information needs of underserved audiences, we interviewed Latinas who were pregnant or mothers of young children living in a Spanish speaking community, and surveyed 33 local health professionals. Findings are that Latina women’s most common source of health information was family and friends. They said they tune to Spanish television and radio programs, but gave low grades to news media for health information. Medical professionals agreed that Latinas generally get their health information through friends and family, and rated the media poorly in terms of serving Latinas’ needs. Since the data indicate that the local news media are not serving Latinas’ health information needs as much as they could, we offer recommendations to potentially exploit new technological affordances and suggest expansion of conventional definitions of health literacy.

  9. An examination of electronic health information privacy in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thai; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Older adults are the quickest growing demographic group and are key consumers of health services. As the United States health system transitions to electronic health records, it is important to understand older adult perceptions of privacy and security. We performed a secondary analysis of the Health Information National Trends Survey (2012, Cycle 1), to examine differences in perceptions of electronic health information privacy between older adults and the general population. We found differences in the level of importance placed on access to electronic health information (older adults placed greater emphasis on provider as opposed to personal access) and tendency to withhold information out of concerns for privacy and security (older adults were less likely to withhold information). We provide recommendations to alleviate some of these privacy concerns. This may facilitate greater use of electronic health communication between patient and provider, while promoting shared decision making.

  10. Antecedents and Consequences of Consumer's Response to Health Information Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben; Uth Thomsen, Thyra; Beckmann, Suzanne C.

    2013-01-01

    This study develops and empirically tests a model for understanding food consumers' health information seeking behaviour. Data were collected from 504 food consumers using a nationally representative consumer panel. The obtained Lisrel results suggest that consumers' product-specific health...... information seeking is positively affected by general food involvement and by usability of product-specific health information. Moreover, product-specific health information seeking and product-specific health information complexity are both positively related to post-purchase health-related dissonance....... This link between information complexity and post-purchase dissonance has implications for marketers of food products since our results suggest that consumers might avoid purchasing the same food item again if post-purchase dissonance is experienced....

  11. Where Doctors Read Health Information Resources and Their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assessing health information are the internet, electronic databases, textbooks, journals and colleagues, in ... federal and state ministries of health and teaching hospital managements in South East Nigeria ..... The findings from this study record.

  12. Readiness for Meaningful Use of Health Information Tech...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Readiness for Meaningful Use of Health Information Technology and Patient Centered Medical Home Recognition Survey Results,...

  13. Tufts academic health information network: concept and scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, N S

    1986-04-01

    Tufts University School of Medicine's new health sciences education building, the Arthur M. Sackler Center for Health Communications, will house a modern medical library and computer center, classrooms, auditoria, and media facilities. The building will also serve as the center for an information and communication network linking the medical school and adjacent New England Medical Center, Tufts' primary teaching hospital, with Tufts Associated Teaching Hospitals throughout New England. Ultimately, the Tufts network will join other gateway networks, information resource facilities, health care institutions, and medical schools throughout the world. The center and the network are intended to facilitate and improve the education of health professionals, the delivery of health care to patients, the conduct of research, and the implementation of administrative management approaches that should provide more efficient utilization of resources and save dollars. A model and scenario show how health care delivery and health care education are integrated through better use of information transfer technologies by health information specialists, practitioners, and educators.

  14. Remotely Delivered Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation: Design and Content Development of a Novel mHealth Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstorn, Jonathan C; Gant, Nicholas; Meads, Andrew; Warren, Ian; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-06-24

    Participation in traditional center-based cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs (exCR) is limited by accessibility barriers. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies can overcome these barriers while preserving critical attributes of center-based exCR monitoring and coaching, but these opportunities have not yet been capitalized on. We aimed to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform for remote delivery of exCR to any geographical location. An iterative process was used to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform (REMOTE-CR) that provides real-time remote exercise monitoring and coaching, behavior change education, and social support. The REMOTE-CR platform comprises a commercially available smartphone and wearable sensor, custom smartphone and Web-based applications (apps), and a custom middleware. The platform allows exCR specialists to monitor patients' exercise and provide individualized coaching in real-time, from almost any location, and provide behavior change education and social support. Intervention content incorporates Social Cognitive Theory, Self-determination Theory, and a taxonomy of behavior change techniques. Exercise components are based on guidelines for clinical exercise prescription. The REMOTE-CR platform extends the capabilities of previous telehealth exCR platforms and narrows the gap between existing center- and home-based exCR services. REMOTE-CR can complement center-based exCR by providing an alternative option for patients whose needs are not being met. Remotely monitored exCR may be more cost-effective than establishing additional center-based programs. The effectiveness and acceptability of REMOTE-CR are now being evaluated in a noninferiority randomized controlled trial.

  15. [Training professionals for delivering ingreated health care to the aged: the interdisciplinary experience of NAI - UNATI/UERJ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Motta, Luciana Branco; Caldas, Célia Pereira; de Assis, Mônica

    2008-01-01

    The training of professionals in the field of healthcare for the aged is one of the priorities of the national policy for the aged in Brazil due to the accelerated aging of the population. The Núcleo de Atenção ao Idoso (NAI), a unit of the Open University of the Third Age/UERJ (UNATI/UERJ) develops an educational program in this field, based on practical care delivery with emphasis to inter-disciplinarity and teamwork. The program includes different training levels and modalities: Residency, Specialization, Professional Practice and Graduation. The program includes an introductory course in gerontology and geriatrics common to all areas, and specific theoretical-practical qualification coordinated by the professional staff from the respective areas. The practical activities occur in different sceneries: long term care institutions, health promotion educational settings, outpatient facilities and the university hospital. Interdisciplinary thinking and acting is a continuous exercise, and the team should be open to innovative strategies. The experience is a contribution to the increasing social demand for qualified professionals committed with the principles of the Unified Health System and integrated health care.

  16. What predicts the trust of online health information?

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Jeong Hyun; Kye, Su-Yeon; Park, Eun Young; Oh, Kyung Hee; Park, Keeho

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Little attention has been paid to levels of trust in online sources of health information. The objective of this study was to investigate levels of trust in various sources of health information (interpersonal channels, traditional media, and Internet media), and to examine the predictors of trust in health information available on the Internet. METHODS: A questionnaire was administered to 1,300 people (20 years of age or older), evaluating levels of trust in various sources of he...

  17. Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet,...

  18. Social value and information quality in online health information search

    OpenAIRE

    Hameed, Tahir; Swar, Bobby

    2016-01-01

    This paper extends and validates a model of value-driven online healthcare information search in online shared contexts. Perceived value is an important factor behind users' decisions concerning search, consumption and reuse of products and services. The role of utilitarian, hedonic and epistemic value of information in user satisfaction and intention to repeat online search is well recognized, but little support has been found for social value affecting user satisfaction critical for such de...

  19. A decade devoted to improving online health information quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Celia; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2005-01-01

    Created in 1995 in response to consumer enthusiasm for the World Wide Web, Health On the Net FoundationHealth On the Net Foundation: http://www.healthonnet.org/ has developed solutions to address the problem of potentially dangerous online health and medical information. Then as now, no international legal framework regulated online content, and consumers needed to be given the means to check the reliability and the relevance of health information [[1

  20. Patient privacy, consent, and identity management in health information exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Hosek, Susan D

    2013-01-01

    As a step toward improving its health information technology (IT) interoperability, the Military Health System is seeking to develop a research roadmap to better coordinate health IT research efforts, address IT capability gaps, and reduce programmatic risk for its enterprise projects. This report identifies gaps in research, policy, and practice involving patient privacy, consent, and identity management that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of care through health information exchange.

  1. Measuring socioeconomic health inequalities in presence of multiple categorical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdissi, Paul; Yazbeck, Myra

    2014-03-01

    While many of the measurement approaches in health inequality measurement assume the existence of a ratio-scale variable, most of the health information available in population surveys is given in the form of categorical variables. Therefore, the well-known inequality indices may not always be readily applicable to measure health inequality as it may result in the arbitrariness of the health concentration index's value. In this paper, we address this problem by changing the dimension in which the categorical information is used. We therefore exploit the multi-dimensionality of this information, define a new ratio-scale health status variable and develop positional stochastic dominance conditions that can be implemented in a context of categorical variables. We also propose a parametric class of population health and socioeconomic health inequality indices. Finally we provide a twofold empirical illustration using the Joint Canada/United States Surveys of Health 2004 and the National Health Interview Survey 2010.

  2. Determinants of Consumer eHealth Information Seeking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefer, Ryan H; Westra, Bonnie L; Khairat, Saif S; Pieczkiewicz, David S; Speedie, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    Patients are increasingly using the Internet and other technologies to engage in their own healthcare, but little research has focused on the determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors related to Internet use. This study uses data from 115,089 respondents to four years of the National Health Interview Series to identify the associations between one consumer eHealth behavior (information seeking) and demographics, health measures, and Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) (messaging, scheduling, refills, and chat). Individuals who use PHIM are 7.5 times more likely to search the internet for health related information. Just as health has social determinants, the results of this study indicate there are potential social determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors including personal demographics, health status, and healthcare access.

  3. Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet, and assesses which youth are more likely to engage in seeking health information from online sources. Drawing from Andersen's (1968) health behavior model and Pescosolido's (1992) network episode model, we develop and refine a model for seeking online sexual health information among homeless youth. Rather than testing the predicative strength of a given model, our aim is to identify and explore conceptually driven correlates that may shed light on the characteristics associated with these help seeking behaviors among homeless youth. Analyses using multivariate logistic regression models reveal that among the sample of youth, females and gay males most frequently seek sexual health information online. We demonstrate the structure of social network ties (e.g., connection with parents) and the content of interactions (e.g., e-mail forwards of health information) across ties are critical correlates of online sexual health information seeking. Results show a continued connection with parents via the Internet is significantly associated with youth seeking HIV or STI information. Similarly for content of interactions, more youth who were sent health information online also reported seeking HIV information and HIV-testing information. We discuss implications for intervention and practice, focusing on how the Internet may be used for dissemination of sexual health information and as a resource for social workers to link transient, runaway, and homeless youth to care.

  4. Scanning Health Information Sources: Applying and Extending the Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Erin K

    2016-01-01

    Information scanning, or attention to information via incidental or routine exposure or browsing, is relatively less understood than information seeking. To (a) provide a more theoretical understanding of information scanning and (b) extend existing information seeking theory to information scanning, the current study used data from the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey to examine cancer information scanning using the comprehensive model of information seeking (CMIS). Consistent with the CMIS, health-related factors were associated with the information-carrier factor of trust, and health-related factors and trust were associated with attention to information sources. Some of these associations differed between entertainment-oriented sources, information-oriented sources, and the Internet. The current findings provide a clearer picture of information scanning and suggest future avenues of research and practice using the CMIS.

  5. Mobile technology in health information systems - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X-Y; Zhang, P-Y

    2016-05-01

    Mobile technology is getting involved in every sphere of life including medical health care. There has been an immense upsurge in mobile phone-based health innovations these days. The expansion of mobile phone networks and the proliferation of inexpensive mobile handsets have made the digital information and communication technology capabilities very handy for the people to exploit if for any utility including health care. The mobile phone based innovations are able to transform weak and under performing health information system into more modern and efficient information system. The present review article will enlighten all these aspects of mobile technology in health care.

  6. Exploring health information technology education: an analysis of the research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgona, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This article is an analysis of the Health Information Technology Education published research. The purpose of this study was to examine selected literature using variables such as journal frequency, keyword analysis, universities associated with the research and geographic diversity. The analysis presented in this paper has identified intellectually significant studies that have contributed to the development and accumulation of intellectual wealth of Health Information Technology. The keyword analysis suggests that Health Information Technology research has evolved from establishing concepts and domains of health information systems, technology and management to contemporary issues such as education, outsourcing, web services and security. The research findings have implications for educators, researchers, journal.

  7. Transforming health care delivery through consumer engagement, health data transparency, and patient-generated health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, D Z; Wald, J S

    2014-08-15

    Address current topics in consumer health informatics. Literature review. Current health care delivery systems need to be more effective in the management of chronic conditions as the population turns older and experiences escalating chronic illness that threatens to consume more health care resources than countries can afford. Most health care systems are positioned poorly to accommodate this. Meanwhile, the availability of ever more powerful and cheaper information and communication technology, both for professionals and consumers, has raised the capacity to gather and process information, communicate more effectively, and monitor the quality of care processes. Adapting health care systems to serve current and future needs requires new streams of data to enable better self-management, improve shared decision making, and provide more virtual care. Changes in reimbursement for health care services, increased adoption of relevant technologies, patient engagement, and calls for data transparency raise the importance of patient-generated health information, remote monitoring, non-visit based care, and other innovative care approaches that foster more frequent contact with patients and better management of chronic conditions.

  8. Smartphone Ownership Among US Adult Cigarette Smokers: 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Jaimee L; Mull, Kristin E

    2017-08-31

    Despite increasing interest in smartphone apps as a platform for delivery of tobacco cessation interventions, no previous studies have evaluated the prevalence and characteristics of smokers who can access smartphone-delivered interventions. To guide treatment development in this new platform and to evaluate disparities in access to smartphone-delivered interventions, we examined associations of smartphone ownership with demographics, tobacco use and thoughts about quitting, other health behaviors, physical and mental health, health care access, and Internet and technology utilization using a nationally representative sample of US adult smokers. Data were from the National Cancer Institute's 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey 4 (HINTS 4), Cycle 4. This mailed survey targeted noninstitutionalized individuals aged 18 years or older using two-stage stratified random sampling. For this analysis, we restricted the sample to current smokers with complete data on smartphone ownership (n=479). Nearly two-thirds (weighted percent=63.8%, 248/479) of smokers reported owning a smartphone. Those who were younger (Pvegetable consumption (P=.03) and were more likely to report past-year efforts to increase exercise (P=.001) and to lose weight (P=.02). No differences in health care access and utilization were found. Smartphone owners reported better physical and mental health in several domains and higher access to and utilization of technology and the Internet, including for health reasons. Smartphone ownership among smokers mirrors many trends in the general population, including the overall rate of ownership and the association with younger age and higher socioeconomic status. Apps for smoking cessation could potentially capitalize on smartphone owners' efforts at multiple health behavior changes and interest in communicating with health care providers via technology. These data also highlight the importance of accessible treatment options for smokers without

  9. College Students' Health Information Activities on Facebook: Investigating the Impacts of Health Topic Sensitivity, Information Sources, and Demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syn, Sue Yeon; Kim, Sung Un

    2016-07-01

    College students tend to lack access to health information. Because social networking sites (SNSs) are popularly adopted by college students, SNSs are considered to be good media channels for college students to obtain health-related information. This study examines the factors that influence college students' health information-seeking and -sharing activities on Facebook. An online survey was distributed to college students between the ages of 18 and 29 to determine intentions pertaining to health information activities according to the factors identified for the study. The factors included both contextual factors (such as health topic sensitivity and health information sources) as well as user factors (such as demographics). Our findings showed that college students are willing to read and post health-related information on Facebook when the health topic is not sensitive. In addition, there are clear differences in preferences between professional sources and personal sources as health information sources. It was found that most user factors, except gender, have no influence on health information activities. The impacts of SNS contexts, awareness of information sources, types of interlocutors, and privacy concerns are further discussed.

  10. Information Seeking When Problem Solving: Perspectives of Public Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kristine; Dobbins, Maureen; Yost, Jennifer; Ciliska, Donna

    2017-04-01

    Given the many different types of professionals working in public health and their diverse roles, it is likely that their information needs, information-seeking behaviors, and problem-solving abilities differ. Although public health professionals often work in interdisciplinary teams, few studies have explored their information needs and behaviors within the context of teamwork. This study explored the relationship between Canadian public health professionals' perceptions of their problem-solving abilities and their information-seeking behaviors with a specific focus on the use of evidence in practice settings. It also explored their perceptions of collaborative information seeking and the work contexts in which they sought information. Key Canadian contacts at public health organizations helped recruit study participants through their list-servs. An electronic survey was used to gather data about (a) individual information-seeking behaviors, (b) collaborative information-seeking behaviors, (c) use of evidence in practice environments, (d) perceived problem-solving abilities, and (e) demographic characteristics. Fifty-eight public health professionals were recruited, with different roles and representing most Canadian provinces and one territory. A significant relationship was found between perceived problem-solving abilities and collaborative information-seeking behavior (r = -.44, p information seeking. The results suggested that when public health professionals take a shared, active approach to problem solving, maintain personal control, and have confidence, they are more likely collaborate with others in seeking information to complete a work task. Administrators of public health organizations should promote collaboration by implementing effective communication and information-seeking strategies, and by providing information resources and retrieval tools. Public health professionals' perceived problem-solving abilities can influence how they collaborate in

  11. Partnering with law enforcement to deliver good public health: the experience of the HIV/AIDS Asia regional program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Mukta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the South-East Asia region, the drug control and supply reduction agenda is of high political importance. A multitude of law enforcement agencies are engaged in this work. Nationwide campaigns such as the “Strike- Hard” campaign in China or the “war on drugs” in Thailand dominate the landscape. Viet Nam’s response to drug use has historically focused on deterrence through punishment and supply-side measures. This policy environment is further complicated by lack of evidence-based drug dependence treatment in several settings. The public health consequences of this approach have been extremely serious, with some of the highest documented prevalence of preventable blood-borne viral infections, including HIV, and hepatitis B and C. The wider socioeconomic consequences of this have been borne by families, communities and the governments themselves. The HIV/AIDS Asia Regional Program (HAARP aims to stop the spread of HIV associated with drug use in South-East Asia and parts of southern China. HAARP works across five countries (Cambodia, China Burma, Laos, Viet Nam chiefly through the Ministries of Health and Social Affairs, National Drug Control Agencies, and Public Security sectors, including prisons. HAARP has also engaged with UN agencies and a wide range of civil society organisations, including organisations of people who use drugs, to ensure their meaningful involvement in matters that directly affect them. We describe the experience of HAARP in implementing a large-scale harm reduction programme in the Sub-Mekong Region. HAARP chose to direct its efforts in three main areas: supporting an enabling environment for effective harm reduction policies, building core capacity among national health and law enforcement agencies, and supporting “universal access” goals by making effective, high-coverage services available to injecting drug users and their partners. The activities supported by HAARP are humble yet important

  12. Partnering with law enforcement to deliver good public health: the experience of the HIV/AIDS Asia regional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukta; Chatterjee, Anindya

    2012-07-09

    In the South-East Asia region, the drug control and supply reduction agenda is of high political importance. A multitude of law enforcement agencies are engaged in this work. Nationwide campaigns such as the "Strike- Hard" campaign in China or the "war on drugs" in Thailand dominate the landscape. Viet Nam's response to drug use has historically focused on deterrence through punishment and supply-side measures. This policy environment is further complicated by lack of evidence-based drug dependence treatment in several settings. The public health consequences of this approach have been extremely serious, with some of the highest documented prevalence of preventable blood-borne viral infections, including HIV, and hepatitis B and C. The wider socioeconomic consequences of this have been borne by families, communities and the governments themselves.The HIV/AIDS Asia Regional Program (HAARP) aims to stop the spread of HIV associated with drug use in South-East Asia and parts of southern China. HAARP works across five countries (Cambodia, China Burma, Laos, Viet Nam) chiefly through the Ministries of Health and Social Affairs, National Drug Control Agencies, and Public Security sectors, including prisons. HAARP has also engaged with UN agencies and a wide range of civil society organisations, including organisations of people who use drugs, to ensure their meaningful involvement in matters that directly affect them. We describe the experience of HAARP in implementing a large-scale harm reduction programme in the Sub-Mekong Region. HAARP chose to direct its efforts in three main areas: supporting an enabling environment for effective harm reduction policies, building core capacity among national health and law enforcement agencies, and supporting "universal access" goals by making effective, high-coverage services available to injecting drug users and their partners.The activities supported by HAARP are humble yet important steps. However, a much higher political

  13. How adolescents use technology for health information: implications for health professionals from focus group studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skinner, Harvey; Biscope, Sherry; Poland, Blake; Goldberg, Eudice

    2003-01-01

    .... To describe how adolescents use technology for their health-information needs, identify the challenges they face, and highlight some emerging roles of health professionals regarding eHealth services for adolescents...

  14. Nurses experiences of delivering care in acute inpatient mental health settings: A narrative synthesis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyder, Marianne; Ehrlich, Carolyn; Crompton, David; McArthur, Leianne; Delaforce, Caroline; Dziopa, Fiona; Ramon, Shulamit; Powell, Elizabeth

    2017-03-14

    Inpatient psychiatric care requires a balance between working with consumers' priorities and goals, managing expectations of the community, legal, professional and service responsibilities. In order to improve service delivery within acute mental health units, it is important to understand the constraints and facilitating factors for good care. We conducted a systematic narrative synthesis, where findings of qualitative studies are synthesised to generate new insights. 21 articles were identified. Our results show that personal qualities, professional skills as well as environmental factors all influence the ability to provide recovery focused care. Three overarching themes which either facilitated or hindered were identified. These included: (i) Complexity of the nursing role (clinical care; practical and emotional support: advocacy and education; enforcing aspects of the Mental Health Act. and, maintaining ward safety); (ii) Constraining factors (operational barriers; change in patient characteristic; and competing understandings of care); and (iii) Facilitating factors (ward factors; nursing tools; nurse characteristics; approach to people; approach to work and ability to self-care). We suggest that the therapeutic use of self is central to the provision of recovery oriented care. However person-centred practice can be fragile and fluid and a compassionate system of support is needed to enable an understanding of context and self. It is critical to have a work environment which fosters hope and optimism and is supportive of autonomy, ensures workload balance, and is safe.

  15. Towards Web-based representation and processing of health information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldfield Eddie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is great concern within health surveillance, on how to grapple with environmental degradation, rapid urbanization, population mobility and growth. The Internet has emerged as an efficient way to share health information, enabling users to access and understand data at their fingertips. Increasingly complex problems in the health field require increasingly sophisticated computer software, distributed computing power, and standardized data sharing. To address this need, Web-based mapping is now emerging as an important tool to enable health practitioners, policy makers, and the public to understand spatial health risks, population health trends and vulnerabilities. Today several web-based health applications generate dynamic maps; however, for people to fully interpret the maps they need data source description and the method used in the data analysis or statistical modeling. For the representation of health information through Web-mapping applications, there still lacks a standard format to accommodate all fixed (such as location and variable (such as age, gender, health outcome, etc indicators in the representation of health information. Furthermore, net-centric computing has not been adequately applied to support flexible health data processing and mapping online. Results The authors of this study designed a HEalth Representation XML (HERXML schema that consists of the semantic (e.g., health activity description, the data sources description, the statistical methodology used for analysis, geometric, and cartographical representations of health data. A case study has been carried on the development of web application and services within the Canadian Geospatial Data Infrastructure (CGDI framework for community health programs of the New Brunswick Lung Association. This study facilitated the online processing, mapping and sharing of health information, with the use of HERXML and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC services

  16. Role of Information in Consumer Selection of Health Plans

    OpenAIRE

    Sainfort, François; Booske, Bridget C.

    1996-01-01

    Considerable efforts are underway in the public and private sectors to increase the amount of information available to consumers when making health plan choices. The objective of this study was to examine the role of information in consumer health plan decisionmaking. A computer system was developed which provides different plan descriptions with the option of accessing varying types and levels of information. The system tracked the information search processes and recorded the hypothetical p...

  17. The impact of health information technology and e-health on the future demand for physician services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Jonathan P; Yeh, Susan; Blumenthal, David

    2013-11-01

    Arguably, few factors will change the future face of the American health care workforce as widely and dramatically as health information technology (IT) and electronic health (e-health) applications. We explore how such applications designed for providers and patients will affect the future demand for physicians. We performed what we believe to be the most comprehensive review of the literature to date, including previously published systematic reviews and relevant individual studies. We estimate that if health IT were fully implemented in 30 percent of community-based physicians' offices, the demand for physicians would be reduced by about 4-9 percent. Delegation of care to nurse practitioners and physician assistants supported by health IT could reduce the future demand for physicians by 4-7 percent. Similarly, IT-supported delegation from specialist physicians to generalists could reduce the demand for specialists by 2-5 percent. The use of health IT could also help address regional shortages of physicians by potentially enabling 12 percent of care to be delivered remotely or asynchronously. These estimated impacts could more than double if comprehensive health IT systems were adopted by 70 percent of US ambulatory care delivery settings. Future predictions of physician supply adequacy should take these likely changes into account.

  18. Health literacy and online health information processing: Unraveling the underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, C.S.; Smit, E.G.; Diviani, N.; van Weert, J.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness of the Internet as a health information source largely depends on the receiver’s health literacy. This study investigates the mechanisms through which health literacy affects information recall and website attitudes. Using 2 independent surveys addressing different Dutch health

  19. Adolescent Health Literacy: The Importance of Credible Sources for Online Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaddar, Suad F.; Valerio, Melissa A.; Garcia, Carolyn M.; Hansen, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little research has examined adolescent health literacy and its relationship with online health information sources. The purpose of this study is to explore health literacy among a predominantly Hispanic adolescent population and to investigate whether exposure to a credible source of online health information, MedlinePlus[R], is…

  20. Influence, information overload, and information technology in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebitzer, James B; Rege, Mari; Shepard, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    We investigate whether information technology (IT) can help physicians more efficiently acquire new knowledge in a clinical environment characterized by information overload. We combine analysis of data from a randomized trial with a theoretical model of the influence that IT has on the acquisition of new medical knowledge. Although the theoretical framework we develop is conventionally microeconomic, the model highlights the non-market and non-pecuniary influence activities that have been emphasized in the sociological literature on technology diffusion. We report three findings. First, empirical evidence and theoretical reasoning suggests that computer-based decision support will speed the diffusion of new medical knowledge when physicians are coping with information overload. Second, spillover effects will likely lead to "underinvestment" in this decision support technology. Third, alternative financing strategies common to new IT, such as the use of marketing dollars to pay for the decision support systems, may lead to undesirable outcomes if physician information overload is sufficiently severe and if there is significant ambiguity in how best to respond to the clinical issues identified by the computer. This is the first paper to analyze empirically and theoretically how computer-based decision support influences the acquisition of new knowledge by physicians.

  1. The experiences of lecturers in African, Asian and European universities in preparing and delivering blended health research methods courses: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protsiv, Myroslava; Atkins, Salla

    2016-01-01

    Background Growing demand for Global Health (GH) training and the internationalisation of education requires innovative approaches to training. Blended learning (BL, a form of e-learning combining face-to-face or real-time interaction with computer-assisted learning) is a promising approach for increasing GH research capacity in low- to middle-income countries. Implementing BL, however, requires additional skills and efforts from lecturers. This paper explores lecturers’ views and experiences of delivering BL courses within the context of two north–south collaborative research capacity building projects, ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH. Design We used a qualitative approach to explore the experiences and perceptions of 11 lecturers involved in designing and delivering BL courses collaboratively across university campuses in four countries (South Africa, Uganda, India and Sweden). Data were collected using interviews in person or via Skype. Inductive qualitative content analysis was used. Results Participants reported that they felt BL increased access to learning opportunities and made training more flexible and convenient for adult learners, which were major motivations to engage in BL. However, despite eagerness to implement and experiment with BL courses, they lacked capacity and support, and found the task time consuming. They needed to make compromises between course objectives and available technological tools, in the context of poor Internet infrastructure. Conclusions BL courses have the potential to build bridges between low- and middle-income contexts and between lecturers and students to meet the demand for GH training. Lecturers were very motivated to try these approaches but encountered obstacles in implementing BL courses. Considerable investments are needed to implement BL and support lecturers in delivering courses. PMID:27725078

  2. The experiences of lecturers in African, Asian and European universities in preparing and delivering blended health research methods courses: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myroslava Protsiv

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Growing demand for Global Health (GH training and the internationalisation of education requires innovative approaches to training. Blended learning (BL, a form of e-learning combining face-to-face or real-time interaction with computer-assisted learning is a promising approach for increasing GH research capacity in low- to middle-income countries. Implementing BL, however, requires additional skills and efforts from lecturers. This paper explores lecturers’ views and experiences of delivering BL courses within the context of two north–south collaborative research capacity building projects, ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH. Design: We used a qualitative approach to explore the experiences and perceptions of 11 lecturers involved in designing and delivering BL courses collaboratively across university campuses in four countries (South Africa, Uganda, India and Sweden. Data were collected using interviews in person or via Skype. Inductive qualitative content analysis was used. Results: Participants reported that they felt BL increased access to learning opportunities and made training more flexible and convenient for adult learners, which were major motivations to engage in BL. However, despite eagerness to implement and experiment with BL courses, they lacked capacity and support, and found the task time consuming. They needed to make compromises between course objectives and available technological tools, in the context of poor Internet infrastructure. Conclusions: BL courses have the potential to build bridges between low- and middle-income contexts and between lecturers and students to meet the demand for GH training. Lecturers were very motivated to try these approaches but encountered obstacles in implementing BL courses. Considerable investments are needed to implement BL and support lecturers in delivering courses.

  3. The evolving state of online search for consumer health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunscher, Dale A

    2008-11-06

    Online search for consumer health information is a public health concern. General-purpose search engines have historically returned health-related query results of dubious relevance and quality. Meanwhile, consumers have become increasingly reliant on and trusting of these engines. General-purpose search engines have attempted to make their interfaces more consumer-friendly with respect to consumer health queries and their results more relevant and trustworthy. We illustrate the characteristics of the evolving health search landscape using network visualization.

  4. Attitudes to Sharing Personal Health Information in Living Kidney Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizo-Abes, Patricia; Young, Ann; Reese, Peter P.; McFarlane, Phil; Wright, Linda; Cuerden, Meaghan

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: In living kidney donation, transplant professionals consider the rights of a living kidney donor and recipient to keep their personal health information confidential and the need to disclose this information to the other for informed consent. In incompatible kidney exchange, personal health information from multiple living donors and recipients may affect decision making and outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We conducted a survey to understand and compare the preferences of potential donors (n = 43), potential recipients (n = 73), and health professionals (n = 41) toward sharing personal health information (in total 157 individuals). Results: When considering traditional live-donor transplantation, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's health information should be shared with the donor (86 and 80%, respectively) and that a donor's information should be shared with the recipient (97 and 89%, respectively). When considering incompatible kidney exchange, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's information should be shared with all donors and recipients involved in the transplant (85 and 85%, respectively) and that a donor's information should also be shared with all involved (95 and 90%, respectively). These results were contrary to attitudes expressed by transplant professionals, who frequently disagreed about whether such information should be shared. Conclusions: Future policies and practice could facilitate greater sharing of personal health information in living kidney donation. This requires a consideration of which information is relevant, how to put it in context, and a plan to obtain consent from all concerned. PMID:20299371

  5. A personal health information toolkit for health intervention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizakevich, Paul N; Eckhoff, Randall; Weger, Stacey; Weeks, Adam; Brown, Janice; Bryant, Stephanie; Bakalov, Vesselina; Zhang, Yuying; Lyden, Jennifer; Spira, James

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of mobile health (mHealth) apps, there is a growing demand for better tools for developing and evaluating mobile health interventions. Recently we developed the Personal Health Intervention Toolkit (PHIT), a software framework which eases app implementation and facilitates scientific evaluation. PHIT integrates self-report and physiological sensor instruments, evidence-based advisor logic, and self-help interventions such as meditation, health education, and cognitive behavior change. PHIT can be used to facilitate research, interventions for chronic diseases, risky behaviors, sleep, medication adherence, environmental monitoring, momentary data collection health screening, and clinical decision support. In a series of usability evaluations, participants reported an overall usability score of 4.5 on a 1-5 Likert scale and an 85 score on the System Usability Scale, indicating a high percentile rank of 95%.

  6. Process evaluation determines the pathway of success for a health center-delivered, nutrition education intervention for infants in Trujillo, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Rebecca C; Gittelsohn, Joel; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary M; Penny, Mary E; Caulfield, Laura E; Narro, M Rocio; Black, Robert E

    2006-03-01

    Process evaluation was used to explain the success of a randomized, controlled trial of an educational intervention to improve the feeding behaviors of caregivers and the nutritional status of infants in Trujillo, Peru. Health personnel delivered a multicomponent intervention within the environment of usual care at government health centers. We created a model of the expected intervention pathway to successful outcomes. Process data were then collected on health center implementation of the intervention and caregiver reception to it. Using multivariate models, we found that variables of health center implementation, caregiver exposure, and caregiver message recall were all significant determinants in the pathway leading to improved feeding behaviors. These outcomes were consistent with our original intervention model. Further support for our model arose from the differences in caregiver reception between intervention and control centers. Process data allowed us to characterize the pathway through which an effective nutrition intervention operated. This study underscores the importance of including process evaluation, which will lead to the development and implementation of more effective nutrition interventions.

  7. Attitudes and Learning through Practice Are Key to Delivering Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Health Care: Analyses from the ODHIN Five Country Cluster Randomized Factorial Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we test path models that study the interrelations between primary health care provider attitudes towards working with drinkers, their screening and brief advice activity, and their receipt of training and support and financial reimbursement. Study participants were 756 primary health care providers from 120 primary health care units (PHCUs in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, The Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Our interventions were training and support and financial reimbursement to providers. Our design was a randomized factorial trial with baseline measurement period, 12-week implementation period, and 9-month follow-up measurement period. Our outcome measures were: attitudes of individual providers in working with drinkers as measured by the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire; and the proportion of consulting adult patients (age 18+ years who screened positive and were given advice to reduce their alcohol consumption (intervention activity. We found that more positive attitudes were associated with higher intervention activity, and higher intervention activity was then associated with more positive attitudes. Training and support was associated with both positive changes in attitudes and higher intervention activity. Financial reimbursement was associated with more positive attitudes through its impact on higher intervention activity. We conclude that improving primary health care providers’ screening and brief advice activity for heavy drinking requires a combination of training and support and on-the-job experience of actually delivering screening and brief advice activity.

  8. [eHealth in Peru: implementation of policies to strengthen health information systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curioso, Walter H

    2014-01-01

    Health information systems play a key role in enabling high quality, complete health information to be available in a timely fashion for operational and strategic decision-making that makes it possible to save lives and improve the health and quality of life of the population. In many countries, health information systems are weak, incomplete, and fragmented. However, there is broad consensus in the literature of the need to strengthen health information systems in countries around the world. The objective of this paper is to present the essential components of the conceptual framework to strengthen health information systems in Peru. It describes the principal actions and strategies of the Ministry of Health of Peru during the process of strengthening health information systems. These systems make it possible to orient policies for appropriate decision-making in public health.

  9. Private sector participation in delivering tertiary health care: a dichotomy of access and affordability across two Indian states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Anuradha; Singh, Prabal Vikram; Bergkvist, Sofi; Samarth, Amit; Rao, Mala

    2015-01-01

    Poor quality care in public sector hospitals coupled with the costs of care in the private sector have trapped India's poor in a vicious cycle of poverty, ill health and debt for many decades. To address this, the governments of Andhra Pradesh (AP) and Maharashtra (MH), India, have attempted to improve people’s access to hospital care by partnering with the private sector. A number of government-sponsored schemes with differing specifications have been launched to facilitate this strategy. Aims This article aims to compare changes in access to, and affordability and efficiency of private and public hospital inpatient (IP) treatments between MH and AP from 2004 to 2012 and to assess whether the health financing innovations in one state resulted in larger or smaller benefits compared with the other. Methods We used data from household surveys conducted in 2004 and 2012 in the two states and undertook a difference-in-difference (DID) analysis. The results focus on hospitalization, out-of-pocket expenditure and length of stay. Results The average IP expenditure for private hospital care has increased in both states, but more so in MH. There was also an observable increase in both utilization of and expenditure on nephrology treatment in private hospitals in AP. The duration of stay recorded in days for private hospitals has increased slightly in MH and declined in AP with a significant DID. The utilization of public hospitals has reduced in AP and increased in MH. Conclusion The state of AP appears to have benefited more than MH in terms of improved access to care by involving the private sector. The Aarogyasri scheme is likely to have contributed to these impacts in AP at least in part. Our study needs to be followed up with repeated evaluations to ascertain the long-term impacts of involving the private sector in providing hospital care. PMID:25759452

  10. Improving Access to Mental Health Care by Delivering Psychotherapeutic Care in the Workplace: A Cross-Sectional Exploratory Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothermund, Eva; Kilian, Reinhold; Rottler, Edit; Mayer, Dorothea; Hölzer, Michael; Rieger, Monika A; Gündel, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Common mental disorders like mood and anxiety disorders and somatoform disorders have high costs, yet under-treatment is still frequent. Many people with common mental disorders are employed, so the workplace is potentially a suitable context in which to provide early treatment. Our study investigates whether a change of setting (workplace versus standard care) improves access to treatment for common mental disorders. Conditional latent profile analysis was applied to identify user profiles for work ability (WAI), clinical symptoms like depression (patient health questionnaire depression, PHQ-9), health-related quality of life (QoL, SF-12), and work-related stress (Maslach Burnout Inventory, irritation scale). Patients were recruited consecutively, via psychotherapeutic consultation in the workplace (n = 174) or psychotherapeutic consultation in outpatient care (n = 193). We identified four user profiles in our model: 'severe' (n = 99), 'moderate I-low QoL' (n = 88), 'moderate II-low work ability' (n = 83), and 'at risk' (n = 97). The 'at risk' profile encompassed individuals with reduced work ability (36.0, 34.73 to 37.37), only mild clinical symptoms (PHQ-9 5.7, 4.92 to 6.53), no signs of work-related stress and good quality of life. A higher proportion of the 'at risk' group than of the 'severe' group sought help via the psychotherapeutic consultation in the workplace (OR 0.287, P workplace is feasible and accepted by users. Offering treatment in the workplace as an alternative to standard outpatient settings is a viable strategy for improving access to treatment for common mental disorders.

  11. Future Research in Health Information Technology: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmat, Morteza; Ayatollahi, Haleh; Maleki, Mohammad Reza; Saghafi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Currently, information technology is considered an important tool to improve healthcare services. To adopt the right technologies, policy makers should have adequate information about present and future advances. This study aimed to review and compare studies with a focus on the future of health information technology. This review study was completed in 2015. The databases used were Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest, Ovid Medline, and PubMed. Keyword searches were used to identify papers and materials published between 2000 and 2015. Initially, 407 papers were obtained, and they were reduced to 11 papers at the final stage. The selected papers were described and compared in terms of the country of origin, objective, methodology, and time horizon. The papers were divided into two groups: those forecasting the future of health information technology (seven papers) and those providing health information technology foresight (four papers). The results showed that papers related to forecasting the future of health information technology were mostly a literature review, and the time horizon was up to 10 years in most of these studies. In the health information technology foresight group, most of the studies used a combination of techniques, such as scenario building and Delphi methods, and had long-term objectives. To make the most of an investment and to improve planning and successful implementation of health information technology, a strategic plan for the future needs to be set. To achieve this aim, methods such as forecasting the future of health information technology and offering health information technology foresight can be applied. The forecasting method is used when the objectives are not very large, and the foresight approach is recommended when large-scale objectives are set to be achieved. In the field of health information technology, the results of foresight studies can help to establish realistic long-term expectations of the future of health information

  12. Low health literacy and evaluation of online health information: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diviani, Nicola; van den Putte, Bas; Giani, Stefano; van Weert, Julia Cm

    2015-05-07

    Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in consumer online health information seeking. The quality of online health information, however, remains questionable. The issue of information evaluation has become a hot topic, leading to the development of guidelines and checklists to design high-quality online health information. However, little attention has been devoted to how consumers, in particular people with low health literacy, evaluate online health information. The main aim of this study was to review existing evidence on the association between low health literacy and (1) people's ability to evaluate online health information, (2) perceived quality of online health information, (3) trust in online health information, and (4) use of evaluation criteria for online health information. Five academic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Communication and Mass-media Complete) were systematically searched. We included peer-reviewed publications investigating differences in the evaluation of online information between people with different health literacy levels. After abstract and full-text screening, 38 articles were included in the review. Only four studies investigated the specific role of low health literacy in the evaluation of online health information. The other studies examined the association between educational level or other skills-based proxies for health literacy, such as general literacy, and outcomes. Results indicate that low health literacy (and related skills) are negatively related to the ability to evaluate online health information and trust in online health information. Evidence on the association with perceived quality of online health information and use of evaluation criteria is inconclusive. The findings indicate that low health literacy (and related skills) play a role in the evaluation of online health information. This topic is therefore worth more scholarly attention. Based on the results of this review

  13. Sources of Health Information Related to Preventive Health Behaviors in a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Nicole; Baer, Heather J.; Clark, Cheryl R.; Lipsitz, Stuart; Hicks, LeRoi S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Current literature suggests that certain sources of information are used in varying degrees among different socioeconomic and demographic groups; therefore, it is important to determine if specific classes of health information sources are more effective than others in promoting health behaviors. Purpose To determine if interpersonal versus mass media sources of health information are associated with meeting recommendations for health behaviors (nonsmoking, fruit/vegetable intake, and exercise) and cancer screening. Methods Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship of health information sources (mass media sources including print, TV, Internet; and interpersonal sources including friends and family, community organizations, and healthcare providers); with meeting recommendations for healthy behaviors and cancer screening in the 2005 and 2007 Health Information National Trends Surveys (HINTS). Analyses were conducted in 2009. Results In the 2005 HINTS, participants reporting use of print media and community organizations as sources of health information over the past year were mostly likely to meet recommendations for health behaviors. In the 2007 HINTS, utilization of healthcare providers for health information was associated with meeting recommendations for health behaviors, particularly cancer screening. Conclusions Use of print media and interpersonal sources of health information are most consistently associated with self-reported health behaviors. Additional research should explore the relationship of health information sources to clinical outcomes. Social network interventions to promote adoption of health behaviors should be further developed. PMID:20494238

  14. Empowering Minority Communities with Health Information - WSSU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurray, L. and W. Templin-Branner

    2010-11-10

    Environmental health focus with training conducted as part of the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation/National Library of Medicine HBCU ACCESS Project at Winston-Salem State University, NC on November 10, 2010.

  15. Health Information in Swahili (Kiswahili) (Kiswahili)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Being 5 - Handwashing - Kiswahili (Swahili (Kiswahili)) PDF Siloam Family Health Center L Expand Section Living with HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS - Sharing Your HIV Status - English HIV/AIDS - Sharing Your HIV Status - Kiswahili ( ...

  16. Electronic Health Records: Permanent, Private, and Informative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the National Library of Medicine helping with electronic health records? The Library has been an early and enthusiastic supporter of research to advance electronic records. A special focus of ours is on ...

  17. Public Preferences about Secondary Uses of Electronic Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, David; Mitra, Nandita; Shah, Anand; Wan, Fei; Asch, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance As health information technology grows secondary uses of personal health information offer promise in advancing research, public health, and health care. Public perceptions about personal health data sharing are important to establish and evaluate ethical and regulatory structures for overseeing the use of these data. Objective Measure patient preferences toward sharing their electronic health information for secondary purposes—uses other than their own health care.. Design In this conjoint analysis study, participants were randomized to receive 6 of 18 scenarios describing secondary uses of electronic health information, constructed with 3 attributes: uses (research, health care quality improvement, marketing), users (university hospital, drug company, public health department), and data sensitivity (medical history, medical history plus genetic test results). This experimental design enabled participants to reveal their preferences for secondary uses of their personal health information. Setting and Participants We surveyed 3,336 Hispanic (n=568), non-Hispanic African American (n=500), and non-Hispanic White (n=2,268) adults representing 65.1% of those from a nationally representative, online panel. Main Outcomes and Measures Participants responded to each conjoint scenario by rating their willingness to share their electronic personal health information on a 1–10 scale (1=low, 10=high). Conjoint analysis yields importance weights reflecting the contribution of a dimension (use, user, sensitivity) to willingness to share personal health information. Results The use of data was the most important factor in the conjoint analysis (63.4% importance weight) compared to the user (32.6% importance weight) and data sensitivity (importance weight: 3.1%). In unadjusted models, marketing uses (−1.55, p<0.001), quality improvement uses (−0.51, p<0.001), drug company users (−0.80, p<0.001) and public health department users (−0.52, p<0.001) were

  18. Consumer health information and local health resources: MedlinePlus and My Health Minnesota --> Go Local Outreach Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Linda A; Brasure, Michelle B

    2008-11-06

    The University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries and an NLM Public Health Informationist Fellow are designing, implementing and evaluating outreach and training related to the My Health Minnesota --> Go Local project. The goal is to enhance the skills of public health and community based organizations in assisting community members with health information needs. Ultimately, this project seeks to improve health literacy among Minnesota citizens.

  19. Health literacy and barriers to health information seeking: A nationwide survey in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seok Hee; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2016-11-01

    To identify the level of health literacy and barriers to information seeking and to explore the predictors of health literacy. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used. A total of 1000 Korean adults were recruited through proportional quota sampling. Health literacy, barriers to health information seeking, sociodemographics, and health-related characteristics were surveyed. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were performed for data analysis. About 61% of participants were classified as inadequately health literate. "No health fairs/activities near home" was the most frequently reported barrier. Older age, lower education, living in the capital city, barriers regarding how to get information and access to expensive books and magazines were predictors of inadequate health literacy. Strategies for improving health literacy and reducing barriers to health information seeking should be designed. Education on how to access health-related information with easily accessible sources either free or inexpensive could be a way to help adults with limited health literacy. Health care professionals should assess clients' health literacy levels, particularly amongst those who are older or have less education. They should provide clients with information on how to access credible and readily available sources of health-related information, considering their health literacy level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cross-border flow of health information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Iorio, Concetta Tania; Carinci, Fabrizio; Brillante, Massimo;

    2013-01-01

    The EUBIROD project aims to perform a cross-border flow of diabetes information across 19 European countries using the BIRO information system, which embeds privacy principles and data protection mechanisms in its architecture (privacy by design). A specific task of EUBIROD was to investigate the...

  1. Health Information System in a Cloud Computing Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Erfannia, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare as a worldwide industry is experiencing a period of growth based on health information technology. The capabilities of cloud systems make it as an option to develop eHealth goals. The main objectives of the present study was to evaluate the advantages and limitations of health information systems implementation in a cloud-computing context that was conducted as a systematic review in 2016. Science direct, Scopus, Web of science, IEEE, PubMed and Google scholar were searched according study criteria. Among 308 articles initially found, 21 articles were entered in the final analysis. All the studies had considered cloud computing as a positive tool to help advance health technology, but none had insisted too much on its limitations and threats. Electronic health record systems have been mostly studied in the fields of implementation, designing, and presentation of models and prototypes. According to this research, the main advantages of cloud-based health information systems could be categorized into the following groups: economic benefits and advantages of information management. The main limitations of the implementation of cloud-based health information systems could be categorized into the 4 groups of security, legal, technical, and human restrictions. Compared to earlier studies, the present research had the advantage of dealing with the issue of health information systems in a cloud platform. The high frequency of studies conducted on the implementation of cloud-based health information systems revealed health industry interest in the application of this technology. Security was a subject discussed in most studies due to health information sensitivity. In this investigation, some mechanisms and solutions were discussed concerning the mentioned systems, which would provide a suitable area for future scientific research on this issue. The limitations and solutions discussed in this systematic study would help healthcare managers and decision

  2. District health information system assessment: a case study in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeisi, Ahmad Reza; Saghaeiannejad, Sakineh; Karimi, Saeed; Ehteshami, Asghar; Kasaei, Mahtab

    2013-03-01

    Health care managers and personnel should be aware and literate of health information system in order to increase the efficiency and effectiveness in their organization. Since accurate, appropriate, precise, timely, valid information and interpretation of information is required and is the basis for policy planning and decision making in various levels of the organization. This study was conducted to assess the district health information system evolution in Iran according to WHO framework. This research is an applied, descriptive cross sectional study, in which a total of twelve urban and eight rural facilities, and the district health center at Falavarjan region were surveyed by using a questionnaire with 334 items. Content and constructive validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed with correlation coefficient of 0.99. Obtained data were analyzed with SPSS 16 software and descriptive statistics were used to examine measures of WHO compliance. The analysis of data revealed that the mean score of compliance of district health information system framework was 35.75 percent. The maximum score of compliance with district health information system belonged to the data collection process (70 percent). The minimum score of compliance with district health information system belonged to information based decision making process with a score of 10 percent. District Health Information System Criteria in Isfahan province do not completely comply with WHO framework. Consequently, it seems that health system managers engaged with underlying policy and decision making processes at district health level should try to restructure and decentralize district health information system and develop training management programs for their managers.

  3. On reducing information asymmetry in U.S. health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Oswald A J; Kesavan, Ram; Bernacchi, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Information asymmetry is a significant issue facing the U.S. health care system. In this article, we investigate some methods of reducing this asymmetry. We trace the information asymmetry using the "wicked problem" of the health care distribution system. An information asymmetry reduction method requiring joint responsibilities among health care stakeholders is developed. It is argued that information asymmetry is a contributor to enormous health care inflation. Hence, any reduction in such asymmetry will reduce health care costs. Concepts from both signaling and corrective justice theories are integrated in this article to help reduce the information asymmetry that exists in the U.S. health care system. Getting health care costs in line with other "advanced" nations, is the long-term solution to the wicked problem that currently exists in the U.S. health care system. There is an immediate need for a centralized health care database with adequate provisions for individual privacy. Both processes as well as an outcome-based control system are essential for reducing information asymmetries in the U.S. health care system.

  4. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  5. Completely Isolated? Health Information Seeking among Social Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askelson, Natoshia M.; Campo, Shelly; Carter, Knute D.

    2011-01-01

    To better target messages it is important to determine where people seek their health information. Interpersonal networks are a common way most people gather health information, but some people have limited networks. Using data from the 2004 General Social Survey (N = 984), we compared social isolates and nonisolates in their health…

  6. Completely Isolated? Health Information Seeking among Social Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askelson, Natoshia M.; Campo, Shelly; Carter, Knute D.

    2011-01-01

    To better target messages it is important to determine where people seek their health information. Interpersonal networks are a common way most people gather health information, but some people have limited networks. Using data from the 2004 General Social Survey (N = 984), we compared social isolates and nonisolates in their health…

  7. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  8. Adolescent health literacy: the importance of credible sources for online health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaddar, Suad F; Valerio, Melissa A; Garcia, Carolyn M; Hansen, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Little research has examined adolescent health literacy and its relationship with online health information sources. The purpose of this study is to explore health literacy among a predominantly Hispanic adolescent population and to investigate whether exposure to a credible source of online health information, MedlinePlus(®), is associated with higher levels of health literacy. An online survey was administered to a cross-sectional random sample of high school students in South Texas. Self-reported sociodemographic characteristics and data on health-information-seeking behavior and exposure to MedlinePlus(®) were collected. Health literacy was assessed by eHEALS and the Newest Vital Sign (NVS). Linear and binary logistic regressions were completed. Of the 261 students who completed the survey, 56% had heard of MedlinePlus(®), 52% had adequate levels of health literacy as measured by NVS, and the mean eHEALS score was 30.6 (possible range 8-40). Health literacy was positively associated with self-efficacy and seeking health information online. Exposure to MedlinePlus(®) was associated with higher eHealth literacy scores (p literacy (odds ratio: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 4.1). Exposure to a credible source of online health information is associated with higher levels of health literacy. The incorporation of a credible online health information resource into school health education curricula is a promising approach for promoting health literacy. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  9. Evaluation of health information systems research in information systems research: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haried, Peter; Claybaugh, Craig; Dai, Hua

    2017-04-01

    Given the importance of the health-care industry and the promise of health information systems, researchers are encouraged to build on the shoulders of giants as the saying goes. The health information systems field has a unique opportunity to learn from and extend the work that has already been done by the highly correlated information systems field. As a result, this research article presents a past, present and future meta-analysis of health information systems research in information systems journals over the 2000-2015 time period. Our analysis reviewed 126 articles on a variety of topics related to health information systems research published in the "Senior Scholars" list of the top eight ranked information systems academic journals. Across the selected information systems academic journals, our findings compare research methodologies applied, health information systems topic areas investigated and research trends. Interesting results emerge in the range and evolution of health information systems research and opportunities for health information systems researchers and practitioners to consider moving forward.

  10. Structural Equation Model of Health Promoting Behaviors for Health Information Seekers with Mobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hanna; Kim, Jeongeun; Byun, Ahjung

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted on verifying whether variables such as prior health related behaviors, health literacy, interpersonal influence, perceived ease of use and usefulness of health information, and behavioral intention could predict actual health promoting behaviors of consumers using health information with mobile in the future. The research model was based on Technology Acceptance Model. Data were collected from 199 mobile health information seekers. Participants' actual health promoting behaviors were checked after 3 months from pre-data collection. The final modified model had good fit indices.

  11. Depolarization in Delivering Public Services? Impacts of Minimum Service Standards (MSS on the Quality of Health Services in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Roudo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Some scholars argue that decentralization policy tends to create polarization, i.e. an increase of inequality/disparity among districts. To deal with this problem, Minimum Service Standards (MSS were introduced as a key strategy in decentralizing Indonesia. In this research, we tried to find out through MSS performance measurements whether imposing standards can be effective in a decentralized system by seeking its impacts on polarization/depolarization in the delivery of public services, specifically in the health sector. This question is basically a response to the common criticism that decentralization is good to create equality between central government and local governments but often does not work to achieve equality among local governments. Using self-assessment data from a sample of 54 districts from 534 districts in Indonesia, from 2010 to 2013, we found that the existence of depolarization in the delivery of public services could potentially occur among regions by reducing the gap between their public service performance and the targets of MSS. We acknowledge that there are weaknesses in the validity of the self-assessment data, caused by a lack of knowledge and skills to execute the self-assessment according to the official guidelines, by the overrating of target achievements, as well as the lack of data from independent sources to confirm the self-assessment outcomes. We also acknowledge that differences in financial capacity are still the main determinant why one district is more successful in achieving the MSS targets compared to other districts. Keywords. Decentralization, Public Service, Minimum Standard Service

  12. Health care librarians and information literacy: an investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelham, Charlotte

    2014-09-01

    Until relatively recently, the concept of information literacy, and teaching the skills to enable it, was mainly a concern of academic libraries. Now, it is also seen to be of high importance within the context of health care libraries. Health care libraries and librarians can provide crucial support towards the implementation of evidence-based practice in patient care through both information literacy skills training and by conducting mediated searches on behalf of health care practitioners. This article reports the findings from an investigation conducted by Charlotte Kelham as part of her MA in Librarianship from the University of Sheffield. Her dissertation investigated how health care librarians understand the concept of information literacy, the implications of this for their role and their perceptions around how their role is valued. Charlotte graduated from Sheffield in 2013 and is currently job hunting. AM. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Journal.

  13. Supporting cancer patients’ unanchored health information management with mobile technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hartzler, Andrea; Powell, Christopher; Pratt, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from home, when they are experiencing pain or treatment side effects, or when their abilities to deal with information effectively are otherwise impaired. In this paper, we describe the results from a four-week evaluation of HealthWeaver Mobile, a mobile phone application that we developed to support such “unanchored” patient information activities. Based on experiences from nine cancer patients, our results indicate that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture information whenever a need arises, and to share information with clinicians during clinic visits. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more confident in their ability to stay in control of their information and their health. PMID:22195130

  14. Supporting cancer patients' unanchored health information management with mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hartzler, Andrea; Powell, Christopher; Pratt, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from home, when they are experiencing pain or treatment side effects, or when their abilities to deal with information effectively are otherwise impaired. In this paper, we describe the results from a four-week evaluation of HealthWeaver Mobile, a mobile phone application that we developed to support such "unanchored" patient information activities. Based on experiences from nine cancer patients, our results indicate that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture information whenever a need arises, and to share information with clinicians during clinic visits. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more confident in their ability to stay in control of their information and their health.

  15. Shifts in the architecture of the Nationwide Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenert, Leslie; Sundwall, David; Lenert, Michael Edward

    2012-01-01

    In the midst of a US $30 billion USD investment in the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) and electronic health records systems, a significant change in the architecture of the NwHIN is taking place. Prior to 2010, the focus of information exchange in the NwHIN was the Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO). Since 2010, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) has been sponsoring policies that promote an internet-like architecture that encourages point to-point information exchange and private health information exchange networks. The net effect of these activities is to undercut the limited business model for RHIOs, decreasing the likelihood of their success, while making the NwHIN dependent on nascent technologies for community level functions such as record locator services. These changes may impact the health of patients and communities. Independent, scientifically focused debate is needed on the wisdom of ONC's proposed changes in its strategy for the NwHIN.

  16. The Relationship of Health Literacy With Use of Digital Technology for Health Information: Implications for Public Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer; Gerstner, Gena; Pergolino, Kristen; Graham, Yvonne; Falisi, Angela; Strogatz, David

    An understanding of the association of health literacy with patterns related to access and usage of digital technologies and preferences for sources of health information is necessary for public health agencies and organizations to appropriately target channels for health information dissemination. A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted in New York State. Health literacy was assessed using the Morris Single-Item Screener, a self-report question. A weighted analysis was conducted utilizing Stata/SE. The final sample size of New York State residents used for analysis was 1350. In general, self-report health literacy did not predict digital technology use (ie, Internet and smartphone use, text messaging) but was associated with certain digital activities. People with low self-report health literacy were less likely to use search engines (P = .026) but more likely to get health information from social networking sites (P = .002) and use health-related phone apps (P = .046). With respect to health information seeking, those with lower self-report health literacy reported greater difficulty with their most recent search for health information. Furthermore, they were more likely to prefer text messages (P = .013) and radio (P = .022), 2 text-limited communication channels, to receive health information than those with higher self-report health literacy. While self-report health literacy does not appear to influence access to and use of digital technologies, there is a strong association with experiences searching for health information and preferences for health information sources. Public health agencies and organizations should consider the needs and preferences of people with low health literacy when determining channels for health information dissemination. They should also consider implementing interventions to develop health information-seeking skills in populations they serve and prepare information and materials that are easily accessible and

  17. Interoperability design of personal health information import service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomainen, Mika; Mykkänen, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Availability of personal health information for individual use from professional patient records is an important success factor for personal health information management (PHIM) solutions such as personal health records. In this paper we focus on this crucial part of personal wellbeing information management splutions and report the interoperability design of personal information import service. Key requirements as well as design factors for interfaces between PHRs and EPRs are discussed. Open standards, low implementation threshold and the acknowledgement of local market and conventions are emphasized in the design.

  18. The Association Between Perceived Health Status and Health Information Communication Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounsanga, Jerry; Voss, Maren Wright; Crum, Anthony Bryan; Hung, Man

    2016-11-01

    Varying types of health information sources may influence health outcomes, but not much is known about their impact. The purpose of our study was to explore the association between health information sources and individuals' health status. A total of 14,966 participants who responded to the Annenberg National Health Communication Survey between 2005 and 2012 were included. Controlling for demographics, comorbidities, communication patterns, and socioeconomic status, we utilized regression analysis to examine the relationship between sources of health information and perceived health status. Included in the study were a total of 8,103 females and 6,863 males between 18 and 101 years old (M = 49.14, SD = 16.13). Health information from the Internet and pharmaceutical companies was significantly associated with better health status (p news outlets, and health care companies was not. Information from the Internet was significantly associated with better health status, suggesting that health information from the Internet may have benefits. However, use of social media and health care apps did not relate to better health status, which may indicate that these sources are not as useful to consumers or that these sources have not yet saturated the health information marketplace.

  19. Health, sport and nutritional information: tailoring your approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Maria J

    2012-06-01

    One of the intended legacies of the London 2012 Olympics is to increase the level of physical activity amongst the general population. Health information on the positive health benefits of sport and nutrition can assist in this goal and its positive benefit can been seen in communities within and beyond the United Kingdom, particularly within an educational context. In the United States, young people view their teachers as a valuable source of health information, and in Taiwan, teachers have been key collaborators in the development of a national Health e-Learning Network providing multimedia-learning modules for use in the classroom. However, classrooms are not the only source of health information and, with the reported inaccuracies in the translation of health information from academic papers to the popular press, school librarians have a role to play in facilitating students' ability to assess the quality of the health information they access, whatever the source. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  20. Health science library and information services in the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeley, P J; Marshall, S B; Foster, E C

    1985-01-01

    In an increasingly information-based society, hospitals need a variety of information for multiple purposes--direct patient care, staff development and training, continuing education, patient and community education, and administrative decision support. Health science library and information services play a key role in providing broad-based information support within the hospital. This guide identifies resources that will help administrators plan information services that are appropriate to their needs.

  1. Health-related ad information and health motivation effects on product evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrysochou, Polymeros; Grunert, Klaus G

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the effect of health-related ad information on perceived product healthfulness and purchase intention. Also, the study investigates whether consumers' health motivation moderates the effects, because of the way health motivation affects processing of health-related information...... in ads. Three types of healthrelated ad elements are distinguished: functional claims, process claims and health imagery. These elements were combined in mock ads and an online experiment was run to test the study hypotheses. Results show that health imagery has the largest impact on consumers' product...... evaluations, while functional claims and process claims have much smaller effects. Health motivation shows significant interaction with process claims on product evaluations....

  2. Empowering Minority Communities with Health Information - UDC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurray, L.; R. Foster; and R. Womble

    2010-11-02

    Training update with Environmental a health focus. Training conducted as part of the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation/National Library of Medicine - HBCU ACCESS Project at the University of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC on November 2, 2010.

  3. Strategic approach to information security and assurance in health research

    OpenAIRE

    Akazawa, Shunichi; Igarashi, Manabu; Sawa, Hirofumi; Tamashiro, Hiko

    2005-01-01

    Information security and assurance are an increasingly critical issue in health research. Whether health research be in genetics, new drugs, disease outbreaks, biochemistry, or effects of radiation, it deals with information that is highly sensitive and which could be targeted by rogue individuals or groups, corporations, national intelligence agencies, or terrorists, looking for financial, social, or political gains. The advents of the Internet and advances in recent information technologies...

  4. Health Information Seeking and Cancer Screening Adherence Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneyderman, Yuliya; Rutten, Lila J Finney; Arheart, Kristopher L; Byrne, Margaret M; Kornfeld, Julie; Schwartz, Seth J

    2016-03-01

    Effective screening tools are available for many of the top cancer killers in the USA. Searching for health information has previously been found to be associated with adhering to cancer screening guidelines, but Internet information seeking has not been examined separately. The current study examines the relationship between health and cancer Internet information seeking and adherence to cancer screening guidelines for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer in a large nationally representative dataset. The current study was conducted using data from the Health Information National Trends Survey from 2003 and 2007. The study examined age-stratified models which correlated health and cancer information seeking with getting breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening on schedule, while controlling for several key variables. Internet health and cancer information seeking was positively associated with getting Pap screening on schedule, while information seeking from any sources was positively associated with getting colorectal screening on schedule. People who look for health or cancer information are more likely to get screened on schedule. Some groups of people, however, do not exhibit this relationship and, thus, may be more vulnerable to under-screening. These groups may benefit more from targeted interventions that attempt to engage people in their health care more actively.

  5. The Associations between Health Literacy, Reasons for Seeking Health Information, and Information Sources Utilized by Taiwanese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mi-Hsiu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the associations between health literacy, the reasons for seeking health information, and the information sources utilized by Taiwanese adults. Method: A cross-sectional survey of 752 adults residing in rural and urban areas of Taiwan was conducted via questionnaires. Chi-squared tests and logistic regression were used for…

  6. The Associations between Health Literacy, Reasons for Seeking Health Information, and Information Sources Utilized by Taiwanese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mi-Hsiu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the associations between health literacy, the reasons for seeking health information, and the information sources utilized by Taiwanese adults. Method: A cross-sectional survey of 752 adults residing in rural and urban areas of Taiwan was conducted via questionnaires. Chi-squared tests and logistic regression were used for…

  7. Factors associated with adolescents' perspectives on health needs and preference for health information sources in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Che; Chou, Yen-Yin; Lin, Shio-Jean; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    To identify health needs, preferred sources of health information and associated factors in Taiwanese adolescents. Cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey conducted in Taiwanese adolescents aged 12-18 years in 2010. Adolescents were queried about their health needs, healthcare service utilisation and preferred sources of health information. We compared differences in reported health needs and available sources among gender groups and grade levels. Demographic correlates of adolescent health needs were further examined using multiple ordinal logistic regression analysis. Participants (n=5018) needed weight and height information most, followed by dietary health advice. Academic stress was emphasised more than behavioural issues. Perceived needs for health information varied by age and gender. General high school programme, suburban location and chronic illness were associated with higher need. Only a small proportion (4.3%) of adolescents used healthcare services for mental and emotional concerns. Parents were the primary sources of health information, although students also turned to teachers, particularly for sensitive issues. Moreover, the mass media and internet were increasingly popular sources of information. To achieve continuous care from childhood through adolescence to adulthood, paediatricians should understand adolescents' diverse views of health needs and preferred sources of health information. Several demographic variables were shown to influence their health needs, reflecting the East Asian cultural context. Anticipatory guidance on body image, dietary health and academic stress should be emphasised while caring for these adolescents. We therefore advocate the development and effective delivery of culturally relevant adolescent-friendly health services.

  8. Do patient preferences for health information vary by health literacy or numeracy? A qualitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglio, Bridget; Glasgow, Russell E; Bull, Sheana S

    2012-01-01

    Seeking health information can be a complicated process for a patient. Patients must know the topic of interest, where to look or ask, how to assess and comprehend, and how to evaluate the credibility and trustworthiness of the sources. In this study, the authors describe preferences of patients with multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease with varying health literacy and numeracy abilities for receiving health information. Participants were recruited from 2 health care systems. Health literacy and numeracy were assessed and participants completed an orally administered survey consisting of open-ended questions about obtaining health information and preferences for health information. In-depth interviews were conducted with a subset of participants. A diverse sample of 150 individuals (11.3% Latino, 37.3% African American, 44.7% with income less than $15,000/year) participated. Most participants had adequate functional health literacy, while 65% had low numeracy skills. Regardless of health literacy or numeracy ability, participants overwhelmingly preferred to receive health information during a face-to-face conversation with their health care provider. While individuals with adequate functional health literacy identified a variety of health information sources, actions are needed to ensure multiple modalities are available and are in plain, clear language that reinforces patients' understanding and application of information to health behavior.

  9. Behavioral Health Information Technology: From Chaos To Clarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranallo, Piper A; Kilbourne, Amy M; Whatley, Angela S; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2016-06-01

    The use of health information technology (IT) in general health care has been shown to have significant potential to facilitate the delivery of safe, high-quality, and cost-effective care. However, its application to behavioral health care has been slow, limiting the extent to which consumers seeking care for mental health or substance use disorders can derive its benefits. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of the use of health IT in behavioral health and to describe some unique challenges experienced in that domain. We also highlight current obstacles to, and recommendations for, the use of health IT in improving the quality of behavioral health care. We conclude with recommendations for prioritizing the work that we believe will move the US health care system toward more effective, efficient, and patient-centric care in behavioral health.

  10. Delivering at Home or in a Health Facility? Health-Seeking Behaviour of Women and the Role of Traditional birth attendants in Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Constanze; Mwaipopo, Rosemarie

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional birth attendants retain an important role in reproductive and maternal health in Tanzania. The Tanzanian Government promotes TBAs in order to provide maternal and neonatal health counselling and initiating timely referral, however, their role officially does not include delivery attendance. Yet, experience illustrates that most TBAs still often handle complicated deliveries. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to describe (1) women’s health-seeking behaviour...

  11. Understanding family health information seeking: a test of the theory of motivated information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovick, Shelly R

    2014-01-01

    Although a family health history can be used to assess disease risk and increase health prevention behaviors, research suggests that few people have collected family health information. Guided by the Theory of Motivated Information Management, this study seeks to understand the barriers to and facilitators of interpersonal information seeking about family health history. Individuals who were engaged to be married (N = 306) were surveyed online and in person to understand how factors such as uncertainty, expectations for an information search, efficacy, and anxiety influence decisions and strategies for obtaining family health histories. The results supported the Theory of Motivated Information Management by demonstrating that individuals who experienced uncertainty discrepancies regarding family heath history had greater intention to seek information from family members when anxiety was low, outcome expectancy was high, and communication efficacy was positive. Although raising uncertainty about family health history may be an effective tool for health communicators to increase communication among family members, low-anxiety situations may be optimal for information seeking. Health communication messages must also build confidence in people's ability to communicate with family to obtain the needed health information.

  12. Brazilian community health agents and qualitative primary healthcare information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Margareth S; Pinto, Rogério Meireles; Galhego-Garcia, Wilson; da Cunha, Zeilma; Cordeiro, Hésio A; Fagundes-Filho, Francisco E; Pinho, Mônica A L; Voet, Susan M V; Talbot, Yves; Caldas, Rodrigo S; de Souza, Thiago J; Costa, Edwaldo

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore female community health agents' views about the value of recording qualitative information on contextual health issues they observe during home visits, data that are not officially required to be documented for the Brazilian System of Primary Healthcare Information. The study was conducted in community primary healthcare centres located in the cities of Araçatuba and Coroados (state of São Paulo) and Rio de Janeiro (state of Rio de Janeiro), Brazil. The design was a qualitative, exploratory study. The purposeful sampling criteria were being female, with a minimum of three years of continuous service in the same location. Data collection with 62 participants was conducted via 11 focus groups (in 2007 and 2008). Audio files were transcribed and submitted to the method of thematic analysis. Four themes guided the analysis: working with qualitative information and undocumented observation; reflecting on qualitative information; integrating/analysing quantitative and qualitative information; and information-sharing with agents and family health teams. In 2010, 25 community health agents verified the final interpretation of the findings. Participants valued the recording of qualitative, contextual information to expand understanding of primary healthcare issues and as an indicator of clients' improved health behaviour and health literacy. While participants initiated the recording of additional health information, they generally did not inform the family health team about these findings. They perceived that team members devalued this type of information by considering it a reflection of the clientele's social conditions or problems beyond the scope of medical concerns. Documentation of qualitative evidence can account for the effectiveness of health education in two ways: by improving preventative care, and by amplifying the voices of underprivileged clients who live in poverty to ensure the most appropriate and best quality primary

  13. Health Information-Seeking in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percheski, Christine; Hargittai, Eszter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the sources of health information among first-year university students and whether the predictors of information-seeking varied by information source. Participants: First-year students in a required course at a midwestern public university were eligible to participate, and 82% (n = 1,060) completed the study.…

  14. Health literacy and sources of health information for caregivers of urban children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnano, Maria; Halterman, Jill S; Conn, Kelly M; Shone, Laura P

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the resources used by urban caregivers of children with asthma to obtain health information. The authors analyzed data for 304 families of children with persistent asthma to describe (1) sources of health information, (2) access and use of Internet resources, and (3) the association between the caregiver's health literacy (HL) and use of health information sources. Overall, 37% of caregivers had limited HL. Most families received health information from a health care professional (94%), written sources (51%), family/friends (42%), non-print media (34%), and the Internet (30%). Less than half of caregivers had access to the Internet at home, but 73% reported Internet use in the past year. Caregivers with adequate HL were more likely to obtain information from multiple sources and to use and have access to the Internet. The results suggest that HL is associated with where caregivers obtain health information from for their children and their use of the Internet.

  15. Parent information evenings: filling a gap in Irish child and adolescent mental health services?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, F

    2010-02-01

    It is estimated that 20% of children experience psychological problems at any one time. 1 Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) in Ireland are under-resourced. Recent economic downturn has hindered the possibility of increased funding to alleviative these deficits. It is now imperative that mental health professionals create innovative and cost effective solutions to promote positive mental health. Recent literature has focused on the benefits of self delivered parenting programmes, with minimal costs incurred. 2,3 Based on the developing evidence supporting self directed approaches, the Lucena Foundation has initiated a series of parent information evenings. These evenings are offered on a monthly basis, and are free to attend. To date 1,538 parents have attended. Feedback from parents has been very positive with 80.5% of them finding them useful or very useful.

  16. [Mapping of information on worker's health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Raul Borges; Ribeiro, Helena

    2010-12-01

    Geographic studies and spatial analyses have been recognized in Brazilian public health papers. It is still, however, very little explored by researchers. In a survey of the leading scientific journals covering issues related to Brazilian worker's health, we found the predominant use of charts and tables as a way to organize and present results with a small number of maps. This survey was conducted by examining all papers published in four journals, covering the period from 1967 to 2009 (Revista de Saúde Pública, Cadernos de Saúde Pública, Revista Saúde e Sociedade, and Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia). After analyzing the set of papers selected for the study, the papers that used maps were given special attention. The tools of geoprocessing and geostatistics with GIS support, although little used, open new possibilities to use thematic cartography in the field of workers' health. However, it is recommended that editors of scientific journals have detailed technical standards as well as specific reports for the publication of cartographic figures aimed at facilitating the modifications necessary for the improvement of the visual quality of maps and of the spatial correlations through cartography.

  17. Open Source, Open Standards, and Health Care Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the improvements in patient safety, quality of patient care, and efficiency that health care information systems have the potential to bring has led to significant investment. Globally the sale of health care information systems now represents a multibillion dollar industry. As policy makers, health care professionals, and patients, we have a responsibility to maximize the return on this investment. To this end we analyze alternative licensing and software development models, as well as the role of standards. We describe how licensing affects development. We argue for the superiority of open source licensing to promote safer, more effective health care information systems. We claim that open source licensing in health care information systems is essential to rational procurement strategy. PMID:21447469

  18. Open source, open standards, and health care information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Carl J; Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2011-02-17

    Recognition of the improvements in patient safety, quality of patient care, and efficiency that health care information systems have the potential to bring has led to significant investment. Globally the sale of health care information systems now represents a multibillion dollar industry. As policy makers, health care professionals, and patients, we have a responsibility to maximize the return on this investment. To this end we analyze alternative licensing and software development models, as well as the role of standards. We describe how licensing affects development. We argue for the superiority of open source licensing to promote safer, more effective health care information systems. We claim that open source licensing in health care information systems is essential to rational procurement strategy.

  19. Quality and Health Literacy Demand of Online Heart Failure Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajita, Maan Isabella; Rodney, Tamar; Xu, Jingzhi; Hladek, Melissa; Han, Hae-Ra

    The ubiquity of the Internet is changing the way people obtain their health information. Although there is an abundance of heart failure information online, the quality and health literacy demand of these information are still unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the quality and health literacy demand (readability, understandability, and actionability) of the heart failure information found online. Google, Yahoo, Bing, Ask.com, and DuckDuckGo were searched for relevant heart failure Web sites. Two independent raters then assessed the quality and health literacy demand of the included Web sites. The quality of the heart failure information was assessed using the DISCERN instrument. Readability was assessed using 7 established readability tests. Finally, understandability and actionability were assessed using the Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool for Print Materials. A total of 46 Web sites were included in this analysis. The overall mean quality rating was 46.0 ± 8.9 and the mean readability score was 12.6 grade reading level. The overall mean understandability score was 56.3% ± 16.2%. Finally, the overall mean actionability score was 34.7% ± 28.7%. The heart failure information found online was of fair quality but required a relatively high health literacy level. Web content authors need to consider not just the quality but also the health literacy demand of the information found in their Web sites. This is especially important considering that low health literacy is likely prevalent among the usual audience.

  20. Information security risk management for computerized health information systems in hospitals: a case study of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Javad Zarei,1 Farahnaz Sadoughi2 1Health Information Management, Health Management and Economics Research Center, School of Health Management and Information Science, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran, 2Health Information Management Department, School of Health Management and Information Science, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran Background: In recent years, hospitals in Iran – similar to those in other countries – have experienced growing use of computerized health information systems (CHISs, which play a significant role in the operations of hospitals. But, the major challenge of CHIS use is information security. This study attempts to evaluate CHIS information security risk management at hospitals of Iran.Materials and methods: This applied study is a descriptive and cross-sectional research that has been conducted in 2015. The data were collected from 551 hospitals of Iran. Based on literature review, experts’ opinion, and observations at five hospitals, our intensive questionnaire was designed to assess security risk management for CHISs at the concerned hospitals, which was then sent to all hospitals in Iran by the Ministry of Health.Results: Sixty-nine percent of the studied hospitals pursue information security policies and procedures in conformity with Iran Hospitals Accreditation Standards. At some hospitals, risk identification, risk evaluation, and risk estimation, as well as risk treatment, are unstructured without any specified approach or methodology. There is no significant structured approach to risk management at the studied hospitals.Conclusion: Information security risk management is not followed by Iran’s hospitals and their information security policies. This problem can cause a large number of challenges for their CHIS security in future. Therefore, Iran’s Ministry of Health should develop practical policies to improve information security

  1. eHealth literacy: a marker for "digital divide" in health information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Neter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available eHealth literacy is defined as the use of emerging information and communications technology to improve or enable health and health care. The study examined whether literacy disparities are diminished or enhanced in the search for health information on the Internet.We used a countrywide representative random-digital-dial telephone household survey of the Israeli adult population (18 years and older, N = 4286.Respondents who were highly eHealth literate tended to be younger and more educated than their less eHealth-literate counterparts. They were also more active consumers of all types of information on the Internet, used more search strategies, and scrutinized information more carefully than did the less eHealth-literate respondents. Finally, respondents who were highly eHealth literate gained more positive outcomes from the information search in terms of cognitive, instrumental (self-management of health care needs, health behaviors, and better use of health insurance, and interpersonal (interacting with their physician gains.The association of eHealth literacy with background attributes indicates that the Internet reinforces existing social differences. The more comprehensive and sophisticated use of the Internet and the subsequent increased gains among the high eHealth literate create new inequalities in the domain of digital health information.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v3i3.281

  2. A new perspective on consumer health Web use: "valuegraphic" profiles of health information seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, F H; Wilkins, S T

    2001-01-01

    Only one half of adults in the United States place a high priority on seeking health information. An examination of today's health information seeker based upon health behavioral intentions, values, and priorities (valuegraphics) reveals that an individual's level of health information seeking corresponds to the value he or she places or the quality of health desired, and current level of personal health involvement. The relationship between valuegraphics and health status and health care use is also examined. Findings from a study that identified significant variance in Web use and satisfaction based upon the valuegraphic profiles of visitors to a hospital system-sponsored consumer Web site are also examined. The implications of consumer health valuegraphic profiling to future Web development by health care organizations are discussed.

  3. Real Time Alert System: A Disease Management System Leveraging Health Information Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vibha; Sheley, Meena E.; Xu, Shawn; Downs, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Rates of preventive and disease management services can be improved by providing automated alerts and reminders to primary care providers (PCPs) using of health information technology (HIT) tools. Methods: Using Adaptive Turnaround Documents (ATAD), an existing Health Information Exchange (HIE) infrastructure and office fax machines, we developed a Real Time Alert (RTA) system. RTA is a computerized decision support system (CDSS) that is able to deliver alerts to PCPs statewide for recommended services around the time of the patient visit. RTA is also able to capture structured clinical data from providers using existing fax technology. In this study, we evaluate RTA’s performance for alerting PCPs when their patients with asthma have an emergency room visit anywhere in the state. Results: Our results show that RTA was successfully able to deliver “just in time” patient-relevant alerts to PCPs across the state. Furthermore, of those ATADs faxed back and automatically interpreted by the RTA system, 35% reported finding the provided information helpful. The PCPs who reported finding information helpful also reported making a phone call, sending a letter or seeing the patient for follow up care. Conclusions: We have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of electronically exchanging important patient related information with the PCPs statewide. This is despite a lack of a link with their electronic health records. We have shown that using our ATAD technology, a PCP can be notified quickly of an important event such as a patient’s asthma related emergency room admission so further follow up can happen in near real time. PMID:23569648

  4. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Privacy-Related Context Information for Ubiquitous Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Pirkko; Ruotsalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Background Ubiquitous health has been defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems. A system is composed of one or more information systems, their stakeholders, and the environment. These systems offer health services to individuals and thus implement ubiquitous computing. Privacy is the key challenge for ubiquitous health because of autonomous processing, rich contextual metadata, lack of predefined trust among participants, and the business objectives. Additionally, regulations and policies of stakeholders may be unknown to the individual. Context-sensitive privacy policies are needed to regulate information processing. Objective Our goal was to analyze privacy-related context information and to define the corresponding components and their properties that support privacy management in ubiquitous health. These properties should describe the privacy issues of information processing. With components and their properties, individuals can define context-aware privacy policies and set their privacy preferences that can change in different information-processing situations. Methods Scenarios and user stories are used to analyze typical activities in ubiquitous health to identify main actors, goals, tasks, and stakeholders. Context arises from an activity and, therefore, we can determine different situations, services, and systems to identify properties for privacy-related context information in information-processing situations. Results Privacy-related context information components are situation, environment, individual, information technology system, service, and stakeholder. Combining our analyses and previously identified characteristics of ubiquitous health, more detailed properties for the components are defined. Properties define explicitly what context information for different components is needed to create context-aware privacy policies that can control, limit, and constrain information processing. With properties, we can define, for example, how

  6. Important ingredients for health adaptive information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senathirajah, Yalini; Bakken, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare information systems frequently do not truly meet clinician needs, due to the complexity, variability, and rapid change in medical contexts. Recently the internet world has been transformed by approaches commonly termed 'Web 2.0'. This paper proposes a Web 2.0 model for a healthcare adaptive architecture. The vision includes creating modular, user-composable systems which aim to make all necessary information from multiple internal and external sources available via a platform, for the user to use, arrange, recombine, author, and share at will, using rich interfaces where advisable. Clinicians can create a set of 'widgets' and 'views' which can transform data, reflect their domain knowledge and cater to their needs, using simple drag and drop interfaces without the intervention of programmers. We have built an example system, MedWISE, embodying the user-facing parts of the model. This approach to HIS is expected to have several advantages, including greater suitability to user needs (reflecting clinician rather than programmer concepts and priorities), incorporation of multiple information sources, agile reconfiguration to meet emerging situations and new treatment deployment, capture of user domain expertise and tacit knowledge, efficiencies due to workflow and human-computer interaction improvements, and greater user acceptance.

  7. Low health literacy and evaluation of online health information: A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Diviani; B. van den Putte; S. Giani; J.C.M. van Weert

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in consumer online health information seeking. The quality of online health information, however, remains questionable. The issue of information evaluation has become a hot topic, leading to the development of guidelines and checklists to d

  8. Low health literacy and evaluation of online health information: A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diviani, N.; van den Putte, B.; Giani, S.; van Weert, J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in consumer online health information seeking. The quality of online health information, however, remains questionable. The issue of information evaluation has become a hot topic, leading to the development of guidelines and checklists to

  9. Building a Rapid Learning Health Care System for Oncology: Why CancerLinQ Collects Identifiable Health Information to Achieve Its Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Alaap; Stewart, Andrew K; Kolacevski, Andrej; Michels, Dina; Miller, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The ever-increasing volume of scientific discoveries, clinical knowledge, novel diagnostic tools, and treatment options juxtaposed with rising costs in health care challenge physicians to identify, prioritize, and use new information rapidly to deliver efficient and high-quality care to a growing and aging patient population. CancerLinQ, a rapid learning health care system in oncology, is an initiative of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and its Institute for Quality that addresses these challenges by collecting information from the electronic health records of large numbers of patients with cancer. CancerLinQ is first and foremost a quality measurement and reporting system through which oncologists can harness the depth and power of their patients' clinical records and other data to assess, monitor, and improve the care they deliver. However, in light of privacy and security concerns with regard to collection, use, and disclosure of patient information, this article addresses the need to collect protected health information as defined under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 to drive rapid learning through CancerLinQ.

  10. Understanding Health Information Seeking from an Actor-Centric Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Simon; Waldman, Linda; Bloom, Gerry; Rasheed, Sabrina; Scott, Nigel; Ahmed, Tanvir; Khan, Nazib Uz Zaman; Sharmin, Tamanna

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a conceptual approach for discussing health information seeking among poor households in Africa and Asia. This approach is part of a larger research endeavor aimed at understanding how health systems are adapting; with possibilities and constraints emerging. These health systems can be found in a context of the changing relationships between states, markets and civil society in low and middle income countries. The paper starts from an understanding of the health sector as a "health knowledge economy", organized to provide people with access to knowledge and advice. The use of the term "health knowledge economy" draws attention to the ways the health sector is part of a broader knowledge economy changing the way individuals and households obtain and use specialist information. The paper integrates an actor centric approach with the theory of planned behavior. It seeks to identify the actors engaged in the health knowledge economy as a precursor to longer term studies on the uptake of innovations integrating health services with mobile phones, commonly designated as mHealth, contributing to an understanding of the potential vulnerabilities of poor people, and highlighting possible dangers if providers of health information and advice are strongly influenced by interest groups.

  11. Preferred sources of health information in persons with multiple sclerosis: degree of trust and information sought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Ruth Ann; Salter, Amber R; Tyry, Tuula; Fox, Robert J; Cutter, Gary R

    2013-03-17

    Effective health communication is important for informed decision-making, yet little is known about the range of information sources used by persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), the perceived trust in those information sources, or how this might vary according to patient characteristics. We aimed to investigate the sources of health information used by persons with MS, their preferences for the source of health information, and levels of trust in those information sources. We also aimed to evaluate how these findings varied according to participant characteristics. In 2011, participants in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry were asked about their sources of health information using selected questions adapted from the 2007 Health Information National Trends (HINTS) survey. Of 12,974 eligible participants, 66.18% (8586/12,974) completed the questionnaire. Mass media sources, rather than interpersonal information sources, were the first sources used by 83.22% (5953/7153) of participants for general health topics and by 68.31% (5026/7357) of participants for MS concerns. Specifically, the Internet was the first source of health information for general health issues (5332/7267, 73.40%) and MS (4369/7376, 59.23%). In a logistic regression model, younger age, less disability, and higher annual income were independently associated with increased odds of use of mass media rather than interpersonal sources of information first. The most trusted information source was a physician, with 97.94% (8318/8493) reporting that they trusted a physician some or a lot. Information sought included treatment for MS (4470/5663, 78.93%), general information about MS (3378/5405, 62.50%), paying for medical care (1096/4282, 25.59%), where to get medical care (787/4282, 18.38%), and supports for coping with MS (2775/5031, 55.16%). Nearly 40% (2998/7521) of participants had concerns about the quality of the information they gathered. Although

  12. How well are health information websites displayed on mobile phones? Implications for the readability of health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Christina; Dunn, Matthew

    2016-06-02

    Issue addressed: More than 87% of Australians own a mobile phone with Internet access and 82% of phone owners use their smartphones to search for health information, indicating that mobile phones may be a powerful tool for building health literacy. Yet, online health information has been found to be above the reading ability of the general population. As reading on a smaller screen may further complicate the readability of information, this study aimed to examine how health information is displayed on mobile phones and its implications for readability.Methods: Using a cross-sectional design with convenience sampling, a sample of 270 mobile webpages with information on 12 common health conditions was generated for analysis, they were categorised based on design and position of information display.Results: The results showed that 71.48% of webpages were mobile-friendly but only 15.93% were mobile-friendly webpages designed in a way to optimise readability, with a paging format and queried information displayed for immediate viewing.Conclusion: With inadequate evidence and lack of consensus on how webpage design can best promote reading and comprehension, it is difficult to draw a conclusion on the effect of current mobile health information presentation on readability.So what?: Building mobile-responsive websites should be a priority for health information providers and policy-makers. Research efforts are urgently required to identify how best to enhance readability of mobile health information and fully capture the capabilities of mobile phones as a useful device to increase health literacy.

  13. From loquacious to reticent: understanding patient health information communication to guide consumer health IT design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Rupa S; Guterbock, Thomas M; Fitzgibbon, Kara; Williams, Ishan C; Wellbeloved-Stone, Claire A; Bears, Jaime E; Menefee, Hannah K

    2017-07-01

    It is increasingly recognized that some patients self-manage in the context of social networks rather than alone. Consumer health information technology (IT) designed to support socially embedded self-management must be responsive to patients' everyday communication practices. There is an opportunity to improve consumer health IT design by explicating how patients currently leverage social media to support health information communication. The objective of this study was to determine types of health information communication patterns that typify Facebook users with chronic health conditions to guide consumer health IT design. Seven hundred participants with type 2 diabetes were recruited through a commercial survey access panel. Cluster analysis was used to identify distinct approaches to health information communication both on and off Facebook. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) methods were used to identify demographic and behavioral differences among profiles. Secondary analysis of qualitative interviews ( n  = 25) and analysis of open-ended survey questions were conducted to understand participant rationales for each profile. Our analysis yielded 7 distinct health information communication profiles. Five of 7 profiles had consistent patterns both on and off Facebook, while the remaining 2 demonstrated distinct practices, with no health information communication on Facebook but some off Facebook. One profile was distinct from all others in both health information communication practices and demographic composition. Rationales for following specific health information communication practices were categorized under 6 themes: altruism, instrumental support, social support, privacy and stigma, convenience, and Facebook knowledge. Facebook has been widely adopted for health information communication; This study demonstrates that Facebook has been widely adopted for health information communication. It also shows that the ways in which patients communicate health

  14. Informal payments and the quality of health care: Mechanisms revealed by Tanzanian health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mæstad, Ottar; Mwisongo, Aziza

    2011-02-01

    Informal payments for health services are common in many transitional and developing countries. The aim of this paper is to investigate the nature of informal payments in the health sector of Tanzania and to identify mechanisms through which informal payments may affect the quality of health care. Our focus is on the effect of informal payments on health worker behaviours, in particular the interpersonal dynamics among health workers at their workplaces. We organised eight focus groups with 58 health workers representing different cadres and levels of care in one rural and one urban district in Tanzania. We found that health workers at all levels receive informal payments in a number of different contexts. Health workers sometimes share the payments received, but only partially, and more rarely within the cadre than across cadres. Our findings indicate that health workers are involved in 'rent-seeking' activities, such as creating artificial shortages and deliberately lowering the quality of service, in order to extract extra payments from patients or to bargain for a higher share of the payments received by their colleagues. The discussions revealed that many health workers think that the distribution of informal payments is grossly unfair. The findings suggest that informal payments can impact negatively on the quality of health care through rent-seeking behaviours and through frustrations created by the unfair allocation of payments. Interestingly, the presence of corruption may also induce non-corrupt workers to reduce the quality of care. Positive impacts can occur because informal payments may induce health workers to increase their efforts, and maybe more so if there is competition among health workers about receiving the payments. Moreover, informal payments add to health workers' incomes and might thus contribute to retention of health workers within the health sector.

  15. High-quality Health Information Provision for Stroke Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Sheng Du; Jing-Jian Ma; Mu Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:High-quality information provision can allow stroke patients to effectively participate in healthcare decision-making,better manage the stroke,and make a good recovery.In this study,we reviewed information needs of stroke patients,methods for providing information to patients,and considerations needed by the information providers.Data Sources:The literature concerning or including information provision for patients with stroke in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015.Study Selection:We included all the relevant articles on information provision for stroke patients in English,with no limitation of study design.Results:Stroke is a major public health concern worldwide.High-quality and effective health information provision plays an essential role in helping patients to actively take part in decision-making and healthcare,and empowering them to effectively self-manage their long-standing chronic conditions.Different methods for providing information to patients have their relative merits and suitability,and as a result,the effective strategies taken by health professionals may include providing high-quality information,meeting patients' individual needs,using suitable methods in providing information,and maintaining active involvement of patients.Conclusions:It is suggested that to enable stroke patients to access high-quality health information,greater efforts need to be made to ensure patients to receive accurate and current evidence-based information which meets their individual needs.Health professionals should use suitable information delivery methods,and actively involve stroke patients in information provision.

  16. Privacy and health information: health cards offer a workable solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Neame

    2008-12-01

    Currently there is a crisis emerging in which professionals are arguing that they are being compelled to compromise their ethical responsibilities to their patients, and government is responding that their measures are necessary to preserve access to quality data for research and planning. This paper proposes an integrated plan for managing these issues in a manner that is ethically sustainable, as well as in keeping with all provisions of the law, using a personal health card.

  17. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

  18. 77 FR 72985 - Health Information Technology: Revisions to the 2014 Edition Electronic Health Record...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... Electronic Health Record Certification Criteria; and Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Revisions to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information... Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs We described the legislative basis for the Medicare and...

  19. [The role of information in public health decision-making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Public health, prevention, health education and health promotion are inseparable from the concepts of information and communication. Information should respond as much as possible to the needs of professionals, decision-makers, and consumers who are more and more concerned and conscious of its importance in light of "information overload", various dissemination channels and the multiplicity of its sources. There are numerous issues at stake ranging from comprehension, to the validation of health information, health education, health promotion, prevention, decision-making, as well as issues related to knowledge and power. Irrespective of the type of choice to be made, the need for information, knowledge, and know-how is inseparable from that of other tools or regulatory measures required for decision-making. Information is the same as competence, epidemiological and population data, health data, scientific opinion, and expert conferences--all are needed to assist in decision-making. Based on the principle of precaution, information must increasingly take into account the rejection of a society which often reasons on the basis of a presumption of zero-risk, in an idealistic manner, and which also excludes the possibility of new risks. The consumer positions himself as the regulator of decisions, specifically those with regard to the notion of acceptable level of risk. All of the actors involved in the health system are or become at one moment or another public health decision-makers. Their decision might be based either on an analytical approach, or on an intuitive approach. Although the act of decision-making is the least visible part of public health policy, it is certainly the driving force. This process should integrate the perspective of all of the relevant players, including consumers, who are currently situated more and more frequently at the heart of the health system. Public health decision-making is conducted as a function of political, strategic and

  20. Sharing and communicating health care information: summary and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthner, H F; Scherrer, J R; Dahlen, R

    1994-01-01

    Sharing and communicating information is a fundamental task in modern medicine. The health care system of the western world is based on teamwork of professionals who participate in the care of patients. Exchange of information (not just data) requires the communicating parties to agree on a communication channel, an exchange protocol, and a common language. The language includes an alphabet, words, phrases, and symbols that express and assign meaning, understood by all. The most common forms of communication are the spoken word and the paper-based patient record. Computers and communication systems improve the sharing of health care information by overcoming the limitations imposed by the dimensions of time and location. However, natural language is still too complex and too ambiguous for current computing devices to handle the complex interactions between health care professional and patients. A simpler 'language' is needed that uses domain specific vocabularies (and/or codes), well-defined exchange protocols for data, information, knowledge, and, in the future, perhaps even wisdom. This simpler 'language' is expected to handle most of the routine information exchange but not eliminate natural language. It is essential that health care information systems preserve and incorporate natural language expressions and integrate them with structured vocabularies. Today, agreeing on standard data exchange protocols and domain specific vocabularies and codes is our greatest challenge. However, standards alone are not sufficient. Acceptance of the standards by the health care professionals, verifications in clinical environments, and implementation agreements by the medical informatics industry are essential. The group on 'Sharing and Communication of Health Care Information' addressed the issues raised above and unanimously recommends a number of steps that will improve the sharing of information. In addition, specific recommendations are offered to governments, health

  1. A geospatial time-aware web interface to deliver information about air pollution and exposure in a big city and its surroundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogliolo, M. P.; Contino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A GIS-based web-mapping system is presented, aimed at providing specialists, stakeholders and population with a simple, while scientifically rigorous, way to obtain information about people exposure to air pollution in the city of Rome (Italy). It combines a geo-spatial visualization with easy access to time dimension and to quantitative information. The study is part of the EXPAH (Population Exposure to PAHs) LIFE+ EC Project, which goal is to identify and quantify children and elderly people exposure to PM2.5-bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere of Rome, and to assess the impact on human health. The core of the system is a GIS, which database contains data and results of the project research activity. They include daily indoor and outdoor ground measurements and daily maps from simulation modeling of atmospheric PAHs and PM2.5 concentration for the period June 2011-May 2012, and daily and average exposure maps. Datasets have been published as time-enabled standard OGC Web Map Services (WMS). A set of web mapping applications query the web services to produce a set of interactive and time-aware thematic maps. Finding effective ways to communicate risk for human health, and environmental determinants for it, is a topical and challenging task: the web mapping system presented is a prototype of a possible model to disseminate scientific results on these items, providing a sight into impacts of air pollution on people living and working in a big city, and shipping information about the overall exposure, its spatial pattern and levels at specific locations.

  2. Understanding online health information: Evaluation, tools, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaunoyer, Elisabeth; Arsenault, Marianne; Lomanowska, Anna M; Guitton, Matthieu J

    2017-02-01

    Considering the status of the Internet as a prominent source of health information, assessing online health material has become a central issue in patient education. We describe the strategies available to evaluate the characteristics of online health information, including readability, emotional content, understandability, usability. Popular tools used in assessment of readability, emotional content and comprehensibility of online health information were reviewed. Tools designed to evaluate both printed and online material were considered. Readability tools are widely used in online health material evaluation and are highly covariant. Assessment of emotional content of online health-related communications via sentiment analysis tools is becoming more popular. Understandability and usability tools have been developed specifically for health-related material, but each tool has important limitations and has been tested on a limited number of health issues. Despite the availability of numerous assessment tools, their overall reliability differs between readability (high) and understandability (low). Approaches combining multiple assessment tools and involving both quantitative and qualitative observations would optimize assessment strategies. Effective assessment of online health information should rely on mixed strategies combining quantitative and qualitative evaluations. Assessment tools should be selected according to their functional properties and compatibility with target material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards Web-based representation and processing of health information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, S.; Mioc, Darka; Yi, X.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There is great concern within health surveillance, on how to grapple with environmental degradation, rapid urbanization, population mobility and growth. The Internet has emerged as an efficient way to share health information, enabling users to access and understand data at their fing......Background: There is great concern within health surveillance, on how to grapple with environmental degradation, rapid urbanization, population mobility and growth. The Internet has emerged as an efficient way to share health information, enabling users to access and understand data...... at their fingertips. Increasingly complex problems in the health field require increasingly sophisticated computer software, distributed computing power, and standardized data sharing. To address this need, Web-based mapping is now emerging as an important tool to enable health practitioners, policy makers...... facilitated the online processing, mapping and sharing of health information, with the use of HERXML and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) services. It brought a new solution in better health data representation and initial exploration of the Web-based processing of health information. Conclusion: The designed...

  4. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Tobacco Information Seeking and Information Sources: Findings From the 2015 Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh B; Robinson, Joelle; O'Brien, Erin Keely; Zhao, Xiaoquan

    2017-09-01

    This article describes sources of health information, types of tobacco information sought, and trust in sources of tobacco information among U.S. racial/ethnic groups (Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, Asian and Pacific Islanders, and Other). Cross-sectional data (N = 3,788) from a nationally representative survey, HINTS-FDA 2015, were analyzed to examine unadjusted and adjusted associations between race/ethnicity and (a) first source of health information, (b) tobacco information seeking, and (c) trust in sources of tobacco information. Adjusted associations controlled for current tobacco product use and sociodemographic variables. Findings indicated that the Internet was the most common first source of health information while health care providers were the second most common source for all racial/ethnic groups. Tobacco-related health information seeking was more prevalent than other tobacco product information seeking. Unadjusted analyses indicated that a higher proportion of Whites sought other tobacco product information compared to Asians and Pacific Islanders. Trust was rated highest for doctors while trust for health organizations was rated second highest. Asians and Pacific Islanders had higher trust in the government compared to all other groups. Blacks had higher trust in religious organizations compared to all other groups besides Hispanics. Blacks had higher trust for tobacco companies compared to Whites and Other. Many of these differences were attenuated in adjusted analyses. This research has implications for tobacco control practice and policymaking by identifying potential dissemination strategies.

  5. Disclosing personal health information relating to adults who lack capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2014-03-01

    The need to share information about patients is vital to effective care and protection, especially where it relates to adults who lack decision-making capacity but it has to be balanced against the right to confidentiality. Like other health professionals, district nurses have a duty to maintain the confidentiality of patient information, and incapable adults have the right to expect their personal health information to be kept private. This right is guaranteed by the common-law duty of confidence, the Data Protection Act 1998 and the NHS Care Record Guarantee and confidentiality policy. This article discusses the district nurse's legal obligations when considering sharing information in relation to an incapable adult

  6. Health and social media: perfect storm of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Luque, Luis; Bau, Teresa

    2015-04-01

    The use of Internet in the health domain is becoming a major worldwide trend. Millions of citizens are searching online health information and also publishing content about their health. Patients are engaging with other patients in online communities using different types of social media. The boundaries between mobile health, social media, wearable, games, and big data are becoming blurrier due the integration of all those technologies. In this paper we provide an overview of the major research challenges with the area of health social media. We use several study cases to exemplify the current trends and highlight future research challenges. Internet is exploding and is being used for health purposes by a great deal of the population. Social networks have a powerful influence in health decisions. Given the lack of knowledge on the use of health social media, there is a need for complex multidisciplinary research to help us understand how to use social networks in favour of public health. A bigger understanding of social media will give health authorities new tools to help decision-making at global, national, local, and corporate level. There is an unprecedented amount of data that can be used in public health due the potential combination of data acquired from mobile phones, Electronic Health Records, social media, and other sources. To identify meaningful information from those data sources it is not trial. Moreover, new analytics tools will need to be developed to analyse those sources of data in a way that it can benefit healthcare professionals and authorities.

  7. Health Risk Information Engagement and Amplification on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Yulia A

    2017-04-01

    Emerging pandemics call for unique health communication and education strategies in which public health agencies need to satisfy the public's information needs about possible risks while preventing risk exaggeration and dramatization. As a route to providing a framework for understanding public information behaviors in response to an emerging pandemic, this study examined the characteristics of communicative behaviors of social media audiences in response to Ebola outbreak news. Grounded in the social amplification of risks framework, this study adds to an understanding of information behaviors of online audiences by showing empirical differences in audience engagement with online health information. The data were collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Facebook channel. The final data set included 809 CDC posts and 35,916 audience comments. The analysis identified the differences in audience information behaviors in response to an emerging pandemic, Ebola, and health promotion posts. While the CDC had fewer posts on Ebola than health promotion topics, the former received more attention from active page users. Furthermore, audience members who actively engaged with Ebola news had a small overlap with those who engaged with non-Ebola information during the same period. Overall, this study demonstrated that information behavior and audience engagement is topic dependent. Furthermore, audiences who commented on news about an emerging pandemic were homogenous and varied in their degree of information amplification.

  8. Health Information Technology as a Universal Donor to Bioethics Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Kenneth W

    2017-04-01

    Health information technology, sometimes called biomedical informatics, is the use of computers and networks in the health professions. This technology has become widespread, from electronic health records to decision support tools to patient access through personal health records. These computational and information-based tools have engendered their own ethics literature and now present an opportunity to shape the standard medical and nursing ethics curricula. It is suggested that each of four core components in the professional education of clinicians-privacy, end-of-life care, access to healthcare and valid consent, and clinician-patient communication-offers an opportunity to leverage health information technology for curricular improvement. Using informatics in ethics education freshens ethics pedagogy and increases its utility, and does so without additional demands on overburdened curricula.

  9. INFORMATION SOCIETY AND FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY OF THE ROMANIAN HEALTH SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATIANA BOGDAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The financial sustainability of the health systems often reveals the ability of policy makers to finance healthcare in the face of growing cost pressures, with populations ageing, new technologies and increased patient expectations for healthcare coverage and quality. Thus, the healthcare systems need to reinvent themselves by using innovative financing mechanisms coupled with electronic information and communication systems, while offering greater transparency, flexibility and choice and increasing access to the services available. The paper analyses the healthcare financing models: the national health system, the social insurance or the private insurance model so that the Romanian health care reform should preserve the best elements of its existing system while selectively adapt techniques and processes that seemed to have been successful in other countries. Moreover, the application of information and communication technologies – eHealth offers new possibilities for improving almost every aspect of healthcare, from making medical systems more powerful and responsive to providing better health information to all.

  10. Health information management for research and quality assurance: the Comprehensive Renal Transplant Research Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famure, Olusegun; Phan, Nicholas Anh-Tuan; Kim, Sang Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The Kidney Transplant Program at the Toronto General Hospital uses numerous electronic health record platforms housing patient health information that is often not coded in a systematic manner to facilitate quality assurance and research. To address this, the comprehensive renal transplant research information system was conceived by a multidisciplinary healthcare team. Data analysis from comprehensive renal transplant research information system presented at programmatic retreats, scientific meetings, and peer-reviewed manuscripts contributes to quality improvement and knowledge in kidney transplantation.

  11. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Satyavir; Yadav Kapil; Nongkynrih Baridalyne; Krishnan Anand; Gupta Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Met...

  12. Bridging Organizational Divides in Health Care: An Ecological View of Health Information Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background The fragmented nature of health care delivery in the United States leads to fragmented health information and impedes patient care continuity and safety. Technologies to support interorganizational health information exchange (HIE) are becoming more available. Understanding how HIE technology changes health care delivery and affects people and organizations is crucial to long-term successful implementation. Objective Our study investigated the impacts of HIE technology on organizat...

  13. Addressing the changing sources of health information in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Alishahi Tabriz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion : Although during 8 years of study radio and television remained as main source of health information but there is an increasing tendency to use internet especially in men. Policymakers should revise their broadcasting strategies based on people demand.

  14. Oral health information from the dentist to the diabetologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahdi, M.; Teeuw, W.J.; Meeuwissen, H.G.T.A.; Hoekstra, J.B.L.; Gerdes, V.E.A.; Loos, B.G.; Meesters, E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes care includes annual evaluation of micro- and macrovascular complications, however, oral pathologies are not included. We studied retrieving oral health information, in particular periodontal disease, from the dentist and studied the association between the reported periodontal c

  15. The value of health information technology: filling the knowledge gap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudin, Robert S; Jones, Spencer S; Shekelle, Paul; Hillestad, Richard J; Keeler, Emmett B

    2014-01-01

    Despite rapid growth in the rate of adoption of health information technology (HIT), and in the volume of evaluation studies, the existing knowledge base for the value of HIT is not advancing at a similar rate...

  16. Health Information in Amharic (amarunya): MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → Amharic (amarunya) URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/amharic.html Health Information in Amharic (amarunya) To use ...

  17. The operation criteria of a health management information system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The operation criteria of a health management information system. ... Subjects: Forty (40) healthcare workers who were involved in the ... in KNH was performance 17 (53.1%), Other indicators that were commonly applied in HMIS evaluation in ...

  18. Scaling of Health Information Systems in Nigeria and Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw; Shaw, Vincent; Braa, Jørn

    2007-01-01

    Systems Programme in Nigeria and Ethiopia, the interdependencies between three spheres are identified as being important in scaling health information systems. The three spheres that are explored are the volume of data collected, human resource factors and access to technology. We draw on concepts from......This paper addresses the IFIP 9.4 conference theme for papers that take stock of the development of ICT in the health sector, and in particular how infrastructure and human resource factors influence the implementation of e-development initiatives. Using case studies from the Health Information...... the balance. Three flexible standards are identified as being critical strategies to global health information scaling initiatives, namely an essential data set, a scalable process of information systems collection and collation consisting of gateways between paper based systems and hardware and software...

  19. Health Management Information System in Private Clinics in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health Management Information System in Private Clinics in Ilorin, Nigeria. ... Journal Home > Vol 46, No 5 (2004) > ... private clinics located in Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria to determine the awareness and level of involvement ... Article Metrics.

  20. Efficient medical information retrieval in encrypted Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruski, Cédric; Wisniewski, François

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of eHealth platforms across the world, whose main objective is to centralize patient's healthcare information to ensure the best continuity of care, requires the development of advanced tools and techniques for supporting health professionals in retrieving relevant information in this vast quantity of data. However, for preserving patient's privacy, some countries decided to de-identify and encrypt data contained in the shared Electronic Health Records, which reinforces the complexity of proposing efficient medical information retrieval approach. In this paper, we describe an original approach exploiting standards metadata as well as knowledge organizing systems to overcome the barriers of data encryption for improving the results of medical information retrieval in centralized and encrypted Electronic Health Records. This is done through the exploitation of semantic properties provided by knowledge organizing systems, which enable query expansion. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the approach together with illustrating examples and a discussion on the advantages and limitations of the provided framework.